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Sample records for hospital planning

  1. Enterprise resource planning for hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Merode, Godefridus G; Groothuis, Siebren; Hasman, Arie

    2004-06-30

    Integrated hospitals need a central planning and control system to plan patients' processes and the required capacity. Given the changes in healthcare one can ask the question what type of information systems can best support these healthcare delivery organizations. We focus in this review on the potential of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems for healthcare delivery organizations. First ERP systems are explained. An overview is then presented of the characteristics of the planning process in hospital environments. Problems with ERP that are due to the special characteristics of healthcare are presented. The situations in which ERP can or cannot be used are discussed. It is suggested to divide hospitals in a part that is concerned only with deterministic processes and a part that is concerned with non-deterministic processes. ERP can be very useful for planning and controlling the deterministic processes.

  2. Planned hospital birth versus planned home birth

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ole; Clausen, Jette A

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies of increasingly better quality and in different settings suggest that planned home birth in many places can be as safe as planned hospital birth and with less intervention and fewer complications. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1998. Objectives To assess the effects of planned hospital birth compared with planned home birth in selected low-risk women, assisted by an experienced midwife with collaborative medical back up in case transfer should be necessary. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (30 March 2012) and contacted editors and authors involved with possible trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing planned hospital birth with planned home birth in low-risk women as described in the objectives. Data collection and analysis The two review authors as independently as possible assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. Main results Two trials met the inclusion criteria but only one trial involving 11 women provided some outcome data and was included. The evidence from this trial was of moderate quality and too small to allow conclusions to be drawn. Authors’ conclusions There is no strong evidence from randomised trials to favour either planned hospital birth or planned home birth for low-risk pregnant women. However, the trials show that women living in areas where they are not well informed about home birth may welcome ethically well-designed trials that would ensure an informed choice. As the quality of evidence in favour of home birth from observational studies seems to be steadily increasing, it might be as important to prepare a regularly updated systematic review including observational studies as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions as to attempt to set up new randomised controlled trials. PMID:22972043

  3. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  4. Report: hospitals need more sophisticated planning efforts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1990-09-20

    Sophisticated planning efforts are increasing among hospitals. However, hospital planners and marketers still have far to go before they can match their counterparts in industry. This is according to a report on hospital planning recently released by the Society for Healthcare Planning and Marketing of the American Hospital Association, Chicago.

  5. Hospital strategic preparedness planning: the new imperative.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Peter M; Duncan, W Jack; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2007-01-01

    Strategic preparedness planning is an important new imperative for many hospitals. Strategic preparedness planning goes beyond traditional product/market strategic planning by focusing on disaster prevention, containment, and response roles. Hospitals, because of their unique mission, size, complexity, the types of materials they handle, and the types of patients they encounter, are especially vulnerable to natural and human-initiated disasters. In addition, when disasters occur, hospitals must develop well-conceived first responder (receiver) strategies. This paper argues the case for strategic preparedness planning for hospitals and proposes a process for this relatively new and much needed type of planning.

  6. Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000867.htm Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan To use the sharing features ... please enable JavaScript. After an illness, leaving the hospital is your next step toward recovery. Depending on ...

  7. Strategic planning processes and hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer A; Begun, James W

    2008-01-01

    Many common management practices in healthcare organizations, including the practice of strategic planning, have not been subject to widespread assessment through empirical research. If management practice is to be evidence-based, evaluations of such common practices need to be undertaken. The purpose of this research is to provide evidence on the extent of strategic planning practices and the association between hospital strategic planning processes and financial performance. In 2006, we surveyed a sample of 138 chief executive officers (CEOs) of hospitals in the state of Texas about strategic planning in their organizations and collected financial information on the hospitals for 2003. Among the sample hospitals, 87 percent reported having a strategic plan, and most reported that they followed a variety of common practices recommended for strategic planning-having a comprehensive plan, involving physicians, involving the board, and implementing the plan. About one-half of the hospitals assigned responsibility for the plan to the CEO. We tested the association between these planning characteristics in 2006 and two measures of financial performance for 2003. Three dimensions of the strategic planning process--having a strategic plan, assigning the CEO responsibility for the plan, and involving the board--are positively associated with earlier financial performance. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the cause-and-effect relationship between planning and performance.

  8. Developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dychtwald, K; Zitter, M

    1988-09-01

    The initial stages of developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals are explored in this excerpt from the book, The Role of the Hospital in an Aging Society: A Blueprint for Action. The elderly have unique perceptual, cognitive, social, and psychological needs and preferences, and a marketing strategy for eldercare services must reflect these factors, as well as the financial role of third-party payers and the decision-making influence of families and physicians. Among the elements the hospital must address when developing a marketing strategy are market selection and segmentation, targeting markets with specific services, pricing, and positioning the hospital for a maximum share of the eldercare market.

  9. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instead of waiting for challenges to confront hospital management, doctors and managers should act in advance to optimize and sustain value-based health. This work highlights the importance of scenario planning in hospitals, proposes an elaborated definition of the stakeholders of a hospital and defines the influence factors to which hospitals are exposed to. Methodology: Based on literature analysis as well as on personal interviews with stakeholders we propose an elaborated definition of stakeholders and designed a questionnaire that integrated the following influence factors, which have relevant impact on hospital management: political/legal, economic, social, technological and environmental forces. These influence factors are examined to develop the so-called critical uncertainties. Thorough identification of uncertainties was based on a “Stakeholder Feedback”. Results: Two key uncertainties were identified and considered in this study: the development of workload for the medical staff the profit oriented performance of the medical staff. According to the developed scenarios, complementary education of the medical staff as well as of non-medical top executives and managers of hospitals was the recommended core strategy. Complementary scenario-specific strategic options should be considered whenever needed to optimize dealing with a specific future development of the health care environment. Conclusion: Strategic planning in hospitals is essential to ensure sustainable success. It considers multiple situations and integrates internal and external insights and perspectives in addition to identifying weak signals and “blind spots”. This flows into a sound planning for multiple strategic options. It is a state of the art tool that allows dealing with the increasing challenges facing hospital management. PMID:26504735

  10. COLOR PLANNING FOR HOSPITALS AND SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobil Finishes Co., Inc., Chicago, IL.

    THE AIM OF THIS MANUAL PREPARED FOR ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS IS TO PROVIDE FOR COLOR PLANNING IN HOSPITALS AND SCHOOLS AND ALTHOUGH APPROPRIATE FOR THE SELECTION OF ALL INTERIOR SURFACE MATERIALS IN NEW CONSTRUCTION. IN SCHOOL, AND INDIVIDUAL'S EXPOSURE TO DECORATION IS REPEATED DAILY FOR BOTH STUDENTS AND STAFF ATTEND AT LEAST FOR THE SCHOOL…

  11. Planned Parenthood services in teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    1973-06-01

    As a contribution to the continuing discussion stimulated by the WHO Study Group on education and training for family planning in health services (December 1971, Geneva), the Regional Medical Executive Committee of IPPF commissioned articles on planned parenthood services and training in the university hospital context in both Austria and Belgium. In Vienna, Graz, and Innsbruck medical students receive regular instruction in the physiology and pathology of reproduction and contraceptive methods. Training in methods of fertility regulation is integrated into the gynecology curriculum in both lectures and group discussion. Planned parenthood and social medicine are at present not essential examination subjects. In obligatory practical work in gynecology clinics there are only 2 periods of 6 days in which the student can obtain only a very superficial picture of gynecology and obstetrics. If a qualified physician remains in a university clinic to specialize in these fields, instruction includes complete training in family planning with the possibility of comprehensive practical experience. In Belgium the introduction of planned parenthood into departmental policy and the attainment of national uniformity in thinking and application are recent, due mainly to the coincidence the present chairmen of most departments of obstetrics and gynecology regard planned parenthood as socially indispensable. It is imperative that the education and training of both providers and users be not limited to technical knowledge but expanded to include the all- important psychological, socioeconomic, and health aspects and implications of sexuality. The theory and practice of family planning must be transmitted to the mediical profession, the paramedical professions, and such nonmedical professions as pharmacy. It is noted that the most important new accomplishments of the teaching hospitals lie in the provision of planned parenthood service.

  12. Planning for resilience in hospital internal disaster.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Ernest

    2003-01-01

    This article seeks to clarify the terminology and methods of planning to avert hospital internal disaster. It differentiates "crisis" from "disaster" in the in-hospital setting. Preparedness, as contrasted with mitigation, is meant to reduce the likelihood that a crisis will turn into a disaster. Though there are some recurring features of crises, allowing for preparedness through the identification of a few high-likelihood contingencies, crises are subject to numerous, overwhelming uncertainties. These include hazard uncertainty, incident uncertainty, sequential uncertainty, informational uncertainty, consequential uncertainty, cascade uncertainty, organizational uncertainty, and background uncertainty. In view of the uncertainties, the primary aim of planners should not be to try to create plans for ever more contingencies, since contingencies are far too numerous and perhaps approach infinity, but rather to create capabilities (through proper preparedness) for resilience during crisis. Resilience can be cultivated through improvements in information acquisition and dissemination, communication systems, resource management, mobility management, design for resilience, incident command, and staff versatility.

  13. IT investment planning: the best hospitals.

    PubMed

    Morris, Steven A; Clark, Jeff; Holmes, Judy; Clark, Carol; Gambill, Stanley

    2002-01-01

    A study of hospitals' best practices regarding capital investments in information systems indicates that (1) the process may need more input from IT professionals to cover the technical aspects of planning; (2) the most successful projects are highly aligned with the organization's overall business strategy; and (3) disappointments could be avoided by conducting a better analysis of the organization and its technology, evaluation of past IS performance, and assessment of IS staff capabilities.

  14. Do hospitals practice strategic planning? An empirical study.

    PubMed

    Zallocco, R; Joseph, B; Furey, N

    1984-02-01

    A survey was conducted to determine the extent of strategic planning management and specific planning techniques used in hospitals today. Results indicate that approximately one-half of all hospitals use some sort of formalized strategic planning, although many of these are in the early stages of development. Data is also provided on other strategic planning issues such as budget allocations to planning, planning process participants, and aspects of planning needing improvement. A general discussion of the value of strategic planning to hospital management is offered.

  15. Hospital Bioterrorism Planning and Burn Surge

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B.; Rich, Preston B.; Hultman, C. Scott; Charles, Anthony G.; Jones, Samuel W.; Schmits, Grace L.; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity. PMID:24527874

  16. Hospital bioterrorism planning and burn surge.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B; Rich, Preston B; Hultman, C Scott; Charles, Anthony G; Jones, Samuel W; Schmits, Grace L; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity.

  17. Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth and Birth Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Snowden, Jonathan M; Tilden, Ellen L; Snyder, Janice; Quigley, Brian; Caughey, Aaron B; Cheng, Yvonne W

    2015-12-31

    The frequency of planned out-of-hospital birth in the United States has increased in recent years. The value of studies assessing the perinatal risks of planned out-of-hospital birth versus hospital birth has been limited by cases in which transfer to a hospital is required and a birth that was initially planned as an out-of-hospital birth is misclassified as a hospital birth. We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of all births that occurred in Oregon during 2012 and 2013 using data from newly revised Oregon birth certificates that allowed for the disaggregation of hospital births into the categories of planned in-hospital births and planned out-of-hospital births that took place in the hospital after a woman's intrapartum transfer to the hospital. We assessed perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity, and obstetrical procedures according to the planned birth setting (out of hospital vs. hospital). Planned out-of-hospital birth was associated with a higher rate of perinatal death than was planned in-hospital birth (3.9 vs. 1.8 deaths per 1000 deliveries, P=0.003; odds ratio after adjustment for maternal characteristics and medical conditions, 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 4.30; adjusted risk difference, 1.52 deaths per 1000 births; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.54). The odds for neonatal seizure were higher and the odds for admission to a neonatal intensive care unit lower with planned out-of-hospital births than with planned in-hospital birth. Planned out-of-hospital birth was also strongly associated with unassisted vaginal delivery (93.8%, vs. 71.9% with planned in-hospital births; P<0.001) and with decreased odds for obstetrical procedures. Perinatal mortality was higher with planned out-of-hospital birth than with planned in-hospital birth, but the absolute risk of death was low in both settings. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.).

  18. Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth and Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Tilden, Ellen L.; Snyder, Janice; Quigley, Brian; Caughey, Aaron B.; Cheng, Yvonne W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency of planned out-of-hospital birth in the United States has increased in recent years. The value of studies assessing the perinatal risks of planned out-of-hospital birth versus hospital birth has been limited by cases in which transfer to a hospital is required and a birth that was initially planned as an out-of-hospital birth is misclassified as a hospital birth. Methods We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of all births that occurred in Oregon during 2012 and 2013 using data from newly revised Oregon birth certificates that allowed for the disaggregation of hospital births into the categories of planned in-hospital births and planned out-of-hospital births that took place in the hospital after a woman’s intrapartum transfer to the hospital. We assessed perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity, and obstetrical procedures according to the planned birth setting (out of hospital vs. hospital). Results Planned out-of-hospital birth was associated with a higher rate of perinatal death than was planned in-hospital birth (3.9 vs. 1.8 deaths per 1000 deliveries, P = 0.003; odds ratio after adjustment for maternal characteristics and medical conditions, 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 4.30; adjusted risk difference, 1.52 deaths per 1000 births; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.54). The odds for neonatal seizure were higher and the odds for admission to a neonatal intensive care unit lower with planned out-of-hospital births than with planned in-hospital birth. Planned out-of-hospital birth was also strongly associated with unassisted vaginal delivery (93.8%, vs. 71.9% with planned in-hospital births; P<0.001) and with decreased odds for obstetrical procedures. Conclusions Perinatal mortality was higher with planned out-of-hospital birth than with planned in-hospital birth, but the absolute risk of death was low in both settings. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

  19. Case mix planning in hospitals: a review and future agenda.

    PubMed

    Hof, Sebastian; Fügener, Andreas; Schoenfelder, Jan; Brunner, Jens O

    2017-06-01

    The case mix planning problem deals with choosing the ideal composition and volume of patients in a hospital. With many countries having recently changed to systems where hospitals are reimbursed for patients according to their diagnosis, case mix planning has become an important tool in strategic and tactical hospital planning. Selecting patients in such a payment system can have a significant impact on a hospital's revenue. The contribution of this article is to provide the first literature review focusing on the case mix planning problem. We describe the problem, distinguish it from similar planning problems, and evaluate the existing literature with regard to problem structure and managerial impact. Further, we identify gaps in the literature. We hope to foster research in the field of case mix planning, which only lately has received growing attention despite its fundamental economic impact on hospitals.

