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Sample records for hospital admissions due

  1. [Hospital admissions due to varicella in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    Guzmán Laura, K P; Periañez Vasco, A; Falcón Neyra, M D; Croche Santander, B

    2014-06-01

    Varicella (chickenpox) can cause serious complications and admission to hospital. Several countries included the varicella vaccine in their immunization schedules. A descriptive and retrospective study of hospitalizations due to varicella and its complications was conducted in a referral center from 2005 to 2011. A total of 1192 children with varicella were seen in the emergency room, of which 99 (8.5%) required admission. The annual incidence of admissions due to varicella and varicella complications was, 19.4 and 15.3 cases per 100,000 children under 14 years, respectively. Complications were more common in children under 5 years (79.5%), and with no underlying disease (78.2%). Infection of skin and soft tissue was the most common complication (62%). The mean hospital stay was 4.5 days (SD 4). Varicella causes high morbidity, and is more frequent in absolute terms in healthy children under 5 years of age. Therefore, routine vaccination recommended by the Immunization Advisory Committee should be mandatory. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions due to pneumonia in children

    PubMed Central

    Negrisoli, Juliana; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando C.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between exposure to air pollutants and hospitalizations due to pneumonia in children of Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Time series ecological study, from 2007 to 2008. Daily data were obtained from the State Environmental Agency for Pollution Control for particulate matter, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, besides air temperature and relative humidity. The data concerning pneumonia admissions were collected in the public health system of Sorocaba. Correlations between the variables of interest using Pearson cofficient were calculated. Models with lags from zero to five days after exposure to pollutants were performed to analyze the association between the exposure to environmental pollutants and hospital admissions. The analysis used the generalized linear model of Poisson regression, being significant p<0.05. RESULTS: There were 1,825 admissions for pneumonia, with a daily mean of 2.5±2.1. There was a strong correlation between pollutants and hospital admissions, except for ozone. Regarding the Poisson regression analysis with the multi-pollutant model, only nitrogen dioxide was statistically significant in the same day (relative risk - RR=1.016), as well as particulate matter with a lag of four days (RR=1.009) after exposure to pollutants. CONCLUSIONS: There was an acute effect of exposure to nitrogen dioxide and a later effect of exposure to particulate matter on children hospitalizations for pneumonia in Sorocaba. PMID:24473956

  3. Incidence of hospital admissions due to adverse drug reactions in France: the EMIR study.

    PubMed

    Bénard-Laribière, Anne; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Pérault-Pochat, Marie-Christine; Noize, Pernelle; Haramburu, Françoise

    2015-02-01

    To assess the incidence of hospital admissions related to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in France and the frequency of preventable ADRs in France, a prospective study was conducted among a representative randomly selected sample of medical wards in public hospitals between December 2006 and June 2007; all patients admitted during a 2-week period were included. An ADR-related hospitalization case was defined as a hospital admission because of an ADR, and an independent committee reviewed and validated all potential cases. Preventability was assessed using the French ADR preventability scale. Data were extrapolated to the population of France. Among 2692 admissions, 97 were related to an ADR (incidence 3.6%, 95% confidence interval, CI [2.8-4.4]). Patients admitted for an ADR were significantly older than those admitted for other reasons (P < 0.001). A third (32.0%) of ADR-related hospitalizations were 'preventable', 16.5% 'potentially preventable'. Drug interactions accounted for 29.9% of ADR-related hospitalizations. The most frequent causes of ADR-related hospitalizations were vascular disorders (20.6%), mainly bleeding complications, central nervous system disorders (11.3%), gastrointestinal disorders, and general disorders (9.3%). Antithrombotic and antineoplastic agents were the most frequently involved (12.6% each), followed by diuretics and analgesics (9.0% each). Vitamin-K-antagonists (VKAs) were the most common drugs associated with admission. The estimated annual number of ADR-related hospitalizations in France was 143 915 (95% CI [112 063-175 766]). ADRs were a significant cause of hospital admission in 2006-2007, in particular those due to VKAs. As new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have been marketed, more attention needs to be paid to ensure a safe use of antithrombotic agents.

  4. [Effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing hospital admission due to exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Montserrat-Capdevila, Josep; Godoy, Pere; Marsal, Josep-Ramon; Cruz, Inés; Solanes, Mònica

    2014-02-01

    The main objective was to determine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing hospitalization due to exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One secondary objective was to estimate the prevalence of vaccination, and to describe the factors that were associated with being vaccinated. A retrospective cohort study was conducted that included 1,323 patients diagnosed with COPD in the Health Centre of the Pla d'Urgell (Lleida, Spain). They were classified into two cohorts: cohort1, patients vaccinated against seasonal influenza (campaign 2011/12), and cohort2, non-vaccinated. The number of patients in both cohorts requiring hospital admission for exacerbation of the disease between the 12/01/2011 and the 03/15/2012 was quantified. Information about the variables of interest was recorded for each patient. A univariate and multivariate analysis was performed. The effectiveness of vaccination was calculated with the formula: E=(1-OR)×100. The ORs and their 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were determined by multivariate logistic regression models. Just over half (55.3%) of the patients had been vaccinated. Vaccinated patients were older and had more associated comorbidity. At the same time, they were less hospitalized (3.0% versus 8.9%; P=.001). The crude and adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccination in this population subgroup was 68.4% (95%CI: 47.5-81.0) and 90.8 (95%CI: 96.8-88.2), respectively. Influenza vaccination is effective in preventing hospitalization due to acute exacerbations in COPD patients. However, immunization coverage is not as high as desired. Designing programs to increase the rate of vaccination in this population would reduce the number of hospital admissions for COPD exacerbation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. [Hospital Admissions due to cyanosis episodes in newborns with gestational age of 34 weeks or more].

    PubMed

    Casanueva, C Paulina; Cifuentes, R Javier

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed between January 2007 and December 2012 to assess the admission rates of newborns due to episodes of cyanosis Retrospective study that included all the newborns hospitalized with episodes of cyanosis between January 2007 and December 2012. In them were employed two study protocols that considered first and second line tests, the latter in view of recurrence of events. The first line protocol considered general biochemical tests, chest x-ray and echocardiography in selected cases, while the second line protocol included electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, nuclear magnetic resonance of the brain, expanded metabolic screening, pyruvic acid, lactic acid, and in case of seizures, cytochemical, and culture of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and PCR (polymerase chain reaction) for herpes. A total of 98 (2.8%) out of 3,454 newborns were admitted due to episodes of cyanosis. Gestational age: 37.8+1.4 weeks, birth weight: 3,145+477 g. Maternal age: 32+4.8 years. Disease was present in 19.4% of mothers; gestational diabetes (8.1%), pregnancy induced hypertension (5.1%), intrahepatic cholestasis (3.1%), and intrauterine growth retardation (3.1%). Gender: 48.8% male, 51.2% female (NS). Birth: caesarean section, 68.4%, and vaginal delivery, 31.6%. Age on admission 1.9+1.4 days. Hospital stay: 4.2+4.2 days. First line tests were performed in 100% of patients with 39.8% fulfilling the criteria for second line study. A condition was detected in 21.4%, with convulsive syndrome was the most frequent (33%). Newborns with an identified condition had 3.8+2.7 episodes versus 1.5+2,4 in those without diagnosis (NS). A home oxygen monitor was given to 15.4%. There were no re-admissions. Most newborns admitted due to cyanosis are discharged with a condition of unknown origin. In this study, convulsive syndrome was the most frequent cause. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Short-term association between environmental factors and hospital admissions due to dementia in Madrid.

    PubMed

    Linares, C; Culqui, D; Carmona, R; Ortiz, C; Díaz, J

    2017-01-01

    Spain has one of the highest proportions of dementia in the world among the population aged 60 years or over. Recent studies link various environmental factors to neurocognitive-type diseases. This study sought to analyse whether urban risk factors such as traffic noise, pollutants and heat waves might have a short-term impact on exacerbation of symptoms of dementia, leading to emergency hospital admission. We conducted a longitudinal ecological time-series study, with the dependent variable being the number of daily dementia-related emergency (DDE) hospital admissions to Madrid municipal hospitals (ICD-10 codes 290.0-290.2, 290.4-290.9, 294.1-294) from 01 to 01-2001 to 31-12-2009, as obtained from the Hospital Morbidity Survey (National Statistics Institute). The measures used were as follows: for noise pollution, Leqd, equivalent diurnal noise level (from 8 to 22h), and Leqn, equivalent nocturnal noise level (from 22 to 8h) in dB(A); for chemical pollution, mean daily NO2, PM2.5, PM1 as provided by the Madrid Municipal Air Quality Monitoring Grid; and lastly, maximum daily temperature (°C), as supplied by the State Meteorological Agency. Scatterplot diagrams were plotted to assess the type of functional relationship existing between the main variable of analysis and the environmental variables. The lags of the environmental variables were calculated to analyse the timing of the effect. Poisson regression models were fitted, controlling for trends and seasonalities, to quantify relative risk (RR). During the study period, there were 1175 DDE hospital admissions. These admissions displayed a linear functional relationship without a threshold in the case of Leqd. The RR of DDE admissions was 1.15 (1.11-1.20) for an increase of 1dB in Leqd, with impact at lag 0. In the case of maximum daily temperature, there was a threshold temperature of 34°C, with an increase of 1°C over this threshold posing an RR of 1.19 (1.09-1.30) at lag 1. The only pollutant to show an

  7. Features and outcomes of unplanned hospital admissions of older people due to ill-defined (R-coded) conditions: Retrospective analysis of hospital admissions data in England

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rising rates of unplanned admissions among older people are placing unprecedented demand on health services internationally. Unplanned hospital admissions for ill-defined conditions (coded with an R prefix within Chapter XVIII of the International Classification of Diseases-10) have been targeted for admission avoidance strategies, but little is known about these admissions. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and factors predicting ill-defined (R-coded) hospital admissions of older people and their association with health outcomes. Methods Retrospective analysis of unplanned hospital admissions to general internal and geriatric medicine wards in one hospital over 12 months (2002) with follow-up for 36 months. The study was carried out in an acute teaching hospital in England. The participants were all people aged 65 and over with unplanned hospital admissions to general internal and geriatric medicine. Independent variables included time of admission, residence at admission, route of admission to hospital, age, gender, comorbidity measured by count of diagnoses. Main outcome measures were primary diagnosis (ill-defined versus other diagnostic code), death during the hospital stay, deaths to 36 months, readmissions within 36 months, discharge destination and length of hospital stay. Results Incidence of R-codes at discharge was 21.6%, but was higher in general internal than geriatric medicine (25.6% v 14.1% respectively). Age, gender and co-morbidity were not significant predictors of R-code diagnoses. Admission via the emergency department (ED), out of normal general practitioner (GP) hours, under the care of general medicine and from non-residential care settings increased the risk of receiving R-codes. R-coded patients had a significantly shorter length of stay (5.91 days difference, 95% CI 4.47, 7.35), were less likely to die (hazard ratio 0.71, 95%CI 0.59, 0.85) at any point, but were as likely to be readmitted as other patients

  8. Ambient ozone concentration and hospital admissions due to childhood respiratory diseases in New York State, 1991-2001.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shao; Bell, Erin M; Liu, Wei; Walker, Randi J; Kim, Nancy K; Hwang, Syni-An

    2008-09-01

    Respiratory diseases constitute one of the leading causes of ill health among children in New York State (NYS). The current project, a component of the NYS Environmental Public Health Tracking Program, investigated a potential association between ambient ozone (O(3)) concentration and childhood respiratory hospital admissions over 11 years in NYS. We used a two-stage Bayesian hierarchical model to assess the exposure-disease associations within 11 geographic regions and statewide. The data included total daily hospital admissions due to respiratory diseases for children 0-17 years old from 1991 to 2001 in NYS (N=134,099) and daily ambient O(3) level with different single-day lags. These analyses adjusted for particulate matter 10 microm in size (PM(10)), meteorological conditions, day of the week, seasonality, long-term trends, and demographic characteristics. In 5 of the 11 regions, including the Upper and Lower Adirondacks, Upper Hudson Valley, Staten Island, and New York City, positive associations were found between respiratory hospital admissions and ambient O(3) level 2 days prior to the admission. Applying different statistical methods and sensitivity analysis of PM(10) did not alter these findings. When region-specific results were combined, no statewide association was apparent. Geographic differences were found in the associations between O(3) levels and respiratory hospital admissions among children. In addition, we found that the two-stage model may be an appropriate approach for tracking the health effects of air pollution over time in different geographic areas when heterogeneity of risk factors across regions is present.

  9. Psychosocial work environment and hospital admissions due to mental disorders: a 15-year prospective study of industrial employees.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Matti; Väänänen, Ari; Koskinen, Aki; Kivimäki, Mika; Virtanen, Marianna; Vahtera, Jussi

    2010-07-01

    Low levels of job control and social support may increase the risk of mental disorders, particularly depression, but the evidence is mostly based on self-reports. We examined whether components of job control and work-related social support predict medically-certified mental disorders. 13868 forest company employees with no previous hospital admissions for mental disorders responded to questionnaires on decision authority, skill discretion, co-worker and supervisor support. They were followed-up for hospital admissions due to mental disorders (ICD-9 codes 290 to 319), using national hospital discharge records (577 hospitalized, mean follow-up 15.1 years). In analyses adjusted for confounders, high skill discretion was associated with a reduced risk of hospital admission for mental disorders (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.58-0.95). High decision authority was associated with an elevated risk (HR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.87). Diagnosis-specific analyses showed high skill discretion to associate with a reduced risk of both depressive and non-depressive non-alcohol-related mental disorders. High decision authority was a risk factor for alcohol-related and depressive disorders. Good co-worker support was associated with a reduced risk of non-depressive non-alcohol-related mental disorders. Supervisor support was not associated with any mental disorders. We used a single time point estimate in an industrial sample comprising largely of men. Contrary to previous research on job control, high decision authority increased the risk of depressive and alcohol-related disorders, which suggest a need to reconsider the strategies for prevention and clinical practise in regard to psychosocial work environment and mental health.

  10. Multiple exposures to airborne pollutants and hospital admissions due to diseases of the circulatory system in Santiago de Chile.

    PubMed

    Franck, Ulrich; Leitte, Arne Marian; Suppan, Peter

    2014-01-15

    High concentrations of various air pollutants have been associated with hospitalization due to development and exacerbation of cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to assess associations between airborne exposures by particulate matter as well as gaseous air pollutants and hospital admissions due to different cardiovascular disease groups in Santiago de Chile. The study was performed in the metropolitan area of Santiago de Chile during 2004-2007. We applied a time-stratified case-crossover analysis taking temporal variation, meteorological conditions and autocorrelation into account. We computed associations between daily ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5--particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 or 2.5 μm, respectively) or ozone (O3) and hospital admissions for cardiovascular illnesses. We found for CO, NO2, PM10 and PM2.5 adverse relationships to cardiovascular admissions while effect strength and lag depended on the pollutant and on the disease group. By trend, in 1-pollutant models most adverse pollutants were NO2 and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) followed by CO, while in 2-pollutant models effects of PM10 persisted in most cases whereas other effects weakened. In addition the strongest effects seemed to be immediate or with a delay of up to 2 days. Adverse effects of ozone could not be detected. Our results provided evidence for adverse health effects of combined exposure to airborne pollutants. Different pollutants accounted for varying adverse effects within different cardiovascular disease groups. Taking case numbers and effect strength of all cardiovascular diseases into account, mitigation measures should address all pollutants but especially NO2, PM10, and CO. © 2013.

  11. Analysis of hospital admissions due to accidental non-fire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in England, between 2001 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rebecca E.; Close, Rebecca; McCann, Lucy J.; Crabbe, Helen; Garwood, Kevin; Hansell, Anna L.; Leonardi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Accidental non-fire-related (ANFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is a cause of fatalities and hospital admissions. This is the first study that describes the characteristics of ANFR CO hospital admissions in England. Methods Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) inpatient data for England between 2001 and 2010 were used. ANFR CO poisoning admissions were defined as any mention of ICD-10 code T58: toxic effect of CO and X47: accidental poisoning by gases or vapours, excluding ICD-10 codes potentially related to fires (X00-X09, T20-T32 and Y26). Results There were 2463 ANFR CO admissions over the 10-year period (annual rate: 0.49/100 000); these comprised just under half (48.7%) of all non-fire-related (accidental and non-accidental) CO admissions. There was seasonal variability, with more admissions in colder winter months. Higher admission rates were observed in the north of England. Just over half (53%) of ANFR admissions were male, and the highest rates of ANFR admissions were in those aged >80 years. Conclusion The burden of ANFR CO poisoning is preventable. The results of this study suggest an appreciable burden of CO and highlight differences that may aid targeting of public health interventions. PMID:25755248

  12. Analysis of hospital admissions due to accidental non-fire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in England, between 2001 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rebecca E; Close, Rebecca; McCann, Lucy J; Crabbe, Helen; Garwood, Kevin; Hansell, Anna L; Leonardi, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    Accidental non-fire-related (ANFR) carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is a cause of fatalities and hospital admissions. This is the first study that describes the characteristics of ANFR CO hospital admissions in England. Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) inpatient data for England between 2001 and 2010 were used. ANFR CO poisoning admissions were defined as any mention of ICD-10 code T58: toxic effect of CO and X47: accidental poisoning by gases or vapours, excluding ICD-10 codes potentially related to fires (X00-X09, T20-T32 and Y26). There were 2463 ANFR CO admissions over the 10-year period (annual rate: 0.49/100 000); these comprised just under half (48.7%) of all non-fire-related (accidental and non-accidental) CO admissions. There was seasonal variability, with more admissions in colder winter months. Higher admission rates were observed in the north of England. Just over half (53%) of ANFR admissions were male, and the highest rates of ANFR admissions were in those aged >80 years. The burden of ANFR CO poisoning is preventable. The results of this study suggest an appreciable burden of CO and highlight differences that may aid targeting of public health interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  13. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5–10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5–10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m3 of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m3. Regarding the chemical species; SO42−, NO3−, NH4+ and K+ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO42− in PM2.5–10 and K+ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies. PMID:27669280

  14. Effects of Particulate Matter and Its Chemical Constituents on Elderly Hospital Admissions Due to Circulatory and Respiratory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Tatiane Morais; Forti, Maria Cristina; de Freitas, Clarice Umbelino; Nascimento, Felipe Parra; Junger, Washington Leite; Gouveia, Nelson

    2016-09-23

    Various fractions of particulate matter have been associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The purpose of our study is to analyze the associations between concentrations of PM2.5, PM2.5-10, PM10 and their chemical constituents (soluble ions) with hospital admissions due to circulatory and respiratory diseases among the elderly in a medium-sized city in Brazil. A time series study was conducted using Poisson regression with generalized additive models adjusted for confounders. Statistically significant associations were identified between PM10 and PM2.5-10 and respiratory diseases. Risks of hospitalization increased by 23.5% (95% CI: 13.5; 34.3) and 12.8% (95% CI: 6.0; 20.0) per 10 μg/m³ of PM2.5-10 and PM10, respectively. PM2.5 exhibited a significant association with circulatory system diseases, with the risk of hospitalization increasing by 19.6% (95% CI: 6.4; 34.6) per 10 μg/m³. Regarding the chemical species; SO₄(2-), NO₃(-), NH₄⁺ and K⁺ exhibited specific patterns of risk, relative to the investigated outcomes. Overall, SO₄(2-) in PM2.5-10 and K⁺ in PM2.5 were associated with increased risk of hospital admissions due to both types of diseases. The results agree with evidence indicating that the risks for different health outcomes vary in relation to the fractions and chemical composition of PM10. Thus, PM10 speciation studies may contribute to the establishment of more selective pollution control policies.

  15. Association between air pollution and daily mortality and hospital admission due to ischaemic heart diseases in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Wilson Wai San; Wong, Tze Wai; Wong, Andromeda H. S.

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic heart disease (IHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The effects of air pollution on IHD mortalities have been widely reported. Fewer studies focus on IHD morbidities and PM2.5, especially in Asia. To explore the associations between short-term exposure to air pollution and morbidities and mortalities from IHD, we conducted a time series study using a generalized additive model that regressed the daily numbers of IHD mortalities and hospital admissions on daily mean concentrations of the following air pollutants: nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), ozone (O3), and sulfur dioxide (SO2). The relative risks (RR) of IHD deaths and hospital admissions per 10 μg/m3 increase in the concentration of each air pollutant were derived in single pollutant models. Multipollutant models were also constructed to estimate their RRs controlling for other pollutants. Significant RRs were observed for all five air pollutants, ranging from 1.008 to 1.032 per 10 μg/m3 increase in air pollutant concentrations for IHD mortality and from 1.006 to 1.021 per 10 μg/m3 for hospital admissions for IHD. In the multipollutant model, only NO2 remained significant for IHD mortality while SO2 and PM2.5 was significantly associated with hospital admissions. This study provides additional evidence that mortalities and hospital admissions for IHD are significantly associated with air pollution. However, we cannot attribute these health effects to a specific air pollutant, owing to high collinearity between some air pollutants.

  16. Asthma disease as cause of admission to hospitals due to exposure to ambient oxidants in Mashhad, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Hamid Reza; Aval, Hamideh Ebrahimi; Alahabadi, Ahmad; Mokammel, Adel; Khamirchi, Ramzanali; Yousefzadeh, Samira; Ahmadi, Ehsan; Rahmani-Sani, Abolfazl; Estaji, Mehdi; Ghanbarnejad, Amin; Gholizadeh, Abdolmajid; Taghavi, Mahmoud; Miri, Mohammad

    2017-10-04

    Nowadays, asthma is one of the most common chronic respiratory diseases, worldwide. Many reports have emphasized the correlation between the short-term exposure to the ambient air pollutants and acute respiratory diseases, especially among children with asthmatic symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the exposure to three atmospheric antioxidants (NO2, SO2, and O3) and hospital admission due to asthmatic disease (HAAD) in the city of Mashhad, Iran. The concentrations of atmospheric antioxidants were obtained from the real-time monitoring stations located in the city. The collected data were employed for developing predictive models in the AirQ software. In order to investigate the association between short-term exposure to air pollutants and HAAD, the study participants were categorized into two age groups: less than 15 and from 15 to 64 years old. The results indicated that in people less than 15 years increase in NO2 (attributable proportion (AP) = 3.775%, 95% CI 0.897-6.883%), SO2 (AP = 3.649%, 95% CI 1.295-5.937%), and O3 (AP = 0.554%,95% CI 0.00-3.321) results in increase in HAAD. While for those aged between 15 and 64 years, the AP was 4.192% (95% CI 0.450-7.662%) for NO2; 0.0% (95% CI 0.00-1.687%) for SO2; and 0.236% (95% CI 0.00-1.216%) for O3. The number of asthmatic cases who were less than 15 years admitted to the hospitals during the study period was higher than that of those within the age groups between 15 and 64 years as a consequence of exposure to NO2 (101 vs. 75), SO2 (98 vs. 0), and O3 (15 vs. 3), respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the AirQ model has not been applied before to estimate the effect of atmospheric antioxidant exposure on hospital admission because of asthma disease. Eventually, this model is proposed to be applicable for other cities around the world.

  17. [Unified National Health System costs in São José dos Campos, São Paulo State, Brazil, for hospital admissions due to external causes].

    PubMed

    Melione, Luís Paulo Rodrigues; Mello-Jorge, Maria Helena Prado de

    2008-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify direct expenditures for hospitalizations due to external causes in the Unified National Health System (SUS) in the city of São José dos Campos, São Paulo State, Brazil. Admissions to the Dr. José de Carvalho Florence Municipal Hospital resulting from external causes or injuries - ICD-10, chapters XIX and XX respectively - were analyzed for the first semester of 2003. 976 patient admission forms were analyzed, after data evaluation. Admissions with the highest total cost were those resulting from motor vehicle accidents and falls. The highest mean cost for hospitalization for injury was due to motor vehicle accidents (BRL 614.63), followed by assault (BRL 594.90). The highest mean cost for hospitalization due to injury was for cervical fractures (BRL 1,191.42) and head injuries (BRL 1,000.44). Hospitalizations with the highest daily cost were skull and facial fractures (BRL 166.72) and abdominal trauma (BRL 148.26). The study confirmed that motor vehicle accidents, falls, and assault are an important source of costs due to hospitalization for injuries.

  18. [Appropriateness of emergency hospital admissions].

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Gómez, J; Villar Arias, A; Ramalle-Gómara, E; Carpintero Escudero, J M; Bragado Blas, L; Ruiz Azpiazu, J I

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this work is to know the proportion of inadequate urgent admissions in a general hospital. A retrospective and descriptive study of patients admitted during 1,999 was performed. The Appropriatness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) was used in order to evaluate the appropriatness of the admissions. Eighteen admissions (4.5%) were inadecuated. There was a higher proportion of inappropriate admission (IA) when the physician responsible of the admission was a medical specialist (internal medicine, hematology or nephrology): odds ratio 5.3 in opposite to emergency physicians (p < 0.03). There was a low proportion of inadequate admissions (4.5%) and the risk of inappropriatness of the admission was major when it was ordered by a medical specialist.

  19. [Estimation of the population attributable fraction due to obesity in hospital admissions for flu valued according to Body Mass Index (BMI) and CUN-BAE].

    PubMed

    Dávila-Batista, V; Carriedo, D; Díez, F; Pueyo Bastida, A; Martínez Durán, B; Martin, V

    2017-05-11

    The obesity pandemic together with the influenza pandemic could lead to a significant burden of disease. The body mass index (BMI) does not discriminate obesity appropriately. The CUN-BAE has recently been used as an estimate of body fatness for Caucasians, including BMI, gender, and age. The aim of this study is to assess the population attributable fraction of hospital admissions due to influenza, due to the body fatness measured with the BMI, and the CUN-BAE. A multicentre study was conducted using matched case-controls. Cases were hospital admissions with the influenza confirmed by the RT-PCR method between 2009 and 2011. The risk of hospital admission and the population attribuible fraction were calculated using the BMI or the CUN-BAE for each adiposity category in a conditional logical regression analysis adjusted for confounding variables. The analyzes were estimated in the total sample, in unvaccinated people, and those less than 65 years-old. A total of 472 hospitalised cases and 493 controls were included in the study. Compared to normal weight, the aOR of influenza hospital admissions increases with each level of BMI (aOR=1.26; 2.06 and 11.64) and CUN-BAE (aOR=2.78; 4.29; 5.43 and 15.18). The population attributable fraction of influenza admissions using CUN-BAE is 3 times higher than that estimated with BMI (0,72 vs. 0,27), with the differences found being similar the non-vaccinated and under 65 year-olds. The BMI could be underestimating the burden of disease attributable to obesity in individuals hospitalised with influenza. There needs to be an appropriate assessment of the impact of obesity and vaccine recommendation criteria. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Inverted U-shape relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasm in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to understand the relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to carcinoma in situ and benign neoplasms, which have been less paid attention to, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1618) across Germany that were available between 1 January, 2009 and 31 December, 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified D00-D48 in situ neoplasms, benign neoplasms and neoplasms of uncertain or unknown behaviour by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). For most subtypes, peaks of admissions were observed in spring and late autumn. There could be four groups of phenomenon among these admissions. To be specific, D06, D16, D21, D24-25, D35 and D39 peaked when PET was at 0 °C. D46 peaked when PET was at 5-10 °C. D03, D04 and D33 had linear relationships. Other admissions peaked when PET was between 0 and 5 °C. All admissions were in common with a drop when PET reached 10 °C or higher. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at 0-10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for medical professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative.

  1. Admission avoidance hospital at home.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, Sasha; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Clarke, Mike J; Kalra, Lalit; Wilson, Andrew D; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C

    2016-09-01

    Admission avoidance hospital at home provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care, and always for a limited time period. This is the third update of the original review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with admission avoidance hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, two other databases, and two trials registers on 2 March 2016. We checked the reference lists of eligible articles. We sought unpublished studies by contacting providers and researchers who were known to be involved in the field. Randomised controlled trials recruiting participants aged 18 years and over. Studies comparing admission avoidance hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care. We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group. We performed meta-analysis for trials that compared similar interventions and reported comparable outcomes with sufficient data, requested individual patient data from trialists, and relied on published data when this was not available. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 16 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1814 participants; three trials recruited participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two trials recruited participants recovering from a stroke, six trials recruited participants with an acute medical condition who were mainly elderly, and the remaining trials recruited participants with a mix of conditions. We assessed the majority of the included studies as at low risk of selection, detection, and attrition bias, and unclear for selective reporting and performance bias. Admission avoidance hospital at home probably makes little

  2. The ageing society and emergency hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, Raphael; Sharpin, Luke; McCormick, Barry; Hurst, Jeremy

    2017-08-01

    There is strong policy interest, in England as elsewhere, in slowing the growth in emergency hospital admissions, which for older people increased by 3.3% annually between 2001/2 and 2012/3. Resource constrains have increased the importance of understanding rising emergency admissions, which in policy discourse is often explained by population aging. This study examines how far the rise in emergency admissions of people over 65 was due to population ageing, how far to the changing likelihood of entering hospital at each age, and how far to other factors which might be more amenable to policy measures. It shows that: admission rates rose with age from age 40 upward but each successive birth cohort experienced lower emergency admission rates after standardising for age and other effects. This downward cohort effect largely offset the consequences of an older and larger population aged over 65. Other factors which could explain increasing admissions, such as new technologies or rising expectations, appear more important than the changing size and age structure of the population as drivers of rising emergency admissions in old age. These findings suggest that stemming the rate of increase in emergency admissions of older people may be feasible, if challenging, despite population ageing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Hospital admissions due to whooping cough: experience of the del niño hospital in Panama. Period 2001-2008].

    PubMed

    Nieto Guevara, J; Luciani, K; Montesdeoca Melián, A; Mateos Durán, M; Estripeaut, D

    2010-03-01

    Bordetella pertussis (whooping cough) is a worldwide public health problem. It is estimated that there are about 20 to 40 million cases with 200,000-400,000 deaths and is increasing in infants and adults. An observational, retrospective study was made. We reviewed the epidemiologic surveillance notification forms from 2001 to 2008 period at the Epidemiology Department of Hospital Del Niño, a tertiary paediatric reference centre in Panama City. All pertussis (whooping cough) cases confirmed by PCR and cultures were selected. From a total of 759 notifications of suspected whooping cough cases, 180 confirmed cases using PCR and culture were analyzed for this study. The admission rate in all ages was 14.4/10,000 admissions, predominantly in < or =3 months with 42.76/10,000 admissions and which accounted for 75% of the cases. Cough was the most important symptom (91%). Cyanosis, leucocytosis and lymphocytosis were the most characteristic clinical findings when comparing positive pertussis with negative. More than two thirds of the subjects less than 3 months of age had not been vaccinated at the time of admission. The death rate was 8.3%, more than half of them in subjects less than 1 month of age. Whooping cough is an important public health problem. Post-partum vaccination could be a strategy to reduce morbidity and mortality in infants less than 3 months of age. 2009 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Characteristics and current direct costs of hospital admissions due to occupational accidents in the southwest of Bahia from 2005 to 2007.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ana Cláudia Conceição; Pereira, Thalles da Costa Lobê

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the profile and cost of admissions for occupational accidents, under the Unified Health System (UHS) in municipalities of the southwest of Bahia, in the period of 2005 to 2007. It was conducted a descriptive study using the records of the Hospital Information System (HIS), from which were extracted data about the sociodemographic, occupational and hospitalization profiles. To express the results, indicators were used as absolute frequencies and proportions, the average stay, Total Cost of Hospitalization (TCH), Hospital Mortality (HM), Average Spenditure (AS) and Cost per Day (CD). 962 admissions were recorded, of which 94.1% were related to path accidents. Among the admitted subjects 65.7% were male, and the most affected age groups were 5 to 14 and 15 to 24 years. There were forearm fractures on 26 cases of typical accidents. 248 cases of intracranial injuries happened during commuting to work, which accounted for 78.2% of traffic accidents and 28.8% of falls. The average stay was of 2.6 days and the deaths occurred in 0.5% of patients discharges. The total cost of the admissions was of R$ 243,125.06, being the AS of R$ 252.73 and CD of R$ 97.44, lower than the external causes. The frequencies of the variables related to the occupation were not verified due to missing values. The data from the HIS Systems were limited for identify the profile of the admitted workers. However, they are important and can be used on occupational health surveillance.

  5. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are associated with emergency admission to hospital for colitis due to inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, J M; McMahon, A D; Murray, F E; McDevitt, D G; MacDonald, T M

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the relation between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and colitis due to inflammatory bowel disease. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted using a prospectively constructed, record linkage database containing hospital event and dispensed drug data (1989-93). The study population consisted of 319,465 people resident in Tayside in January 1989, and still resident (or dead) in October 1994. RESULTS: Of the 785 patients admitted to hospital as emergencies with colitis between July 1989 and June 1993, 200 fulfilled the case criterion of colitis due to inflammatory bowel disease. A further 1198 persons were used as community controls. Odds ratios were calculated for three exposure periods (current, recent, and past exposure). The overall odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) for current and recent exposure to NSAIDs were 1.77 (1.01 to 3.10) and 1.93 (1.20 to 3.09) respectively. Current and recent exposure to NSAIDs was also associated for incident cases, with odds ratios of 2.96 (1.32 to 6.64) and 2.51 (1.13 to 5.55). There was a trend for recent exposure among non-incident cases. CONCLUSION: The use of NSAIDs may be associated with an increased risk of emergency admission to hospital for colitis due to inflammatory bowel disease, particularly among patients with no previous history. PMID:9203940

  6. Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, L.; Sabroe, S.; Damsgaard, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effect of job loss on health an investigation was made of admissions to hospitals in 887 men five years before and three years after the closure of a Danish shipyard. The control group comprised 441 men from another shipyard. The information on hospital admissions was obtained from the Danish national register of patients. The relative risk of admission in the control group dropped significantly in terms of the number of men admitted from the study group from 1.29 four to five years before closure to 0.74 in the three years after closure. This was especially true of admissions due to accidents (1.33 to 0.46) and diseases of the digestive system (4.53 to 1.03). For diseases of the circulatory system, particularly cardiovascular diseases, the relative risk increased from 0.8 to 1.60, and from 1.0 to 2.6 respectively. These changes in risk of illness after redundancy are probably a consequence of a change from the effects of a high risk work environment to the effects of psychosocial stresses such as job insecurity and unemployment. PMID:2511968

  7. [The Health Department of Sicily "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event" decree].

    PubMed

    Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; De Luca, Giovanni; Gabriele, Michele; Tourkmani, Nidal

    2014-06-01

    Mortality and rehospitalizations still remain high after discharge for an acute cardiologic event. In this context, hospital discharge represents a potential pitfall for heart disease patients. In the setting of care transitions, the discharge letter is the main instrument of communication between hospital and primary care. Communication, besides, is an integral part of high-quality, patient-centered interventions aimed at improving the discharge process. Inadequate information at discharge significantly affects the quality of treatment compliance and the adoption of lifestyle modifications for an effective secondary prevention. The Health Department of Sicily, in 2013, established a task force with the aim to elaborate "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event", inviting to participate GICR-IACPR and many other scientific societies of cardiology and primary care, as discharge letter and communication are fundamental junctions of care transitions in cardiology. These recommendations have been published as a specific decree and contain: a structured model of discharge letter, which includes all of the parameters characterizing patients at high clinical risk, high thrombotic risk and low risk according to the Consensus document ANMCO/GICR-IACPR/GISE; is thus possible to identify these patients, choosing consequently the most appropriate follow-up pathways. A particular attention has been given to the "Medication Reconciliation" and to the identification of therapeutic targets; an educational Kit, with different forms on cardiac diseases, risk factors, drugs and lifestyle; a check-list about information given to the patient and caregivers. The "Recommendations" represent, in conclusion, the practical realization of the fruitful cooperation between scientific societies and political-administrative institutions that has been realized in Sicily in the last years.

  8. Lunar phases and psychiatric hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, J J; Roberts, M S

    1994-12-01

    To assess the lunar hypothesis as predictive of mental health emergencies and antisocial behavior, the relation of the lunar hypothesis and the occurrence of psychiatric hospital admissions of developmentally disabled adults was examined. The full moon phase of the lunar cycle did not explain a higher rate of hospital admission and accounted for only .007% of the variance. A critique of the methodology in prior research led to the suggestion that more immediate stressors and environmental factors are more plausible contributing factors to hospital admission.

  9. Children's Hospital Admissions and Mother's Menstruation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Katharina

    1970-01-01

    Of 100 children's emergency admissions to hospital nearly half (49%) were admitted during the mother's paramenstruum. There was a statistically significant association between the mother's menstruation and the child's admission both for accidents and for illnesses. The eldest child in the family appeared to be most affected. PMID:5440570

  10. Inappropriate hospital admissions: patient participation in research.

    PubMed

    Glasby, J; Littlechild, R

    Although political interest in reducing the number of inappropriate hospital admissions is mounting, methods for researching the rate of inappropriate admissions have several major limitations. Whereas traditional studies have tended to be predominantly subjective, more recent studies using clinical review instruments also have a number of limitations. Chief among these is the failure to consider the potential input of the individual patient. To illustrate some of the possible benefits of patient participation, this article cites findings from a study in Birmingham, which sought to involve individual older people in a research study into emergency hospital admissions.

  11. Admissions to hospital due to fracture in England in patients with prostate cancer treated with androgen-deprivation therapy - do we have to worry about the hormones?

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Edward R; Bahl, Amit; Hounsome, Luke; Eylert, Maike F; Verne, Julia; Persad, Raj A

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the association between androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and fracture risk in men with prostate cancer in England. Using the Hospital Episodes Statistics database, which contains all the information about National Health Service (NHS) and NHS-funded hospital admissions in England, for the years 2004-2008, 8 902 patients were found to have had prostate cancer and an admission to hospital with a fracture. Of these patients, 3 372 (37.8%) were identified as being treated with ADT, whilst 5 530 (62.2%) were not. There was a total of 228 852 admissions in the background population. The risk of a fracture requiring hospitalisation increased from 1.12 to 1.41 per 100 person-years in a man with prostate cancer treated with ADT compared with those without ADT, an absolute increase of only 0.29 per 100 person-years. When compared with the background population, there was an increase from 0.58 to 1.41 per 100 person-years, a relative rate ratio increase of 2.4 (P < 0.01) with an absolute increase of 0.83 per 100 person-years. In England there was a small but statistically significant increased risk of fracture in men who had been treated with ADT. Men with prostate cancer, with or without ADT, were at an increased risk of fracture compared with the background population. We therefore suggest that if bone health is to be taken seriously in men with prostate cancer that all these men should be risk assessed (FRAX(®) or Qfracture(®) tools, as National Institute for Health and Care Excellence advised), as all men with prostate cancer have an increased risk of fracture, with those on ADT having slightly higher risk. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Drug use before hospital admission in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Taylor, H G; Stein, C M; Jongeling, G

    1988-01-01

    Drug use before hospital admission was studied prospectively in 284 consecutive patients admitted to general medical wards in Zimbabwe. Drugs were used by 84% of patients. Self-medication was used by 143 (50%) patients, aspirin (54%) and chloroquine (17%) being the most commonly used drugs. Traditional medicines were used by 55 (19%) patients. Drugs dispensed from orthodox medical sources were taken by 128 (45%) patients. Analgesics (22%), antibiotics (18%), and chloroquine (13%) were the commonest drugs dispensed. Urine screening tests were performed and were positive for aspirin in 37% of cases, chloroquine (33%), and antibiotics (20%). Adverse drug reactions requiring hospital admission occurred in 14 patients (10 orthodox medicines, 4 traditional medicines). Drug use before hospital admission, which is often poorly documented, is a source of potential drug toxicity and may obscure a diagnosis of infective illness.

  13. Weekend versus weekday hospital admission and outcomes during hospitalization for patients due to worsening heart failure: a report from Japanese Cardiac Registry of Heart Failure in Cardiology (JCARE-CARD).

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Sanae; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Tsuchihashi-Makaya, Miyuki; Goto, Daisuke; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-05-01

    The day of the week of admission may influence the length of stay and in-hospital death. However, the association between the admission day of the week and in-hospital outcomes has been inconsistent in heart failure (HF) patients among studies reported from Western countries. We thus analyzed this association in HF patients encountered in routine clinical practice in Japan. We studied the characteristics and in-hospital treatment in 1620 patients hospitalized with worsening HF by using the database of the Japanese Cardiac Registry of Heart Failure in Cardiology (JCARE-CARD). Patients were divided into two groups according to weekday (n = 1355; 83.6%) or weekend admission (n = 265; 16.4%). The mean age was 70.7 years and 59.4% were male. Etiology was ischemic in 34.0%, and mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 42.5%. Patients admitted on the weekend were significantly older and had more comorbidities, and more severe symptoms and signs of HF on admission. Length of stay was comparable between weekend and weekday admission (35.2 ± 47.0 days vs 33.6 ± 32.0 days, P = 0.591). Crude in-hospital mortality did not differ between patients admitted on the weekend and weekdays (7.5% vs 5.2%, P = 0.136). Even after adjustment for covariates in multivariable modeling with patients admitted on weekday as the reference, in-hospital death was comparable between patients admitted on the weekend and weekdays (adjusted odds ratio 1.125, 95% confidence interval 0.631-2.004, P = 0.691). Among patients hospitalized for worsening HF, admission day of the week did not affect in-hospital death and length of stay.

  14. Hospital admissions among male drivers in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hannerz, H; Tuchsen, F

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To facilitate decisions about interventions and to establish baseline values for future evaluation of preventive efforts, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the disease pattern among male professional drivers in Denmark. The study differentiated between drivers of goods vehicles and drivers of passenger transport.
METHODS—Cohorts of all 20-59 year old Danish male professional drivers in the years 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1994 were formed, to calculate age standardised hospital admission ratios (SHRs) and time trends (1981-97) for many diagnostic aggregations.
RESULTS—SHRs for diseases in practically all systems and organs of the body were higher among professional drivers than they were in the male working population at large. Also drivers of passenger transport, compared with drivers of goods vehicles, had significantly high SHRs due to infectious and parasitic diseases, diseases of the circulatory system, and diseases of the respiratory system, and significantly lower rates of injury. For both driver groups, the SHRs for acute myocardial infarction increased with time whereas the SHR for acute gastritis decreased, and for drivers of passenger transport an increasing SHR for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was found over time.
CONCLUSION—Drivers of passenger transport and drivers of goods vehicles differ in their disease patterns. The results support the hypothesis that preventive efforts are needed in both groups, but underline that different strategies are required for different categories of drivers.


Keywords: professional drivers; hospital admissions; surveillance system PMID:11245742

  15. [Avoidable Hospital Admissions for Heart Failure, Spain].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Victoria; Lorusso, Nicola; Expósito García, Sebastián; Páez-Pinto, José María; Palmero-Palmero, César; Caballero-Delgado, Gema; Zapico Moreno, María José; Fernández-Moyano, Antonio

    2016-04-25

    The avoidable hospital admissions for heart failure are a problem for health systems worldwide, as they waste resources, generate additional morbidities and high mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors in patients hospitalized for heart failure. A group of medical from Hospital and Primary Care was established. We realized an audit of a sample of 110 patients from Aljarafe towns with highest hospital admissions for heart failure. The analysis used Student T test and Mann Whitney for quantitative variables; Chi-square test and Fisher exact test for qualitative variables. Patients admitted for HF had a mean age of 78.1 years (SD: 9.56); 73 (66.4%) were women; Barthel Index was 45.0 on average; 53.5% had New York Health Association (NYHA) class III and 17 (15.5%) were institutionalized, 70% had between 3 and 5 comorbidities, mainly hypertension (87.3%), dyslipidemia (60.0%), diabetes (57.3%), chronic kidney disease (56.4%), anemia (53.2% ) or atrial fibrillation (52.7%). During hospitalization, 23 patients (20.9%) died. They were mostly women, elderly, had a previous admission and without beta-blockers treatment. The admission in the last 12 months was associated with identification of the primary caregiver; ischemic HF; re-vascularization; inclusion in the COMPARTE Program; treatment change decompensation. The hospital admissions were more frequently an aging population with multiple diseases (hypertension, diabetes, COPD, renal disease) and low capacity for basic activities of daily life. The hospital mortality associated with elderly, women, less use of beta-blockers and the non-inclusion of the patient in the care process.

  16. Multiple hospital admissions in a calendar year.

    PubMed

    Newton, J; Goldacre, M

    1993-09-01

    Hospital in-patient workload is routinely measured as episodes of care. We report on the extent to which counts of episodes of care differ from counts of patients treated in different specialties and in different age groups. Linked records of hospital care in a population of 1.9 million people, collected over an 11-year period (1976-1986), were analysed. The all-ages multiple admission ratio (the number of admissions per 100 people admitted in the same specialty and year) varied between specialties from 102 to 171. Medical specialties tended to have higher ratios than surgical ones. The influence of age on multiple admission ratios varied between specialties, although in general the ratios increased with increasing age. There were progressive but small increases in multiple admission ratios over the period studied in a number of specialties but, by and large, stability over time was more striking than any change. The information presented could be used to estimate person-based admission rates from available episode-based data where the former are not available. This should be helpful both in managing hospital resources and in purchasing care on behalf of resident populations. Purchasers in particular should be aware of numbers of people being treated as well as the numbers of episodes of care provided.

  17. Reducing hospital admissions from nursing homes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The geriatric nursing home population is vulnerable to acute and deteriorating illness due to advanced age, multiple chronic illnesses and high levels of dependency. Although the detriments of hospitalising the frail and old are widely recognised, hospital admissions from nursing homes remain common. Little is known about what alternatives exist to prevent and reduce hospital admissions from this setting. The objective of this study, therefore, is to summarise the effects of interventions to reduce acute hospitalisations from nursing homes. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in Cochrane Library, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and ISI Web of Science in April 2013. Studies were eligible if they had a geriatric nursing home study population and were evaluating any type of intervention aiming at reducing acute hospital admission. Systematic reviews, randomised controlled trials, quasi randomised controlled trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series were eligible study designs. The process of selecting studies, assessing them, extracting data and grading the total evidence was done by two researchers individually, with any disagreement solved by a third. We made use of meta-analyses from included systematic reviews, the remaining synthesis is descriptive. Based on the type of intervention, the included studies were categorised in: 1) Interventions to structure and standardise clinical practice, 2) Geriatric specialist services and 3) Influenza vaccination. Results Five systematic reviews and five primary studies were included, evaluating a total of 11 different interventions. Fewer hospital admissions were found in four out of seven evaluations of structuring and standardising clinical practice; in both evaluations of geriatric specialist services, and in influenza vaccination of residents. The quality of the evidence for all comparisons was of low or very low quality, using the GRADE approach. Conclusions Overall, eleven

  18. Soda consumption and hospital admissions among Californian adults with asthma.

    PubMed

    Cisneros, Ricardo; Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Brown, Paul; Schweizer, Don

    2017-05-01

    Asthma prevalence has been increasing consistently since 1995 in California. Recent studies have found that consuming soda and sugar-containing drinks may pose a risk for asthma. Research that examines the relationship between soda intake and asthma among adult asthmatics is limited. This study investigated the relationship between sugar-sweetened soda consumption and asthma hospitalization among adult asthmatics in California. This cross-sectional study was based on the 2011-2012 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) data and included 3,784 adults who were diagnosed with asthma by a doctor and who currently reported either that they still had asthma, or that they had suffered from an asthma attack in the last 12 months. The analysis was survey weighted. The exposure variable was soda intake measured as the number of times soda was consumed in the last week. The health outcome measure was overnight hospital admission due to asthma. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between soda consumption and overnight hospital admission after adjusting for age, education, sex, race/ethnicity, weight status, smoking status, and self-rated health. Adults with asthma who drank soda three or more times per week reported higher odds of overnight hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.51-5.10, p = 0.001). Our findings suggest that efforts designed to limit soda consumption would benefit asthma suffers by reducing hospital admissions. This, however, needs further research to confirm a direct causal association.

  19. Somnambulism: Emergency Department Admissions Due to Sleepwalking-Related Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Thomas C.; Veerakatty, Sajitha; Haider, Dominik G.; Geiser, Thomas; Ricklin, Meret E.; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Somnambulism is a state of dissociated consciousness, in which the affected person is partially asleep and partially awake. There is pervasive public opinion that sleepwalkers are protected from hurting themselves. There have been few scientific reports of trauma associated with somnambulism and no published investigations on the epidemiology or trauma patterns associated with somnambulism. Methods We included all emergency department (ED) admissions to University Hospital Inselspital, Berne, Switzerland, from January 1, 2000, until August 11, 2015, when the patient had suffered a trauma associated with somnambulism. Demographic data (age, gender, nationality) and medical data (mechanism of injury, final diagnosis, hospital admission, mortality and medication on admission) were included. Results Of 620,000 screened ED admissions, 11 were associated with trauma and sleepwalking. Two patients (18.2%) had a history of known non-rapid eye movement parasomnias. The leading cause of admission was falls. Four patients required hospital admission for orthopedic injuries needing further diagnostic testing and treatment (36.4%). These included two patients with multiple injuries (18.2%). None of the admitted patients died. Conclusion Although sleepwalking seems benign in the majority of cases and most of the few injured patients did not require hospitalization, major injuries are possible. When patients present with falls of unknown origin, the possibility should be evaluated that they were caused by somnambulism. PMID:27833677

  20. Smoking ban in public areas is associated with a reduced incidence of hospital admissions due to ST-elevation myocardial infarctions in non-smokers. Results from the Bremen STEMI Registry.

    PubMed

    Schmucker, J; Wienbergen, H; Seide, S; Fiehn, E; Fach, A; Würmann-Busch, B; Gohlke, H; Günther, K; Ahrens, W; Hambrecht, R

    2014-09-01

    Laws banning tobacco smoking from public areas have been passed in several countries, including the region of Bremen, Germany at the end of 2007. The present study analyses the incidence of hospital admissions due to ST-elevation myocardial infarctions (STEMIs) before and after such a smoking ban was implemented, focusing on differences between smokers and non-smokers. In this respect, data of the Bremen STEMI Registry (BSR) give a complete epidemiological overview of a region in northwest Germany with approximately 800,000 inhabitants since all STEMIs are admitted to one central heart centre. Between January 2006 and December 2010, data from the BSR was analysed focusing on date of admission, age, gender, and prior nicotine consumption. A total of 3545 patients with STEMI were admitted in the Bremen Heart Centre during this time period. Comparing 2006-2007 vs. 2008-2010, hence before and after the smoking ban, a 16% decrease of the number of STEMIs was observed: from a mean of 65 STEMI/month in 2006-2007 to 55/month in 2008-2010 (p < 0.01). The group of smokers showed a constant number of STEMIs: 25/month in 2006-2007 to 26/month in 2008-2010 (+4%, p = 0.8). However, in non-smokers, a significant reduction of STEMIs over time was found: 39/month in 2006-2007 to 29/month in 2008-2010 (-26%, p < 0.01). The decline of STEMIs in non-smokers was consistently observed in all age groups and both sexes. Adjusting for potentially confounding factors like hypertension, obesity, and diabetes mellitus did not explain the observed decline. In the BSR, a significant decline of hospital admissions due to STEMIs in non-smokers was observed after the smoking ban in public areas came into force. No reduction of STEMI-related admissions was found in smokers. These results may be explained by the protection of non-smokers from passive smoking and the absence of such an effect in smokers by the dominant effect of active smoking. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and

  1. Variation in rates of hospital admission for appendicitis in Wales.

    PubMed Central

    West, R R; Carey, M J

    1978-01-01

    In a study designed to investigate the variations in rates of admission to hospital for appendicitis in Wales Hospital Activity Analysis listings were analysed according to the sex and age of the patients and the month and day of the week of admission. The incidence of hospitalisation was greatest among boys aged 10-14 and girls aged 15-19. The number of admissions was higher on weekdays than at weekends, but there were no seasonal variations. Durations of stay differed between the 17 health districts. We conclude that admission rates vary mainly because of differing hospital admission policies. Admission is not wholly governed by the sudden onset of abdominal pain; other factors include the threshold of consultation of each patient, the referral habits of general practitioners, the availability of hospital beds, and the degree to which doctors and patients expect admission. PMID:656866

  2. Accuracy of caregivers’ recall of hospital admissions: implications for research

    PubMed Central

    Burakevych, Nataliia; McKinlay, Christopher Joel Dorman; Alsweiler, Jane Marie; Harding, Jane Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the accuracy of caregivers’ recall of hospital admissions in early childhood. Methods Prospective cohort study of babies born at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia at Waikato Hospital, New Zealand, a regional public hospital and sole provider of acute inpatient care to over 100,000 children. Caregivers’ recall of children’s hospital admissions up to 4.5 years were compared with medical records. Accuracy of recall was related to neonatal and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Out of 267 children, 179 (67%) visited hospital and 106 (40%) were admitted at least once. The most frequent reasons for admission were for respiratory (29%) and gastrointestinal (18%) problems. Of 106 children admitted to hospital, 27 (25%) caregivers did not recall the admission and only 37 (35%) accurately recalled the number of admissions. The accuracy of recall was lower for gastrointestinal (38%) and surgical (40%) problems, while recall of respiratory (64%) and ear, nose and throat (60%) admissions was more accurate. Low socio-economic status and multiple admissions were associated with less accurate recall of number of admissions. Conclusion Caregivers do not accurately report hospital admissions. Questionnaire data about use of hospital facilities should be interpreted cautiously, and may not be sufficiently accurate for use in research studies. PMID:26355393

  3. Body pushing, prescription drugs and hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Byard, Roger W; Kenneally, Michaela

    2017-03-15

    A 39-year-old man died of multi-organ failure complicating mixed drug toxicity that included methadone, oxazepam, oxycodone and nitrazepam. His past medical history involved alcohol and poly-substance abuse with chronic self-harm and suicidal ideation. There had been multiple hospital admissions for drug overdoses. At autopsy the most unusual finding was of two packages of 10 tablets each, wrapped in thin plastic film within the rectum. The insertion of drugs into body orifices and cavities has been termed body pushing to distinguish it from body packing where illicit drugs are wrapped and swallowed for transport and smuggling, and body stuffing where small amounts of loosely wrapped or unwrapped drugs are swallowed to conceal evidence from police. This case demonstrates that body pushing may not always involve illicit drugs or attempted concealment from police or customs officials. It appears that the drugs had been hidden to ensure an additional supply during the time of residence in hospital. The extent to which body pushing is currently being used by patients to smuggle drugs into secure medical facilities is yet to be determined.

  4. Unplanned overnight hospital admission after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed

    Elder, Mark; Steven, David; Beasley, Spencer; Wium, David

    2007-08-24

    To examine the reasons for unplanned overnight hospital admission in paediatric patients undergoing strabismus repair, to identify preventable causes (particularly postoperative nausea and vomiting), and to compare the rate of unplanned overnight stay with a group undergoing inguinal hernia repair. A retrospective review of consecutive patients under age 17 having strabismus surgery over a 5-year period between January 1995 and December 1999 was undertaken at Christchurch Hospital, New Zealand. A control group, from a similar period, of children having elective inguinal hernia repair was used to compare the rate of overnight stay. 375 patients had strabismus surgery, of which 51 stayed overnight; 19 of these were from remote locations and stayed for geographic reasons only, 9 stayed overnight preoperatively only, thus leaving an unplanned overnight stay rate of 6.4%. This compared to a rate of 1.1% in those having hernia surgery. The reasons for overnight stay were postoperative nausea and vomiting (50%), anaesthetic complications (18%), late afternoon surgery (14%), social factors (14%), and pain (5%). Significant associations were found between postoperative nausea and vomiting and the extent and duration of surgery. Possible associations not reaching significance included a higher rate of postoperative nausea and vomiting in those receiving nitrous oxide, and those with evidence of stimulation of the oculo-cardiac reflex. The provision of suitable accommodation and careful planning of the type and timing of surgery would be expected to reduce the overnight stay rate after strabismus surgery.

  5. Contribution of recurrent admissions in children and young people to emergency hospital admissions: retrospective cohort analysis of hospital episode statistics.

    PubMed

    Wijlaars, Linda Pmm; Hardelid, Pia; Woodman, Jenny; Allister, Janice; Cheung, Ronny; Gilbert, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    To examine the contribution of recurrent admissions to the high rate of emergency admissions among children and young people (CYP) in England, and to what extent readmissions are accounted for by patients with chronic conditions. All hospital admissions to the National Health Service (NHS) in England using hospital episode statistics (HES) from 2009 to 2011 for CYP aged 0-24 years. We followed CYP for 2 years from discharge of their first emergency admission in 2009. We determined the number of subsequent emergency admissions, time to next admission, length of stay and the proportion of injury and chronic condition admissions measured by diagnostic codes in all following admissions. 869 895 children had an index emergency admission in 2009, resulting in a further 939 710 admissions (of which 600 322, or 64%, were emergency admissions) over the next 2 years. After discharge from the index admission, 32% of 274,986 (32%) children were readmitted within 2 years, 26% of these readmissions occurring within 30 days of discharge. Recurrent emergency admission accounted for 41% of all emergency admissions in the 2-year cohort and 66% of inpatient days. 41% of index admissions, but 76% of the recurrent emergency admissions, were in children with a chronic condition. Recurrent admissions contribute substantially to total emergency admissions. They often occur soon after discharge, and disproportionately affect CYP with chronic conditions. Policies aiming to discourage readmissions should consider whether they could undermine necessary inpatient care for children with chronic conditions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and in-hospital mortality among HIV-infected patients between 1993 and 2013: Impact of hepatitis C co-infection.

    PubMed

    Meijide, Héctor; Mena, Álvaro; Rodríguez-Osorio, Iria; Pértega, Sonia; Castro-Iglesias, Ángeles; Rodríguez-Martínez, Guillermo; Pedreira, José; Poveda, Eva

    2017-01-01

    New patterns in epidemiological characteristics of people living with HIV infection (PLWH) and the introduction of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) have changed the profile of hospital admissions in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions, re-admissions, and mortality rates in HIV patients and to analyze the role of HCV co-infection. A retrospective cohort study conducted on all hospital admissions of HIV patients between 1993 and 2013. The study time was divided in two periods (1993-2002 and 2003-2013) to be compared by conducting a comparative cross-sectional analysis. A total of 22,901 patient-years were included in the analysis, with 6917 hospital admissions, corresponding to 1937 subjects (75% male, mean age 36±11 years, 37% HIV/HCV co-infected patients). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days (5-16), and the 30-day hospital re-admission rate was 20.1%. A significant decrease in hospital admissions related with infectious and psychiatric diseases was observed in the last period (2003-2013), but there was an increase in those related with malignancies, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality remained high (6.8% in the first period vs. 6.3% in the second one), with a progressive increase of non-AIDS-defining illness deaths (37.9% vs. 68.3%, P<.001). The admission rate significantly dropped after 1996 (4.9% yearly), but it was less pronounced in HCV co-infected patients (1.7% yearly). Hospital admissions due to infectious and psychiatric disorders have decreased, with a significant increase in non-AIDS-defining malignancies, cardiovascular, and chronic respiratory diseases. In-hospital mortality is currently still high, but mainly because of non-AIDS-defining illnesses. HCV co-infection increased the hospital stay and re-admissions during the study period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y

  7. Towards a threshold climate for emergency lower respiratory hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Islam, Muhammad Saiful; Chaussalet, Thierry J; Koizumi, Naoru

    2017-02-01

    Identification of 'cut-points' or thresholds of climate factors would play a crucial role in alerting risks of climate change and providing guidance to policymakers. This study investigated a 'Climate Threshold' for emergency hospital admissions of chronic lower respiratory diseases by using a distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM). We analysed a unique longitudinal dataset (10 years, 2000-2009) on emergency hospital admissions, climate, and pollution factors for the Greater London. Our study extends existing work on this topic by considering non-linearity, lag effects between climate factors and disease exposure within the DLNM model considering B-spline as smoothing technique. The final model also considered natural cubic splines of time since exposure and 'day of the week' as confounding factors. The results of DLNM indicated a significant improvement in model fitting compared to a typical GLM model. The final model identified the thresholds of several climate factors including: high temperature (≥27°C), low relative humidity (≤ 40%), high Pm10 level (≥70-µg/m(3)), low wind speed (≤ 2 knots) and high rainfall (≥30mm). Beyond the threshold values, a significantly higher number of emergency admissions due to lower respiratory problems would be expected within the following 2-3 days after the climate shift in the Greater London. The approach will be useful to initiate 'region and disease specific' climate mitigation plans. It will help identify spatial hot spots and the most sensitive areas and population due to climate change, and will eventually lead towards a diversified health warning system tailored to specific climate zones and populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Health Literacy and the Risk of Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David W; Parker, Ruth M.; Williams, Mark V.; Clark, W. Scott

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the association between patient literacy and hospitalization. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Urban public hospital. PATIENTS A total of 979 emergency department patients who participated in the Literacy in Health Care study and had completed an intake interview and literacy testing with the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults were eligible for this study. Of these, 958 (97.8%) had an electronic medical record available for 1994 and 1995. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Hospital admissions to Grady Memorial Hospital during 1994 and 1995 were determined by the hospital information system. We used multivariate logistic regression to determine the independent association between inadequate functional health literacy and hospital admission. Patients with inadequate literacy were twice as likely as patients with adequate literacy to be hospitalized during 1994 and 1995 (31.5% vs 14.9%, p < .001). After adjusting for age, gender, race, self-reported health, socioeconomic status, and health insurance, patients with inadequate literacy were more likely to be hospitalized than patients with adequate literacy (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13, 2.53). The association between inadequate literacy and hospital admission was strongest among patients who had been hospitalized in the year before study entry (OR 3.15; 95% CI 1.45, 6.85). CONCLUSIONS In this study population, patients with inadequate functional health literacy had an increased risk of hospital admission. PMID:9844076

  9. Hospital admissions associated with gout and their comorbidities in New Zealand and England 1999-2009.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Philip C; Merriman, Tony R; Herbison, Peter; Highton, John

    2013-01-01

    To describe the national demographics, comorbidities and mortality of admissions associated with gout in New Zealand (NZ) from 1999 to 2009 and compare this with English gout admission data from the same period. The characteristics of all admissions due to or complicated by gout in NZ from 1999 to 2009 were analysed. These findings were then compared with the wider NZ population and the English National Health Service (NHS) gout admission rates from 1999 to 2009. There were 10 241 admissions due to gout (group A) and 34 318 admissions complicated by gout (group B) in NZ from 1999 to 2009. There were 32 741 admissions due to gout in England over the same period. Gout admissions rose at 5.5% per year in NZ and at 7.2% per year in England over the study period. NZ gout patients admitted to hospital were more likely to be Māori or a Pacific Islander and had 3-7 comorbidities. Multiple admissions were common with 1479 NZ gout patients admitted more than once. Comorbidities varied between the NZ groups A and B: hypertension (19-39%), renal disease (16-27%) and diabetes mellitus (20-27%) were common. Heart failure (27.6%) and cardiovascular disease (39.1%) were common in those who had gout complicating their hospital admission. This group also had poorer survival compared with those admitted primarily for gout. This is the first study to describe the epidemiology of admissions associated with gout across an entire country. Admissions are rising in both countries studied and those admitted in NZ have a high rate of comorbidity and re-admission.

  10. Experience with a Hospital Laboratory Admission Screen

    PubMed Central

    Davey, P. W.; Letts, H. W.; Anderson, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    A comprehensive laboratory admission screen can be instituted in any large laboratory but only in one in command of conventional technology and with the co-operation of the laboratory, medical, nursing and admitting staff. The capital equipment required is costly and subject to early obsolescence. The operating costs are initially high, but the influence of the screen on the general work load indicates that the total overall procedures ordered by the physician will be reduced in number and that over a three-year period, in an economy subject to continuous inflationary pressure, the total cost will approach what might have been expected had the screen not been instituted. By presenting, shortly after admission, a truly comprehensive laboratory profile, the total number of procedures ordered will be reduced and this reduction bears no relationship to whether or not the data supplied are medically useful. The equipment more recently available for a large admission screen is far superior, from the point of view of speed of assay and cost of maintenance and production, to the equipment that has been available to us in this study. It is believed that the unit cost of assay will continue to decline and that the principle of unsolicited testing will be expanded in the future to include procedures not presently in the profile. It is predicted that in the relatively near future almost all of the laboratory procedures that a clinician could conceivably request will have been done prior to his examination of the patient. PMID:5430051

  11. Frequency of Adverse Events Before, During, and After Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Croft, Lindsay D; Liquori, Michael E; Ladd, James; Day, Hannah R; Pineles, Lisa; Lamos, Elizabeth M; Mehrotra, Preeti; Perencevich, Eli N; Harris, Anthony D; Morgan, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Adverse events (AEs) are unintended physical injuries resulting from or contributed to by medical or surgical care. We determined the frequency and type of AEs before, during, and after hospital admission. We conducted a cohort study of 296 adult hospital patients. We used the standardized Institute for Healthcare Improvement Global Trigger Tool for Measuring Adverse Events to review the medical records of the hospital patients for occurrence, timing relative to hospital admission, severity, and preventability of AEs. We also identified the primary physiologic system affected by the AE. Among 296 patients, we identified 338 AEs. AEs occurred with similar frequency before (n = 148; 43.8%) and during hospital admission (n = 162; 47.9%). Fewer AEs occurred after discharge (n = 28; 8.3%). Half of all AEs (n = 169; 50.0%) were severe, whereas 47.9% (n = 162) were preventable. AEs occur with similar frequency before and during hospitalization and may contribute more to hospital admissions than previously recognized. These findings suggest that efforts to improve patient safety should include outpatient settings in addition to the more commonly targeted acute care settings.

  12. Impact of State Psychiatric Hospital Waitlists on Monthly Admissions.

    PubMed

    La, Elizabeth M; Morrissey, Joseph P; Lich, Kristen Hassmiller; Domino, Marisa Elena; Seibert, Julie; Waller, Anna

    2017-08-15

    This study estimated the effects of a waitlist policy on the monthly number and case mix of admissions to state psychiatric hospitals (SPHs) in North Carolina (NC). Descriptive analyses compared pre/postwaitlist differences in the monthly number and case mix of nonforensic adult admissions (N=72,035) to NC's four SPHs by using data from the three years before and the three years after the waitlist announcement. Hospital-level fixed-effects regression models further evaluated the waitlist policy's impact on the number and case mix of admissions. Regression results confirmed that the waitlist policy was associated with both fewer admissions and changes to the case mix of admissions, including a 4.2% decrease in the percentage of monthly admissions by patients with diagnoses of substance abuse disorders (p=.002) across all months postwaitlist (partially offset by an increase of patients with diagnoses of severe mental illness alone). Waitlists led to reduced monthly admissions and altered case mix following implementation at NC SPHs.

  13. Seasonality of hospital admissions for mental disorders in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Phan Minh; Rocklöv, Joacim; Giang, Kim Bao; Nilsson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Some studies have shown a relationship between seasonality in weather patterns and depressive and behavioural disorders, especially in temperate climate regions. However, there is a lack of studies describing the seasonal patterns of hospital admissions for a variety of mental disorders in tropical and subtropical nations. The aim of this study has been to examine the relationship between seasons and daily hospital admissions for mental disorders in Hanoi, Vietnam. Designs A 5-year database (2008–2012) compiled by Hanoi Mental Hospital covering mental disorder admissions diagnosed by the International Classification of Diseases 10 was analysed. A negative binominal regression model was applied to estimate the associations between seasonality and daily hospital admissions for mental disorders, for all causes and for specific diagnoses. Results The summer season indicated the highest relative risk (RR=1.24, confidence interval (CI)=1.1–1.39) of hospital admission for mental disorders, with a peak in these cases in June (RR=1.46, CI=1.19–1.7). Compared to other demographic groups, males and the elderly (aged over 60 years) were more sensitive to seasonal risk changes. In the summer season, the RR of hospital visits among men increased by 26% (RR=1.26, CI=1.12–1.41) and among the elderly by 23% (RR=1.23, CI=1.03–1.48). Furthermore, when temperatures including minimum, mean, and maximum increased 1°C, the number of cases for mental disorders increased by 1.7%, 2%, and 2.1%, respectively. Conclusion The study results showed a correlation between hospital admission for mental disorders and season. PMID:27566716

  14. Self-harm induced somatic admission after discharge from psychiatric hospital - a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, L; Kroken, R A; Lutro, O; Wentzel-Larsen, T; Kjelby, E; Oedegaard, K J; Jørgensen, H A; Mehlum, L

    2014-05-01

    Few studies have examined rate and predictors of self-harm in discharged psychiatric patients. To investigate the rate, coding, timing, predictors and characteristics of self-harm induced somatic admission after discharge from psychiatric acute admission. Cohort study of 2827 unselected patients consecutively admitted to a psychiatric acute ward during three years. Mean observation period was 2.3 years. Combined register linkage and manual data examination. Cox regression was used to investigate covariates for time to somatic admission due to self-harm, with covariates changing during follow-up entered time dependently. During the observation period, 10.5% of the patients had 792 somatic self-harm admissions. Strongest risk factors were psychiatric admission due to non-suicidal self-harm, suicide attempt and suicide ideation. The risk was increased throughout the first year of follow-up, during readmission, with increasing outpatient consultations and in patients diagnosed with recurrent depression, personality disorders, substance use disorders and anxiety/stress-related disorders. Only 49% of the somatic self-harm admissions were given hospital self-harm diagnosis. Self-harm induced somatic admissions were highly prevalent during the first year after discharge from acute psychiatric admission. Underdiagnosing of self-harm in relation to somatic self-harm admissions may cause incorrect follow-up treatments and unreliable register data. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Determinants of compulsory admissions in a state psychiatric hospital-Case control study.

    PubMed

    Indu, Nair V; Vidhukumar, K; Sarma, P S

    2016-12-09

    Compulsory admissions are against the patient's will and are presumably due to diverse reasons. There has been a rise in compulsory admissions world over. The objective of the study was to determine the risk factors for compulsory admissions in a state psychiatric hospital. A case control study was conducted at the state psychiatric hospital, Trivandrum, Kerala. Cases were involuntary non-legal admissions while controls were voluntary admissions. Putative risk factors studied included social support, severity of psychopathology etc., in addition to the socio-demographic variables. Risk factors for compulsory admissions were higher age, 30-49 years, OR=1.98, 95% CI [1.03-3.81]; >50years, OR=2.2, 95% CI [1.03-4.72], being from an urban locale,OR=1.99, 95% CI [1.13-3.52], living in joint & extended families OR=2.12, 95% CI [1.3-3.4], homelessness OR=2.24, 95% CI [1.32-3.79] and poor social support, OR=4.45 [2.53-7.81]. The type of illness, its duration, diagnosis, or symptom severity were not significantly related to compulsory admissions, but past compulsory admissions OR=5.36, 95% CI [2.09-13.75], poor functioning OR=2.54, 95% CI [1.31-4.91] and poor compliance to medication OR=1.78, 95% CI [1.05-3.01] were associated with compulsory admission. Poor social support, past involuntary admissions and poor functional status retained their association after multivariate analysis. By addressing the modifiable factors like poor social support, poor functional status, and poor compliance to medication, compulsory admissions could be prevented. Since it is found that compulsory admissions are likely to repeat, such patients form a high risk group requiring specific interventions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables--namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature--influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  17. Daily weather variables and affective disorder admissions to psychiatric hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, Stephen; Kinsella, Anthony; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have reported that admission rates in patients with affective disorders are subject to seasonal variation. Notwithstanding, there has been limited evaluation of the degree to which changeable daily meteorological patterns influence affective disorder admission rates. A handful of small studies have alluded to a potential link between psychiatric admission rates and meteorological variables such as environmental temperature (heat waves in particular), wind direction and sunshine. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test, ARIMA and time-series regression analyses to examine whether daily meteorological variables—namely wind speed and direction, barometric pressure, rainfall, hours of sunshine, sunlight radiation and temperature—influence admission rates for mania and depression across 12 regions in Ireland over a 31-year period. Although we found some very weak but interesting trends for barometric pressure in relation to mania admissions, daily meteorological patterns did not appear to affect hospital admissions overall for mania or depression. Our results do not support the small number of papers to date that suggest a link between daily meteorological variables and affective disorder admissions. Further study is needed.

  18. Does mad honey poisoning require hospital admission?

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Abdulkadir; Meriçé, Emine Sayin; Baydin, Ahmet; Topbaş, Murat; Uzun, Hüküm; Türedi, Süleyman; Kalkan, Asim

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe current patterns of monitoring and treatment of mad honey intoxication to make recommendations for a more standardized approach to care of patients with mad honey poisoning. Patients presenting to emergency departments because of honey poisoning between January and October 2007. Age, length of stay in the emergency department, pulse rate, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure are cited as mean +/- SD. Forty-seven cases presenting to the 3 health institutions during 2007 were investigated. It was determined that patients had ingested "mad" honey between 0.5 and 9 hours (mean +/- SD, 2.8 +/- 1.8 hours) before presentation. Patients' pulse rates were 30 to 77/min (mean +/- SD, 46.6 +/- 12.1/min), and systolic blood pressure ranged from 50 to 140 mm Hg (mean +/- SD, 46.6 +/- 12.1 mm Hg). Patient rhythms on arrival were determined as 37 (7.7%) sinus bradycardia, 6 (12.8%) nodal rhythm, 3 (6.4%) normal sinus rhythm, and 1 (2.1%) complete atrioventricular block. Lengths of stay in hospital were 3.6 +/- 2.2 hours in the first university hospital, 22.2 +/- 3.8 hours in the second university hospital, and 3.4 +/- 1.7 hours in the state hospital. A 0.5 to 2 mg of atropine was given to all patients. Our study did not reveal any difference in complications or mortality between patients cared for with brief emergency department observation when compared with patients cared for with 1 day inpatient observation.

  19. A Study of Hospital Admission Rules During Pediatric Residency Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Jane; Alpert, Joel J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of U.S. pediatric training programs to determine the role of rules in the hospital admission of pediatric patients is reported. The results support the hypothesis that rules are a widely used teaching tool. The rules relate to such factors as fevers, age, specific diseases, administrative concerns, head traumas, and poisonings. (JMD)

  20. [Nutrition status on pediatric admissions in Spanish hospitals; DHOSPE study].

    PubMed

    Moreno Villares, José Manuel; Varea Calderón, Vicente; Bousoño García, Carlos; Lama Moré, Rosa; Redecillas Ferreiro, Susana; Peña Quintana, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Malnutrition among hospitalized patients has clinical implications and is associated with adverse outcomes: depression of the immune system, impaired wound healing, muscle wasting, longer length of stay, higher costs and increased mortality. Although the rate of malnutrition in hospitalized children varies in different studies, it seems to be lower than in adult population. Nevertheless, this is a population that has a higher risk of developing malnutrition during hospital stay. There is a need to find the most suitable nutrition screening tool for pediatric patients. As a first step, we have performed a nationwide study on the prevalence of malnutrition on admission, in order to further evaluate the results of employing a screening tool (STAMP). The study is a multicenter, transversal study performed in 32 Spanish hospital between June and September 2011 in patients under 17 admitted to a the hospital longer than 48 hours. Weight, height and STAMP questionnaire were done on admission and repeated at day 7, 14 or at discharge. Nutritional status was classified according to Waterlow index for height and for weight. The study was approved by the Ethics Research Committee in each hospital and informed consent obtained prior to be included in the study. 991 patients were finally included. Mean age was 5.0 years (SD: 4.6), distributed uniformly among ages. Moderate to severe malnutrition was present in 7.8%, and overweight-obesity in 37.9%. We found a significant correlation between nutritional status and type of disease. There were no correlationship with age, or with plasmatic albumin levels. comments: This is the first nationwide study on the prevalence of malnutrition on admission in pediatric patients. Malnutrition in pediatric patients was present in around 8% of admissions, slightly inferior to other series. The most likely explanation is that the study included patients from different types of hospitals, mimicking real life conditions. Copyright © AULA MEDICA

  1. Cause-Specific Hospital Admissions on Hot Days in Sydney, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Vaneckova, Pavla; Bambrick, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    Background While morbidity outcomes for major disease categories during extreme heat have received increasing research attention, there has been very limited investigation at the level of specific disease subcategories. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular (CVD), respiratory (RD), genitourinary (GU) and mental diseases (MD), diabetes (DIA), dehydration (DEH) and ‘the effects of heat and light’ (HEAT) in Sydney between 1991 and 2009. We further investigated the sensitivity to heat of subcategories within the major disease groups. We defined hot days as those with temperatures in the 95th and 99th percentiles within the study period. We applied time-stratified case-crossover analysis to compare the hospital admissions on hot days with those on non-hot days matched by day of the week. We calculated the odds ratios (OR) of admissions between the two types of days, accounting for other environmental variables (relative humidity, ozone and particulate matter) and non-environmental trends (public and school holidays). On hot days, hospital admissions increased for all major categories except GU. This increase was not shared homogeneously across all diseases within a major category: within RD, only ‘other diseases of the respiratory system’ (includes pleurisy or empyema) increased significantly, while admissions for asthma decreased. Within MD, hospital admissions increased only for psychoses. Admissions due to some major categories increased one to three days after a hot day (e.g., DIA, RD and CVD) and on two and three consecutive days (e.g., HEAT and RD). Conclusions/Significance High ambient temperatures were associated with increased hospital admissions for several disease categories, with some within-category variation. Future analyses should focus on subgroups within broad disease categories to pinpoint medical conditions most affected by ambient heat. PMID:23408986

  2. Cause-specific hospital admissions on hot days in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Vaneckova, Pavla; Bambrick, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    While morbidity outcomes for major disease categories during extreme heat have received increasing research attention, there has been very limited investigation at the level of specific disease subcategories. We analyzed daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular (CVD), respiratory (RD), genitourinary (GU) and mental diseases (MD), diabetes (DIA), dehydration (DEH) and 'the effects of heat and light' (HEAT) in Sydney between 1991 and 2009. We further investigated the sensitivity to heat of subcategories within the major disease groups. We defined hot days as those with temperatures in the 95(th) and 99(th) percentiles within the study period. We applied time-stratified case-crossover analysis to compare the hospital admissions on hot days with those on non-hot days matched by day of the week. We calculated the odds ratios (OR) of admissions between the two types of days, accounting for other environmental variables (relative humidity, ozone and particulate matter) and non-environmental trends (public and school holidays). On hot days, hospital admissions increased for all major categories except GU. This increase was not shared homogeneously across all diseases within a major category: within RD, only 'other diseases of the respiratory system' (includes pleurisy or empyema) increased significantly, while admissions for asthma decreased. Within MD, hospital admissions increased only for psychoses. Admissions due to some major categories increased one to three days after a hot day (e.g., DIA, RD and CVD) and on two and three consecutive days (e.g., HEAT and RD). High ambient temperatures were associated with increased hospital admissions for several disease categories, with some within-category variation. Future analyses should focus on subgroups within broad disease categories to pinpoint medical conditions most affected by ambient heat.

  3. Heatwaves and Hospital Admissions for Mental Disorders in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Phan Minh; Rocklöv, Joacim; Giang, Kim Bao; Kullgren, Gunnar; Nilsson, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Studies in high-income countries have shown an association between heatwaves and hospital admissions for mental disorders. It is unknown whether such associations exist in subtropical nations like Vietnam. The study aim was to investigate whether hospital admissions for mental disorders may be triggered, or exacerbated, by heat exposure and heatwaves, in a low- and middle-income country, Vietnam. For this, we used data from the Hanoi Mental Hospital over five years (2008–2012) to estimate the effect of heatwaves on admissions for mental disorders. A zero-inflated negative binomial regression model accounting for seasonality, time trend, days of week, and mean humidity was used to analyse the relationship. Heatwave events were mainly studied as periods of three or seven consecutive days above the threshold of 35°C daily maximum temperature (90th percentile). The study result showed heatwaves increased the risk for admission in the whole group of mental disorders (F00-79) for more persistent heatwaves of at least 3 days when compared with non-heatwave periods. The relative risks were estimated at 1.04 (0.95–1.13), 1.15 (1.005–1.31), and 1.36 (1–1.90) for a one-, three- and seven-day heatwave, respectively. Admissions for mental disorders increased among men, residents in rural communities, and the elderly population during heatwaves. The groups of organic mental disorders, including symptomatic illnesses (F0-9) and mental retardation (F70-79), had increased admissions during heatwaves. The findings are novel in their focus on heatwave impact on mental diseases in a population habituating in a subtropical low- and middle-income country characterized by rapid epidemiological transitions and environmental changes. PMID:27195473

  4. Steering Patients to Safer Hospitals? The Effect of a Tiered Hospital Network on Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety “leaps.” The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Study Design Changes in hospital admissions’ patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Principal Findings Patients affiliated with the engineers’ union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists’ union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Conclusions Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear. PMID:18761676

  5. Respiratory hospital admission risk near large composting facilities.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Philippa; Bakolis, Ioannis; Fecht, Daniela; Pearson, Clare; Leal Sanchez, Maria; Kinnersley, Rob; de Hoogh, Kees; Hansell, Anna L

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale composting can release bioaerosols in elevated quantities, but there are few studies of health effects on nearby communities. A cross-sectional ecological small area design was used to examine risk of respiratory hospital admissions within 2500m of all 148 English large-scale composting facilities in 2008-10. Statistical analyses used a random intercept Poisson regression model at Census Output Area (COA) level (mean population 310). Models were adjusted for age, sex, deprivation and tobacco sales. Analysing 34,963 respiratory hospital admissions in 4656 COAs within 250-2500m of a site, there were no significant trends using pre-defined distance bands of >250-750m, >750-1500m and >1500-2500m. Using a continuous measure of distance, there was a small non-statistically significant (p=0.054) association with total respiratory admissions corresponding to a 1.5% (95% CI: 0.0-2.9%) decrease in risk if moving from 251m to 501m. There were no significant associations for subgroups of respiratory infections, asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This national study does not provide evidence for increased risks of respiratory hospital admissions in those living beyond 250m of an outdoor composting area perimeter. Further work using better measures of exposure and exploring associations with symptoms and disease prevalence, especially in vulnerable groups, is recommended to support regulatory approaches. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between atmospheric pollutants and hospital admissions in Lisbon.

    PubMed

    Cruz, A M J; Sarmento, S; Almeida, S M; Silva, A V; Alves, C; Freitas, M C; Wolterbeek, H

    2015-04-01

    Ambient air pollution is recognised as one of the potential environmental risk factors causing health hazards to the exposed population, demonstrated in numerous previous studies. Several longitudinal, ecological and epidemiological studies have shown associations between outdoor levels of outdoor atmospheric pollutants and adverse health effects, especially associated with respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions. The aim of this work is to assess the influence of atmospheric pollutants over the hospital admissions in Lisbon, by Ordinary Least Squares Linear Regression. The pollutants (CO, NO, NO2, SO2, O3, PM10 and PM2.5) were obtained from 13 monitoring stations of the Portuguese Environmental Agency, which provide hourly observations. Hospital admission data were collected from the Central Administration of the Health System and were compiled by age: <15, 15-64, >64 years old. The study period was 2006-2008. Results showed significant positive associations between the following: (1) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and circulatory diseases for ages between 15 and 64 years (0.5% hospital admissions (HA) increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO increase) and above 64 years (1.0% stroke admission increase with 10 μg m(-3) NO2 increase); (2) the pollutants CO, NO, NO2, SO2, PM10 and PM2.5 and respiratory diseases for ages below 15 years (up to 1.9% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) pollutant increase); and (3) the pollutants NO, NO2 and SO2 and respiratory diseases for ages above 64 years (1.3% HA increase with 10 μg m(-3) CO increase).

  7. Hospital admission avoidance through the introduction of a virtual ward.

    PubMed

    Jones, Joanne; Carroll, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    The ageing British population is placing increased demands on the delivery of care in mainstream health-care institutions. While people are living longer, a significant percentage is also living with one or more long-term conditions. These issues, alongside continuing financial austerity measures, require a radical improvement in the care of patients away from hospitals. The Wyre Forest Clinical Commissioning Group introduced a virtual ward model for two main purposes: to save on spiralling costs of hospital admissions, and, secondly, to ensure the preferred wishes of most patients to be cared for and even die at home were achieved. This commentary describes how the virtual ward model was implemented and the impact of preventing unplanned emergency admissions to hospitals. The setting up of enhanced care services and virtual wards in one county is discussed, aiming to highlight success points and potential pitfalls to avoid. The results from the implementation of the virtual ward model show a significant reduction in emergency and avoidable patient admissions to hospital. The success of virtual wards is dependent on integrated working between different health-care disciplines.

  8. Paediatric admissions to the British military hospital at Camp Bastion, Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    Arul, GS; Reynolds, J; DiRusso, S; Scott, A; Bree, S; Templeton, P; Midwinter, MJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION International humanitarian law requires emergency medical support for both military personnel and civilians, including children. Here we present a detailed review of paediatric admissions with the pattern of injury and the resources they consume. METHODS All paediatric admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion between 1 January and 29 April 2011 were analysed prospectively. Data collected included time and date of admission, patient age and weight, mechanism of injury, extent of wounding, treatment, length of hospital stay and discharge destination. RESULTS Eighty-five children (65 boys and 17 girls, median age: 8 years, median weight: 20kg) were admitted. In 63% of cases the indication for admission was battle related trauma and in 31% non-battle trauma. Of the blast injuries, 51% were due to improvised explosive devices. Non-battle emergencies were mainly due to domestic burns (46%) and road traffic accidents (29%). The most affected anatomical area was the extremities (44% of injuries). Over 30% of patients had critical injuries. Operative intervention was required in 74% of cases. The median time to theatre for all patients was 52 minutes; 3 patients with critical injuries went straight to theatre in a median of 7 minutes. A blood transfusion was required in 27 patients; 6 patients needed a massive transfusion. Computed tomography was performed on 62% of all trauma admissions and 40% of patients went to the intensive care unit. The mean length of stay was 2 days (range: 1–26 days) and there were 7 deaths. CONCLUSIONS Paediatric admissions make up a small but significant part of admissions to the hospital at Camp Bastion. The proportion of serious injuries is very high in comparison with admissions to a UK paediatric emergency department. The concentration of major injuries means that lessons learnt in terms of teamwork, the speed of transfer to theatre and massive transfusion protocols could be applied to UK paediatric practice. PMID:22524930

  9. Adverse drug reactions leading to urgent hospital admission in an elderly population: prevalence and main features.

    PubMed

    Pedrós, Consuelo; Formiga, Francesc; Corbella, Xavier; Arnau, Josep Maria

    2016-02-01

    To assess the prevalence of urgent hospitalization due to adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in patients aged ≥ 65 years, to compare the in-hospital mortality rates between patients admitted for ADRs and those admitted for other causes, and to describe the ADRs, the used and suspected drugs, and the drug-reaction associations. A cross-sectional study was conducted by using the institutional database of the Pharmacovigilance Programme of Bellvitge University Hospital, a 750-bed tertiary care hospital, with information corresponding to a 7-year period. ADR-related admissions of patients aged ≥ 65 years prospectively identified through a systematic daily review of all admission diagnosis were reviewed. ADRs were suspected to be the main reason for urgent admission in 1976 out of 60,263 patients aged ≥ 65 years (prevalence of ADR-related hospitalization 3.3 % [95 % CI 3.1-3.4 %]). The crude in-hospital mortality rate was 10.2 % in patients with ADR-related admission and 9 % in patients admitted for other causes (p = 0.077). Most patients (86 %) were exposed to polypharmacy, and a drug-drug interaction was suspected in 49 % of cases. The most frequent drug-reaction associations were acute renal failure related to renin-angiotensin system inhibitors, gastrointestinal bleeding caused by antithrombotics and/or non-steroidal anti-inflammatories, and intracranial bleeding induced by vitamin K antagonists. One out of every 30 urgent admissions of patients aged ≥ 65 years is ADR-related. These ADRs can be as serious and life-threatening as any other acute pathology that merits urgent hospital admission. Most cases involve patients exposed to polypharmacy and result from well-known reactions of a few commonly used drugs.

  10. Primary immunodeficiencies in Chile evaluated through ICD-10 coded hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Poli, C; Hoyos-Bachiloglu, R; Borzutzky, A

    The epidemiology and hospitalisation trends of primary immunodeficiency (PID) in Chile are unknown. We aimed to evaluate hospitalisation trends and demographic characteristics of PID admissions in Chile. PID admissions between 2001 and 2010 (ICD-10 codes D70.0, D70.4, D71, 72.0, D76.1, D80-D84, E70.3, G11.3) were reviewed using national hospital discharge databases. During the study period, 5486 admissions due to PID were registered (0.03% of total). 58.5% of patients were male and 66.3% were under 18 years. Median length of stay was one day (range 1-403 days). The most frequent diagnoses were hypogammaglobulinaemia (27.6%), unspecified immunodeficiency (21.9%), haemophagocytic lymphohystiocytosis (18.3%) and common variable immunodeficiency (11.2%). There was a significant increase in PID admission rate and in one-day hospitalisations during this period (β=0.2; P=0.001 and β=33; P≤0.001, respectively), however no significant variation was found for longer admissions (β=4.8; P=0.175). The increasing trend in PID admission rate was significant in patients with private, but not public insurance (β=0.53; P≤0.001 vs. β=0.08; P=0.079, respectively). We report an increasing trend in admissions due to PID in Chile over a 10-year period. Increase is mainly due to short hospitalisations, possibly accounting for improvements in IVIG access. Higher admission rates in patients with private vs. public insurance suggest socioeconomic disparities in access to PID treatment. ICD-10 coded hospitalisation databases may be useful to determine hospitalisation trends and demographic characteristics of PID admissions worldwide. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Outpatient admissions and hospital costs of Syrian refugees in a Turkish university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tahirbegolli, Bernard; Çavdar, Sabanur; Sümer, Esin Çetinkaya; Akdeniz, Sıdıka I.; Vehid, Suphi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the most frequent admitted polyclinics, diagnoses, and the costs of Syrian refugee patient in a Turkish university hospital in the metropolitan city of Istanbul, Western part of Turkey. Methods: Research methodology consist of analyzing outpatient admissions to the Hospital Polyclinics of Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Cerrahpasa, Istanbul, Turkey from January-June 2014. We carried out diagnosis groups as classified in the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, Australian Modification, and analyzed the hospital cost of first admission through records based in the hospital information system. Results: Median age of 251 Syrian refugee patients is 19 years, inter quartile rate 7-34 years. Patients aged 65 and older compared with those until 18 years and 19 to 64 years aged groups have made statistically significant (p<0.001) less hospital admissions. The Most frequented clinic was the emergency clinic. On June there have been significantly (p<0.001) more admissions compared with other months. The most common diagnoses were diseases of the respiratory system. The costs of per admission was estimated nearly 48 US Dollar/per patient and the total amount of hospital admissions was 12,031.93 US Dollar. Conclusion: On the specified dates, the clinics were mostly frequented from Syrian refugees until 18 years group. The most common presenting symptoms are respiratory diseases and most frequented clinic is emergency. PMID:27381545

  12. Influence of homelessness on acute admissions to hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Lissauer, T; Richman, S; Tempia, M; Jenkins, S; Taylor, B

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the influence of homelessness on acute medical admissions. A prospective case-controlled study was therefore performed on all homeless children admitted through the accident and emergency department over one year, comparing them with the next age matched admission from permanent housing. Assessments made were: whether homelessness or other social factors influenced the doctors' decision to admit; differences in severity of illness; length of stay; and use of primary care. The admitting doctors completed a semi-structured questionnaire during admission about social factors that influenced their decision to admit and graded the severity of the child's illness. The length of hospital stay was recorded. The family's social risk factors and accommodation were assessed at a home visit using a standardised questionnaire and by observation. Seventy homeless children were admitted. Social factors influenced the decision to admit in 77% of homeless children and 43% of controls. More of the homeless children were only mildly ill (33/70) than those from permanent housing (21/70), although three of the homeless children died of overwhelming infections compared with none of the controls. Among homeless families many were recent immigrants (44%). There was a marked increase in socioeconomic deprivation, in major life events in the previous year (median score 3 v 1), and in maternal depression (27% v 8%). Referral to the hospital was made by a general practitioner in only 5/50 (10%) of homeless compared with 18/50 (36%) of controls. Social factors were an important influence on the decision to admit in over three quarters of the homeless children and resulted in admission when less severely ill even when compared with admissions from an inner city population. Even though there was marked social deprivation among the homeless families, the decision to admit was based on vague criteria that need to be further refined. PMID:8259871

  13. Heat-related respiratory hospital admissions in Europe in a changing climate: a health impact assessment

    PubMed Central

    Åström, Christofer; Orru, Hans; Rocklöv, Joacim; Strandberg, Gustav; Ebi, Kristie L; Forsberg, Bertil

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Respiratory diseases are ranked second in Europe in terms of mortality, prevalence and costs. Studies have shown that extreme heat has a large impact on mortality and morbidity, with a large relative increase for respiratory diseases. Expected increases in mean temperature and the number of extreme heat events over the coming decades due to climate change raise questions about the possible health impacts. We assess the number of heat-related respiratory hospital admissions in a future with a different climate. Design A Europe-wide health impact assessment. Setting An assessment for each of the EU27 countries. Methods Heat-related hospital admissions under a changing climate are projected using multicity epidemiological exposure–response relationships applied to gridded population data and country-specific baseline respiratory hospital admission rates. Times-series of temperatures are simulated with a regional climate model based on four global climate models, under two greenhouse gas emission scenarios. Results Between a reference period (1981–2010) and a future period (2021–2050), the total number of respiratory hospital admissions attributed to heat is projected to be larger in southern Europe, with three times more heat attributed respiratory hospital admissions in the future period. The smallest change was estimated in Eastern Europe with about a twofold increase. For all of Europe, the number of heat-related respiratory hospital admissions is projected to be 26 000 annually in the future period compared with 11 000 in the reference period. Conclusions The results suggest that the projected effects of climate change on temperature and the number of extreme heat events could substantially influence respiratory morbidity across Europe. PMID:23355662

  14. Dust storms and the risk of asthma admissions to hospitals in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Thalib, Lukman; Al-Taiar, Abdullah

    2012-09-01

    Arid areas in the Arabian Peninsula are one of the largest sources of global dust, yet there is no data on the impact of this on human health. This study aimed to investigate the impact of dust storms on hospital admissions due to asthma and all respiratory diseases over a period of 5 years in Kuwait. A population-based retrospective time series study of daily emergency asthma admissions and admissions due to respiratory causes in public hospitals in Kuwait was analyzed in relation to dust storm events. Dust storm days were defined as the mean daily PM(10)>200 μg/m(3) based on measurements obtained from all six monitoring sites in the country. During the five-year study period, 569 (33.6%) days had dust storm events and they were significantly associated with an increased risk of same-day asthma and respiratory admission, adjusted relative risk of 1.07 (95% CI: 1.02-1.12) and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.04-1.08), respectively. This was particularly evident among children. Dust storms have a significant impact on respiratory and asthma admissions. Evidence is more convincing and robust compared to that from other geographical settings which highlights the importance of public health measures to protect people's health during dust storms and reduce the burden on health services due to dust events. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. [A descriptive study of the procedures of psychiatric admissions at Razi hospital].

    PubMed

    Rafrafi, Rym; Bergaoui, Haifa; Bram, Nesrine; Bahrini, Lilia; Robbana, Leila; Melki, Wahid; El Hechmi, Zouheir

    2013-10-01

    The law 92-83, has established the rights of the mentally ill to respect for individual freedom and to appropriate care. However some gaps in its implementation led to the revision by Act 2004-40. To study the evolution of the number of admissions with and without consent (hospitalizations at the request of a third party and compulsory hospitalizations), between 2000 and 2009. Retrospective study of the archives of the mental health unit of Razi hospital. The study population included inpatients under the mode of voluntary and involuntary admission either compulsory hospitalizations or at the request of a third party. An increase in the number of hospitalizations without the consent from 2000 to 2009 was noted. The number of compulsory hospitalizations and the one of hospitalizations at the request of a third party rose respectively from 1,048 to 1,443 and from 22 to 1,323. So the number of free hospitalizations has decreased while the number of involuntary hospitalizations has increased, leading to a constant number of total hospitalizations. The sex ratio for compulsory hospitalizations has increased from 2.04 to 5.83 while it markedly decreased for hospitalizations at the request of a third party (from 10 to 1.7).Men, unlike women, were more likely to be hospitalized compulsorily than at the request of a third party. There is a larger use of hospital admissions under constraints than free ones; is it due to a concern for the respect of law or an abuse in the deprivation of freedom for some patients?

  16. Florida initiative aims to slash unnecessary admissions due to 'catch-all' dehydration diagnosis.

    PubMed

    2001-05-01

    When the peer review organization in Florida sounded an alarm about unnecessary medical admissions with the diagnosis of dehydration, a Tampa hospital decided to make the issue a priority. Although St. Joseph's Hospital was performing better than average, it still found ways to reduce the number of inappropriate admissions and improve related outcome measures.

  17. Impact of urban atmospheric environment on hospital admissions in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Silva, Edelci Nunes da; Ribeiro, Helena

    2012-08-01

    To analyze the impact of intra-urban atmospheric conditions on circulatory and respiratory diseases in elder adults. Cross-sectional study based on data from 33,212 hospital admissions in adults over 60 years in the city of São Paulo, southeastern Brazil, from 2003 to 2007. The association between atmospheric variables from Congonhas airport and bioclimatic index, Physiological Equivalent Temperature, was analyzed according to the district's socioenvironmental profile. Descriptive statistical analysis and regression models were used. There was an increase in hospital admissions due to circulatory diseases as average and lowest temperatures decreased. The likelihood of being admitted to the hospital increased by 12% with 1ºC decrease in the bioclimatic index and with 1ºC increase in the highest temperatures in the group with lower socioenvironmental conditions. The risk of admission due to respiratory diseases increased with inadequate air quality in districts with higher socioenvironmental conditions. The associations between morbidity and climate variables and the comfort index varied in different groups and diseases. Lower and higher temperatures increased the risk of hospital admission in the elderly. Districts with lower socioenvironmental conditions showed greater adverse health impacts.

  18. The cost of lower respiratory tract infections hospital admissions in the Canadian Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Robinson, Joan; Young, Michael; Ng, Kaspar; Mamdani, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Background Inuit infants who reside in the Nunavut (NU) regions of Arctic Canada have extremely high rates of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) associated with significant health expenditures, but the costs in other regions of Arctic Canada have not been documented. Objective This prospective surveillance compares, across most of Arctic Canada, the rates and costs associated with LRTI admissions in infants less than 1 year of age, and the days of hospitalization and costs adjusted per live birth. Design This was a hospital-based surveillance of LRTI admissions of infants less than 1 year of age, residing in Northwest Territories (NT), the 3 regions of Nunavut (NU); [Kitikmeot (KT), Kivalliq (KQ) and Qikiqtani (QI)] and Nunavik (NK) from 1 January 2009 to 30 June 2010. Costs were obtained from the territorial or regional governments and hospitals, and included transportation, hospital stay, physician fees and accommodation costs. The rates of LRTI hospitalizations, days of hospitalization and associated costs were calculated per live birth in each of the 5 regions. Results There were 513 LRTI admissions during the study period. For NT, KT, KQ, QI and NK, the rates of LRTI hospitalization per 1000 live births were 38, 389, 230, 202 and 445, respectively. The total days of LRTI admission per live birth were 0.25, 3.3, 2.6, 1.7 and 3 for the above regions. The average cost per live birth for LRTI admission for these regions was $1,412, $22,375, $14,608, $8,254 and $10,333. The total cost for LRTI was $1,498,232 in NT, $15,662,968 in NU and $3,874,881 in NK. Medical transportation contributed to a significant proportion of the costs. Conclusion LRTI admission rates in NU and Nunavik are much higher than that in NT and remain among the highest rates globally. The costs of these admissions are exceptionally high due to the combination of very high rates of admission, very expensive medical evacuations and prolonged hospitalizations. Decreasing the rates of LRTI

  19. Hospital admissions for neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants occupationally exposed to mercury.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Hanehøj, Kirsten; Kjuus, Helge; Juel, Knud

    2011-12-01

    For many years an amalgam containing metallic mercury, which has been associated with neurological and renal diseases, has been used in dentistry. In this nationwide study we compared hospital admissions due to neurological and renal diseases among dentists and dental assistants to admissions in controls. This register-based cohort study included all Danish workers employed in dental clinics, general practitioners' clinics or lawyers' offices between 1964 and 2006. We compared dentists with general practitioners and lawyers, and dental assistants with medical secretaries, nurses and legal secretaries. We also compared dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with high occupational mercury exposure with dentists and dental assistants employed during periods with less mercury exposure. We followed all subjects in a nationwide register of hospital admissions. We analysed risk of neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease and renal diseases using a Cox regression model. The cohort consisted of 122,481 workers including 5371 dentists and 33,858 dental assistants. For neurological diseases, no association was observed for dental assistants, while for dentists an increasing risk for periods with less mercury exposure was observed. Among dental assistants, a negative association between employment length and risk of neurological disease was observed. Admissions for renal disease among dental assistants were increased during periods with less mercury exposure compared with controls. For dentists a non-significant increased risk was observed between employment length and renal disease risk. Our nationwide study does not indicate that occupational exposure to mercury increases the risk of hospital admissions for neurological, Parkinson's or renal diseases.

  20. Drug related hospital admissions in subspecialities of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Hallas, J

    1996-04-01

    It is well established in the literature that adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug non-compliance contribute substantially to the admissions at medical wards. Some important questions, however, remain unanswered. The purpose of this thesis was to characterise the drug-related hospital admissions (DRH) and to assess the magnitude of the problem seen in relation to the demographic parameters and drug use of the background population. In addition, an attempt was made to reduce the DRH incidence by an intervention program. The scope of the study program was adverse drug reactions, intended self-poisoning, non-compliance, underdosing and interactions. The material included 1999 admissions to six departments of internal medicine at Odense University Hospital. The patients were reviewed prospectively, while they were still in the wards, but use of standardised criteria fOR assessment of drug-ADR causality. With inclusion of a definite, probable and possible causal relationship, ADRs and toxic reactions were found as an important factor in 8.4% of all admissions. The incidense of ADR related admissions was 400 per 100,000 per year for the background population as a whole, but showing a strong increase with age. The drug-specific ADR incidences were generally small compared to the drug sales figures. Non-compliance contributed to 2.0% of admissions with diuretics and anti-asthmatics as the drugs most frequently involved. Two departments were re-investigated after an intervention program, primarily targetting general practitioners. The over-all incidence of DRHs was unaffected by the intervention, but the subset classified as avoidable DRHs showed a significant decline. The case material was subject to a blinded evaluation by an external peer group using the same criteria as the investigators. There was no indication that the observed decline in avoidable DRHs should be explained by a shift in the investigators' assessment of cases. It was concluded that the intervention

  1. [Asthma and air pollution. A study of admissions to the Hospital of Saint-Nazaire].

    PubMed

    Chailleux, E; Guyon, C; Taddeï, F; Bouillard, J; Pioche, D

    1990-01-01

    To test the possible influence of atmospheric pollution on the frequency of asthmatic exacerbations we have looked to see whether there is a link between the number of daily admissions for asthma in hospitals in Saint-Nazaire and data from pollution sensors in the network of the Association for the Measurement of Atmospheric Pollution in the Loire estuary. The pollutions studied were sulphur dioxide, oxide of nitrogen (NOx) and non sedimenting dust (black smoke). The meteorological data (speed and direction of the wind and temperature) were also recorded. The study was carried out for 18 months in a retrospective fashion. During this period 372 hospital admissions were recorded in 229 subjects. The number of daily admissions correlated in a significant fashion with the level of black smoke (r = 0.149, p less than 0.001) and this result was particularly due to subjects who were less than 15 years old. In this group the frequency of hospital admission was doubled on those days when the level of smoke was at its most elevated. There was a weak link between the peaks of SO2 (r = 0.116, p less than 0.05). An analysis of the place of residence in those hospitals and the dominant direction of the wind did not enable us to confirm the role of the principal sources of industrial pollution, which were all situated to the east of Saint-Nazaire.

  2. [Hospital admissions for varicella complications in children aged less than 15 years old].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Yarza, E-G; Arranz, L; Alustiza, J; Azkunaga, B; Uriz, J; Sarasua, A; Mendiburu, I; Emparanza, J I

    2003-09-01

    The complications of varicella are one of the arguments in favor of universal vaccination programs in children. To describe the complications of varicella requiring hospital admission in a well-defined population (Gipuzkoa, Spain) and to compare the incidence of hospitalization with that reported in other series. Observational, retrospective, multicenter study of admissions for varicella. The medical histories codified as varicella (minimum data set, CIE-0, codes 952.0-052.9) from 1 January 1993 to 31 December 2002 were reviewed. Calculation of hospitalization rates was based on emergency department visits and population data. The pediatric population of Gipuzkoa seeking medical attention at one of the four Basque Country Health Service hospitals in the area: Hondarribia, Mendaro, San Sebastian and Zumarraga. The mean coverage in Gipuzkoa is 54,999 children aged less than 15 years/year. All the children aged 0-15 years old admitted for more than 24 h with a discharge diagnosis of varicella complications. The variables studied are: age, gender, personal history, varicella immunization, immune status, fever, chest X-ray, complementary investigations, length of hospital stay, treatment, discharge diagnosis, clinical course, complications and sequelae at discharge. Seventy-one children were hospitalized. None had been vaccinated against the varicella-zoster virus. Eighty percent were aged less than 5 years and three were immunocompromised. Fifty-six percent had bacterial superinfection and invasive forms were found in seven patients. The mean length of admission was 6.5 days +/- 5.1. No deaths or sequelae were reported. The annual incidence rate of admissions longer than 24 hours due to varicella complications was 12.9 cases per 100,000 children aged less than 15 years, representing 0.31% of all annual admissions in this age group.

  3. A prospective study of adverse drug reactions as a cause of admission to a paediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    MARTÍNEZ-MIR, I.; GARCÍA-LÓPEZ, M.; PALOP, V.; FERRER, J. M.; ESTAÑ, L.; RUBIO, E.; MORALES-OLIVAS, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    1A total of 512 consecutive paediatric hospital admissions of children 2 years old or less were evaluated to assess the extent and pattern of admission caused by suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs). The proportion of suspected ADRs related to hospital admissions was 4.3%. 2The organ-systems most commonly implicated were the central nervous system (40.5%), digestive system (16.7%), and skin and appendages (14.3%). Together, they accounted for 71.5% of admissions attributed to ADRs. The most common clinical manifestations inducing admission were convulsions (4 cases), dizziness (4), vomiting (3), and tremor, fever, itching and apnoea (2 cases each). 3The four classes of drugs most frequently suspected in admissions due to ADRs were respiratory drugs (35%), anti-infective agents (25%), drugs active on the central nervous system (15%) and drugs used in dermatology (10%). The most common drugs related to ADRs were a combination of chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, phenylephrine, guaiphenesin and salicylic acid (4 cases), followed by fenoterol, adrenaline, paracetamol, DTP vaccine and antipolio vaccine (2 cases each). 4There were no significant differences between children older and younger than 1 year (odds ratio 0.89; 95% CI 0.37–2.17) or between the sexes as regards hospital admittance due to suspected ADRs (odds ratio 1.94; 95% CI 0.72–5.42). 5The results of this kind of study may be influenced by patterns of drug utilization. Nevertheless, the lack of specific studies of drug effects in young children makes it desirable to carry out pharmacoepidemiological studies in this age group. PMID:8877022

  4. Herpes Zoster Associated Hospital Admissions in Italy: Review of the Hospital Discharge Forms

    PubMed Central

    Gabutti, Giovanni; Serenelli, Carlotta; Cavallaro, Alessandra; Ragni, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    In Italy a specific surveillance system for zoster does not exist, and thus updated and complete epidemiological data are lacking. The objective of this study was to retrospectively review the national hospital discharge forms database for the period 1999–2005 using the code ICD9-CM053. In the period 1999–2005, 35,328 hospital admissions have been registered with annual means of 4,503 hospitalizations and 543 day-hospital admissions. The great part of hospitalizations (61.9%) involved subjects older than 65 years; the mean duration of stay was 8 days. These data, even if restricted to hospitalizations registered at national level, confirm the epidemiological impact of shingles and of its complications. PMID:19826547

  5. Contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Alfred; Harris, Russell H; Warden, Todd; Roth, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    Emergency department (ED) practices are traditionally profiled in terms of their patient encounters. Such evaluations reflect a preponderance of outpatient visits while crediting income from admitted patients to traditional hospital-based services. This study evaluates the contribution of ED admissions to inpatient hospital revenue. The study was set at an urban tertiary care community hospital with university affiliation. Information referable to ED patients was collected from the hospital's Universal Billing Code (UB-92)-based patient information warehouse. Data fields referable to hospital charges, insurance type, and disposition were used for analysis of a 1-year period from September 1, 1998 to August 31, 1999. Statistical analysis was through chi square and ANOVA. During the study period 33,174 patients were treated in the ED with 6,671 (20%) admitted to inpatient services. Total hospital charges for all ED patients during this time were $107 million dollars with $9.1 million (8.5%) generated from discharged patients and $98.0 million (91.5%) from admitted ED patients (P <.001). Mean charges for individual discharged patients were $344.10 whereas for individual admitted patients mean charges were $14,692.28. (P <.001) Medicaid and self pay represented 55.4% of the insurance coverage for discharged ED patients whereas these same insurance classes accounted for only 16.3% of admitted patients. (P <.001) Medicare visits accounted for 12.7% of discharged ED patients but 60.7% of admitted patients (P <.001). Total hospital gross revenue for inpatient services for the study period was $288 million of which 34% was contributed from admitted ED patients. ED services represent a major source of inpatient hospital revenue. The recognition of the ED's potential in this area may be lost if income from patients admitted through the ED is credited to traditional hospital-based services.

  6. Medical Residencies and Increased Admissions in Rural Hospitals with Fewer Than 200 Beds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connor, Robert A.

    2000-01-01

    A study of 1,792 rural hospitals with fewer than 200 beds found an increase of 100-200 admissions per resident--more for smaller hospitals and fewer for larger hospitals. Because increased admissions improve the financial health and continued operation of rural hospitals, this study confirms the importance of education-based strategies in ensuring…

  7. Non-resident orthopaedic admissions to Dunedin Hospital, New Zealand: 1997 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Gwynne Jones, David

    2005-06-24

    The purpose of this study is to audit the numbers of non-residents requiring orthopaedic admission to our hospital and determine the effect of increasing tourist numbers and changes in Accident ACC regulations on healthcare resources. Details of non-resident orthopaedic admissions for fiscal years 1997/8 to 2003/4 were analysed with respect to country of residence, mechanism of injury, case weights consumed, and actual costs. There has been no change in numbers of admissions or cost, averaging 32 cases (50 case weights [CWs]) per year. Most patients came from Asia (59 cases; 26%), then Australia (52 cases; 23%) and UK (40 cases; 18%). Snowsports accounted for 40% of admissions, Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) for 17%, and falls for 29%. Non-resident, non-MVA admissions have averaged 21 CWs per year since the changes in ACC regulations in 1999. Despite increasing tourist numbers, there has been no increase in numbers or CW of non-residents requiring orthopaedic admission. Although representing only a small proportion of the orthopaedic budget, they generate many hidden costs. The 50 CWs annually equates to approximately 13 major joint replacements per year. The increase in CWs consumed due to the ACC changes have had no corresponding increase in contracted orthopaedic volumes.

  8. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Population and methods Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. Results There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR = 1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p = 0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR= 0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p = 0.63). Conclusion In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. PMID:26388119

  9. Impact of tornadoes on hospital admissions for acute cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Silva-Palacios, Federico; Casanegra, Ana Isabel; Shapiro, Alan; Phan, Minh; Hawkins, Beau; Li, Ji; Stoner, Julie; Tafur, Alfonso

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of data describing cardiovascular events after tornado outbreaks. We proposed to study the effects of tornadoes on the incidence of cardiovascular events at a tertiary care institution. Hospital admission records from a single center situated in a tornado-prone area three months before and after a 2013 tornado outbreak were abstracted. To control for seasonal variation, we also abstracted data from the same period of the prior year (control). Hospital admissions for cardiovascular events (CVEs) including acute myocardial infarction, stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) were summated by zip codes, and compared by time period. There were 22,607 admissions analyzed, of which 6,705 (30%), 7,980 (35%), and 7,922 (35%) were during the pre-tornado, post-tornado, and control time frames, respectively. There were 344 CVE in the controls, 317 CVE in pre-tornado and 364 CVEs in post tornado periods. There was no difference in the prevalence of CVE during the post-tornado season compared with the control (PPR=1.05 95% CI: 0.91 to 1.21, p=0.50) or the pre-tornado season (PPR=0.96, 95% CI: 0.83 to 1.21, p=0.63). In conclusion, tornado outbreaks did not increase the prevalence of cardiovascular events. In contrast to the effect of hurricanes, implementation of a healthcare policy change directed toward the early treatment and prevention of cardiovascular events after tornadoes does not seem warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Hospital Admission for Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Eric M; Myers, Laura J; Vassar, Stefanie; Bravata, Dawn M

    2017-08-01

    To determine the impact of admission among transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients in the emergency department (ED). Retrospective cohort study using national Veterans Health Administration data (2008). We first analyzed whether admitted patients were discharged from the hospital with a diagnosis of TIA. We then analyzed whether admission was associated with a composite outcome (new stroke, new myocardial infarction, or death in the year after TIA) using multivariate logistic regression modeling with propensity score matching. Among 3623 patients assigned a diagnosis of TIA in the ED, 2118 (58%) were admitted to the hospital or placed in observation compared with 1505 (42%) who were discharged from the ED. Among the 2118 patients who were admitted, 903 (43% of admitted group) were discharged from the hospital with a diagnosis of TIA, and 548 (26% of admitted group) were discharged with a diagnosis of stroke. Admitted patients were more likely than nonadmitted patients to receive processes of care (i.e., brain imaging, carotid imaging, echocardiography). In matched analyses using propensity scores, the 1-year composite outcome in the admitted group (15.3%) was not lower than the discharged group (13.3%, OR 1.17 [.94-1.46], P = .17). Less than half of patients admitted with a diagnosis of TIA retained that diagnosis at hospital discharge. Although admitted patients were more likely to receive diagnostic procedures, we did not identify improvements in outcomes among admitted patients; however, evaluating care for patients with TIA is limited by the reliability of secondary data analysis. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk Factors for Inpatient Hospital Admission in Pediatric Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puckett, Yana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Our objective was to determine the risk factors for inpatient admission of pediatric burn patients. Materials & methods This cross-sectional study uses data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database (HCUP KID) for the years of 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012 to estimate the risk factors for inpatient admission for pediatric patients who sustained a burn injury. Patients who sustained a burn between the ages of 1 and 18 years were included. Results A total of 43,453 patients met inclusion criteria. Of those, 42.3% were Caucasian, 20.1% were African American, and 19.3% were Hispanic. Males comprised 63.5% of the studied population. The month of July was associated with a 31.8% increased chance (p=.011) of being admitted to hospital for a pediatric burn. It was found that patients being admitted had a 32.2% increased chance (p=.002) of a fluid and electrolyte abnormality and a 61.0% increased chance (p=.027) of drug abuse.  Conclusions Pediatric burn patients are more likely to be admitted to the hospital having a fluid and electrolyte abnormality, having a drug abuse status, and/or during the month of July. PMID:27335714

  12. Hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury of Austrian residents vs. of visitors to Austria.

    PubMed

    Mauritz, Walter; Brazinova, Alexandra; Majdan, Marek; Leitgeb, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The goal was to compare epidemiology of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Austrian residents vs. visitors to Austria. Data on all hospital admissions due to TBI (ICD-10 codes S06.0-S06.9; years 2009-2011) was provided by the Austrian Statistical Office. Data on Austrian population and on tourism (visitor numbers, nights spent) was retrieved from www.statistik.at . Age, sex, mechanism of injury, season and mortality was analysed for Austrian residents vs. visitors. Visitors contributed 3.9% to the total population and 9.2% of all TBI cases. Incidence of hospital admissions was 292/100,000/year in Austrian residents and was 727/100,000/year in visitors. Male:female ratio was 1.39:1 in Austrian residents and 1.55:1 in visitors. Austrian cases were older than visitors' cases (mean age 41 vs. 28 years). Austrian cases were distributed evenly over the seasons, while 75% of the visitors' cases happened during winter and spring. The most frequently observed causes of TBI in Austrian residents were private accidents, while sports caused almost half of the visitors' cases. Hospital mortality was lower in visitors than in Austrian residents (0.8 vs. 2.1%). Sports-related TBI of visitors causes a significant workload for Austrian hospitals. Better prevention is warranted.

  13. Impact of a national smoking ban on hospital admission for acute coronary syndromes: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Edmond M; Kearney, Patricia M; Kearney, Peter P; Sullivan, Patrick; Perry, Ivan J

    2012-04-01

    A ban on smoking in the workplace was introduced in Ireland on March 29, 2004. As exposure to secondhand smoke has been implicated in the development of coronary disease, this might impact the incidence of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The smoking ban was associated with a decreased rate of hospital admissions for ACS. We analyzed data collected in a registry of all patients admitted to hospital with ACS in the southwest of Ireland, catchment population 620 525, from March 2003 until March 2007. In the year following implementation of the ban, there was a significant 12% reduction in ACS admissions (177.9 vs 205.9/100,000; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 164.0-185.1, P = 0.002). This reduction was due to fewer events occurring among men (281.5 vs 233.5, P = 0.0011) and current smokers (408 vs 302 admissions, P < 0.0001). There was no change in the rate of admissions for ACS in the following year (174.3/100,000; 95% CI: 164.0-185.1, P > 0.1). However, a further 13% reduction was observed between March 2006 and March 2007 (149.2; 95% CI: 139.7-159.2). Variation in admissions with time as a continuous variable also demonstrated a reduction on implementation of the smoking ban. A national ban on smoking in public places was associated with an early significant decrease in hospital admissions for ACS, suggesting a rapid effect of banning smoking in public places on ACS. A further reduction of similar magnitude 2 years after implementation of the ban is consistent with a longer-term effect that should be further examined in long-term studies. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Hospital costs due to violence against children and adolescents in Pernambuco State, Brazil, during 1999].

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Roberto Natanael da Silva; Alves, João Guilherme Bezerra; Filho, José Eulálio Cabral

    2002-01-01

    This study focused on expenditures under the Brazilian National Unified Health System (SUS) due to hospitalization of children and adolescents as the result of violence in Pernambuco State in 1999. Data were collected from the Hospital Admittance Forms covering the State of Pernambuco. Some 9,220 hospital admissions due to external causes were identified, with a cost of R$3,659,558.62. Mean cost of hospitalization for children and adolescents in Pernambuco State in 1999 was R$306.49. Mean cost of hospitalization due to external causes was R$396.91. Traumatic lesions were the most common reason for hospital admission (84.7%). Violence against children and adolescents in Greater Metropolitan Recife accounted for 65.1% of hospital admissions and 77.9% of all hospital costs in Pernambuco State.

  15. Increase in avoidable hospital admissions after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Sasabuchi, Yusuke; Matsui, Hiroki; Yasunaga, Hideo; Fushimi, Kiyohide

    2017-03-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami and nuclear disaster on 11 March 2011 had a short-term influence on the increase in emergency department visits and hospital admissions due to various diseases. However, it remains unclear whether the earthquake and tsunami disaster affected the long-term health conditions of people in the affected areas. Using a national inpatient database in Japan, we investigated people's ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs), which are defined as conditions for which effective management and treatment should prevent admission to a hospital. We compared the number of admissions for ACSCs before-quake (July 2010 to February 2011) with after-quake (July 2012 to February 2013) periods in the disaster area compared with other areas using a difference-in-differences design. Linear regression models with the interaction between periods and areas were used to estimate the impact of the earthquake on admissions for ACSCs. No significant difference in difference was seen in preventable ACSCs (where immunisation and other interventions can prevent illness) or chronic ACSCs (where effective care can prevent flare-ups), while acute ACSCs (where early intervention can prevent more serious progression) increased significantly (3.3 admissions per 100 000 population; 95% CI 0.4 to 6.3; p=0.028). Preventable and chronic ACSCs may have increased just after the earthquake and then immediately decreased. However, avoidable admissions due to acute ACSCs remained high in the long term after the earthquake and tsunami disaster. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Home management of hematological patients requiring hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Isaia, Gianluca; Tibaldi, Vittoria; Astengo, Marco; Ladetto, Marco; Marinello, Renata; Bo, Mario; Michelis, Giuliana; Ruatta, Fiorella; Ricauda, Nicoletta Aimonino

    2010-01-01

    The hospital-at-home service (HHS) could be considered as an alternative to the traditional ward for elderly patients. We aimed at evaluating the home management of elderly people requiring transfusions. The ever-increasing demand on acute hospital services requires alternative methods of delivering all aspects of health care. HHS demonstrated to be as efficacious as a traditional ward for elderly and functionally compromised patients. The method was a retrospective descriptive study enrolling patients needing an hospital admission from 1st January 2007 to 31st December 2007 and reporting an hematological discharge's diagnosis as primary or secondary diagnosis. A total of 54 patients were evaluated in this study. Of them, 34 (62.9%) needed a hemocomponent transfusion for a total volume of 112 blood units and 49 platelet pools. Patients requiring at least one blood or platelet transfusion were more functionally compromised and presented a higher level of acute physiology and chronic health evaluation, compared to the non-transfused ones. The conclusion was that hematological subjects mainly the frail ones and functionally highly compromised with acute illnesses could be treated at home as an alternative of the traditional medical ward. This could be the starting point for future studies that will be able to increase the power of hospital-at-home service for this type of patients.

  17. [Decrease in hospitalizations due to polyvalent medical day hospital].

    PubMed

    Escobar, M A; García-Egido, A A; Carmona, R; Lucas, A; Márquez, C; Gómez, F

    2012-02-01

    The day hospital is an alternative to hospitalization. This alternative improves accessibility and comfort of the patients, and avoids hospitalizations. Nevertheless, the efficacy of the polyvalent medical day hospital in avoiding hospitalizations has not been evaluated. To analyze hospital stays avoided by the polyvalent medical day hospital of a university hospital of the Andalusian Health Service. An observational prospective study of the patients studied and/or treated in the polyvalent medical day hospital of the Hospital Universitario Puerto Real over a one year period. A total of 9640 patients were attended to, with 1413 procedures and 4921 i.v. treatments. There were 3182 visits to the priority consultation of the polyvalent medical day hospital. The most frequent consultation complaints were constitutional symptoms (15.9%) and anemia (14.5%). After the first visit, 21.5% of the patients were discharged and fewer than 3% were hospitalized. Hospitalization was avoided in 16.8% of the patients, there being a 6.0% decrease in the need for hospital beds (5.0% reduction in the internal medicine unit). Inadequate hospitalizations and 30-day readmissions decreased 93.3% and 4.2%, respectively. The most frequent diagnosis was neoplasm (26.0%), and most of the beds freed up were generated by patients diagnosed of neoplasm (26.7%). With this type of polyvalent medical day hospital, we have observed improved efficiency of health care, freeing up hospital beds by reducing hospitalizations, inadequate hospitalizations and re-admissions in the medical units involved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Air pollution and admissions due to ST elevation myocardial infarction-a time-series study from northwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Samad; Hajizadeh, Reza; Pourafkari, Leili; Shokouhi, Behrouz; Tajlil, Arezou; Mazani, Sarvin; Kavandi, Hadiseh; Ansari, Hosein; Nader, Nader D

    2017-10-04

    We investigated the association between the levels of air pollutants and the number of daily admissions due to ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in a metropolitan in the northwest of Iran. Daily concentrations of common air pollutants were obtained for the greater city of Tabriz for a period of 2 years. These reports included sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen byproducts (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O3), and particulate matters < 10 μm (PM10). The census of admissions for STEMI was retrieved for the same period from hospital registries. The association of daily variations in air pollutant levels and the daily number of STEMI admissions were investigated in a time-series analysis. In the multi-pollutant model adjusting for long-term trend, seasonality, and temperature, a significant association was found for 1-h [NO2] and 24-h [CO]. A marginally significant association was observed for 24-h [NO2] and 8-h [CO]. The 24-h [CO] had the strongest association with the number of admissions with STEMI. Maximum 1-h concentrations of NO2 on the same day and on the prior day as well as 24-h concentrations of CO on the prior day were independently associated with increased number of STEMI admissions. However, daily concentrations of SO2, NO, O3, and PM10 were not associated with the frequency of hospital admissions for STEMI.

  19. Anticoagulant-related hospital admissions: serious adverse reactions identified through hospital databases.

    PubMed

    Heng, Charles; Rybarczyk-Vigouret, Marie Christine; Michel, Bruno

    2015-02-01

    A growing number of patients today receive anticoagulants. These drugs can cause serious adverse reactions leading to patients' hospitalization. The present study aimed to assess the number of hospital admissions as a result of anticoagulant adverse reactions in Alsace, a French region of 1.8 million inhabitants, and to estimate the economic burden associated with their management. A retrospective analysis was performed using data extracted from the regional and anonymous hospital Programme de Médicalisation des Systèmes d'Information (PMSI) database to assess the number of hospital admissions and the associated costs. Stays from public and private hospitals were extracted from the database using two International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, codes referring to anticoagulant drugs: 'T45.5-Poisoning by anticoagulants' and 'Y44.2-Anticoagulants' adverse effect in therapeutic use'. Costs were calculated from official French tariffs. Within a 2-year period from 1 Januray 2010 to 31 December 2011, 462 anticoagulant-related hospital admissions, predominantly in elderly patients, were identified in Alsace. These stays, as a result of anticoagulant adverse reactions, represented a cost of 2 050 127.86 euros (including hospitalization and expensive drugs). Regional PMSI database constitutes an effective tool to explore anticoagulant-related hospital admissions. Based on our study, one can state that the cost of anticoagulation therapies lies not only in the price of the drugs but also in the cost of adverse reaction management. Policy makers should be aware of this reality and should focus on better medication supervision in order to improve patient safety and reduce expenses. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Excess hospital admissions during the July 1995 heat wave in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Semenza, J C; McCullough, J E; Flanders, W D; McGeehin, M A; Lumpkin, J R

    1999-05-01

    This study describes medical conditions treated in all 47 non-VA hospitals in Cook County, IL during the 1995 heat wave. We characterize the underlying diseases of the susceptible population, with the goal of tailoring prevention efforts. Primary and secondary discharge diagnoses made during the heat wave and comparison periods were obtained from computerized inpatient hospital discharge data to determine reasons for hospitalization, and comorbid conditions, respectively. During the week of the heat wave, there were 1072 (11%) more hospital admissions than average for comparison weeks and 838 (35%) more than expected among patients aged 65 years and older. The majority of this excess (59%) were treatments for dehydration, heat stroke, and heat exhaustion; with the exception of acute renal failure no other primary discharge diagnoses were significantly elevated. In contrast, analysis of comorbid conditions revealed 23% (p = 0.019) excess admissions of underlying cardiovascular diseases, 30% (p = 0.033) of diabetes, 52% (p = 0.011) of renal diseases, and 20% (p = 0.027) of nervous system disorders. Patient admissions for emphysema (p = 0.007) and epilepsy (p = 0.009) were also significantly elevated during the heat wave week. The majority of excess hospital admissions were due to dehydration, heat stroke, and heat exhaustion, among people with underlying medical conditions. Short-term public health interventions to reduce heat-related morbidity should be directed toward these individuals to assure access to air conditioning and adequate fluid intake. Long-term prevention efforts should aim to improve the general health condition of people at risk through, among other things, regular physician-approved exercise.