  20. Modeling to Optimize Hospital Evacuation Planning in EMS Systems.

    PubMed

    Bish, Douglas R; Tarhini, Hussein; Amara, Roel; Zoraster, Richard; Bosson, Nichole; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    To develop optimal hospital evacuation plans within a large urban EMS system using a novel evacuation planning model and a realistic hospital evacuation scenario, and to illustrate the ways in which a decision support model may be useful in evacuation planning. An optimization model was used to produce detailed evacuation plans given the number and type of patients in the evacuating hospital, resource levels (teams to move patients, vehicles, and beds at other hospitals), and evacuation rules. Optimal evacuation plans under various resource levels and rules were developed and high-level metrics were calculated, including evacuation duration and the utilization of resources. Using this model we were able to determine the limiting resources and demonstrate how strategically augmenting the resource levels can improve the performance of the evacuation plan. The model allowed the planner to test various evacuation conditions and resource levels to demonstrate the effect on performance of the evacuation plan. We present a hospital evacuation planning analysis for a hospital in a large urban EMS system using an optimization model. This model can be used by EMS administrators and medical directors to guide planning decisions and provide a better understanding of various resource allocation decisions and rules that govern a hospital evacuation.

  1. Hospital and medical staff strategic planning: developing an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, A M

    1994-08-01

    The physician as the principal customer of the hospital is a relatively new concept, indicative of the shift to a more complete market orientation in strategic planning. Although medical staff and medical community dynamics receive increasing attention in strategic planning, much more sophistication is now needed to involve physicians constructively in strategic planning for the hospital and medical staff. While full consonance of physician and hospital plans may be achievable only in a completely integrated delivery system, there is considerable room for improvement in current organizational models.

  2. 6. 1859 sketch of the hospital's ground floor plan, before ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. 1859 sketch of the hospital's ground floor plan, before construction commenced in 1860. Photocopied from Report of the Board of Managers of the Hospital of the Protestant Episcopal Church, 1859 - Hospital of Protestant Episcopal Church in Philadelphia, Front Street & Lehigh Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. Mechanisms of microregulation of private hospitals by health plan operators.

    PubMed

    Ugá, Maria Alicia Domínguez; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat; Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Gerschman, Silvia

    2009-10-01

    To analyze the mechanisms employed by health plan operators for microregulation of clinical management and health care qualification within care-providing hospitals. A nation-wide cross-sectional study was carried out. The universe consisted of hospitals which provided care to health plan operators in 2006. A sample of 83 units was selected, stratified by Brazilian macroregion and type of hospital. Data were obtained by means of a questionnaire administered to hospital managers. Microregulation of hospitals by health plan operators was minimal or almost absent in terms of health care qualification. Operator activity focused predominantly on intense control of the amount of services used by patients. Hospitals providing services to health plan operators did not constitute health micro-systems parallel or supplementary to the Sistema Unico de Saúde (SUS - Brazilian National Health System). The private care-providing hospitals were predominantly associated with SUS. However, these did not belong to a private care-provider network, even though their service usage was subject to strong regulation by health plan operators. Operator intervention in the form of system management was incipient or virtually absent. Roughly one-half of investigated hospitals reported adopting clinical directives, whereas only 25.4% reported managing pathology and 30.5% reported managing cases. Contractual relationships between hospitals and health plan operators are merely commercial contracts with little if any incorporation of aspects related to the quality of care, being generally limited to aspects such as establishment of prices, timeframes, and payment procedures.

  4. Hospital development plans: a new tool to break ground for strategic thinking in Tanzanian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Flessa, Steffen

    2005-12-01

    Tanzanian hospitals suffer from underfunding and poor management. In particular, planning and strategic thinking need improvement. Cultural values such as subordination, risk aversion, and high time preference, together with a long history of socialist government, result in lack of responsibility, accountability, and planning. This has been addressed by the health sector reform with its focus on decentralization, strengthened by the introduction of basket funding facilitated by the Comprehensive Council Health Plans. As a consequence of this the next logical step is to improve the authority of regional and district hospitals in the use of their resources by introducing hospital development plans. These strategic plans were introduced as tools of strategic planning in 2001 by the Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau in close collaboration with the Tanzanian Ministry of Health, binding the release of rehabilitation funds to presentation of a strategic hospital plan. This study examines the rationale and content of hospital development plans. Initial experiences are discussed. The quality of presented plans has steadily improved, but there is a tendency for hospitals with a close connection to development partners to present well prepared reports while other hospitals have severe problems fulfilling the requirements. For many hospitals it is in fact the first time that they have had to define their functions and future role, thus breaking ground for strategic thinking.

  5. Strategic planning processes and financial performance among hospitals in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi; Kaissi, Amer; Semaan, Adele; Natafgi, Nabil Maher

    2013-01-01

    Strategic planning has been presented as a valuable management tool. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare and its effect on organizational performance is limited in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). The study aimed to explore the use of strategic planning processes in Lebanese hospitals and to investigate its association with financial performance. The study comprised 79 hospitals and assessed occupancy rate (OR) and revenue-per-bed (RPB) as performance measures. The strategic planning process included six domains: having a plan, plan development, plan implementation, responsibility of planning activities, governing board involvement, and physicians' involvement. Approximately 90% of hospitals have strategic plans that are moderately developed (mean score of 4.9 on a 1-7 scale) and implemented (score of 4.8). In 46% of the hospitals, the CEO has the responsibility for the plan. The level of governing board involvement in the process is moderate to high (score of 5.1), whereas physician involvement is lower (score of 4.1). The OR and RPB amounted to respectively 70% and 59 304 among hospitals with a strategic plan as compared with 62% and 33 564 for those lacking such a plan. No statistical association between having a strategic plan and either of the two measures was detected. However, the findings revealed that among hospitals that had a strategic plan, higher implementation levels were associated with lower OR (p < 0.05). In an LMIC healthcare environment characterized by resource limitation, complexity, and political and economic volatility, flexibility rather than rigid plans allow organizations to better cope with environmental turbulence. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Incorporating efficiency in hospital-capacity planning in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Scholtes, Stefan; Vera, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Hospital occupancy is a key metric in hospital-capacity planning in Germany, even though this metric neglects important drivers of economic efficiency, for example treatment costs and case mix. We suggest an alternative metric, which incorporates economic efficiency explicitly, and illustrate how this metric can be used in the hospital-capacity planning cycle. The practical setting of this study is the hospital capacity planning process in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz. The planning process involves all 92 acute-care hospitals of this federal state. The study is based on standard hospital data, including annual costs, number of cases--disaggregated by medical departments and ICD codes, respectively--length-of-stay, certified beds, and occupancy rates. Using the developed metric, we identified 18 of the 92 hospitals as inefficient and targets for over-proportional capacity cuts. On the upside, we identified 15 efficient hospitals. The developed model and analysis has affected the federal state's most recent medium term planning cycle.

  7. Does health plan generosity enhance hospital market power?

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P

    2015-12-01

    We test whether the generosity of employer-sponsored health insurance facilitates the exercise of market power by hospitals. We construct indices of health plan generosity and the price and volume of hospital services using data from Truven MarketScan for 601 counties from 2001 to 2007. We use variation in the industry and union status of covered workers within a county over time to identify the causal effects of generosity. Although OLS estimates fail to reject the hypothesis that generosity facilitates the exercise of hospital market power, IV estimates show a statistically significant and economically important positive effect of plan generosity on hospital prices in uncompetitive markets, but not in competitive markets. Our results suggest that most of the aggregate effect of hospital market structure on prices found in previous work may be coming from areas with generous plans.

  8. Succession planning: perspectives of chief executive officers in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to explore the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origins of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study examined how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry.

  9. Assessing hospital emergency management plans: a guide for infection preventionists.

    PubMed

    Rebmann, Terri

    2009-11-01

    Hospital emergency management plans are essential and must include input from an infection preventionist (IP). Multiple hospital planning documents exist, but many do not address infection prevention issues, combine them with noninfection prevention issues, or are disease/event specific. An all-encompassing emergency management planning guide for IPs is needed. A literature review and Internet search were conducted in December 2008. Data from relevant sources were extracted. A spreadsheet was created that delineated hospital emergency management plan components of interest to IPs. Of the sources screened, 49 were deemed relevant. Eleven domains were identified: (1) having a plan; (2) assessing hospital readiness; (3) having infection prevention policies and procedures; (4) having occupational health policies and procedures; (5) conducting surveillance and triage; (6) reporting incidents, having a communication plan, and managing information; (7) having laboratory support; (8) addressing surge capacity issues; (9) having anti-infective therapy and/or vaccines; (10) providing infection prevention education; and (11) managing physical plant issues. Infection preventionists should use this article as an assessment tool for evaluating their hospital emergency management plan and for developing policies and procedures that will decrease the risk of infection transmission during a mass casualty event.

  10. Incorporating the USAF Flight Center's TQM plan in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Bridges, R D; Mathews, K A

    1993-01-01

    A total quality management (TQM) plan has been instituted by the United States Air Force Flight Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base. To determine the feasibility of implementing the same basic TQM plan in a district hospital, a joint industry-government team was established. Five areas of concentration were selected for review: infrastructure, methodology, training, strategic plan, and a "Quality Bill of Rights." The TQM "infrastructure" is intended to match and complement the existing organizational structure and chain of command, not to supplant it. As the overall plan seemed well-adapted for implementation in a hospital setting, a three-phase implementation approach was identified that included conceptual planning, initial training and goal setting, and full-scale implementation. Each phase is described in terms of objectives, staffing, and timing requirements.

  11. IT strategic planning in hospitals: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Jaana, Mirou; Teitelbaum, Mari; Roffey, Tyson

    2014-07-01

    To date, IT strategic planning has been mostly theory-based with limited information on "best practices" in this area. This study presents the process and outcomes of IT strategic planning undertaken at a pediatric hospital (PH) in Canada. A five-stage sequential and incremental process was adopted. Various tools / approaches were used including review of existing documentation, internal survey (n = 111), fifteen interviews, and twelve workshops. IT strategic planning was informed by 230 individuals (12 percent of hospital community) and revealed consistency in the themes and concerns raised by participants (e.g., slow IT projects delivery rate, lack of understanding of IT priorities, strained communication with IT staff). Mobile and remote access to patients' information, and an integrated EMR were identified as top priorities. The methodology and used approach revealed effective, improved internal relationships, and ensured commitment to the final IT strategic plan. Several lessons were learned including: maintaining a dynamic approach capable of adapting to the fast technology evolution; involving stakeholders and ensuring continuous communication; using effective research tools to support strategic planning; and grounding the process and final product in existing models. This study contributes to the development of "best practices" in IT strategic planning, and illustrates "how" to apply the theoretical principles in this area. This is especially important as IT leaders are encouraged to integrate evidence-based management into their decision making and practices. The methodology and lessons learned may inform practitioners in other hospitals planning to engage in IT strategic planning in the future.

  12. Hospital planning in France and the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Altenstetter, C

    1980-01-01

    This article on hospital planning programs in France and North-Rhine Westfalia (a state in the Federal Republic of Germany), assembles information on the formal building blocks of inter-organizational relations in the formulation and implementation process. Because these planning programs are embedded in past social policy developments and institution-building, it is necessary to first compare the two countries' compulsory health insurance schemes. This is followed by a general profile of each health care system. A third section examines the formulation and implementation of the countries' hospital planning programs and participation patterns. Based on this comparison, inferences are drawn that are relevant to policy and research. The analysis yields three major conclusions. First, despite abundant legal and administrative controls at the disposal of central health bureaucracies, the capability of the national leadership to influence the hospital system through innovative planning is limited by jurisdictional, institutional, functional and territorial fragmentation, and differentiation of control and public responsibility in health. However, the diverse goal orientations of participants may provide the necessary tension to allow for some change in otherwise highly structured political and administrative systems. Second, despite differences in historical, political and administrative developments, the decision making systems for health care policies in France and the Federal Republic, with the exception of health insurance, are strikingly similar to the fragmented decision making system in the United States. Third, the effect of government-mandated participation is empirically uncertain. Opening up the circle of participants seems to have reinforced alliances between public bureaucracies and corporate vested interests. Hospital planning continues to be carried out for rather than with the consumer and citizen. Hospital planning which is a mixture of goal and process

  13. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital furnishing...

  14. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  15. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital furnishing...

  16. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital furnishing...

  17. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  18. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  19. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  20. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  1. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital...: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services. (a) The State plan must provide that each mental hospital furnishing...

  2. PACS: from planning to implementation for a new hospital facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Judith A.

    2001-08-01

    Planning PACS for a new hospital facility is an enormous undertaking with many varied user opinions. A pure objective-oriented planning approach was utilized along with a small PACS core planning team. The small PACS core team consisted of owner representation (administration), user representation (radiologists) and the PACS consultant. The overall PACS planning process was broken down into segments. Each segmented represented a key milestone for PACS planning with a set of clear objectives. The PACS core team followed a schedule beginning with preliminary PACS information moving forward to bid specification. An important element in PACS planning was the development of a PACS Component Location Matrix. The matrix was developed from the architectural plans for the new hospital and provided a guideline for everyone including architects and engineers. The matrix included CAD system identification number, location by architectural room number, room name, component network, remote diagnostics and storage. After a year of planning the PACS system and acceptance of vendor bid, the implementation process was ready to begin. The same small PACS core planning team remains intact for the implementation phase of the project.

  3. Resource Requirements Planning for Hospitals Treating Serious Infectious Disease Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Verzi, Stephen Joseph; Finley, Patrick D.; Turnquist, Mark A.; Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Griffin, Ann R.; Ricci, Karen J.; Plotinsky, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    This report presents a mathematical model of the way in which a hospital uses a variety of resources, utilities and consumables to provide care to a set of in-patients, and how that hospital might adapt to provide treatment to a few patients with a serious infectious disease, like the Ebola virus. The intended purpose of the model is to support requirements planning studies, so that hospitals may be better prepared for situations that are likely to strain their available resources. The current model is a prototype designed to present the basic structural elements of a requirements planning analysis. Some simple illustrati ve experiments establish the mo del's general capabilities. With additional inve stment in model enhancement a nd calibration, this prototype could be developed into a useful planning tool for ho spital administrators and health care policy makers.