  1. Severe infective keratitis leading to hospital admission in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Wong, T; Ormonde, S; Gamble, G; McGhee, C N J

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To identify key risk factors and the management and outcome of severe infective keratitis leading to public hospital admission in New Zealand. Methods: Over a 2 year period, all admissions of presumed infective keratitis to Auckland Hospital were identified. The clinical records of all 103 cases were retrospectively reviewed with respect to clinical features, risk factors, management, and outcomes. Results: The mean time from first symptoms or signs and presentation to hospital was 8.9 (SD 15.5) days. The majority of subjects, 88%, had at least one of the risk factors commonly associated with infective keratitis including previous ocular surgery (30%), contact lens wear (26%), topical corticosteroid use (25%), and ocular trauma (24%). Corneal scraping was performed in 92% and of a total of 105 scrapes, 71% were positive. Bacteria were isolated in all these cases, the majority being Gram positive organisms (72%). The most common isolates identified were coagulase negative Staphylococcus (16%), Propionibacterium acnes (14%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (11%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9%). In addition, yeasts were isolated in 5%, fungi in 4%, virus in 2%, and chlamydia in 1%. Importantly, polymicrobial infection accounted for 33% of culture positive cases. Antimicrobial treatment was changed on the basis of culture results in 17 cases (16.5%). Median initial visual and final best corrected visual acuity was 6/36–6/48 (logMAR 0.86) (IQR 0.39–2.00) and 6/12–6/15 (logMAR 0.360) (IQR 0.15–1.70), respectively. Previous ocular surgery and topical corticosteroid use were significantly associated with poorer visual acuity. The mean hospital stay was 5.8 days and the median 4.0 (IQR 2.0–8.0) days. Longer duration of stay was associated with the presence of hypopyon, larger ulcers, previous ocular surgery, and poor visual acuity. Conclusions: Infectious keratitis is an important cause of ocular morbidity. A significant proportion of cases have potentially

  2. Acute hospital admission for nursing home residents without cognitive impairment with a diagnosis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Drageset, J; Eide, G E; Harrington, C; Ranhoff, A H

    2015-03-01

    Studies of hospitalisation of cognitively intact nursing home (NH) residents with cancer are scarce. Knowledge about associations between socio-demographic, medical and social support variables and hospital admissions aids in preventing unnecessary admissions. This is part of a prospective study from 2004 to 2005 with follow-up to 2010 for admission rates. We studied whether residents with cancer have more admissions and whether socio-demographic and medical variables and social support subdimensions are associated with admission among cognitively intact NH residents with (n = 60) and without (n = 167) cancer aged ≥65 years scoring ≤0.5 on the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale and residing ≥6 months. We measured social support by face-to-face interview. We identified all respondents through NH medical records for hospital admission, linking their identification numbers to the hospital record system to register all admissions. We examined whether socio-demographic and medical variables (medical records) and social support subscales were associated with the time between inclusion and first admission. Residents with cancer had more admissions (25/60) than those without (53/167) (odds ratio 1.7). Social integration was correlated with admission (P = 0.04) regardless of cancer diagnosis. Residents with cancer had more hospital admissions than those without. Higher social integration gave more admissions independent of cancer diagnosis.

  3. Low-level air pollution and hospital admissions for cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases in Helsinki.

    PubMed Central

    Pönkä, A; Virtanen, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether low concentrations of ambient air pollutants are associated with hospital admissions for ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases. METHODS: Associations between daily concentrations of sulfur dioxide, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and particulates and daily hospital admissions due to ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases were studied in Helsinki, Finland, 1987 through 1989. The regression analyses controlled for weather, day of the week, season, long-term trends, and influenza epidemics. RESULTS: Admissions via emergency rooms due to ischemic cardiac diseases (n = 7005) were significantly associated with the prevailing levels of nitric oxide and ozone, and those due to cerebrovascular diseases (n = 3737) were associated with nitrogen dioxide; these levels were only moderate. Long-term transient myocardial ischemic attacks were related to particulates, and short-term ischemic attacks were related to nitrogen dioxide. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of ischemic cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases may be provoked by pollutants in concentrations lower than those given as guidelines in many countries and lower than previously shown. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8806380

  4. A comparative study of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases during normal and dusty days in Iran.

    PubMed

    Geravandi, Sahar; Sicard, Pierre; Khaniabadi, Yusef Omidi; De Marco, Alessandra; Ghomeishi, Ali; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Mahboubi, Mohammad; Yari, Ahmad Reza; Dobaradaran, Sina; Hassani, Ghasem; Mohammadi, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghi, Shahram

    2017-06-19

    During the last century, most of people around the world moved from communicable to non-communicable diseases, mainly due to air pollution. Air pollutants and dust storm increase risk of morbidity, for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, and increase the number of deaths. The city of Ahvaz is considered as the focal point of air pollution and dust storm in Iran. The aim of this study was to determine the number of Hospital Admission Respiratory Disease (HARD) including asthma attacks, acute bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease attributed to PM10 by a descriptive study during normal and dust event days in Ahvaz during the time period 2010-2012. The hourly PM10 data was collected from the Iranian Environmental Protection Agency and Razi hospital. The annual PM10 mean concentrations reached 282, 288 and 278 μg/m(3) in 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. The number of HARD attributed to PM10 was 1438, 1945 and 1393 people, respectively, and the highest number of daily admissions was attributed to the highest daily PM10 concentration in Ahvaz. The average number of daily HARD during dusty days was higher than normal days, and a significant positive correlation, between the number of hospital admissions and dusty days, was found. Dust had significant impact on HARD in Ahvaz.

  5. Day hospital versus admission for acute psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Max; Crowther, Ruth; Sledge, William Hurt; Rathbone, John; Soares-Weiser, Karla

    2014-01-01

    Background Inpatient treatment is an expensive way of caring for people with acute psychiatric disorders. It has been proposed that many of those currently treated as inpatients could be cared for in acute psychiatric day hospitals. Objectives To assess the effects of day hospital versus inpatient care for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (June 2010) which is based on regular searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsycINFO. We approached trialists to identify unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of day hospital versus inpatient care, for people with acute psychiatric disorders. Studies were ineligible if a majority of participants were under 18 or over 65, or had a primary diagnosis of substance abuse or organic brain disorder. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data. We calculated weighted or standardised means for continuous data. Day hospital trials tend to present similar outcomes in slightly different formats, making it difficult to synthesise data. We therefore sought individual patient data so that we could re-analyse outcomes in a common format. Main results Ten trials (involving 2685 people) met the inclusion criteria. We obtained individual patient data for four trials (involving 646 people). We found no difference in the number lost to follow-up by one year between day hospital care and inpatient care (5 RCTs, n = 1694, RR 0.94 CI 0.82 to 1.08). There is moderate evidence that the duration of index admission is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (4 RCTs, n = 1582, WMD 27.47 CI 3.96 to 50.98). There is very low evidence that the duration of day patient care (adjusted days/month) is longer for patients in day hospital care than inpatient care (3 RCTs, n = 265, WMD 2.34 days

  6. Weekend hospital admission and discharge for heart failure: association with quality of care and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Horwich, Tamara B; Hernandez, Adrian F; Liang, Li; Albert, Nancy M; Labresh, Kenneth A; Yancy, Clyde W; Fonarow, Gregg C

    2009-09-01

    Although hospital admissions during weekends have been associated with worse quality of care and worse outcomes in some but not all medical conditions, the impact of weekend versus weekday admission and discharge for heart failure (HF) has not been well studied. This study investigates the association of (1) weekend compared to weekday HF admissions and discharges with quality of care and (2) weekend versus weekday HF admissions with length of stay (LOS) and mortality in the hospital. Data were analyzed for 81,810 HF admissions at 241 sites participating in Get With the Guidelines (GWTG)-HF from January 2005 to September 2008. The cohort was stratified by weekend versus weekday admission and discharge. Generalized estimating equations adjusted for patient and hospital characteristics and clustering. Mean age was 72 +/- 14 years; left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 39+/-17%. Inhospital mortality was 3.0% and median LOS 4 days. Weekend admission was associated with decreased odds of LVEF documentation. Weekend discharge was associated with decreased odds of LVEF documentation and completed discharge instructions. Weekend HF admission compared to weekday admission was associated with slightly higher risk-adjusted odds of longer inhospital LOS (1.03 [1.01-1.05] and increased inhospital mortality (1.13 [1.02-1.27]). Among GWTG-HF hospitals, weekend admission and discharge for HF were associated with similar quality of care in many but not all measures. Risk-adjusted LOS was slightly longer and mortality moderately higher for weekend HF admissions.

  7. The effect of temperature on cardiovascular disease hospital admissions among elderly people in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Giang, Pham Ngan; Dung, Do Van; Bao Giang, Kim; Vinhc, Hac Van; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2014-01-01

    Projected increases in weather variability due to climate change will have severe consequences on human health, increasing mortality, and disease rates. Among these, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), highly prevalent among the elderly, have been shown to be sensitive to extreme temperatures and heat waves. This study aimed to find out the relationship between daily temperature (and other weather parameters) and daily CVD hospital admissions among the elderly population in Thai Nguyen province, a northern province of Vietnam. Retrospective data of CVD cases were obtained from a data base of four hospitals in Thai Nguyen province for a period of 5 years from 2008 to 2012. CVD hospital admissions were aggregated by day and merged with daily weather data from this period. Distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used to derive specific estimates of the effect of weather parameters on CVD hospital admissions of up to 30 days, adjusted for time trends using b-splines, day of the week, and public holidays. This study shows that the average point of minimum CVD admissions was at 26°C. Above and below this threshold, the cumulative CVD admission risk over 30 lag days tended to increase with both lower and higher temperatures. The cold effect was found to occur 4-15 days following exposure, peaking at a week's delay. The cumulative effect of cold exposure on CVD admissions was statistically significant with a relative risk of 1.12 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.25) for 1°C decrease below the threshold. The cumulative effect of hot temperature on CVD admissions was found to be non-significant and was estimated to be at a relative risk of 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.52) for 1°C increase in the temperature. No significant association was found between CVD admissions and the other weather variables. Exposure to cold temperature is associated with increasing CVD admission risk among the elderly population.

  8. Air pollution from biomass burning and asthma hospital admissions in a sugar cane plantation area in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Arbex, Marcos Abdo; Martins, Lourdes Conceição; de Oliveira, Regiani Carvalho; Pereira, Luiz Alberto Amador; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Cançado, José Eduardo Delfini; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the total suspended particles (TSPs) generated from preharvest sugar cane burning and hospital admission due to asthma (asthma hospital admissions) in the city of Araraquara. Design An ecological time‐series study. Total daily records of asthma hospital admissions (ICD 10th J15) were obtained from one of the main hospitals in Araraquara, São Paulo State, Brazil, from 23 March 2003 to 27 July 2004. The daily concentration of TSP (μg/m3) was obtained using Handi‐vol equipment (Energética, Brazil) placed in downtown Araraquara. The local airport provided the daily mean figures of temperature and humidity. The daily number of asthma hospital admissions was considered as the dependent variable in Poisson's regression models and the daily concentration of TSP was considered the independent variable. The generalised linear model with natural cubic spline was adopted to control for long‐time trend. Linear terms were used for weather variables. Results TSP had an acute effect on asthma admissions, starting 1 day after TSP concentrations increased and remaining almost unchanged for the next four days. A 10 μg/m3 increase in the 5‐day moving average (lag1–5) of TSP concentrations was associated with an increase of 11.6% (95% CI 5.4 to 17.7) in asthma hospital admissions. Conclusion Increases in TSP concentrations were definitely associated with asthma hospital admissions in Araraquara and, despite using sugar cane alcohol to reduce air pollution from automotive sources in large Brazilian urban centres, the cities where sugar cane is harvested pay a high toll in terms of public health. PMID:17435205

  9. The Ambiguous Effect of GP Competition: The Case of Hospital Admissions.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Kamrul; Kjerstad, Egil

    2016-10-14

    In the theoretical literature on general practitioner (GP) behaviour, one prediction is that intensified competition induces GPs to provide more services resulting in fewer hospital admissions. This potential substitution effect has drawn political attention in countries looking for measures to reduce the growth in demand for hospital care. However, intensified competition may induce GPs to secure hospital admissions a signal to attract new patients and to keep the already enlisted ones satisfied, resulting in higher admission rates at hospitals. Using both static and dynamic panel data models, we aim to enhance the understanding of whether such relations are causal. Results based on ordinary least square (OLS) models indicate that aggregate inpatient admissions are negatively associated with intensified competition both in the full sample and for the sub-sample patients aged 45 to 69, while outpatient admissions are positively associated. Fixed-effect estimations do not confirm these results though. However, estimations of dynamic models show significant negative (positive) effects of GP competition on aggregate inpatient (outpatient) admissions in the full sample and negative effects on aggregate inpatient admissions and emergency admissions for the sub-sample. Thus, intensified GP competition may reduce inpatient hospital admissions by inducing GPs to provide more services, whereas, the alternative hypothesis seems valid for outpatient admissions. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Environmental triggers of hospital admissions for school-age children with asthma in two British cities.

    PubMed

    Julious, Steven A; Jain, Ritika; Mason, Suzanne

    2012-10-01

    Research has reported seasonal peaks in asthma in school age asthmatic children. The study aimed to assess if hospital admissions could be predicted from the possible environmental triggers using data from two British cities: Aberdeen and Doncaster. However, there were no consistent patterns across the two cities with no clear evidence that hospital admissions could be predicted from environmental data.

  11. Counting the cost of dementia-related hospital admissions: A regional investigation.

    PubMed

    Annear, Michael J; Tierney, Laura T; Vickers, James C; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    At a time of increasing dementia prevalence, this research explores the cost of treatment and length of stay associated with the syndrome in a large regional hospital. Database analysis of 4332 recorded admissions to a large regional Australian hospital among adults aged 55 years and older during winter 2013 and 2014. Costs of hospital treatment and length of stay for people with a diagnosis of dementia who presented to a regional hospital were significantly greater than people with no diagnosis over two years. Costs were unrelated to age or likelihood of death in hospital. Prevalence of dementia admissions was low, but treated conditions indicate that the syndrome may be an underlying, and potentially unrecognised, factor in many admissions. Dementia imposes a large cost and resource burden on a regional hospital. Improved identification of the syndrome on admission and implementation of best-evidence management of dementia in regional hospitals may improve care efficiency. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  12. Management of thallium poisoning in patients with delayed hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong-Wen; Xu, Qing-Yan; Zhang, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Qiong; Liu, Zhang-Suo; Kan, Quan-Cheng; Sun, Cheng-Ye; Wang, Lexin

    2012-01-01

    To describe the clinical features and management of thallium poisoning in patients with delayed hospital admission. Fourteen patients (median age 36 years) were admitted 9-19 days after ingesting food poisoned with thallium. Clinical and laboratory data, including blood and urine thallium concentrations, were collected. Patients were treated with oral Prussian blue, a chelating agent sodium dimercaptosulfonate, and hemodialysis. All patients experienced a triad of symptoms of acute gastrointestinal upset, painful combined polyneuropathy, and hair loss after consuming poisoned food. Fatigue and skin pigmentation were observed in all patients. Abnormal liver function tests were found in 6 (42.9%) and delirium and coma were identified in 4 (28.6%). Two weeks after the poisoning, the blood and urine thallium concentration ranged from 219.0 to 1414.4 μg/L (median: 535.3) and 956.5 to 11285.0 μg/L (median: 7460.0), respectively. One patient (7.1%) with a previous history of pulmonary fibrosis died of respiratory failure in hospital. Symptoms were improved and blood or urine thallium levels were normalized in the remaining 13 patients before discharge. After a 6.5 ± 1-month follow-up, 1 patient (7.1%) developed deep venous thrombosis in the left lower limb. In another patient (7.1%), numbness in the lower limbs remained. Acute thallium poisoning is commonly manifested by gastrointestinal upset, painful polyneuropathy, and significant hair loss. Treatment strategies included Prussian blue and hemodialysis, which were associated with a good outcome in this case series.

  13. Emergency multiple sclerosis hospital admissions attributable to chemical and acoustic pollution: Madrid (Spain), 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Rocío; Linares, Cristina; Recio, Alberto; Ortiz, Cristina; Díaz, Julio

    2017-08-25

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most prevalent neurological disease among young adults in Spain. A number of recent studies have linked traffic-related pollution, both chemical and acoustic, to the aetiology and exacerbation of neurodegenerative diseases. To analyse the existence of a significant short-term association between daily emergency MS hospital admissions and chemical and acoustic pollution caused by traffic in Madrid. We conducted a longitudinal ecological time series study, in which the dependent variable was the number of daily emergency MS hospital admissions (ICD-9: 340) registered in Madrid from 1 January 2001 to 31 December 2009. The independent variables were daily mean concentrations (μg/m(3)) of PM2.5, PM10, O3 and NO2. Equivalent diurnal (Leqd), nocturnal (Leqn) and daily equivalent noise levels (Leq24) were also considered. In addition, we controlled for linear trends, seasonality and the autoregressive nature of the series itself. Day of the week was also added as a covariate. Significant environmental variables were determined using Poisson GLM models. Relative risk (RR) and attributable risk (AR) values were calculated for increases of 10μg/m(3) in the case of chemical pollutants and 1dB(A) in noise levels. While there was no association between chemical pollutants caused by traffic and MS admissions, such an association was in evidence for Leqd at lag zero. This association is linear without a threshold, with there being a level above 67dB(A) from which this effect is more pronounced. The RRs were as follows: for all Leqd values, 1.21 (95% CI: 1.16, 1.26); and for Leqd >67dB(A), 1.62 (95% CI: 1.24, 2.13). The above results indicate that traffic noise can exacerbate MS symptoms, leading to hospital admissions due to this cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Association between air pollution and hospital admission: Case study at three monitoring stations in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahari, Marina; Zin@Ibrahim, Wan Zawiah Wan; Ismail, Noriszura; Ni, Tan Hui

    2014-06-01

    The relationships between the exposure of pollutants towards hospitalized admission and mortality have been identified in several studies on Asian cities such as Taipei, Bangkok and Tokyo. In Malaysia, evidence on the health risks associated with exposure to pollutants is limited. In this study, daily time-series data were analysed to estimate risks of cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalized admissions associated with particulate matter ≤ 10 μm (PM10), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide, and ozone concentrations in Klang Valley during 2004-2009. Daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory outcomes were obtained from eleven hospitals while pollutants data were taken from several air quality monitoring stations located nearest to the hospitals. These data were fitted with Generalised Additive Poisson regression models. Additionally, temperature, humidity, and time data were also included to allow for potential effect of weather and time-varying influences on hospital admissions. CO showed the most significant (P < 0.05) relationship to cardiovascular admissions. An increment of 1 ppm in CO predicted an increase of 4% to 20% in cardiovascular admissions. Respiratory admissions were associated with PM10, which had about 1% increase in risk of admission per 10 ug/m3 increment in PM10. Exposure to CO and PM10 increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses in Klang Valley, Malaysia.

  15. Charges for hospital admissions attributable to health disparities for African-American patients, 1998-2002.

    PubMed

    Chumney, Elinor C G; Mauldin, Patrick D; Simpson, Kit N

    2006-05-01

    Racial disparities exist across most major disease categories, which result in a disproportionately large number of hospital admissions for many conditions. Estimates for the financial impact of the racial admission differences for the State of South Carolina are assessed. South Carolina hospital discharge data for 1998-2002 was used for the analysis. The database includes all-payer billing data for inpatient hospital admissions as received on the UB-92 billing file for the covered episode. Charges were inflation adjusted to 2002 constant dollars. For 1998-2002, there were an estimated dollar 1.6 billion in total charges for hospital admissions in South Carolina that were attributed to higher age-adjusted admission rates for African-American patients. In addition, African Americans had consistently higher hospital admission rates for disease categories that are often associated with a failure to obtain ambulatory and preventive care. This simple analysis reveals that age-adjusted hospital admission rates for African Americans in South Carolina are higher than for Caucasians, and the gap appears to be widening over time. Given the magnitude of the financial implication, interventions with even a small impact on the conditions underlying the racial disparities in hospital admissions are likely to be cost effective.

  16. Management of uncomplicated skull fractures in children: is hospital admission necessary?

    PubMed

    Vogelbaum, M A; Kaufman, B A; Park, T S; Winthrop, A L

    1998-08-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the necessity for routine hospital admission of children with skull fractures, a normal neurological exam, a normal head CT, and no other injuries ('uncomplicated skull fracture'). A prospective study of closed-head injuries in children was done over a 2-year period at St. Louis Children's Hospital. All patients with closed head injuries underwent skull radiographs and a head CT scan. From this cohort, children with uncomplicated skull fractures were identified and studied. For comparison, a retrospective analysis was also performed of the hospital admission records of children admitted over a 5-year period (1990-1994) with the diagnosis of epidural hematoma (EDH) to identify the typical time intervals between injury and documentation of the lesion in these cases. Forty-four patients with uncomplicated skull fractures were identified; all had been admitted for observation. Mean age was 1.8 years. Average time between injury and hospital admission was 6.35 h with half of this time being spent in the emergency room. Average LOS was 35 h, but 50% of patients were hospitalized less than 24 h. No patient in this study group suffered a complication related to their inury. Twenty-three patients with EDH had been admitted during the 5-year review period. Slightly more than one-half of patients had their EDH detected within 6 h of injury. The others were diagnosed more than 6 h after injury due to a delay in medical evaluation or a delay in obtaining a computed tomographic (CT) scan after an initial medical evaluation. Patients with uncomplicated skull fractures, in the absence of recurrent emesis and/or evidence of child abuse, can be considered for discharge home. The definition of an uncomplicated skull fracture requires that a head CT be performed on these patients.

  17. Investigation of bias after data linkage of hospital admissions data to police road traffic crash reports

    PubMed Central

    Cryer, P; Westrup, S; Cook, A; Ashwell, V; Bridger, P; Clarke, C

    2001-01-01

    Research question—Does a database of hospital admission data linked to police road traffic accident (RTA) reports produce less biased information for the injury prevention policymaker, planner, and practitioner than police RTA reports alone? Design—Data linkage study. Study population—Non-fatal injury victims of road traffic crashes in southern England who were admitted to hospital. Data sources—Hospital admissions and police RTA reports. Main outcome measures—The estimated proportion of road traffic crashes admitted to hospital that were included on the linked database; distributions by age, sex, and road user groups: (A) for all RTA injury admissions and (B) for RTA serious injury admissions defined by length of stay or by nature of injury. Results—An estimated 50% of RTA injury admissions were included on the linked database. When assessing bias, admissions data were regarded as the "gold standard". The distributions of casualties by age, sex, and type of road user showed major differences between the admissions data and the police RTA injury data of comparable severity. The linked data showed smaller differences when compared with admissions data. For RTA serious injury admissions, the distributions by age and sex were approximately the same for the linked data compared with admissions data, and there were small but statistically significant differences between the distributions across road user group for the linked data compared with hospital admissions. Conclusion—These results suggest that investigators could be misinformed if they base their analysis solely on police RTA data, and that information derived from the linked database is less biased than that from police RTA data alone. A national linked dataset of road traffic crash data should be produced from hospital admissions and police RTA data for use by policymakers, planners and practitioners. PMID:11565992

  18. Counting the cost of diabetic hospital admissions from a multi-ethnic population in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Gulliford, M C; Ariyanayagam-Baksh, S M; Bickram, L; Picou, D; Mahabir, D

    1995-12-01

    Many middle-income countries are experiencing an increase in diabetes mellitus but patterns of morbidity and resource use from diabetes in developing countries have not been well described. We evaluated hospital admission with diabetes among different ethnic groups in Trinidad. We compiled a register of all patients with diabetes admitted to adult medical, general surgical, and ophthalmology wards at Port of Spain Hospital, Trinidad. During 26 weeks, 1447 patients with diabetes had 1722 admissions. Annual admission rates, standardized to the World Population, for the catchment population aged 30-64 years were 1031 (95% CI 928 to 1134) per 100,000 in men and 1354 (1240 to 1468) per 100,000 in women. Compared with the total population, admission rates were 33% higher in the Indian origin population and 47% lower in those of mixed ethnicity. The age-standardized rate of amputation with diabetes in the general population aged 30-64 years was 54 (37 to 71) per 100,000. The hospital admission fatality rate was 8.9% (95%CI 7.6% to 10.2%). Mortality was associated with increasing age, admission with hyperglycaemia, elevated serum creatinine, cardiac failure or stroke and with lower-limb amputation during admission. Diabetes accounted for 13.6% of hospital admissions and 23% of hospital bed occupancy. Admissions associated with disorders of blood glucose control or foot problems accounted for 52% of diabetic hospital bed occupancy. The annual cost of admissions with diabetes was conservatively estimated at TT+ 10.66 million (UK 1.24 million pounds). In this community diabetes admission rates were high and varied according to the prevalence of diabetes. Admissions, fatalities and resource use were associated with acute and chronic complications of diabetes. Investing in better quality preventive clinical care for diabetes might provide an economically advantageous policy for countries like Trinidad and Tobago.

  19. Overlapping of Serotonin Syndrome with Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome due to Linezolid-Fluoxetine and Olanzapine-Metoclopramide Interactions: A Case Report of Two Serious Adverse Drug Effects Caused by Medication Reconciliation Failure on Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Shahzad; Haider, Nafis; Ahmed, Rafeeque

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic and antidepressant are often used in combination for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders. The concomitant use of antipsychotic and/or antidepressant with drugs that may interact can lead to rare, life-threatening conditions such as serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We describe a patient who has a history of taking two offending drugs that interact with drugs given during the course of hospital treatment which leads to the development of serotonin syndrome overlapped with neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The physician should be aware that both NMS and SS can appear as overlapping syndrome especially when patients use a combination of both antidepressants and antipsychotics. PMID:27433163

  20. Influence of hospital admission in the pharmacotherapy complexity of HIV+ patients.

    PubMed

    Robustillo Cortés, María de Las Aguas; Morillo Verdugo, Ramón; Barreiro Fernández, Esther María; Pavón Plata, Ascensión; Monje Agudo, Patricia

    2017-07-01

    To determine the variation in the pharmacotherapy complexity index in HIV+ patients after hospital admission. A retrospective, single-center study with HIV+ patients on antiretroviral treatment (ART) who were admitted to hospital between 2008 and 2015 were conducted. Demographic, analytical, clinical and pharmacotherapy variables were collected, as well as those about the use of healthcare resources. The primary endpoint was the variation in the overall complexity index after a hospital admission, measured through the MRCI tool (University of Colorado). There was also an analysis of the variation in adherence to ART, and of the causes that led to an increase in pharmacotherapy complexity after hospitalization. The study included 146 patients (84.9% male) with 45.3 ± 9.1 years as mean age; 30.8% of these patients had experienced an admission to hospital in the previous year, with a median stay of seven days (IQR: 4-12,5). The  mean overall complexity before hospital admission was 14.5 ± 7.2 vs. 16.5 ± 8.0 after admission, with a significant difference (1.97 [CI = 0.85;3.09]). The percentage of patients adherent to ART before admission was 58.3% vs. 41.8% after admission (p = 0.023). The only factor associated to an increase in complexity was having five or more chronic drugs prescribed before admission (OR = 3.146 [1.045-9.471]). The overall pharmacotherapy complexity increased after hospital admission, reducing the adherence to ART. Chronic treatment prescribed before admission was the only factor associated with an increase in complexity after admission. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  1. Age, sex, ethnic origin and hospital admission for heart attack and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Beevers, D. G.; Cruickshank, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    The frequency of admission for heart attack and stroke in blacks, whites and Asians to Dudley Road Hospital, Birmingham, was studied. The study population (denominator) was 17 739 consecutive admissions to this hospital for the years 1975 to 1979, in 35- to 64-year-old men and women. Admission for heart attack was half as common in blacks compared with whites and, in some age groups, there was a slightly increased rate in Asians. By contrast, in both sexes and in all age groups, stroke admission was commoner in blacks. These differences cannot be explained by differing levels of blood pressure or cigarette smoking in the 3 ethnic groups.

  2. Mental and nonmental health hospital admissions among chronically homeless adults before and after supportive housing placement.

    PubMed

    Rieke, Katherine; Smolsky, Ann; Bock, Erin; Erkes, Laura Peet; Porterfield, Erin; Watanabe-Galloway, Shinobu

    2015-01-01

    Individuals experiencing chronic homelessness may utilize hospital services more frequently than the general population. Understanding the benefits of providing permanent supportive housing to these individuals can lead to improved services for this population. This study examined the effect of supportive housing placement on hospital admissions of adults who were homeless. Admissions were examined for a period of one-year pre- and postsupportive housing placement for 23 adults. Results showed a reduction in the number of emergency department admissions and an increase in outpatient admissions during the year following housing placement, indicating that supportive housing may encourage more appropriate use of health care services.

  3. Orthopaedic admissions due to sports and recreation injuries.

    PubMed

    Delaney, R A; Falvey, E; Kalimuthu, S; Molloy, M G; Fleming, P

    2009-02-01

    The health benefits of exercise may be attenuated by sports and recreation related injury (SRI). Though the majority of SRI are mild and self-limiting, a significant number are serious and require orthopaedic intervention. The aims of this study were to assess the burden of these serious injuries on the orthopaedic inpatient service, and to investigate potential target areas for injury prevention. All 1,590 SRI seen in the ED over a 3-month period were analysed using the Patient Information Management System to determine which patients received inpatient orthopaedic care. The medical records of those 63 patients who required inpatient care under orthopaedics were reviewed and data collected on demographic features, history, operative procedure and theatre resources, and length of hospital stay. Data were analyzed using SPSS. SRI accounted for 12.3% of all ED presentations. The principal activities resulting in injury requiring orthopaedic care were soccer, hurling and informal play e.g. trampoline. Falls made up 37% of the overall mechanism of injury but 68% of the injuries severe enough to require operative management. Most operative procedures were performed as part of a routine day trauma list but 20% were performed out of hours. This group of injuries places a significant burden on a busy trauma service. Injury prevention measures such as public education regarding falls in sport may have a role in reducing this burden.

  4. Occurrence and repetition of hospital admissions for accidents in preschool children.

    PubMed Central

    Sellar, C; Ferguson, J A; Goldacre, M J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine trends over time in the rates of admission to hospital for accidents of preschool children and to study patterns of repeated admissions for accidents in these children. DESIGN--Analysis of linked, routine abstracts of hospital inpatient records for accidents. SETTING--Six districts in the Oxford Regional Health Authority covered by the Oxford record linkage study. SUBJECTS--Records for 19,427 children aged 5 years and under at the time of first recorded admission to hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Number of admissions to hospital. RESULTS--Records were analysed in three groups: person based annual admission rates were calculated for each calendar year; each child's first recorded admission in 1976-85 was identified, and the child's record was followed up by linkage for one year from that admission; each child's first recorded admission in 1976-81 was identified and followed up for five years. Overall, 19,427 children from an average annual resident population of 163,000 children in 1976-86 had 20,657 admissions for accidents before they were 6 years of age. Of these admissions 13,983 were for injuries, 5717 for poisonings, and 957 for burns. Admission rates declined after 1976 for poisoning, but no substantial changes over time were found in admission rates for injuries or burns. A total of 17,724 children were followed up for one year and 10,889 for five years; 470 (2.6%) of the children who were followed up for one year and 926 (8.5%) of those followed up for five years had at least one further admission for an accident. Of those followed up for one year the 4 and 5 year old children were least likely and those under 1 and 1 year old were most likely to have a further admission for an accident. The number of children who had more than one accident was greater than would be expected if accidents were random occurrences. Those who had a poisoning at first admission were more likely to have another poisoning than an injury or burn; and those

  5. [A Comparison of Methods for Modeling Factors Associated with Hospital Admissions in Incident Cases of Heart Failure].

    PubMed

    Prado-Galbarro, Francisco Javier; Del-Cura-González, Isabel; Garrido-Elustondo, Sofía; Gamiño-Arroyo, Ana Estela; Sánchez-Piedra, Carlos; Sarriá Santamera, Antonio

    2017-05-24

    Heart failure (HF) is an important public health problem due to its increasing prevalence, and the decompensation associated with hospital admission represents an increased risk of death. The objective of this study was to compare several methods to model the variable hospitalizations and to determine the effect of factors associated with hospital admissions in incident cases of HF. Study of a retrospective cohort of patients with information extracted from electronic medical records of PC was performed. Patients 24 year and older with at least 1 visit to PC in 2006 were included. Registered hospital admissions of HF incident cases between 2006 and 2010 or until death were analyzed and comparison of Poisson, Negative Binomial (NB), zero-inflated and Hurdle regression models were conducted to identify factors associated con hospitalizations. 3,061 patients were identified in a cohort of 227,984. Regarding the factors associated with hospitalizations and according to the zero inflated NB regression model, patients who presented valvular disease (OR=2.01; CI95% 1.22-3.30), or were being treated with antithrombotics (OR=3.45; CI95%: 1.61-7.42) or diuretics (OR=2.28; CI95% 1.13-4.58) had a lower likelihood of hospitalization. Factors associated with a higher rate of hospital admissions were having valvular disease (IRR=1.37; CI95% 1.03-1.81) or diabetes (IRR=1.38; 1.07-1.78), and being treated with calcium antagonists (IRR=1.35; CI95% 1.05- 1.73) or ACE inhibitors (IRR=1.43; CI95% 1.06- 1.92). Having being referred to a cardiologist had a protective effect (IRR=0.86; CI95% 0.76- 0.97). The regression model that obtained the best adjustment was the zero inflated NB. According to this model, the factors associated with an increase in hospital admissions were valvulopathies, diabetes and treatment with calcium antagonists.

  6. Large animal-related injury requiring hospital admission: injury pattern disparities.

    PubMed

    Shahan, C Patrick; Emmett, Katrina; Zarzaur, Ben L

    2012-11-01

    Due to the infrequent occurrence of large animal-related injury (LARI) in many areas, their significance as a public health problem could be overlooked. The purpose of this study was to examine the demographics and injury disparities associated with LARI. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Survey from 2001 was used to construct a cohort of patients admitted after LARI. Patients were stratified by age, gender, race, and median household income of patient's zip code. Where available total hospital charges were converted to cost using the hospital's cost-to-charge ratio. To determine variables associated with injury type, univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis were used. 2424 LARI admissions were identified within the database. The largest proportion of admitted patients were female (53.8%), Caucasian (64.6%), and from areas with median income >$45,000 (41.8%). Average hospital cost was $5062. Overall, the most common injuries were rib fractures (15.2%), vertebral fractures (11.6%) and haemo-pneumothorax (9%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that age disparities with older patients receiving more rib fractures, haemo-pneumothorax, vertebral fractures, and pelvic fractures. Skull fractures and head injuries are disproportionately seen in younger patients. Gender disparities were also present, with females more likely to have vertebral fractures but less likely to have rib fractures and heart and lung injuries. Disparities based on age and gender are associated with hospital admission for LARI in the United States. These admissions have a significant impact on the healthcare system with nationwide cost estimates of nearly $60 million. These findings represent potential areas for targeted prevention efforts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Recent Patient Characteristics and Medications at Admission and Discharge in Hospitalized Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Arimura, Tadaaki; Miura, Shin-Ichiro; Morito, Natsumi; Shiga, Yuhei; Kitajima, Ken; Morii, Joji; Iwata, Atsushi; Fujimi, Kanta; Yahiro, Eiji; Saku, Keijiro

    2016-02-01

    To improve the clinical outcome of heart failure (HF), it is important to evaluate the etiology and comorbidities of HF. We previously reported the baseline clinical characteristics and medications in hospitalized patients with HF in years 2000 - 2002 (group 2000) and 2007 - 2009 (group 2008). We conducted a retrospective study of 158 patients who were hospitalized due to HF between 2012 and 2014 (group 2013) in the Department of Cardiology, Fukuoka University Hospital. We analyzed the clinical characteristics and medications at admission and discharge, and compared the findings in group 2013 to those in group 2000 and group 2008. The major causes of HF were ischemic heart disease, hypertensive cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and dilated cardiomyopathy. The New York Heart Association classification in group 2013 was significantly higher than those in group 2000 and group 2008. There was no difference in the level of brain natriuretic peptide at admission between group 2008 and group 2013. Tolvaptan began to be administered in group 2013. The median dose of furosemide just before the use of tolvaptan was 40 mg/day. At discharge, group 2013 showed higher rates of β-blocker and aldosterone antagonist. There was no difference in the frequency of loop diuretics. The dose of carvedilol at discharge was only 6.2 ± 4.0 mg/day. Antiarrhythmic drugs and β-blocker were used more frequently in HF with reduced ejection fraction (EF) than in HF with preserved EF. We may be able to improve the clinical outcome of HF by examining the differences in the clinical characteristics and medications at admission and discharge in hospitalized patients with HF.

  8. Variation in management of community-acquired pneumonia requiring admission to Alberta, Canada hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Y.; Marrie, T. J.; Carriere, K. C.; Predy, G.; Houston, C.; Ness, K.; Johnson, D. H.

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies have shown small area variation in the rate of admission to hospital for patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We determined the rates of admission and length of stay for patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Alberta and the factors influencing admission rates and length of stay. Using hospital abstracts, hospital admissions for community-acquired pneumonia from 1 April 1994 to 31 March 1999 were compared. We classified Alberta hospitals according to geographical regions, by the number of beds, and by number of community-acquired pneumonia cases. There were 12,000 annual hospital discharges for community-acquired pneumonia costing over $40 million per year. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 12% and the 1 year mortality rate was 26%. Compared with rural hospitals, regional and metropolitan hospitals admitted patients with greater severity of illness as demonstrated by greater in-hospital mortality, cost per case and comorbidity. Age-sex adjusted hospital discharge rates were significantly below the provincial average in both urban regions. Hospital discharge rates for residents in all rural regions and 4 of 5 regions with a regional hospital were significantly higher than the provincial average. After adjusting for comorbidity, the relative risk for a longer length of stay was 22% greater in regional hospitals and about 30% greater in urban hospitals compared to rural hospitals. Seasonal variation in the admission rate was evident, with higher rates in the winter of each year. We conclude that rural hospitals would be likely to benefit from a protocol to help with the admission decision and urban hospitals from a programme to reduce length of stay. PMID:12613744

  9. Hospital admissions and exercise capacity decline in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Maria A; Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Ferrer, Jaume; Balcells, Eva; Rodríguez, Esther; de Batlle, Jordi; Gómez, Federico P; Sauleda, Jaume; Ferrer, Antoni; Barberà, Joan A; Agustí, Alvar; Gea, Joaquim; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Antó, Josep M; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2014-04-01

    Exercise capacity declines with time and is an important determinant of health status and prognosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesised that hospital admissions are associated with exercise capacity decline in these patients. Clinical and functional variables were collected for 342 clinically stable COPD patients. The 6-min walk distance (6MWD) was determined at baseline and after a mean±sd of 1.7±0.3 years. Information on hospitalisations during follow-up was obtained from centralised administrative databases. Linear regression was used to model changes in exercise capacity. Patients were mostly male (92%), with mean±sd age 67.9±8.6 years, post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 s 54±17% predicted and baseline 6MWD 433±93 m. During follow-up, 6MWD decreased by 21.9±51.0 m·year(-1) and 153 (45%) patients were hospitalised at least once. Among patients admitted only for COPD-related causes (50% of those ever admitted), the proportion presenting a clinically significant loss of 6MWD was higher than in patients admitted for only nonrespiratory conditions (53% versus 29%, p=0.040). After adjusting for confounders, annual 6MWD decline was greater (26 m·year(-1), 95% CI 13-38 m·year(-1); p<0.001) in patients with more than one all-cause hospitalisation per year, as compared with those with no hospitalisations. Hospitalisations are related to a greater decline in exercise capacity in COPD.

  10. Clinical associations of delirium in hospitalized adult patients and the role of on admission presentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Robert Y; Heacock, Laura C; Bhargave, Geeta A; Fogel, Joyce F

    2010-10-01

    To describe clinical associations of delirium in hospitalized patients and relationships to on admission presentation. Retrospective analysis of an administrative hospitalization database 1998-2007. Acute care hospitalizations in the New York State (NYS). Four categories of diagnosis related group (DRG) hospitalizations were extracted from a NYS administrative database: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, urinary tract/kidney infection (UTI), and lower extremity orthopedic surgery (LEOS) DRGs. These hospitalizations were examined for clinical associations with delirium coding both on and after admission. Delirium was coded in 0.8% of the cohort, of which an on admission diagnosis was present in 59%. On admission delirium was strongly associated with dementia (adjusted odds ratio 0, 95%CI 5.8-6.3) and with adverse drug effects (ADEs) (adjusted odds ratio 4.6, 95%CI 4.3, 5.0). After admission delirium was even more highly associated with ADEs (adjusted odds ratio 22.2, 95%CI 20.7-23.7). The UTI DRG category had the greatest proportion of on admission delirium. However after admission delirium was more common in the LEOS DRG category. Over time, there was a greater increase in delirium proportions in the UTI DRG category, and an overall increase in coding for encephalopathy states (potential alternative delirium descriptors). ADEs play an important role in delirium regardless of whether or not it is present on admission. While the finding that most delirium hospitalizations presented on admission suggests that delirium impacts more as a clinical admitting determinant, in-hospital prevention strategies may still have benefit in targeted settings where after admission delirium is more frequent, such as patients with LEOS. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Variation and outcomes associated with direct hospital admission among children with pneumonia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Leyenaar, JoAnna K; Shieh, Meng-Shiou; Lagu, Tara; Pekow, Penelope S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2014-09-01

    Although the majority of children with an unplanned admission to the hospital are admitted through the emergency department (ED), direct admissions constitute a significant proportion of hospital admissions nationally. Despite this, past studies of children have not characterized direct admission practices or outcomes. Pneumonia is the leading cause of pediatric hospitalization in the United States, providing an ideal lens to examine variation and outcomes associated with direct admissions. To describe rates and patterns of direct admission in a large sample of US hospitals and to compare resource utilization and outcomes between children with pneumonia admitted directly to a hospital and those admitted from an ED. Retrospective cohort study of children 1 to 17 years of age with pneumonia who were admitted to hospitals contributing data to Perspective Data Warehouse. We developed hierarchical generalized linear models to examine associations between admission type and outcomes. Outcome measures included (1) length of stay, (2) high turnover hospitalization, (3) total hospital cost, (4) transfer to the intensive care unit, and (5) readmission within 30 days of hospital discharge. A total of 19,736 children from 278 hospitals met eligibility criteria, including 7100 (36.0%) who were admitted directly and 12,636 (64.0%) through the ED. Rates of direct admission varied considerably across hospitals, with a median direct admission rate of 33.3% (interquartile range, 11.1%-50.0%). Children admitted directly were more likely to be white, to have private health insurance, and to be admitted to small, general community hospitals. In adjusted models, children admitted directly had a 9% higher length of stay (risk ratio, 1.09 [95% CI, 1.07-1.11]), 39% lower odds of high turnover hospitalization (odds ratio [OR], 0.61 [95% CI, 0.56-0.66]), and 12% lower cost (risk ratio, 0.88 [95% CI, 0.87-0.90]) than those admitted through the ED, with no significant differences in transfers

  12. Air pollution and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Lanzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan; Mi, Shengquan; Zhou, Shuhong; Wang, Shigong; Xie, Xiaoyun

    2014-02-01

    Lanzhou is among the most seriously air-polluted cities in China as a whole, due to its unique topography, climate, industrial structure and so on. We studied the relationship between different air pollution and respiratory hospitalizations from 2001 to 2005, the total of respiratory hospital admissions were 28,057. The data were analyzed using Poisson regression models after controlling for the long time trend for air pollutants, the "day of week" effect and confounding meteorological factors. Three air pollutants (PM10, SO2, NO2) had a lag effect, the lag was 3-5 days for PM10, 1-3 days for SO2 and 1-4 days for NO2. The relative risks were calculated for increases in the inter-quartile range of the pollutants (139 μg/m(3) in PM10, 61 μg/m(3) in SO2 and 31 μg/m(3) in NO2). Results showed that there were significant associations between air pollutants and respiratory hospital admissions, and stronger effects were observed for females and aged ≥65 yrs in Lanzhou.

  13. Impact of Hospital Admission Care At a Pediatric Unit: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Macías, Marta; Zornoza, Carmen; Rodriguez, Elena; García, José A; Fernández, José A; Luque, Rafaela; Collado, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The time of admission to a hospital, especially when unplanned, has been reported as the most stressful moment of hospitalization for both parents and children (Odievre, 2001). This qualitative study explored parents and hospital staff's perceptions and experiences related to the process of admission to a pediatric unit. Focus groups, two with parents (total n = 12) and one with health care professionals (n = 6), were conducted, and content analysis inspired by Graneheim and Lundman (2004) was performed. Parents identified four categories of perceptions: 1) management of an uncertain situation at the time of admission, 2) feelings related to the child's illness, 3) parent perception of professional's performance, and 4) parent experience of their role. Health care professionals identified two categories: 1) hospital admission as a continuous care process, and 2) undertaking improvements in the admission process. A common theme emerged about the importance of parents' trust in professionals in order to build a therapeutic relationship. Findings underscore the need for strategies to improve the hospital pediatric admission process based on a parent-professional relationship of trust and confidence through continuous quality communication and support. These strategies would include providing a nurse in charge of the admission process to assure continuity of care throughout the child's hospitalization.

  14. Description of total population hospital admissions for cleft lip and/or palate in Australia.

    PubMed

    Lo, Jonathan Y J; Kilpatrick, Nicky; Jacoby, Peter; Slack-Smith, Linda M

    2015-12-07

    Orofacial clefts are a group of frequently observed congenital malformations often requiring multiple hospital admissions over the lifespan of affected individuals. The aim of this study was to describe the total-population hospital admissions with principal diagnosis of cleft lip and/or palate in Australia over a 10 year period. Data for admissions to hospitals were obtained from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Hospital Morbidity Database (July 2000 to June 2010). The outcome variable was a hospital separation with the principal diagnosis of cleft palate, cleft lip or cleft lip and palate (ICD-10-AM diagnosis codes Q35-Q37 respectively). Trends in rates of admission and length of stay by age, gender and cleft type were investigated. A total of 11, 618 admissions were identified; cleft palate (4,454; 0.22 per 10,000 people per year), cleft lip (2,251; 0.11) and cleft lip and palate (4,913; 0.25). Admission age ranged from birth to 79 years with males more frequently admitted. Most admissions occurred prior to adolescence in cleft palate and cleft lip and through to late teens in cleft lip and palate, declining for all groups after 25 years. This study identified population level trends in hospital separations for orofacial cleft diagnosis in Australia.

  15. The emerging burden of hospital admissions of adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Verheugt, Carianne L; Uiterwaal, Cuno S P M; van der Velde, Enno T; Meijboom, Folkert J; Pieper, Petronella G; Sieswerda, Gertjan Tj; Plokker, Herbert W M; Grobbee, Diederick E; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2010-06-01

    To assess the extent and the characteristics of hospital admissions in registered adult patients with congenital heart disease. Observational cohort study. The Netherlands. 5798 adult patients with congenital heart disease from the Dutch CONCOR national registry linked to the Dutch National Medical Registration (Prismant). All hospital admissions from the years 2001 up until 2006. During 28 990 patient-years, 2908 patients (50%) were admitted to hospital. Median age at admission was 39 years (range 18-86 years); 46% were male. Admission rate in CONCOR patients was high among all ages (range 11-68%) and exceeded that of the general Dutch population two to three times; this difference was most pronounced in the older age groups. Altogether there were 8916 admissions, 5411 (61%) of which were for cardiovascular indications. Among cardiovascular admissions, referrals for arrhythmias were most common (31%). Of 4926 interventions, 2459 (50%) were cardiovascular, most often reparative interventions or cardioversion (53%). Most non-cardiovascular admissions were obstetric. Among defects, univentricular heart and tricuspid atresia had the highest incidence and duration of admission. Healthcare utilisation in registered and medically supervised adult patients with congenital heart disease is high and increases with age. Admission rates are at least two times higher than in the general population, and most marked in the older age groups. With the ageing of this population, a major increase in healthcare utilisation is imminent in the near future. Timely preparation of healthcare resources is crucial to sustain optimal care.

  16. Effects of a provincial ban of two toxic organophosphorus insecticides on pesticide poisoning hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background. Pesticide self-poisoning causes one third of global suicides. Sri Lanka halved its suicide rate by banning WHO Class I organophosphorus (OP) insecticides and then endosulfan. However, poisoning with Class II toxicity OPs, particularly dimethoate and fenthion, remains a problem. We aimed to determine the effect and feasibility of a ban of the two insecticides in one Sri Lankan district. Methods. Sale was banned in June 2003 in most of Polonnaruwa District, but not Anuradhapura District. Admissions with pesticide poisoning to the district general hospitals was prospectively recorded from 2002. Results. Hospital admissions for dimethoate and fenthion poisoning fell by 43% after the ban in Polonnaruwa, while increasing by 23% in Anuradhapura. The pesticide case fatality fell from 14.4% to 9.0% in Polonnaruwa (odds ratio [OR] 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–0.84) and 11.3% to 10.6% in Anuradhapura (OR 0.93, 95%CI 0.70–1.25; p = 0.051). This reduction was not sustained, with case fatality in Polonnaruwa rising to 12.1% in 2006–2007. Further data analysis indicated that the fall in case fatality had actually been due to a coincidental reduction in case fatality for pesticide poisoning overall, in particular for paraquat poisoning. Conclusions. We found that the insecticides could be effectively banned from agricultural practice, as shown by the fall in hospital admissions, with few negative consequences. However, the ban had only a minor effect on pesticide poisoning deaths because it was too narrow. A study assessing the agricultural and health effects of a more comprehensive ban of highly toxic pesticides is necessary to determine the balance between increased costs of agriculture and reduced health care costs and fewer deaths. PMID:22372788

  17. Qualitative critical incident study of patients’ experiences leading to emergency hospital admission with advanced respiratory illness

    PubMed Central

    Karasouli, Eleni; Munday, Daniel; Bailey, Cara; Staniszewska, Sophie; Hewison, Alistair; Griffiths, Frances

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The high volume of emergency admissions to hospital is a challenge for health systems internationally. Patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are frequently admitted to hospital as emergency cases. While the frequency of emergency admission has been investigated, few studies report patient experiences, particularly in relation to the decision-making process prior to emergency admission. We sought to explore patient and carer experiences and those of their healthcare professionals in the period leading up to emergency admission to hospital. Setting 3 UK hospitals located in different urban and rural settings. Design Qualitative critical incident study. Participants 24 patients with advanced lung cancer and 15 with advanced COPD admitted to hospital as emergencies, 20 of their carers and 50 of the health professionals involved in the patients’ care. Results The analysis of patient, carer and professionals’ interviews revealed a detailed picture of the complex processes involved leading to emergency admission to hospital. 3 phases were apparent in this period: self-management of deteriorating symptoms, negotiated decision-making and letting go. These were dynamic processes, characterised by an often rapidly changing clinical condition, uncertainty and anxiety. Patients considered their options drawing on experience, current and earlier advice. Patients tried to avoid admission, reluctantly accepting it, albeit often with a sense of relief, as anxiety increased with worsening symptoms. Conclusions Patients with advanced respiratory illness, and their carers, try to avoid emergency admission, and use logical and complex decision-making before reluctantly accepting it. Clinicians and policy-makers need to understand this complex process when considering how to reduce emergency hospital admissions rather than focusing on identifying and labelling admissions as ‘inappropriate’. PMID:26916687

  18. Qualitative critical incident study of patients' experiences leading to emergency hospital admission with advanced respiratory illness.

    PubMed

    Karasouli, Eleni; Munday, Daniel; Bailey, Cara; Staniszewska, Sophie; Hewison, Alistair; Griffiths, Frances

    2016-02-25

    The high volume of emergency admissions to hospital is a challenge for health systems internationally. Patients with lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are frequently admitted to hospital as emergency cases. While the frequency of emergency admission has been investigated, few studies report patient experiences, particularly in relation to the decision-making process prior to emergency admission. We sought to explore patient and carer experiences and those of their healthcare professionals in the period leading up to emergency admission to hospital. 3 UK hospitals located in different urban and rural settings. Qualitative critical incident study. 24 patients with advanced lung cancer and 15 with advanced COPD admitted to hospital as emergencies, 20 of their carers and 50 of the health professionals involved in the patients' care. The analysis of patient, carer and professionals' interviews revealed a detailed picture of the complex processes involved leading to emergency admission to hospital. 3 phases were apparent in this period: self-management of deteriorating symptoms, negotiated decision-making and letting go. These were dynamic processes, characterised by an often rapidly changing clinical condition, uncertainty and anxiety. Patients considered their options drawing on experience, current and earlier advice. Patients tried to avoid admission, reluctantly accepting it, albeit often with a sense of relief, as anxiety increased with worsening symptoms. Patients with advanced respiratory illness, and their carers, try to avoid emergency admission, and use logical and complex decision-making before reluctantly accepting it. Clinicians and policy-makers need to understand this complex process when considering how to reduce emergency hospital admissions rather than focusing on identifying and labelling admissions as 'inappropriate'. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  19. Hospital admissions for respiratory symptoms and failure to thrive before and after Nissen fundoplication.

    PubMed

    Lee, Steven L; Shabatian, Hooman; Hsu, Jin-Wen; Applebaum, Harry; Haigh, Philip I

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Nissen fundoplication decreases hospital admissions for respiratory symptoms and failure to thrive (FTT). A retrospective study using discharge abstract data from Southern California Kaiser Permanente hospitals during the last decade was done. Three hundred forty-two pediatric patients had at least one Nissen fundoplication. Hospital admissions for aspiration and other pneumonia, respiratory distress/apnea, and FTT were determined before and after Nissen fundoplication. Age and associated neurologic disorders were also studied. Statistical analysis was determined by chi(2) analysis, Poisson regression analysis, and relative risk. The number of patients requiring hospital admission for aspiration and other pneumonia, respiratory distress/apnea, and FTT was similar before and after Nissen fundoplication. The proportion of readmission within 1 year after Nissen fundoplication for aspiration pneumonia was 0.1250 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0266-0.3236); other pneumonia, 0.5465 (95% CI, 0.4355-0.6542); respiratory distress/apnea, 0.5039 (95% CI, 0.4145-0.5931); and FTT, 0.5669 (95% CI, 0.4761-0.6545). Associated neurologic disorders independently increased hospital admissions for aspiration and other pneumonia, respiratory distress/apnea, and FTT. Age was inversely related to hospital admissions for respiratory distress and FTT. Nissen fundoplication did not improve hospital admissions for pneumonia, respiratory distress/apnea, and FTT. Associated neurologic disorders increased readmissions for pneumonia, respiratory distress/apnea, and FTT, whereas increasing age decreased readmission for respiratory distress and FTT.

  20. Consumer segmentation and time interval between types of hospital admission: a clinical linkage database study.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Umesh T; Lawson, Claire A; Moody, Dawn K; Teece, Lucy; Uttley, John; Harvey, John; Iqbal, Z; Jones, P W

    2017-03-14

    Healthcare policies target unplanned hospital admissions and 30-day re-admission as key measures of efficiency, but do not focus on factors that influence trajectories of different types of admissions in the same patient over time. To investigate the influence of consumer segmentation and patient factors on the time intervals between different types of hospital admission. A cohort design was applied to an anonymised linkage database for adults aged 40 years and over (N = 58 857). Measures included Mosaic segmentation, multimorbidity defined on six chronic condition registers and hospital admissions over a 27-month time period. The shortest mean time intervals between two consecutive planned admissions were: 90 years and over (160 days (95% confidence interval (CI): 146-175)), Mosaic groups 'Twilight subsistence' (171 days (164-179)) or 'Welfare borderline' and 'Municipal dependency' (177 days (172-182)) compared to the reference Mosaic groups (186 days (180-193)), and multimorbidity count of four or more (137 days (130-145)). Mosaic group 'Twilight subsistence' (rate ratio (RR) 1.22 (95% CI: 1.08-1.36)) or 'Welfare borderline' and 'Municipal dependency' RR 1.20 (1.10-1.31) were significantly associated with higher rate to an unplanned admission following a planned event. However, associations between patient factors and unplanned admissions were diminished by adjustment for planned admissions. Specific consumer segmentation and patient factors were associated with shorter time intervals between different types of admissions. The findings support innovation in public health approaches to prevent by a focus on long-term trajectories of hospital admissions, which include planned activity.

  1. Coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions: implications for healthcare planning in the UK.

    PubMed

    Muzerengi, S; Rick, C; Begaj, I; Ives, N; Evison, F; Woolley, R L; Clarke, C E

    2017-05-01

    Hospital Episode Statistics data are used for healthcare planning and hospital reimbursements. Reliability of these data is dependent on the accuracy of individual hospitals reporting Secondary Uses Service (SUS) which includes hospitalisation. The number and coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions at a tertiary centre in Birmingham was assessed. Retrospective, routine-data-based study. A retrospective electronic database search for all Parkinson's disease patients admitted to the tertiary hospital over a 4-year period (2009-2013) was performed on the SUS database using International Classification of Disease codes, and on the local inpatient electronic prescription database, Prescription and Information Communications System, using medication prescriptions. Capture-recapture methods were used to estimate the number of patients and admissions missed by both databases. From the two databases, between July 2009 and June 2013, 1068 patients with Parkinson's disease accounted for 1999 admissions. During these admissions, the Parkinson's disease was coded as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Ninety-one percent of these admissions were recorded on the SUS database. Capture-recapture methods estimated that the number of Parkinson's disease patients admitted during this period was 1127 patients (95% confidence interval: 1107-1146). A supplementary search of both SUS and Prescription and Information Communications System was undertaken using the hospital numbers of these 1068 patients. This identified another 479 admissions. SUS database under-estimated Parkinson's disease admissions by 27% during the study period. The accuracy of disease coding is critical for healthcare policy planning and must be improved. If the under-reporting of Parkinson's disease admissions on the SUS database is repeated nationally, expenditure on Parkinson's disease admissions in England is under-estimated by approximately £61 million per year. Copyright © 2016 The Royal

  2. Reductions in hospital admissions and mortality rates observed after integrating emergency care: a natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Vazeer; Palmer, Christopher R; Bennett, Tom J H; Robinson, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Reducing emergency admissions is a priority for the NHS. A single hospital's emergency care system was reorganised with the principles of front-loaded investigations, integration of specialties, reduced duplication, earlier decision making by senior clinicians and a combined emergency assessment area. The authors relocated our Medical Assessment Unit into our emergency department in 2006. The authors evaluated changes in admissions and mortality before and after 2006, compared with other similar hospitals. Design Quasi-experimental before and after study using routinely collected data. Setting and participants 1 acute hospital in England, the intervention site, was compared with 23 other English hospitals between 2001 and 2009. Outcome measures Our outcome measures were hospital standardised mortality ratios (HSMRs) for non-elective admissions and standardised admission ratios (SARs). Results The authors observed a statistically and clinically significant decrease in HSMR and SAR. The intervention hospital had the lowest HSMR and SAR of all the hospitals in our sample. This was statistically significant, p=0.0149 and p=0.0002, respectively. Conclusion Integrating emergency care in one location is associated with a meaningful reduction in mortality and emergency admissions to hospital. PMID:22858459

  3. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  4. Use of patient-controlled psychiatric hospital admissions: patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Trine; Bliksted, Vibeke; Lomborg, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Mimi

    2017-07-01

    By patient-controlled admission (PCA), psychiatric patients with a PCA contract can initiate a brief admission without a health professional gatekeeper. However, research regarding use of PCA is scarce. In this Danish multi-centre study, motives for and satisfaction with PCA were explored. During a 1-year period, patients from 11 Danish mental health units evaluated PCA using a questionnaire developed for the purpose. In total, 190 patients evaluated 462 admissions. The majority had concluded a PCA contract to receive early help. PCA was mostly initiated because of mental health conditions, but also because of social and everyday problems. The purpose was mainly to be at peace and prevent symptom increase. Patients from units with a quarantine period felt more ready for discharge than the others. Patients were in general satisfied with PCA (61.7%), but patients who hoped for improved medication or wished to obtain more care were less satisfied. Patients can use PCA as a means to receive timely help. Motives for patients seeking help are not limited to mental conditions. Expectations that cannot be met within the organizational structure of the PCA programme are associated with less satisfaction. However, regional differences in structures were associated with satisfaction. Patients who had access to shorter PCAs were more satisfied, and a quarantine period may even help patients become more ready for discharge. A brief admission period does not cause dissatisfaction at discharge and can be used in the clinical setting.

  5. Mold sensitization is common amongst patients with severe asthma requiring multiple hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, B Ronan; Hopkinson, Linda C; Denning, David W

    2005-02-18

    Multiple studies have linked fungal exposure to asthma, but the link to severe asthma is controversial. We studied the relationship between asthma severity and immediate type hypersensitivity to mold (fungal) and non-mold allergens in 181 asthmatic subjects. We recruited asthma patients aged 16 to 60 years at a University hospital and a nearby General Practice. Patients were categorized according to the lifetime number of hospital admissions for asthma (82 never admitted, 53 one admission, 46 multiple admissions). All subjects had allergy skin prick tests performed for 5 mold allergens (Aspergillus, Alternaria, Cladosporium, Penicillium and Candida) and 4 other common inhalant allergens (D. pteronyssinus, Grass Pollen, Cat and Dog). Skin reactivity to all allergens was commonest in the group with multiple admissions. This trend was strongest for mold allergens and dog allergen and weakest for D. pteronyssinus. 76% of patients with multiple admissions had at least one positive mold skin test compared with 16%-19% of other asthma patients; (Chi squared p < 0.0001). Multiple mold reactions were also much commoner in the group with multiple admissions (50% V 5% and 6%; p < 0.0001). The number of asthma admissions was related to the number and size of positive mold skin allergy tests (Spearman Correlation Coefficient r = 0.60, p < 0.0001) and less strongly correlated to the number and size of non-mold allergy tests (r = 0.34, p = 0.0005). Hospital admissions for asthma patients aged 16-40 were commonest during the mold spore season (July to October) whereas admissions of patients aged above 40 peaked in November-February (Chi Squared, p < 0.02). These findings support previous suggestions that mold sensitization may be associated with severe asthma attacks requiring hospital admission.

  6. Managing chronic disease in Ireland: hospital admission rates and clinical outcomes in a large ulcerative colitis population.

    PubMed

    Desmond, A N; Shanahan, F

    2012-03-01

    Health care planning demands a detailed knowledge of the course of chronic diseases in the Irish population. This study describes hospital admission rates, medication use and outcomes in a large cohort of patients with ulcerative colitis attending a tertiary referral centre in Ireland. Four hundred and twenty-four patients who attended during the 18-year period from January 1991 to January 2009 were identified. Baseline demographics, hospital admission, medications required, extent of colitis and date of colectomy were recorded. More than half (55.4%) of the patients were managed exclusively in an outpatient setting throughout diagnosis and follow-up. Systemic corticosteroids, thiopurines and infliximab were required by 70, 29.5 and 5% of the patients, respectively. Overall 5-year colectomy rate due to failure of medical therapy was 15.8%. Independent predictors of colectomy were hospital admission at first presentation (odds ratio 3.6, p < 0.0001) and pancolitis at diagnosis (odds ratio 2.3, p < 0.01). The majority of patients with colitis have an uncomplicated disease course and do not require thiopurines, biologic agents or hospital admission. Principal management at a primary care level may be appropriate in many cases. Colectomy rates at a specialist centre in Ireland compare favourably with international figures.

  7. Delay in hospital admission of patients with cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Ferro, José M; Lopes, M G; Rosas, M J; Fontes, J

    2005-01-01

    Factors influencing early hospital admission have been described for several stroke types but not for cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis (CVT). CVT is more difficult to diagnose than arterial stroke; delay in hospital admission may postpone CVT treatment. The purposes of this study were: (1) to describe the delay between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission of patients with CVT, and (2) to identify the variables that influence that delay. We registered the interval (days) between the onset of symptoms and hospital admission in 91 consecutive patients admitted to 20 Portuguese hospitals between June 1995 and June 1998. We also studied the impact of admission delay on treatments (prescription of anticoagulants and the number of days elapsed between the onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation and admission). Median admission delay was 4 days. Twenty-two (25%) patients were admitted within 24 h. Two thirds of the patients were admitted within 7 days and 75% within 13 days. In multiple logistic regression analysis, admission within 24 h was positively associated with mental status disorder (delirium or abulia; OR = 4.59; 95% CI = 1.41-14.89) and negatively associated with headache (OR = 0.03; 95% CI = 0.00-0.32). Presentation as isolated intracranial hypertension was associated with admission delay of more than 4 days (OR = 2.63; 95% CI = 0.97-7.14). Papilloedema was associated with an admission delay of more than 13 days (OR = 4.69; 95% CI = 1.61-13.61). There was no association between admission delay and the proportion of anticoagulated patients. The interval between onset of symptoms and start of anticoagulation was shorter in patients admitted earlier (p = 0.0001, for either admission within 24 h, 4 or 13 days). There is a considerable delay until the clinical picture associated with CVT is recognised as justifying hospital admission, especially when patients present with symptoms identical to isolated intracranial hypertension syndrome

  8. [Gonococcal infection related hospital admissions in Madrid: 1997-2006].

    PubMed

    Ariza-Mejía, María Carmen; García-García, Laura; Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel; Gil-Prieto, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Gonorrhoea is one of the most frequent sexually transmitted diseases in the world. It is a serious problem due to its morbidity, complications and associated sequelae. This study aims to estimate the frequency of hospitalisations due to gonococcal infection in Madrid between 1997 and 2006. A retrospective epidemiological study was performed using data from the National Epidemiological Surveillance System for hospital data (Minimum Basic Data Set, [MBDS]). All hospitalisations related to gonococcal infection in Madrid were analysed. Information on hospitalisation rates, mortality, fatality and stay were obtained and gathered by year, sex and age. During this study period, 113 hospitalisations related to gonococcal infection were recorded (Spanish Version of the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification: ICD-9-CM codes 098.0 and 098.89, any diagnostic position) representing a hospitalisation rate of 0.21 per 100,000, mortality rate of 0.02 per 100,000 people and case-fatality rate of 9.73%. An increased rate of hospitalisation in children up to 4 years and adults older than 65 years was observed. The hospitalisation rate in patients with gonococcal infection has decreased in recent years, but it is important to continue with existing public health and control policies and create new ones to reduce these figures. Copyright 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Trend study on the association between hospital admissions and the health of Dutch older adults (1995–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Galenkamp, Henrike; Deeg, Dorly J H; de Jongh, Renate T; Kardaun, Jan W P F; Huisman, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Objectives An increase in hospital admission rates in older people may reflect improved access to healthcare, but also declining health trends in the older population. Owing to a lack of individual-level data, the latter possibility has received little attention. The current study examines associations between health status and hospitalisation rates of older adults in the Netherlands. Design Observational individual-level data linked to hospital register data. Setting Data from 1995 to 2009 from the nationally representative Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were linked to the Dutch Hospital Discharge Register. Participants A total of 5681 observations of 2520 respondents across 4 measurement points (each with a follow-up of 36 months; ages 65–88 years). Outcome measures The contribution of health, demographic, psychosocial and lifestyle characteristics to time trends in hospitalisation was assessed in multivariate models. Results Between 1995 and 2009, the percentage with 1 or more overnight admissions (planned or acute) increased slightly from 38.1% to 39.7%. This was due to an increase in acute admission only (22.2–27.0%). Increased prevalences of chronic diseases, functional limitations and polypharmacy accounted for part of the observed increase in acute admissions. In addition, a more than doubled prevalence of day admissions over time was observed (12.3–28.3%), a trend that was unrelated to changes in individual characteristics. Conclusions This trend study showed a contribution of declines in population health to increases in acute hospital admissions. Since these declines did not provide a full explanation, healthcare reforms and increases in treatment possibilities in this period are likely to have contributed as well. PMID:27531734

  10. [Influence of the demographic change on hospital admissions and costs in Germany].

    PubMed

    Biermann, Janine; Neumann, Anja; Hewer, Alexander; Wasem, Jürgen; Erbel, Raimund; Neumann, Till

    2010-12-01

    In the next years the population of most western countries will age rapidly. Beside socioeconomic and social problems sustainable consequences on the health care system are expected. Ageing of the population will place a corresponding growth in demand of health care services and relating expenditures. The following analysis assesses the impact of demographic factors on hospital admissions and related costs over the next 30 years. German Federal Statistical Office 12th coordinated population projection, diagnosis statistics and cost of illness data were used to develop a projection of future hospital admissions and associated economic burden. The model considers age- and sex-specific differences. Ageing will increase all-cause hospital admissions by 12% between 2010 and 2040. Diseases of the circulatory system will have one of the most tremendous increases with an expected rise of 34% until 2040. In contrast, hospital stays because of mental and behavioural disorders will decrease by 9%. As hospital admissions rise we expect a further increase in overall expenditures for hospitalisations. Ageing of the population will further increase the demand for inpatient hospital services during the coming years. Nevertheless, the increase of hospital admissions will differ concerning single illness groups. The development of new care strategies should take these aspects into consideration.

  11. The effect of temperature on cardiovascular disease hospital admissions among elderly people in Thai Nguyen Province, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Giang, Pham Ngan; Dung, Do Van; Giang, Kim Bao; Vinhc, Hac Van; Rocklöv, Joacim

    2014-12-01

    Background Projected increases in weather variability due to climate change will have severe consequences on human health, increasing mortality, and disease rates. Among these, cardiovascular diseases (CVD), highly prevalent among the elderly, have been shown to be sensitive to extreme temperatures and heat waves. Objectives This study aimed to find out the relationship between daily temperature (and other weather parameters) and daily CVD hospital admissions among the elderly population in Thai Nguyen province, a northern province of Vietnam. Methods Retrospective data of CVD cases were obtained from a data base of four hospitals in Thai Nguyen province for a period of 5 years from 2008 to 2012. CVD hospital admissions were aggregated by day and merged with daily weather data from this period. Distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM) was used to derive specific estimates of the effect of weather parameters on CVD hospital admissions of up to 30 days, adjusted for time trends using b-splines, day of the week, and public holidays. Results This study shows that the average point of minimum CVD admissions was at 26°C. Above and below this threshold, the cumulative CVD admission risk over 30 lag days tended to increase with both lower and higher temperatures. The cold effect was found to occur 4-15 days following exposure, peaking at a week's delay. The cumulative effect of cold exposure on CVD admissions was statistically significant with a relative risk of 1.12 (95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.25) for 1°C decrease below the threshold. The cumulative effect of hot temperature on CVD admissions was found to be non-significant and was estimated to be at a relative risk of 1.17 (95% confidence interval: 0.90-1.52) for 1°C increase in the temperature. No significant association was found between CVD admissions and the other weather variables. Conclusion Exposure to cold temperature is associated with increasing CVD admission risk among the elderly population.

  12. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  13. Temporal dynamics of emergency department and hospital admissions of pediatric asthmatics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimes, Daniel; Levine, Elissa; Timmins, Sidey; Weiss, Sheila R.; Bollinger, Mary E.; Blaisdell, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that can result in exacerbations leading to urgent care in emergency departments (EDs) and hospitals. We examined seasonal and temporal trends in pediatric asthma ED (1997-1999) and hospital (1986-1999) admission data so as to identify periods of increased risk of urgent care by age group, gender, and race. All pediatric ED and hospital admission data for Maryland residents occurring within the state of Maryland were evaluated. Distinct peaks in pediatric ED and hospital asthma admissions occurred each year during the winter-spring and autumn seasons. Although the number and timing of these peaks were consistent across age and racial groups, the magnitude of the peaks differed by age and race. The same number, timing, and relative magnitude of the major peaks in asthma admissions occurred statewide, implying that the variables affecting these seasonal patterns of acute asthma exacerbations occur statewide. Similar gross seasonal trends are observed worldwide. Although several environmental, infectious, and psychosocial factors have been linked with increases in asthma exacerbations among children, thus far they have not explained these seasonal patterns of admissions. The striking temporal patterns of pediatric asthma admissions within Maryland, as described here, provide valuable information in the search for causes.

  14. Effect of a government funded medication programme on paediatric asthma hospital admissions in Antigua and Barbuda.

    PubMed

    Martin, T C; Heitor, F; Price, J; Kienstra, K; Walwyn-Venugopal, L; Aslam, P A

    2009-01-01

    To assess the effect of a government funded asthma medication programme on paediatric (age < or = 12 years) asthma hospital admissions in Antigua and Barbuda. A retrospective review of all hospital admissions for asthma in children was performed for the six years before and six years after a Medical Benefits Scheme (MBS) programme was established in 1997 to provide asthma medications at no out-of-pocket cost. Holberton Hospital records (1992 to 2003) which include all paediatric asthma admissions in Antigua and Barbuda, were reviewed Paediatric admissions for asthma fell from mean +/- standard deviation of 77.0 +/- 24.8 per year before the MBS programme was started to 48.0 +/- 17.1 per year (p < 0.05) after the MBS programme was started. The number of multiple admissions fell from 18.7 +/- 2.7 to 9.5 +/- 4.8 (p < 0.005) and the number of children admitted multiple times per year fell from 7.8 +/- 1.9 to 4.7 +/- 2.5 (p < 0.05). The number of children aged four to nine years admitted with asthma fell from 7.8 per 1000 annually during 1992 to 1997 to 4.4 per 1000 per year during 1998 to 2003. The government funded MBS programme for asthma medication has resulted in a 38% decrease in hospital admissions for paediatric asthma over a six-year period. The benefits of a similar programme in other developing countries should be considered.

  15. Parenteral penicillin for children with meningococcal disease before hospital admission: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Harnden, Anthony; Ninis, Nelly; Thompson, Matthew; Perera, Rafael; Levin, Michael; Mant, David; Mayon-White, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact on mortality and morbidity of parenteral penicillin given to children before admission to hospital with suspected meningococcal disease. Design Retrospective comparison of fatal and non-fatal cases. Setting England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; December 1997 to February 1999. Participants 158 children aged 0-16 years (26 died, 132 survived) in whom a general practitioner had made the diagnosis of meningococcal disease before hospital admission. Results Administration of parenteral penicillin by general practitioners was associated with increased odds ratios for death (7.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 37.7) and complications in survivors (5.0, 1.7 to 15.0). Children who received penicillin had more severe disease on admission (median Glasgow meningococcal septicaemia prognostic score (GMSPS) 6.5 v 4.0, P = 0.002). Severity on admission did not differ significantly with time taken to reach hospital. Conclusions Children who were given parenteral penicillin by a general practitioner had more severe disease on reaching hospital than those who were not given penicillin before admission. The association with poor outcome may be because children who are more severely ill are being given penicillin before admission. PMID:16554335

  16. Refusal of intensive care unit admission due to a full unit: impact on mortality.

    PubMed

    Robert, René; Reignier, Jean; Tournoux-Facon, Caroline; Boulain, Thierry; Lesieur, Olivier; Gissot, Valérie; Souday, Vincent; Hamrouni, Mouldi; Chapon, Cécile; Gouello, Jean-Paul

    2012-05-15

    Intensive care unit (ICU) beds are a scarce resource, and patients denied intensive care only because the unit is full may be at increased risk of death. To compare mortality after first ICU referral in admitted patients and in patients denied admission because the unit was full. Prospective observational multicenter cohort study of consecutive patients referred for ICU admission during two 45-day periods, conducted in 10 ICUs. Of 1,762 patients, 430 were excluded from the study, 116 with previously denied admission to another ICU and 270 because they were deemed too sick or too well to benefit from ICU admission. Of the remaining 1,332 patients, 1,139 were admitted, and 193 were denied admission because the unit was full (65 were never admitted, 39 were admitted after bumping of another patient, and 89 were admitted on subsequent referral). Crude Day 28 and Day 60 mortality rates in the nonadmitted and admitted groups were 30.1 versus 24.3% (P = 0.07) and 33.3 versus 27.2% (P = 0.06), respectively. Day 28 mortality adjusted on age, previous disease, Glasgow scale score less than or equal to 8, shock, creatinine level greater than or equal to 250 μmol/L, and prothrombin time greater than or equal to 30 seconds was nonsignificantly higher in patients refused ICU admission only because of a full unit compared with patients admitted immediately. Patients admitted after subsequent referral had higher mortality rates on Day 28 (P = 0.05) and Day 60 (P = 0.04) compared with directly admitted patients. Delayed ICU admission due to a full unit at first referral is associated with increased mortality.

  17. Racial disparities in receiving total hip/knee replacement surgery: the effect of hospital admission sources.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Rizzo, John A; Parasuraman, Shreekant; Gunnarsson, Candace

    2013-02-01

    Using a nationally-representative inpatient care dataset (the HCUP National Inpatient Sample from 2002 to 2007) we examined racial disparities in receiving total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) surgeries. Multivariable logistic regression models revealed that racial minorities were significantly less likely to receive THR or TKR than Whites, controlling for patients' hospital admission source and hospital characteristics. Employing Blinder-Oaxaca decomposition techniques, we found that observed difference in population characteristics explained 55%-67% and 78% of the racial disparities in THR and TKR, respectively. Differences in patients' hospital admission source emerged as the major individual factor associated with these disparities, explaining 57%-77% of racial disparities in THR and 26%-50% of racial disparities in TKR. This study suggests that substantive racial and ethnic disparities exist in utilization of THR and TKR surgery. Observed population characteristics accounted for most of these differences, with hospital admission source being the key factor.

  18. Depression predicts future emergency hospital admissions in primary care patients with chronic physical illness.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Elspeth A; Dickens, Chris; Blakemore, Amy; Watson, Jennifer; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Lovell, Karina; Afzal, Cara; Kapur, Navneet; Tomenson, Barbara

    2016-03-01

    More than 15 million people currently suffer from a chronic physical illness in England. The objective of this study was to determine whether depression is independently associated with prospective emergency hospital admission in patients with chronic physical illness. 1860 primary care patients in socially deprived areas of Manchester with at least one of four exemplar chronic physical conditions completed a questionnaire about physical and mental health, including a measure of depression. Emergency hospital admissions were recorded using GP records for the year before and the year following completion of the questionnaire. The numbers of patients who had at least one emergency admission in the year before and the year after completion of the questionnaire were 221/1411 (15.7%) and 234/1398 (16.7%) respectively. The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of prospective emergency admission to hospital: having no partner (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.15); having ischaemic heart disease (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.46); having a threatening experience (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29); depression (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.40); and emergency hospital admission in the year prior to questionnaire completion (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.98 to 5.86). To prevent potentially avoidable emergency hospital admissions, greater efforts should be made to detect and treat co-morbid depression in people with chronic physical illness in primary care, with a particular focus on patients who have no partner, have experienced threatening life events, and have had a recent emergency hospital admission. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Depression predicts future emergency hospital admissions in primary care patients with chronic physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Elspeth A.; Dickens, Chris; Blakemore, Amy; Watson, Jennifer; Chew-Graham, Carolyn; Lovell, Karina; Afzal, Cara; Kapur, Navneet; Tomenson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Objective More than 15 million people currently suffer from a chronic physical illness in England. The objective of this study was to determine whether depression is independently associated with prospective emergency hospital admission in patients with chronic physical illness. Method 1860 primary care patients in socially deprived areas of Manchester with at least one of four exemplar chronic physical conditions completed a questionnaire about physical and mental health, including a measure of depression. Emergency hospital admissions were recorded using GP records for the year before and the year following completion of the questionnaire. Results The numbers of patients who had at least one emergency admission in the year before and the year after completion of the questionnaire were 221/1411 (15.7%) and 234/1398 (16.7%) respectively. The following factors were independently associated with an increased risk of prospective emergency admission to hospital: having no partner (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.15); having ischaemic heart disease (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.46); having a threatening experience (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.29); depression (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.40); and emergency hospital admission in the year prior to questionnaire completion (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.98 to 5.86). Conclusion To prevent potentially avoidable emergency hospital admissions, greater efforts should be made to detect and treat co-morbid depression in people with chronic physical illness in primary care, with a particular focus on patients who have no partner, have experienced threatening life events, and have had a recent emergency hospital admission. PMID:26919799

  20. The impact of assertive outreach teams on hospital admissions for psychosis: a time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, I; Lloyd, C; Bland, J M; Savage Grainge, A

    2015-09-01

    Although the assertive outreach model was developed in the United States and imported to the United Kingdom to date, there is only limited evidence to support its wide-scale implementation within the United Kingdom. This is the first study to have combined a large dataset with this type of research method to explore the impact of assertive outreach teams on hospital admissions. The introduction and expansion of assertive outreach teams was associated with reducing hospital admissions for people with psychosis. This study found a consistent summer peak in hospital admissions which community and in-patient mental health nurses should take account of and plan for. Ever since the Mental Health Policy Implementation Policy Guide paved the way for the introduction of the Assertive Outreach Treatment (AOT) model in England, the impact of this approach has been the subject of considerable debate but limited evaluation. To date, most of the evidence supporting this model has originated from outside the United Kingdom. A central aim of the AOT was to reduce the need for in-patient treatment. We aimed to assess the impact of the AOT model on hospital admissions for people with psychosis in England. Interrupted time series analysis was used in this study to evaluate the impact of the policy change. Following the introduction of the AOT model, a statistically significant reduction in hospital admissions for psychosis was found. In addition, we observed a repeated, annual summer peak in admissions. This study adds to the international evidence which supports the effectiveness of the AOT model in reducing hospital admissions for people with severe mental health problems. We offer five suggested implications for mental health nurses and clients based on our findings. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Quantifying alcohol-related emergency admissions in a UK tertiary referral hospital: a cross-sectional study of chronic alcohol dependency and acute alcohol intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Vardy, J; Keliher, T; Fisher, J; Ritchie, F; Bell, C; Chekroud, M; Clarey, F; Blackwood, L; Barry, L; Paton, E; Clark, A; Connelly, R

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Alcohol is responsible for a proportion of emergency admissions to hospital, with acute alcohol intoxication and chronic alcohol dependency (CAD) implicated. This study aims to quantify the proportion of hospital admissions through our emergency department (ED) which were thought by the admitting doctor to be (largely or partially) a result of alcohol consumption. Setting ED of a UK tertiary referral hospital. Participants All ED admissions occurring over 14 weeks from 1 September to 8 December 2012. Data obtained for 5497 of 5746 admissions (95.67%). Primary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions related to alcohol as defined by the admitting ED clinician. Secondary outcome measures Proportion of emergency admissions due to alcohol diagnosed with acute alcohol intoxication or CAD according to ICD-10 criteria. Results 1152 (21.0%, 95% CI 19.9% to 22.0%) of emergency admissions were thought to be due to alcohol. 74.6% of patients admitted due to alcohol had CAD, and significantly greater than the 26.4% with ‘Severe’ or ‘Very Severe’ acute alcohol intoxication (p<0.001). Admissions due to alcohol differed to admissions not due to alcohol being on average younger (45 vs 56 years, p<0.001) more often male (73.4% vs 45.1% males, p<0.001) and more likely to have a diagnosis synonymous with alcohol or related to recreational drug use, pancreatitis, deliberate self-harm, head injury, gastritis, suicidal ideation, upper gastrointestinal bleeds or seizures (p<0.001). An increase in admissions due to alcohol on Saturdays reflects a surge in admissions with acute alcohol intoxication above the weekly average (p=0.003). Conclusions Alcohol was thought to be implicated in 21% of emergency admissions in this cohort. CAD is responsible for a significantly greater proportion of admissions due to alcohol than acute intoxication. Interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related admissions must incorporate measures to tackle CAD. PMID:27324707

  2. Effects of air pollution on respiratory hospital admissions in İstanbul, Turkey, 2013 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Çapraz, Özkan; Deniz, Ali; Doğan, Nida

    2017-08-01

    We examined the associations between the daily variations of air pollutants and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in İstanbul, the largest city of Turkey. A time series analysis of counts of daily hospital admissions and outdoor air pollutants was performed using single-pollutant Poisson generalized linear model (GLM) while controlling for time trends and meteorological factors over a 3-year period (2013-2015) at different time lags (0-9 days). Effects of the pollutants (Excess Risk, ER) on current-day (lag 0) hospital admissions to the first ten days (lag 9) were determined. Data on hospital admissions, daily mean concentrations of air pollutants of PM10, PM2.5 and NO2 and daily mean concentrations of temperature and humidity of İstanbul were used in the study. The analysis was conducted among people of all ages, but also focused on different sexes and different age groups including children (0-14 years), adults (35-44 years) and elderly (≥65 years). We found significant associations between air pollution and respiratory related hospital admissions in the city. Our findings showed that the relative magnitude of risks for an association of the pollutants with the total respiratory hospital admissions was in the order of: PM2.5, NO2, and PM10. The highest association of each pollutant with total hospital admission was observed with PM2.5 at lag 4 (ER = 1.50; 95% CI = 1.09-1.99), NO2 at lag 4 (ER = 1.27; 95% CI = 1.02-1.53) and PM10 at lag 0 (ER = 0.61; 95% CI = 0.33-0.89) for an increase of 10 μg/m3 in concentrations of the pollutants. In conclusion, our study showed that short-term exposure to air pollution was positively associated with increased respiratory hospital admissions in İstanbul during 2013-2015. As the first air pollution hospital admission study using GLM in İstanbul, these findings may have implications for local environmental and social policies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Decreasing avoidable hospital admissions with the implementation of an emergency department case management program.

    PubMed

    Sharieff, Ghazala Q; Cantonis, Matt; Tressler, Michelle; Whitehead, Mary; Russe, Jamie; Lovell, Eric

    2014-01-01

    With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, increased emphasis has been placed on optimizing quality and reducing expenditures. The use of an emergency department case manager (EDCM) is reemerging as an important initiative in the quest to provide high-quality care and decrease unnecessary hospital admissions. A pilot study of the use of EDCMs was conducted in one of the authors' EDs during a 6-month trial period. By using evidence-based criteria, the EDCM helped in real time to verify admission criteria, assisted with inpatient versus outpatient designation, found community alternatives to hospital admission, and initiated discharge planning for patients who required admission and were at high risk for readmission. EDCMs also worked with pharmacists to assist with medication management for patients who required assistance with obtaining prescriptions. Because of the pilot study's success, the authors' health care system will be implementing EDCMs throughout the organization.

  4. Seasonal variations in hospital admissions for mania: Examining for associations with weather variables over time.

    PubMed

    Medici, Clara Reece; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl; Parker, Gordon

    2016-11-15

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a seasonal pattern with emerging evidence that weather conditions may trigger symptoms. Thus, our aims were to investigate if year-to-year variations in admissions with mania correlated with year-to-year variations in key meteorological variables, if there was a secular trend in light of climate change and if gender or admission status influenced the seasonal pattern. We undertook a Danish register-based nationwide historical cohort study. We included all adults hospitalized to psychiatric care from 1995 to 2012 with mania using the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register. The Danish Meteorological Institute provided the meteorological variables. The association between weather and admissions was tested using linear regression. Our database comprised 24,313 admissions with mania. There was a seasonal pattern with admission rates peaking in summer. Higher admission rates were associated with more sunshine, more ultraviolet radiation, higher temperature and less snow but were unassociated with rainfall. We did not find a secular trend in the seasonal pattern. Finally, neither gender nor admission status impacted on the overall seasonal pattern of admissions with mania. Only patients in psychiatric care were included. We could not subdivide by type of bipolar disorder. This cohort study based on more than 24,000 admissions identified a distinct seasonal pattern in hospital admissions for those with mania. We found no secular trend. This could indicate that the climate change is not impacting on seasonal patterns, that there is no link between the proposed variables or that change is currently not sufficiently distinctive. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rates of hospital admissions for primary angle closure glaucoma among Chinese, Malays, and Indians in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Wong, T. Y.; Foster, P.; Seah, S.; Chew, P.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To estimate the rates of hospital admissions for primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG) in Chinese, Malays, and Indians in Singapore
METHODS—A population-wide hospital discharge database in Singapore was used to identify all hospital admissions with a primary discharge diagnosis of PACG (International Classification of Disease—CM code: 365.2). The Singapore census was used for denominator data.
RESULTS—Between 1993 and 1997 there were 894 hospital admissions for PACG. The mean annual rate of PACG admissions was 11.1 per 100 000 (95% confidence interval (CI), 10.4, 11.8) among people aged 30 years and over. The annual rate was highest for Chinese (age and sex adjusted rate: 12.2 per 100 000), which was twice that of Malays (6.0 per 100 000) and Indians (6.3 per 100 000). Females had two times higher rates than males in all three races (age adjusted relative risk: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.7, 2.3).
CONCLUSION—Malay and Indian people had identical rates of hospital admissions for PACG, which were only half the rates compared with Chinese.

 PMID:10966951

  6. From hospital admission to independent living: is prediction possible?

    PubMed

    Lipskaya-Velikovsky, Lena; Kotler, Moshe; Easterbrook, Adam; Jarus, Tal

    2015-04-30

    An integral component of recovery from mental illness is being able to engage in everyday activities. This ability is often restricted among people with schizophrenia. Although functional deficits are addressed during hospitalization, the ability to predict daily functioning based on information gathered during hospitalization has not been well established. This study examines whether measurements completed during hospitalization can be useful for predicting independent living within the community. Inpatients with schizophrenia (N=104) were enrolled in the study and assessed for cognitive functioning, functional capacity and symptoms. They were approached again 6 months after discharge to evaluate their functioning with respect to everyday life Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and Activities of Daily Living (ADL). Functional capacity during hospitalization predicted 26.8% of ADL functioning and 38.8% of IADL functioning. ADL was best predicted by the severity of negative symptoms, cognitive functioning, and the number of hospitalizations (51.2%), while IADL was best predicted by functional capacity, cognition, and number of hospitalizations (60.1%). This study provides evidence that evaluations during hospitalization can be effective, and demonstrates the advantage of a holistic approach in predicting daily functioning. When a holistic approach is not practical, a functional capacity measurement may serve as an effective predictor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Hyponatremia on admission to the emergency room as a risk factor for hospital mortality].

    PubMed

    Vega, Jorge; Manríquez, Francisco; Madrid, Eva; Goecke, Helmuth; Carrasco, Alejandra; Martínez, Gonzalo; Joyas, Alejandro; Rojas, Fernando; Salinas, Julio; Borja, Hernán

    2011-08-01

    Patients who develop hyponatremia during their hospitalization have higher hospital mortality. To determine if the presence of hyponatremia on admission to the emergency room is a risk factor for hospital mortality. Two hundred forty five patients consecutively admitted to the emergency room and then transferred to the Medicine Department, where they finally died, were matched for age and gender with 245 control subjects admitted to the emergency room and hospitalized in the Medicine Department at the same time, but survived. The dependent variable was death, and the exposure variable was hyponatremia. Admission diagnosis and Charlson comorbidity index was considered as confounding variables. Hyponatremia at admission occurred in 30 and 17% of patients who died and survived, respectively, rendering an adjusted odds ratio for death of 2.13 (95% confidence intervals = 1.27-3.57). Charlson Comorbidity Index according to age score was higher in subjects with hyponatremia compared to those without hyponatremia (8.1 ± 3.1 and 7.2 ± 2.8; p = 0.01). Multivariate analysis showed that age, gender, length of stay, cause of hospitalization and chronic diseases did not significantly modify the effect of hyponatremia on hospital mortality. Hyponatremia on admission at emergency room had a significant association with hospital mortality. Subjects with hyponatremia had a higher Charlson Comorbidity Index score.

  8. Determination of functional prognosis in hospitalized patients following an intensive care admission

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Natália A; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Ferreira, Arthur S; Ntoumenopoulos, George; Dias, Jerffesson; Guimaraes, Fernando S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the factors associated with the functional progress of hospitalized patients following an intensive care admission. METHODS Retrospective study including data from a cohort of 198 hospitalized patients following an intensive care admission and not requiring mechanical ventilation in a single tertiary referral hospital. A generalized linear model was used to identify the main effects of clinical and demographic variables on the outcomes of functionality (KATZ Index of Independence in Activities of Daily Living) and muscle strength (MRC Scale). The covariates identified as independent predictors were analysed using the receiver operating characteristic curves. The analysis differentiated the periods in the intensive care unit (ICU), in the Ward (WARD) and the total time of hospital stay (TOT). RESULTS Considering the functional outcome (ΔKATZ), the variables that significantly contributed to the model (P < 0.05) were the KATZ and MRC on admission, age, sepsis (no), and total length of stay (TLS). Regarding the muscle strength outcome model (ΔMRC), the predictors were MRC on admission, Simplified Acute Physiology Score III, previous stroke, TLS, and sex (female). The variable age (AUC = 0.664) discriminated the ΔKATZICU. The variables age (AUC = 0.712), KATZ in ICU (AUC = 0.590) and on ward admission (AUC = 0.746), and MRC on ward admission (AUC = 0.721) were discriminative for ΔKATZWARD. For ΔKATZTOT the variables KATZ on ICU admission (AUC = 0.621) and TLS (AUC = 0.617) were discriminative. For ΔMRCICU the variables SAPSIII (AUC = 0.661) and MRC on ICU admission (AUC = 0.653) were discriminative. MRC on ICU (AUC = 0.681) and ward admission (AUC = 0.553) were discriminative for ΔMRCWARD. TLS (AUC = 0.649) and MRC on ward admission (AUC = 0.696) discriminative for the ΔMRCTOT. CONCLUSION Specific functional, clinical and demographical variables at ICU admission are associated with the functional prognosis during the hospitalization period

  9. Winter circulation weather types and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Galicia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Royé, D; Taboada, J J; Martí, A; Lorenzo, M N

    2016-04-01

    The link between various pathologies and atmospheric conditions has been a constant topic of study over recent decades in many places across the world; knowing more about it enables us to pre-empt the worsening of certain diseases, thereby optimizing medical resources. This study looked specifically at the connections in winter between respiratory diseases and types of atmospheric weather conditions (Circulation Weather Types, CWT) in Galicia, a region in the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula. To do this, the study used hospital admission data associated with these pathologies as well as an automatic classification of weather types. The main result obtained was that weather types giving rise to an increase in admissions due to these diseases are those associated with cold, dry weather, such as those in the east and south-east, or anticyclonic types. A second peak was associated with humid, hotter weather, generally linked to south-west weather types. In the future, this result may help to forecast the increase in respiratory pathologies in the region some days in advance.

  10. Winter circulation weather types and hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Galicia, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Royé, D.; Taboada, J. J.; Martí, A.; Lorenzo, M. N.

    2016-04-01

    The link between various pathologies and atmospheric conditions has been a constant topic of study over recent decades in many places across the world; knowing more about it enables us to pre-empt the worsening of certain diseases, thereby optimizing medical resources. This study looked specifically at the connections in winter between respiratory diseases and types of atmospheric weather conditions (Circulation Weather Types, CWT) in Galicia, a region in the north-western corner of the Iberian Peninsula. To do this, the study used hospital admission data associated with these pathologies as well as an automatic classification of weather types. The main result obtained was that weather types giving rise to an increase in admissions due to these diseases are those associated with cold, dry weather, such as those in the east and south-east, or anticyclonic types. A second peak was associated with humid, hotter weather, generally linked to south-west weather types. In the future, this result may help to forecast the increase in respiratory pathologies in the region some days in advance.

  11. The impact of primary care organization on avoidable hospital admissions for diabetes in 23 countries

    PubMed Central

    Van Loenen, Tessa; Faber, Marjan J.; Westert, Gert P.; Van den Berg, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Diabetes is a so-called ambulatory care sensitive condition. It is assumed that by appropriate and timely primary care, hospital admissions for complications of such conditions can be avoided. This study examines whether differences between countries in diabetes-related hospitalization rates can be attributed to differences in the organization of primary care in these countries. Design Data on characteristics of primary care systems were obtained from the QUALICOPC study that includes surveys held among general practitioners and their patients in 34 countries. Data on avoidable hospitalizations were obtained from the OECD Health Care Quality Indicator project. Negative binomial regressions were carried out to investigate the association between characteristics of primary care and diabetes-related hospitalizations. Setting A total of 23 countries. Subjects General practitioners and patients. Main outcome measures Diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations. Results Continuity of care was associated with lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Broader task profiles for general practitioners and more medical equipment in general practice were associated with higher rates of admissions for uncontrolled diabetes. Countries where patients perceive better access to care had higher rates of hospital admissions for long-term diabetes complications. There was no association between disease management programmes and rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Hospital bed supply was strongly associated with admission rates for uncontrolled diabetes and long-term complications. Conclusions Countries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalizations. Hospital bed supply appeared to be a very important factor in this relationship. Apparently, it takes more than strong primary care to avoid hospitalizations. Key pointsCountries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of

  12. The impact of primary care organization on avoidable hospital admissions for diabetes in 23 countries.

    PubMed

    Van Loenen, Tessa; Faber, Marjan J; Westert, Gert P; Van den Berg, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a so-called ambulatory care sensitive condition. It is assumed that by appropriate and timely primary care, hospital admissions for complications of such conditions can be avoided. This study examines whether differences between countries in diabetes-related hospitalization rates can be attributed to differences in the organization of primary care in these countries. Data on characteristics of primary care systems were obtained from the QUALICOPC study that includes surveys held among general practitioners and their patients in 34 countries. Data on avoidable hospitalizations were obtained from the OECD Health Care Quality Indicator project. Negative binomial regressions were carried out to investigate the association between characteristics of primary care and diabetes-related hospitalizations. A total of 23 countries. General practitioners and patients. Diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations. Continuity of care was associated with lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Broader task profiles for general practitioners and more medical equipment in general practice were associated with higher rates of admissions for uncontrolled diabetes. Countries where patients perceive better access to care had higher rates of hospital admissions for long-term diabetes complications. There was no association between disease management programmes and rates of diabetes-related hospitalization. Hospital bed supply was strongly associated with admission rates for uncontrolled diabetes and long-term complications. Countries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of diabetes-related hospitalizations. Hospital bed supply appeared to be a very important factor in this relationship. Apparently, it takes more than strong primary care to avoid hospitalizations. Countries with elements of strong primary care do not necessarily have lower rates of diabetes-related avoidable hospitalization. Hospital bed supply is strongly associated

  13. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  14. Local macroeconomic trends and hospital admissions for child abuse, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne N; Medina, Sheyla P; Feudtner, Chris; Luan, Xianqun; Localio, Russell; Fieldston, Evan S; Rubin, David M

    2012-08-01

    To examine the relationship between local macroeconomic indicators and physical abuse admission rates to pediatric hospitals over time. Retrospective study of children admitted to 38 hospitals in the Pediatric Hospital Information System database. Hospital data were linked to unemployment, mortgage delinquency, and foreclosure data for the associated metropolitan statistical areas. Primary outcomes were admission rates for (1) physical abuse in children <6 years old, (2) non-birth, non-motor vehicle crash-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) in infants <1 year old (which carry high risk for abuse), and (3) all-cause injuries. Poisson fixed-effects regression estimated trends in admission rates and associations between those rates and trends in unemployment, mortgage delinquency, and foreclosure. Between 2000 and 2009, rates of physical abuse and high-risk TBI admissions increased by 0.79% and 3.1% per year, respectively (P ≤ .02), whereas all-cause injury rates declined by 0.80% per year (P < .001). Abuse and high-risk TBI admission rates were associated with the current mortgage delinquency rate and with the change in delinquency and foreclosure rates from the previous year (P ≤ .03). Neither abuse nor high-risk TBI rates were associated with the current unemployment rate. The all-cause injury rate was negatively associated with unemployment, delinquency, and foreclosure rates (P ≤ .007). Multicenter hospital data show an increase in pediatric admissions for physical abuse and high-risk TBI during a time of declining all-cause injury rate. Abuse and high-risk TBI admission rates increased in relationship to local mortgage delinquency and foreclosure trends.

  15. Trends in hospital admission rates for whooping cough in England across five decades: database studies.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Hoang, Uy; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-04-01

    Our aim was to report on trends in hospitalisation rates for pertussis in England from the 1960s to 2011; and to provide context for the recent unexpected activity of Bordetella pertussis in the UK. A retrospective analysis of English national Hospital Episode Statistics (HES, 1968-2011) and the Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS, 1963-2011) for people admitted to hospital with whooping cough. England and the Oxford Record Linkage Study area. Age- and gender-specific hospital admission rates, and summary age- and sex-standardised rates, for people aged under 25 years per 100,000 population in each age group. Admission rates declined from the 1960s to the early 1970s. For example, the standardised rates were 12.8 (95% confidence interval 11.2-14.5) per 100,000 in England in 1968 and 4.0 (3.0-4.9) per 100,000 in 1973. They then increased to reach 45.0 (41.4-48.6) per 100,000 in 1978 and 47.4 (43.7-51.1) in 1982. From the late 1980s, admission rates continued to decline, falling to between 1 and 4 per 100,000 in each of the years between 2003 and 2011. While the trend in hospital admissions closely followed that in notifications, the annual ratio between these two measures was not consistent ranging from 1.07 (95% confidence interval 1.00-1.14) to 4.03 (3.79-4.27) notifications per admission over the last 10 years. Epidemics of whooping cough in the late 1970s and early 1980s were associated with a significant rise in hospital admission rates. Current admission rates are low, by historical comparison. Vaccine programmes must continue to be fully implemented in order to improve control of pertussis activity.

  16. Social networks enabled coordination model for cost management of patient hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed Shahadat; Hossain, Liaquat

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we introduce a social networks enabled coordination model for exploring the effect of network position of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors in a patient-centered care network that evolves during patient hospitalization period on the total cost of coordination. An actor is a node, which represents an entity such as individual and organization in a social network. In our analysis of actor networks and coordination in the healthcare literature, we identified that there is significant gap where a number of promising hospital coordination model have been developed (e.g., Guided Care Model, Chronic Care Model) for the current healthcare system focusing on quality of service and patient satisfaction. The health insurance dataset for total hip replacement (THR) from hospital contribution fund, a prominent Australian Health Insurance Company, are analyzed to examine our proposed coordination model. We consider network attributes of degree, connectedness, in-degree, out-degree, and tie strength to measure network position of actors. To measure the cost of coordination for a particular hospital, average of total hospitalization expenses for all THR hospital admissions is used. Results show that network positions of "patient," "physician," and "hospital" actors considering all hospital admissions that a particular hospital has have effect on the average of total hospitalization expenses of that hospital. These results can be used as guidelines to set up a cost-effective healthcare practice structure for patient hospitalization expenses. © 2011 National Association for Healthcare Quality.

  17. Impact of a new senior emergency department on emergency department recidivism, rate of hospital admission, and hospital length of stay.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Daniel C; Singal, Bonita; Kropf, Charles W; Fisk, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Senior (geriatric) emergency departments (EDs) are an emerging phenomenon across the United States, designed to provide greater comfort for elders, screening for common morbidities, and selective contact with social workers. We hypothesize that the senior ED will reduce recidivism, rate of admission, and hospital length of stay. This was a pre/postintervention observational study of seniors (≥65 years) before and after opening of a new senior ED in a large community hospital. Older nonseniors treated during the same periods were included to detect temporal trend bias. Outcomes included admission to the hospital, hospital length of stay, and ED return visits. Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for patient age, sex, triage level, insurance type, admission on the index visit, and hospital length of stay, were used to test association with time to return within 30 and 180 days. Multivariable regression modeling was used to determine whether the intervention was associated with admission on the index visit, and hospital length of stay. There was no significant difference in time to return within 30 days (HR=1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95 to 1.23), 180 days (HR=0.99; 95% CI 0.91 to 1.08), or average hospital length of stay. Risk of being admitted on the index visit was lower for seniors treated in the senior ED compared with the regular ED (Relative Risk=0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98). A new senior ED was not associated with reduced ED recidivism or hospital length of stay, but was associated with decreased rate of admission. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prognostic value of rectal temperature at hospital admission in client-owned rabbits.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Nicola; Toth, Giulia; Selleri, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether rectal temperature at hospital admission, independently or in conjunction with other parameters, was associated with all-cause mortality in client-owned rabbits. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. ANIMALS 316 client-owned rabbits consecutively hospitalized in an exotics-only animal hospital. PROCEDURES Rectal temperature of each hospitalized rabbit was measured at admission. Individual variables, including survival up to 1 week after hospital discharge, were recorded. Univariate, multivariate, and sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS Rabbits with hypothermia at admission had a risk of death before or within 1 week after hospital discharge 3 times that of rabbits without hypothermia (relative risk, 3.09; 95% confidence interval, 2.17 to 4.39). For each 1°C (1.8°F) decrease in admission rectal temperature, the odds of death were doubled (OR, 2.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.69 to 2.64). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of the finding. Older age, suspected presence of a systemic disease, and presence of gastrointestinal stasis were also significantly associated with an increased risk of death. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Rectal temperature was easily measured in rabbits and was a major predictor of death in the present patient cohort. Because of its association with death in both healthy and diseased rabbits in this study, rectal temperature should always be measured during physical examination of rabbits. Treatment of hypothermia in client-owned rabbits requires further research.

  19. Air pollution and hospital admissions for asthma in a tropical city: Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Shang-Shyue Tsai; Meng-Hsuan Cheng; Hui-Fen Chiu; Trong-Neng Wu; Chun-Yuh Yang

    2006-07-15

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there is an association between air pollutants levels and hospital admissions for asthma in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for asthma and ambient air pollution data for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 1996 through 2003. The relative risk of hospital admission was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. In the single-pollutant models, on warm days ({>=}25{sup o}C) statistically significant positive associations were found in all pollutants except sulfur dioxide. On cool days ({<=} 25{sup o}C) all pollutants were significantly associated with asthma admissions. For the two pollutant models, CO and O{sub 3} were significant in combination with each of the other four pollutants on warm days. On cool days NO{sub 2} remained statistically significant in all the two-pollutant models. This study provides evidence that higher levels of ambient pollutants increase the risk of hospital admissions for asthma.

  20. Air pollution and emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Valencia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ballester, F; Tenias, J; Perez-Hoyos, S

    2001-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE—To estimate the short-term association between air pollution levels and emergency hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Valencia, within 1994-1996 period.
DESIGN—Daily levels of air pollution and emergency admissions for cardiovascular diseases were related to using an ecological time series design. The number of admissions was obtained from the hospital records database. Selected groups of causes were all cardiovascular diseases, heart admissions, and admissions for cerebrovascular diseases. The number of admissions for digestive diseases was used as control. Pollutants were black smoke, sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone (O3). Magnitude of association was estimated by Poisson autoregresive regression. Estimations were calculated according the hottest (May to October) and the coldest (November to April) periods.
SETTING—City of Valencia, Spain, about 750 000 inhabitants.
PARTICIPANTS—People being admitted to the two major hospitals in the city, with a catchment area of nearly 400 000 inhabitants.
MAIN RESULTS—For the whole period, a significant association for SO2-24 h was found so a rise in its levels of 10 µg/m3 was associated with an increment of 3% (95%CI 0.4 to 5.7%) in the expected number of cardiovascular admissions. A significant association for black smoke, SO2-24 h, SO2-1 h, and CO-1 h was found in the hottest semester. All these associations were verified with a lag of two days. The estimates of the associations for particles, SO2, and CO were affected by the inclusion of the other pollutants in their models. NO2 was independently associated with cerebrovascular admissions. There were no significant associations between air pollution and admissions for digestive diseases.
CONCLUSIONS—Current levels of air pollution and emergency cardiovascular admissions are significantly related in Valencia.


Keywords: air pollution; cardiovascular disease

  1. Coarse Particulate Matter Air Pollution and Hospital Admissions for Cardiovascular and Respiratory Diseases Among Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Roger D.; Chang, Howard H.; Bell, Michelle L.; McDermott, Aidan; Zeger, Scott L.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Dominici, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    Context Health risks of fine particulate matter of 2.5 µm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) have been studied extensively over the last decade. Evidence concerning the health risks of the coarse fraction of greater than 2.5 µm and 10 µm or less in aerodynamic diameter (PM10-2.5) is limited. Objective To estimate risk of hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases associated with PM10-2.5 exposure, controlling for PM2.5. Design, Setting, and Participants Using a database assembled for 108 US counties with daily cardiovascular and respiratory disease admission rates, temperature and dew-point temperature, and PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 concentrations were calculated with monitoring data as an exposure surrogate from January 1, 1999, through December 31, 2005. Admission rates were constructed from the Medicare National Claims History Files, for a study population of approximately 12 million Medicare enrollees living on average 9 miles (14.4 km) from collocated pairs of PM10 and PM2.5 monitors. Main Outcome Measures Daily counts of county-wide emergency hospital admissions for primary diagnoses of cardiovascular or respiratory disease. Results There were 3.7 million cardiovascular disease and 1.4 million respiratory disease admissions. A 10-µg/m3 increase in PM10-2.5 was associated with a 0.36% (95% posterior interval [PI], 0.05% to 0.68%) increase in cardiovascular disease admissions on the same day. However, when adjusted for PM2.5, the association was no longer statistically significant (0.25%; 95% PI, −0.11% to 0.60%). A 10-µg/m3 increase in PM10-2.5 was associated with a nonstatistically significant unadjusted 0.33% (95% PI, −0.21% to 0.86%) increase in respiratory disease admissions and with a 0.26% (95% PI, −0.32% to 0.84%) increase in respiratory disease admissions when adjusted for PM2.5. The unadjusted associations of PM2.5 with cardiovascular and respiratory disease admissions were 0.71% (95% PI, 0.45%–0.96%) for same

  2. Childhood Malaria Admission Rates to Four Hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Okiro, Emelda A.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.; Kabaria, Caroline W.; Ligomeka, Jeffrey; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Ali, Doreen; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection. Results In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend P<0.05). At these hospitals clinical malaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from <6% across all sites in 2000 to maximum of 33% at one hospital site by 2010. Additionally, malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000–2010 across all sites. Discussion Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may

  3. Consultant input in acute medical admissions and patient outcomes in hospitals in England: a multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Bell, Derek; Lambourne, Adrian; Percival, Frances; Laverty, Anthony A; Ward, David K

    2013-01-01

    Recent recommendations for physicians in the UK outline key aspects of care that should improve patient outcomes and experience in acute hospital care. Included in these recommendations are Consultant patterns of work to improve timeliness of clinical review and improve continuity of care. This study used a contemporaneous validated survey compared with clinical outcomes derived from Hospital Episode Statistics, between April 2009 and March 2010 from 91 acute hospital sites in England to evaluate systems of consultant cover for acute medical admissions. Clinical outcomes studied included adjusted case fatality rates (aCFR), including the ratio of weekend to weekday mortality, length of stay and readmission rates. Hospitals that had an admitting Consultant presence within the Acute Medicine Unit (AMU, or equivalent) for a minimum of 4 hours per day (65% of study group) had a lower aCFR compared with hospitals that had Consultant presence for less than 4 hours per day (p<0.01) and also had a lower 28 day re-admission rate (p<0.01). An 'all inclusive' pattern of Consultant working, incorporating all the guideline recommendations and which included the minimum Consultant presence of 4 hours per day (29%) was associated with reduced excess weekend mortality (p<0.05). Hospitals with >40 acute medical admissions per day had a lower aCFR compared to hospitals with fewer than 40 admissions per day (p<0.03) and had a lower 7 day re-admission rate (p<0.02). This study is the first large study to explore the potential relationships between systems of providing acute medical care and clinical outcomes. The results show an association between well-designed systems of Consultant working practices, which promote increased patient contact, and improved patient outcomes in the acute hospital setting.

  4. [Prevalence of genetic diseases in admissions to a tertiary care hospital pediatric service].

    PubMed

    Moya, Ana; Hernández, Marta; Mellado, Cecilia

    2016-02-01

    With the epidemiological changes, the role of genetic factors as a cause of morbidity and mortality is increasing, changing disease patterns of patients admitted to pediatric hospitals. To describe the prevalence of genetic diseases (GD) in patients admitted to a tertiary-care hospital Pediatric Service. The clinical records of consecutive admissions to a Pediatric Service of a clinical hospital in 2011 were reviewed. Two categories were assigned: with GD and without GD. Both groups were compared according to days of hospitalization, type of admission, readmissions and mortality. We reviewed the 98.1% of the 1,781 total annual admissions (1,459 cases), 322 of them were readmissions (187 cases). The mean age at admission was 54.8 ± 54 months and 55% were male. The mean hospitalization length was 4.9 ± 10 days. Of total admissions and individual cases, 52.7% (938/1,781) and 48% (705/1,459) were cases with GD, respectively. Within this group, 85% (597/705) were sub-categorized as having a significant genetic base. The differences between gender, age average income and hospital mortality were not significant between the two categories. Readmissions were more common for GD than for patients without GD (Odds ratio (OR): 2.6, confidence intervals (CI): 1.9-3.6). Average hospital stay was 27% higher among GD patients (p < 0.01). Our findings confirm the high prevalence of GD in pediatric hospitals (52.7%), with a higher risk for readmission in cases with GD compared with those without GD.

  5. Acute and Chronic Effects of Particles on Hospital Admissions in New-England

    PubMed Central

    Kloog, Itai; Coull, Brent A.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Koutrakis, Petros; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have reported significant associations between exposure to PM2.5 and hospital admissions, but all have focused on the effects of short-term exposure. In addition all these studies have relied on a limited number of PM2.5 monitors in their study regions, which introduces exposure error, and excludes rural and suburban populations from locations in which monitors are not available, reducing generalizability and potentially creating selection bias. Methods Using our novel prediction models for exposure combining land use regression with physical measurements (satellite aerosol optical depth) we investigated both the long and short term effects of PM2.5 exposures on hospital admissions across New-England for all residents aged 65 and older. We performed separate Poisson regression analysis for each admission type: all respiratory, cardiovascular disease (CVD), stroke and diabetes. Daily admission counts in each zip code were regressed against long and short-term PM2.5 exposure, temperature, socio-economic data and a spline of time to control for seasonal trends in baseline risk. Results We observed associations between both short-term and long-term exposure to PM2.5 and hospitalization for all of the outcomes examined. In example, for respiratory diseases, for every10-µg/m3 increase in short-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 0.70 percent increase in admissions (CI = 0.35 to 0.52) while concurrently for every10-µg/m3 increase in long-term PM2.5 exposure there is a 4.22 percent increase in admissions (CI = 1.06 to 4.75). Conclusions As with mortality studies, chronic exposure to particles is associated with substantially larger increases in hospital admissions than acute exposure and both can be detected simultaneously using our exposure models. PMID:22529923

  6. Hazards of Hospitalization: Residence Prior to Admission Predicts Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Mendelson, Daniel A.; Bingham, Karilee W.; McCann, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies investigating adverse outcomes of hospitalized elders have focused on community-dwelling patients. Given the rapid growth of populations living in other settings, such as assisted living facilities, it is important to understand whether these patients are at higher risk of experiencing specific adverse outcomes during…

  7. Hazards of Hospitalization: Residence Prior to Admission Predicts Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Susan M.; Mendelson, Daniel A.; Bingham, Karilee W.; McCann, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies investigating adverse outcomes of hospitalized elders have focused on community-dwelling patients. Given the rapid growth of populations living in other settings, such as assisted living facilities, it is important to understand whether these patients are at higher risk of experiencing specific adverse outcomes during…

  8. Hospital Pre-Admission Orientation and Patient Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ramona L.

    1987-01-01

    The study examined effects of a physician-delivered orientation on patient satisfaction for a short hospital stay (3 days or less). Using a comparative study design, the researcher found that, when patients had an orientation, satisfaction with services improved, as did perception of the physician's professionalism. (Author/CH)

  9. The Impact of Profitability of Hospital Admissions on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Background Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. Methods We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). Results The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010–0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p < .001). Mortality in newly unprofitable service lines is significantly more sensitive to reduced payment generosity than in service lines that remain profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700–13,000 fewer deaths nationally. Conclusions The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. PMID:23346946

  10. The impact of profitability of hospital admissions on mortality.

    PubMed

    Lindrooth, Richard C; Konetzka, R Tamara; Navathe, Amol S; Zhu, Jingsan; Chen, Wei; Volpp, Kevin

    2013-04-01

    Fiscal constraints faced by Medicare are leading to policies designed to reduce expenditures. Evidence of the effect of reduced reimbursement on the mortality of Medicare patients discharged from all major hospital service lines is limited. We modeled risk-adjusted 30-day mortality of patients discharged from 21 hospital service lines as a function of service line profitability, service line time trends, and hospital service line and year-fixed effects. We simulated the effect of alternative revenue-neutral reimbursement policies on mortality. Our sample included all Medicare discharges from PPS-eligible hospitals (1997, 2001, and 2005). The results reveal a statistically significant inverse relationship between changes in profitability and mortality. A $0.19 average reduction in profit per $1.00 of costs led to a 0.010-0.020 percentage-point increase in mortality rates (p < .001). Mortality in newly unprofitable service lines is significantly more sensitive to reduced payment generosity than in service lines that remain profitable. Policy simulations that target service line inequities in payment generosity result in lower mortality rates, roughly 700-13,000 fewer deaths nationally. The policy simulations raise questions about the trade-offs implicit in universal reductions in reimbursement. The effect of reduced payment generosity on mortality could be mitigated by targeting highly profitable services only for lower reimbursement. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Demographic, seasonal, and spatial differences in acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital in Melbourne Australia

    PubMed Central

    Loughnan, Margaret E; Nicholls, Neville; Tapper, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    Background Seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the northern hemisphere are well described in the literature. More recently age and gender differences in cardiac mortality and to a lesser extent morbidity have been presented. To date spatial differences between the seasonal patterns of cardiac disease has not been presented. Literature relating to seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the southern hemisphere and in Australia in particular is scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the seasonal, age, gender, and spatial patterns of cardiac disease in Melbourne Australia by using acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital as a marker of cardiac disease. Results There were 33,165 Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) admissions over 2186 consecutive days. There is a seasonal pattern in AMI admissions with increased rates during the colder months. The peak month is July. The admissions rate is greater for males than for females, although this difference decreases with advancing age. The maximal AMI season for males extends from April to November. The difference between months of peak and minimum admissions was 33.7%. Increased female AMI admissions occur from May to November, with a variation between peak and minimum of 23.1%. Maps of seasonal AMI admissions demonstrate spatial differences. Analysis using Global and Local Moran's I showed increased spatial clustering during the warmer months. The Bivariate Moran's I statistic indicated a weaker relationship between AMI and age during the warmer months. Conclusion There are two distinct seasons with increased admissions during the colder part of the year. Males present a stronger seasonal pattern than females. There are spatial differences in AMI admissions throughout the year that cannot be explained by the age structure of the population. The seasonal difference in AMI admissions warrants further investigation. This includes detailing the prevalence of cardiac disease in the community and examining

  12. Postpartum maternal morbidity requiring hospital admission in Lusaka, Zambia – a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, Lisa; Ahmed, Yusuf; Murray, Susan F

    2005-01-01

    Background Information on the extent of postpartum maternal morbidity in developing countries is extremely limited. In many settings, data from hospital-based studies is hard to interpret because of the small proportion of women that have access to medical care. However, in those areas with good uptake of health care, the measurement of the type and incidence of complications severe enough to require hospitalisation may provide useful baseline information on the acute and severe morbidity that women experience in the early weeks following childbirth. An analysis of health services data from Lusaka, Zambia, is presented. Methods Six-month retrospective review of hospital registers and 4-week cross-sectional study with prospective identification of postpartum admissions. Results Both parts of the study identified puerperal sepsis and malaria as, respectively, the leading direct and indirect causes of postpartum morbidity requiring hospital admission. Puerperal sepsis accounted for 34.8% of 365 postpartum admissions in the 6-month period. Malaria and pneumonia together accounted for one-fifth of all postpartum admissions (14.5% & 6% respectively). At least 1.7% of the postpartum population in Lusaka will require hospital-level care for a maternal morbidity. Conclusions In developing country urban settings with high public health care usage, meticulous review of hospital registers can provide baseline information on the burden of moderate-to-severe postpartum morbidity. PMID:15686592

  13. Hospital Admissions, Transfers and Costs of Guillain-Barré Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Lingsma, Hester F.; Vanrolleghem, Ann M.; Sturkenboom, Miriam C. J. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jacobs, Bart C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has a highly variable clinical course, leading to frequent transfers within and between hospitals and high associated costs. We defined the current admissions, transfers and costs in relation to disease severity of GBS. Methods Dutch neurologists were requested to report patients diagnosed with GBS between November 2009 and November 2010. Information regarding clinical course and transfers was obtained via neurologists and general practitioners. Results 87 GBS patients were included with maximal GBS disability score of 1 or 2 (28%), 3 or 4 (53%), 5 (18%) and 6 (1%). Four mildly affected GBS patients were not hospital admitted. Of the 83 hospitalized patients 68 (82%) were initially admitted at a neurology department, 4 (5%) at an ICU, 4 (5%) at pediatrics, 4 (5%) at pediatrics neurology and 3 (4%) at internal medicine. Median hospital stay was 17 days (IQR 11–26 days, absolute range 1–133 days). Transfers between departments or hospitals occurred in 33 (40%) patients and 25 (30%) were transferred 2 times or more. From a cost-effectiveness perspective 21 (25%) of the admissions was suboptimal. Median costs for hospital admission of GBS patients were 15,060 Euro (IQR 11,226–23,683). Maximal GBS disability score was significantly correlated with total length of stay, number of transfers, ICU admission and costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for GBS patients are highly heterogeneous, with frequent transfers and higher costs for those with more severe disease. Future research should aim to develop prediction models to early identify the most cost-effective allocation in individual patients. PMID:26859880

  14. Hospital Admissions, Transfers and Costs of Guillain-Barré Syndrome.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Nikki; Lingsma, Hester F; Vanrolleghem, Ann M; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; van Doorn, Pieter A; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Jacobs, Bart C

    2016-01-01

    Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) has a highly variable clinical course, leading to frequent transfers within and between hospitals and high associated costs. We defined the current admissions, transfers and costs in relation to disease severity of GBS. Dutch neurologists were requested to report patients diagnosed with GBS between November 2009 and November 2010. Information regarding clinical course and transfers was obtained via neurologists and general practitioners. 87 GBS patients were included with maximal GBS disability score of 1 or 2 (28%), 3 or 4 (53%), 5 (18%) and 6 (1%). Four mildly affected GBS patients were not hospital admitted. Of the 83 hospitalized patients 68 (82%) were initially admitted at a neurology department, 4 (5%) at an ICU, 4 (5%) at pediatrics, 4 (5%) at pediatrics neurology and 3 (4%) at internal medicine. Median hospital stay was 17 days (IQR 11-26 days, absolute range 1-133 days). Transfers between departments or hospitals occurred in 33 (40%) patients and 25 (30%) were transferred 2 times or more. From a cost-effectiveness perspective 21 (25%) of the admissions was suboptimal. Median costs for hospital admission of GBS patients were 15,060 Euro (IQR 11,226-23,683). Maximal GBS disability score was significantly correlated with total length of stay, number of transfers, ICU admission and costs. Hospital admissions for GBS patients are highly heterogeneous, with frequent transfers and higher costs for those with more severe disease. Future research should aim to develop prediction models to early identify the most cost-effective allocation in individual patients.

  15. Increased hospital admissions associated with extreme-heat exposure in King County, Washington, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Isaksen, Tania Busch; Yost, Michael G; Hom, Elizabeth K; Ren, You; Lyons, Hilary; Fenske, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality have been associated with extreme heat events, particularly in temperate climates. Few epidemiologic studies have considered the impact of extreme heat events on hospitalization rates in the Pacific Northwest region. This study quantifies the historic (May to September 1990-2010) heat-morbidity relationship in the most populous Pacific Northwest County, King County, Washington. A relative risk (RR) analysis was used to explore the association between heat and all non-traumatic hospitalizations on 99th percentile heat days, whereas a time series analysis using a piecewise linear model approximation was used to estimate the effect of heat intensity on hospitalizations, adjusted for temporal trends and day of the week. A non-statistically significant 2% [95% CI: 1.02 (0.98, 1.05)] increase in hospitalization risk, on a heat day vs. a non-heat day, was noted for all-ages and all non-traumatic causes. When considering the effect of heat intensity on admissions, we found a statistically significant 1.59% (95% CI: 0.9%, 2.29%) increase in admissions per degree increase in humidex above 37.4°C. Admissions stratified by cause and age produced statistically significant results with both relative risk and time series analyses for nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure, and natural heat exposure hospitalizations. This study demonstrates that heat, expressed as humidex, is associated with increased hospital admissions. When stratified by age and cause of admission, the non-elderly age groups (<85 years) experience significant risk for nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure, natural heat exposure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and asthma hospitalizations.

  16. Variation in US hospital emergency department admission rates by clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Dai, Ying; Ross, Joseph S; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Capp, Roberta; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-03-01

    Variation in hospitalization rates have been described for decades, yet little is known about variation in emergency department (ED) admission rates across clinical conditions. We sought to describe variation in ED risk-standardized admission rates (RSAR) and the consistency between condition-specific ED admission rates within hospitals. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2009 National Emergency Department Sample, an all-payer administrative, claims dataset. We identify the 15 most frequently admitted conditions using Clinical Classification Software. To identify conditions with the highest ED RSAR variation, we compared both the ratio of the 75th percentile to the 25th percentile hospital and coefficient of variation between conditions. We calculate Spearman correlation coefficients to assess within-hospital correlation of condition-specific ED RSARs. Of 21,885,845 adult ED visits, 4,470,105 (20%) resulted in admission. Among the 15 most frequently admitted conditions, the 5 with the highest magnitude of variation were: mood disorders (ratio of 75th:25th percentile, 6.97; coefficient of variation, 0.81), nonspecific chest pain (2.68; 0.66), skin and soft tissue infections (1.82; 0.51), urinary tract infections (1.58; 0.43), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.57; 0.33). For these 5 conditions, the within-hospital RSAR correlations between each pair of conditions were >0.4, except for mood disorders, which was poorly correlated with all other conditions (r<0.3). There is significant condition-specific variation in ED admission rates across US hospitals. This variation appears to be consistent between conditions with high variation within hospitals.

  17. Increased hospital admissions associated with extreme-heat exposure in King County, Washington, 1990-2010

    PubMed Central

    Isaksen, Tania Busch; Yost, Michael G.; Hom, Elizabeth K.; Ren, You; Lyons, Hilary; Fenske, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Increased morbidity and mortality have been associated with extreme heat events, particularly in temperate climates. Few epidemiologic studies have considered the impact of extreme heat events on hospitalization rates in the Pacific Northwest region. This study quantifies the historical (May to September 1990-2010) heat-morbidity relationship in the most populous Pacific Northwest County -King County, Washington. A relative risk (RR) analysis was used to explore the association between heat and all non-traumatic hospitalizations on 99th percentile heat days, while a time series analysis using a piece-wise linear model approximation was used to estimate the effect that heat’s intensity has on hospitalizations, adjusted for temporal trends and day of the week. A non-statistically significant 2% [95% CI: 1.02 (0.98, 1.05)] increase in hospitalization risk, on a heat day versus a non-heat day, was noted for all-ages, all non-traumatic causes. When considering the effect heat intensity has on admissions, we found a statistically significant 1.59% (95% CI: 0.9%, 2.29%) increase in admissions per degree increase in humidex above 37.4 °C. Admissions stratified by cause and age produced statistically significant results with both relative risk and time series analyses for nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure and natural heat exposure hospitalizations. This study demonstrates that heat, expressed as humidex, is associated with increased hospital admissions. When stratified by age and cause of admission, the non-elderly (less than 85) age groups experience significant risk for: nephritis and nephrotic syndromes, acute renal failure, natural heat exposure, COPD and asthma hospitalizations. PMID:25719287

  18. Variation in U.S. Hospital Emergency Department Admission Rates by Clinical Condition

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Arjun K.; Dai, Ying; Ross, Joseph S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Capp, Roberta; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Variation in hospitalization rates have been described for decades, yet little is known about variation in emergency department (ED) admission rates across clinical conditions. We sought to describe variation in ED risk-standardized admission rates (RSAR) and the consistency between condition-specific ED admission rates within hospitals. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of the 2009 National Emergency Department Sample, an all-payer administrative claims dataset. We identify the 15 most frequently admitted conditions using Clinical Classification Software. To identify conditions with the highest ED RSAR variation we compared both the ratio of the 75th percentile to the 25th percentile hospital and coefficient of variation between conditions. We calculate Spearman correlation coefficients to assess within-hospital correlation of condition-specific ED RSARs. Results Of 21,885,845 adult ED visits, 4,470,105 (20%) resulted in admission. Among the 15 most frequently admitted conditions, the five with the highest magnitude of variation were: mood disorders (ratio of 75th:25th percentile, 6.97; coefficient of variation, 0.81), nonspecific chest pain (2.68; 0.66), skin and soft tissue infections (1.82; 0.51), urinary tract infections (1.58; 0.43) and COPD (1.57; 0.33). For these five conditions, the within-hospital RSAR correlations between each pair of conditions were greater than 0.4, except for mood disorders, which was poorly correlated with all other conditions (r<0.3). Conclusions There is significant condition-specific variation in ED admission rates across US hospitals. This variation appears to be consistent between conditions with high variation within hospitals. PMID:25397965

  19. Ultrafine and Fine Particles and Hospital Admissions in Central Europe. Results from the UFIREG Study.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Stefanie; Schneider, Alexandra; Breitner, Susanne; Stafoggia, Massimo; Erzen, Ivan; Dostal, Miroslav; Pastorkova, Anna; Bastian, Susanne; Cyrys, Josef; Zscheppang, Anja; Kolodnitska, Tetiana; Peters, Annette

    2016-11-15

    Evidence of short-term effects of ultrafine particles (UFP) on health is still inconsistent and few multicenter studies have been conducted so far especially in Europe. Within the UFIREG project, we investigated the short-term effects of UFP and fine particulate matter (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm [PM2.5]) on daily cause-specific hospital admissions in five Central and Eastern European cities using harmonized protocols for measurements and analyses. Daily counts of cause-specific hospital admissions focusing on cardiovascular and respiratory diseases were obtained for Augsburg and Dresden (Germany), 2011-2012; Chernivtsi (Ukraine), 2013 to March 2014; and Ljubljana (Slovenia) and Prague (Czech Republic), 2012-2013. Air pollution and meteorologic data were measured at fixed monitoring sites in all cities. We analyzed city-specific associations using confounder-adjusted Poisson regression models and pooled the city-specific effect estimates using metaanalysis methods. A 2,750 particles/cm(3) increase (average interquartile range across all cities) in the 6-day average of UFP indicated a delayed and prolonged increase in the pooled relative risk of respiratory hospital admissions (3.4% [95% confidence interval, -1.7 to 8.8%]). We also found increases in the pooled relative risk of cardiovascular (exposure average of lag 2-5, 1.8% [0.1-3.4%]) and respiratory (6-d average exposure, 7.5% [4.9-10.2%]) admissions per 12.4 μg/m(3) increase (average interquartile range) in PM2.5. Our findings indicated delayed and prolonged effects of UFP exposure on respiratory hospital admissions in Central and Eastern Europe. Cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions increased in association with an increase in PM2.5. Further multicenter studies are needed using harmonized UFP measurements to draw definite conclusions on health effects of UFP.