  4. Pharmacy Leader’s Role in Hospital Emergency Preparedness Planning

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Christopher; Daniel, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The Director’s Forum column is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. Environmental disasters and terrorist attacks demonstrate that it is imperative for both a hospital and community to have an emergency preparedness plan. The goal of this article is to provide health-system pharmacy leaders with a practical approach in developing an emergency operations plan (EOP) that can be activated in the event of a disaster. Pharmacy leaders should (1) review government and community disaster responses and understand the movement of drug supply for each response, (2) create a pharmacy disaster plan, (3) list the essential medications and determine their inventory levels, and (4) establish a staff training program to enhance understanding and implementation of the EOP. If successfully developed and executed, a hospital pharmacy department’s EOP has a high rating of success in meeting patient-centered needs in the unforeseen event of a disaster PMID:24958947

  5. How many years can hospital master plans be effective.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the effectiveness of master planning for hospitals based on recent surveys carried out in the UK and Japan. In the UK, Northwick Park Hospital, built in the 1970s, was selected for surveys in 1999 and 2002 because of being a typical example representing John Weeks' 1960s concept of 'indeterminate architecture' to cope with growth and change. In Japan, the Chiba Cancer Center, also built in the 1970s, was selected to survey in 2002 because of being a good example of a 'multi-wing type' configuration developed in Japan for growth and change. The paper concludes with the determination that the master plans for both these hospitals have been generally successful, despite the fact that changes were often not anticipated by the architectural proposals. In addition, it is seen that a master plan can be effective for at least a period of 30 years given certain conditions.

  6. Pharmacy Leader's Role in Hospital Emergency Preparedness Planning.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Daniel, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    The Director's Forum column is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. Environmental disasters and terrorist attacks demonstrate that it is imperative for both a hospital and community to have an emergency preparedness plan. The goal of this article is to provide health-system pharmacy leaders with a practical approach in developing an emergency operations plan (EOP) that can be activated in the event of a disaster. Pharmacy leaders should (1) review government and community disaster responses and understand the movement of drug supply for each response, (2) create a pharmacy disaster plan, (3) list the essential medications and determine their inventory levels, and (4) establish a staff training program to enhance understanding and implementation of the EOP. If successfully developed and executed, a hospital pharmacy department's EOP has a high rating of success in meeting patient-centered needs in the unforeseen event of a disaster.

  7. Children's hospitals and PACS: six profiles of planning and implementation.

    PubMed

    Keen, C

    1999-01-01

    Six pediatric hospitals were interviewed at length about the status of PACS in their facilities. Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio entered electronic imaging communications in 1993. Several nearby clinics were connected through teleradiology and by 1998, the radiology department had developed a business plan for the implementation of PACS. Two hospitals in Atlanta, Egleston Hospital and Scottish Rite Children's. Medical Center, merged in 1998 to become one entity with two medical campuses. They now treat 60 percent of Atlanta's pediatric patients. Merging incompatible systems has been the administrator's most immediate problem. One director of imaging services is responsible for the recently merged Mary Bridge Children's Hospital and Tacoma General Hospital, plus a network of clinics and medical facilities scatted throughout Tacoma and the South Puget Sound area in Washington state. A state-of-the-art mini-PACS and teleradiology system were implemented at Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City, in 1991. Over the years, it has added modalities into an electronic system that now results in significantly improved use of physicians' time and patient relations. St. Louis Children's Hospital, with both a director of radiology and a PACS administrator, has implemented teleradiology and an ultrasound mini-PACS, and has plans for an enterprise-wide PACS. Children's Hospital in Birmingham, Ala., a major trauma center, provides specialized pediatric care to nearly all 67 counties in Alabama. With a 20-year history of online computerization, it is now reengineering its emergency department and will implement CR there first.

  8. National survey of hospital pharmacy facilities: planning and design experience.

    PubMed

    Alexander, V B; Barker, K N

    1986-02-01

    Recent major renovation or construction programs of hospital pharmacy facilities and pharmacists' involvement in the planning process for those new facilities are described. A 12-page questionnaire was sent in July 1982 to the chief pharmacists in a random sample of 1846 hospitals in the United States stratified by 10 hospital types. The percentage of hospitals of each type involved in an ongoing or recent (within the preceding 10 years) major renovation or construction project of all or part of the pharmacy was determined. Of those respondents having an ongoing or recent major project, the extent and timing of pharmacists' involvement in the planning process were determined for hospitals of each type. The response rate was 45.6%, and the respondents were representative of the population. Thirty percent of all hospitals had not altered their pharmacy facilities within the preceding 10 years. Nonprofit general medical-surgical hospitals and federal hospitals had the highest percentages of recent projects (78% and 79%, respectively); projects were more likely to involve a new pharmacy facility than remodeling. In 1982, 27% of all respondents had a major pharmacy facilities project under way. Of respondents with an ongoing or recent project, 38% were asked to propose needs for new pharmacy facilities, 45% served on the planning team, and 20% anticipated the need for new facilities; space and location were predetermined without pharmacist involvement in 25% of all cases. Two percent of the respondents had no notice of the deadline for finalizing plans for the new facilities; 22% had one to six months' notice, and 48% had over a year.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Aligning business and information technology domains: strategic planning in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J C; Thomas, J B

    1992-01-01

    This article develops a framework for strategic information technology (IT) management in hospitals, termed the Strategic Alignment Model. This model is defined in terms of four domains--business strategy, IT strategy, organizational infrastructure, and IT infrastructure--each with its constituent components. The concept of strategic alignment is developed using two fundamental dimensions--strategic fit and integration. Different perspectives that hospitals use for aligning the various domains are discussed, and a prescriptive model of strategic IT planning is proposed.

  10. 1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. 1943 Plan View of 'Fort Lewis Station Hospital, Section No. 5.' Drawn by V. Steinbrueck for J.C. Boespflug Construction Co. July 23, 1943. HABS 8x10' negative was made from an 8.5 x 11' copy on card stock in the collection of the Community Library, Madigan Army Medical Center, Fort Lewis, WA. - Madigan Hospital, Bounded by Wilson & McKinley Avenues & Garfield & Lincoln Streets, DuPont, Pierce County, WA

  11. Medicare Advantage Plans Pay Hospitals Less Than Traditional Medicare Pays.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Devlin, Aileen M; Kessler, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    There is ongoing debate about how prices paid to providers by Medicare Advantage plans compare to prices paid by fee-for-service Medicare. We used data from Medicare and the Health Care Cost Institute to identify the prices paid for hospital services by fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare, Medicare Advantage plans, and commercial insurers in 2009 and 2012. We calculated the average price per admission, and its trend over time, in each of the three types of insurance for fixed baskets of hospital admissions across metropolitan areas. After accounting for differences in hospital networks, geographic areas, and case-mix between Medicare Advantage and FFS Medicare, we found that Medicare Advantage plans paid 5.6 percent less for hospital services than FFS Medicare did. Without taking into account the narrower networks of Medicare Advantage, the program paid 8.0 percent less than FFS Medicare. We also found that the rates paid by commercial plans were much higher than those of either Medicare Advantage or FFS Medicare, and growing. At least some of this difference comes from the much higher prices that commercial plans pay for profitable service lines.

  12. Hospital capacity planning: from measuring stocks to modelling flows

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen; Barlow, James; McKee, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The metric of “bed numbers” is commonly used in hospital planning, but it fails to capture key aspects of how hospital services are delivered. Drawing on a study of innovative hospital projects in Europe, we argue that hospital capacity planning should not be based on beds, but rather on the ability to deliver processes. We propose using approaches that are based on manufacturing theory such as “lean thinking” that focuses on the value that different processes add for the primary customer, i.e. the patient. We argue that it is beneficial to look at the hospital, not from the perspective of beds or specialties, but rather from the path taken by the patients who are treated in them, the respective processes delivered by health professionals and the facilities appropriate to those processes. Systematized care pathways seem to offer one avenue for achieving these goals. However, they need to be underpinned by a better understanding of the flows of patients, work and goods within a hospital, the bottlenecks that occur, and translation of this understanding into new capacity planning tools. PMID:20680129

  13. Hospital capacity planning: from measuring stocks to modelling flows.

    PubMed

    Rechel, Bernd; Wright, Stephen; Barlow, James; McKee, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The metric of "bed numbers" is commonly used in hospital planning, but it fails to capture key aspects of how hospital services are delivered. Drawing on a study of innovative hospital projects in Europe, we argue that hospital capacity planning should not be based on beds, but rather on the ability to deliver processes. We propose using approaches that are based on manufacturing theory such as "lean thinking" that focuses on the value that different processes add for the primary customer, i.e. the patient. We argue that it is beneficial to look at the hospital, not from the perspective of beds or specialties, but rather from the path taken by the patients who are treated in them, the respective processes delivered by health professionals and the facilities appropriate to those processes. Systematized care pathways seem to offer one avenue for achieving these goals. However, they need to be underpinned by a better understanding of the flows of patients, work and goods within a hospital, the bottlenecks that occur, and translation of this understanding into new capacity planning tools.

  14. Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Services Planned and Levels of Implementation and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auslander, Gail K.; Soskolne, Varda; Stanger, Varda; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Kaplan, Giora

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the implementation, adequacy, and outcomes of discharge planning. The authors carried out a prospective study of 1,426 adult patients discharged from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel. Social workers provided detailed discharge plans on each patient. Telephone interviews were conducted two weeks post-discharge. Findings…

  15. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Dainiak, Nicholas . E-mail: pndain@bpthosp.org; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-05-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event.

  16. Medicare Managed Care plan Performance: A Comparison across Hospitalization Types

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Jayasree; Mobley, Lee Rivers

    2012-01-01

    Objective The study evaluates the performance of Medicare managed care (Medicare Advantage [MA]) Plans in comparison to Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) Plans in three states with historically high Medicare managed care penetration (New York, California, Florida), in terms of lowering the risks of preventable or ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSC) hospital admissions and providing increased referrals for admissions for specialty procedures. Study Design/Methods Using 2004 hospital discharge files from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP-SID) of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, ACSC admissions are compared with ‘marker’ admissions and ‘referral-sensitive’ admissions, using a multinomial logistic regression approach. The year 2004 represents a strategic time to test the impact of MA on preventable hospitalizations, because the HMOs dominated the market composition in that time period. Findings MA enrollees in California experienced 22% lower relative risk (RRR= 0.78, p<0.01), those in Florida experienced 16% lower relative risk (RRR= 0.84, p<0.01), while those in New York experienced 9% lower relative risk (RRR=0.91, p<0.01) of preventable (versus marker) admissions compared to their FFS counterparts. MA enrollees in New York experienced 37% higher relative risk (RRR=1.37, p<0.01) and those in Florida had 41% higher relative risk (RRR=1.41, p<0.01)—while MA enrollees in California had 13% lower relative risk (RRR=0.87, p<0.01)—of referral-sensitive (versus marker) admissions compared to their FFS counterparts. Conclusion While MA plans were associated with reductions in preventable hospitalizations in all three states, the effects on referral-sensitive admissions varied, with California experiencing lower relative risk of referral-sensitive admissions for MA plan enrollees. The lower relative risk of preventable admissions for MA plan enrollees in New York and Florida became more pronounced after accounting for selection

  17. Planning an outing from hospital for ventilator-dependent children.

    PubMed

    Gilgoff, I S; Helgren, J

    1992-10-01

    Returning ventilator-dependent children to the home environment has become a well-accepted occurrence. The success of a home program depends on careful pre-discharge planning in order to ensure the child's medical safety, and adequate preparation to ensure the child's and family's adjustment to an active community life after discharge. To achieve this, involvement in community activities must begin while the child is still in hospital. As part of a complete rehabilitation program, nine ventilator-dependent children were taken on an inpatient outing to Disneyland. The planning and goals of the outing are described.

  18. Outcomes of planned home birth with registered midwife versus planned hospital birth with midwife or physician

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Patricia A.; Saxell, Lee; Page, Lesley A.; Klein, Michael C.; Liston, Robert M.; Lee, Shoo K.

    2009-01-01

    Background Studies of planned home births attended by registered midwives have been limited by incomplete data, nonrepresentative sampling, inadequate statistical power and the inability to exclude unplanned home births. We compared the outcomes of planned home births attended by midwives with those of planned hospital births attended by midwives or physicians. Methods We included all planned home births attended by registered midwives from Jan. 1, 2000, to Dec. 31, 2004, in British Columbia, Canada (n = 2889), and all planned hospital births meeting the eligibility requirements for home birth that were attended by the same cohort of midwives (n = 4752). We also included a matched sample of physician-attended planned hospital births (n = 5331). The primary outcome measure was perinatal mortality; secondary outcomes were obstetric interventions and adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes. Results The rate of perinatal death per 1000 births was 0.35 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.00–1.03) in the group of planned home births; the rate in the group of planned hospital births was 0.57 (95% CI 0.00–1.43) among women attended by a midwife and 0.64 (95% CI 0.00–1.56) among those attended by a physician. Women in the planned home-birth group were significantly less likely than those who planned a midwife-attended hospital birth to have obstetric interventions (e.g., electronic fetal monitoring, relative risk [RR] 0.32, 95% CI 0.29–0.36; assisted vaginal delivery, RR 0.41, 95% 0.33–0.52) or adverse maternal outcomes (e.g., third- or fourth-degree perineal tear, RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.28–0.59; postpartum hemorrhage, RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49–0.77). The findings were similar in the comparison with physician-assisted hospital births. Newborns in the home-birth group were less likely than those in the midwife-attended hospital-birth group to require resuscitation at birth (RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.14–0.37) or oxygen therapy beyond 24 hours (RR 0.37, 95% CI 0.24–0.59). The

  19. Improving discharge planning communication between hospitals and patients.

    PubMed

    New, P W; McDougall, K E; Scroggie, C P R

    2016-01-01

    A potential barrier to patient discharge from hospital is communication problems between the treating team and the patient or family regarding discharge planning. To determine if a bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' increases patient and family's knowledge of discharge date and destination and the name of the key clinician primarily responsible for team-patient communication. This article is a 'before-after' study of patients, their families and the interdisciplinary ward-based clinical team. Outcomes assessed pre-implementation and post-implementation of a bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' containing discharge information for patients and families. Patients and families were asked if they knew the key clinician for team-patient communication and the proposed discharge date and discharge destination. Responses were compared with those set by the team. Staff were surveyed regarding their perceptions of patient awareness of discharge plans and the benefit of the 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet'. Significant improvement occurred regarding patients' knowledge of their key clinician for team-patient communication (31% vs 75%; P = 0.0001), correctly identifying who they were (47% vs 79%; P = 0.02), and correctly reporting their anticipated discharge date (54% vs 86%; P = 0.004). There was significant improvement in the family's knowledge of the anticipated discharge date (78% vs 96%; P = 0.04). Staff reported the 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' assisted with communication regarding anticipated discharge date and destination (very helpful n = 11, 39%; a little bit helpful n = 11, 39%). A bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' can potentially improve communication between patients, families and their treating team. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  20. A financial planning model for estimating hospital debt capacity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D S; Heath, D; Levin, P J

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based financial planning model was formulated to measure the impact of a major capital improvement project on the fiscal health of Stanford University Hospital. The model had to be responsive to many variables and easy to use, so as to allow for the testing of numerous alternatives. Special efforts were made to identify the key variables that needed to be presented in the model and to include all known links between capital investment, debt, and hospital operating expenses. Growth in the number of patient days of care was singled out as a major source of uncertainty that would have profound effects on the hospital's finances. Therefore this variable was subjected to special scrutiny in terms of efforts to gauge expected demographic trends and market forces. In addition, alternative base runs of the model were made under three distinct patient-demand assumptions. Use of the model enabled planners at the Stanford University Hospital (a) to determine that a proposed modernization plan was financially feasible under a reasonable (that is, not unduly optimistic) set of assumptions and (b) to examine the major sources of risk. Other than patient demand, these sources were found to be gross revenues per patient, operating costs, and future limitations on government reimbursement programs. When the likely financial consequences of these risks were estimated, both separately and in combination, it was determined that even if two or more assumptions took a somewhat more negative turn than was expected, the hospital would be able to offset adverse consequences by a relatively minor reduction in operating costs.