  20. Accuracy of diagnostic coding of hospital admissions for cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, I D; Bleasdale, C; Hind, C R; Woodcock, A A

    1991-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of diagnostic coding of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, the case notes of 166 admissions to four hospitals were reviewed. These consisted of all admissions that had been coded as "idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis" (ICD code 516.3: 97 admissions) or as "postinflammatory pulmonary fibrosis" (ICD code 515.9: 69 admissions). Of 88 available records of admissions coded as idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis, 70 (80%) patients had definite cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, and six (7%) possible cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis according to predetermined conventional clinical criteria. Only seven (8%) admissions were clearly coded wrongly. Sixty four records were available for patients coded as having postinflammatory pulmonary fibrosis; 16 (25%) of these patients had definite cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis, a further 12 (19%) had possible cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis or fibrosing alveolitis with a connective tissue disorder, and the remainder had a very wide range of diagnoses. In this study the idiopathic fibrosing alveolitis (ICD 516.3) code was relatively reliable, but a substantial proportion of admissions coded under postinflammatory pulmonary fibrosis (ICD 515.9) also had cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis and code 515.9 was of little diagnostic value. The data are inadequate for case finding, though in respect of cryptogenic fibrosing alveolitis may be adequate for planning purposes. There continues to be a need for more medical input into the process of diagnostic coding. PMID:1926030

  1. Hospitalisation due to infectious and parasitic diseases in District Civil Hospital, Belgaum, Karnataka.

    PubMed

    Naik, A C; Bhat, S; Kholkute, S D

    2008-01-01

    To assess the burden of infectious and parasitic diseases on hospital services at District Civil Hospital (DCH) Belgaum, a retrospective study was carried out using discharge records concerning 8506 inpatients due to infectious and parasitic diseases among 95,655 patients admitted for all causes during the reference period 2000-2003. Out of the 21 causes of infectious and parasitic diseases, only 5 contributed maximally towards hospital admission. The most frequent cause was intestinal infections (44.0%) followed by tuberculosis (35.4%). 57.5% of these admissions were from the productive age group of 20-54 years. Tuberculosis is the most important disease in terms of hospital bed days (59.7%). Tuberculosis and intestinal infectious diseases represent more than three-fourth of the overall burden in terms of hospital bed days.

  2. Hyperosmolar non-ketotic diabetic coma as a cause of emergency hyperglycaemic admission to Baragwanath Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rolfe, M; Ephraim, G G; Lincoln, D C; Huddle, K R

    1995-03-01

    There were 136 emergency hyperglycaemic admissions to Baragwanath Hospital over a 6-month period during 1992-1993, representing 1.2% of the total number of medical admissions; 24 (18%) patients died. Diabetic keto-acidosis (DKA) accounted for 88 (65%) admissions (mortality rate 9%) while 16 admissions (12%) were as a result of hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma (HNKC), defined as hyperglycaemia, dehydration and an altered level of consciousness with a plasma osmolality > or = 330 and an arterial pH > or = 7.30, with absent or minimal ketonuria. Of these 16 patients, 9 (56%) were known to have diabetes mellitus. Patients with HNKC were significantly older than those with DKA (P < 0.001) and other patients with nonketotic hyperglycaemia (P < 0.05). The overall mortality rate was 44%; prophylactic low-molecular-weight heparin appeared of benefit (P < 0.05).

  3. [Survey on the cost of the admission process of nursing technicians in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Okano, Helena Isuku Horibe; Castilho, Valeria

    2007-09-01

    This study was aimed at contributing to the cost management of the admission process of nursing technicians by mapping and measuring the direct cost of the main activities in this process. The exploratory, retrospective, documental study on the modality of case study was carried out at the Educational Support Service of the University of São Paulo's Hospital Universitário. The admission process was divided into five sub-processes: planning, recruiting, selection, hiring and admission training. Results showed that the direct total cost of the admission process was R$ 6359.90, and that, within the sub-processes, selection was the one that consumed most resources--R$ 3416.40, amounting to 53.72% of the total. Each hired candidate cost R$ 635.99.

  4. Future projections of child oral-related hospital admission rates in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Alsharif, Alla; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2016-01-11

    This study aimed to project the hospital admission rates of Western Australian children for oral conditions, with a particular focus on dental caries, embedded and impacted teeth, and pulp and periapical conditions through to the year 2026. Two methods were used to generate projection data through to the year 2026, using the Western Australian Hospital Morbidity Dataset for the period 1999-2000 to 2008-2009. The projected admission rate increase in those children aged 14 years and younger from 2000 to 2026 was 43%. The admission rates are expected to more than double over time (7317 cases in 2026 compared to only 3008 cases in 2000) for those children living in metropolitan areas. Dental caries, embedded and impacted teeth, and pulp and periapical conditions will remain the top (mostly) preventable causes of admission throughout this time. Anticipating the future burden of oral-related hospital admissions in children, in terms of expected numbers of cases, is vital for optimising the resource allocation for early diagnosis, prevention and treatment. A concerted effort will be required by policymakers and oral healthcare communities to effect substantial change for the future.

  5. [Topics and considerations on reducing hospital admission: from evidence to practice].

    PubMed

    Amblàs Novellas, Jordi; Panicot, Joan Espaulella; Pueyo, Carles Blay; Brunet, Núria Molist; Lucchetti d'Aniello, Gianni E; Arisa, Antoni Anglada; Casas, Jordi Roca

    2013-01-01

    Demographic changes and the economic situation of the recent years have conditioned a turning point in health policies, which have decided to progressively prioritize chronicity care programs. Given that hospital costs were concentrated in attention to patients with chronic diseases, reduction on admissions is now a priority target. Meanwhile, we state that among the obviously community handling paradigmatic aim for those patients and the current care situation, there is a long way to do that should be done gradually. According to the current scientific evidence: Is it sensible to assume that there is a proper level of admissions or is it better for the patients to reduce the number of admissions? Is it possible to operationally and reliably define which hospital admissions are avoidable? Is it harmful to a patient and to the health care system to admit a patient with multiple chronic disease? Maybe are hospital admissions are avoidable and readmissions are indicators of a fragmented health care system? Given that situation, a reasonable approach requires firstly a critical analysis of the various realities of care (microsystems) and a systematic review of the scientific evidence-breaking, and rejecting some topics if necessary. Secondly, we should bring all this knowledge to clinical practice, conciliating «what» and the know-how, individual and population view, sole disease and multimorbidity, and finally clinical approach and health planning. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Driving intoxicated: is hospital admission protective against legal ramifications?

    PubMed

    Cheek, Susannah Mary; Murry, Jason Steven; Truitt, Michael Seth; Dunn, Ernest Lewis

    2013-12-01

    According to the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in 2010, 10,228 people were killed in alcohol-impaired driving crashes. Daily, intoxicated drivers are seen in trauma centers across the country. At our trauma center, we sought to determine the number of drivers who had a documented elevation in their blood alcohol content (BAC) and compare this with county police records to evaluate how many charges for driving while intoxicated (DWI) were issued. A retrospective chart review was performed for trauma admissions during a 3-year period. Patients with a BAC of less than 0.08 g/dL were excluded. Only documented drivers were included. This group of intoxicated drivers was then compared against public records from the Dallas County for any record of a charge of DWI. During a 3-year period, from 2009 to 2011, 118 drivers had a confirmed BAC above the legal limit of 0.08 g/dL. Average BAC level was 0.218 g/dL. Injuries varied widely between patients with an average Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 11. Extremity fractures were seen in 27%, facial fractures were seen in 16%, and intracranial hemorrhage was seen in 7%. Forty-eight percent of the patients were admitted to the intensive care unit initially, with an average length of intensive care unit stay of 1.5 days (range, 0-25 days). Only 18% of our patients (21) received a charge of DWI. Four patients were charge with related offenses. A motor vehicle accident may be protective against the legal ramifications of drinking and driving. Less than 20% of patients who were driving under the influence incurred any legal repercussion. Deterrents that prevent law enforcement from being able to obtain evidence needed for prosecution should be eliminated. Health care providers and law enforcement agencies should work as a team to help mitigate the incidence of drunk driving and its burden on society. Epidemiologic study, level III.

  7. Ethnic group variations in alcohol-related hospital admissions in England: does place matter?

    PubMed

    Barry, Eleanor; Laverty, Anthony A; Majeed, Azeem; Millett, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The health burden of alcohol use is socially and geographically patterned in many countries. Less is known about variations in this burden between ethnic groups and whether this differs across place of residence. National cross-sectional study using hospital admission data in England. Alcohol-related admission rates, where an alcohol-related condition was either the primary diagnosis (considered as the reason for admission) or a comorbidity, were calculated using ethnic group specific rates for English regions. In 2010/11 there were a total of 264,870 alcohol-related admissions in England. Admission rates were higher in the North of England than elsewhere (e.g. for primary diagnosis 161 per 100,000 population in the North vs. 62 per 100,000 in the South). These patterns were not uniform across ethnic groups however. For example, admission rates for alcohol-related comorbidity were four times higher among White Irish in London compared with those in the South of England (306 to 76 per 100,000) and four times higher in Indians living in the Midlands compared with those in the South of England (128 to 29 per 100,000). These patterns were similar for admissions with a comorbid alcohol-related condition. Geographical location may be an important determinant of within and between ethnic group variations in alcohol-related hospital admissions in England. While a number of factors were not examined here, this descriptive analysis suggests that this heterogeneity should be taken into account when planning interventions and services for the prevention and management of alcohol misuse.

  8. Effects of particulate matter exposure on multiple sclerosis hospital admission in Lombardy region, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Angelici; Mirko, Piola; Tommaso, Cavalleri; Giorgia, Randi; Francesca, Cortini; Roberto, Bergamaschi; Andrea, Baccarelli A; Alberto, Bertazzi Pier; Cecilia, Pesatori Angela; Valentina, Bollati

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, characterized by recurrent relapses of inflammation that cause mild to severe disability. Exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) has been associated with acute increases in systemic inflammatory responses and neuroinflammation. In the present study, we hypothesize that exposure to PM < 10 µm in diameter (PM10) might increase the occurrence of MS-related hospitalizations. Methods We obtained daily concentrations of PM10 from 53 monitoring sites covering the study area and we identified 8287 MS-related hospitalization through hospital admission-discharge records of the Lombardy region, Italy, between 2001 and 2009. We used a Poisson regression analysis to investigate the association between exposure to PM10 and risk of hospitalization. Results A higher RR of hospital admission for MS relapse was associated with exposure to PM10 at different time intervals. The maximum effect of PM10 on MS hospitalization was found for exposure between days 0 and 7: Hospital admission for MS increased 42% (95%CI 1.39–1.45) on the days preceded by one week with PM10 levels in the highest quartile. The p-value for trend across quartiles was < 0.001. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that air pollution may have a role in determining MS occurrence and relapses. Our findings could open new avenues for determining the pathogenic mechanisms of MS and potentially be applied to other autoimmune diseases. PMID:26624240

  9. Protocol for an overview of systematic reviews of interventions to reduce unscheduled hospital admissions among adults.

    PubMed

    Bobrovitz, Niklas; Onakpoya, Igho; Roberts, Nia; Heneghan, Carl; Mahtani, Kamal R

    2015-08-21

    Unscheduled hospital admissions are an increasing burden on health systems worldwide. To date, initiatives to reduce admissions have had limited success as it is unclear which strategies effectively reduce admissions and are supported by a strong evidence-base. Therefore, we will conduct an overview to find, assess and summarise all published peer-reviewed systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials that examine the effect of an intervention on unplanned admissions among adults. This is a protocol for a systematic overview of reviews. We will search four databases: Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Cochrane Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects. We will consider systematic reviews and meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials in adults (≥ 16 years old) evaluating the effect of any intervention on unscheduled hospital admissions including those to treat, monitor, diagnose or prevent a health problem. We will only include reviews that identified unscheduled hospitalisations as a prespecified outcome. Two authors will independently screen articles for inclusion using a priori criteria. We will assess the quality of included reviews and extract ratings of the quality of evidence from within each review. We will create a hierarchical list of interventions based on estimates of absolute admission reductions and the quality of the evidence. Presentation of results will align with guidelines in the Cochrane Handbook of Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis statement. Ethics approval is not required. We will submit the results of this study for peer-review publication. The results will inform future research and could be used by healthcare managers, administrators and policymakers to guide resource allocation decisions and inform local implementation and optimisation of interventions to reduce unscheduled hospital admissions. Published by the BMJ

  10. Clinical audit of COPD patients requiring hospital admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC study.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Alvarez-Martínez, Carlos J; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients' characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0-35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0-62%) and 6.5% died (0-35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0-50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement.

  11. Clinical Audit of COPD Patients Requiring Hospital Admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC Study

    PubMed Central

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Álvarez-Martínez, Carlos J.; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G.; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    Backgrounds AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients’ characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. Methodology/Principal Findings An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0–35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0–62%) and 6.5% died (0–35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0–50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. Conclusions/Significance The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement. PMID:22911875

  12. Increasing Short-Stay Unplanned Hospital Admissions among Children in England; Time Trends Analysis ’97–‘06

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Sonia; Bottle, Alex; Gilbert, Ruth; Sharland, Mike

    2009-01-01

    Background Timely care by general practitioners in the community keeps children out of hospital and provides better continuity of care. Yet in the UK, access to primary care has diminished since 2004 when changes in general practitioners' contracts enabled them to ‘opt out’ of providing out-of-hours care and since then unplanned pediatric hospital admission rates have escalated, particularly through emergency departments. We hypothesised that any increase in isolated short stay admissions for childhood illness might reflect failure to manage these cases in the community over a 10 year period spanning these changes. Methods and Findings We conducted a population based time trends study of major causes of hospital admission in children <10 years using the Hospital Episode Statistics database, which records all admissions to all NHS hospitals in England using ICD10 codes. Outcomes measures were total and isolated short stay unplanned hospital admissions (lasting less than 2 days without readmission within 28 days) from 1997 to 2006. Over the period annual unplanned admission rates in children aged <10 years rose by 22% (from 73.6/1000 to 89.5/1000 child years) with larger increases of 41% in isolated short stay admissions (from 42.7/1000 to 60.2/1000 child years). There was a smaller fall of 12% in admissions with length of stay of >2 days. By 2006, 67.3% of all unplanned admissions were isolated short stays <2 days. The increases in admission rates were greater for common non-infectious than infectious causes of admissions. Conclusions Short stay unplanned hospital admission rates in young children in England have increased substantially in recent years and are not accounted for by reductions in length of in-hospital stay. The majority are isolated short stay admissions for minor illness episodes that could be better managed by primary care in the community and may be evidence of a failure of primary care services. PMID:19829695

  13. Increasing short-stay unplanned hospital admissions among children in England; time trends analysis '97-'06.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Sonia; Bottle, Alex; Gilbert, Ruth; Sharland, Mike

    2009-10-15

    Timely care by general practitioners in the community keeps children out of hospital and provides better continuity of care. Yet in the UK, access to primary care has diminished since 2004 when changes in general practitioners' contracts enabled them to 'opt out' of providing out-of-hours care and since then unplanned pediatric hospital admission rates have escalated, particularly through emergency departments. We hypothesised that any increase in isolated short stay admissions for childhood illness might reflect failure to manage these cases in the community over a 10 year period spanning these changes. We conducted a population based time trends study of major causes of hospital admission in children <10 years using the Hospital Episode Statistics database, which records all admissions to all NHS hospitals in England using ICD10 codes. Outcomes measures were total and isolated short stay unplanned hospital admissions (lasting less than 2 days without readmission within 28 days) from 1997 to 2006. Over the period annual unplanned admission rates in children aged <10 years rose by 22% (from 73.6/1000 to 89.5/1000 child years) with larger increases of 41% in isolated short stay admissions (from 42.7/1000 to 60.2/1000 child years). There was a smaller fall of 12% in admissions with length of stay of >2 days. By 2006, 67.3% of all unplanned admissions were isolated short stays <2 days. The increases in admission rates were greater for common non-infectious than infectious causes of admissions. Short stay unplanned hospital admission rates in young children in England have increased substantially in recent years and are not accounted for by reductions in length of in-hospital stay. The majority are isolated short stay admissions for minor illness episodes that could be better managed by primary care in the community and may be evidence of a failure of primary care services.

  14. Effect of Present-on-Admission (POA) Reporting Accuracy on Hospital Performance Assessments Using Risk-Adjusted Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, L Elizabeth; Chu, Philip W; Bacchetti, Peter; Kruger, Jenna; Bindman, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate how the accuracy of present-on-admission (POA) reporting affects hospital 30-day acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality assessments. Data Sources A total of 2005 California patient discharge data (PDD) and vital statistics death files. Study Design We compared hospital performance rankings using an established model assessing hospital performance for AMI with (1) a model incorporating POA indicators of whether a secondary condition was a comorbidity or a complication of care, and (2) a simulation analysis that factored POA indicator accuracy into the hospital performance assessment. For each simulation, we changed POA indicators for six major acute risk factors of AMI mortality. The probability of POA being changed depended on patient and hospital characteristics. Principal Findings Comparing the performance rankings of 268 hospitals using the established model with that using the POA indicator, 67 hospitals' (25 percent) rank differed by ≥10 percent. POA reporting inaccuracy due to overreporting and underreporting had little additional impact; POA overreporting contributed to 4 percent of hospitals' difference in rank compared to the POA model and POA underreporting contributed to <1 percent difference. Conclusion Incorporating POA indicators into risk-adjusted models of AMI care has a substantial impact on hospital rankings of performance that is not primarily attributable to inaccuracy in POA hospital reporting. PMID:25285372

  15. Overweight and obesity among older adults on admission to hospital.

    PubMed

    Lithander, F E; Keogh, A M; Killeen, L

    2011-03-01

    Poor nutritional status, which includesboth under- a nd over-nutrition, i s associated w it h poor health outcomes. T his cross-sectional study assessed the nutritional status of older patients admitted to an acute geriatric ward of a Dublin hospital. Anthropometric and clinical measurements were made. Thirty patients, mean (sd) age 79 (7) y and body mass index 26.6 (4.7) kg/m2, participated. More patients were overweight (n = 12) or obese (n = 9) than underweight (n= 1) or healthy weight (n = 8) which indicates that this age-group may be part of the Irish obesity epidemic.

  16. Factors associated with hospital admission for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Alcázar, Bernardino; García-Polo, Cayo; Herrejón, Alberto; Ruiz, Luis Alberto; de Miguel, Javier; Ros, José Antonio; García-Sidro, Patricia; Conde, Gema Tirado; López-Campos, José Luis; Martínez, Carlos; Costán, Joaquin; Bonnin, Marc; Mayoralas, Sagrario; Miravitlles, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) that require hospital admission have a major impact on the progression of disease and generate high health costs. A multi-center, cross-sectional, observational, study was conducted with the aim to identify factors associated with hospital admission in patients with COPD. We obtained data of socio-demographic and anthropometric characteristics, quality of life, respiratory symptoms, anxiety and depression, physical activity and pulmonary function tests. We analyzed their association with hospital admission with a multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model. We analyzed 127 patients, 50 (39%) of whom had been hospitalized. 93.7% were men, mean age 67 years (SD=9) and a FEV1 of 41.9% (SD=15.3). In the first model obtained, the baseline SpO(2), the BODE index and emergency room (ER) visits were associated with hospital admission and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.809. In a second model we included only variables readily available (without the 6 minutes walking test) and only the SpO(2) and previous visits to the ER were significant with an AUC ROC 0.783. hospital admission for exacerbation of COPD is associated with poor SpO(2), higher BODE index score and a greater number of visits to the ER. In case you do not have the 6 minutes walking test, the other two variables offer a similar discriminative ability. Copyright © 2011 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. The influence of the day of the week of hospital admission on the prognosis of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Barros, Juliana B; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Alencar, Airlane P; Lotufo, Paulo A; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the weekday and weekend distribution of stroke case hospital admissions and their respective prognosis based on a sample from the Estudo de Mortalidade e Morbidade do Acidente Vascular Cerebral (EMMA), a cohort of stroke patients admitted to a community hospital in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. We ascertained all consecutive cases of first-time strokes between April 2006 and December 2008 and performed a subsequent one-year follow-up. No association was found between frequency of hospital admissions due to ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes and the specific day of the week on which the admission occurred. However, ten-day and twelve-month case-fatality was higher in hemorrhagic stroke patients admitted at the weekend. We also found that intracerebral hemorrhage patients admitted on weekends had a worse survival rate (50%) compared with those admitted during weekdays (25.6%, P log-rank = 0.03). We found a multivariate hazard ratio of 2.49 (95%CI: 1.10-5.81, P trend = 0.03) for risk of death at the weekend compared to weekdays for intracerebral hemorrhage cases. No difference in survival was observed with respect to the overall sample of stroke or ischemic stroke patients.

  18. A qualitative study of determinants of patient behaviour leading to an infection related hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Tonna, A P; Weidmann, A E; Laing, R B; Tonna, I; Macartney, G M; Paudyal, V; Stewart, D

    2017-03-01

    Objectives To describe and understand the determinants of patients' behaviours surrounding admission to hospital for an acute infective episode Method Patients admitted to the infection or acute medicine admission units of a major Scottish teaching hospital and commenced on antibiotic therapy after admission were included. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted using a pre-piloted interview schedule guide that focused on gathering information about patient behaviours and experiences prior to admission to hospital with an acute infection. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using the Framework Approach. Emerging themes were matched to the Theoretical Domains Framework of behavioural determinants. Results Twenty-one patients consented to participate and 18 transcripts were suitable for analysis. The most common infections were those of the skin, soft tissue and respiratory tract. From the patients' perspectives, behavioural determinants that appeared to impact their admission to hospital were principally their knowledge, beliefs of consequences, the environmental context and resources (mainly out-of-hours services), social influences and their own emotions. Determinants such as knowledge of the signs and symptoms, beliefs of consequences and environmental context were facilitators of health seeking behaviours. The main barriers were a lack of awareness of consequences of infection potentially leading to delayed admission impacting infection severity, stay in secondary care and resource utilisation. Conclusions This study has shown that any initial patient-centred intervention that is proposed to change patient behaviour needs to be based on behavioural determinants emerging in this research. The intervention may include aspects such as patient education on resources available out-of-hours and ways to access the healthcare system, education on recognising signs of infection leading to prompter treatment and positive

  19. Hospital admissions and school dropout: a retrospective cohort study of the 'selection hypothesis'.

    PubMed

    van Heesch, Mirjam M J; Bosma, Hans; Traag, Tanja; Otten, Ferdy

    2012-08-01

    School dropout is an important predictor of poor health and of high relevance for public health (in accord with the 'causation hypothesis'). Rather than examining how dropout affects health, we set out to examine how poor health might affect school dropout (in accord with the 'selection hypothesis'). Hospital admissions are potentially indicative of more serious disease and might be expected to result in learning backlogs. Longitudinal data of the Dutch Secondary Education Pupil Cohort 1993 (VOCL'93) and the National Medical Registration (LMR) were combined. The study population consisted of 16,239 pupils who were followed from first grade at secondary school until they left fulltime education. Pupils were monitored regarding both their educational careers and their hospital admissions. Nine percent had a hospital admission and 10% became a school dropout. Hospital admissions were only predictive of later school dropout for pupils starting in the highest type of secondary education (pre-university education) [OR 1.54 (95% CI 1.05-2.26)], not for pupils with lower educational levels. Pre-university pupils who had been hospitalized for more than 9 days [OR 2.34 (95% CI 1.08-5.09)] or who were hospitalized more than three times [OR 4.20 (95% CI 1.75-10.04)] had particularly heightened odds of school dropout. Our findings further support the 'selection hypothesis' and confirm the relevance of dropout for public health. Public health workers and educational professionals should probably aim at intensified monitoring of children who have been hospitalized and simultaneously aim at improving accessibility to (higher quality) education in the hospital.

  20. [Health care administration for the mass admission of victims to the hospital].

    PubMed

    Zhigunov, A K; Kosenkov, A N; Aslanov, A D; Miznev, I A; Oĭtov, T A

    2007-01-01

    Experience of health care organization at district hospital on the day of armed conflict is discussed. Sixty-six patients with various injuries have been admitted during 5 hours. Optimal organization of health care system permitted to realize all the diagnostic and surgical procedures in time. Overall 98 operations have been performed at 64 patients. Rapid pre-admission care and transportation to specialized hospital allow to decrease hemorrhage volume, shock severity and lethality.

  1. Complex Case Conferences Associated with Reduced Hospital Admissions for High-Risk Patients with Multiple Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Tuso, Philip; Watson, Heather L; Garofalo-Wright, Lynn; Lindsay, Gail; Jackson, Ana; Taitano, Maria; Koyama, Sandra; Kanter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Reducing avoidable hospital readmissions presents an opportunity to improve health care quality and reduce avoidable costs. We studied the effect person-focused care may have on reducing avoidable admissions to the hospital. Methods: Among patients with heart failure discharged from the hospital, we evaluated the effect on 30-day readmissions of transitions-in-care interventions: home health visits, follow-up phone calls, and physician office visits. We also used a standardized diagnostic tool to interview readmitted patients to identify social reasons that may have contributed to the readmission. Finally, we used the learnings from both interventions to develop a new intervention: a single complex disease case conference that included the entire health care team. We measured hospital admissions for 21 patients during the 6 months before and after their complex case conferences. Results: Observed-over-expected hospital readmission rates were lowest for patients receiving a postdischarge visit with a home health nurse and a follow-up visit with their physician (0.54), compared with solely a physician visit (0.81), home health visit (1.2), or phone call (1.55). Various social issues may contribute to hospital readmissions, including caregiver knowledge, ability to care for oneself at home, and issues related to medications (adherence, ability to pay, and knowledge about potential side effects). Substantially fewer hospital admissions occurred after complex case conferences. Conclusions: Complex case conferences with disease-focused and person-focused interventions may be associated with reduced hospital admissions for patients with heart failure and multiple comorbidities. PMID:24626071

  2. INFLUENCE OF ALTERNATIVE PM COMPONENTS IN MASS ASSOCIATIONS WITH PHILADELPHIA, PA MORTALITY AND HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of hospital admissions and mortality data have indicated that adverse human health effects are associated with present-day ambient particualte matter (PM) pollution levels. However, the PM mass measurement is chemically non-specific, ignoring the fact th...

  3. Evaluating Psychiatric Hospital Admission Decisions for Children in Foster Care: An Optimal Classification Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowden, Jessica A.; Leon, Scott C.; Bryant, Fred B.; Lyons, John S.

    2007-01-01

    This study explored clinical and nonclinical predictors of inpatient hospital admission decisions across a sample of children in foster care over 4 years (N = 13,245). Forty-eight percent of participants were female and the mean age was 13.4 (SD = 3.5 years). Optimal data analysis (Yarnold & Soltysik, 2005) was used to construct a nonlinear…

  4. Influence of Asian dust storms on daily acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Teng, Joshua Chen-Yuan; Chan, Yun-Shan; Peng, Yu-I; Liu, Tsai-Ching

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first to explore the relationship between Asian dust storm events (ADS) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) hospital admissions by applying time series models. Nationwide population-based hospitalization claims data in Taiwan were used. There were 143,063 AMI admissions during 2000-2009. An autoregressive with exogenous variables (ARX) time series model was used to investigate the dynamic connection between AMI hospital admissions and ADS events. AMI hospitalizations significantly spiked on post-ADS day three. Among the total population, 3.2 more cases of AMI admissions occurred on post-ADS day three. When the data were stratified by age and gender, the same delayed effect was present in the male population, especially those aged 45-64 and over 74. Our study shows that although an ADS event does not cause an immediate incidence of AMI, storms may increase AMI incidence through a delayed effect. Hence, AMI prevention is not only important during a dust storm, but particularly so in subsequent days. During the days after an ADS, exposure to dust should be minimized by staying indoors as much as possible and by wearing a mask when exposure to dust is unavoidable. This is especially true for working and older adults. Nurses at local public health centers can increase awareness and promote public safety by providing health information to local communities regarding the link between dust storms and AMI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. INFLUENCE OF ALTERNATIVE PM COMPONENTS IN MASS ASSOCIATIONS WITH PHILADELPHIA, PA MORTALITY AND HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological analyses of hospital admissions and mortality data have indicated that adverse human health effects are associated with present-day ambient particualte matter (PM) pollution levels. However, the PM mass measurement is chemically non-specific, ignoring the fact th...

  6. [Air pollution and hospital admission trends of children with bronchial obstruction in Tuzla Canton].

    PubMed

    Hadzć, Devleta; Mladina, Nada; Ljuca, Farid; Bazardzanović, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of bronchial obstruction in children is continuously increasing at any age. Many studies have found associations between increase of respiratory diseases and air pollution. The aim of this paper was to establish possible connection between children hospital admission trends for bronchial obstruction and levels of measured concentration of air pollution agents in Tuzla Canton area. The results of investigation demonstrated that the distribution of hospital admissions of children with bronchial obstruction was different regarding place of inhabitants and season. Spatial distribution demonstrated that the highest number of children treated for bronchial obstruction was from Tuzla, Lukavac and Zivinice. The incidence of patients from these municipalities was significantly above the participation of these municipalities in total population. Seasonal distribution of hospital admissions of children with bronchial obstruction was different for single municipalities of Tuzla Canton and for different seasons. Air pollutants, sulfur oxide and dust deposition were significantly higher for heating season compared to season without heating. There is a link between frequency of hospital admission for bronchial obstruction and level of measured air pollutants.

  7. The relationship of respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions to the southern California wildfires of 2003

    PubMed Central

    Delfino, R J; Brummel, S; Wu, J; Stern, H; Ostro, B; Lipsett, M; Winer, A; Street, D H; Zhang, L; Tjoa, T; Gillen, D L

    2014-01-01

    Objective There is limited information on the public health impact of wildfires. The relationship of cardiorespiratory hospital admissions (n = 40 856) to wildfire-related particulate matter (PM2.5) during catastrophic wildfires in southern California in October 2003 was evaluated. Methods Zip code level PM2.5 concentrations were estimated using spatial interpolations from measured PM2.5, light extinction, meteorological conditions, and smoke information from MODIS satellite images at 250 m resolution. Generalised estimating equations for Poisson data were used to assess the relationship between daily admissions and PM2.5, adjusted for weather, fungal spores (associated with asthma), weekend, zip code-level population and sociodemographics. Results Associations of 2-day average PM2.5 with respiratory admissions were stronger during than before or after the fires. Average increases of 70 μg/m3 PM2.5 during heavy smoke conditions compared with PM2.5 in the pre-wildfire period were associated with 34% increases in asthma admissions. The strongest wildfire-related PM2.5 associations were for people ages 65– 99 years (10.1% increase per 10 μg/m3 PM2.5, 95% CI 3.0% to 17.8%) and ages 0–4 years (8.3%, 95% CI 2.2% to 14.9%) followed by ages 20–64 years (4.1%, 95% CI 20.5% to 9.0%). There were no PM2.5–asthma associations in children ages 5–18 years, although their admission rates significantly increased after the fires. Per 10 μg/m3 wildfire-related PM2.5, acute bronchitis admissions across all ages increased by 9.6% (95% CI 1.8% to 17.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admissions for ages 20–64 years by 6.9% (95% CI 0.9% to 13.1%), and pneumonia admissions for ages 5–18 years by 6.4% (95% CI 21.0% to 14.2%). Acute bronchitis and pneumonia admissions also increased after the fires. There was limited evidence of a small impact of wildfire-related PM2.5 on cardiovascular admissions. Conclusions Wildfire-related PM2.5 led to increased respiratory

  8. The ecological relationship between deprivation, social isolation and rates of hospital admission for acute psychiatric care: a comparison of London and New York City.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Sarah; Copeland, Alison; Fagg, James; Congdon, Peter; Almog, Michael; Fitzpatrick, Justine

    2006-03-01

    We report on comparative analyses of small area variation in rates of acute hospital admissions for psychiatric conditions in Greater London around the year 1998 and in New York City (NYC) in 2000. Based on a theoretical model of the factors likely to influence psychiatric admission rates, and using data from the most recent population censuses and other sources, we examine the association with area indicators designed to measure access to hospital beds, socio-economic deprivation, social fragmentation and ethnic/racial composition. We report results on admissions for men and women aged 15-64 for all psychiatric conditions (excluding self-harm), drug-related substance abuse/addiction, schizophrenia and affective disorders. The units of analysis in NYC were 165 five-digit Zip Code Areas and, in London, 760 electoral wards as defined in 1998. The analysis controls for age and sex composition and, as a proxy for access to care, spatial proximity to hospitals with psychiatric beds. Poisson regression modeling incorporating random effects was used to control for both overdispersion in the counts of admissions and for the effects of spatial autocorrelation. The results for NYC and London showed that local admission rates for all types of condition were positively and significantly associated with deprivation and the association is independent of demographic composition or 'access' to beds. In NYC, social fragmentation showed a significant association with admissions due to affective disorders and schizophrenia, and for drug dependency among females. Racial minority concentration was significantly and positively associated with admissions for schizophrenia. In London, social fragmentation was associated positively with admissions for men and women due to schizophrenia and affective disorders. The variable measuring racial/ethnic minority concentration for London wards showed a negative association with admission rates for drug dependency and for affective disorders. We

  9. Coarse Particulate Air Pollution Associated with Increased Risk of Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in a Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-10-16

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between coarse particles (PM₂.₅-₁₀) levels and frequency of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases (RD) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for RD including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia, and ambient air pollution data levels for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 2006 to 2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions for RD was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased rate of admissions for RD were significantly associated with higher coarse PM levels only on cool days (<25 °C), with a 10 µg/m³ elevation in PM₂.₅-₁₀ concentrations associated with a 3% (95% CI = 1%-5%) rise in COPD admissions, 4% (95% CI = 1%-7%) increase in asthma admissions, and 3% (95% CI = 2%-4%) rise in pneumonia admissions. No significant associations were found between coarse particle levels and the number of hospital admissions for RD on warm days. In the two-pollutant models, PM₂.₅-₁₀ levels remained significantly correlated with higher rate of RD admissions even controlling for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, or ozone on cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM₂.₅-₁₀ enhance the risk of hospital admissions for RD on cool days.

  10. Urban-rural variation in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional injury in Ireland

    PubMed Central

    Boland, M; Staines, A; Fitzpatrick, P; Scallan, E

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore urban-rural differences in the mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional injuries in the Republic of Ireland. Design: Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) in residents of urban and non-city areas (called rural areas) from all causes of unintentional injury were calculated using Central Statistics Office mortality data from 1980–2000. Hospital admission data (Hospital In-Patient Enquiry) from 1993–2000 were used to calculate standardised hospital admission ratios (SARs) in urban and rural residents. Population data were obtained from the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 censuses. Results: The rate of unintentional injury mortality was significantly higher in rural residents for all-cause unintentional injury mortality (SMR 103.0, 95% confidence interval 101 to 105), and specifically for deaths related to motor vehicle trauma (MVT), drowning, machinery, and firearms. There were significantly higher SMRs in urban residents for falls and poisoning. The rate of unintentional injury hospital admission was significantly higher in rural residents for all-cause unintentional injury (SAR 104.6, 95% confidence interval 104 to 105) and specifically for injuries from falls, MVT, being struck by or against an object, injuries in pedal cyclists, fire/burn injuries, and machinery injuries. SARs were significantly higher in residents of urban areas for poisoning and injuries in pedestrians. Conclusions: There are urban-rural differences in mortality and admissions for injuries in Ireland. Possible reasons for the higher rural mortality rates are higher case fatality in MVT and rural exposure to hazardous farm machinery, firearms, and open areas of water. This information could assist in targeting prevention programmes under the proposed National Injury Prevention Strategy. PMID:15691988

  11. Impact of haze and air pollution-related hazards on hospital admissions in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zili; Wang, Jian; Chen, Lianghua; Chen, Xinyu; Sun, Guiyuan; Zhong, Nanshan; Kan, Haidong; Lu, Wenju

    2014-03-01

    Guangzhou is a metropolitan in south China with unique pollutants and geographic location. Unlike those in western countries and the rest of China, the appearance of haze in Guangzhou is often (about 278 days per year on average of 4 years). Little is known about the influence of these hazes on health. In this study, we investigated whether short-term exposures to haze and air pollution are associated with hospital admissions in Guangzhou. The relationships between haze, air pollution, and daily hospital admissions during 2008-2011 were assessed using generalized additive model. Studies were categorized by gender, age, season, lag, and disease category. In haze episodes, an increase in air pollutant emissions corresponded to 3.46 (95 % CI, 1.67, 5.27) increase in excessive risk (ER) of total hospital admissions at lag 1, 11.42 (95 % CI, 4.32, 18.99) and 11.57 (95 % CI, 4.38, 19.26) increases in ERs of cardiovascular illnesses at lags 2 and 4 days, respectively. As to total hospital admissions, an increase in NO2 was associated with a 0.73 (95 % CI, 0.11, 1.35) and a 0.28 (95 % CI, 0.11, 0.46) increases in ERs at lag 5 and lag 05, respectively. For respiratory illnesses, increases in NO2 was associated with a 1.94 (95 % CI, 0.50, 3.40) increase in ER at lag 0, especially among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Haze (at lag1) and air pollution (for NO2 at lag 5 and for SO2 at lag3) both presented more drastic effects on the 19 to 64 years old and in the females. Together, we demonstrated that haze pollution was associated with total and cardiovascular illnesses. NO2 was the sole pollutant with the largest risk of hospital admissions for total and respiratory diseases in both single- and multi-pollutant models.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for medication reconciliation errors during hospital admission in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Vargas, Blanca; Delgado Silveira, Eva; Iglesias Peinado, Irene; Bermejo Vicedo, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Background Care transitions are risk points for medication discrepancies, especially in the elderly. Objective This study was undertaken to assess prevalence and describe medication reconciliation errors during admission in elderly patients and to analyze associated risk factors. We also evaluate the effect of these errors on the length of hospital stay. Setting General surgery, orthopedics, internal medicines and infectious diseases departments of a 1070-bed Spanish teaching hospital. Method This is a prospective observational study. Patients >65 years and taking ≥5 medications were randomly selected from those admitted to hospital. The pharmacist obtained the best possible medication history based on medical records, medical notes from patients' previous admissions to hospital, "brown bag" review, community care prescriptions, and comprehensive patient interviews. It was compared to current inpatient prescription to detect unintentional discrepancies (discrepancy with no apparent clinical explanation), which were reported to the physician. When the physician accepted the discrepancy by changing the medication order, it was recorded as a medication reconciliation error and classified by type of error. Several variables were analyzed as possible risk/protective factors. Main outcome measure Is prevalence of medication reconciliation errors at admission. Results Reconciliation was performed on 206 patients. Medication reconciliation errors occurred in 49.5 % (102/206) of patients. 1996 medications were recorded, and 359 had unintentional discrepancies (56.0 % (201/359) medication reconciliation errors). The most common was omission (65.1 %). Identified risk factors were as follows: physician experience, number of pre-admission prescribed medications, and previous surgeries. Computerized order entry system was a protective factor. Conclusion Medication reconciliation errors occur in almost half of the elderly patients at admission, especially omissions. Risk

  13. Use of a Patient Portal During Hospital Admissions to Surgical Services

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jamie R.; Davis, Sharon E.; Cronin, Robert M.; Jackson, Gretchen P.

    2016-01-01

    Patient portal research has focused on medical outpatient settings, with little known about portal use during hospitalizations or by surgical patients. We measured portal adoption among patients admitted to surgical services over two years. Surgical services managed 37,025 admissions of 31,310 unique patients. One-fourth of admissions (9,362, 25.3%) involved patients registered for the portal. Registration rates were highest for admissions to laparoscopic/gastrointestinal (55%) and oncology/endocrine (50%) services. Portal use occurred during 1,486 surgical admissions, 4% of all and 16% of those registered at admission. Inpatient portal use was associated with patients who were white, male, and had longer lengths of stay (p < 0.01). Viewing health record data and secure messaging were the most commonly used functions, accessed in 4,836 (72.9%) and 1,626 (24.5%) user sessions. Without specific encouragement, hospitalized surgical patients are using our patient portal. The surgical inpatient setting may provide opportunities for patient engagement using patient portals. PMID:28269956

  14. Respiratory hospital admissions associated with PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache Valleys

    SciTech Connect

    Pope CA, I.I.I. )

    1991-03-01

    This study assessed the association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution in Utah, Salt Lake, and Cache valleys during April 1985 through March 1989. Utah and Salt Lake valleys had high levels of PM10 pollution that violated both the annual and 24-h standards issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Much lower PM10 levels occurred in the Cache Valley. Utah Valley experienced the intermittent operation of its primary source of PM10 pollution: an integrated steel mill. Bronchitis and asthma admissions for preschool-age children were approximately twice as frequent in Utah Valley when the steel mill was operating versus when it was not. Similar differences were not observed in Salt Lake or Cache valleys. Even though Cache Valley had higher smoking rates and lower temperatures in winter than did Utah Valley, per capita bronchitis and asthma admissions for all ages were approximately twice as high in Utah Valley. During the period when the steel mill was closed, differences in per capita admissions between Utah and Cache valleys narrowed considerably. Regression analysis also demonstrated a statistical association between respiratory hospital admissions and PM10 pollution. The results suggest that PM10 pollution plays a role in the incidence and severity of respiratory disease.

  15. The impact of heat, cold, and heat waves on hospital admissions in eight cities in Korea.

    PubMed

    Son, Ji-Young; Bell, Michelle L; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2014-11-01

    Although the impact of temperature on mortality is well documented, relatively fewer studies have evaluated the associations of temperature with morbidity outcomes such as hospital admissions, and most studies were conducted in North America or Europe. We evaluated weather and hospital admissions including specific causes (allergic disease, asthma, selected respiratory disease, and cardiovascular disease) in eight major cities in Korea from 2003 to 2008. We also explored potential effect modification by individual characteristics such as sex and age. We used hierarchical modeling to first estimate city-specific associations between heat, cold, or heat waves and hospitalizations, and then estimated overall effects. Stratified analyses were performed by cause of hospitalization, sex, and age (0-14, 15-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years). Cardiovascular hospitalizations were significantly associated with high temperature, whereas hospitalizations for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease were significantly associated with low temperature. The overall heat effect for cardiovascular hospitalization was a 4.5% (95% confidence interval 0.7, 8.5%) increase in risk comparing hospitalizations at 25 to 15 °C. For cold effect, the overall increase in risk of hospitalizations comparing 2 with 15 °C was 50.5 (13.7, 99.2%), 43.6 (8.9, 89.5%), and 53.6% (9.8, 114.9%) for allergic disease, asthma, and selected respiratory disease, respectively. We did not find statistically significant effects of heat waves compared with nonheat wave days. Our results suggest susceptible populations such as women and younger persons. Our findings provide suggestive evidence that both high and low ambient temperatures are associated with the risk of hospital admissions, particularly in women or younger person, in Korea.

  16. Exacerbations, hospital admissions and impaired health status in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Miravitlles, Marc; Calle, Miriam; Alvarez-Gutierrez, Francisco; Gobartt, Elena; López, Francisco; Martín, Antonio

    2006-04-01

    Impaired health status may be a risk factor for frequent exacerbations and hospital admission and, in turn, exacerbations and admissions may further impair the health status of patients with COPD. We have investigated the variables associated with frequent exacerbations (3 or more per year) and admission, with particular interest in health status, in a cohort of ambulatory patients with moderate to severe COPD attended by chest physicians in Spain. A total of 227 investigators included 1057 patients with a mean predicted FEV1 of 41.8%. The mean total score on the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) was 47.9 units, and 300 patients (28.4%) had 3 or more exacerbations the previous year and 344 (32.6%) were admitted at least once during the same period. In multivariate analysis only the SGRQ total score was significantly associated with both frequent exacerbations (OR = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-2.12; p<0.0001) and admission (OR = 1.01; 95% CI = 1.00-1.02; p = 0.0008). Other variables significantly associated with frequent exacerbations were chronic mucus hypersecretion, increased baseline dyspnea, comorbidity, GOLD stage IV and treatment with inhaled corticosteroids. Variables associated with admission were lower educational level, increased number of exacerbations, use of long-term oxygen therapy and use of short acting beta-2 agonists. An impaired health status is associated with an increased number of exacerbations and with admission to hospital in the previous year. These results, together with previous studies, confirm that impairment in health status in COPD is both a marker of risk for, and a consequence of, frequent exacerbations and admissions.

  17. Impact of air pollution on hospital admissions in Southwestern Ontario, Canada: Generating hypotheses in sentinel high-exposure places

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Karen Y; Luginaah, Isaac N; Gorey, Kevin M

    2007-01-01

    Background Southwestern Ontario (SWO) in Canada has been known as a 'hot spot' in terms of environmental exposure and potential effects. We chose to study 3 major cities in SWO in this paper. We compared age-standardized hospital admission ratios of Sarnia and Windsor to London, and to generate hypotheses about potential pollutant-induced health effects in the 'Chemical Valley', Sarnia. Methods The number of daily hospital admissions was obtained from all hospitals in London, Windsor and Sarnia from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2000. We used indirect age adjustment method to obtain standardized admissions ratios for males and females and we chose London as the reference population. This process of adjustment was to apply the age-specific admission rates of London to the population of Sarnia and Windsor in order to yield expected admissions. The observed number of admissions was then compared to the expected admissions in terms of a ratio. These standardized admissions ratios and their corresponding confidence intervals were calculated for Sarnia and Windsor. Results Our findings showed that Sarnia and Windsor had significantly higher age-adjusted hospital admissions rates compared to London. This finding was true for all admissions, and especially pronounced for cardiovascular and respiratory admissions. For example, in 1996, the observed number of admissions in Sarnia was 3.11 (CI: 2.80, 3.44) times for females and 2.83 (CI: 2.54, 3.14) times for males as would be expected by using London's admission rates. Conclusion Since hospital admissions rates were significantly higher in 'Chemical Valley' as compared to both London and Windsor, we hypothesize that these higher rates are pollution related. A critical look at the way ambient air quality and other pollutants are monitored in this area is warranted. Further epidemiological research is needed to verify our preliminary indications of harmful effects in people living in 'Chemical Valley'. PMID:17612400

  18. Association between use of a health information exchange system and hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Vest, J R; Kern, L M; Campion, T R; Silver, M D; Kaushal, R

    2014-01-01

    Relevant patient information is frequently difficult to obtain in emergency department (ED) visits. Improved provider access to previously inaccessible patient information may improve the quality of care and reduce hospital admissions. Health information exchange (HIE) systems enable access to longitudinal, community-wide patient information at the point of care. However, the ability of HIE to avert admissions is not well demonstrated. We sought to determine if HIE system usage is correlated with a reduction in admissions via the ED. We identified 15,645 adults from New York State with an ED visit during a 6-month period, all of whom consented to have their information accessible in the HIE system, and were continuously enrolled in two area health plans. Using claims we determined if the ED encounter resulted in an admission. We used the HIE's system log files to determine usage during the encounter. We determined the association between HIE system use and the likelihood of admission to the hospital from the ED and potential cost savings. The HIE system was accessed during 2.4% of encounters. The odds of an admission were 30% lower when the system was accessed after controlling for confounding (odds ratio = 0.70; 95%C I= 0.52, 0.95). The annual savings in the sample was $357,000. These findings suggest that the use of an HIE system may reduce hospitalizations from the ED with resultant cost savings. This is an important outcome given the substantial financial investment in interventions designed to improve provider access to patient information in the US.

  19. Trends in hospital admissions for Varicella and Zoster viruses in England, 2001/2002-2010/2011: time trend study.

    PubMed

    Abdalrahman, Bayad; Laverty, Anthony A; Beckett, Gail; Majeed, Azeem

    2015-01-01

    Varicella and Herpes Zoster are common infectious diseases. Various studies have estimated rates of infection for both manifestations of these infections; however rates of hospital admissions across the country have not previously been described. This paper presents data on hospital admissions in England for Varicella and Herpes Zoster from 2001/2002 to 2010/2011. Time trends study of all hospital admissions for Varicella and Herpes Zoster from 2001/2002 to 2010/2011 in England. Hospital admissions across England from 2001/2002 to 2010/2011. We included all patients admitted to hospital from 2001/2002 to 2010/2011 diagnosed with Varicella and Zoster according to the International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10). The main outcome measures were admission rates by year and diagnosis and age-specific admission rates for Varicella and Zoster from 2001/2002 to 2010/2011. We analysed data from Hospital Episode Statistics which include patient characteristics such as age which was used here in order to standardise rates to the relevant population. We also used mid-year population estimates from the Office for National Statistics for standardisation purposes. All analyses were conducted using Stata v12.0. The hospital admission rate for Varicella cases has risen by 1.8% over the 10-year study period. While the overall admission rates for Herpes Zoster have decreased by 4% from 2001/2002 levels. The vast majority of Varicella and Zoster admissions were not associated with any complications. The introduction of Herpes Zoster vaccine is anticipated to decrease hospital admissions in older age groups further. A repeat of this study after a further period of time would help to evaluate the impact of the introduction of Herpes Zoster vaccine in England on hospital admissions.

  20. Burden of Infected Diabetic Foot Ulcers on Hospital Admissions and Costs.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Selvarajah, Shalini; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald E; Hines, Kathryn F; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Costs related to diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) care are greater than $1 billion annually and rising. We sought to describe the impact of diabetes mellitus (DM) on foot ulcer admissions in the United States, and to investigate potential explanations for rising hospital costs. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2005-2010) was queried using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision (ICD-9) codes for a primary diagnosis of foot ulceration. Multivariable analyses were used to compare outcomes and per-admission costs among patients with foot ulceration and DM versus non-DM. In total, 962,496 foot ulcer patients were admitted over the study period. The overall rate of admissions was relatively stable over time, but the ratio of DM versus non-DM admissions increased significantly (2005: 10.2 vs. 2010: 12.7; P < 0.001). Neuropathy and infection accounted for 90% of DFU admissions, while peripheral vascular disease accounted for most non-DM admissions. Admissions related to infection rose significantly among DM patients (2005: 39,682 vs. 2010: 51,660; P < 0.001), but remained stable among non-DM patients. Overall, DM accounted for 83% and 96% of all major and minor amputations related to foot ulcers, respectively, and significantly increased cost of care (DM: $1.38 vs. non-DM: $0.13 billion/year; P < 0.001). Hospital costs per DFU admission were significantly higher for patients with infection compared with all other causes ($11,290 vs. $8,145; P < 0.001). Diabetes increases the incidence of foot ulcer admissions by 11-fold, accounting for more than 80% of all amputations and increasing hospital costs more than 10-fold over the 5 years. The majority of these costs are related to the treatment of infected foot ulcers. Education initiatives and early prevention strategies through outpatient multidisciplinary care targeted at high-risk populations are essential to preventing further increases in what is already a substantial economic burden. Copyright © 2016

  1. Errors in medication history at hospital admission: prevalence and predicting factors.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Lina M; Bondesson, Åsa; Höglund, Peter; Eriksson, Tommy

    2012-04-03

    An accurate medication list at hospital admission is essential for the evaluation and further treatment of patients. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency, type and predictors of errors in medication history, and to evaluate the extent to which standard care corrects these errors. A descriptive study was carried out in two medical wards in a Swedish hospital using Lund Integrated Medicines Management (LIMM)-based medication reconciliation. A clinical pharmacist identified each patient's most accurate pre-admission medication list by conducting a medication reconciliation process shortly after admission. This list was then compared with the patient's medication list in the hospital medical records. Addition or withdrawal of a drug or changes to the dose or dosage form in the hospital medication list were considered medication discrepancies. Medication discrepancies for which no clinical reason could be identified (unintentional changes) were considered medication history errors. The final study population comprised 670 of 818 eligible patients. At least one medication history error was identified by pharmacists conducting medication reconciliations for 313 of these patients (47%; 95% CI 43-51%). The most common medication error was an omitted drug, followed by a wrong dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a higher number of drugs at admission (odds ratio [OR] per 1 drug increase = 1.10; 95% CI 1.06-1.14; p < 0.0001) and the patient living in their own home without any care services (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.02-2.45; p = 0.042) were predictors for medication history errors at admission. The results further indicated that standard care by non-pharmacist ward staff had partly corrected the errors in affected patients by four days after admission, but a considerable proportion of the errors made in the initial medication history at admission remained undetected by standard care (OR for medication errors detected by pharmacists

  2. Errors in medication history at hospital admission: prevalence and predicting factors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An accurate medication list at hospital admission is essential for the evaluation and further treatment of patients. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency, type and predictors of errors in medication history, and to evaluate the extent to which standard care corrects these errors. Methods A descriptive study was carried out in two medical wards in a Swedish hospital using Lund Integrated Medicines Management (LIMM)-based medication reconciliation. A clinical pharmacist identified each patient's most accurate pre-admission medication list by conducting a medication reconciliation process shortly after admission. This list was then compared with the patient's medication list in the hospital medical records. Addition or withdrawal of a drug or changes to the dose or dosage form in the hospital medication list were considered medication discrepancies. Medication discrepancies for which no clinical reason could be identified (unintentional changes) were considered medication history errors. Results The final study population comprised 670 of 818 eligible patients. At least one medication history error was identified by pharmacists conducting medication reconciliations for 313 of these patients (47%; 95% CI 43-51%). The most common medication error was an omitted drug, followed by a wrong dose. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that a higher number of drugs at admission (odds ratio [OR] per 1 drug increase = 1.10; 95% CI 1.06-1.14; p < 0.0001) and the patient living in their own home without any care services (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.02-2.45; p = 0.042) were predictors for medication history errors at admission. The results further indicated that standard care by non-pharmacist ward staff had partly corrected the errors in affected patients by four days after admission, but a considerable proportion of the errors made in the initial medication history at admission remained undetected by standard care (OR for medication errors

  3. Racial differences in admissions to high-quality hospitals for coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Ioana; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary S; Cram, Peter

    2010-07-26

    Research increasingly shows that blacks with coronary heart disease (CHD) are treated at lower-quality hospitals. Little is known about racial differences in admission to high-quality hospitals. We identified all black and white Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) admitted during 2002 through 2005 to hospitals located in markets with top-ranked cardiac hospitals, as ascertained from the US News and World Report "America's Best Hospitals" annual rankings. The relationship between race and admission to top-ranked hospitals was estimated using multinomial conditional logit models to account for distance from patient residence to all available hospitals. In unadjusted analyses, blacks with AMI or undergoing CABG, compared with whites, were more likely to be admitted to top-ranked hospitals (18.3% vs 10.5% and 34.4% vs 22.7% [P < .001]) but also more likely to bypass top-ranked hospitals (25.8% vs 14.7% and 37.5% vs 26.3% [P < .001]). In models accounting for distance, blacks with acute myocardial infarction were more likely (odds ratio [OR], 1.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.16 [P < .001]), whereas blacks undergoing CABG were equally likely (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.97-1.13; P = .27) to be admitted to top-ranked hospitals compared with whites. However, within socially disadvantaged zip codes, blacks undergoing CABG were less likely to receive care at top-ranked hospitals (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.64-0.86 [P < .001]) compared with whites and more likely to bypass top-ranked hospitals located closer to their residence (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.02-1.30 [P = .03]). Black Medicare patients with acute myocardial infarction or undergoing CABG were equally or more likely to be admitted to top-ranked hospitals, except for socially disadvantaged black patients undergoing CABG.

  4. [Medicines reconciliation at hospital admission into an electronic prescribing program].

    PubMed

    Villamayor-Blanco, Lucía; Herrero-Poch, Leticia; De-Miguel-Bouzas, Jose Carlos; Freire Vazquez, M Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Objetivo: Describir y analizar los resultados obtenidos durante un año con un nuevo procedimiento de conciliación de la medicación al ingreso hospitalario basado en un programa de prescripción electrónica asistida. Método: Estudio observacional, prospectivo, no aleatorizado y no controlado de 12 meses de duración, en el que se incluyeron todos los pacientes que ingresaron, durante ese año, en un hospital general concertado de 450 camas. Para la conciliación de la medicación se utilizó el programa de prescripción electrónica como medio para el abordaje multidisciplinar (enfermería, médicos y farmacéuticos). La conciliación se realizó al ingreso hospitalario y se midieron los errores de conciliación. Resultados: Se incluyeron 23.701 pacientes, conciliándose 53.920 medicamentos, de los cuales no tenían discrepancias 48.744 (90,4%) y 5.176 (9,6%) presentaban discrepancias: 4.731 (8,8 % de los fármacos) justificadas y 445 (0,8% de los fármacos) no justificadas. La mayor parte de las discrepancias no justificadas, (n = 310; 69,7%) se debieron a errores en el registro de la medicación domiciliaria al ingreso: medicación no registrada o errores de medicamentos, dosis, frecuencia o vía de administración, omisiones de prescripción, 23,6% (n = 105) y duplicidades, 6,7% (n = 30). En ningún caso el error de conciliación llegó al paciente. Conclusiones: Mediante las ayudas informáticas incluidas en el programa de prescripción electrónica asistida y el abordaje multidisciplinar del proceso de conciliación se consigue realizar la conciliación de la medicación al ingreso en el 98% de los pacientes en el momento del ingreso, evidenciando errores de conciliación solo en el 1,3% de los pacientes.

  5. Nutritional status of children with Wilms' tumour on admission to a South African hospital and its influence on outcome.

    PubMed

    Lifson, Lauren F; Hadley, G P; Wiles, Nicola L; Pillay, Kirthee

    2017-07-01

    In developing countries up to 77% of children with cancer have been shown to be malnourished on admission. High rates of malnutrition occur due to factors such as poverty and advanced disease. Weight can be an inaccurate parameter for nutritional assessment of children with solid tumours as it is influenced by tumour mass. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of malnutrition amongst children with Wilms tumour (WT), the level of nutritional support received on admission and the influence of nutritional status on outcome. Seventy-six children diagnosed with WT and admitted to Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital between 2004 and 2012 were studied prospectively. Nutritional assessment was conducted using weight, height, mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) and triceps skinfold thickness (TSFT) prior to initiating treatment. Outcome was determined 2 years after admission. Time until commencement of nutritional resuscitation and nature, thereof, were recorded. Stunting and wasting was evident in 12% and 15% of patients, respectively. The prevalence of malnutrition was 66% when MUAC, TSFT and albumin were used. Malnutrition was not a predictor of poor outcome and did not predict advanced disease. The majority of patients (84%) received nutritional resuscitation within 2 weeks of admission. When classifying nutritional status in children with WT, the utilisation of weight and height in isolation can lead to an underestimation of the prevalence of malnutrition. Nutritional assessment of children with WT should also include MUAC and TSFT. Early aggressive nutritional resuscitation is recommended. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Associations between Extreme Precipitation and Gastrointestinal-Related Hospital Admissions in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Marie S.; Li, Shi; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Hu, Howard; Ghosh, Santu; Balakrishnan, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Understanding the potential links between extreme weather events and human health in India is important in the context of vulnerability and adaptation to climate change. Research exploring such linkages in India is sparse. Objectives: We evaluated the association between extreme precipitation and gastrointestinal (GI) illness-related hospital admissions in Chennai, India, from 2004 to 2007. Methods: Daily hospital admissions were extracted from two government hospitals in Chennai, India, and meteorological data were retrieved from the Chennai International Airport. We evaluated the association between extreme precipitation (≥ 90th percentile) and hospital admissions using generalized additive models. Both single-day and distributed lag models were explored over a 15-day period, controlling for apparent temperature, day of week, and long-term time trends. We used a stratified analysis to explore the association across age and season. Results: Extreme precipitation was consistently associated with GI-related hospital admissions. The cumulative summary of risk ratios estimated for a 15-day period corresponding to an extreme event (relative to no precipitation) was 1.60 (95% CI: 1.29, 1.98) among all ages, 2.72 (95% CI: 1.25, 5.92) among the young (≤ 5 years of age), and 1.62 (95% CI: 0.97, 2.70) among the old (≥ 65 years of age). The association was stronger during the pre-monsoon season (March–May), with a cumulative risk ratio of 6.50 (95% CI: 2.22, 19.04) for all ages combined compared with other seasons. Conclusions: Hospital admissions related to GI illness were positively associated with extreme precipitation in Chennai, India, with positive cumulative risk ratios for a 15-day period following an extreme event in all age groups. Projected changes in precipitation and extreme weather events suggest that climate change will have important implications for human health in India, where health disparities already exist. Citation: Bush KF, O

  7. Changes in hospital admissions and inpatient tariff associated with a Diabetes Integrated Care Initiative: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Simmons, David; Yu, Dahai; Wenzel, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The Diabetes Integrated Care Initiative (DICI) has tested whether hospital admissions and total amounts paid for inpatient care have declined through closer (integrated) working between primary, secondary and community diabetes services in Cambridgeshire. Poisson regression models were used to compare the percentage change in hospital admissions, and tariff paid, before and after each of 43 months (April 2007 - November 2010). East Cambridgeshire and Fenland (ECF) practices were divided into those fully (n = 10) and less (n = 7) "engaged" with the intervention defined by the extent of their uptake of intervention components between July 2009 and June 2010. Other parts of the county were "controls". Among patients with diabetes in the fully engaged ECF practices, the monthly average hospital admission rate was 19.0% (13.9, 24.2) higher (7.7 hospital admissions per 1000 patients) and the monthly tariff paid was 28.8% (28.7, 28.9) higher (£19.60 per patient per month), at the time of introducing the DICI versus the pre-implementation period (April 2007 to June 2009). These differences, had dropped to 8.7% (1.9, 15.6) and 13.4% (13.2, 13.5) (£9.92 per patient per month) higher 12 months after introduction. Comparable reductions in the rate of increase were not seen among those without diabetes or in control areas. During the DICI, patients with diabetes from "fully engaged" practices experienced increased hospitalization and amount paid for in-patient care, the extent of which trended downwards by 12 months. Further time is needed to monitor whether this trend is sustained. © 2013 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Prognostic value of on admission arterial PCO2 in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Zeynab; Saadat, Mohammad; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Background There is little data about the correlation between the outcome of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the hypercapnic type respiratory failure. In this study we prospectively investigated the prognostic significance of first arterial CO2 tension in patients hospitalized with CAP. Methods In this prospective study patients with CAP, admitted to a general hospital were included. PaCO2 was measured for each subject in an arterial blood sample drawn in the first 2 hours and its correlations with three major outcomes were evaluated: intensive care unit (ICU) admission, duration of admission and mortality in 30 days. Results A total of 114 patients (mean age: 60.9±18.3; male: 51.8%) diagnosed with CAP were included. Significant relationship was not found between PaCO2 and mortality (P=0.544) or ICU admission (P=0.863). However advanced age, associated CHF, high BUN levels, high CURB-65 scores, associated pleural effusion in chest X-ray and being admitted to the ICU (P=0.012, 0.004, 0.003, <0.001, 0.045 and <0.001 respectively) were all significant prognostic factors of higher mortality risks. Prognostic factors for ICU admission were a history of malignancy (P=0.004), higher CURB-65 (P<0.001) scores and concomitant pleural effusion (P=0.028) in chest X-ray. Hypercapnic patients hospitalized for longer duration compared with normocapnic subjects. Furthermore, patients with lower pH (P=0.041) and pleural effusions (P=0.002) were hospitalized longer than the others. Conclusions There was less prominent prognostic value regarding on-admission PaCO2 in comparison to other factors such as CURB-65. Considering the inconsistent results of surveys conducted on prognostic value of PaCO2 for CAP outcomes, further investigations are required to reach a consensus on this matter. PMID:27867552

  9. [Outlier patient admissions and their relationship with the emergence of clinical complications and prolonged hospital stays].