  1. A financial planning model for estimating hospital debt capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, D S; Heath, D; Levin, P J

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based financial planning model was formulated to measure the impact of a major capital improvement project on the fiscal health of Stanford University Hospital. The model had to be responsive to many variables and easy to use, so as to allow for the testing of numerous alternatives. Special efforts were made to identify the key variables that needed to be presented in the model and to include all known links between capital investment, debt, and hospital operating expenses. Growth in the number of patient days of care was singled out as a major source of uncertainty that would have profound effects on the hospital's finances. Therefore this variable was subjected to special scrutiny in terms of efforts to gauge expected demographic trends and market forces. In addition, alternative base runs of the model were made under three distinct patient-demand assumptions. Use of the model enabled planners at the Stanford University Hospital (a) to determine that a proposed modernization plan was financially feasible under a reasonable (that is, not unduly optimistic) set of assumptions and (b) to examine the major sources of risk. Other than patient demand, these sources were found to be gross revenues per patient, operating costs, and future limitations on government reimbursement programs. When the likely financial consequences of these risks were estimated, both separately and in combination, it was determined that even if two or more assumptions took a somewhat more negative turn than was expected, the hospital would be able to offset adverse consequences by a relatively minor reduction in operating costs. PMID:7111658

  2. On the Planning and Design of Hospital Circulation Zones.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Verderber, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    This present literature review explores current issues and research inconsistencies regarding the design of hospital circulation zones and the associated health-related outcomes. Large general hospitals are immense, highly sophisticated institutions. Empirical studies have indicated excessively institutional environments in large medical centers are a cause of negative effects to occupants, including stress, anxiety, wayfinding difficulties and spatial disorientation, lack of cognitional control, and stress associated with inadequate access to nature. The rise of patient-centered and evidence-based movements in healthcare planning and design has resulted in a general rise in the quality of hospital physical environments. However, as a core component of any healthcare delivery system, hospital circulation zones have tended to remain neglected within the comparatively broad palette of research conducted and reported to date. A systematic literature review was conducted based upon combinations of key words developed vis-à-vis a literature search in 11 major databases in the realm of the health sciences and the planning and design of built environments for healthcare. Eleven peer-reviewed articles were included in the analysis. Six research themes were identified according to associated health-related outcomes, including wayfinding difficulties and spatial disorientation, communication and socialization patterns, measures and control of excessive noise, patient fall incidents, and occupants' stress and satisfaction levels. Several knowledge gaps as well as commonalities in the pertinent research literature were identified. Perhaps the overriding finding is that occupants' meaningful exposure to views of nature from within hospital circulation zones can potentially enhance wayfinding and spatial navigation. Future research priories on this subject are discussed.

  3. [Evaluation of a functional plan for caregivers in hospital].

    PubMed

    Quiñoz-Gallardo, M Dolores; Vellido-González, Concepción; Rivas-Campos, Antonio; Martín-Berrido, Mercedes; González-Guerrero, Leticia; Vellido-González, Dolores; Nieto-Poyato, Rosa María; Corral-Rubio, M Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The care of dependent persons has increased, as such that healthcare reforms are taking caregivers into account. A functional plan in hospitalization was developed for caregivers, and his study aims to investigate its implementation, identifying the strengths and weaknesses that promote changes between the formal and informal system. A qualitative study was designed, using nursing professionals and caregivers identified in the hospital as subjects. A focus group technique was used with 8 people selected for each segment. Two scripts were developed with questions on the evaluation criteria included in the plan: identification/recruitment, reception, rest, diet, health care, information/health education, management and implementation of the plan and other proposals. The data were collected during May 2011. Difficulties were encountered in identifying caregivers, as an initial evaluation was not made. As regards the reception, in some cases the information brochure was not given. Rest was not possible as the caregivers did not want to move away from the patient. Diet was the main cause of the conflict, highlighting the lack of health education to continue in home care. Circuits of preferential care in emergency were positively valuated. Nurses consider the plan as an extra task. The strengths and weaknesses identified should enable improvements to be made in the implementation of the plan, in order to achieve changes in specific aspects such as information/education, health, rest and diet of the caregivers. We emphasize the need to enhance the model change. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. [Strategic planning: an important economic action for German hospitals].

    PubMed

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Zink, Wolfgang; Russo, Sebastian G

    2011-11-01

    In medical systems, economic issues and means of action are in the course of dwindling human (physicians and nurses) and financial resources are more important. For this reason, physicians must understand basic economic principles. Only in this way, there may be medical autonomy from social systems and hospital administrators. The current work is an approach to present a model for strategic planning of an anesthesia department. For this, a "strengths", "weaknesses", "opportunities", and "threats" (SWOT) analysis is used. This display is an example of an exemplary anaesthetic department.

  5. Hospital-based expert model for health technology procurement planning in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Frosini, F; Dori, F; Regolini, J; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G

    2014-01-01

    Although in the last years technology innovation in healthcare brought big improvements in care level and patient quality of life, hospital complexity and management cost became higher. For this reason, necessity of planning for medical equipment procurement within hospitals is getting more and more important in order to sustainable provide appropriate technology for both routine activity and innovative procedures. In order to support hospital decision makers for technology procurement planning, an expert model was designed as reported in the following paper. It combines the most widely used approaches for technology evaluation by taking into consideration Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Medical Equipment Replacement Model (MERM). The designing phases include a first definition of prioritization algorithms, then the weighting process through experts' interviews and a final step for the model validation that included both statistical testing and comparison with real decisions. In conclusion, the designed model was able to provide a semi-automated tool that through the use of multidisciplinary information is able to prioritize different requests of technology acquisition in hospitals. Validation outcomes improved the model accuracy and created different "user profiles" according to the specific needs of decision makers.

  6. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  7. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  8. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required...

  9. Validating Performance of a Hospital Discharge Planning Decision Tool in Community Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holland, Diane E; Brandt, Cheryl; Targonski, Paul V; Bowles, Kathryn H

    The Early Screen for Discharge Planning (ESDP) is a decision support tool developed in an urban academic medical center. High ESDP scores identify patients with nonroutine discharge plans who would benefit from early discharge planning intervention. We aimed to determine the predictive performance of the ESDP in a different practice setting. Rural regional community hospital. We designed a comparative, descriptive survey study and enrolled a convenience sample of 222 patients (identified at admission) who provided informed consent. Sample characteristics and ESDP scores were collected during enrollment. The Problems After Discharge Questionnaire, EuroQoL-5Dimensions quality-of-life measure, length of stay, and use of post-acute care services were recorded after discharge. We compared outcomes between patients with low and high ESDP scores. More than half of the sample (51.8%) had a high ESDP score. Patients with high ESDP scores reported more problems after discharge (p = .02), reported lower quality of life (p < .001), had longer length of stays (p = .04), and used post-acute care services (p = .006) more than patients with low ESDP scores. The difference in the average percentage of unmet needs was not statistically significant (p = .12), but patients with high ESDP scores reported more unmet needs than patients with low ESDP scores. The value of systematically proactive approaches to discharge planning is increasingly recognized, but establishing the performance capacity of support tools is critical for optimizing benefit. These study findings support use of the ESDP in regional community hospitals, making it a useful, open-source decision support tool for various health care delivery systems.

  10. Landscape Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Landscape Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  11. First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  12. The third stage of hospital long-range planning: the marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Rynne, T J

    1980-01-01

    Today most hospital administrators are convinced they should implement long-range planning. The marketing approach to long-range planning is an effective strategy that is consumer oriented. It starts the planning process with the consumer, letting the consumer's needs and wants guide the organization's planning.

  13. HCA Richmond Hospitals' new marketing strategy a winning plan.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    HCA Richmond Hospitals, a five-hospital system in Richmond, Va., is positioning itself as a winner in a highly competitive, healthcare-saturated market since overhauling is marketing strategy a little over a year ago. The marketing strategy enables individual hospital to target their own unique constituencies. "Understanding the intricate marketing dynamics of hospital systems is today of critical importance and equal complexity," said Tony Bejamin, principal of Oxygen Advertising Inc., New York, the agency that remodeled HCA Richmond Hospitals' marketing strategy.

  14. How a new 'public plan' could affect hospitals' finances and private insurance premiums.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Allen; DaVanzo, Joan E; El-Gamil, Audrey M; Berger, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Two key health reform bills in the House of Representatives and Senate include the option of a "public plan" as an additional source of health coverage. At least initially, the plan would primarily be structured to cover many of the uninsured and those who now have individual coverage. Because it is possible, and perhaps even likely, that this new public payer would pay less than private payers for the same services, such a plan could negatively affect hospital margins. Hospitals may attempt to recoup losses by shifting costs to private payers. We outline the financial pressures that hospitals and private payers could experience under various assumptions. High uninsured enrollment in a public plan would bolster hospital margins; however, this effect is reversed if the privately insured enter a public plan in large proportions, potentially stressing the hospital industry and increasing private insurance premiums.

  15. Strategic planning, implementation, and evaluation processes in hospital systems: a survey from Iran.

    PubMed

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2014-09-28

    Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items "the rate of the compliance to requirements" and "the quantity of planning facilitators" (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved.

  16. Strategic Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation Processes in Hospital Systems: A Survey From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim & Background: Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. Methods: The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. Results: All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items “the rate of the compliance to requirements” and “the quantity of planning facilitators” (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved. PMID:25716385

  17. 78 FR 28051 - Federal Plan Requirements for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators; Final... Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators AGENCY... federal plan and the new source performance standards for hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  18. Costs of Planned Home vs. Hospital Birth in British Columbia Attended by Registered Midwives and Physicians.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Patricia A; Mitton, Craig; Aghajanian, Jaafar

    2015-01-01

    Home birth is available to women in Canada who meet eligibility requirements for low risk status after assessment by regulated midwives. While UK researchers have reported lower costs associated with planned home birth, there have been no published studies of the costs of home versus hospital birth in Canada. Costs for all women planning home birth with a regulated midwife in British Columbia, Canada were compared with those of all women who met eligibility requirements for home birth and were planning to deliver in hospital with a registered midwife, and with a sample of women of similar low risk status planning birth in the hospital with a physician. We calculated costs of physician service billings, midwifery fees, hospital in-patient costs, pharmaceuticals, home birth supplies, and transport. We compared costs among study groups using the Kruskall Wallis test for independent groups. In the first 28 days postpartum, we report a $2,338 average savings per birth among women planning home birth compared to hospital birth with a midwife and $2,541 compared to hospital birth planned with a physician. In longer term outcomes, similar reductions were observed, with cost savings per birth at $1,683 compared to the planned hospital birth with a midwife, and $1,100 compared to the physician group during the first eight weeks postpartum. During the first year of life, costs for infants of mothers planning home birth were reduced overall. Cost savings compared to planned hospital births with a midwife were $810 and with a physician $1,146. Costs were similarly reduced when findings were stratified by parity. Planned home birth in British Columbia with a registered midwife compared to planned hospital birth is less expensive for our health care system up to 8 weeks postpartum and to one year of age for the infant.

  19. [Consumer satisfaction study in philanthropic hospital health plans].

    PubMed

    Gerschman, Silvia; Veiga, Luciana; Guimarães, César; Ugá, Maria Alicia Dominguez; Portela, Margareth Crisóstomo; Vasconcellos, Miguel Murat; Barbosa, Pedro Ribeiro; Lima, Sheyla Maria Lemos

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of research aimed at identifying and analyzing the argumentation and rationale that justify the satisfaction of consumers with their health plans. The qualitative method applied used the focus group technique, for which the following aspects were defined: the criteria for choosing the health plans which were considered, the composition of the group and its distribution, recruitment strategy, and infrastructure and dynamics of the meetings. The health plan beneficiaries were classified into groups according to their social class, the place where they lived, mainly, the relationship that they established with the health plan operators which enabled us to develop a typology for the plan beneficiaries. Initially, we indicated how the health plan beneficiaries assess and use the Brazilian Unified Health System (SUS), and, then, considering the types of plans defined, we evaluated their degree of satisfaction with the different aspects of health care, and identified which aspects mostly contributed explain their satisfaction.

  20. Hospitals Negotiating Leverage with Health Plans: How and Why Has It Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Devers, Kelly J; Casalino, Lawrence P; Rudell, Liza S; Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Brewster, Linda R; Lake, Timothy K

    2003-01-01

    Objective To describe how hospitals' negotiating leverage with managed care plans changed from 1996 to 2001 and to identify factors that explain any changes. Data Sources Primary semistructured interviews, and secondary qualitative (e.g., newspaper articles) and quantitative (i.e., InterStudy, American Hospital Association) data. Study Design The Community Tracking Study site visits to a nationally representative sample of 12 communities with more than 200,000 people. These 12 markets have been studied since 1996 using a variety of primary and secondary data sources. Data Collection Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of individuals from hospitals, health plans, and knowledgeable market observers. Secondary quantitative data on the 12 markets was also obtained. Principal Findings Our findings suggest that many hospitals' negotiating leverage significantly increased after years of decline. Today, many hospitals are viewed as having the greatest leverage in local markets. Changes in three areas—the policy and purchasing context, managed care plan market, and hospital market—appear to explain why hospitals' leverage increased, particularly over the last two years (2000–2001). Conclusions Hospitals' increased negotiating leverage contributed to higher payment rates, which in turn are likely to increase managed care plan premiums. This trend raises challenging issues for policymakers, purchasers, plans, and consumers. PMID:12650374

  1. Design, Planning and Management of the Hospital Custody Unit at Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, C de la; Fuente Martín, B de la; Grifol-Clar, E

    2017-12-01

    The design and management of a Hospital Custody Unit at Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón, to focus the aim of this study on specialized medical care for extra-penitentiary patients who have suffered from a disease. We are building a new space to facilitate their daily lives at hospital and we want to offer a double function to the patients that consists of a custody space and a health rehabilitation space. We carried out a scientific literature search on the international and national databases, about Hospital Custody Units or Restricted Access Units. The language of the reviews that we checked was English and Spanish. We wrote the Action Guide of the Hospital Custody Unit for the design, planning and management of the Hospital Custody Unit at Hospital Universitario Fundación Alcorcón. (We included complementary bibliographic material and the Quick Guide in the Unit). The Hospital Custody Unit will be compatible with medical activity, occupational safety and the custody of patients that are in prison. We thus require consensus with police departments about custody protocols along with assistance from the clinicians' teams at penitentiary centers and referral hospitals. Furthermore, it is important to step up special care for mental health and to promote telemedicine and new technologies to streamline medical care along with coordination with healthcare professionals.

  2. Planning among nurse managers in district hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Asamani, James Avoka; Kwafo, Esther Oforiwaa; Ansah-Ofei, Adelaide Maria

    2013-12-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored the planning practices of nurse managers at ward level, their knowledge of planning process and the factors that influence effective planning. Although the practice of planning was almost universal, half the participants had no knowledge of the process, and this knowledge gap was traced to a lack of educational preparation before their appointment. In-service training, support from management and staff, and funding were identified as major factors influencing effective planning at ward level. The authors recommend that prospective nurse managers have educational preparation before they take up these positions and nurse managers already in post have capacity-building training in planning.

  3. Hospital space planning: what happened to all the magic numbers?

    PubMed

    Hayward, C

    1984-04-01

    "Magic numbers" and user "wish lists" have traditionally been used to determine space needs in health care institutions. Today, however, combining functional and space planning to yield a space program that integrates with the facility's long-range strategic plan can be accomplished through a user needs approach. These three approaches are discussed in light of their positive and negative aspects and their contributions to the planning process. In particular, a methodology for examining a department's potential "space generators" is provided. Along with this methodology is the reasoning behind beginning the detailed analysis early in the planning process.

  4. First Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. Second Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  6. Ground Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  7. Second Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  8. Ground Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  9. First Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  10. Characteristics of acute care hospitals with diversity plans and translation services.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Charles B; Shen, Jay J; Ginn, Gregory O

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals provide diversity activities for a number of reasons. The authors examined community demand, resource availability, managed care, institutional pressure, and external orientation related variables that were associated with acute care hospital diversity plans and translation services. The authors used multiple logistic regression to analyze the data for 478 hospitals in the 2006 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset that had available data on the racial and ethnic status of their discharges. We also used 2004 and 2006 American Hospital Association (AHA) data to measure the two dependent diversity variables and the other independent variables. We found that resource, managed care, and external orientation variables were associated with having a diversity plan and that resource, managed care, institutional, and external orientation variables were associated with providing translation services. The authors concluded that more evidence for diversity's impact, additional resources, and more institutional pressure may be needed to motivate more hospitals to provide diversity planning and translation services.

  11. Hospital specialization: product-line planning during the market reformation.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    Rational expectations theory dictates that firms respond to shifts in the demand function as a result of substantial reforms in the insurance marketplace. Federal health reform has enhanced the benefits of specialization. Hospital product-line specialization trends are studied using multiple regression analysis for the period 2001-2010. The observed 32.8 percent rise in specialization was associated with a 9.8 percent decline in unit cost per admission. The number of specialized hospitals has grown by 174 percent in the past decade. Other hospitals are getting more specialized by reducing their product lines. Specialization has been highest in competitive West Coast markets and lowest in the rate-regulated states (New York and Massachusetts). Hospitals have less incentive to contain costs by decreasing the array of services offered in stringent rate-setting states. The term "underspecialization" is advanced to capture the inability of some hospitals to selectively prune out product lines in order to specialize. Such hospitals spread resources so thinly that many good departments suffer. Unit cost per case (DRG-adjusted) is higher in the less specialized hospitals.

  12. Optimization-based decision support to assist in logistics planning for hospital evacuations.

    PubMed

    Glick, Roger; Bish, Douglas R; Agca, Esra

    2013-01-01

    The evacuation of the hospital is a very complex process and evacuation planning is an important part of a hospital's emergency management plan. There are numerous factors that affect the evacuation plan including the nature of threat, availability of resources and staff the characteristics of the evacuee population, and risk to patients and staff. The safety and health of patients is of fundamental importance, but safely moving patients to alternative care facilities while under threat is a very challenging task. This article describes the logistical issues and complexities involved in planning and execution of hospital evacuations. Furthermore, this article provides examples of how optimization-based decision support tools can help evacuation planners to better plan for complex evacuations by providing real-world solutions to various evacuation scenarios.

  13. A terrorism response plan for hospital security and safety officers.

    PubMed

    White, Donald E

    2002-01-01

    Security and Safety managers in today's healthcare facilities need to factor terrorism response into their emergency management plans, separate from the customary disaster plans and the comparatively recent security plans. Terrorism incidents will likely be security occurrences that use a weapon of mass destruction to magnify the incidents into disasters. Facility Y2K Plans can provide an excellent framework for the detailed contingency planning needed for terrorism response by healthcare facilities. Tabbed binder notebooks, with bulleted procedures and contact points for each functional section, can provide security and safety officers with at-a-glance instructions for quick 24/7 implementation. Each functional section should focus upon what activities or severity levels trigger activation of the backup processes. Network with your countywide, regional, and/or state organizations to learn what your peers are doing. Comprehensively inventory your state, local, and commercial resources so that you have alternate providers readily available 24/7 to assist your facility upon disasters.

  14. Hospital to Home: Plan for a Smooth Transition

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some items to include: ■ Insurance information and identification card ■ List of your doctors, with contact information ■ ... Home Make sure to order all the needed equipment and supplies. A member of your hospital team can help ...

  15. Strategic plan modelling by hospital senior administration to integrate diversity management.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, John J

    2010-11-01

    Limited research suggests that some hospital senior administrators and chief executive officers (CEOs) have employed a strategic planning function to achieve diversity management practices. As the hospital industry struggles with how to integrate diversity practices to improve patient satisfaction, increase the quality of care and enhance clinical outcomes for minority populations, understanding the planning process involved in this endeavour becomes significant for senior hospital administrators. What is not well understood is what this strategic planning process represents and how it is applied to integrate diversity management. Scant research exists about the type of strategic models that hospital CEOs employ when they wish to reposition their organizations through diversity management. This study examines the strategic planning models used by senior administrators to integrate diversity management for an institutional-wide agenda. A qualitative survey process was used for CEOs in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. The key research questions dealt with what type of strategic plan approach senior administrators used for integrating diversity management and what rationale they used to pursue this. Significant differences were reported between three types of strategic plan modelling used by CEOs. Also, when comparing past and current practices over time, such differences existed. The need to integrate diversity management is underscored by this study. How senior hospital administrators apply strategic plan models and what impact these approaches have represent the major implications that this study offers.

  16. Business planning in Hong Kong hospitals: the emergence of a seamless health care management process.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the progress made by public hospitals in Hong Kong in implementing a business planning approach. A review of available literature suggests two main exploratory themes. The first establishes the key features of business planning in the private sector. The second theme discusses the problems of adapting this approach to the distinctive requirements of the public sector. The literature also suggests three dimensions for evaluating planning: incremental-developmental; reactive-proactive; ends-means. Qualitative data were collected by scrutinizing relevant organizational documentation and by discussions with focus groups formed by participants in the planning process. The data were analyzed against eight key elements of a business plan identified from the literature and from panels of business experts. These elements were found to be present in the Hospital Authority's plans but were less evident in hospital level plans. Because of the unitary nature of hospital organization in Hong Kong, it has been difficult for hospitals to break out of a reactive, incremental and ends-based pattern to a more imaginative identification of the distinctive business and market that they may be in. This is, however, changing rapidly and it is clear that there is in place a robust and 'seamless' health care management process.

  17. Consumer research and strategic planning for hospitals: a second opinion.

    PubMed

    Muller, A

    1984-01-01

    Strategic planning based on a market orientation requires close attention to consumers' needs and preferences. Therefore, consumer research is a prerequisite for strategic planning. However, problems and limitations have been pointed out in business fields which have had over 30 years' experience with consumer research. These shortcomings also apply to consumer research in healthcare. Several examples are presented to illustrate this point. Some recommendations follow which should make consumer research more useful for strategic planning. Yet, the importance of consumer research should not be overestimated.

  18. Succession planning in hospitals and the association with organizational performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Effective succession planning is the heart of leadership development and an essential business strategy because it enhances the ability to achieve orderly transitions and maintain productivity levels. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies that exhibit a positive association of previous years' performance with internal succession planning. The key to successful succession planning lies in building a solid foundation of profitability. Having successors ready to fill key vacancies helps improve operational condition and the bottom line, and thus, gives a competitive edge in the market. Preparing successors for leadership may determine which organizations simply survive and which thrive and lead their markets down the road.

  19. Complete self-sufficiency planning: designing and building disaster-ready hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brands, Chad K; Hernandez, Raquel G; Stenberg, Arnold; Carnes, Gary; Ellen, Jonathan; Epstein, Michael; Strouse, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The need for healthcare systems and academic medical centers to be optimally prepared in the event of a disaster is well documented. Events such as Hurricane Katrina demonstrate a major gap in disaster preparedness for at-risk medical institutions. To address this gap, we outline the components of complete self-sufficiency planning in designing and building hospitals that will function at full operational capacity in the event of a disaster. We review the processes used and outcomes achieved in building a new critical access, freestanding children's hospital in Florida. Given that hurricanes are the most frequently occurring natural disaster in Florida, the executive leadership of our hospital determined that we should be prepared for worst-case scenarios in the design and construction of a new hospital. A comprehensive vulnerability assessment was performed. A building planning process that engaged all of the stakeholders was used during the planning and design phases. Subsequent executive-level review and discussions determined that a disaster would require the services of a fully functional hospital. Lessons learned from our own institution's previous experiences and those of medical centers involved in the Hurricane Katrina disaster were informative and incorporated into an innovative set of hospital design elements used for construction of a new hospital with full operational capacity in a disaster. A freestanding children's hospital was constructed using a new framework for disaster planning and preparedness that we have termed complete self-sufficiency planning. We propose the use of complete self-sufficiency planning as a best practice for disaster preparedness in the design and construction of new hospital facilities.

  20. [Problems and prospects of improving hospital care planning in the USSR].

    PubMed

    Korchagin, V P; Kravchenko, N A; Epifantsev, V I; Matveev, E N

    1989-01-01

    The necessity of planning the hospital network (bed capacity and its structure) in combination with social security institutions is validated. Thus, planning of the hospital network should be carried out in combination with social security institutions, the degree of development of other forms of medical services (hospitals at home, day hospitals, curative and diagnostic complexes, etc.) being taken into account. By preliminary estimates the demand for hospital beds is 127 per 10,000, 13 for chronic patients and the elderly in medicosocial facilities, 38.9 in social security institutions. Realization of the principles of differentiated hospital treatment of patients according to the degree of its intensity enables one to use hospital resources more effectively and to raise the quality of inpatient care. It is recommended to differentiate specific investments in hospital construction (25,000-70,000 rubles per a bed) according to the demand in hospital beds at different stages of treatment intensity and hierarchial level of medical care organization. Equal possibilities in the provision of inpatient care for the whole population can be achieved within the framework of unified regional models of the network of health care facilities, based on the standard target approach to the utilization of hospital resources.

  1. Brave new world: integrating electronics into a hospital security plan.

    PubMed

    Van Vlack, Bill; York, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Although approximately 90% of cameras that are currently installed in hospitals are analog-based, the trend is to switch to IP network-based digital cameras. How IT, security, and other departments can work together to successfully implement the new systems is explained in this article.

  2. Hospital compensation programs: a plan to attract and retain qualified managerial talent.

    PubMed

    Whitted, G S

    1983-07-01

    Hospital incentive compensation programs by themselves certainly are no guarantee of a hospital's economic success. Implemented poorly and without a comprehensive, well-considered plan design, these programs only will subvert a hospital's short-term and long-range objectives. Conversely, a flexible and thoughtful incentive compensation program can help attract and retain qualified managerial talent. In addition, it can help the hospital enhance its financial achievement without sacrificing the complementary goals of high-quality patient care and service to the community.

  3. Financing and planning of public and private not-for-profit hospitals in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ceri R; McKee, Martin

    2004-03-01

    While much has been written about health care financing in Europe in recent years, discussion has almost entirely focused on revenue. In contrast, there has been remarkably little written on financing of capital investment in European health care systems. Yet major changes are underway in several countries, in particular involving new forms of public-private partnerships (PPP). At the same time, there is growing recognition of the way in which the inherited structure of the health care delivery system constrains the system's ability to adapt to changing circumstances. This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken among key informants in the member states of the European Union to begin to ascertain existing practices and future plans in relation to hospital planning and financing amongst public and private not-for-profit hospitals. The locus of hospital planning decisions reflect the constitutional framework of the country involved, and thus the emphasis on national or local plans. There has been an expansion of private sector involvement, with four basic models identified: private loans direct to the hospital; private loans to a regional health body; a PPP where the private sector's role is to build, design and operate the non-clinical functions of the hospital; and, finally, a PPP, where the private sector's involvement also includes management of the clinical functions of the hospital. It is too early to say whether these approaches will be more successful than the models they are replacing.

  4. Priority-setting and hospital strategic planning: a qualitative case study.

    PubMed

    Martin, Douglas; Shulman, Ken; Santiago-Sorrell, Patricia; Singer, Peter

    2003-10-01

    To describe and evaluate the priority-setting element of a hospital's strategic planning process. Qualitative case study and evaluation against the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness' of a strategic planning process at a large urban university-affiliated hospital. The hospital's strategic planning process met the conditions of 'accountability for reasonableness' in large part. Specifically: the hospital based its decisions on reasons (both information and criteria) that the participants felt were relevant to the hospital; the number and type of participants were very extensive; the process, decisions and reasons were well communicated throughout the organization, using multiple communication vehicles; and the process included an ethical framework linked to an effort to evaluate and improve the process. However, there were opportunities to improve the process, particularly by giving participants more time to absorb the information relevant to priority-setting decisions, more time to take difficult decisions and some means to appeal or revise decisions. A case study linked to an evaluation using 'accountability for reasonableness' can serve to improve priority-setting in the context of hospital strategic planning.