    PubMed

    Cabrera Torres, Enrique; García Iglesias, María Aránzazu; Santos Jiménez, María Teresa; González Hierro, Miguel; Diego Domínguez, María Luisa

    2017-09-21

    To analyze the relationship between the type of hospital admission (outlier and non-outlier admissions) and the appearance of clinical complications and the average stay. From a retrospective epidemiological study of a cohort of patients admitted to the Hospital Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca (Salamanca, Spain) over a six-month period, outlier and non-outlier patients were identified. This project had access to the admissions department database, the hospital's CMBD (in Spanish, Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos) for hospitalisation, the AP-DRG (All Patient-Diagnosis Related Groups) and ALCOR (a clinical-statistics analytics tool). It then proceeded to break down the results by DRG, looking at the five most common DRGs in that period. 8.4% of the total 11,842 admissions were medical outliers. In the overall study, the average stay was longer for outlier patients (8. 11 days) than for other patients (7.15 days). The mortality rate was, likewise, higher for outlier patients, although there was a reduced incidence of complications (7.6% for outlier patients as opposed to 8.4% for others). The analysis by DRG corroborated these results in three of the five cases investigated, showing longer average stays but fewer clinical complications in the case of outlier patients. On admission to hospital, a significant proportion of patients were allocated beds on inappropriate wards (outlier patients). It was more common to find medical patients placed on surgical wards than vice versa. The average stay of outlier patients was longer than that of patients admitted to the correct ward. The study found no significant difference between the two groupś in terms of clinical complication rates. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Trends in hospital admission rates for whooping cough in England across five decades: database studies

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Uy; Goldacre, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to report on trends in hospitalisation rates for pertussis in England from the 1960s to 2011; and to provide context for the recent unexpected activity of Bordetella pertussis in the UK. Design A retrospective analysis of English national Hospital Episode Statistics (HES, 1968–2011) and the Oxford Record Linkage Study (ORLS, 1963–2011) for people admitted to hospital with whooping cough. Setting England and the Oxford Record Linkage Study area. Main outcome measures Age- and gender-specific hospital admission rates, and summary age- and sex-standardised rates, for people aged under 25 years per 100,000 population in each age group. Results Admission rates declined from the 1960s to the early 1970s. For example, the standardised rates were 12.8 (95% confidence interval 11.2–14.5) per 100,000 in England in 1968 and 4.0 (3.0–4.9) per 100,000 in 1973. They then increased to reach 45.0 (41.4–48.6) per 100,000 in 1978 and 47.4 (43.7–51.1) in 1982. From the late 1980s, admission rates continued to decline, falling to between 1 and 4 per 100,000 in each of the years between 2003 and 2011. While the trend in hospital admissions closely followed that in notifications, the annual ratio between these two measures was not consistent ranging from 1.07 (95% confidence interval 1.00–1.14) to 4.03 (3.79–4.27) notifications per admission over the last 10 years. Conclusions Epidemics of whooping cough in the late 1970s and early 1980s were associated with a significant rise in hospital admission rates. Current admission rates are low, by historical comparison. Vaccine programmes must continue to be fully implemented in order to improve control of pertussis activity. PMID:24526463

  11. Analysis of the medication reconciliation process conducted at hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Contreras Rey, María Beatriz; Arco Prados, Yolanda; Sánchez Gómez, Ernesto

    2016-06-01

    fueron y en 93 (29,8%) la aceptación no procedía por un cambio en la situación del paciente. Las mayores oportunidades de mejora se identificaron en los servicios de Digestivo, Medicina Interna y Cirugía General y en los grupos terapéuticos: sangre y órganos hematopoyéticos, sistema cardiovascular y sistema nervioso. Conclusiones: En nuestro hospital solo una tercera parte de las intervenciones fueron aceptadas y reconocidas como errores de conciliación. No obstante, la conciliación de la medicación al ingreso realizada por un farmacéutico mostró ser útil en la identificación y prevención de errores de medicación. Un mejor entendimiento de los casos en los que las intervenciones no fueron aceptadas podría mejorar el resultado en el futuro.

  12. Triumph of hope over experience: learning from interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admissions identified through an Academic Health and Social Care Network

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internationally health services are facing increasing demands due to new and more expensive health technologies and treatments, coupled with the needs of an ageing population. Reducing avoidable use of expensive secondary care services, especially high cost admissions where no procedure is carried out, has become a focus for the commissioners of healthcare. Method We set out to identify, evaluate and share learning about interventions to reduce avoidable hospital admission across a regional Academic Health and Social Care Network (AHSN). We conducted a service evaluation identifying initiatives that had taken place across the AHSN. This comprised a literature review, case studies, and two workshops. Results We identified three types of intervention: pre-hospital; within the emergency department (ED); and post-admission evaluation of appropriateness. Pre-hospital interventions included the use of predictive modelling tools (PARR – Patients at risk of readmission and ACG – Adjusted Clinical Groups) sometimes supported by community matrons or virtual wards. GP-advisers and outreach nurses were employed within the ED. The principal post-hoc interventions were the audit of records in primary care or the application of the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP) within the admission ward. Overall there was a shortage of independent evaluation and limited evidence that each intervention had an impact on rates of admission. Conclusions Despite the frequency and cost of emergency admission there has been little independent evaluation of interventions to reduce avoidable admission. Commissioners of healthcare should consider interventions at all stages of the admission pathway, including regular audit, to ensure admission thresholds don’t change. PMID:22682525

  13. The effect of seatbelt legislation on hospital admissions with road traffic injuries in an oil-rich, fast-developing country.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Al Humoud, Suhail M Q; Price, Penny; Azhar, Abdulaziz; Khalid, Muayad K; Rysavy, Martin; Crundall, David

    2007-06-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the effect of seat-belt legislation on hospital admissions with road traffic injuries and was designed as a retrospective descriptive study. All motor vehicle crashes recorded during the period 2001 - 2004 were extracted from the Emergency Medical Service Department. Details of the crashes, injuries and safety devices used were studied. The present study revealed that safety belt usage rates have increased from 8% in 2001 to 67% in 2004 among patients admitted to hospital with injury after road traffic crashes. The admission rate of patients with road traffic injuries per 100 000 population reduced by 17.7%. The enforcement of the seat-belt legislation played a vital role in reduction of hospital admissions due to road traffic crashes.

  14. The Impact of Admission Diagnosis on Recurrent or Frequent Hospitalizations in 3 Dementia Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lai, Wei-An

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increasing numbers of patients with different types of dementia have resulted in the increasing medical care loads. It is not known whether explanatory factors for recurrent or prolong hospitalization were driven by the subtypes of dementia. We analyzed 203 dementia patients aged >65-year-old with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), or Parkinsonism-related dementia (PRD). With a 4-year follow-up period, logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of dementia diagnosis, cerebrovascular risk factors, chronic systemic diseases, and the etiology for admission for recurrent (>4 times/4 years) or prolonged hospitalization stay (>14 days per hospitalization). There were 48 AD, 96 VaD, and 59 PRD patients that completed the 4-year study. The average length of hospital stay was significant, the shortest in AD and the longest in PRD (P = 0.01), whereas the frequency of hospitalization was not different among 3 dementia subtypes. Although delirium is the most common etiology for admission in the patients, diabetes mellitus (Odds ratio, OR = 2.79, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 11.21, P < 0.001), and fall-related hip fracture (OR = 4.762, P = 0.029) were significantly associated with prolong hospitalization. Patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 9.87, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 84.48, P < 0.001), urinary tract infection (OR = 55.09, P < 0.001), and fall-related fracture (OR = 141.7, P < 0.001) predict recurrent hospitalization. Dementia subtypes did not influence directly on the hospitalization courses. The etiologies for admission carried higher clinical significance, compared with the coexisted systemic diseases. PMID:26579820

  15. Ambient biomass smoke and cardio-respiratory hospital admissions in Darwin, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Fay H; Bailie, Ross S; Pilotto, Louis S; Hanigan, Ivan C

    2007-01-01

    Background Increasing severe vegetation fires worldwide has been attributed to both global environmental change and land management practices. However there is little evidence concerning the population health effects of outdoor air pollution derived from biomass fires. Frequent seasonal bushfires near Darwin, Australia provide an opportunity to examine this issue. We examined the relationship between atmospheric particle loadings <10 microns in diameter (PM10), and emergency hospital admissions for cardio-respiratory conditions over the three fire seasons of 2000, 2004 and 2005. In addition we examined the differential impacts on Indigenous Australians, a high risk population subgroup. Methods We conducted a case-crossover analysis of emergency hospital admissions with principal ICD10 diagnosis codes J00–J99 and I00–I99. Conditional logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios for admission with 10 μg/m3 rises in PM10. These were adjusted for weekly influenza rates, same day mean temperature and humidity, the mean temperature and humidity of the previous three days, days with rainfall > 5 mm, public holidays and holiday periods. Results PM10 ranged from 6.4 – 70.0 μg/m3 (mean 19.1). 2466 admissions were examined of which 23% were for Indigenous people. There was a positive relationship between PM10 and admissions for all respiratory conditions (OR 1.08 95%CI 0.98–1.18) with a larger magnitude in the Indigenous subpopulation (OR1.17 95% CI 0.98–1.40). While there was no relationship between PM10 and cardiovascular admissions overall, there was a positive association with ischaemic heart disease in Indigenous people, greatest at a lag of 3 days (OR 1.71 95%CI 1.14–2.55). Conclusion PM10 derived from vegetation fires was predominantly associated with respiratory rather than cardiovascular admissions. This outcome is consistent with the few available studies of ambient biomass smoke pollution. Indigenous people appear to be at higher risk

  16. Hospital admissions from a pediatric HIV care and treatment program in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Nosek, Carl A; Buck, W Chris; Caviness, Alison C; Foust, Abbie; Nyondo, Yewo; Bottomani, Madalitso; Kazembe, Peter N

    2016-01-30

    The scale up of pediatric antiretroviral treatment programs across Sub-Saharan Africa over the last decade has brought increasing numbers of children into HIV care. This patient population requiring life-long care presents new challenges in the outpatient and inpatient settings. We sought to describe hospitalizations from a large pediatric HIV treatment facility to better understand the scope of the situation and identify areas for improved care delivery. We conducted a retrospective case series of all HIV-infected and exposed patients <18 years enrolled at Baylor College of Medicine Children's Foundation Malawi, from October 2004-October 2010. Patients admitted to the hospital on or after the day of enrollment were included. Data were extracted from electronic clinic records. Analysis was done at the patient and admission level, as some patients had multiple admissions. Of 5062 patients enrolled in care, 877 (17.3 %) had 1137 admissions at median age 24 months (IQR: 12-62). 191 (21.8 %) patients had multiple admissions. A high proportion of admissions occurred in patients under two years (49.4 %), those within one month of clinic enrollment (32.9 %), those with severe immune suppression (44.0 %), and those not on ART (48.5 %). The frequency of primary admission diagnoses varied across these same variables, with malnutrition, pneumonia, and malaria being the most common. Illness requiring hospitalization is common in HIV-infected and exposed children and these results reinforce the need for a comprehensive care package with special attention to nutrition. Strengthened programs for malaria prevention and expanded access to pneumococcal vaccine are also needed. The high burden of admissions in children under 24 months and those newly enrolled in care suggests a need for continued improvement of early infant diagnosis and provider-initiated testing programs to link patients to care before they are symptomatic. Similarly, the high proportion of admissions in

  17. Cool and dry weather enhances the effects of air pollution on emergency IHD hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Hong; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Wang, Xiaorong; Tian, Linwei; Tse, Lap Ah; Wong, Tze Wai

    2013-09-20

    Associations between ambient pollution and cardiovascular morbidity including ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been confirmed. Weather factors such as temperature, season and relative humidity (RH) may modify the effects of pollution. We conducted this study to examine the effects of air pollution on emergency IHD hospital admissions varied across seasons and RH levels, and to explore the possible joint modification of weather factors on pollution effects. Daily time series of air pollution concentrations, mean temperature and RH were collected from IHD hospital admissions from 1998 to 2007 in Hong Kong. We used generalized additive Poisson models with interaction term to estimate the pollution effects varied across seasons and RH levels, after adjusting for time trends, weather conditions, and influenza outbreaks. An increase in the detrimental effects of air pollution in cool season and on low humidity days was observed. In the cool and dry season, a 10 μg/m(3) increment of lag03 exposure was associated with an increase of emergency IHD admissions by 1.82% (95% CI: 1.24-2.40%), 3.89% (95% CI: 3.08-4.70%), and 2.19% (95% CI: 1.33-3.06%) for particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and ozone (O3), respectively. The effects of pollutants decreased greatly and lost statistical significance in the warm and humid season. We found season and RH jointly modified the associations between ambient pollution and IHD admissions, resulting in increased IHD admissions in the cool and dry season and reduced admissions in the warm and humid season. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Classification and monitoring of the appropriateness of emergency admissions in a tertiary hospital].

    PubMed

    López-Picazo Ferrer, J J; Tomás García, N; Cubillana Herrero, J D; Gómez Company, J A; de Dios Cánovas García, J

    2014-01-01

    To measure the appropriateness of hospital admissions, to classify its Clinical Services (CS) according to the level of inappropriateness, and to determine the usefulness of applying rapid assessment techniques (lot quality assurance sampling) in these types of measurements. A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary hospital to assess the clinical records of emergency admissions to the 12 CS with a higher volume of admissions, using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP). A four-level («A» to «D») increasingly inadequate admissions scale was constructed setting both standard and threshold values in every stratum. Every CS was classified in one of them using lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS). A total of 156 cases (13 cases from every CS) were assessed. The assessment effort (devoted time) was also estimated. There were 22.4±6.3% of inadequate admissions. In the CS classification, 9 (75%) got a good or acceptable appropriateness level, and only 1 (8%) got an inacceptable level. The time devoted was estimated at 17 hours. AEP is useful to assess the admission appropriateness and may be included in the «Emergencies» process management, although its variability prevents the use for external comparisons. If both LQAS and the appropriateness classification level and the global estimation (by unifying lot samples) are combined, the monitoring is affordable without a great effort. To extend these tools to other quality indicators requiring direct observation or clinical records, manual assessment could improve the monitoring efficiency. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Prediction of Emergency Department Hospital Admission Based on Natural Language Processing and Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingyu; Kim, Joyce; Patzer, Rachel E; Pitts, Stephen R; Patzer, Aaron; Schrager, Justin D

    2017-08-16

    To describe and compare logistic regression and neural network modeling strategies to predict hospital admission or transfer following initial presentation to Emergency Department (ED) triage with and without the addition of natural language processing elements. Using data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), a cross-sectional probability sample of United States EDs from 2012 and 2013 survey years, we developed several predictive models with the outcome being admission to the hospital or transfer vs. discharge home. We included patient characteristics immediately available after the patient has presented to the ED and undergone a triage process. We used this information to construct logistic regression (LR) and multilayer neural network models (MLNN) which included natural language processing (NLP) and principal component analysis from the patient's reason for visit. Ten-fold cross validation was used to test the predictive capacity of each model and receiver operating curves (AUC) were then calculated for each model. Of the 47,200 ED visits from 642 hospitals, 6,335 (13.42%) resulted in hospital admission (or transfer). A total of 48 principal components were extracted by NLP from the reason for visit fields, which explained 75% of the overall variance for hospitalization. In the model including only structured variables, the AUC was 0.824 (95% CI 0.818-0.830) for logistic regression and 0.823 (95% CI 0.817-0.829) for MLNN. Models including only free-text information generated AUC of 0.742 (95% CI 0.731- 0.753) for logistic regression and 0.753 (95% CI 0.742-0.764) for MLNN. When both structured variables and free text variables were included, the AUC reached 0.846 (95% CI 0.839-0.853) for logistic regression and 0.844 (95% CI 0.836-0.852) for MLNN. The predictive accuracy of hospital admission or transfer for patients who presented to ED triage overall was good, and was improved with the inclusion of free text data from a patient

  20. Association between PM10 and respiratory hospital admissions in different seasons in heavily polluted Lanzhou City.

    PubMed

    An, Xingqin; Yan, Tao; Mi, Shengquan; Sun, Zhaobin; Hou, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Exposure-response relationship between particulate matter less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10) and human health in different seasons from 2001 to 2005 was examined based on hospital admissions data of respiratory system diseases from four major hospitals in Lanzhou, China. To quantify associations of respiratory system diseases with multiple air pollutants and meteorological conditions, a semiparametric generalized additive model was used in the authors' study by implementing daily ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and PM10 data collected from the Lanzhou Environmental Monitoring Station and daily meteorological data from Lanzhou Meteorological Bureau. Results showed that daily averaged PM10 increased per interquartile range the hospital admissions number of respiratory diseases by 3.3% in spring, 1.4% in summer, 3.6% in autumn, and 4.0% in winter from a single-pollutant model, or 3.1%, 1.4%, 3.0%, and 4.0% from a multi-pollutant model, respectively. The effect of PM10 on respiratory hospital admissions was lowest in summer and highest in winter. The relative risks of PM10 on female or the elderly (≥ 65 yrs.) were higher, showing a stronger association of PM10 with respiratory diseases in female and elderly groups than in males and people younger than 65.

  1. Pediatric poisonings and risk markers for hospital admission in a major emergency department in Romania.

    PubMed

    Oprescu, Florin; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Wallis, Anne; Young, Tracy; Nour, Daniel; Cherecheş, Razvan M

    2012-02-01

    To identify the prevalence, characteristics, and risk markers for childhood poisonings treated in the emergency department of a large Romanian hospital. Trauma registry data using ICD-10 codes and case summaries were studied to identify poisonings among children aged 0-18. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors associated with hospital admission. Between 1999 and 2003, 1,173 pediatric trauma cases were seen in the emergency department; 437 (37.3%) were treated for poisoning, including medication (35%), alcohol (26%), chemical products (19%), and carbon monoxide (14%). Half of all poisonings were unintentional, primarily affecting children < 10 years. Half were intentional, mainly affecting children 10-18. Females were three times more likely than males to have documented suicidal intent (P < .0001). Over 30% of suicide attempts were among children ages 10-14 (P < .0001). We report significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (P < .05) of hospital admission for children 10-18, and for chemical substance poisoning, and suicidal intent. Pediatric poisoning is a serious public health issue in Romania, and we suggest these findings are relevant across other eastern European countries with limited resources. Poisonings result in morbidity and hospital admissions, yet there are few prevention resources available. Health education programs and consumer product safety policies are needed in Romania and eastern Europe.

  2. The Influence of Group Versus Individual Prenatal Care on Phase of Labor at Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Ellen L; Emeis, Cathy L; Caughey, Aaron B; Weinstein, Sarah R; Futernick, Sarah B; Lee, Christopher S

    2016-07-01

    Group prenatal care, an alternate model of prenatal care delivery, has been associated with various improved perinatal outcomes in comparison to standard, individual prenatal care. One important maternity care process measure that has not been explored among women who receive group prenatal care versus standard prenatal care is the phase of labor (latent vs active) at hospital admission. A retrospective case-control study was conducted comparing 150 women who selected group prenatal care with certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) versus 225 women who chose standard prenatal care with CNMs. Analyses performed included descriptive statistics to compare groups and multivariate regression to evaluate the contribution of key covariates potentially influencing outcomes. Propensity scores were calculated and included in regression models. Women within this sample who received group prenatal care were more likely to be in active labor (≥ 4 cm of cervical dilatation) at hospital admission (odds ratio [OR], 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-2.99; P = .049) and were admitted to the hospital with significantly greater cervical dilatation (mean [standard deviation, SD] 5.7 [2.5] cm vs. 5.1 [2.3] cm, P = .005) compared with women who received standard prenatal care, controlling for potential confounding variables and propensity for group versus individual care selection. Group prenatal care may be an effective and safe intervention for decreasing latent labor hospital admission among low-risk women. Neither group prenatal care nor active labor hospital admission was associated with increased morbidity. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  3. Trauma admissions to the intensive care unit at a reference hospital in Northwestern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Chalya, Phillipo L; Gilyoma, Japhet M; Dass, Ramesh M; Mchembe, Mabula D; Matasha, Michael; Mabula, Joseph B; Mbelenge, Nkinda; Mahalu, William

    2011-10-24

    Major trauma has been reported to be a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization worldwide and consumes a significant amount of the health care budget. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and treatment outcome of major trauma patients admitted into our ICU and to identify predictors of outcome. Between January 2008 and December 2010, a descriptive prospective study of all trauma admissions to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania was conducted. A total of 312 cases of major trauma were admitted in the ICU, representing 37.1% of the total ICU admissions. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 5.5:1. Their median age was 27 years. Trauma admissions were almost exclusively emergencies (95.2%) and came mainly from the Accident and Emergency (60.6%) and Operating room (23.4%). Road traffic crash (RTC) was the most common cause of injuries affecting 70.8% of patients. Two hundred fourteen patients (68.6%) required surgical intervention. The overall ICU length of stay (LOS) for all trauma patients ranged from 1 to 59 days (median = 8 days). The median ICU length of hospital stay (LOS) for survivors and non-survivors were 8 and 5 days respectively. (P = 0.002). Mortality rate was 32.7%. Mortality rate of trauma patients was significantly higher than that of all ICU admissions (32.7% vs. 18.8%, P = 0.0012). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, multiple injuries, severe head injuries and burns were responsible for a longer mean ICU stay (P < 0.001) whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, injury severity core >16, prolonged duration of loss of consciousness, delayed ICU admission (0.028), the need for ventilatory support and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan significantly influenced mortality (P < 0.001). Trauma resulting from road traffic crashes is a leading cause of intensive care

  4. Trauma admissions to the Intensive care unit at a reference hospital in Northwestern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Major trauma has been reported to be a major cause of hospitalization and intensive care utilization worldwide and consumes a significant amount of the health care budget. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics and treatment outcome of major trauma patients admitted into our ICU and to identify predictors of outcome. Methods Between January 2008 and December 2010, a descriptive prospective study of all trauma admissions to a multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) of Bugando Medical Centre in Northwestern Tanzania was conducted. Results A total of 312 cases of major trauma were admitted in the ICU, representing 37.1% of the total ICU admissions. Males outnumbered females by a ratio of 5.5:1. Their median age was 27 years. Trauma admissions were almost exclusively emergencies (95.2%) and came mainly from the Accident and Emergency (60.6%) and Operating room (23.4%). Road traffic crash (RTC) was the most common cause of injuries affecting 70.8% of patients. Two hundred fourteen patients (68.6%) required surgical intervention. The overall ICU length of stay (LOS) for all trauma patients ranged from 1 to 59 days (median = 8 days). The median ICU length of hospital stay (LOS) for survivors and non-survivors were 8 and 5 days respectively. (P = 0.002). Mortality rate was 32.7%. Mortality rate of trauma patients was significantly higher than that of all ICU admissions (32.7% vs. 18.8%, P = 0.0012). According to multivariate logistic regression analysis, multiple injuries, severe head injuries and burns were responsible for a longer mean ICU stay (P < 0.001) whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score < 9, systolic blood pressure < 90 mmHg, injury severity core >16, prolonged duration of loss of consciousness, delayed ICU admission (0.028), the need for ventilatory support and finding of space occupying lesion on computed tomography scan significantly influenced mortality (P < 0.001). Conclusion Trauma resulting from road traffic crashes is a

  5. Trends in Hospital Admission and Surgical Procedures Following ED visits for Diverticulitis.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Ericksen, Margaret B; Havens, Joaquim M; Ma, Jiemin; Weissman, Joel S; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-07-01

    Diverticulitis is a common diagnosis in the emergency department (ED). Outpatient management of diverticulitis is safe in selected patients, yet the rates of admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis are unknown, as are the predictive patient characteristics. Our goal is to describe trends in admission and surgical procedures following ED visits for diverticulitis, and to determine which patient characteristics predict admission. : We performed a cross-sectional descriptive analysis using data on ED visits from 2006-2011 to determine change in admission and surgical patterns over time. The Nationwide Emergency Department Sample database, a nationally representative administrative claims dataset, was used to analyze ED visits for diverticulitis. We included patients with a principal diagnosis of diverticulitis (ICD-9 codes 562.11, 562.13). We analyzed the rate of admission and surgery in all admitted patients and in low-risk patients, defined as age <50 with no comorbidities (Elixhauser). We used hierarchical multivariate logistic regression to identify patient characteristics associated with admission for diverticulitis. Fryom 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased by 21.3% from 238,248 to 302,612, while the admission rate decreased from 55.7% to 48.5% (-7.2%, 95% CI [-7.78 to -6.62]; p<0.001 for trend). The admission rate among low-risk patients decreased from 35.2% in 2006 to 26.8% in 2011 (-8.4%, 95% CI [-9.6 to -7.2]; p<0.001 for trend). Admission for diverticulitis was independently associated with male gender, comorbid illnesses, higher income and commercial health insurance. The surgical rate decreased from 6.5% in 2006 to 4.7% in 2011 (-1.8%, 95% CI [-2.1 to -1.5]; p<0.001 for trend), and among low-risk patients decreased from 4.0% to 2.2% (-1.8%, 95% CI [-4.5 to -1.7]; p<0.001 for trend). From 2006 to 2011 ED visits for diverticulitis increased, while ED admission rates and surgical rates declined, with

  6. Future respiratory hospital admissions from wildfire smoke under climate change in the Western US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coco Liu, Jia; Mickley, Loretta J.; Sulprizio, Melissa P.; Yue, Xu; Peng, Roger D.; Dominici, Francesca; Bell, Michelle L.

    2016-12-01

    Background. Wildfires are anticipated to be more frequent and intense under climate change. As a result, wildfires may emit more air pollutants that can harm health in communities in the future. The health impacts of wildfire smoke under climate change are largely unknown. Methods. We linked projections of future levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) specifically from wildfire smoke under the A1B climate change scenario using the GEOS-Chem model for 2046-2051, present-day estimates of hospital admission impacts from wildfire smoke, and future population projections to estimate the change in respiratory hospital admissions for persons ≥65 years by county (n = 561) from wildfire PM2.5 under climate change in the Western US. Results. The increase in intense wildfire smoke days from climate change would result in an estimated 178 (95% confidence interval: 6.2, 361) additional respiratory hospital admissions in the Western US, accounting for estimated future increase in the elderly population. Climate change is estimated to impose an additional 4990 high-pollution smoke days. Central Colorado, Washington and southern California are estimated to experience the highest percentage increase in respiratory admissions from wildfire smoke under climate change. Conclusion. Although the increase in number of respiratory admissions from wildfire smoke seems modest, these results provide important scientific evidence of an often-ignored aspect of wildfire impact, and information on their anticipated spatial distribution. Wildfires can cause serious social burdens such as property damage and suppression cost, but can also raise health problems. The results provide information that can be incorporated into development of environmental and health policies in response to climate change. Climate change adaptation policies could incorporate scientific evidence on health risks from natural disasters such as wildfires.

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of adverse drug reactions at admission to hospital: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Sze Ling; Ang, Xiaohui; Sani, Levana L.; Ng, Hong Yen; Winther, Michael D.; Liu, Jian Jun; Brunham, Liam R.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) contribute to poorer patient outcomes and additional burden to the healthcare system. However, data on the true burden, relevant types and drugs causing ADRs are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization in the general adult population in Singapore and to investigate their characteristics. Methods We prospectively recruited 1000 adult patients with unplanned admission to a large tertiary‐care hospital. Two independent reviewers evaluated all suspected ADRs for causality, type, severity and avoidability. The prevalence of ADR‐related hospitalization was calculated based on ‘definite’ and ‘probable’ ADRs. Logistic regression was used to evaluate predictors for having an ADR at admission. Results The prevalence of all ADRs at admission was 12.4% (95% CI: 10.5–14.6%) and ADRs causing admission was 8.1% (95% CI: 6.5–10.0%). The most common ADRs were gastrointestinal‐related. The most common drug category causing ADRs were cardiovascular drugs. Patients with ADRs had a longer length of stay than those who did not (median 4 vs. 3 days, P = 1.70 × 10−3). About 30% of ADRs at admission were caused by at least one drug with a clinical annotation in the Pharmacogenomics KnowledgeBase (PharmGKB), suggesting that some of these ADRs may have been predicted by pharmacogenetic testing. Conclusions We have quantified the burden and characteristics of clinically impactful ADRs in the Singaporean general adult population. Our results will provide vital information for efforts in reducing ADRs through targeted vigilance, patient education and pharmacogenomics in Singapore. PMID:27640819

  8. Forecasting asthma-related hospital admissions in London using negative binomial models.

    PubMed

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Health forecasting can improve health service provision and individual patient outcomes. Environmental factors are known to impact chronic respiratory conditions such as asthma, but little is known about the extent to which these factors can be used for forecasting. Using weather, air quality and hospital asthma admissions, in London (2005-2006), two related negative binomial models were developed and compared with a naive seasonal model. In the first approach, predictive forecasting models were fitted with 7-day averages of each potential predictor, and then a subsequent multivariable model is constructed. In the second strategy, an exhaustive search of the best fitting models between possible combinations of lags (0-14 days) of all the environmental effects on asthma admission was conducted. Three models were considered: a base model (seasonal effects), contrasted with a 7-day average model and a selected lags model (weather and air quality effects). Season is the best predictor of asthma admissions. The 7-day average and seasonal models were trivial to implement. The selected lags model was computationally intensive, but of no real value over much more easily implemented models. Seasonal factors can predict daily hospital asthma admissions in London, and there is a little evidence that additional weather and air quality information would add to forecast accuracy.

  9. Small primary care physician practices have low rates of preventable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Casalino, Lawrence P; Pesko, Michael F; Ryan, Andrew M; Mendelsohn, Jayme L; Copeland, Kennon R; Ramsay, Patricia Pamela; Sun, Xuming; Rittenhouse, Diane R; Shortell, Stephen M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly two-thirds of US office-based physicians work in practices of fewer than seven physicians. It is often assumed that larger practices provide better care, although there is little evidence for or against this assumption. What is the relationship between practice size--and other practice characteristics, such as ownership or use of medical home processes--and the quality of care? We conducted a national survey of 1,045 primary care-based practices with nineteen or fewer physicians to determine practice characteristics. We used Medicare data to calculate practices' rate of potentially preventable hospital admissions (ambulatory care-sensitive admissions). Compared to practices with 10-19 physicians, practices with 1-2 physicians had 33 percent fewer preventable admissions, and practices with 3-9 physicians had 27 percent fewer. Physician-owned practices had fewer preventable admissions than hospital-owned practices. In an era when health care reform appears to be driving physicians into larger organizations, it is important to measure the comparative performance of practices of all sizes, to learn more about how small practices provide patient care, and to learn more about the types of organizational structures--such as independent practice associations--that may make it possible for small practices to share resources that are useful for improving the quality of care.

  10. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  11. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  12. Going up in ashes? Smoking-attributable morbidity, hospital admissions and expenditure in Greece.

    PubMed

    Tsalapati, Konstantina; Vardavas, Constantine I; Athanasakis, Konstantinos; Thireos, Eleftherios; Vozikis, Athanassios; Pavi, Elpida; Behrakis, Panagiotis; Kyriopoulos, Ioannis

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to calculate the morbidity, hospitalizations and subsequent hospital costs for the treatment of the smoking-attributable fraction of diseases in Greece using a prevalence-based annual cost approach. In 2011, smoking accounted for 199,028 hospital admissions (8.9% of the national total), with attributable hospital treatment costs calculated at more than €554 million, which represents 10.7% of the national hospital budget. These results pose a compelling reason for the European Union to champion tobacco control as a means of reducing the financial and social burden of disease in Greece and other countries currently facing a financial maelstrom. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid Primary Care Follow-up from the ED to Reduce Avoidable Hospital Admissions.

    PubMed

    Carmel, Amanda S; Steel, Peter; Tanouye, Robert; Novikov, Aleksey; Clark, Sunday; Sinha, Sanjai; Tung, Judy

    2017-08-01

    Hospital admissions from the emergency department (ED) now account for approximately 50% of all admissions. Some patients admitted from the ED may not require inpatient care if outpatient care could be optimized. However, access to primary care especially immediately after ED discharge is challenging. Studies have not addressed the extent to which hospital admissions from the ED may be averted with access to rapid (next business day) primary care follow-up. We evaluated the impact of an ED-to-rapid-primary-care protocol on avoidance of hospitalizations in a large, urban medical center. We conducted a retrospective review of patients referred from the ED to primary care (Weill Cornell Internal Medicine Associates - WCIMA) through a rapid-access-to-primary-care program developed at New York-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center. Referrals were classified as either an avoided admission or not, and classifications were performed by both emergency physician (EP) and internal medicine physician reviewers. We also collected outcome data on rapid visit completion, ED revisits, hospitalizations and primary care engagement. EPs classified 26 (16%) of referrals for rapid primary care follow-up as avoided admissions. Of the 162 patients referred for rapid follow-up, 118 (73%) arrived for their rapid appointment. There were no differences in rates of ED revisits or subsequent hospitalizations between those who attended the rapid follow-up and those who did not attend. Patients who attended the rapid appointment were significantly more likely to attend at least one subsequent appointment at WCIMA during the six months after the index ED visit [N=55 (47%) vs. N=8 (18%), P=0.001]. A rapid-ED-to-primary-care-access program may allow EPs to avoid admitting patients to the hospital without risking ED revisits or subsequent hospitalizations. This protocol has the potential to save costs over time. A program such as this can also provide a safe and reliable ED discharge option

  14. Admission time to hospital: a varying standard for a critical definition for admissions to an intensive care unit from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, Shane; Weiss, Heike; Bailey, Michael; van Lint, Allison; Cameron, Peter; Pilcher, David

    2014-11-01

    Time spent in the emergency department (ED) before admission to hospital is often considered an important key performance indicator (KPI). Throughout Australia and New Zealand, there is no standard definition of 'time of admission' for patients admitted through the ED. By using data submitted to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, the aim was to determine the differing methods used to define hospital admission time and assess how these impact on the calculation of time spent in the ED before admission to an intensive care unit (ICU). Between March and December of 2010, 61 hospitals were contacted directly. Decision methods for determining time of admission to the ED were matched to 67,787 patient records. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the relationship between decision method and the reported time spent in the ED. Four mechanisms of recording time of admission were identified, with time of triage being the most common (28/61 hospitals). Reported median time spent in the ED varied from 2.5 (IQR 0.83-5.35) to 5.1 h (2.82-8.68), depending on the decision method. After adjusting for illness severity, hospital type and location, decision method remained a significant factor in determining measurement of ED length of stay. Different methods are used in Australia and New Zealand to define admission time to hospital. Professional bodies, hospitals and jurisdictions should ensure standardisation of definitions for appropriate interpretation of KPIs as well as for the interpretation of studies assessing the impact of admission time to ICU from the ED. WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE TOPIC?: There are standards for the maximum time spent in the ED internationally, but these standards vary greatly across Australia. The definition of such a standard is critically important not only to patient care, but also in the assessment of hospital outcomes. Key performance indicators rely on quality data to improve decision

  15. Short-term exposure to ambient ozone and stroke hospital admission: A case-crossover analysis.

    PubMed

    Montresor-López, Jessica A; Yanosky, Jeff D; Mittleman, Murray A; Sapkota, Amir; He, Xin; Hibbert, James D; Wirth, Michael D; Puett, Robin C

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the association between short-term exposure to ambient ozone air pollution and stroke hospital admissions among adult residents of South Carolina (SC). Data on all incident stroke hospitalizations from 2002 to 2006 were obtained from the SC Office of Research and Statistics. Ozone exposure data were obtained from the US Environmental Protection Agency's Hierarchical Bayesian Model. A semi-symmetric bidirectional case-crossover design was used to examine the association between ozone exposure on lag days 0-2 (0 to 2 days before admission) and stroke hospitalization. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No significant associations were observed between short-term ozone exposure and hospitalization for all stroke (e.g., lag day 0: OR=0.98; 95% CI=0.96, 1.00) or ischemic stroke (lag day 0: OR=0.98; 95% CI=0.96, 1.01). Risk of hospitalization for hemorrhagic stroke appeared to be higher among African Americans than European Americans; however, the majority of these associations did not reach statistical significance. Among adults in SC from 2002 to 2006, there was no evidence of an association between ozone exposure and risk of hospitalization for all stroke or ischemic stroke; however, African Americans may have an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke.

  16. The "July Effect": A Look at July Medical Admissions in Teaching Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mims, Lisa D; Porter, Maribeth; Simpson, Kit N; Carek, Peter J

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of admission for myocardial infarction, heart failure, or pneumonia during the first academic quarter compared with all other quarters in teaching versus nonteaching hospitals on length of stay, cost, and mortality. Using data 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, multivariable modeling with an interaction term was used to test teaching hospital effect by academic quarter. Logistic regression was used for mortality and log-transformed linear models for cost and length of stay. Charlson Index scores were similar in teaching and nonteaching hospitals. Patients admitted to teaching hospitals for myocardial infarction in the first quarter had a higher risk-adjusted mortality (1.217; confidence interval, 1.147-1.290) than those admitted to a nonteaching hospital during the same quarter (0.849; confidence interval, 0.815-0.885). Mean cost heart failure admissions averaged $584 more, and the mean length of stay was longer (0.10; P = .0127), during the first academic quarter. These effects were not present for quarters 2 through 4. This study suggests small increases in mortality among patients admitted with myocardial infarction in the first academic quarter compared with all other quarters in teaching versus nonteaching hospitals. Increased cost and longer stay were seen for those admitted with heart failure. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  17. An Investigation of Perspectives of Respite Admission Among People Living With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and the Hospitals That Support Them.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Michiko; Narita, Yugo; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-07-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a progressive disease with rapid degeneration. Respite care is an essential service for improving the well-being of both patients with this disease and their family caregivers, but accessibility of respite services is limited. This study investigates perspectives on respite admission among people living with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the hospitals supporting them. We conducted semistructured interviews among 3 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 12 family members, exploring demographic information and their awareness and experience of respite admission. We also interviewed 16 representatives from hospitals about awareness of and preparation for respite admission for patients with this disease, the role of regional networks for intractable diseases, and knowledge about communication support schemes. We found significant differences in the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale between patients who had and had not received respite admission. Qualitative analysis of the data indicated that respite admission was a contributory factor in continuing and stabilizing home care. Limited provision of social services and hospital care quality were barriers to respite admission. Respite admission was essential to continued home care for patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Severe-stage patients were eligible for respite admission. Its accessibility, however, was limited, especially for patients living in rural areas. Supporting hospitals had limited capacity to respond to patients' needs. Individualized care and communication were internal barriers to respite admission.

  18. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient.

    PubMed

    Haverkort, J J Mark; Minderhoud, A L C Ben; Wind, Jelte D D; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Ellerbroek, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital's preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery.

  19. Extreme weather and air pollution effects on cardiovascular and respiratory hospital admissions in Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Tsangari, H; Paschalidou, A K; Kassomenos, A P; Vardoulakis, S; Heaviside, C; Georgiou, K E; Yamasaki, E N

    2016-01-15

    In many regions of the world, climatic change is associated with increased extreme temperatures, which can have severe effects on mortality and morbidity. In this study, we examine the effect of extreme weather on hospital admissions in Cyprus, for inland and coastal areas, through the use of synoptic weather classifications (air mass types). In addition, the effect of particulate air pollution (PM10) on morbidity is examined. Our results show that two air mass types, namely (a) warm, rainy days with increased levels of water vapour in the atmosphere and (b) cold, cloudy days with increased levels of precipitation, were associated with increased morbidity in the form of hospital admissions. This was true both for cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, for all age groups, but particularly for the elderly, aged over 65. Particulate air pollution was also associated with increased morbidity in Cyprus, where the effect was more pronounced for cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of electronic medication reconciliation at hospital admission on clinician workflow.

    PubMed

    Vawdrey, David K; Chang, Nancy; Compton, Audrey; Tiase, Vicky; Hripcsak, George

    2010-11-13

    Many hospitals have experienced challenges with accomplishing the Joint Commission's National Patient Safety Goal for medication reconciliation. Our institution implemented a fully electronic process for performing and documenting medication reconciliation at hospital admission. The process used a commercial EHR and relied on a longitudinal medication list called the "Outpatient Medication Profile" (OMP). Clinician compliance with documenting medication reconciliation was difficult to achieve, but approached 100% after a "hard-stop" reminder was implemented. We evaluated the impact of the process at a large urban academic medical center. Before the new process was adopted, the average number of medications contained in the OMP for a patient upon admission was <2. One year after adoption, the average number had increased to 4.7, and there were regular updates made to the list. Updating the OMP was predominantly done by physicians, NPs, and PAs (94%), followed by nurses (5%) and pharmacists (1%).

  1. Long-term exposure to traffic pollution and hospital admissions in London.

    PubMed

    Halonen, Jaana I; Blangiardo, Marta; Toledano, Mireille B; Fecht, Daniela; Gulliver, John; Anderson, H Ross; Beevers, Sean D; Dajnak, David; Kelly, Frank J; Tonne, Cathryn

    2016-01-01

    Evidence on the effects of long-term exposure to traffic pollution on health is inconsistent. In Greater London we examined associations between traffic pollution and emergency hospital admissions for cardio-respiratory diseases by applying linear and piecewise linear Poisson regression models in a small-area analysis. For both models the results for children and adults were close to unity. In the elderly, linear models found negative associations whereas piecewise models found non-linear associations characterized by positive risks in the lowest and negative risks in the highest exposure category. An increased risk was observed among those living in areas with the highest socioeconomic deprivation. Estimates were not affected by adjustment for traffic noise. The lack of convincing positive linear associations between primary traffic pollution and hospital admissions agrees with a number of other reports, but may reflect residual confounding. The relatively greater vulnerability of the most deprived populations has important implications for public health.

  2. European hospital adherence to GOLD recommendations for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbation admissions.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C Michael; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Hartl, Sylvia

    2013-12-01

    Understanding how European care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) admissions vary against guideline standards provides an opportunity to target appropriate quality improvement interventions. In 2010-2011 an audit of care against the 2010 'Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease' (GOLD) standards was performed in 16 018 patients from 384 hospitals in 13 countries. Clinicians prospectively identified consecutive COPD admissions over a period of 8 weeks, recording clinical care measures on a web-based data tool. Data were analysed comparing adherence to 10 key management recommendations. Adherence varied between hospitals and across countries. The lack of available spirometry results and variable use of oxygen and non-invasive ventilation (NIV) are high impact areas identified for improvement.

  3. Hospital admission following induced abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea--a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Vallely, Lisa M; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D L; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion.

  4. Hospital Admission following Induced Abortion in Eastern Highlands Province, Papua New Guinea – A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    Vallely, Lisa M.; Homiehombo, Primrose; Kelly-Hanku, Angela; Kumbia, Antonia; Mola, Glen D. L.; Whittaker, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background In Papua New Guinea abortion is restricted under the Criminal Code Act. While safe abortions should available in certain situations, frequently they are not available to the majority of women. Sepsis from unsafe abortion is a leading cause of maternal mortality. Our findings form part of a wider, mixed methods study designed to identify complications requiring hospital treatment for post abortion care and to explore the circumstances surrounding unsafe abortion. Methods Through a six month prospective study we identified all women presenting to the Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital following spontaneous and induced abortions. We undertook semi-structured interviews with women and reviewed individual case notes, extracting demographic and clinical information. Findings Case notes were reviewed for 56% (67/119) of women presenting for post abortion care. At least 24% (28/119) of these admissions were due to induced abortion. Women presenting following induced abortions were significantly more likely to be younger, single, in education at the time of the abortion and report that the baby was unplanned and unwanted, compared to those reporting spontaneous abortion. Obtained illegally, misoprostol was the method most frequently used to end the pregnancy. Physical and mechanical means and traditional herbs were also widely reported. Conclusion In a country with a low contraceptive prevalence rate and high unmet need for family planning, all reproductive age women need access to contraceptive information and services to avoid, postpone or space pregnancies. In the absence of this, women are resorting to unsafe means to end an unwanted pregnancy, putting their lives at risk and putting an increased strain on an already struggling health system. Women in this setting need access to safe, effective means of abortion. PMID:25329982

  5. Risk factors of leptospirosis among febrile hospital admissions in northeastern Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Rafizah, A A Noor; Aziah, B D; Azwany, Y N; Imran, M Kamarul; Rusli, A Mohamed; Nazri, S Mohd; Nikman, A Mohd; Nabilah, I; Asma', H Siti; Zahiruddin, W M; Zaliha, I

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease. Risk factors for the disease may vary among countries. This study was conducted to determine the risk factors of leptospirosis among febrile cases. A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 999 febrile patients admitted to 10 hospitals in northeastern Malaysia, from August 2010 to February 2011. An interviewer-guided proforma sheet on sociodemography, type of occupation and social history data was distributed to all adult patients with fever on admission. Serum sample for leptospirosis was screened by IgM Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (IgM ELISA) test and confirmed by Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT). The cut-off point for positive MAT was ≥ 1:400 titer in single acute specimens. Seroprevalence of leptospirosis was 8.4% (95% CI: 6.8, 10.3) (n=84/999) by MAT. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the high risk occupation group (OR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.22, 3.13) (p=0.005) and history of recent recreational activity (OR: 2.36, 95% CI: 1.46, 3.85) (p<0.001) were significant associated factors for leptospirosis. This study shows a relatively high seroprevalence of leptospirosis in northeastern Malaysia. Identification of high risk occupational group and history of recent recreational activity will help to increase the index of suspicion to diagnose leptospirosis among febrile inpatients due to its mimicking other common febrile illnesses in Malaysia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacts of hot and cold temperature extremes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.; Kříž, B.

    2010-09-01

    Elevated mortality associated with high ambient temperatures in summer represents one of the main impacts of weather extremes on human society. Increases in mortality during heat waves were examined in many European countries; much less is known about the effects of heat waves on morbidity, measured for example by the number of hospital admissions. Relatively less understood is also cold-related mortality and morbidity in winter, when the relationships between weather and human health are more complex, less direct, and confounded by other factors such as epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The present study examines links between hot and cold temperature extremes and daily hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in the population of the Czech Republic over 1994-2007. We make use of a recently completed database of all admissions for cardiovascular diseases to hospitals in the area of the Czech Republic since 1994, with a detailed classification of diseases and detailed information concerning each patient (in total 1,467,675 hospital admissions over 1994-2007). The main goals of the study are (i) to identify excess/deficit morbidity during and after periods of heat waves in summer and cold spells in winter, (ii) to compare the links for individual diseases (e.g. acute myocardial infarction, I21; angina pectoris, I20; cerebral infarction, I63; brain ischemia, I64) and to identify those diagnoses that are most closely linked to weather, (iii) to identify population groups most vulnerable to temperature extremes, and (iv) to compare the links to temperature extremes for morbidity and mortality. Periods when morbidity data were affected by epidemics of influenza and acute respiratory infections in winter were excluded from the analysis.

  7. Comparison of wildfire smoke estimation methods and associations with cardiopulmonary-related hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ryan W; Ford, Bonne; Lassman, William; Pfister, Gabriele; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Fischer, Emily; Volckens, John; Pierce, Jeffrey R; Magzamen, Sheryl

    2017-03-01

    Climate forecasts predict an increase in frequency and intensity of wildfires. Associations between health outcomes and population exposure to smoke from Washington 2012 wildfires were compared using surface monitors, chemical-weather models, and a novel method blending three exposure information sources. The association between smoke particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and cardiopulmonary hospital admissions occurring in Washington from 1 July to 31 October 2012 was evaluated using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Hospital admissions aggregated by ZIP code were linked with population-weighted daily average concentrations of smoke PM2.5 estimated using three distinct methods: a simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model, a kriged interpolation of PM2.5 measurements from surface monitors, and a geographically weighted ridge regression (GWR) that blended inputs from WRF-Chem, satellite observations of aerosol optical depth, and kriged PM2.5. A 10 μg/m(3) increase in GWR smoke PM2.5 was associated with an 8% increased risk in asthma-related hospital admissions (odds ratio (OR): 1.076, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.019-1.136); other smoke estimation methods yielded similar results. However, point estimates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) differed by smoke PM2.5 exposure method: a 10 μg/m(3) increase using GWR was significantly associated with increased risk of COPD (OR: 1.084, 95%CI: 1.026-1.145) and not significant using WRF-Chem (OR: 0.986, 95%CI: 0.931-1.045). The magnitude (OR) and uncertainty (95%CI) of associations between smoke PM2.5 and hospital admissions were dependent on estimation method used and outcome evaluated. Choice of smoke exposure estimation method used can impact the overall conclusion of the study.

  8. Comparison of wildfire smoke estimation methods and associations with cardiopulmonary-related hospital admissions

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Ryan W.; Ford, Bonne; Lassman, William; Pfister, Gabriele; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Fischer, Emily; Volckens, John; Pierce, Jeffrey R.; Magzamen, Sheryl

    2017-01-01

    Climate forecasts predict an increase in frequency and intensity of wildfires. Associations between health outcomes and population exposure to smoke from Washington 2012 wildfires were compared using surface monitors, chemical-weather models, and a novel method blending three exposure information sources. The association between smoke particulate matter ≤2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5) and cardiopulmonary hospital admissions occurring in Washington from 1 July to 31 October 2012 was evaluated using a time-stratified case-crossover design. Hospital admissions aggregated by ZIP code were linked with population-weighted daily average concentrations of smoke PM2.5 estimated using three distinct methods: a simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model, a kriged interpolation of PM2.5 measurements from surface monitors, and a geographically weighted ridge regression (GWR) that blended inputs from WRF-Chem, satellite observations of aerosol optical depth, and kriged PM2.5. A 10 μg/m3 increase in GWR smoke PM2.5 was associated with an 8% increased risk in asthma-related hospital admissions (odds ratio (OR): 1.076, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.019–1.136); other smoke estimation methods yielded similar results. However, point estimates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) differed by smoke PM2.5 exposure method: a 10 μg/m3 increase using GWR was significantly associated with increased risk of COPD (OR: 1.084, 95%CI: 1.026–1.145) and not significant using WRF-Chem (OR: 0.986, 95%CI: 0.931–1.045). The magnitude (OR) and uncertainty (95%CI) of associations between smoke PM2.5 and hospital admissions were dependent on estimation method used and outcome evaluated. Choice of smoke exposure estimation method used can impact the overall conclusion of the study. PMID:28868515

  9. Susceptibility to penicillin derivatives among third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae recovered on hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Mischnik, Alexander; Baumert, Philipp; Hamprecht, Axel; Rohde, Anna; Peter, Silke; Feihl, Susanne; Knobloch, Johannes; Gölz, Hanna; Kola, Axel; Obermann, Birgit; Querbach, Christiane; Willmann, Matthias; Gebhardt, Friedemann; Tacconelli, Evelina; Gastmeier, Petra; Seifert, Harald; Kern, Winfried V

    2017-01-01

    As part of the multicenter Antibiotic Therapy Optimisation Study-the largest study on the prevalence of third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae carriage upon hospital admission-minimum inhibitory concentration values were generated for ampicillin/sulbactam, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, piperacillin/tazobactam, mecillinam, mecillinam/clavulanic acid, and temocillin against third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species and Enterobacter species.

  10. Hospital Transfers of Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF) Patients within 48 Hours and 30 Days after SNF Admission

    PubMed Central

    Ouslander, Joseph G.; Naharci, Ilkin; Engstrom, Gabriella; Shutes, Jill; Wolf, David G.; Rojido, Maria; Tappen, Ruth; Newman, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Close to one in 5 patients admitted to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) are readmitted to the acute hospital within 30 days, and a substantial percentage are readmitted within two days of the SNF admission. These rapid returns to the hospital may provide insights for improving care transitions between the acute hospital and the SNF. Objectives To describe the characteristics of SNF to hospital transfers that occur within 48 hours and 30 days of SNF admission based on root cause analyses (RCAs) performed by SNF staff, and identify potential areas of focus for improving transitions between hospitals and SNFs. Design Trained staff from SNFs enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial of the INTERACT (Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers) quality improvement program performed retrospective RCAs on hospital transfers during a 12-month implementation period. Setting SNFs from across the U.S. Participants 64 of 88 SNFs randomized to the intervention group submitted RCAs. Interventions SNFs were implementing the INTERACT quality improvement program. Measures Data were abstracted from the INTERACT Quality Improvement (QI) tool, a structured, retrospective RCA on hospital transfers. Results Among 4,658 transfers for which data on the time between SNF admission and hospital transfer were available, 353 (8%) occurred within 48 hours of SNF admission; 524 (11%) 3–6 days after SNF admission; 1,450 (31%) (7 – 29 days after SNF admission; and 2,331 (50%) occurred 30 days or longer after admission. Comparisons between transfers that occurred within 48 hours and within 30 days of SNF admission to transfers that occurred 30 days or longer after SNF admission revealed several statistically significant differences between patient risk factors for transfer, symptoms and signs precipitating the transfers, and other characteristics of the transfers. Hospitalization in the last 30 days and year was significantly more common among those with rapid returns to

  11. Declining Statewide Trends in Motor Vehicle Crashes and Injury-Related Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Dischinger, Patricia C.; Ryb, Gabriel E.; Kufera, Joseph A.; Ho, Shiu M.

    2013-01-01

    Numbers of crashes, rates of police-reported injury severity, and hospital admission rates were calculated for the ten year period between 2001 and 2010 in Maryland. Comparisons were made for two 5-year periods of 2001–2005 and 2006–2010. Crash characteristics remained similar for the two five-year periods, but there was a significant increase in occupant age. Declines in police-reported injury severity were noted for each of four age groups: 16–29, 30–54, 55–64, and 65+, with smaller declines among older occupants. In addition, there were significant declines in hospital admissions, comparing the two time periods. Although reductions in crashes may be attributable to various roadway, behavioral, and other safety improvement efforts, reductions in hospital admission rates most likely reflect major improvements in crashworthiness implemented during the past decade. For those admitted to hospitals, significant increases in injury severity were noted between the first and second time periods. There was an association between age and ISS, a measure of total bodily injury, with the highest ISS scores noted for the youngest and oldest groups (16–29 and 55+, respectively). In addition, there was a significant increase in the mean age over time, from 39 in 2001 to 43 in 2010, p<.001. In general, the incidence and severity of injuries increased for all body regions. There was also a significant increase in hospital mortality, although length of hospital stay remained the same. Given these trends, increased efforts need to focus on both injury prevention and treatment for the increasing population of older, sometimes frail, vehicle occupants. PMID:24406962

  12. No evidence of purported lunar effect on hospital admission rates or birth rates.

    PubMed

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Studies indicate that a fraction of nursing professionals believe in a "lunar effect"-a purported correlation between the phases of the Earth's moon and human affairs, such as birth rates, blood loss, or fertility. This article addresses some of the methodological errors and cognitive biases that can explain the human tendency of perceiving a lunar effect where there is none. This article reviews basic standards of evidence and, using an example from the published literature, illustrates how disregarding these standards can lead to erroneous conclusions. Román, Soriano, Fuentes, Gálvez, and Fernández (2004) suggested that the number of hospital admissions related to gastrointestinal bleeding was somehow influenced by the phases of the Earth's moon. Specifically, the authors claimed that the rate of hospital admissions to their bleeding unit is higher during the full moon than at other times. Their report contains a number of methodological and statistical flaws that invalidate their conclusions. Reanalysis of their data with proper procedures shows no evidence that the full moon influences the rate of hospital admissions, a result that is consistent with numerous peer-reviewed studies and meta-analyses. A review of the literature shows that birth rates are also uncorrelated to lunar phases. Data collection and analysis shortcomings, as well as powerful cognitive biases, can lead to erroneous conclusions about the purported lunar effect on human affairs. Adherence to basic standards of evidence can help assess the validity of questionable beliefs.

  13. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-11-13

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004-2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07-1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04-1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas.

  14. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Jang, Suk Yong; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyung Hee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Choi, Young; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders. We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002-2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3). There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919-0.999). Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures. Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare.

  15. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bo Yeon; Lee, Eunil; Lee, Suji; Heo, Seulkee; Jo, Kyunghee; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Man Sik

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. PMID:26580643

  16. A Full-Capacity Protocol Allows for Increased Emergency Patient Volume and Hospital Admissions.

    PubMed

    Willard, Erin; Carlton, Elizabeth F; Moffat, Lindsay; Barth, Bradley E

    2017-09-01

    Our hospital was encountering problems with ED crowding. We sought to determine the impact of implementing a full-capacity protocol to respond to anticipated or actual crowding conditions. Our full-capacity protocol is based on collaboration among multiple hospital units. We completed a quality improvement initiative using a pre/post analysis of all ED patient encounters after implementing a full-capacity protocol with a corresponding period from the prior year. The principal outcomes measured were patient volume, admission rate, patient left without being seen (LWBS) rate, length of stay, and ambulance diversion hours. In the post-full-capacity protocol period, a 7.4% increase in emergency patient encounters (P < .001) and an 11.9% increase in admissions (P < .001) were noted compared with the corresponding period in 2013. Also noted in the study period were a 10.2% decrease in LWBS rate (P = .29), an increase in length of stay of 34 minutes (P < .001), and a 92% decrease in ambulance diversion hours (111 fewer hours, P < .001). The collaborative full-capacity protocol was effective in reducing LWBS and ambulance diversion, while accommodating a significant increase in ED volume and increased hospital admission rates at our institution. Copyright © 2017 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Social Welfare Centers Protect Outpatients with Mood Disorders from Risk of Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kyu-Tae; Jang, Suk Yong; Park, Sohee; Cho, Kyung Hee; Yoo, Ki-Bong; Choi, Young; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Background South Korea faces difficulties in the management of mental disorders, and those difficulties are expected to gradually worsen. Therefore, we analyzed the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders. Methods We used data from the National Health Insurance Service National Sample Cohort 2002–2013, which included all medical claims filed for the 50,160 patients who were newly diagnosed with a mood disorder among the 1,025,340 individuals in a nationally representative sample. We performed a logistic regression analysis using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to examine the relationship between social welfare centers and hospital admission after outpatient treatment for mood disorders (ICD-10: F3). Results There was a 3.9% admission rate among a total of 99,533 person-years. Outpatients who lived in regions with more social welfare centers were less likely to be admitted to a hospital (per increase of five social welfare centers per 100,000 people; OR: 0.958; 95% CI: 0.919–0.999). Social welfare centers had an especially strong protective effect on patients with relatively mild mood disorders and those who were vulnerable to medical expenditures. Conclusions Considering the protective role of social welfare centers in managing patients with mood disorders, health-policy makers need to consider strategies for activating mental healthcare. PMID:26745728

  18. Associations between environmental factors and hospital admissions for sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Frédéric B.; Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Analitis, Antonis; Font, Anna; Menzel, Stephan; Chakravorty, Subarna; Thein, Swee Lay; Inusa, Baba; Telfer, Paul; de Montalembert, Mariane; Fuller, Gary W.; Katsouyanni, Klea; Rees, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is an increasing global health burden. This inherited disease is characterized by a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity, which can only partly be explained by genetic factors. Environmental factors are likely to play an important role but studies of their impact on disease severity are limited and their results are often inconsistent. This study investigated associations between a range of environmental factors and hospital admissions of young patients with sickle cell disease in London and in Paris between 2008 and 2012. Specific analyses were conducted for subgroups of patients with different genotypes and for the main reasons for admissions. Generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models were used to assess the magnitude of the associations and to calculate relative risks. Some environmental factors significantly influence the numbers of hospital admissions of children with sickle cell disease, although the associations identified are complicated. Our study suggests that meteorological factors are more likely to be associated with hospital admissions for sickle cell disease than air pollutants. It confirms previous reports of risks associated with wind speed (risk ratio: 1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.00–1.12) and also with rainfall (1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.01–1.12). Maximum atmospheric pressure was found to be a protective factor (0.93/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 0.88–0.99). Weak or no associations were found with temperature. Divergent associations were identified for different genotypes or reasons for admissions, which could partly explain the lack of consistency in earlier studies. Advice to patients with sickle cell disease usually includes avoiding a range of environmental conditions that are believed to trigger acute complications, including extreme temperatures and high altitudes. Scientific evidence to support such advice is limited and

  19. Associations between environmental factors and hospital admissions for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Piel, Frédéric B; Tewari, Sanjay; Brousse, Valentine; Analitis, Antonis; Font, Anna; Menzel, Stephan; Chakravorty, Subarna; Thein, Swee Lay; Inusa, Baba; Telfer, Paul; de Montalembert, Mariane; Fuller, Gary W; Katsouyanni, Klea; Rees, David C

    2017-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an increasing global health burden. This inherited disease is characterized by a remarkable phenotypic heterogeneity, which can only partly be explained by genetic factors. Environmental factors are likely to play an important role but studies of their impact on disease severity are limited and their results are often inconsistent. This study investigated associations between a range of environmental factors and hospital admissions of young patients with sickle cell disease in London and in Paris between 2008 and 2012. Specific analyses were conducted for subgroups of patients with different genotypes and for the main reasons for admissions. Generalized additive models and distributed lag non-linear models were used to assess the magnitude of the associations and to calculate relative risks. Some environmental factors significantly influence the numbers of hospital admissions of children with sickle cell disease, although the associations identified are complicated. Our study suggests that meteorological factors are more likely to be associated with hospital admissions for sickle cell disease than air pollutants. It confirms previous reports of risks associated with wind speed (risk ratio: 1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.12) and also with rainfall (1.06/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.12). Maximum atmospheric pressure was found to be a protective factor (0.93/standard deviation; 95% confidence interval: 0.88-0.99). Weak or no associations were found with temperature. Divergent associations were identified for different genotypes or reasons for admissions, which could partly explain the lack of consistency in earlier studies. Advice to patients with sickle cell disease usually includes avoiding a range of environmental conditions that are believed to trigger acute complications, including extreme temperatures and high altitudes. Scientific evidence to support such advice is limited and sometimes

  20. Admissions in second stage of labor in two teaching hospitals: obstetric outcomes and determining factors.

    PubMed

    Tekle, Habtemariam; Kumbi, Solomon

    2007-04-01

    Unmonitored labor and the second stage of labor are generally considered to be associated with increased maternal and neonatal complications. Study of admissions in the second stage of labor is important to understand the situation. assess determinant factors and compare obstetric outcome of women admitted in second stage of labor with women admitted in the active phase of first stage of labor. This is a case control study conducted between March and April 2002 in two teaching hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Of the total 755 deliveries 148 (20%) were admitted in the second stage of labor. Illiterates, housewives, students and house maids---are significantly likely to be admitted in second stage of labor, OR 3.0, 4.6, 5.7 and 9.3, respectively. Significant association was observed between admission in second stage of labor and unknown last menstrual period, OR 5.6, 2.02-2.67. Main reasons for coming late included problems related to referral, decision-making, transport, money and delay within hospitals in 64.2%, 29.2%, 25.5%, 19% and 11.7%, respectively. Significant association was observed in rates of uterine rupture/obstructed labor and prolonged rupture of membranes in cases, OR 10.7 and 2.2, respectively. Fifth minute apgar score of < or = 3 was significantly higher in newborns of mothers admitted in second stage, OR 2.46, 1.12, 5.42. Neonatal ICU admission and perinatal loss were higher in mothers admitted in second stage though not significant. Education, occupational status, economic problems, place of residence and institutional problems are determinants for admission in second stage. Maternal and perinatal complications are common in the cases. Timely referral, anticipation and management of complications related with admission in second stage is recommended.