  5. [Terrorists' target World Cup 2006: disaster medicine on the sidelines?! Aspects of hospital disaster planning].

    PubMed

    Weidringer, J W; Ansorg, J; Ulrich, B C; Polonius, M-J; Domres, B D

    2004-09-01

    Focussing on possible mass casualty situations during events such as the soccer world championship in 2006, the Professional Board of Surgeons in Germany and the German Society for Surgery canvassed surgeons-in-chief in the last quarter of 2003 concerning disaster plans for hospitals. The rate of returned questionnaires amounted to 26% covering the following areas of interest: plans-ready to use, known by the employees as well as by the rescue coordination center, performance of exercises, and concepts on decontamination and detoxification. Based on past numbers of casualties during soccer disasters, an excursus into details also includes a description of an approach to reduce the danger of bottleneck effects at doors. A preliminary concept based on the upcoming system for funding hospitals in Germany and including new partnerships is outlined, succeeded by some hopefully helpful hints for a web-based hospital disaster plan.

  6. The need for strategic tax planning among nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela C

    2005-01-01

    Strategic tax planning issues are important to the nonprofit health care sector, despite its philanthropic mission. The consolidation of the industry has led management to fight for resources and develop alternative strategies for raising money. When management evaluates alternative collaborative structures to increase efficiency, the impact on governance structures must also be considered. The increased governmental scrutiny of joint ventures within the health care sector warrants management's attention as well. The financial incentives must be considered, along with the various tax policy implications of cross-sector collaborations.

  7. OCLC for the hospital library: the justification plan for hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Allen, C W; Branson, J R

    1982-07-01

    This paper delineates the necessary steps to provide hospital administrators with the information needed to evaluate an automated system, OCLC, for addition to the medical library. Based on experience at the Norton-Children's Hospitals, included are: (1) cost analyses of present technical processing systems and cost comparisons with OCLC; (2) delineation of start-up costs for installing OCLC; (3) budgetary requirements for 1981; (4) the impact of automation on library systems, personnel, and services; (5) potential as a shared service; and (6) preparation of the proposal for administrative review.

  8. Creating a Business Plan and Projecting Revenue for a Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    Establishing a Laser Center Creating a Business Plan and Projecting Revenue for a Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital Captain Matthew T...Revenue for A Cosmetic Laser Center in a Community Hospital Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author(s) Project Number Task...Establishing a Laser Center 1 Abstract In the United States today, cosmetic laser surgery is rapidly increasing as a popular method for physicians to

  9. Strategic planning in healthcare: the experience of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics.

    PubMed

    Sollenberger, Donna K

    2006-01-01

    In 1999, after 25 years of stable leadership from a single CEO, the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics (UWHC) Authority Board named a new CEO. The 471-bed academic medical center had recently experienced significant change and challenges. In 1996, it had emerged as a public authority, a statutory designation by the state of Wisconsin that moved the hospital and clinics from the University of Wisconsin and the state of Wisconsin, and created it as a quasi-public entity with its own board. In 1999, when the new CEO was named, the hospital was experiencing a loss of revenue and market share, operating deficits, a 22 percent nurse vacancy rate, and patient satisfaction scores below the 40th percentile. The first task assigned to the new CEO by the board was the development of a new strategic plan that would reverse these trends and position UWHC as a premier academic hospital. The CEO began a strategic planning process that involved leaders, physicians, and staff from throughout the hospital and clinics, its affiliated medical school, and the physician practice plan. This article describes the collaborative, integrative, and communicative strategic planning process UWHC used; details the organization of the process; describes the results achieved by UWHC; and lists the lessons learned along the way.

  10. Development of a nurse case management service: a proposed business plan for rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Crow, Carolyn S

    2005-01-01

    The nurse case management service (NCMS) for rural hospitals is an entrepreneurial endeavor designed to provide rural patients with quality, cost-effective healthcare. This article describes the development of an NCMS. A detailed marketing and financial plan, a review of industry trends, and the legal structure and risks associated with the development of the venture are presented. The financial plan projects a minimum savings of 223,200 dollars for rural institutions annually. To improve quality and reduce cost for rural hospitals, the authors recommend implementation of an NCMS.

  11. Succession planning: trends regarding the perspectives of Chief Executive Officers in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric; Collins, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to revisit the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origin of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study sought to develop understanding of how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry. The results of this 2012 study were compared with a previous study conducted in 2007 to determine if the perceptions had changed over time.

  12. Modeling an integrated hospital management planning problem using integer optimization approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitepu, Suryati; Mawengkang, Herman; Irvan

    2017-09-01

    Hospital is a very important institution to provide health care for people. It is not surprising that nowadays the people’s demands for hospital is increasing. However, due to the rising cost of healthcare services, hospitals need to consider efficiencies in order to overcome these two problems. This paper deals with an integrated strategy of staff capacity management and bed allocation planning to tackle these problems. Mathematically, the strategy can be modeled as an integer linear programming problem. We solve the model using a direct neighborhood search approach, based on the notion of superbasic variables.

  13. Impact of Catholic Hospital Affiliation During Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency on the Provision of Family Planning.

    PubMed

    Guiahi, Maryam; Hoover, Jennifer; Swartz, Maryke; Teal, Stephanie

    2017-08-01

    Catholic hospitals operate under the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services, which for obstetrics and gynecology residents may create barriers to receiving adequate training in family planning. We evaluated how training at a Catholic hospital affects trainees' subsequent provision of reproductive health services at secular institutions. This qualitative study used semistructured interviews with recent obstetrics and gynecology graduates in generalist practice at secular institutions. We queried about their training experiences, perceived deficiencies, and current provision of family planning services. Three researchers independently coded transcripts, using grounded theory. We reached thematic saturation after 15 of 31 graduates (48%) from 7 Catholic hospital residencies participated in interviews between June 2014 and February 2015. Many participants reported a lack of awareness regarding limitations on this aspect of their training. All participants reported reproductive health care training deficiencies, and many explained that "elective" training required resident initiative to obtain. After graduation, participants reported dissatisfaction with training in family planning, delayed competency in this area, and a lack of ability to provide certain family planning procedures. All felt that Catholic programs should improve family planning training by providing routine, opt-out family planning opportunities. Obstetricians and gynecologists who trained at Catholic institutions felt that religion-based policies negatively affected their training experiences and the range of reproductive health services they subsequently provide in practice. Forming collaborations with off-site facilities, particularly for postpartum tubal ligation and uterine evacuation, may improve the reproductive care these physicians ultimately provide to women.

  14. Quantifying opportunities for hospital cost control: medical device purchasing and patient discharge planning.

    PubMed

    Robinson, James C; Brown, Timothy T

    2014-09-01

    To quantify the potential reduction in hospital costs from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning. We performed multivariate statistical analyses of the association between total variable cost per procedure and medical device price and length of stay, controlling for patient and hospital characteristics. Ten hospitals in 1 major metropolitan area supplied patient-level administrative data on 9778 patients undergoing joint replacement, spine fusion, or cardiac rhythm management (CRM) procedures in 2008 and 2010. The impact on each hospital of matching lowest local market device prices and lowest patient length of stay (LOS) was calculated using multivariate regression analysis controlling for patient demographics, diagnoses, comorbidities, and implications. Average variable costs ranged from $11,315 for joint replacement to $16,087 for CRM and $18,413 for spine fusion. Implantable medical devices accounted for a large share of each procedure's variable costs: 44% for joint replacement, 39% for spine fusion, and 59% for CRM. Device prices and patient length-of-stay exhibited wide variation across hospitals. Total potential hospital cost savings from achieving best local practices in device prices and patient length of stay are 14.5% for joint replacement, 18.8% for spine fusion;,and 29.1% for CRM. Hospitals have opportunities for cost reduction from adoption of best local practices in supply chain management and discharge planning.

  15. Economies of scale and scope in the Danish hospital sector prior to radical restructuring plans.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Troels; Olsen, Kim Rose; Kilsmark, Jannie; Lauridsen, Jørgen T; Pedersen, Kjeld Møller

    2012-07-01

    The Danish hospital sector faces a significant rebuilding program driven by recent regional reform and guidelines for acute admission hospitals. Within the next 5-10 years, the number of public hospitals offering acute admission will be reduced from 35 to approximately 20 larger hospitals. As the administrative data may be biased during the middle of a restructuring process our objective was to analyze whether the configuration of Danish public hospitals was subject to economies of scale and scope prior to the restructuring plans. We estimated a quadratic cost function using panel data on the total costs for somatic treatment, casemix adjusted DRG-production values, and other cost drivers for the three years before the 2007 reforms. A short-run cost function was used to derive estimates of a long-run cost function by applying the envelope condition. Next, we estimated economies of scale and scope. We identified moderate-to-significant economies of scale and scope. This indicates that the Danish hospital sector was characterized by unexploited gains from consolidation. Our results suggest that the proposed plans have the potential to result in hospitals that are more efficient. However, post-restructuring studies elsewhere show that the strategy of horizontal integration has failed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  17. California hospital networks are narrower in Marketplace than in commercial plans, but access and quality are similar.

    PubMed

    Haeder, Simon F; Weimer, David L; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-05-01

    Do insurance plans offered through the Marketplace implemented by the State of California under the Affordable Care Act restrict consumers' access to hospitals relative to plans offered on the commercial market? And are the hospitals included in Marketplace networks of lower quality compared to those included in the commercial plans? To answer these questions, we analyzed differences in hospital networks across similar plan types offered both in the Marketplace and commercially, by region and insurer. We found that the common belief that Marketplace plans have narrower networks than their commercial counterparts appears empirically valid. However, there does not appear to be a substantive difference in geographic access as measured by the percentage of people residing in at least one hospital market area. More surprisingly, depending on the measure of hospital quality employed, the Marketplace plans have networks with comparable or even higher average quality than the networks of their commercial counterparts.

  18. A Hospital Management Course: Description and Evaluation of Its Effect on Attitudes toward Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levchuk, John W.

    1981-01-01

    A course in hospital pharmacy management that focused on planning is described. The course had a positive effect on self-perceived ability but no effect on already positive student attitudes. Instructional objectives, lecture outline, evaluation criteria, and a synopsis of the questionnaire are appended. (Author/MLW)

  19. A decision support database for nurse care planning as part of a hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Newton, C

    1995-01-01

    This paper, based on a doctoral thesis, describes the development and evaluation of a computerized care planning database at the Royal Hampshire County Hospital. It is part of an integrated Hospital Information System, the first to be installed in an United Kingdom. The research examines nurses' attitudes to the Nursing Process to the new care planning system before, three months after, and one year after its implementation. The quality of manual vs. computer care planning is compared in the same time periods using an existing quality assurance instrument and an audit tool, developed during the research. All data was analyzed in each time period in a framework of personal and organizational change theories. The proactive nature of the research allowed findings to be used as a basis for modifications during the process, which culminated in a further project to provide a database of standard based care plans. Results showed that an understanding of the Nursing Process was inadequate and that most nurses were ambivalent about paper care planning and the proposed computer care plans. Three months after implementation, attitudes became more unfavorable; however, after a year, attitudes showed a significant shift towards the positive pole. Conversely, the overall quality-of-care planning improved significantly.

  20. Hospital treatment - Is it affordable? A structured cost analysis of vaginal deliveries and planned caesarean sections.

    PubMed

    Heer, I M; Kahlert, S; Rummel, S; Kümper, C; Jonat, W; Strauss, A

    2009-11-03

    The analysis of cost effectiveness in hospitals is as difficult as treating the patients properly. We are yet not able to answer the simple question of what costs are caused by a certain diagnosis and its treatment during an average hospital stay. To answer some issues of the global problem of cost effectiveness during hospitalisation, we analysed the costs and the cost structure of a normal obstetrical hospital stay during an uncomplicated vaginal delivery and a planned caesarean section. Cost data was collected and summarized from the patients file, the hospital's computer system gathering all cost centres, known material expenses and expenses of non obstetrical medical services. For vaginal deliveries/planned caesareans we can calculate with a surplus of about 83Euro/1432Euro. About 45% of the summarized costs are calculated on a reliable database. The introduction of the DRG based clearing system in Germany has aggravated the discussion on cost effectiveness. Our meticulous work-up of expenses excluded personal precautionary costs and personnel costs of documentation because no tools are described to depict such costs. If we would add these costs to the known expenses of our study, we strongly suspect that hospital treatment of vaginal deliveries or planned caesarean sections is not cost effective.

  1. Hospital treatment -is it affordable? A structured cost analysis of vaginal deliveries and planned caesarean sections

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The analysis of cost effectiveness in hospitals is as difficult as treating the patients properly. We are yet not able to answer the simple question of what costs are caused by a certain diagnosis and its treatment during an average hospital stay. Methods To answer some issues of the global problem of cost effectiveness during hospitalisation, we analysed the costs and the cost structure of a normal obstetrical hospital stay during an uncomplicated vaginal delivery and a planned caesarean section. Cost data was collected and summarized from the patients file, the hospital's computer system gathering all cost centres, known material expenses and expenses of non obstetrical medical services. Results For vaginal deliveries/planned caesareans we can calculate with a surplus of about 83 €/1432 €. About 45% of the summarized costs are calculated on a reliable database. Discussion The introduction of the DRG based clearing system in Germany has aggravated the discussion on cost effectiveness. Our meticulous work-up of expenses excluded personal precautionary costs and personnel costs of documentation because no tools are described to depict such costs. If we would add these costs to the known expenses of our study, we strongly suspect that hospital treatment of vaginal deliveries or planned caesarean sections is not cost effective. PMID:19948447

  2. Optimal administrative scale for planning public services: a social cost model applied to Flemish hospital care.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart

    2015-01-01

    In choosing the scale of public services, such as hospitals, both economic and public administrative considerations play important roles. The scale and the corresponding spatial distribution of public institutions have consequences for social costs, defined as the institutions' operating costs and the users' travel costs (which include the money and time costs). Insight into the relationship between scale and spatial distribution and social costs provides a practical guide for the best possible administrative planning level. This article presents a purely economic model that is suitable for deriving the optimal scale for public services. The model also reveals the corresponding optimal administrative planning level from an economic perspective. We applied this model to hospital care in Flanders for three different types of care. For its application, we examined the social costs of hospital services at different levels of administrative planning. The outcomes show that the social costs of rehabilitation in Flanders with planning at the urban level (38 areas) are 11% higher than those at the provincial level (five provinces). At the regional level (18 areas), the social costs of rehabilitation are virtually equal to those at the provincial level. For radiotherapy, there is a difference of 88% in the social costs between the urban and the provincial level. For general care, there are hardly any cost differences between the three administrative levels. Thus, purely from the perspective of social costs, rehabilitation should preferably be planned at the regional level, general services at the urban level and radiotherapy at the provincial level.

  3. [Building Process and Architectural Planning Characteristics of Daehan Hospital Main Building].

    PubMed

    Lee, Geauchul

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the introduction process of Daehan Hospital from Japan as the modern medical facility in Korea, and the architectural planning characteristics as a medical facility through the detailed building process of Daehan Hospital main building. The most noticeable characteristic of Daehan Hospital is that it was designed and constructed not by Korean engineers but by Japanese engineers. Therefore, Daehan Hospital was influenced by Japanese early modern medical facility, and Japanese engineers modeled Daehan Hospital main building on Tokyo Medical School main building which was constructed in 1876 as the first national medical school and hospital. The architectural type of Tokyo Medical School main building was a typical school architecture in early Japanese modern period which had a middle corridor and a pseudo Western-style tower, but Tokyo Medical School main building became the model of a medical facility as the symbol of the medical department in Tokyo Imperial University. This was the introduction and transplantation process of Japanese modern 'model' like as other modern systems and technologies during the Korean modern transition period. However, unlike Tokyo Medical School main building, Daehan Hospital main building was constructed not as a wooden building but as a masonry building. Comparing with the function of Daehan Hospital main building, its architectural form and construction costs was excessive scale, which was because Japanese Resident-General of Korea had the intention of ostentation that Japanese modernity was superior to Korean Empire.

  4. Access to Accredited Cancer Hospitals Within Federal Exchange Plans Under the Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Kenneth L; Liao, Kai-Ping; Krause, Trudy M; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-02-20

    Purpose The Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance in the United States, but concerns have arisen about access to specialized cancer care within narrow provider networks. To characterize the scope and potential impact of this problem, we assessed rates of inclusion of Commission on Cancer (CoC) -accredited hospitals and National Cancer Institute (NCI) -designated cancer centers within federal exchange networks. Methods We downloaded publicly available machine-readable network data and public use files for individual federal exchange plans from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for the 2016 enrollment year. We linked this information to National Provider Identifier data, identified a set of distinct provider networks, and assessed the rates of inclusion of CoC-accredited hospitals and NCI-designated centers. We measured variation in these rates according to geography, plan type, and metal level. Results Of 4,058 unique individual plans, network data were available for 3,637 (90%); hospital information was available for 3,531 (87%). Provider lists for these plans reduced into 295 unique networks for analysis. Ninety-five percent of networks included at least one CoC-accredited hospital, but just 41% of networks included NCI-designated centers. States and counties each varied substantially in the proportion of networks listed that included NCI-designated centers (range, 0% to 100%). The proportion of networks that included NCI-designated centers also varied by plan type (range, 31% for health maintenance organizations to 49% for preferred provider organizations; P = .04) but not by metal level. Conclusion A large majority of federal exchange networks contain CoC-accredited hospitals, but most do not contain NCI-designated cancer centers. These results will inform policy regarding access to cancer care, and they reinforce the importance of promoting access to clinical trials and specialized care through community sites.

  5. Evaluation of Hospitals' Disaster Preparedness Plans in the Holy City of Makkah (Mecca): A Cross-Sectional Observation Study.

    PubMed

    Al-Shareef, Ali S; Alsulimani, Loui K; Bojan, Hattan M; Masri, Taha M; Grimes, Jennifer O; Molloy, Michael S; Ciottone, Gregory R

    2017-02-01

    Makkah (Mecca) is a holy city located in the western region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Each year, millions of pilgrims visit Makkah. These numbers impact both routine health care delivery and disaster response. This study aimed to evaluate hospitals' disaster plans in the city of Makkah. Study investigators administered a questionnaire survey to 17 hospitals in the city of Makkah. Data on hospital characteristics and three key domains of disaster plans (general evaluation of disaster planning, structural feasibility of the hospitals, and health care worker knowledge and training) were collated and analyzed. A response rate of 82% (n=14) was attained. Ten (71%) of the hospitals were government hospitals, whereas four were private hospitals. Eleven (79%) hospitals had a capacity of less than 300 beds. Only nine (64%) hospitals reviewed their disaster plan within the preceding two years. Nine (64%) respondents were drilling for disasters at least twice per year. The majority of hospitals did not rely on a hazard vulnerability analysis (HVA) to develop their Emergency Operations Plan. Eleven (79%) hospitals had the Hospital Incident Command Systems (HICS) present in their plans. All hospitals described availability of some supplies required for the first 24 hours of a disaster response, such as: N95 masks, antidotes for nerve agents, and antiviral medications. Only five (36%) hospitals had a designated decontamination area. Nine (64%) hospitals reported ability to re-designate inpatient wards into an intensive care unit (ICU) format. Only seven (50%) respondents had a protocol for increasing availability of isolation rooms to prevent the spread of airborne infection. Ten (71%) hospitals had a designated disaster-training program for health care workers. Makkah has experienced multiple disaster incidents over the last decade. The present research suggests that Makkah hospitals are insufficiently prepared for potential future disasters. This may represent a

  6. [Planned non-hospital births in industrialized countries: bureaucratic dream vs. professional responsibility].

    PubMed

    Arabin, B; Chervenak, F A; McCullough, L B

    2013-02-01

    This article addresses in how far planned non-hospital births should be an alternative to planned hospital births. Advocates of planned non-hospital deliveries have emphasised patient safety, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and respect for women's rights. We provide a critical evaluation of each of these claims and have doubts that the information available for the pregnant women and the public is in accord with professional responsibility. We understand that the increasing rates of interventions and operative deliveries in hospital births demand an answer, but we doubt that planned home birth is the appropriate professional solution. Complications during non-hospital births inevitably demand a transport of mother and child to a perinatal centre. The time delay by itself is an unnecessary risk for both and this cannot be abolished by bureaucratic quality criteria as introduced for non-hospital births in Germany. Evidence-based studies have shown that modern knowledge of the course of delivery including ultrasound as well as intensive care during the delivery all reduce the rate of operative deliveries. Unfortunately, this is not well-known and only rarely considered during any delivery. All these facts, however, are the best arguments to find a cooperative model within perinatal centres to combine the art of midwifery with modern science, reduction of pain and perinatal care of the pregnant women before, during and after birth. We therefore call on obstetricians, midwifes and health-care providers as well as health politicians to carefully analyse the studies from Western countries showing increasing risks if the model of intention-to-treat is considered and accoordingly not to support planned non-hospital births nor to include these models into prospective trials. Alternatively, we recommend the introduction of a home-like climate within hospitals and perinatal centres, to avoid unnecessary invasive measures and to really care for the pregnant mother

  7. [State of emergency plans for massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, D; Fizzano, M R; Barletta, C; Pietrantonio, F

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the level of implementation of plans for the massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to a sample of 100 hospitals selected through the network of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU). Each answer of the questionnaire was assigned a score, then reported on a scale of compliance (maximum 65 points, threshold 35 points). The average scores were analyzed by hospital's venue, level of activity and previous experience of managing a real emergency. Student's t-test was used to compare means. Thirty-two hospitals sent the questionnaire, representing 33% of those selected. Five were excluded for incomplete data. The data analyzed refers to 27 hospitals of various levels of complexity, from all around the country: 55.6% from the Northern Section, 22.2% from the Centre and 22.2% from the Southern section and the Islands; and only 55.6% are above the minimum threshold of compliance. The weakest PEMAF's area is the one related to the specific training of health workers, therefore the percentage of hospitals complying the requirements in this field is down to 37%. Ten hospitals (37%) had managed a real maxi-emergence in the past: belonging to such group of hospitals is associated with an average level of compliance significantly higher than the others (p < 0.005). Due to a limited percentage of responders, the study involved so far a too small amount of hospitals; happily, they were evenly distributed in the different sections of the Country; therefore it will be appropriate to obtain a larger compliance before reaching clear-cut conclusions, but it already appears that the most critical point is the lack of specific education to maxi-emergencies in the hospital personnel.

  8. Strategic planning for clinical services: St. Joseph Hospital and Health Care Center.

    PubMed

    Linggi, A; Pelham, L D

    1986-09-01

    A pharmacy department at a 340-bed community hospital based its strategic plan for developing patient-oriented services on a sound drug distribution system, a credible work-measurement program, and fiscal responsibility. In 1982 the department of pharmacy and i.v. therapy implemented a strategic plan for improving pharmaceutical services. The plan involved developing goals and objectives for the department; marketing the department's services and fiscal management to hospital administrators, medical staff, and nursing staff; building teamwork among the pharmacy staff; and improving the drug distribution system before instituting clinical services. Hiring of additional pharmacy staff was justified on the basis of work-measurement data. By adjusting staffing levels every two weeks based on work-measurement data, the department increased the efficiency of drug distribution activities; the pharmacy also implemented cost-saving programs like selection of therapeutic alternates and formulary restrictions. The savings were then reinvested in labor-intensive patient-oriented pharmaceutical services. A staff development program using staff pharmacists as preceptors expanded the breadth and depth of pharmacists' clinical skills. The planning efforts were successful because the needs of hospital administrators, the pharmacy department, and staff members were addressed.

  9. Framework for preventing accidental falls in hospitals - management plan for ADL, medication and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of medical accidents is essential. Among medical accidents, accidental falls remain a serious problem. While "assessment score sheets" have already been used in hospitals to prevent accidental falls, satisfactory results have not actually been achieved. In this study, we aim to establish a methodology for preventing accidental falls. We consider that the 'management plan' for each patient includes three factors. A plan of instructions for patients on actions they can take for safety in their ADL (Activities of Daily Living) is essential as a base. Second, a plan to keep up with any short term change in a patient's state is needed, because the state of a hospitalized patient will usually be temporarily affected by medication and changing medical conditions. We develop a model for preventing accidental falls, which enable us to design appropriate management plan for each patient. Then, we develop a prototype system based on the designed model. Finally, we address the result of verification of the model, by applying the prototype system into actual cases in hospitals.

  10. [Hospital nurses' knowledge of the patient care plan for immediate life threatening situations].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Borrajo, Sara; Martínez de Lahidalga-Martínez, Olga; Gutiérrez-García de Cortazar, Aitziber; Arriaran-Mendialdua, Izaskun; Latorre-García, Kepa

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate knowledge of nurses in adult hospital units in Txagorritxu Hospital (Vitoria) on care plans for immediate life-threatening (ILT) situations and to determine their self-evaluation of knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and the main sociodemographic characteristics that could influence the need for better training in this field. We performed a cross-sectional, analytical, observational study through a survey of 207 nurses in adult hospital units. Data were collected using a self-administered 20-item questionnaire. Five of these items measured knowledge of the care plan for ILT situations. The response rate was 74.39%. Of the five questions measuring knowledge, 32.4% of the nurses answered four or more questions correctly. Of the total, 38.3% knew when to activate the ILT plan; 12.99% did not know how to remove or lower the bed head when the patient was experiencing an ILT situation, and 24.03% did so with difficulty. No significant differences were found in nurses' experience, age, or the percentage of correct responses. Training courses should be organized to enable nurses to act in an ILT situation, including when to activate the care plan, how to perform the measures, and how to handle the center's materials/equipment.

  11. Planning and verification in radiotherapy: our experience in a filmless hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresin, A.; Carbonini, C.; Ferrari, M. B.; Asnaghi, D.; Botturi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In our hospital we have recently installed a new radiotherapy treatment planning and verification system. Our system allows to follow the normal clinical workflow: from patient identification to follow-up through the treatment delivery with the study of the best irradiation geometry. We designed a new technical solutions relating to the use of four linear accelerators, a Record and Verify system, a Treatment Planning System (TPS) and a clinical folder, completely paperless. All the procedures for treatment planning, setup and verification are integrated in our digital imaging long-term archive. The integration is based on the existing HL7 and DICOM standard protocols described in the International Committee and IHE RO Technical Framework, which is able to support the workflow. All the images used for planning and setup are stored in the Oncentra DICOM archive server for short-term archiving and then are sent to the Agfa DICOM long-term archive for legal and scientific purposes.

  12. Training hospital managers for strategic planning and management: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Vukovic, Dejana; Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Marinkovic, Jelena; Vasic, Vladimir; Laaser, Ulrich

    2015-02-26

    Training is the systematic acquisition of skills, rules, concepts, or attitudes and is one of the most important components in any organization's strategy. There is increasing demand for formal and informal training programs especially for physicians in leadership positions. This study determined the learning outcomes after a specific training program for hospital management teams. The study was conducted during 2006 and 2007 at the Centre School of Public Health and Management, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade and included 107 participants involved in the management in 20 Serbian general hospitals. The management teams were multidisciplinary, consisting of five members on average: the director of the general hospital, the deputy directors, the head nurse, and the chiefs of support services. The managers attended a training program, which comprised four modules addressing specific topics. Three reviewers independently evaluated the level of management skills at the beginning and 12 months after the training program. Principal component analysis and subsequent stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were performed to determine predictors of learning outcomes. The quality of the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses performed by the trainees improved with differences between 0.35 and 0.49 on a Likert scale (p < 0.001). Principal component analysis explained 81% of the variance affecting their quality of strategic planning. Following the training program, the external environment, strategic positioning, and quality of care were predictors of learning outcomes. The four regression models used showed that the training program had positive effects (p < 0.001) on the ability to formulate a Strategic Plan comprising the hospital mission, vision, strategic objectives, and action plan. This study provided evidence that training for strategic planning and management enhanced the strategic decision-making of hospital

  13. A health plan work in progress: hospital-physician price and quality transparency.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Ann; Liebhaber, Allison; Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-08-01

    Responding to large employers' interest in greater health care price and quality transparency, health plans are developing consumer tools to compare price and quality information across hospitals and physicians, but the tools' pervasiveness and usefulness are limited, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Many large employers view price and quality transparency as key to a broader consumerism strategy, where employees take more responsibility for medical costs, lifestyle choices and treatment decisions. Some health plans believe providing price and quality information to enrollees is a competitive advantage, while others are skeptical about the benefits and are proceeding cautiously to avoid potential unintended consequences. Health plans are in various stages of making price information available to enrollees. Plans generally provide some type of price information on inpatient and outpatient procedures and services from data based on their own negotiated prices or through aggregated health plan claims data obtained through a vendor; few plans provide price information on services in physician offices. However, the information provided often lacks specificity about individual providers, and its availability is often limited to enrollees in specific geographic areas. Health plans generally rely on third-party sources to package publicly available quality information instead of using information gleaned from their own claims or other data. Health plans' ability to advance price and quality comparison tools to the point where a critical mass of consumers trust and use the information to choose physicians and hospitals will likely have considerable influence on the ultimate success of broader health consumerism efforts.