  1. Epidemiological trends and geographic variation in hospital admissions for diverticulitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Geoffrey C; Sam, Justina; Anand, Nitasha

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the increasing incidence and geographic variation of acute diverticulitis. METHODS: Using the nationwide inpatient sample (NIS) we identified a cohort who had been admitted with diverticulitis between 1998 and 2005. We calculated age-, sex-, and region-specific rates of hospitalizations for diverticulitis over time. RESULTS: The age-adjusted hospitalization rate for diverticulitis increased from 61.8 per 100 000 to 75.5 per 100 000 between 1998 and 2005, and increased similarly in both sexes. Diverticulitis-associated admissions were male-predominant in those younger than age 45 years but were female-predominant thereafter. Admission rates increased the most among those < 45 years, while remaining unchanged for those ≥ 65 years. By 2005, the majority of hospitalized patients were < 65 years. Age-adjusted rates of diverticulitis-associated hospitalizations were lower in the West (50.4/100 000) compared to the Northeast (77.7/100 000), South (73.9/100 000), and Midwest (71.0/100 000). CONCLUSION: Diverticulitis-associated hospitalizations have steeply risen, especially in young adults. These epidemiological trends vary by geographic region and warrant further investigation into potential dietary and environmental etiologies. PMID:21472127

  2. Trends in alcohol-related admissions to hospital by age, sex and socioeconomic deprivation in England, 2002/03 to 2013/14.

    PubMed

    Green, Mark A; Strong, Mark; Conway, Lucy; Maheswaran, Ravi

    2017-05-08

    Prevalence of alcohol-related harms in England are among the highest in Europe and represents an important policy issue. Understanding how alcohol-related trends vary by demographic factors is important for informing policy debates. The aim of our study was to examine trends in alcohol-related admissions to hospital in England, with a focus on variations by sex, age and socioeconomic deprivation. We used data on hospital admissions for England for the financial years 2002/03 to 2013/14. Our four main outcome variables were acute and chronic conditions wholly and partially attributable to alcohol consumption. We also looked at four specific conditions wholly attributable to alcohol. Socioeconomic deprivation was measured using the English Indices of Deprivation of a patient's residence (categorised by quintile). We calculated crude rates, age-specific rates (visualised by Lexis plots) and directly standardised rates by deprivation category, separately for males and females. Total admissions for all alcohol-attributable admissions increased from 201,398 in 2002/03 to 303,716 in 2013/14. The relative increase of these admissions was larger than compared to non-alcohol attributable admissions. Acute admissions wholly attributable to alcohol had the largest relative increase of our outcome measures, and displayed a bimodal distribution with higher rates in adolescence/young adults and middle age. Chronic conditions wholly attributable to alcohol were concentrated in middle age (particularly males). While admission rates were generally higher for males, females had higher rates of hospitalisations due to 'Intentional self-poisoning due to alcohol'. We also found evidence of wide social inequalities by level of deprivation, which were wider for men than compared to women across all of our outcome measures other than 'Intentional self-poisoning due to alcohol'. Our study expands the evidence base to help understand population level trends in alcohol-related admissions by

  3. A time-series analysis of the relation between unemployment rate and hospital admission for acute myocardial infarction and stroke in Brazil over more than a decade.

    PubMed

    Katz, Marcelo; Bosworth, Hayden B; Lopes, Renato D; Dupre, Matthew E; Morita, Fernando; Pereira, Carolina; Franco, Fabio G M; Prado, Rogerio R; Pesaro, Antonio E; Wajngarten, Mauricio

    2016-12-01

    The effect of socioeconomic stressors on the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is currently open to debate. Using time-series analysis, our study aimed to evaluate the relationship between unemployment rate and hospital admission for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and stroke in Brazil over a recent 11-year span. Data on monthly hospital admissions for AMI and stroke from March 2002 to December 2013 were extracted from the Brazilian Public Health System Database. The monthly unemployment rate was obtained from the Brazilian Institute for Applied Economic Research, during the same period. The autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to test the association of temporal series. Statistical significance was set at p<0.05. From March 2002 to December 2013, 778,263 admissions for AMI and 1,581,675 for stroke were recorded. During this time period, the unemployment rate decreased from 12.9% in 2002 to 4.3% in 2013, while admissions due to AMI and stroke increased. However, the adjusted ARIMA model showed a positive association between the unemployment rate and admissions for AMI but not for stroke (estimate coefficient=2.81±0.93; p=0.003 and estimate coefficient=2.40±4.34; p=0.58, respectively). From 2002 to 2013, hospital admissions for AMI and stroke increased, whereas the unemployment rate decreased. However, the adjusted ARIMA model showed a positive association between unemployment rate and admissions due to AMI but not for stroke. Further studies are warranted to validate our findings and to better explore the mechanisms by which socioeconomic stressors, such as unemployment, might impact on the incidence of CVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Coagulopathy and Shock on Admission is Associated with Mortality for Children with Traumatic Injuries at Combat Support Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    to US military combat support hospitals in Afghanistan and Iraq: Learning from the first 2000 admissions. J Trauma 2009; 67:762–768 7. Niles SE...25:579–581 11. Hindy -Francois C, Meyer P, Blanot S, et al: Admission base deficit as a long-term prognostic factor in severe pediatric trau- ma

  5. Monitoring Child Abuse and Neglect at a Population Level: Patterns of Hospital Admissions for Maltreatment and Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melissa; Nassar, Natasha; Leonard, Helen; Mathews, Richard; Patterson, Yvonne; Stanley, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of maltreatment and assault related hospital admissions and deaths among children; and identify common injuries and conditions associated with these admissions using routinely collected morbidity and mortality data. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of all children aged…

  6. Monitoring Child Abuse and Neglect at a Population Level: Patterns of Hospital Admissions for Maltreatment and Assault

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Melissa; Nassar, Natasha; Leonard, Helen; Mathews, Richard; Patterson, Yvonne; Stanley, Fiona

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence, trends, and characteristics of maltreatment and assault related hospital admissions and deaths among children; and identify common injuries and conditions associated with these admissions using routinely collected morbidity and mortality data. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of all children aged…

  7. Apparent Temperature and Cause-Specific Emergency Hospital Admissions in Greater Copenhagen, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Wichmann, Janine; Andersen, Zorana; Ketzel, Matthias; Ellermann, Thomas; Loft, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    One of the key climate change factors, temperature, has potentially grave implications for human health. We report the first attempt to investigate the association between the daily 3-hour maximum apparent temperature (Tappmax) and respiratory (RD), cardiovascular (CVD), and cerebrovascular (CBD) emergency hospital admissions in Copenhagen, controlling for air pollution. The study period covered 1 January 2002−31 December 2006, stratified in warm and cold periods. A case-crossover design was applied. Susceptibility (effect modification) by age, sex, and socio-economic status was investigated. For an IQR (8°C) increase in the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax, a 7% (95% CI: 1%, 13%) increase in the RD admission rate was observed in the warm period whereas an inverse association was found with CVD (−8%, 95% CI: −13%, −4%), and none with CBD. There was no association between the 5-day cumulative average of Tappmax during the cold period and any of the cause-specific admissions, except in some susceptible groups: a negative association for RD in the oldest age group and a positive association for CVD in men and the second highest SES group. In conclusion, an increase in Tappmax is associated with a slight increase in RD and decrease in CVD admissions during the warmer months. PMID:21829550

  8. Use of patient-controlled psychiatric hospital admissions: mental health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Ellegaard, Trine; Mehlsen, Mimi; Lomborg, Kirsten; Bliksted, Vibeke

    2017-07-01

    In a patient-controlled admission (PCA) programme, the decision about hospital admission is made solely by the patient, with no gatekeeper function allocated to the mental health professionals (MHPs). Current knowledge about how MHPs experience and evaluate PCA is sparse. This Danish multi-centre study examined the MHP assessment of the PCA programme in daily clinical practice, and compared PCA evaluations made by MHPs and patients. A questionnaire was developed and a survey conducted over the course of a year at all Danish mental health units included in the PCA programme. MHPs made an overall evaluation of the PCA programme. At each unique PCA, both patient and MHP evaluated the specific admission when the patient entered the unit and at discharge. In total, 546 questionnaires were included in the survey, based on 252 unique MHPs. The MHPs rated the PCA programme positively. The MHPs believed that PCA helped patients receive early help and avoid long admissions. Overall, agreement was poor when comparing patients' and MHPs' evaluation of the same PCA. MHPs (and patients) seem to be in favour of implementing the PCA programme. However, results revealed that MHPs and patients have different views of what caused the patient to admit themselves and why patients were discharged. MHPs should be aware that patients might have other reasons for admitting and discharging themselves than what seems most obvious to the MHP.

  9. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2012-01-01

    Background Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Methods Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. Results A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40–65 years and older than 65 years. Conclusions The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI. PMID:22337557

  10. Hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction before and after implementation of a comprehensive smoke-free policy in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Sebrié, Ernesto Marcelo; Sandoya, Edgardo; Hyland, Andrew; Bianco, Eduardo; Glantz, Stanton A; Cummings, K Michael

    2013-05-01

    Stimulated by the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, many countries in Latin America adopted comprehensive smoke-free policies. In March 2006, Uruguay became the first Latin American country to adopt 100% smoke-free national legislation, which ended smoking in all indoor public places and workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The objective of this study was to evaluate trends in hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease 2 years before and 2 years after the policy was implemented in Uruguay. Reports of hospital admissions for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (International Classification of Disease-10 I21) from 37 hospitals (79% of all hospital admissions in the country), representing the period 2 years before and 2 years after the adoption of a nationwide smoke-free policy in Uruguay (between 1 March 2004 and 29 February 2008), were reviewed. A time series analysis was undertaken to compare the average monthly number of events of hospital admission for AMI before and after the smoke-free law. A total of 7949 hospital admissions for AMI were identified during the 4-year study period. Two years after the smoke-free policy was enacted, hospital admissions for AMI fell by 22%. The same pattern and roughly the same magnitude of reduction in AMI admissions were observed for patients seen in public and private hospitals, men, women and people aged 40-65 years and older than 65 years. The national smoke-free policy implemented in Uruguay in 2006 was associated with a significant reduction in hospital admissions for AMI.

  11. Effects of meteorological factors on daily hospital admissions for asthma in adults: a time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peng, Li; Kan, Haidong; Xu, Jianming; Chen, Renjie; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Weibing

    2014-01-01

    There is limited evidence for the impacts of meteorological changes on asthma hospital admissions in adults in Shanghai, China. To quantitatively evaluate the short-term effects of daily mean temperature on asthma hospital admissions. Daily hospital admissions for asthma and daily mean temperatures between January 2005 and December 2012 were analyzed. After controlling for secular and seasonal trends, weather, air pollution and other confounding factors, a Poisson generalized additive model (GAM) combined with a distributed lag non-linear model were used to explore the associations between temperature and hospital admissions for asthma. During the study periods, there were 15,678 hospital admissions for asthma by residents of Shanghai, an average 5.6 per day. Pearson correlation analysis found a significant negative correlation (r = -0.174, P<0.001) between asthma hospitalizations and daily mean temperature (DMT). The DMT effect on asthma increased below the median DMT, with lower temperatures associated with a higher risk of hospital admission for asthma. Generally, the cold effect appeared to be relatively acute, with duration lasting several weeks, while the hot effect was short-term. The relative risk of asthma hospital admissions associated with cold temperature (the 25th percentile of temperature relative to the median temperature) was 1.20 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01∼1.41) at lag0-14. However, warmer temperatures were not associated with asthma hospital admissions. Cold temperatures may trigger asthmatic attacks. Effective strategies are needed to protect populations at risk from the effects of cold.

  12. Effect of air pollution control on mortality and hospital admissions in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Dockery, Douglas W; Rich, David Q; Goodman, Patrick G; Clancy, Luke; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; George, Prethibha; Kotlov, Tania

    2013-07-01

    During the 1980s the Republic of Ireland experienced repeated severe pollution episodes. Domestic coal burning was a major source of this pollution. In 1990 the Irish government introduced a ban on the marketing, sale, and distribution of coal in Dublin. The ban was extended to Cork in 1995 and to 10 other communities in 1998 and 2000. We previously reported decreases in particulate black smoke (BS*) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) concentrations, measured as total gaseous acidity, in Dublin after the 1990 coal ban (Clancy et al. 2002). In the current study we explored and compared the effectiveness of the sequential 1990, 1995, and 1998 bans in reducing community air pollution and in improving public health. We compiled records of daily BS, total gaseous acidity (SO2), and counts of cause-specific deaths from 1981 to 2004 for Dublin County Borough (1990 ban), county Cork (1995 ban), and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1998 ban). We also compiled daily counts of hospital admissions for cardiovascular, respiratory, and digestive diagnoses for Cork County Borough (1991 to 2004) and counties Limerick, Louth, Wexford, and Wicklow (1993 to 2004). We compared pre-ban and post-ban BS and SO2 concentrations for each city. Using interrupted time-series methods, we estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized mortality rates in each city or county after the corresponding local coal ban. We regressed weekly age- and sex-standardized mortality rates against an indicator of the post- versus pre-ban period, adjusting for influenza epidemics, weekly mean temperature, and a season smooth of the standardized mortality rates in Coastal counties presumably not affected by the bans. We compared these results with similar analyses in Midlands counties also presumably unaffected by the bans. We also estimated the change in cause-specific, directly standardized, weekly hospital admissions rates normalized for underreporting in each city or county after the 1995

  13. [The information needs of non-hospital based physicians regarding admissions and transfers].

    PubMed

    Hermeling, P; de Cruppé, W; Geraedts, M

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the quality criteria which, from the perspective of non-hospital based physicians, are relevant in order to give patients quality-oriented recommendations in the selection of a suitable hospital or specialist. A primary telephone survey of 300 physicians from 5 specialist groups collected relevance assessments of 59 quality criteria for hospitals, GPs and specialist practices. A descriptive bi- and multivariate analysis was performed using McNemar tests, correlation and regression analysis. Next to the personal experiences which the physician and his patients made with the hospital or non-hospital based colleague in the past, there is a general interest in vital structural and outcome parameters of hospitals and medical practices. Physicians deem the nature and scope of services offered by the hospitals and medical practices as less relevant. In 12 of the 59 examined quality criteria, the relevance assessments differ depending on whether the physician is dealing with an elective admission to hospital or a referral to a GP or specialist. In the analysis of possible correlations between preferences and factors which might be influencing the physician, gender, age and specialisation were found to have an effect. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Air pollutants and hospitalization due to pneumonia among children. An ecological time series study.

    PubMed

    Tuan, Tassia Soldi; Venâncio, Taís Siqueira; Nascimento, Luiz Fernando Costa

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to air pollutants is one of the factors responsible for hospitalizations due to pneumonia among children. This has considerable financial cost, along with social cost. A study to identify the role of this exposure in relation to hospital admissions due to pneumonia among children up to 10 years of age was conducted. Ecological time series study using data from São José dos Campos, Brazil. Daily data on hospitalizations due to pneumonia and on the pollutants CO, O3, PM10 and SO2, temperature and humidity in São José dos Campos, in 2012, were analyzed. A generalized additive model of Poisson's regression was used. Relative risks for hospitalizations due to pneumonia, according to lags of 0-5 days, were estimated. The population-attributable fraction, number of avoidable hospitalizations and cost savings from avoidable hospitalizations were calculated. There were 539 admissions. Exposure to CO and O3 was seen to be associated with hospitalizations, with risks of 1.10 and 1.15 on the third day after exposure to increased CO concentration of 200 ppb and ozone concentration of 20 µg/m3. Exposure to the pollutants of particulate matter and sulfur dioxide were not shown to be associated with hospitalizations. Decreases in CO and ozone concentrations could lead to 49 fewer hospitalizations and cost reductions of R$ 39,000.00. Exposure to certain air pollutants produces harmful effects on children's health, even in a medium-sized city. Public policies to reduce emissions of these pollutants need to be implemented.

  15. Derivation and Validation of a Quality Indicator to Benchmark In-Hospital Complications Among Injury Admissions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lynne; Lauzier, François; Stelfox, Henry T; Kortbeek, John; Simons, Richard; Berthelot, Simon; Clément, Julien; Bourgeois, Gilles; Turgeon, Alexis F

    2016-07-01

    The rate of complications among injury admissions has been estimated to be more than 3 times that observed for general admissions, and complications have been targeted as an important quality-of-care metric. Despite the negative effect of complications on resource use and patient mortality and morbidity, there is no standardized method to benchmark trauma centers in terms of in-hospital complications, to our knowledge. To develop a quality indicator (QI) for in-hospital complications that can be used to evaluate the quality of acute injury care and to assess its validity. Multicenter retrospective cohort study. The setting was a well-established inclusive trauma system in Canada. Participants included all 66 048 moderate or major injury admissions to an adult trauma center between April 1, 2006, and March 31, 2012. The dates of the analysis were January to April 2015. The primary outcome was the occurrence of at least 1 in-hospital complication. We selected risk-adjustment variables by expert consultation and bootstrap resampling. We evaluated internal validity using measures of discrimination, construct validity, and forecasting. The study cohort comprised 66 048 patients. Their mean (SD) age was 59 (22) years, and 48.0% were female. Fifteen percent of patients had at least 1 in-hospital complication. The risk-adjustment model has excellent discrimination (area under the curve, 0.81) and calibration. The QI was correlated with the risk-adjusted incidence of mortality (r = 0.71), unplanned readmission (r = 0.43), and mean length of stay (r = 0.68). Hospital performance on the QI from 2007 to 2009 was predictive of performance from 2010 to 2012 (r = 0.82). We developed a QI to benchmark trauma centers on in-hospital complications among injury admissions. The QI is based on data that are routinely collected in most trauma systems and demonstrates good internal validity. The integration of this QI in trauma quality improvement programs will

  16. Proximity to coke works and hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease in England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Aylin, P; Bottle, A; Wakefield, J; Jarup, L; Elliott, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The incidence of hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular diseases in areas close to operating coke works in England and Wales was investigated.
METHODS—A small area study using distance from source as a proxy for exposure was undertaken in subjects aged 65 or over and children under 5 years within 7.5 km of four coke works (1991 estimated populations 87 760 and 43 932, respectively). The main outcome measures were emergency hospital admissions in 1992/3-1994/5 with a primary diagnosis of coronary heart disease (ICD 410-414), stroke (ICD 431-438), all respiratory diseases (ICD 460-519), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ICD 491-492), and asthma (ICD 493) in those aged 65 or over, and all respiratory and asthma admissions in children under 5 years of age.
RESULTS—At age 65 or over the combined estimate of relative risk with proximity to coke works (per km) ranged from 0.99 (95% CI 0.90to 1.09) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to 1.03 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.13) for asthma. For children under 5 years the combined estimate of risk was 1.08 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.20) for all respiratory disease and 1.07 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.18) for asthma. There was evidence of significant heterogeneity in risk estimates between coke work groups, especially in children under 5 years (p<0.001 and p=0.004 for respiratory disease and asthma, respectively). For the Teesside coke works in North East England the relative risk with proximity (per km) was 1.09 (95% CI 1.06 to 1.12) for respiratory disease and 1.09 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.15) for asthma.
CONCLUSIONS—No evidence overall was found for an association between hospital admissions and living near operational coke works in England and Wales. Trends of a higher risk of hospital admission for respiratory disease and asthma among children with proximity to the Teesside plant require further investigation.

 PMID:11182017

  17. Urban heat island and air pollution--an emerging role for hospital respiratory admissions in an urban area.

    PubMed

    Lai, Li-Wei; Cheng, Wan-Li

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study discussed here was to determine the associations among the urban heat island (UHI), air quality, and hospital respiratory admissions in the warm center of an urban area. The authors collected and analyzed the data regarding air quality parameters, meteorological parameters, and the daily hospital respiratory admissions in the Taichung metropolis in the autumns of 2003 and 2004. By collecting the vertical meteorological parameters and air pollutant concentrations via the tethersonde balloon technique, the authors simulated convergence in Dali using The Air Pollution Model (TAPM) for the atmospheric conditions. The authors also examined the hypotheses with Duncan's Multiple Range test, and analyzed spatial patterns vis-à-vis air temperature, air quality, and hospital respiratory admissions with GIS. The results indicated that the UHI phenomenon-which generates convergence and then transports air pollutants to a metropolitan area-increases hospital respiratory admissions in the warm center of an urban area.

  18. Increase in emergency admissions to hospital for children aged under 15 in England, 1999-2010: national database analysis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Peter J; Goldacre, Michael J; Mant, David; Heneghan, Carl; Thomson, Anne; Seagroatt, Valerie; Harnden, Anthony

    2013-05-01

    To investigate a reported rise in the emergency hospital admission of children in England for conditions usually managed in the community. Population-based study of hospital admission rates for children aged under 15, based on analysis of Hospital Episode Statistics and population estimates for England, 1999-2010. Trends in rates of emergency admission to hospital. The emergency admission rate for children aged under 15 in England has increased by 28% in the past decade, from 63 per 1000 population in 1999 to 81 per 1000 in 2010. A persistent year-on-year increase is apparent from 2003 onwards. A small decline in the rates of admissions lasting 1 day or more has been offset by a twofold increase in short-term admissions of <1 day. Considering the specific conditions where high emergency admission rates are thought to be inversely related to primary care quality, admission rates for upper respiratory tract infections rose by 22%, lower respiratory tract infections by 40%, urinary tract infections by 43% and gastroenteritis by 31%, while admission rates for chronic conditions fell by 5.6%. The continuing increase in very-short-term admission of children with common infections suggests a systematic failure, both in primary care (by general practice, out-of-hours care and National Health Service Direct) and in hospital (by emergency departments and paediatricians), in the assessment of children with acute illness that could be managed in the community. Solving the problem is likely to require restructuring of the way acute paediatric care is delivered.

  19. Coarse Particulate Air Pollution Associated with Increased Risk of Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases in a Tropical City, Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Meng-Hsuan; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether there was an association between coarse particles (PM2.5–10) levels and frequency of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases (RD) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Hospital admissions for RD including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, and pneumonia, and ambient air pollution data levels for Kaohsiung were obtained for the period from 2006 to 2010. The relative risk of hospital admissions for RD was estimated using a case-crossover approach, controlling for weather variables, day of the week, seasonality, and long-term time trends. For the single pollutant model (without adjustment for other pollutants), increased rate of admissions for RD were significantly associated with higher coarse PM levels only on cool days (<25 °C), with a 10 µg/m3 elevation in PM2.5–10 concentrations associated with a 3% (95% CI = 1%–5%) rise in COPD admissions, 4% (95% CI = 1%–7%) increase in asthma admissions, and 3% (95% CI = 2%–4%) rise in pneumonia admissions. No significant associations were found between coarse particle levels and the number of hospital admissions for RD on warm days. In the two-pollutant models, PM2.5–10 levels remained significantly correlated with higher rate of RD admissions even controlling for sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, or ozone on cool days. This study provides evidence that higher levels of PM2.5–10 enhance the risk of hospital admissions for RD on cool days. PMID:26501308

  20. Prognostic value of cell-free DNA in plasma of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors at ICU admission and 24h post-admission.

    PubMed

    Gornik, Ivan; Wagner, Jasenka; Gašparović, Vladimir; Miličić, Davor; Degoricija, Vesna; Skorić, Boško; Gornik, Olga; Lauc, Gordan

    2014-02-01

    Cell-free DNA has been associated with outcome in several acute conditions including two reports concerning the outcomes after cardiac arrest that found association of circulating DNA quantities at admission with mortality. The origins of cell-free DNA are primarily necrosis and apoptosis, which in cardiac arrest occur during ischaemia ("no-flow" and "low-flow" period), during reperfusion injury and as a consequence of post-arrest inflammatory response. Respecting the facts that significant cellular damage may occur during the post-arrest period, and that damage might be reduced by mild therapeutic hypothermia, we investigated the prognostic value of cell free DNA at ICU admission and 24h after admission. A prospective study was conducted in three university associated intensive care units and included patients resuscitated from non-traumatic out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Patient data were collected in accordance with the Utstein protocol. Therapeutic hypothermia was performed according to ICU policies. Blood for cell-free DNA quantification was sampled at admission and at 24±1h after admission. Outcome measures were hospital morality and cerebral performance expressed with CPC scale at discharge. Inclusion criteria were met in 67 patients; 24-h mortality was 37.3% and hospital mortality was 71.6%. The following variables were associated with 24-h mortality in univariate analysis: asystole as the presenting rhythm, "no-flow" time, "low-flow" time and cell-free DNA at admission (median 0.081 in survivors vs. 0.160ng/μl in non-survivors; P=0.038). Multivariate analysis that included the above variables showed that no-flow time and low-flow time were independently associated with 24-h mortality. Hospital mortality was associated with the following factors: "low flow" time, coronary intervention, cell-free DNA at ICU admission and at 24h after admission (0.042 vs. 0.188ng/μl; P=0.048). ROC curve for cell-free DNA 24h post-admission showed sensitivity of 81.0% and

  1. Frequency, nature and outcomes of hospital admissions in centenarians in an area of North-East England.

    PubMed

    Dotchin, Catherine L; Gray, William K; Gaskin, Elizabeth; Hartley, Samantha; Walker, Richard W

    2016-08-01

    There are few data on the use of hospital services by centenarians living in the UK. In the present study, we recorded the frequency, nature and outcomes of hospital admissions in centenarians in an area of North-East England. Data regarding hospital attendance in centenarians in Northumberland and North Tyneside, covered by one National Health Service Trust, were collected. For the years 2010-2013, demographics, frequency of admission and length of hospital stay data were collected. Medical notes for those admitted in 2011 were reviewed, and data extracted relating to diagnosis, medications and past medical history. Across the 4 years of the study, there were 349 hospital attendances of centenarians. A total of 264 of these attendances resulted in admission with an overnight stay. In 2011, there were 107 attendances, 75 of which (in 54 unique patents) resulted in admission and an overnight stay. The unique patients admitted represented 41.5% of the centenarians living in the catchment area. The most common primary reason for admission in centenarians was respiratory tract infection, though falls were a primary or secondary reason for admission in 41.3% of centenarians. There were 11 in-hospital deaths in 2011, and a further seven deaths within 30 days of discharge. The median number of medications taken on admission and discharge was six. Almost half of the centenarians living in the catchment area were admitted to hospital during 2011. Over 25% of admissions either died in hospital or within 30 days of discharge. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2016; 16: 969-975. © 2015 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient

    PubMed Central

    Minderhoud, A.L.C. (Ben); Wind, Jelte D.D.; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery. PMID:26812146

  3. Identification of risk factors for hospital admission using multiple-failure survival models: a toolkit for researchers.

    PubMed

    Westbury, Leo D; Syddall, Holly E; Simmonds, Shirley J; Cooper, Cyrus; Sayer, Avan Aihie

    2016-04-26

    The UK population is ageing; improved understanding of risk factors for hospital admission is required. Linkage of the Hertfordshire Cohort Study (HCS) with Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data has created a multiple-failure survival dataset detailing the characteristics of 2,997 individuals at baseline (1998-2004, average age 66 years) and their hospital admissions (regarded as 'failure events') over a 10 year follow-up. Analysis of risk factors using logistic regression or time to first event Cox modelling wastes information as an individual's admissions after their first are disregarded. Sophisticated analysis techniques are established to examine risk factors for admission in such datasets but are not commonly implemented. We review analysis techniques for multiple-failure survival datasets (logistic regression; time to first event Cox modelling; and the Andersen and Gill [AG] and Prentice, Williams and Peterson Total Time [PWP-TT] multiple-failure models), outline their implementation in Stata, and compare their results in an analysis of housing tenure (a marker of socioeconomic position) as a risk factor for different types of hospital admission (any; emergency; elective; >7 days). The AG and PWP-TT models include full admissions histories in the analysis of risk factors for admission and account for within-subject correlation of failure times. The PWP-TT model is also stratified on the number of previous failure events, allowing an individual's baseline risk of admission to increase with their number of previous admissions. All models yielded broadly similar results: not owner-occupying one's home was associated with increased risk of hospital admission. Estimated effect sizes were smaller from the PWP-TT model in comparison with other models owing to it having accounted for an increase in risk of admission with number of previous admissions. For example, hazard ratios [HR] from time to first event Cox models were 1.67(95 % CI: 1.36,2.04) and 1

  4. Expiratory flow limitation relates to symptoms during COPD exacerbations requiring hospital admission

    PubMed Central

    Jetmalani, Kanika; Timmins, Sophie; Brown, Nathan J; Diba, Chantale; Berend, Norbert; Salome, Cheryl M; Wen, Fu-Qiang; Chen, Peng; King, Gregory G; Farah, Claude S

    2015-01-01

    Background Expiratory flow limitation (EFL) is seen in some patients presenting with a COPD exacerbation; however, it is unclear how EFL relates to the clinical features of the exacerbation. We hypothesized that EFL when present contributes to symptoms and duration of recovery during a COPD exacerbation. Our aim was to compare changes in EFL with symptoms in subjects with and without flow-limited breathing admitted for a COPD exacerbation. Subjects and methods A total of 29 subjects with COPD were recruited within 48 hours of admission to West China Hospital for an acute exacerbation. Daily measurements of post-bronchodilator spirometry, resistance, and reactance using the forced oscillation technique and symptom (Borg) scores until discharge were made. Flow-limited breathing was defined as the difference between inspiratory and expiratory respiratory system reactance (EFL index) greater than 2.8 cmH2O·s·L−1. The physiological predictors of symptoms during recovery were determined by mixed-effect analysis. Results Nine subjects (31%) had flow-limited breathing on admission despite similar spirometry compared to subjects without flow-limited breathing. Spirometry and resistance measures did not change between enrolment and discharge. EFL index values improved in subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, with resolution in four patients. In subjects with flow-limited breathing on admission, symptoms were related to inspiratory resistance and EFL index values. In subjects without flow-limited breathing, symptoms related to forced expiratory volume in 1 second/forced vital capacity. In the whole cohort, EFL index values at admission was related to duration of stay (Rs=0.4, P=0.03). Conclusion The presence of flow-limited breathing as well as abnormal respiratory system mechanics contribute independently to symptoms during COPD exacerbations. PMID:25999709

  5. Effectiveness of a Respiratory Day Hospital Program to Reduce Admissions for Exacerbation in Patients with Severe COPD: A Prospective, Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Daniel; Montón, Concepción; Marín, Alicia; Solanes, Ingrid; López-Sánchez, Marta; Pomares, Xavier; Muñoz-Esquerre, Mariana; Dorca, Jordi; Santos, Salud

    2017-06-01

    The respiratory Day Hospital (DH) is a care facility currently operating at various healthcare institutions. It monitors patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presenting repeated exacerbations with at least two hospital admissions per year. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the DH program for controlling admissions for COPD exacerbations in this cohort of patients, and to identify clinical factors associated with hospitalizations and mortality. An observational prospective multicenter study was carried out at three hospitals. The sample comprised 150 consecutive patients (median age 70 [65-76] years, FEV1 33 [26-43]%, 97% males), included at the DH program. Over a one-year period, variables assessing effectiveness and use of healthcare resources were recorded. Factors associated with hospitalizations and mortality were identified. Patients made a median of 4[2-5] emergency visits due to COPD exacerbations with a median of 1[0-2] hospitalization(s)/year. Most of exacerbations (77%) were evaluated at the DH, but there were fewer hospitalizations from the DH than from the emergency department (21% vs. 81%, p < 0.001). In all, 29% of the patients had at least two admissions; these were the patients with the most severe disease. Age, readmission at 30-days and the presence of respiratory failure were the predictors of mortality. In conclusion, the DH program is an effective model for reducing hospitalizations in this cohort of patients. In all, 29% of the patients required two hospital admissions or more; these patients had more advanced disease and poorer prognosis, and would be most likely to benefit from additional care support.

  6. Short-term associations between particle oxidative potential and daily mortality and hospital admissions in London.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Richard W; Samoli, Evangelia; Analitis, Antonis; Fuller, Gary W; Green, David C; Anderson, H Ross; Purdie, Esme; Dunster, Chrissi; Aitlhadj, Layla; Kelly, Frank J; Mudway, Ian S

    2016-08-01

    Particulate matter (PM) from traffic and other sources has been associated with adverse health effects. One unifying theory is that PM, whatever its source, acts on the human body via its capacity to cause damaging oxidation reactions related to its content of pro-oxidants components. Few epidemiological studies have investigated particle oxidative potential (OP) and health. We conducted a time series analysis to assess associations between daily particle OP measures and numbers of deaths and hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. During 2011 and 2012 particles with an aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 and 10μm (PM2.5 and PM10 respectively) were collected daily on Partisol filters located at an urban background monitoring station in Central London. Particulate OP was assessed based on the capacity of the particles to oxidize ascorbate (OP(AA)) and glutathione (OP(GSH)) from a simple chemical model reflecting the antioxidant composition of human respiratory tract lining fluid. Particulate OP, expressed as % loss of antioxidant per μg of PM, was then multiplied by the daily concentrations of PM to derive the daily OP of PM mass concentrations (% loss per m(3)). Daily numbers of deaths and age- and cause-specific hospital admissions in London were obtained from national registries. Poisson regression accounting for seasonality and meteorology was used to estimate the percentage change in risk of death or admission associated with an interquartile increment in particle OP. We found little evidence for adverse associations between OP(AA) and OP(GSH) and mortality. Associations with cardiovascular admissions were generally positive in younger adults and negative in older adults with confidence intervals including 0%. For respiratory admissions there was a trend, from positive to negative associations, with increasing age although confidence intervals generally included 0%. Our study, the first to analyse daily particle OP measures and

  7. Radiology imaging delays as independent predictors of length of hospital stay for emergency medical admissions.

    PubMed

    Cournane, S; Conway, R; Creagh, D; Byrne, D G; Sheehy, N; Silke, B

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the extent to which the time to completion for computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound could be shown to influence the length of stay and costs incurred while in hospital, while accounting for patient acuity. All emergency admissions, totalling 25,326 imaging investigations between 2010-2014 were evaluated. The 50(th), 75(th), and 90(th) centiles of completion times for each imaging type was entered into a multivariable truncated Poisson regression model predicting the length of hospital stay. Estimates of risk (odds or incidence rate ratios [IRRs]) of the regressors were adjusted for acute illness severity, Charlson comorbidity index, chronic disabling disease score, and sepsis status. Quantile regression analysis was used to examine the impact of imaging on total hospital costs. For all imaging examinations, longer hospital lengths of stay were shown to be related to delays in imaging time. Increased delays in CT and MRI were shown to be associated with increased hospital episode costs, while ultrasound did not independently predict increased hospital costs. The magnitude of the effect of imaging delays on episode costs were equivalent to some measures of illness severity. CT, MRI, and ultrasound are undertaken in patients with differing clinical complexity; however, even with adjustment for complexity, the time delay in a more expeditious radiological service could potentially shorten the hospital episode and reduce costs. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Digoxin and 30-day all-cause hospital admission in older patients with chronic diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hashim, Taimoor; Elbaz, Shereen; Patel, Kanan; Morgan, Charity J; Fonarow, Gregg C; Fleg, Jerome L; McGwin, Gerald; Cutter, Gary R; Allman, Richard M; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Zile, Michael R; Bourge, Robert C; Ahmed, Ali

    2014-02-01

    In the main Digitalis Investigation Group (DIG) trial, digoxin reduced the risk of 30-day all-cause hospitalization in older systolic heart failure patients. However, this effect has not been studied in older diastolic heart failure patients. In the ancillary DIG trial, of the 988 patients with chronic heart failure and preserved (> 45%) ejection fraction, 631 were age ≥ 65 years (mean age 73 years, 45% women, 12% non-whites), of whom 311 received digoxin. All-cause hospitalization 30-day post randomization occurred in 4% of patients in the placebo group and 9% each among those in the digoxin group receiving 0.125 mg and ≥ 0.25 mg a day dosage (P = .026). Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for digoxin use overall for 30-day, 3-month, and 12-month all-cause hospitalizations were 2.46 (1.25-4.83), 1.45 (0.96-2.20) and 1.14 (0.89-1.46), respectively. There was one 30-day death in the placebo group. Digoxin-associated HRs (95% CIs) for 30-day hospitalizations due to cardiovascular, heart failure, and unstable angina causes were 2.82 (1.18-6.69), 0.51 (0.09-2.79), and 6.21 (0.75-51.62), respectively. Digoxin had no significant association with 30-day all-cause hospitalization among younger patients (6% vs 7% for placebo; HR 0.80; 95% CI, 0.36-1.79). In older patients with chronic diastolic heart failure, digoxin increased the risk of 30-day all-cause hospital admission, but not during longer follow-up. Although chance finding due to small sample size is possible, these data suggest that unlike in systolic heart failure, digoxin may not reduce 30-day all-cause hospitalization in older diastolic heart failure patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. [Hospitalization due to eating behavior disorders. Patient and family satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Rojo, L; Barberá, M; Plumed, J; Sangüesa, M C; Livianos, L

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we assess the quality of an inpatient unit for eating disorders from the patients' and their parents perspective in order to clarify some clinical questions concerning inpatient treatment. A satisfaction questionnaire was designed with open and closed questions separately for the patients and their relatives. The first type of items (53 for patients and 15 for relatives) were analyzed by the standard statistical methods. The second type (one question per questionnaire) was studied with the help of qualitative techniques. It was sent to all discharged patients (n = 299). We obtained the data from the answers (n = 174) and then looked for correlations with factors as compulsory admission at the hospital, age of patients and duration of the disorder. A high level of general satisfaction was obtained by patients and parents answering the closed questions. The open one, discriminates among shades of meaning. coercive factors, such as compulsory admission, did not affect the level of satisfaction in our study. While most patients were concerned about excessive supervision and lack of privacy, many parents considered control measures as scarce and asked for support upon discharge. Along general lines, hospitalization has been satisfactory for both the patients and their family. Forced admission did not significantly intervene in the subsequent satisfaction of the patient.

  10. Hospital admissions as a function of temperature, other weather phenomena and pollution levels in an urban setting in China.

    PubMed

    Chan, Emily Y Y; Goggins, William B; Yue, Janice S K; Lee, Poyi

    2013-08-01

    To explore the relationship between weather phenomena and pollution levels and daily hospital admissions (as an approximation to morbidity patterns) in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR), China, in 1998-2009. Generalized additive models and lag models were constructed with data from official sources on hospital admissions and on mean daily temperature, mean daily wind speed, mean relative humidity, daily total global solar radiation, total daily rainfall and daily pollution levels. During the hot season, admissions increased by 4.5% for every increase of 1 °C above 29 °C; during the cold season, admissions increased by 1.4% for every decrease of 1 °C within the 8.2-26.9 °C range. In subgroup analyses, admissions for respiratory and infectious diseases increased during extreme heat and cold, but cardiovascular disease admissions increased only during cold temperatures. For every increase of 1 °C above 29 °C, admissions for unintentional injuries increased by 1.9%. During the cold season, for every decrease of 1 °C within the 8.2-26.9 °C range, admissions for cardiovascular diseases and intentional injuries rose by 2.1% and 2.4%, respectively. Admission patterns were not sensitive to sex. Admissions for respiratory diseases rose during hot and cold temperatures among children but only during cold temperatures among the elderly. In people aged 75 years or older, admissions for infectious diseases rose during both temperature extremes. In Hong Kong SAR, hospitalizations rise during extreme temperatures. Public health interventions should be developed to protect children, the elderly and other vulnerable groups from excessive heat and cold.

  11. High resource use among adult congenital heart surgery admissions in adult hospitals: risk factors and association with death and comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Ami B; Rajabali, Alefiyah; He, Wei; Benavidez, Oscar J

    2015-01-01

    Adult hospitals are a common location of adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) admissions, including cardiac surgical admissions. Understanding the patterns and predictors of resource use could aid these institutions by identifying and targeting potentially modifiable determinants of high resource use (HRU). Our objectives were to examine resource use during adult congenital heart surgical admissions in adult hospitals, determine the association of HRU with mortality, and identify risk factors for HRU. Population-based retrospective study We obtained data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 2005-2009 and examined ACHD surgical admissions ages 18-49 years (n = 16 231). We defined HRU as admissions with >90th percentile for total hospital charges. Despite representing 10% of admissions, HRU admissions accounted for 32% of total charges. HRU admissions had a higher mortality rate (9.7% vs. 1.8%, P < .001). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that HRU is associated with government insurance adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6,2.4), emergency admissions AOR 3.9 (95% CI 3.1,4.8), complications AOR 4.2 (95% CI 3.3,5.2), renal failure AOR 1.8 (95% CI 1.4,2.2), congestive heart failure AOR 1.2 (95% CI 1,1.4), surgical complexity risk category-2 AOR 2.0 (95% CI 1.0,3.6), and category-3+ AOR 2.3 (95% CI 1.4,3.8). HRU admissions for adult congenital heart surgery consumed a disproportionate amount of resources and were associated with higher mortality. HRU risk factors included nonelective admissions, government insurance, heart failure, surgical complexity, renal failure, and complications. Complications, if preventable, may be a target for improvement strategies to decrease resource use. Other risk factors may require a broader patient care approach. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Impact of weekend admission on in-hospital mortality in severe community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Hironori; Kunisawa, Susumu; Yamashita, Kazuto; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about the consequences of weekend admission on the quality of care in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. We compared the outcomes of weekend versus weekdays' admission for these patients on risk-adjusted mortality. Using a large nationwide administrative database, we analysed patients with severe pneumonia who had been hospitalized in 1044 acute care hospitals between 2012 and 2013. We compared risk-adjusted in-hospital mortality of guideline-concordant care between patients admitted weekdays and patients admitted on weekends. The study sample comprised 17 342 patients admitted on weekdays and 6190 patients admitted on weekends. The mortality rate of the weekend admission group was significantly higher than that of the weekday admission group (23.7% vs 20.5%; P < 0.001). Even after adjusting for baseline patient severity and need for urgent care, weekend admissions were associated with higher mortality (odds ratio: 1.10; 95% confidence interval: 1.02-1.19). The implementation rates of guideline-concordant microbiological tests (including sputum cultures and urine antigen tests) were significantly lower in the weekend admission group. These tests were found to be associated with lower in-hospital mortality. Our findings showed that weekend admission was associated with increased mortality in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia in Japan. This may have been influenced by lower implementation of microbiological testing. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  13. The effect of coarse ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Yue Chen; Qiuying Yang; Daniel Krewski; Richard T. Burnett; Yuanli Shi; Kimberlyn M. McGrail

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this article is to examine differences in the effect of ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. 8989 adults 65 yr of age or older living in the greater Vancouver area who were admitted to hospital for any acute respiratory disease (ICD-9 codes 460-519) between June 1, 1995, and March 31, 1999 were studied. Time-series analysis was used to evaluate the association between respiratory admissions and daily measures of particulate matter (PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5}, and PM{sub 10-2.5} in urban air, after adjustment for gaseous copollutants (CO, O{sub 3}, NO{sub 2}, and SO{sub 2}) and meteorological variables. Repeated admissions for respiratory disease were common among the elderly. Approximately 30% of the subjects were readmitted to hospital after the first admission; 9% had more than 2 admissions for respiratory disease during the 4-yr study period. PM{sub 10-2.5} was significantly associated with the second and overall admissions for respiratory disease, but not with the first admission. The adjusted relative risks for an increment of 4.2 {mu} g/m{sup 3} in-day average PM{sub 10-2.5} concentrations were 1.03 for the first admission, 1.22 for the second admission, and 1.06 for overall admissions. There was no significant association between PM{sub 2.5} and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. The data suggest that (1) people with a history of respiratory admissions are at a higher risk of respiratory disease in relation to particulate air pollution in urban areas, (2) analyses based on overall rather than repeated hospital admissions lead to lower estimates of the risk of respiratory disease associated with particulate air pollution, and (3) PM{sub 10-2.5} has a larger effect on respiratory admissions than PM{sub 2.5}.

  14. The effect of coarse ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Yang, Qiuying; Krewski, Daniel; Burnett, Richard T; Shi, Yuanli; McGrail, Kimberlyn M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this article is to examine differences in the effect of ambient particulate matter on first, second, and overall hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. We studied 8989 adults 65 yr of age or older living in the greater Vancouver area who were admitted to hospital for any acute respiratory disease (ICD-9 codes 460-519) between June 1, 1995, and March 31, 1999. Time-series analysis was used to evaluate the association between respiratory admissions and daily measures of particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5, and PM10 - 2.5) in urban air, after adjustment for gaseous copollutants (CO, O3, NO2, and SO2) and meteorological variables. Repeated admissions for respiratory disease were common among the elderly. Approximately 30% of the subjects were readmitted to hospital after the first admission; 9% had more than 2 admissions for respiratory disease during the 4-yr study period. PM10 - 2.5 was significantly associated with the second and overall admissions for respiratory disease, but not with the first admission. The adjusted relative risks for an increment of 4.2 microg/m(3) in -day average PM10 - 2.5 concentrations were 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.98-1.09) for the first admission, 1.22 (1.10-1.36) for the second admission, and 1.06 (1.02, 1.11) for overall admissions. There was no significant association between PM2.5 and hospital admissions for respiratory disease among the elderly. Our data suggest that (1) people with a history of respiratory admissions are at a higher risk of respiratory disease in relation to particulate air pollution in urban areas, (2) analyses based on overall rather than repeated hospital admissions lead to lower estimates of the risk of respiratory disease associated with particulate air pollution, and (3) PM10 - 2.5 has a larger effect on respiratory admissions than PM2.5.

  15. Health conditions in a cohort of New Zealand Vietnam veterans: hospital admissions between 1988 and 2009

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Brian; Broughton, John; Tong, Darryl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To inform the provision of support to veterans by analysing hospital discharge data, thereby identifying which conditions show an excess risk, require specific management strategies and deserve further investigation. Setting Tertiary level care, including all public and private New Zealand hospitals. Participants All New Zealand Vietnam veterans with service between 1964 and 1972. Primary outcome measures Standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHRs) were calculated based on the number of first observed hospital admissions for a condition, those expected being based on New Zealand national hospitalisation rates. Results The SHR for all causes of hospitalisation was 1.18, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.21, with modest increases for the major common causes, cardio and cerebrovascular disease. Admission rates for chronic renal failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were highest in the 2006–2009 time period. The highest statistically significant hospitalisation risk was for alcohol-related mental disorder, SHR 1.91, 99% CI 1.39 to 2.43. Conclusions Chronic renal failure has limited attribution to veteran service but along with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has the potential to have high costs both to the individual and the health system. We suggest that routine surveillance of veterans by way of a ‘flag’ in national and primary care databases would facilitate the recognition of service-related conditions and the appropriate provision of healthcare. PMID:26656012

  16. Impact of North Carolina's motorcycle helmet law on hospital admissions and charges for care of traumatic brain injuries.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Rebecca B; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Austin, Anna; Creppage, Kathleen

    2015-04-01

    BACKGROUND North Carolina requires motorcyclists of all ages to wear federally approved safety helmets. The purpose of this article is to estimate the impact of this state law in terms of hospital admissions for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and associated hospital charges. METHODS Hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBIs and associated hospital charges in 2011 were extracted from the North Carolina Hospital Discharge Data system. We estimated hospital admissions and charges for the same year under the counterfactual condition of North Carolina without a universal motorcycle helmet law by using various substitutes (Florida, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina residents treated in North Carolina). RESULTS North Carolina's universal helmet law prevented an estimated 190 to 226 hospital admissions of North Carolina motorcyclists with TBI in 2011. Averted hospital charges to taxpayer-funded sources (ie, government and public charges) were estimated to be between $9.5 million and $11.6 million for 2011, and total averted hospital charges for 2011 were estimated to be between $25.3 million and $31.0 million. LIMITATIONS Cost estimates are limited to inpatients during the initial period of hospital care. This study was unable to capture long-term health care costs and productivity losses incurred by North Carolina's TBI patients and their caregivers. CONCLUSIONS North Carolina's universal motorcycle helmet law generates health and economic benefits for the state and its taxpayers.

  17. Effects of sudden air pressure changes on hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases in Prague

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kysely, Jan; Plavcova, Eva

    2013-04-01

    Sudden weather changes have long been supposed to be associated with negative impacts on human health. However, relatively few studies attempted to quantify these relationships. In this study, we use large 6-hour changes of atmospheric sea level pressure as proxy for sudden weather changes, and evaluate their association with hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases. Winter and summer seasons and positive and negative pressure changes are analyzed separately, using data for the city of Prague (population of 1.2 million) over 16-year period (1994-2009). We find that sudden pressure drops in winter are associated with significant increases in the number of hospital admissions. Increases in morbidity are not observed for pressure drops in summer, nor pressure increases in any season. Analysis of synoptic weather maps shows that the large pressure drops in winter are associated with strong zonal (westerly) flow and rapidly moving low pressure systems with centres over Northern Europe and atmospheric fronts affecting the area of Western and Central Europe. Several of the largest pressure decreases were associated with infamous winter storms (such as Lothar on December 25, 1999 and Kyrill on January 18, 2007). Analysis of links between passages of strong atmospheric fronts and hospital admissions shows that the links are much weaker if weather changes are characterized by frontal passages. Since climate models project strengthening of the zonal circulation in winter and increased frequency of winter storms, the negative effects of such weather phenomena and their possible changes in a warmer climate of the 21st century need to be better understood, particularly as their importance in inducing excess morbidity and mortality in winter may increase compared to cold spells.

  18. No Evidence of Purported Lunar Effect on Hospital Admission Rates or Birth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Margot, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that a fraction of nursing professionals believe in a “lunar effect”—a purported correlation between the phases of the Earth’s moon and human affairs, such as birth rates, blood loss, or fertility. Purpose This article addresses some of the methodological errors and cognitive biases that can explain the human tendency of perceiving a lunar effect where there is none. Approach This article reviews basic standards of evidence and, using an example from the published literature, illustrates how disregarding these standards can lead to erroneous conclusions. Findings Román, Soriano, Fuentes, Gálvez, and Fernández (2004) suggested that the number of hospital admissions related to gastrointestinal bleeding was somehow influenced by the phases of the Earth’s moon. Specifically, the authors claimed that the rate of hospital admissions to their bleeding unit is higher during the full moon than at other times. Their report contains a number of methodological and statistical flaws that invalidate their conclusions. Reanalysis of their data with proper procedures shows no evidence that the full moon influences the rate of hospital admissions, a result that is consistent with numerous peer-reviewed studies and meta-analyses. A review of the literature shows that birth rates are also uncorrelated to lunar phases. Conclusions Data collection and analysis shortcomings, as well as powerful cognitive biases, can lead to erroneous conclusions about the purported lunar effect on human affairs. Adherence to basic standards of evidence can help assess the validity of questionable beliefs. PMID:25756232

  19. The incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ford-Jones, E L; Mindorff, C M; Gold, R; Petric, M

    1990-04-01

    For determination of the incidence of viral-associated diarrhea after admission to a pediatric hospital, all patients admitted to general pediatrics, cardiology, and neurosurgery wards without diarrhea between January 1 and July 31, 1985 were followed 5 days per week for presence of diarrhea, etiologic agent, and possible risk factors. A total of 1,530 patients were followed for 3,642 days. Of these patients, 69 developed 80 nosocomial diarrhea episodes after 72 hours in hospital for a nosocomial diarrhea rate of 4.5 infected children per 100 admissions. Of 358 patients with an infected roommate, 37 (10.3%) developed nosocomial diarrhea. Etiologic agents recognized included rotavirus (43%), calicivirus (16%), astrovirus (14%), minreovirus (12%), adenovirus (8%), Salmonella sp. (4%), and parvo/picornavirus (3%). The nosocomial diarrhea rate by age was: 0-11 months, 8.8%; 12-35 months, 3.6%; and 36 months or more, 0.6%. The rate by length of stay was: 3-7 days, 8.4%; 8-14 days, 10.4%; 15-21 days, 7.9%; and 22 days or more, 8.8%, and by number of roommates/1,000 patient-days it was: 0-1, 15.7; 2 to 3, 27.7; and 4 or more, 45.2. Patients who acquired diarrhea were more likely to be diapered (9.6% vs. 1.8%, p less than 0.001). Playroom use was not significantly different in the two groups. A total of 64 patients developed diarrhea within 72 hours of admission (community diarrhea rate = 4.2). Nosocomial viral-associated diarrhea is almost exclusively a disease of diapered children less than age 36 months and occurs at any time during hospital stay. It is more common in multibed rooms, but does occur in single-bed rooms.

  20. A Nationwide Analysis of Outcomes of Weekend Admissions for Intracerebral Hemorrhage Shows Disparities Based on Hospital Teaching Status

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achint A.; Benjo, Alexandre; Pathak, Ambarish; Kar, Jitesh; Jani, Vishal B.; Annapureddy, Narender; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Sabharwal, Manpreet S.; Simoes, Priya K.; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Yacoub, Rabi; Javed, Fahad; El Hayek, Georges; Menon, Madhav C.; Nadkarni, Girish N.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With the “weekend effect” being well described, the Brain Attack Coalition released a set of “best practice” guidelines in 2005, with the goal to uniformly provide standard of care to patients with stroke. We attempted to define a “weekend effect” in outcomes among patients with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) over the last decade, utilizing the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) data. We also attempted to analyze the trend of such an effect. Materials and Methods: We determined the association of ICH weekend admissions with hospital outcomes including mortality, adverse discharge, length of stay, and cost compared to weekday admissions using multivariable logistic regression. We extracted our study cohort from the NIS, the largest all-payer data set in the United States. Results: Of 485 329 ICH admissions from 2002 to 2011, 27.5% were weekend admissions. Overall, weekend admissions were associated with 11% higher odds of in-hospital mortality. When analyzed in 3-year groups, excess mortality of weekend admissions showed temporal decline. There was higher mortality with weekend admissions in nonteaching hospitals persisted (odds ratios 1.16, 1.13, and 1.09, respectively, for 3-year subgroups). Patients admitted during weekends were also 9% more likely to have an adverse discharge (odds ratio 1.09; 95% confidence interval: 1.07-1.11; P < .001) with no variation by hospital status. There was no effect of a weekend admission on either length of stay or cost of care. Conclusion: Nontraumatic ICH admissions on weekends have higher in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge. This demonstrates need for in-depth review for elucidating this discrepancy and stricter adherence to standard-of-care guidelines to ensure uniform care. PMID:27053981

  1. Time Trends in Hospital Admissions for Bronchiectasis: Analysis of the Spanish National Hospital Discharge Data (2004 to 2013)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Gema; López de Andrés, Ana; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentín; Pedraza-Serrano, Fernando; Puente-Maestu, Luis; de Miguel-Díez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Objective To analyze changes in the incidence, diagnostic procedures, comorbidity, length of hospital stay (LOHS), costs and in-hospital mortality (IHM) for patients with bronchiectasis who were hospitalized in Spain over a 10-year period. Methods We included all admissions for patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis as primary or secondary diagnosis during 2004–2013. Results 282,207 patients were admitted to the study. After controlling for possible confounders, we observed a significant increase in the incidence of hospitalizations over the study period when bronchiectasis was a secondary diagnosis. When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis we observed a significant decline in the incidence. In all cases, this pathology was more frequent in males, and the average age and comorbidity increased significantly during the study period (p<0.001). When bronchiectasis was the primary diagnosis, the most frequent secondary diagnosis was Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. When bronchiectasis was the secondary diagnosis, the most frequent primary diagnosis was COPD. IHM was low, tending to decrease from 2004 to 2013 (p<0.05). The average LOHS decreased significantly during the study period in both cases (p<0.001). The mean cost per patient decreased in patients with bronchiectasis as primary diagnosis, but it increased for cases of bronchiectasis as secondary diagnosis (p<0.001). Conclusions Our results reveal an increase in the incidence of hospital admissions for patients with bronchiectasis as a secondary diagnosis from 2004 to 2013, as opposed to cases of bronchiectasis as the primary diagnosis. Although the average age and comorbidity significantly increased over time, both IHM and average LOHS significantly decreased. PMID:27622273

  2. Effects of ambient temperature on stroke hospital admissions: Results from a time-series analysis of 104,432 strokes in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Pi; Zheng, Murui; Feng, Wenru; Wu, Jiagang; Deng, Changyu; Luo, Ganfeng; Wang, Li; Pan, Bingying; Liu, Huazhang

    2017-02-15

    Stroke is a main cause of death and public health burden in China. The evidence on the burden of different strokes attack attribute to ambient temperature in China is limited. This study aimed to show the characteristics of stroke attack and the attributable risk due to temperature based on hospital admission data in Guangzhou, one of the most developed cities in China. From January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2015, 104,432 stroke hospitalizations in Guangzhou residents from 67 hospitals for stroke sentinel surveillance were registered. Characteristics of hospital admissions by gender, age group, calendar year and stroke subtype were analyzed, and distributed lag non-linear models were applied to evaluate the effects of temperature on stroke attack admissions. Stroke attack admissions increased from 31,851 to 36,755 through 2013 to 2015, increasing by 15.4%. An increasing trend in the risk of stroke attack with age was observed, irrespectively of stroke subtype and calendar year. People with hypertension were more likely to have an associated stroke than people without that. The effects of cold temperature on attack admissions for CBI and ICH strokes were significant. Overall, the percentages of CBI and ICH attack admissions attribute to cold temperature were 9.06% (95% CI: 1.84, 15.00) and 15.09% (95% CI: 5.86, 21.96), respectively. Besides, elderly people were more vulnerable to cold temperature than the young. Measures should be taken to increase public awareness about the ill effects of cold temperature on stroke attack, and educate the public about self-protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Risk Factors for Hospital Admission with RSV Bronchiolitis in England: A Population-Based Birth Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Joanna; Bottle, Alex; Sharland, Mike; Modi, Neena; Aylin, Paul; Majeed, Azeem; Saxena, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the timing and duration of RSV bronchiolitis hospital admission among term and preterm infants in England and to identify risk factors for bronchiolitis admission. Design A population-based birth cohort with follow-up to age 1 year, using the Hospital Episode Statistics database. Setting 71 hospitals across England. Participants We identified 296618 individual birth records from 2007/08 and linked to subsequent hospital admission records during the first year of life. Results In our cohort there were 7189 hospital admissions with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis, 24.2 admissions per 1000 infants under 1 year (95%CI 23.7–24.8), of which 15% (1050/7189) were born preterm (47.3 bronchiolitis admissions per 1000 preterm infants (95% CI 44.4–50.2)). The peak age group for bronchiolitis admissions was infants aged 1 month and the median was age 120 days (IQR = 61–209 days). The median length of stay was 1 day (IQR = 0–3). The relative risk (RR) of a bronchiolitis admission was higher among infants with known risk factors for severe RSV infection, including those born preterm (RR = 1.9, 95% CI 1.8–2.0) compared with infants born at term. Other conditions also significantly increased risk of bronchiolitis admission, including Down's syndrome (RR = 2.5, 95% CI 1.7–3.7) and cerebral palsy (RR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.5–4.0). Conclusions Most (85%) of the infants who are admitted to hospital with bronchiolitis in England are born at term, with no known predisposing risk factors for severe RSV infection, although risk of admission is higher in known risk groups. The early age of bronchiolitis admissions has important implications for the potential impact and timing of future active and passive immunisations. More research is needed to explain why babies born with Down's syndrome and cerebral palsy are also at higher risk of hospital admission with RSV bronchiolitis. PMID:24586581

  4. Cost saving potential in cardiovascular hospital costs due to reduction in air pollution.

    PubMed

    Devos, Stefanie; Cox, Bianca; Dhondt, Stijn; Nawrot, Tim; Putman, Koen

    2015-09-15

    We describe a methodological framework to estimate potential cost savings in Belgium for a decrease in cardiovascular emergency admissions (ischemic heart disease (IHD), heart rhythm disturbances (HRD), and heart failure) due to a reduction in air pollution. Hospital discharge data on emergency admissions from an academic hospital were used to identify cases, derive risk functions, and estimate hospital costs. Risk functions were derived with case-crossover analyses with weekly average PM10, PM2.5, and NO2 exposures. The risk functions were subsequently used in a micro-costing analysis approach. Annual hospital cost savings for Belgium were estimated for two scenarios on the decrease of air pollution: 1) 10% reduction in each of the pollutants and 2) reduction towards annual WHO guidelines. Emergency admissions for IHD and HRD were significantly associated with PM10, PM2.5, and NO2 exposures the week before admission. The estimated risk reduction for IHD admissions was 2.44% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.33%-4.50%], 2.34% [95% CI: 0.62%-4.03%], and 3.93% [95% CI: 1.14%-6.65%] for a 10% reduction in PM10, PM2.5, and NO2 respectively. For Belgium, the associated annual cost savings were estimated at € 5.2 million, € 5.0 million, and € 8.4 million respectively. For HRD, admission risk could be reduced by 2.16% [95% CI: 0.14%-4.15%], 2.08% [95% CI: 0.42%-3.70%], and 3.46% [95% CI: 0.84%-6.01%] for a 10% reduction in PM10, PM2.5, and NO2 respectively. This corresponds with a potential annual hospital cost saving in Belgium of € 3.7 million, € 3.6 million, and € 5.9 million respectively. If WHO annual guidelines for PM10 and PM2.5 are met, more than triple these amounts would be saved. This study demonstrates that a model chain of case-crossover and micro-costing analyses can be applied in order to obtain estimates on the impact of air pollution on hospital costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Red blood cell distribution width and haemoglobin are associated with hospital admission in patients with acute allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Buonocore, Ruggero; Picanza, Alessandra; Schirosa, Fabio; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is significantly associated with a variety of human disorders. This study aimed to investigate whether RDW value at admission may predict the need of hospitalisation in patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute allergic reactions. The study population consisted of adult patients (aged > 17) admitted to the ED for acute allergic reactions. One hundred and thirty-two subjects were included, 12 of whom (9%) required hospital admission for severity of symptoms. Patients who needed hospital admission displayed significantly lower values of haemoglobin and significantly higher values of RDW-coefficient of variation (RDW-CV). In multivariate analysis, haemoglobin and RDW-CV were found to be independent predictors of hospital admission. The area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity for predicting hospital admission were 0.72, 0.88 and 0.42 for haemoglobin and 0.73, 0.88 and 0.50 for RDW-CV, respectively. The combination of these tests (both positive) was characterised by 0.76 AUC, 0.83 sensitivity, 0.67 specificity, 0.96 negative predictive value and 0.30 positive predictive. The results of this study suggest that two common and inexpensive parameters such as haemoglobin and RDW are independent predictors of hospital admission in patients presenting to the ED with acute allergic reactions.

  6. High rates of hospital admission among older residents in assisted living facilities: opportunities for intervention and impact on acute care.

    PubMed

    Hogan, David B; Amuah, Joseph E; Strain, Laurel A; Wodchis, Walter P; Soo, Andrea; Eliasziw, Misha; Gruneir, Andrea; Hagen, Brad; Teare, Gary; Maxwell, Colleen J

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about health or service use outcomes for residents of Canadian assisted living facilities. Our objectives were to estimate the incidence of admission to hospital over 1 year for residents of designated (i.e., publicly funded) assisted living (DAL) facilities in Alberta, to compare this rate with the rate among residents of long-term care facilities, and to identify individual and facility predictors of hospital admission for DAL residents. Participants were 1066 DAL residents (mean age ± standard deviation 84.9 ± 7.3 years) and 976 longterm care residents (85.4 ± 7.6 years) from the Alberta Continuing Care Epidemiological Studies (ACCES). Research nurses completed a standardized comprehensive assessment for each resident and interviewed family caregivers at baseline (2006 to 2008) and 1 year later. We used standardized interviews with administrators to generate facility- level data. We determined hospital admissions through linkage with the Alberta Inpatient Discharge Abstract Database. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to identify predictors of hospital admission. The cumulative annual incidence of hospital admission was 38.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.9%- 41.9%) for DAL residents and 13.7% (95% CI 11.5%-15.8%) for long-term care residents. The risk of hospital admission was significantly greater for DAL residents with greater health instability, fatigue, medication use (11 or more medications), and 2 or more hospital admissions in the preceding year. The risk of hospital admission was also significantly higher for residents from DAL facilities with a smaller number of spaces, no licensed practical and/ or registered nurses on site (or on site less than 24 hours a day, 7 days a week), no chain affiliation, and from select health regions. The incidence of hospital admission was about 3 times higher among DAL residents than among long-term care residents, and the risk of hospital admission was associated with a number of

  7. Outcomes of hospitalized patients undergoing emergency general surgery remote from admission.

    PubMed

    Sharoky, Catherine E; Bailey, Elizabeth A; Sellers, Morgan M; Kaufman, Elinore J; Sinnamon, Andrew J; Wirtalla, Christopher J; Holena, Daniel N; Kelz, Rachel R

    2017-09-01

    Emergency general surgery during hospitalization has not been well characterized. We examined emergency operations remote from admission to identify predictors of postoperative 30-day mortality, postoperative duration of stay >30 days, and complications. Patients >18 years in The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (2011-2014) who had 1 of 7 emergency operations between hospital day 3-18 were included. Patients with operations >95th percentile after admission (>18 days; n = 581) were excluded. Exploratory laparotomy only (with no secondary procedure) represented either nontherapeutic or decompressive laparotomy. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of study outcomes. Of 10,093 patients with emergency operations, most were elderly (median 66 years old [interquartile ratio: 53-77 years]), white, and female. Postoperative 30-day mortality was 12.6% (n = 1,275). Almost half the cohort (40.1%) had a complication. A small subset (6.8%) had postoperative duration of stay >30 days. Postoperative mortality after exploratory laparotomy only was particularly high (>40%). In multivariable analysis, an operation on hospital day 11-18 compared with day 3-6 was associated with death (odds ratio 1.6 [1.3-2.0]), postoperative duration of stay >30 days (odds ratio 2.0 [1.6-2.6]), and complications (odds ratio 1.5 [1.3-1.8]). Exploratory laparotomy only also was associated with death (odds ratio 5.4 [2.8-10.4]). Emergency general surgery performed during a hospitalization is associated with high morbidity and mortality. A longer hospital course before an emergency operation is a predictor of poor outcomes, as is undergoing exploratory laparotomy only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Indications to Hospital Admission and Isolation of Children With Possible or Defined Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Andrea Lo; Bocchino, Marialuisa; Lancella, Laura; Gabiano, Clara; Garazzino, Silvia; Scotto, Riccardo; Raffaldi, Irene; Assante, Luca Rosario; Villani, Alberto; Esposito, Susanna; Guarino, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tuberculosis (TB) is a re-emerging health problem in developed countries. This paper is part of large guidelines on the global management of TB in children, by a group of scientific societies. It describes the indications to hospitalization of children with suspected or diagnosed TB, the isolation measures, hospital discharge, and re-admission into the community. Using the Consensus Conference method, relevant publications in English were identified by means of a systematic review of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from their inception until 31 December 2014. Available data on indications to hospitalization were mainly indirect and largely derived from observational studies. They include: (1) host-related risk factors, the main being age <12 months, immune deficiencies, and malnutrition; (2) TB-related clinical conditions that resemble those of pneumonia but also include drug-resistance; and (3) social and logistic conditions. The latter are based on opinion and depend on local conditions. Analysis of the literature showed that patients hospitalized with suspected pulmonary TB should be put in precautionary respiratory isolation regardless of their age while they await diagnosis. The general conditions for re-admission into the community are at least 14 days of effective treatment and negative microscopic tests of 3 consecutive samples in previously microscopically positive patients. This is the first paper that provides indications to hospitalization of children with TB. Most recommendations are generally applicable in all developed countries. Some might need an adaptation to local setting, epidemiological, parameters, and availability of specific health-care facilities. PMID:26683914

  9. Global and regional burden of hospital admissions for severe acute lower respiratory infections in young children in 2010: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Harish; Simões, Eric A F; Rudan, Igor; Gessner, Bradford D; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Zhang, Jian Shayne F; Feikin, Daniel R; Mackenzie, Grant A; Moïsi, Jennifer C; Roca, Anna; Baggett, Henry C; Zaman, Syed M A; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Lucero, Marilla G; Chandran, Aruna; Gentile, Angela; Cohen, Cheryl; Krishnan, Anand; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Arguedas, Adriano; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Ope, Maurice; Ruvinsky, Raúl Oscar; Hortal, María; McCracken, John P; Madhi, Shabir A; Bruce, Nigel; Qazi, Shamim A; Morris, Saul S; El Arifeen, Shams; Weber, Martin W; Scott, J Anthony G; Brooks, W Abdullah; Breiman, Robert F; Campbell, Harry

    2013-04-20

    The annual number of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths due to severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in young children worldwide is unknown. We aimed to estimate the incidence of admissions and deaths for such infections in children younger than 5 years in 2010. We estimated the incidence of admissions for severe and very severe ALRI in children younger than 5 years, stratified by age and region, with data from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1990, and March 31, 2012, and from 28 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these incidence estimates to population estimates for 2010, to calculate the global and regional burden in children admitted with severe ALRI in that year. We estimated in-hospital mortality due to severe and very severe ALRI by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from hospital-based studies. We identified 89 eligible studies and estimated that in 2010, 11·9 million (95% CI 10·3-13·9 million) episodes of severe and 3·0 million (2·1-4·2 million) episodes of very severe ALRI resulted in hospital admissions in young children worldwide. Incidence was higher in boys than in girls, the sex disparity being greatest in South Asian studies. On the basis of data from 37 hospital studies reporting case fatality ratios for severe ALRI, we estimated that roughly 265,000 (95% CI 160,000-450,000) in-hospital deaths took place in young children, with 99% of these deaths in developing countries. Therefore, the data suggest that although 62% of children with severe ALRI are treated in hospitals, 81% of deaths happen outside hospitals. Severe ALRI is a substantial burden on health services worldwide and a major cause of hospital referral and admission in young children. Improved hospital access and reduced inequities, such as those related to sex and rural status, could substantially decrease mortality related to such infection. Community-based management of severe disease could be an

  10. Global and regional burden of hospital admissions for severe acute lower respiratory infections in young children in 2010: a systematic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Harish; Simões, Eric AF; Rudan, Igor; Gessner, Bradford D; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Zhang, Jian Shayne F; Feikin, Daniel R; Mackenzie, Grant A; Moiïsi, Jennifer C; Roca, Anna; Baggett, Henry C; Zaman, Syed MA; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Lucero, Marilla G; Chandran, Aruna; Gentile, Angela; Cohen, Cheryl; Krishnan, Anand; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Arguedas, Adriano; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Andrade, Ana Lucia; Ope, Maurice; Ruvinsky, Raúl Oscar; Hortal, María; McCracken, John P; Madhi, Shabir A; Bruce, Nigel; Qazi, Shamim A; Morris, Saul S; El Arifeen, Shams; Weber, Martin W; Scott, J Anthony G; Brooks, W Abdullah; Breiman, Robert F; Campbell, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background The annual number of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths due to severe acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in young children worldwide is unknown. We aimed to estimate the incidence of admissions and deaths for such infections in children younger than 5 years in 2010. Methods We estimated the incidence of admissions for severe and very severe ALRI in children younger than 5 years, stratified by age and region, with data from a systematic review of studies published between Jan 1, 1990, and March 31, 2012, and from 28 unpublished population-based studies. We applied these incidence estimates to population estimates for 2010, to calculate the global and regional burden in children admitted with severe ALRI in that year. We estimated in-hospital mortality due to severe and very severe ALRI by combining incidence estimates with case fatality ratios from hospital-based studies. Findings We identified 89 eligible studies and estimated that in 2010, 11·9 million (95% CI 10·3–13·9 million) episodes of severe and 3·0 million (2·1–4·2 million) episodes of very severe ALRI resulted in hospital admissions in young children worldwide. Incidence was higher in boys than in girls, the sex disparity being greatest in South Asian studies. On the basis of data from 37 hospital studies reporting case fatality ratios for severe ALRI, we estimated that roughly 265 000 (95% CI 160 000–450 000) in-hospital deaths took place in young children, with 99% of these deaths in developing countries. Therefore, the data suggest that although 62% of children with severe ALRI are treated in hospitals, 81% of deaths happen outside hospitals. Interpretation Severe ALRI is a substantial burden on health services worldwide and a major cause of hospital referral and admission in young children. Improved hospital access and reduced inequities, such as those related to sex and rural status, could substantially decrease mortality related to such infection

  11. The Epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis in Scotland: Inferences from Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Adam E.; Jarvis, Lynne; McLaughlin, Ryan; Fries, Anastasia; Ebers, George C.; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurological disorder with a highly characteristic disease distribution. Prevalence and incidence in general increase with increasing distance from the equator. Similarly the female to male sex ratio increases with increasing latitude. Multiple possible risk factors have been hypothesised for this epidemiological trend, including human leukocyte antigen allele frequencies, ultraviolet exposure and subsequent vitamin D levels, smoking and Epstein-Barr virus. In this study we undertook a study of medical records across Scotland on an NHS health board level of resolution to examine the epidemiology of MS in this region. Methods and Results We calculated the number and rate of patient-linked hospital admissions throughout Scotland between 1997 and 2009 from the Scottish Morbidity Records. We used weighted-regression to examine correlations between these measures of MS, and latitude and smoking prevalence. We found a highly significant relationship between MS patient-linked admissions and latitude (r weighted by standard error (rsw) = 0.75, p = 0.002). There was no significant relationship between smoking prevalence and MS patient-linked admissions. Discussion There is a definite latitudinal effect on MS risk across Scotland, arising primarily from an excess of female MS patients at more Northerly latitudes. Whether this is a true gradient or whether a threshold effect may apply at particular latitude will be revealed only by further research. A number of genetic and environmental factors may underlie this effect. PMID:21298053

  12. Seasonal Variations in Hospital Admissions for ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction in New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Swampillai, Janice; Wijesinghe, Namal; Sebastian, Cherian; Devlin, Gerard P

    2012-01-01

    Background Increased numbers of ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) admissions have been observed during winter in many countries. Our aim was to assess if seasonal variation of STEMI was present in the Waikato region of New Zealand. Methods Case notes of patients admitted to Waikato hospital with STEMI between July 1998 and December 2007 were analysed. The incidence of STEMI during summer (December to February), autumn (March to May), winter (June to August) and spring (September to November) were calculated. The individuals were divided into 2 age groups of ≤ 70 and > 70 years of age. Results A total of 3,569 patients (mean age 66.9 ± 14.1 years, 64% men) were included. STEMI presentation during winter was significantly higher compared with summer (35 ± 13 versus 27.3 ± 11.3 cases per month, P < 0.02) with 3 additional STEMI admissions per fortnight during winter months. The increase in STEMI in winter was more apparent in patients > 70 years of age, with an 8.5% increase in winter admissions compared to summer (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in the incidence of STEMI between other seasons. Conclusion There is a higher incidence of STEMI during winter in the Waikato region compared with summer. This increased incidence is particularly pronounced in patients over 70 years of age. Further investigations are necessary to elicit potential causes.

  13. Impact of a measles immunisation campaign on measles admissions to a Natal hospital.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, S S; Abdool Karim, Q; Chamane, M

    1991-12-07

    During May and June 1990, a national mass measles immunisation campaign was undertaken in South Africa. This study is an assessment of the impact of the campaign on measles admissions to a provincial referral hospital that has specifically designated wards for children with communicable diseases. Data from the measles ward admissions book for the 18 months before the campaign (1 January 1989-30 June 1990) and 6 months after the campaign (1 July 1990-31 December 1990) were compared. Since the campaign, the average number of measles admissions has declined by 64.4% from 87 to 31 per month (P less than 0.01). Before the campaign, 21.3% of measles patients admitted were aged 7-9 months compared with 27.6% after the campaign, highlighting the urgent need to improve the measles vaccination coverage in this age group. An analysis of the geographical source of patients showed that measles continued to occur after the campaign in most of the areas where it existed before the campaign. It is concluded that important gains have been achieved by the campaign. These will be rapidly eroded and epidemics of measles may occur if measles vaccination efforts wane and slump back to pre-campaign levels. It is important to capitalise on the momentum generated through the campaign by continuing to support efforts of existing health care services to improve and maintain high levels of measles immunisation coverage.

  14. Geomagnetic storms: association with incidence of depression as measured by hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Kay, R W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis that geomagnetic storms may partly account for the seasonal variation in the incidence of depression, by acting as a precipitant of depressive illness in susceptible individuals, is supported by a statistically significant 36.2% increase in male hospital admissions with a diagnosis of depressed phase, manic-depressive illness in the second week following such storms compared with geomagnetically quiet control periods. There is a smaller but not statistically significant increase in female psychotic depression and non-psychotic depression admissions following storms. There was no correlation between geomagnetic storm levels and number of male admissions with psychotic depression, which is consistent with a threshold event affecting predisposed individuals. Phase advance in pineal circadian rhythms of melatonin synthesis may be a possible mechanism of causation or be present as a consequence of 5-hydroxytryptamine and adrenergic system dysfunction associated with geomagnetic disturbance. Effects on cell membrane permeability, calcium channel activity and retinal magneto-receptors are suggested as possible underlying biochemical mechanisms.

  15. [Epidemiology of hospital loads in patients with multiple hospitalizations due to diabetes].

    PubMed

    Staniscia, T; Manzoli, L; Matarrese, D; Di Giovanni, P; Cataudo, S; Testa, P; Schioppa, F; Vitullo, F; Monastra, G; Romano, F

    2005-01-01

    This study describes the results of a retrospective study carried out to evaluate the hospitalizations of patients with type 2 diabetes admitted from January to June 2001 in the teaching hospital "SS. Annunziata" of Chieti. This research evaluates the generic appropriateness using the PRUO manual and the specific appropriateness using the guidelines approved by Italian Diabetes Association, Italian Diabetes Society and Italian College of General Practitioners. A sample of 196 medical charts was examined. The percentage of inappropriate admission was 21.9%. The "critical" clinical conditions of patients were responsible for only 23.7% of inappropriate admissions. The first reason of the inappropriateness of the admission was the execution of diagnostic examinations (60.5%), followed by the execution of medical therapy (23.2%) and waiting for surgical intervention (16.3%). 46.5% of inappropriate hospitalization was prescribed by specialists. Concerning specific appropriateness, 42.3% of hospitalization was inappropriate. These findings suggest that a system for the assessment of disease management of diabetes should be started up in the Abruzzo region. Moreover, guidelines utilization should be implemented in order to get a more correct utilization of acute hospital by specialists and GPs.

  16. Association between antipsychotic/antidepressant drug treatments and hospital admissions in schizophrenia assessed using a mental health case register

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Rudolf N; Savulich, George; Mann, Louisa M; Fernández-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact of psychotropic drug choice upon admissions for schizophrenia is not well understood. Aims: To examine the association between antipsychotic/antidepressant use and time in hospital for patients with schizophrenia. Methods: We conducted an observational study, using 8 years’ admission records and electronically generated drug histories from an institution providing secondary mental health care in Cambridgeshire, UK, covering the period 2005–2012 inclusive. Patients with a coded ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia were selected. The primary outcome measure was the time spent as an inpatient in a psychiatric unit. Antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs used by at least 5% of patients overall were examined for associations with admissions. Periods before and after drug commencement were compared for patients having pre-drug admissions, in mirror-image analyses correcting for overall admission rates. Drug use in one 6-month calendar period was used to predict admissions in the next period, across all patients, in a regression analysis accounting for the effects of all other drugs studied and for time. Results: In mirror-image analyses, sulpiride, aripiprazole, clozapine, and olanzapine were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. In regression analyses, sulpiride, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, and clozapine–aripiprazole and clozapine–amisulpride combinations were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. Conclusions: Use of these drugs was associated with fewer days in hospital. Causation is not implied and these findings require confirmation by randomized controlled trials. PMID:27336041

  17. Minimum alcohol prices and outlet densities in British Columbia, Canada: estimated impacts on alcohol-attributable hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Tim; Zhao, Jinhui; Martin, Gina; Macdonald, Scott; Vallance, Kate; Treno, Andrew; Ponicki, William; Tu, Andrew; Buxton, Jane

    2013-11-01

    We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia. The longitudinal panel study (2002-2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time periods, adjusting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation, moving average effects, season, and a range of economic and social variables. A 10% increase in the average minimum price of all alcoholic beverages was associated with an 8.95% decrease in acute alcohol-attributable admissions and a 9.22% reduction in chronic alcohol-attributable admissions 2 years later. A Can$ 0.10 increase in average minimum price would prevent 166 acute admissions in the 1st year and 275 chronic admissions 2 years later. We also estimated significant, though smaller, adverse impacts of increased private liquor store density on hospital admission rates for all types of alcohol-attributable admissions. Significant health benefits were observed when minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia were increased. By contrast, adverse health outcomes were associated with an expansion of private liquor stores.

  18. Minimum Alcohol Prices and Outlet Densities in British Columbia, Canada: Estimated Impacts on Alcohol-Attributable Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinhui; Martin, Gina; Macdonald, Scott; Vallance, Kate; Treno, Andrew; Ponicki, William; Tu, Andrew; Buxton, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated whether periodic increases in minimum alcohol prices were associated with reduced alcohol-attributable hospital admissions in British Columbia. Methods. The longitudinal panel study (2002–2009) incorporated minimum alcohol prices, density of alcohol outlets, and age- and gender-standardized rates of acute, chronic, and 100% alcohol-attributable admissions. We applied mixed-method regression models to data from 89 geographic areas of British Columbia across 32 time periods, adjusting for spatial and temporal autocorrelation, moving average effects, season, and a range of economic and social variables. Results. A 10% increase in the average minimum price of all alcoholic beverages was associated with an 8.95% decrease in acute alcohol-attributable admissions and a 9.22% reduction in chronic alcohol-attributable admissions 2 years later. A Can$ 0.10 increase in average minimum price would prevent 166 acute admissions in the 1st year and 275 chronic admissions 2 years later. We also estimated significant, though smaller, adverse impacts of increased private liquor store density on hospital admission rates for all types of alcohol-attributable admissions. Conclusions. Significant health benefits were observed when minimum alcohol prices in British Columbia were increased. By contrast, adverse health outcomes were associated with an expansion of private liquor stores. PMID:23597383

  19. Causes of hospital admission among people living with HIV worldwide: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ford, Nathan; Shubber, Zara; Meintjes, Graeme; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Eholie, Serge; Mills, Edward J; Davies, Mary-Ann; Vitoria, Marco; Penazzato, Martina; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Frigati, Lisa; O'Brien, Daniel; Ellman, Tom; Ajose, Olawale; Calmy, Alexandra; Doherty, Meg

    2015-10-01

    Morbidity associated with HIV infection is poorly characterised, so we aimed to investigate the contribution of different comorbidities to hospital admission and in-hospital mortality in adults and children living with HIV worldwide. Using a broad search strategy combining terms for hospital admission and HIV infection, we searched MEDLINE via PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, LILACS, AIM, IMEMR and WPIMR from inception to Jan 31, 2015, to identify studies reporting cause of hospital admission in people living with HIV. We focused on data reported after 2007, the period in which access to antiretroviral therapy started to become widespread. We estimated pooled proportions of hospital admissions and deaths per disease category by use of random-effects models. We stratified data by geographical region and age. We obtained data from 106 cohorts, with reported causes of hospital admission for 313 006 adults and 6182 children living with HIV. For adults, AIDS-related illnesses (25 119 patients, 46%, 95% CI 40-53) and bacterial infections (14 034 patients, 31%, 20-42) were the leading causes of hospital admission. These two categories were the most common causes of hospital admission for adults in all geographical regions and the most common causes of mortality. Common region-specific causes of hospital admission included malnutrition and wasting, parasitic infections, and haematological disorders in the Africa region; respiratory disease, psychiatric disorders, renal disorders, cardiovascular disorders, and liver disease in Europe; haematological disorders in North America; and respiratory, neurological, digestive and liver-related conditions, viral infections, and drug toxicity in South and Central America. For children, AIDS-related illnesses (783 patients, 27%, 95% CI 19-34) and bacterial infections (1190 patients, 41%, 26-56) were the leading causes of hospital admission, followed by malnutrition and wasting, haematological disorders, and, in the African region

  20. Hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections among infants in the Canadian Arctic: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Anna; Panzov, Val; Young, Michael; Robinson, Joan; Lee, Bonita; Moraes, Theo; Mamdani, Muhammad; Giles, B. Louise; Jiang, Depeng; Bisson, Danny; Dennis, Marguerite; Morel, Johanne; Hall, Judith; Hui, Charles; Paes, Bosco; Mahony, James B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether this burden of disease of lower respiratory tract infections is comparable across the Canadian Arctic. The objectives of this surveillance study were to compare the rates of hospital admission for lower respiratory tract infection and the severity of infection across Arctic Canada, and to describe the responsible viruses. Methods: We performed a prospective multicentre surveillance study of infants less than 1 year of age admitted in 2009 with lower respiratory tract infection to all hospitals (5 regional, 4 tertiary) in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Nunavik to assess for regional differences. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were processed by means of a polymerase chain reaction respiratory viral panel, testing for 20 respiratory viruses and influenza A (H1N1). The role of coinfection was assessed by means of regression analysis for length of stay (short: < 7 d; long: > 14 d). Outcomes compared included rates of lower respiratory tract infection, respiratory syncytial virus infection, transfer to tertiary hospital and severe lower respiratory tract infection (respiratory failure, intubation and mechanical ventilation, and/or cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Results: There were 348 admissions for lower respiratory tract infection in the population of interest in 2009. Rates of admission per 1000 live births varied significantly, from 39 in the Northwest Territories to 456 in Nunavik (p < 0.001). The rates of tertiary admissions and severe lower respiratory tract infection per 1000 live births in the Northwest Territories were 5.6 and 1.4, respectively, compared to 55.9 and 17.1, respectively, in Nunavut and 52.0 and 20.0, respectively, in Nunavik (p ≤ 0.001). Respiratory syncytial virus was the most common virus identified (124 cases [41.6% of those tested]), and coinfection was detected in 51 cases (41.1%) of infection with this virus. Longer length of stay was associated with coinfection (odds ratio [OR] 2.64) and underlying

  1. Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada: a trend analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weichenthal, Scott; Wong, Joan; Smith-Doiron, Marc; Dugandzic, Rose; Kosatsky, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of mortality and morbidity from carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada has received little attention. Our objective was to evaluate trends in mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning across Canada. Methods Age- and sex-standardized mortality (1981–2009) and hospital admission (1995–2010) rates by age group, sex and site of carbon monoxide exposure were calculated for each province and for all of Canada. We quantified the long-term trends by calculating the average annual percent change. Multivariable Poisson regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of carbon monoxide poisoning across age groups, sex and month of occurrence. Results In Canada, there were 1808 unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning deaths between 1981 and 2009 and 1984 admissions to hospital between 1995 and 2010. Average annual decreases of 3.46% (95% confidence interval [CI] –4.59% to –2.31%) and 5.83% (95% CI –7.79% to –3.83%) were observed for mortality and hospital admission rates, respectively. Mortality (IRR 5.31, 95% CI 4.57 to 6.17) and hospital admission (IRR 2.77, 95% CI 2.51 to 3.03) rates were elevated in males compared with females. Decreased trends in the rates were observed for all sites of carbon monoxide exposure, but the magnitude of this decrease was lowest in residential environments. Deaths and admissions to hospital were most frequent from September to April, with peaks in December and January. Interpretation Mortality and hospital admission rates for unintentional nonfire-related carbon monoxide poisoning in Canada have declined steadily. Continued efforts should focus on reducing carbon monoxide poisoning during the cooler months and in residential environments. PMID:26389101

  2. Helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries in Canadian provinces and territories: interrupted time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Tim; Turgeon, Alexis F; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries among young people and adults in Canada. Design Interrupted time series analysis using data from the National Trauma Registry Minimum Data Set. Setting Canadian provinces and territories; between 1994 and 2003, six of 10 provinces implemented helmet legislation. Participants All admissions (n=66 716) to acute care hospitals in Canada owing to cycling related injury between 1994 and 2008. Main outcome measure Rate of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries before and after the implementation of provincial helmet legislation. Results Between 1994 and 2008, 66 716 hospital admissions were for cycling related injuries in Canada. Between 1994 and 2003, the rate of head injuries among young people decreased by 54.0% (95% confidence interval 48.2% to 59.8%) in provinces with helmet legislation compared with 33.1% (23.3% to 42.9%) in provinces and territories without legislation. Among adults, the rate of head injuries decreased by 26.0% (16.0% to 36.3%) in provinces with legislation but remained constant in provinces and territories without legislation. After taking baseline trends into consideration, however, we were unable to detect an independent effect of legislation on the rate of hospital admissions for cycling related head injuries. Conclusions Reductions in the rates of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries were greater in provinces with helmet legislation, but injury rates were already decreasing before the implementation of legislation and the rate of decline was not appreciably altered on introduction of legislation. While helmets reduce the risk of head injuries and we encourage their use, in the Canadian context of existing safety campaigns, improvements to the cycling infrastructure, and the passive uptake of helmets, the incremental contribution of provincial helmet legislation to reduce

  3. Helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries in Canadian provinces and territories: interrupted time series analysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Jessica; Ramsay, Tim; Turgeon, Alexis F; Zarychanski, Ryan

    2013-05-14

    To investigate the association between helmet legislation and admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries among young people and adults in Canada. Interrupted time series analysis using data from the National Trauma Registry Minimum Data Set. Canadian provinces and territories; between 1994 and 2003, six of 10 provinces implemented helmet legislation. All admissions (n=66,716) to acute care hospitals in Canada owing to cycling related injury between 1994 and 2008. Rate of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries before and after the implementation of provincial helmet legislation. Between 1994 and 2008, 66,716 hospital admissions were for cycling related injuries in Canada. Between 1994 and 2003, the rate of head injuries among young people decreased by 54.0% (95% confidence interval 48.2% to 59.8%) in provinces with helmet legislation compared with 33.1% (23.3% to 42.9%) in provinces and territories without legislation. Among adults, the rate of head injuries decreased by 26.0% (16.0% to 36.3%) in provinces with legislation but remained constant in provinces and territories without legislation. After taking baseline trends into consideration, however, we were unable to detect an independent effect of legislation on the rate of hospital admissions for cycling related head injuries. Reductions in the rates of admissions to hospital for cycling related head injuries were greater in provinces with helmet legislation, but injury rates were already decreasing before the implementation of legislation and the rate of decline was not appreciably altered on introduction of legislation. While helmets reduce the risk of head injuries and we encourage their use, in the Canadian context of existing safety campaigns, improvements to the cycling infrastructure, and the passive uptake of helmets, the incremental contribution of provincial helmet legislation to reduce hospital admissions for head injuries seems to have been minimal.

  4. Effects of Coarse Particulate Matter on Emergency Hospital Admissions for Respiratory Diseases: A Time-Series Analysis in Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hong; Tian, Linwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Tse, Lap Ah; Tam, Wilson; Wong, Tze Wai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many epidemiological studies have linked daily counts of hospital admissions to particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) and ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5), but relatively few have investigated the relationship of hospital admissions with coarse PM (PMc; 2.5–10 μm aerodynamic diameter). Objectives: We conducted this study to estimate the health effects of PMc on emergency hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Hong Kong after controlling for PM2.5 and gaseous pollutants. Methods: We conducted a time-series analysis of associations between daily emergency hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Hong Kong from January 2000 to December 2005 and daily PM2.5 and PMc concentrations. We estimated PMc concentrations by subtracting PM2.5 from PM10 measurements. We used generalized additive models to examine the relationship between PMc (single- and multiday lagged exposures) and hospital admissions adjusted for time trends, weather conditions, influenza outbreaks, PM2.5, and gaseous pollutants (nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and ozone). Results: A 10.9-μg/m3 (interquartile range) increase in the 4-day moving average concentration of PMc was associated with a 1.94% (95% confidence interval: 1.24%, 2.64%) increase in emergency hospital admissions for respiratory diseases that was attenuated but still significant after controlling for PM2.5. Adjusting for gaseous pollutants and altering models assumptions had little influence on PMc effect estimates. Conclusion: PMc was associated with emergency hospital admissions for respiratory diseases in Hong Kong independent of PM2.5 and gaseous pollutants. Further research is needed to evaluate health effects of different components of PMc. PMID:22266709

  5. Early coagulopathy in trauma patients: an on-scene and hospital admission study.

    PubMed

    Floccard, Bernard; Rugeri, Lucia; Faure, Alexandre; Saint Denis, Marc; Boyle, Eileen Mary; Peguet, Olivier; Levrat, Albrice; Guillaume, Christian; Marcotte, Guillaume; Vulliez, Alexandre; Hautin, Etienne; David, Jean Stéphane; Négrier, Claude; Allaouchiche, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Amongst trauma patients, early coagulopathy is common on hospital admission. No studies have evaluated the initial coagulation status in the pre-hospital setting. We hypothesise that the coagulopathic process begins at the time of trauma. We studied the on-scene and on hospital arrival coagulation profile of trauma patients. Prospective, observational study investigating the on-scene coagulation profile and its time course. We studied 45 patients at the scene of the accident, before fluid administration, and on hospital admission and classified their coagulopathy using the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis score during a 2-month period. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen concentration, factors II, V and VII activity, fibrin degradation products, antithrombin and protein C activities, platelet counts and base deficit were measured. The median injury severity score was 25 (13-35). On-scene, coagulation status was abnormal in 56% of patients. Protein C activities were decreased in the trauma-associated coagulopathy group (p=.02). Drops in protein C activities were associated with changes in activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, fibrinogen concentration, factor V and antithrombin activities. Only factor V levels decreased significantly with the severity of the trauma. On hospital admission, coagulation status was abnormal in 60% of patients. The on-scene coagulopathy was spontaneously normalised only in 2 patients whereas others had the same or a poorer coagulopathy status. All parameters of coagulation were significantly abnormal comparing to the on-scene phase. Decreases in protein C activities were related to the coagulation status (p<.0001) and changes in other coagulation parameters. Patients with base deficit ≤-6 mmol/L had changes in antithrombin, factor V and protein C activities but no significant coagulopathy. Coagulopathy occurs very early after injury, before fluid administration, at

  6. Developing a programme for medication reconciliation at the time of admission into hospital.

    PubMed

    Giménez Manzorro, Álvaro; Zoni, Ana Clara; Rodríguez Rieiro, Cristina; Durán-García, Esther; Trovato López, Alejandro Nicolás; Pérez Sanz, Cristina; Bodas Gutiérrez, Patricia; Jiménez Muñoz, Ana Belén

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the methods used to develop the medication reconciliation programme implemented in a tertiary care hospital, and to discuss the main problems encountered and lessons learned during the process. A quasi-experimental study was carried out, analysing discrepancies between routine medication and drugs prescribed in the hospital, before and after an electronic reconciliation tool was introduced at admission. This tool was integrated into the computerized provider order entry system. The implementation of the electronic reconciliation tool has shown a reduction of the rate of discrepancies, decreasing from 7.24% (CI 95% 6.0-8.5) before the intervention to 4.18% (CI 95% 3.2-5.1) afterwards. Projects like this are costly, but this study has made it possible to detect numerous areas where interventions could be useful and proved the importance of a medication reconciliation programme.

  7. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  8. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  9. Rates and relative risk of hospital admission among women in violent intimate partner relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Kernic, M A; Wolf, M E; Holt, V L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the history of hospitalization among women involved in violent intimate relationships. METHODS: In this 1-year retrospective cohort study, female residents of King County, Washington, who were aged 18 to 44 years and who had filed for a protection order were compared with nonabused women in the same age group. Outcome measures included overall and diagnosis-specific hospital admission rates and relative risk of hospitalization associated with abuse. RESULTS: Women known to be exposed to a violent intimate relationship were significantly more likely to be hospitalized with any diagnosis (age-specific relative risks [RRs] ranging from 1.2 to 2.1), psychiatric diagnoses (RR = 3.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8, 4.6), injury and poisoning diagnoses (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.2, 2.8), digestive system diseases (RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.3, 2.9), and diagnoses of assault (RR = 4.9, 95% CI = 1.1, 22.1) or attempted suicide (RR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.6, 9.2) in the year before filing a protection order. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed an increased relative risk of both overall and diagnosis-specific hospitalizations among abused women. Intimate partner violence has a significant impact on women's health and use of health care. PMID:10983199

  10. Head injury with and without hospital admission: comparisons of incidence and short-term disability.

    PubMed Central

    Fife, D

    1987-01-01

    All persons with head injuries (skull fracture or injury to the cranial contents resulting in a physician visit or at least one day of disability), regardless of treatment or hospital admission status, were identified from National Health Interview Survey data for the years 1977-81. Among those who reported such head injuries within the two weeks prior to interview, only 16 per cent were admitted to hospitals. Children, members of low-income families, and those injured at home, school, or in a recreational setting were less likely to be admitted to hospital than others. Among those who sustained a head injury in the previous three months and had some disability from that injury during the two weeks prior to interview, those not admitted to hospital included one-half of those with three to seven days of bed disability and one-third of those with more than seven days of bed disability; and they accounted for one-half of all disability days. These findings indicate that hospital-based head injury incidence data are incomplete and may contain substantial biases. PMID:2954475

  11. Clean indoor air regulation and incidence of hospital admissions for acute coronary syndrome in Kanawha County, West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rahul; Luo, Juhua; Anderson, Robert H; Ray, Anita

    2011-07-01

    Secondhand smoke is a risk factor for coronary heart disease. Laws and regulations prohibiting smoking in public areas and workplaces can reduce rates of acute myocardial infarction. Our objective was to describe hospital admission rates for acute coronary events, based on smoking status, diabetes status, and sex, in the presence of a long-standing (2000-2008) county clean indoor air regulation (CIAR). We also examined the effect of making restaurants completely smoke-free. We obtained hospital admission data for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and acute myocardial infarction from all acute care hospitals serving Kanawha County, West Virginia, for 2000 through 2008. A CIAR was enacted in 1995 and revised in 2000 and 2003. We performed descriptive analyses on hospital admission rates of ACS over time and present these data by sex, age group, smoking status, and medical history of diabetes. The incidence of hospital admissions for ACS consistently declined during the period studied. This change was most pronounced among nonsmokers, people without diabetes, and women, compared with their respective counterparts. Similar benefits occurred for male smokers when the CIAR was revised to make restaurants completely smoke-free in 2004. In the presence of a CIAR, a consistent decline in incidence of hospital admissions for ACS can be demonstrated. However, the benefits derived may be disproportionately affected by smoking status, diabetes status, and sex.

  12. Inpatient Dermatology: Characteristics of Patients and Admissions in a Tertiary Level Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Arpita; Chowdhury, Satyendranath; Poddar, Indrasish; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27%) were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33%) and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%). Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2%) improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73%) patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64%) required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13%) were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses. PMID:27688450

  13. Audit of acute admissions of COPD: standards of care and management in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Roberts, C M; Ryland, I; Lowe, D; Kelly, Y; Bucknall, C E; Pearson, M G

    2001-03-01

    Despite publication of several management guidelines for COPD, relatively little is known about standards of care in clinical practice. Data were collected on the management of 1400 cases of acute admission with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in 38 UK hospitals to compare clinical practice against the recommended British Thoracic Society standards. Variation in the process of care between the different centres was analysed and a comparison of the management by respiratory specialists and nonrespiratory specialists made. There were large variations between centres for many of the variables studied. A forced expiratory volume in one second measurement was found in only 53% of cases. Of the investigations recommended in the acute management arterial blood gases were performed in 79% (interhospital range 40-100%) of admissions and oxygen was formally prescribed in only 64% (range 9-94%). Of those cases with acidosis and hypercapnia 35% had no further blood gas analysis and only 13% received ventilatory support. Long-term management was also deficient with 246 cases known to be severely hypoxic on admission yet two-thirds had no confirmation that oxygen levels had returned to levels above the requirements for long-term oxygen therapy. Only 30% of current smokers had cessation advice documented. To conclude, the median standards of care observed fell below those recommended by the guidelines. The lowest levels of performance were for patients not under the respiratory specialists, but specialists also have room for improvement. The substantial variation in the process of care between hospitals is strong evidence that it is possible for other centres with poorer performance to improve their levels of care.

  14. Comparing exposure metrics for the effects of fine particulate matter on emergency hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Mannshardt, Elizabeth; Sucic, Katarina; Jiao, Wan; Dominici, Francesca; Frey, H Christopher; Reich, Brian; Fuentes, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    A crucial step in an epidemiological study of the effects of air pollution is to accurately quantify exposure of the population. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of the health effects estimates associated with short-term exposure to fine particulate matter with respect to three potential metrics for daily exposure: ambient monitor data, estimated values from a deterministic atmospheric chemistry model, and stochastic daily average human exposure simulation output. Each of these metrics has strengths and weaknesses when estimating the association between daily changes in ambient exposure to fine particulate matter and daily emergency hospital admissions. Monitor data is readily available, but is incomplete over space and time. The atmospheric chemistry model output is spatially and temporally complete but may be less accurate than monitor data. The stochastic human exposure estimates account for human activity patterns and variability in pollutant concentration across microenvironments, but requires extensive input information and computation time. To compare these metrics, we consider a case study of the association between fine particulate matter and emergency hospital admissions for respiratory cases for the Medicare population across three counties in New York. Of particular interest is to quantify the impact and/or benefit to using the stochastic human exposure output to measure ambient exposure to fine particulate matter. Results indicate that the stochastic human exposure simulation output indicates approximately the same increase in the relative risk associated with emergency admissions as using a chemistry model or monitoring data as exposure metrics. However, the stochastic human exposure simulation output and the atmospheric chemistry model both bring additional information, which helps to reduce the uncertainly in our estimated risk.

  15. Monotherapy With Major Antihypertensive Drug Classes and Risk of Hospital Admissions for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Boal, Angela H.; Smith, Daniel J.; McCallum, Linsay; Muir, Scott; Touyz, Rhian M.; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive and bipolar disorders predispose to atherosclerosis, and there is accruing data from animal model, epidemiological, and genomic studies that commonly used antihypertensive drugs may have a role in the pathogenesis or course of mood disorders. In this study, we propose to determine whether antihypertensive drugs have an impact on mood disorders through the analysis of patients on monotherapy with different classes of antihypertensive drugs from a large hospital database of 525 046 patients with follow-up for 5 years. There were 144 066 eligible patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria: age 40 to 80 years old at time of antihypertensive prescription and medication exposure >90 days. The burden of comorbidity assessed by Charlson and Elixhauser scores showed an independent linear association with mood disorder diagnosis. The median time to hospital admission with mood disorder was 847 days for the 299 admissions (641 685 person-years of follow-up). Patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers had the lowest risk for mood disorder admissions, and compared with this group, those on β-blockers (hazard ratio=2.11; [95% confidence interval, 1.12–3.98]; P=0.02) and calcium antagonists (2.28 [95% confidence interval, 1.13–4.58]; P=0.02) showed higher risk, whereas those on no antihypertensives (1.63 [95% confidence interval, 0.94–2.82]; P=0.08) and thiazide diuretics (1.56 [95% confidence interval, 0.65–3.73]; P=0.32) showed no significant difference. Overall, our exploratory findings suggest possible differential effects of antihypertensive medications on mood that merits further study: calcium antagonists and β-blockers may be associated with increased risk, whereas angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers may be associated with a decreased risk of mood disorders. PMID:27733585

  16. Residential exposure to aircraft noise and hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases: multi-airport retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Andrew W; Peters, Junenette L; Levy, Jonathan I; Melly, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether exposure to aircraft noise increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases in older people (≥65 years) residing near airports. Design Multi-airport retrospective study of approximately 6 million older people residing near airports in the United States. We superimposed contours of aircraft noise levels (in decibels, dB) for 89 airports for 2009 provided by the US Federal Aviation Administration on census block resolution population data to construct two exposure metrics applicable to zip code resolution health insurance data: population weighted noise within each zip code, and 90th centile of noise among populated census blocks within each zip code. Setting 2218 zip codes surrounding 89 airports in the contiguous states. Participants 6 027 363 people eligible to participate in the national medical insurance (Medicare) program (aged ≥65 years) residing near airports in 2009. Main outcome measures Percentage increase in the hospitalization admission rate for cardiovascular disease associated with a 10 dB increase in aircraft noise, for each airport and on average across airports adjusted by individual level characteristics (age, sex, race), zip code level socioeconomic status and demographics, zip code level air pollution (fine particulate matter and ozone), and roadway density. Results Averaged across all airports and using the 90th centile noise exposure metric, a zip code with 10 dB higher noise exposure had a 3.5% higher (95% confidence interval 0.2% to 7.0%) cardiovascular hospital admission rate, after controlling for covariates. Conclusions Despite limitations related to potential misclassification of exposure, we found a statistically significant association between exposure to aircraft noise and risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases among older people living near airports. PMID:24103538

  17. Does Admission to Medicine or Orthopaedics Impact a Geriatric Hip Patient's Hospital Length of Stay?

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sarah E; VanHouten, Jacob P; Lakomkin, Nikita; Ehrenfeld, Jesse; Jahangir, Amir Alex; Boyce, Robert H; Obremksey, William T; Sethi, Manish K

    2016-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the association between admitting service, medicine or orthopaedics, and length of stay (LOS) for a geriatric hip fracture patient. Retrospective. Urban level 1 trauma center. Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients from 2000 to 2009. Orthopaedic surgery for geriatric hip fracture. Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, hospitalization length, and admitting service. Negative binomial regression used to determine association between LOS and admitting service. Six hundred fourteen geriatric hip fracture patients were included in the analysis, of whom 49.2% of patients (n = 302) were admitted to the orthopaedic service and 50.8% (3 = 312) to the medicine service. The median LOS for patients admitted to orthopaedics was 4.5 days compared with 7 days for patients admitted to medicine (P < 0.0001). Readmission was also significantly higher for patients admitted to medicine (n = 92, 29.8%) than for those admitted to orthopaedics (n = 70, 23.1%). After controlling for important patient factors, it was determined that medicine patients are expected to stay about 1.5 times (incidence rate ratio: 1.48, P < 0.0001) longer in the hospital than orthopaedic patients. This is the largest study to demonstrate that admission to the medicine service compared with the orthopaedic service increases a geriatric hip fractures patient's expected LOS. Since LOS is a major driver of cost as well as a measure of quality care, it is important to understand the factors that lead to a longer hospital stay to better allocate hospital resources. Based on the results from our institution, orthopaedic surgeons should be aware that admission to medicine might increase a patient's expected LOS. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  18. Residential exposure to aircraft noise and hospital admissions for cardiovascular diseases: multi-airport retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Correia, Andrew W; Peters, Junenette L; Levy, Jonathan I; Melly, Steven; Dominici, Francesca

    2013-10-08

    To investigate whether exposure to aircraft noise increases the risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases in older people (≥ 65 years) residing near airports. Multi-airport retrospective study of approximately 6 million older people residing near airports in the United States. We superimposed contours of aircraft noise levels (in decibels, dB) for 89 airports for 2009 provided by the US Federal Aviation Administration on census block resolution population data to construct two exposure metrics applicable to zip code resolution health insurance data: population weighted noise within each zip code, and 90th centile of noise among populated census blocks within each zip code. 2218 zip codes surrounding 89 airports in the contiguous states. 6 027 363 people eligible to participate in the national medical insurance (Medicare) program (aged ≥ 65 years) residing near airports in 2009. Percentage increase in the hospitalization admission rate for cardiovascular disease associated with a 10 dB increase in aircraft noise, for each airport and on average across airports adjusted by individual level characteristics (age, sex, race), zip code level socioeconomic status and demographics, zip code level air pollution (fine particulate matter and ozone), and roadway density. Averaged across all airports and using the 90th centile noise exposure metric, a zip code with 10 dB higher noise exposure had a 3.5% higher (95% confidence interval 0.2% to 7.0%) cardiovascular hospital admission rate, after controlling for covariates. Despite limitations related to potential misclassification of exposure, we found a statistically significant association between exposure to aircraft noise and risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases among older people living near airports.

  19. Combining Different Privacy-Preserving Record Linkage Methods for Hospital Admission Data.

    PubMed

    Stausberg, Jürgen; Waldenburger, Andreas; Borgs, Christian; Schnell, Rainer

    2017-01-01

    Record linkage (RL) is the process of identifying pairs of records that correspond to the same entity, for example the same patient. The basic approach assigns to each pair of records a similarity weight, and then determines a certain threshold, above which the two records are considered to be a match. Three different RL methods were applied under privacy-preserving conditions on hospital admission data: deterministic RL (DRL), probabilistic RL (PRL), and Bloom filters. The patient characteristics like names were one-way encrypted (DRL, PRL) or transformed to a cryptographic longterm key (Bloom filters). Based on one year of hospital admissions, the data set was split randomly in 30 thousand new and 1,5 million known patients. With the combination of the three RL-methods, a positive predictive value of 83 % (95 %-confidence interval 65 %-94 %) was attained. Thus, the application of the presented combination of RL-methods seem to be suited for other applications of population-based research.

  20. Pharmacological treatment and risk of psychiatric hospital admission in bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Joas, Erik; Karanti, Alina; Song, Jie; Goodwin, Guy M; Lichtenstein, Paul; Landén, Mikael

    2017-03-01

    BackgroundClinical trials have examined the efficacy of drugs to prevent relapse in patients with bipolar disorder, however, their design often limits generalisation to routine clinical practice.AimsTo estimate the effectiveness of drugs used for maintenance treatment in bipolar disorder.MethodWe used national registers to identify 35 022 individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder and information on lithium, valproate, carbamazepine, lamotrigine, quetiapine and olanzapine treatment from 2006 to 2009. The main outcome was psychiatric hospital admissions. We used stratified cox regression to compare periods on and off medication within the same individual.ResultsMedication with lithium, valproate, lamotrigine, olanzapine and quetiapine was associated with reduced rates of admission to hospital. Lithium was more effective than quetiapine and olanzapine. The effects of specific drugs depended on the polarity of the mood episode.ConclusionsOur findings complement results from randomised controlled trails, but suggest that lithium is more effective than both quetiapine and olanzapine in routine clinical practice. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  1. Trends in stroke admissions to a Tanzanian hospital over four decades: a retrospective audit.

    PubMed

    Walker, Richard W; Viney, Rachel; Green, Laura; Mawanswila, Manasseh; Maro, Venance P; Gjertsen, Charlotte; Godfrey, Hannah; Smailes, Rosanna; Gray, William K

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to record stroke admissions to a tertiary referral hospital in Tanzania over four decades. We audited the medical records held at a large teaching and tertiary referral hospital in northern Tanzania over four decades. We collected records for the years 1974-1976, 1984-1986, 1994-1995 and 2008. All patients admitted as inpatients with a primary diagnosis of stroke were included in the study. Data collected included age, sex, stroke subtype, predominant side of symptoms and survival to discharge. The number of stroke admissions rose from just four in the three-year period 1974-1976 (mean 1.3 cases annually) to 153 cases annually in 2008. The mean age of those admitted rose steadily during this period, as did the proportion of females admitted. The burden of stroke on health services in Tanzania appears to have increased rapidly. If this increase is to be slowed, then sustainable primary preventative measures to target known stroke risk factors will be required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Involuntary Psychiatric Admissions and Development of Psychiatric Services as an Alternative to Full-Time Hospitalization in France.

    PubMed

    Gandré, Coralie; Gervaix, Jeanne; Thillard, Julien; Macé, Jean-Marc; Roelandt, Jean-Luc; Chevreul, Karine

    2017-09-01

    The development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization in psychiatry is limited because consensus about the benefits of such alternatives is lacking. This study assessed whether the development of such alternatives in French psychiatric sectors was associated with a reduction in involuntary inpatient care, taking into account other factors that are potentially associated with involuntary admission. Data on whether a patient had at least one involuntary full-time admission in 2012 were extracted from the French national discharge database for psychiatric care. The development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization was estimated as the percentage of human resources allocated to these alternatives out of all human resources allocated to psychiatry, measured at the level of the hospital hosting each sector. Other factors potentially associated with involuntary admission (characteristics of patients, health care providers, and the environment) were extracted from administrative databases, and a multilevel logistic model was carried out to account for the nested structure of the data. Significant variations were observed between psychiatric sectors in rates of involuntary inpatient admissions. A large portion of the variation was explained by characteristics of the sectors. A significant negative association was found between involuntary admissions and the development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization, after adjustment for other factors associated with involuntary admissions. Findings suggest that the development of alternatives to full-time hospitalization is beneficial for quality of care, given that it is negatively associated with involuntary full-time admissions. The reduction of such admissions aligns with international recommendations for psychiatric care.

  3. The efficacy of fetal fibronectin testing in minimising hospital admissions, length of hospital stay and cost savings in women presenting with symptoms of pre-term labour.

    PubMed

    Dutta, D; Norman, J E

    2010-01-01

    The following review includes a number of studies on the effect of fetal fibronectin (fFN) testing and non-testing, as well as the positive and negative test results, some combining with transvaginal ultrasonographic measurement of cervical length primarily to reduce hospital admissions and length of hospital stay (with associated reduction in health service costs), in women presenting to hospital with symptoms of pre-term labour. English language medical literature was analysed using the search parameters: fetal fibronectin, cervical length, preterm labour, hospital admissions and length of stay. A total of 19 studies were included. Ten of these discussed the role of fFN in decreasing hospital admissions, transfers, length of stay and interventions like corticosteroids and tocolytics. Seven studies demonstrated a correlation of fFN testing with an actual estimate of cost savings of health resources. Five studies explored the combined predictability of fetal fibronectin and cervical length with regards to pre-term labour.

  4. Risk Factors for 30-Day Hospital Re-Admission with an Infectious Complication after Lower-Extremity Vascular Procedures.

    PubMed

    Melvin, Joseph C; Smith, Jamie B; Kruse, Robin L; Vogel, Todd R

    2017-04-01

    Lowering the 30-d re-admission rate after vascular surgery offers the potential to improve healthcare quality. This study evaluated re-admission associated with infections after open and endovascular lower extremity (LE) procedures for peripheral artery disease (PAD). Patients admitted for elective LE procedures for PAD were selected from the Cerner Health Facts(®) database. Chi-square analysis evaluated the characteristics of the index admission associated with infection at 30-d re-admission. Multivariable logistic models were created to examine the association of patient and procedural characteristics with infections at re-admission. The microbiology data available at the time of re-admission were evaluated also. A total of 7,089 patients underwent elective LE procedures, of whom 770 (10.9%) were re-admitted within 30 d. A total of 289 (37.5%) had a diagnosis of infection during the re-admission. These infections included surgical site (14.8%), cellulitis (13.6%), sepsis (8.8%), urinary tract (4.9%), and pneumonia (4.9%). Index stay factors associated with infection at re-admission were fluid and electrolyte disorders, kidney disease, diabetes, previous infection, and chronic anemia. Laboratory results associated with an infection during re-admission were post-operative hemoglobin <8 g/dL, blood urea nitrogen >20 mg/dL, platelet counts >400 × 10(3)/mcL, glucose >180 mg/dL, and white blood cell count >11.0 × 10(3)/mcL. Adjusted models demonstrated longer stay, chronic anemia, previous infection, treatment at a teaching hospital, and hemoglobin <8 g/dL to be risk factors for re-admission with infection. Infective organisms isolated during the re-admission stay included Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Escherichia, Pseudomonas, Proteus, and Klebsiella. Infectious complications were associated with more than one-third of all re-admissions after LE procedures. Predictors of re-admission within 30 d with an infectious complication were longer stay

  5. Faecal shedding of CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli in horses receiving broad-spectrum antimicrobial prophylaxis after hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Damborg, Peter; Marskar, Peter; Baptiste, Keith E; Guardabassi, Luca

    2012-01-27

    The objective of this longitudinal study was to investigate the occurrence and genetic background of faecal Escherichia coli resistant to cefotaxime (CTX) in horses receiving broad-spectrum antimicrobial prophylaxis after admission to a veterinary teaching hospital. The ten horses enrolled in the study were treated with cefquinome either alone (n=4) or in combination with metronidazole (n=3) or other antimicrobial agents (n=3). CTX-resistant coliforms in faeces collected before, during and after treatment were quantified on selective MacConkey agar supplemented with CTX, and a colony isolated randomly from each positive sample was characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and by PCR detection and sequencing of bla(TEM), bla(SHV), bla(CTX-M) and bla(CMY). All horses were negative for CTX-resistant coliforms at admission but became positive within the first three days of treatment. The average faecal densities of CTX-resistant coliforms increased significantly following antimicrobial prophylaxis (P<0.001). Genetic characterization of 29 faecal isolates revealed that this effect was due to proliferation of E. coli producing either CTX-M-1 (n=28) or CTX-M-14 (n=1). Five CTX-M-1 isolates produced additional β-lactamases (TEM-1, CMY-34 and the novel variant CMY-53). Shedding of CTX-M-producing E. coli appeared intermittent in four horses and persisted two weeks after antimicrobial treatments in five of six patients tested after discharge from hospital. Nosocomial transmission was suggested by finding five identical CTX-M-1-producing E. coli pulsotypes in multiple horses. The originality of the study lies in the unanticipated high frequency and genetic diversity of CTX-M-producing E. coli observed in the faecal flora of hospitalized patients receiving broad-spectrum antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  6. Emergency hospitalization in the elderly in a French university hospital: medical and social conditions and crisis factors precipitating admissions and outcome at discharge.

    PubMed

    Onen, F; Abidi, H; Savoye, L; Elchardus, J M; Legrain, S; Courpron, P H

    2001-12-01

    Emergency admissions of elderly patients constitute a major management issue due to the complexity of their problems. The aim of this retrospective observational study was to identify medical and social characteristics and crisis factors for emergency department (ED) hospitalization in elderly patients, and to evaluate the influence of these factors on the length of stay and outcome at discharge. During a 4-month period, 396 patients aged 70 years and older were referred to the ED of a University Hospital (Hĵpital Edouard Herriot) in Lyon, France. A questionnaire specifically designed for the study was completed for each patient using the information in the patients' files previously filled in by the "Rapid Geriatric Assessment Team" of the ED. We described civil and marital status, living conditions, reason for admission to ED and other associated pathologies according to the ICM-9, crisis factors, length of stay (LOS) and outcome at discharge. The mean age was 81.9 years (SD 6.5); two thirds (66.7%) of the study subjects were female, and 46.7% were widowed; the majority (68.7%) lived in their own homes. The main reasons for admission were cardiopulmonary diseases in 31.6% of cases, followed by neuropsychiatric disorders in 28.2%, and falls in 8.3%; a final category (31.8%) included subjects admitted for general, non-specific symptoms. Among the crisis factors observed, 49.4% presented an acute episode of a chronic illness, 33.6% lived alone, and 20.9% had been hospitalized during the 6-month period preceding the study. The average LOS was 3.15 days. The multivariate model showed that falls increase LOS by 74%, dementia by 65%, and depression by 21%. Upon discharge, 13% returned to their residence before hospitalization, 55% were transferred to a medical speciality ward, and 4% to other facilities, whereas only 19% were transferred to a geriatric ward, and 9% died during their stay in the ED. The multinomial model showed that outcome at discharge was influenced

  7. Hospital admissions resulting from unsafe abortion: estimates from 13 developing countries.

    PubMed

    Singh, Susheela

    2006-11-25

    Complications from unsafe abortion are believed to account for the largest proportion of hospital admissions for gynaecological services in developing countries. The WHO estimates that one in eight pregnancy-related deaths result from unsafe abortions. The social stigma and legal restrictions associated with abortion in many countries means that data on the magnitude of this problem are scarce; this article estimates the rate and numbers of hospital admissions resulting from unsafe abortions in developing countries to help quantify the problem. National estimates of abortion-related hospital admissions in women aged 15-44 years were compiled for 13 developing countries: Africa (Egypt, Nigeria, and Uganda), Asia (Bangladesh, Pakistan, and the Philippines), and Latin America and the Caribbean (Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, Mexico, and Peru). These data were combined with supplementary data from five countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, and South Africa) to give estimates for the three world regions. The annual hospitalisation rate varies from a low of about 3 per 1000 women in Bangladesh to a high of about 15 per 1000 in Egypt and Uganda. Nigeria, Pakistan, and the Philippines have rates of 4-7 per 1000, and two countries in Latin America with recent data have rates of almost 9 per 1000. In the developing world as a whole, an estimated five million women are admitted to hospital for treatment of complications from induced abortions each year. This equates to an average rate of 5.7 per 1000 women per year in all developing regions, excluding China. By comparison, in developed countries complications from abortion procedures or hospitalisation are rare. These results help quantify the magnitude of the adverse health effects of unsafe abortion in developing countries and highlight the need for improved access to post-abortion care. The provision of abortion services is changing to include the drug misoprostol

  8. Effectiveness of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery in a tertiary university hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing demand on hospitalisation, either due to elective activity from the waiting lists or due to emergency admissions coming from the Emergency Department (ED), requires looking for strategies that lead to effective bed management. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a surgery admission unit for major elective surgery patients who were admitted for same-day surgery. Methods We included all patients admitted for elective surgery in a university tertiary hospital between the 1st of September and the 31st of December 2006, as well as those admitted during the same period of 2008, after the introduction of the Surgery Admission Unit. The main outcome parameters were global length of stay, pre-surgery length of stay, proportion of patients admitted the same day of the surgery and number of cancellations. Differences between the two periods were evaluated by the T-test and Chi-square test. Significance at P < 0.05 was assumed throughout. Results We included 6,053 patients, 3,003 during 2006 and 3,050 patients during 2008. Global length of stay was 6.2 days (IC 95%:6.4-6) in 2006 and 5.5 days (IC 95%:5.8-5.2) in 2008 (p < 0.005). Pre-surgery length of stay was reduced from 0.46 days (IC 95%:0.44-0.48) in 2006 to 0.29 days (IC 95%:0.27-0.31) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The proportion of patients admitted for same-day surgery was 67% (IC 95%:69%-65%) in 2006 and 76% (IC 95%:78%-74%) in 2008 (p < 0.005). The number of cancelled interventions due to insufficient preparation was 31 patients in 2006 and 7 patients in 2008. Conclusions The implementation of a Surgery Admission Unit for patients undergoing major elective surgery has proved to be an effective strategy for improving bed management. It has enabled an improvement in the proportion of patients admitted on the same day as surgery and a shorter length of stay. PMID:20096114

  9. Inappropriate prescribing and related hospital admissions in frail older persons according to the STOPP and START criteria.

    PubMed

    Dalleur, Olivia; Spinewine, Anne; Henrard, Séverine; Losseau, Claire; Speybroeck, Niko; Boland, Benoit

    2012-10-01

    Over the last few years, the Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions (STOPP) and Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment (START) criteria have been increasingly used to evaluate the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing. However, very few studies have evaluated the link between these criteria and clinical outcomes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of inappropriate prescribing according to STOPP and START in a population of frail elderly persons admitted acutely to hospital; to evaluate whether these inappropriate prescribing events contributed to hospital admissions; and to identify determinants of hospital admissions potentially related to inappropriate prescribing. This was a cross-sectional study including all frail older patients admitted to a 975-bed teaching hospital over a 12-month period. A pharmacist and a geriatrician independently detected events of prescribing of potentially inappropriate medication (PIM) and potential prescribing omission (PPO), using the STOPP and START criteria, respectively, in all patients included in the study. They determined whether the inappropriate prescribing event was the main cause or a contributory cause of hospital admission. Demographic, clinical and geriatric clinical syndromes (i.e. cognitive impairment, falls) were evaluated as potential determinants of hospital admissions related to inappropriate prescribing, using multivariate methods (i.e. logistic regression and a classification tree). 302 frail older persons (median age 84 years) were included in the study. PIMs (prevalence 48%) mainly involved overuse and/or misuse of benzodiazepines, aspirin and opiates. PPOs (prevalence 63%) were mainly related to underuse of calcium and vitamin D supplementation, aspirin and statins. Overall, inappropriate prescribing according to STOPP (54 PIMs) and/or START (38 PPOs) led or contributed to hospital admission in 82 persons (27%). The multivariate analyses indicated a relation

  10. Risk of death or hospital admission among community-dwelling older adults living with dementia in Australia.

    PubMed

    You, Emily Chuanmei; Dunt, David Robert; White, Vanessa; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Doyle, Colleen

    2014-06-10

    Older people living with dementia prefer to stay at home to receive support. But they are at high risk of death and/or hospital admissions. This study primarily aimed to determine risk factors for time to death or hospital admission (combined) in a sample of community-dwelling older people living with dementia in Australia. As a secondary study purpose, risk factors for time to death were also examined. This study used the data of a previous project which had been implemented during September 2007 and February 2009. The original project had recruited 354 eligible clients (aged 70 and over, and living with dementia) for Extended Aged Care At home Dementia program services during September 2007 and 2008. Client information and carer stress had been collected from their case managers through a baseline survey and three-monthly follow-up surveys (up to four in total). The principal data collection tools included Global Deterioration Scale, Modified Barthel Index, Instrumental-Dependency OARS, Adapted Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, as well as measures of clients' socio-demographic characteristics, service use and diseases diagnoses. The sample of our study included 284 clients with at least one follow-up survey. The outcome variable was death or hospital admission, and death during six, nine and 16-month study periods. Stepwise backwards multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was employed, and Kaplan-Meier survival analysis using censored data was displayed. Having previous hospital admissions was a consistent risk factor for time to death or hospital admission (six-month: HR = 3.12; nine-month: HR = 2.80; 16-month: HR = 2.93) and for time to death (six-month: HR = 2.27; 16-month: HR = 2.12) over time. Previously worse cognitive status was a consistent risk factor over time (six- and nine-month: HR = 0.58; 16-month: HR = 0.65), but no previous use of community care was only a short-term risk factor (six-month: HR = 0.42) for

  11. The impact of a proactive chronic care management program on hospital admission rates in a German health insurance society.

    PubMed

    Hamar, Brent; Wells, Aaron; Gandy, William; Haaf, Andreas; Coberley, Carter; Pope, James E; Rula, Elizabeth Y

    2010-12-01

    Hospital admissions are the source of significant health care expenses, although a large proportion of these admissions can be avoided through proper management of chronic disease. In the present study, we evaluate the impact of a proactive chronic care management program for members of a German insurance society who suffer from chronic disease. Specifically, we tested the impact of nurse-delivered care calls on hospital admission rates. Study participants were insured individuals with coronary artery disease, heart failure, diabetes, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who consented to participate in the chronic care management program. Intervention (n  = 17,319) and Comparison (n  = 5668) groups were defined based on records of participating (or not participating) in telephonic interactions. Changes in admission rates were calculated from the year prior to (Base) and year after program commencement. Comparative analyses were adjusted for age, sex, region of residence, and disease severity (stratification of 3 [least severe] to 1 [most severe]). Overall, the admission rate in the Intervention group decreased by 6.2% compared with a 14.9% increase in the Comparison group (P  <  0.001). The overall decrease in admissions for the Intervention group was driven by risk stratification levels 2 and 1, for which admissions decreased by 8.2% and 14.2% compared to Comparison group increases of 12.1% and 7.9%, respectively. Additionally, Intervention group admissions decreased as the number of calls increased (P  =  0.004), indicating a dose-response relationship. These findings indicate that proactive chronic care management care calls can help reduce hospital admissions among German health insurance members with chronic disease.

  12. The day of the week and acute heart failure admissions: Relationship with acute myocardial infarction, 30-day readmission rate and in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mahek; Patnaik, Soumya; Patel, Brijesh; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Lahewala, Sopan; Figueredo, Vincent M; Martinez, Matthew W; Jacobs, Larry

    2017-09-29

    In-hospital care may be constrained during the weekend due to lesser resources. Impact on outcomes of weekend versus weekday care in congestive heart failure (HF) needs further study. Admissions with a primary diagnosis of HF using ICD-9CM codes were studied. 22,287 HF-admissions from Einstein Medical Center (2003-2013) and 2,248,482 HF-admissions from the 2002-2012 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) were analyzed separately. Primary outcomes were 30-day HF-readmission and in-hospital mortality. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate outcomes. Weekends experienced lower rates of admission and discharge. Mondays experienced the highest admission rate and Fridays experienced the highest discharge rate. Friday was independently associated with highest 30-day HF-readmission rates (Adjusted OR 1.12, CI 1.01-1.23; p=0.02) in addition to risk factors such as African-American race, hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, end-stage renal disease and coronary artery disease. Within the NIS sample, 85,479 in-hospital deaths (3.8%) were recorded. Compared to weekdays, patients admitted over the weekend had greater comorbidities, higher incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (15.8% vs. 16.8%; p<0.01), higher Charlson-comorbidity index and underwent less procedures such as echocardiography, right heart catheterization, coronary angiography, coronary revascularization or