  14. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Barasa, Edwine W.; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities, implementation

  15. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities

  16. Comparative costs of family planning services and hospital-based maternity care in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cakir, H V; Fabricant, S J; Kircalioğlu, F N

    1996-01-01

    The costs of running a recently established family planning program in the Turkish social security system were measured and compared with the costs of providing the medical services and nonmedical benefits for pregnant women. The undiscounted cost savings from averting pregnancy were estimated to exceed the program's recurrent costs by 17.6 to 1. Cost savings represent only 1 percent of all of the system's medical expenditures, but the family planning program is in an early stage, and potential savings could influence management decisionmaking regarding investments in specialized maternity hospitals.

  17. A Study on Strategic Planning and Procurement of Medicals in Uganda’s Regional Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was an analysis of the effect of strategic planning on procurement of medicals in Uganda’s regional referral hospitals (RRH’s). Medicals were defined as essential medicines, medical devices and medical equipment. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has been carrying out strategic planning for the last 15 years via the Health Sector Strategic Plans. Their assumption was that strategic planning would translate to strategic procurement and consequently, availability of medicals in the RRH’s. However, despite the existence of these plans, there have been many complaints about expired drugs and shortages in RRH’s. For this purpose, a third variable was important because it served the role of mediation. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on perceptions of 206 respondents who were selected using simple random sampling. 8 key informant interviews were held, 2 in each RRH. 4 Focus Group Discussions were held, 1 for each RRH, and between 5 and 8 staff took part as discussants for approximately three hours. The findings suggested that strategic planning was affected by funding to approximately 34% while the relationship between funding and procurement was 35%. The direct relationship between strategic planning and procurement was 18%. However when the total causal effect was computed it turned out that strategic planning and the related variable of funding contributed 77% to procurement of medicals under the current hierarchical model where MOH is charged with development of strategic plans for the entire health sector. Since even with this contribution there were complaints, the study proposed a new model called CALF which according to a simulation, if adopted by MOH, strategic planning would contribute 87% to effectiveness in procurement of medicals. PMID:28299158

  18. A Study on Strategic Planning and Procurement of Medicals in Uganda's Regional Referral Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Masembe, Ishak Kamaradi

    2016-12-31

    This study was an analysis of the effect of strategic planning on procurement of medicals in Uganda's regional referral hospitals (RRH's). Medicals were defined as essential medicines, medical devices and medical equipment. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has been carrying out strategic planning for the last 15 years via the Health Sector Strategic Plans. Their assumption was that strategic planning would translate to strategic procurement and consequently, availability of medicals in the RRH's. However, despite the existence of these plans, there have been many complaints about expired drugs and shortages in RRH's. For this purpose, a third variable was important because it served the role of mediation. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on perceptions of 206 respondents who were selected using simple random sampling. 8 key informant interviews were held, 2 in each RRH. 4 Focus Group Discussions were held, 1 for each RRH, and between 5 and 8 staff took part as discussants for approximately three hours. The findings suggested that strategic planning was affected by funding to approximately 34% while the relationship between funding and procurement was 35%. The direct relationship between strategic planning and procurement was 18%. However when the total causal effect was computed it turned out that strategic planning and the related variable of funding contributed 77% to procurement of medicals under the current hierarchical model where MOH is charged with development of strategic plans for the entire health sector. Since even with this contribution there were complaints, the study proposed a new model called CALF which according to a simulation, if adopted by MOH, strategic planning would contribute 87% to effectiveness in procurement of medicals.

  19. Management of conventional mass casualty incidents: ten commandments for hospital planning.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Mauricio; Gurr, Daniel; Memon, Abdul; Kaliff, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The successful management of mass casualty incidents (MCIs) requires standardization of planning, training, and deployment of response. Recent events in the United States, most importantly the Hurricane season in 2005, demonstrated a lack of a unified response plan at local, regional, state, and federal levels. A standard Israeli protocol for hospital preparedness for conventional MCIs, produced by the Office of Emergency Preparedness of the Israeli Ministry of Health, has been reviewed, modified, adapted, and tested in both drills and actual events at a large university medical center in the United States. Lessons learned from this process are herein presented as the10 most important steps (ie, Commandments) to follow when preparing hospitals to be able to respond to conventional MCIs. The standard Israeli emergency protocols have proved to be universally adaptable, flexible, and designed to be adapted by any healthcare institution, regardless of its size and location.

  20. Hospital and Health Plan Partnerships: The Affordable Care Act's Impact on Promoting Health and Wellness

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michelle; White, Annesha; Kelley, Virginia P.; Hopper, Jennifer Kuca; Liu, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Affordable Care Act (ACA) healthcare reforms, centered on achieving the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Triple Aim goals of improving patient care quality and satisfaction, improving population health, and reducing costs, have led to increasing partnerships between hospitals and insurance companies and the implementation of employee wellness programs. Hospitals and insurance companies have opted to partner to distribute the risk and resources and increase coordination of care. Objective To examine the ACA's impact on the health and wellness programs that have resulted from the joint ventures of hospitals and health plans based on the published literature. Method We conducted a review of the literature to identify successful mergers and best practices of health and wellness programs. Articles published between January 2007 and January 2015 were compiled from various search engines, using the search terms “corporate,” “health and wellness program,” “health plan,” “insurance plan,” “hospital,” “joint venture,” and “vertical merger.” Publications that described consolidations or wellness programs not tied to health insurance plans were excluded. Noteworthy characteristics of these programs were summarized and tabulated. Results A total of 44 eligible articles were included in the analysis. The findings showed that despite rising healthcare costs, joint ventures prevent hospitals from trading-off quality and services for cost reductions. Administrators believed that partnering would allow the companies to meet ACA standards for improving clinical outcomes at reduced costs. Before the implementation of the ACA, some employers had wellness programs, but these were not standardized and did not need to produce measurable results. The ACA encouraged improvement of employee wellness programs by providing funding for expanded health services and by mandating quality care. Successful workplace health and wellness

  1. Assessing hospital preparedness using an instrument based on the Mass Casualty Disaster Plan Checklist: results of a statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Wayne; Wainright, Charles; Lu, Ning; Carrico, Ruth

    2004-10-01

    Hospitals would play a critical role in a weapon of mass destruction (WMD) event. The purpose of this study is to assess preparedness for mass casualty events in short-term and long-term hospitals in Kentucky. All short-term and long-term hospitals in Kentucky were surveyed using an instrument based on the Mass Casualty Disaster Plan Checklist and a brief supplemental bioterrorism preparedness questionnaire based on a checklist developed for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Responses were received from 116 of the 118 (98%) hospitals surveyed. Hospitals reported surge capacity equal to 27% of licensed beds, and virtually all respondents were engaged in planning for weapons of mass destruction events. However, advanced planning and preparation were less common. Large regional differences were observed, especially in the area of pharmaceutical planning. Preparedness planning in general and pharmaceutical management planning in particular were more advanced in counties participating in the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program (MMRS). Hospital mass casualty preparedness efforts were in an early stage of development at the time of this survey, and some critical capabilities, such as isolation, decontamination, and syndromic surveillance were clearly underdeveloped. Preparedness planning was more advanced among hospitals located in MMRS counties.

  2. Patient safety begins with proper planning: a quantitative method to improve hospital design.

    PubMed

    Birnbach, D J; Nevo, I; Scheinman, S R; Fitzpatrick, M; Shekhter, I; Lombard, J L

    2010-10-01

    A quantitative methodology that enhances design of patient-safe healthcare facilities is presented. The prevailing paradigm of evaluating the design of healthcare facilities relies mainly on postconstruction criticism of design flaws; by then, design flaws may have already negatively affected patient safety. The methodology presented here utilises simulation-based testing in real-size replicas of proposed hospital designs. Other simulations to assess design solutions generated mainly qualitative data about user experience. To assess the methodology, we evaluated one patient safety variable in a proposed hospital patient room. Fifty-two physicians who volunteered to participate were randomly assigned to examine a standardised patient in two hospital room settings using a replica of the proposed architectural plan; the two settings differed only by the placement of the alcohol-based hand-rub dispenser. The primary outcome was the hand hygiene compliance rate. When the dispenser was in clear view of the physicians as they observed the patient, 53.8% sanitised their hands. When the dispenser was not in their field of view (as in the original architectural plan), 11.5% sanitised their hands (p=0.0011). Based on these results, the final architectural plans were adjusted accordingly. The methodology is an effective and relatively inexpensive means to quantitatively evaluate proposed solutions, which can then be implemented to build patient-safe healthcare facilities. It enables actual users to proactively identify patient safety hazards before construction begins.

  3. [Implementation of a safety and health planning system in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Mariani, F; Bravi, C; Dolcetti, L; Moretto, A; Palermo, A; Ronchin, M; Tonelli, F; Carrer, P

    2007-01-01

    University Hospital "L. Sacco" had started in 2006 a two-year project in order to set up a "Health and Safety Management System (HSMS)" referring to the technical guideline OHSAS 18001:1999 and the UNI and INAIL "Guidelines for a health and safety management system at workplace". So far, the following operations had been implemented: Setting up of a specific Commission within the Risk Management Committee; Identification and appointment of Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Carrying out of a training course addressed to Workers Representatives for Safety and Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Development of an Integrated Informative System for Prevention and Safety; Auditors qualification; Inspection of the Occupational Health Unit and the Prevention and Safety Service: reporting of critical situations and monitoring solutions adopted. Short term objectives are: Self-evaluation through check-lists of each department; Sharing of the Improvement Plan among the departments of the hospital; Planning of Health and Safety training activities in the framework of the Hospital Training Plan; Safety audit.

  4. Planning for Hospital IT Implementation: A New Look at the Business Case

    PubMed Central

    Menachemi, Nir; Randeree, Ebrahim; Burke, Darrell E.; Ford, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary Compared to organizations in other industries, hospitals are slow to adopt information technology (IT). Those planning for system implementation must understand the barriers to IT adoption which, in healthcare, include the relatively high acquisition and maintenance costs of sophisticated administrative and clinical information systems. Understanding the overall business case is particularly important for hospital IT planners. This paper describes the literature that examines benefits from using health IT. In addition, we focus on a series of studies conducted in Florida that provide generalizable evidence regarding the overall business case associated with hospital adoption for information systems. These studies focus broadly on the improved financial, operational, and clinical performance associated with IT. PMID:27429553

  5. Customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering move hospital towards in-house stockless program.

    PubMed

    Burton, R; Mauk, D

    1993-03-01

    By integrating customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering techniques when examining internal costs and efficiencies, materiel managers are able to better realize what concepts will best meet their customers' needs. Defining your customer(s), applying industrial engineering techniques, completing work sampling studies, itemizing recommendations and benefits to each alternative, performing feasibility and cost-analysis matrixes and utilizing resources through productivity monitoring will get you on the right path toward selecting concepts to use. This article reviews the above procedures as they applied to one hospital's decision-making process to determine whether to incorporate a stockless inventory program. Through an analysis of customer demand, the hospital realized that stockless was the way to go, but not by outsourcing the function--the hospital incorporated an in-house stockless inventory program.

  6. Strategic competition: the application of business planning techniques to the hospital marketplace.

    PubMed

    Morris, D E; Rau, S E

    1985-01-01

    Survival in the increasingly turbulent and uncertain health care environment should raise the application of business planning and corporate strategy to the highest levels of institutional consciousness. With hospital mergers and networking arrangements expected to account for over 60% of the hospital beds in the nation by 1990, and with government and business cost containment efforts squeezing hospital margins, the survivors are going to be those institutions able to develop and maintain a sustainable economic advantage over the competition in the programs and services that comprise the major portion of their business. The successful players will be those that allow the institution to identify and exploit new opportunities and concentrate management and financial resources in those segments of the market where competitive advantages are real and attainable.

  7. Hospital nurses' work environment, quality of care provided and career plans.

    PubMed

    Hinno, S; Partanen, P; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, K

    2011-06-01

    In several European countries, the availability of qualified nurses is insufficient to meet current healthcare requirements. Nurses are highly dissatisfied with the rising demands of the healthcare environment and increasingly considering leaving their jobs. The study aims to investigate the relationships between the characteristics of hospital nurses' work environment and the quality of care provided, and furthermore to examine Dutch nurses' career plans. A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey of registered nurses (n = 334) working in the academic and district hospitals was conducted in 2005/2006. Previously validated questionnaires translated into the participants' language were used. Factor and regression analysis were used for data analysis. Overall, nurses rated their work environment rather favourably. Five work environment characteristics were identified: support for professional development, adequate staffing, nursing competence, supportive management and teamwork. Significant relationships were found between nurses' perceptions of their work environment characteristics and quality of care provided and nurses' career plans. When work environment characteristics were evaluated to be better, nurse-assessed quality of care also increased and intentions to leave current job decreased linearly. Study findings suggest that nurses' perceptions of their work environment are important for nurse outcomes in hospital settings. Further research is needed to explore the predictive ability of the work environment for nurse, patient and organizational outcomes in hospitals. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  8. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. Results: We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. Conclusion: With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary. PMID:26759575

  9. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents.

    PubMed

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary.

  10. Coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions: implications for healthcare planning in the UK.

    PubMed

    Muzerengi, S; Rick, C; Begaj, I; Ives, N; Evison, F; Woolley, R L; Clarke, C E

    2017-05-01

    Hospital Episode Statistics data are used for healthcare planning and hospital reimbursements. Reliability of these data is dependent on the accuracy of individual hospitals reporting Secondary Uses Service (SUS) which includes hospitalisation. The number and coding accuracy for Parkinson's disease hospital admissions at a tertiary centre in Birmingham was assessed. Retrospective, routine-data-based study. A retrospective electronic database search for all Parkinson's disease patients admitted to the tertiary hospital over a 4-year period (2009-2013) was performed on the SUS database using International Classification of Disease codes, and on the local inpatient electronic prescription database, Prescription and Information Communications System, using medication prescriptions. Capture-recapture methods were used to estimate the number of patients and admissions missed by both databases. From the two databases, between July 2009 and June 2013, 1068 patients with Parkinson's disease accounted for 1999 admissions. During these admissions, the Parkinson's disease was coded as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Ninety-one percent of these admissions were recorded on the SUS database. Capture-recapture methods estimated that the number of Parkinson's disease patients admitted during this period was 1127 patients (95% confidence interval: 1107-1146). A supplementary search of both SUS and Prescription and Information Communications System was undertaken using the hospital numbers of these 1068 patients. This identified another 479 admissions. SUS database under-estimated Parkinson's disease admissions by 27% during the study period. The accuracy of disease coding is critical for healthcare policy planning and must be improved. If the under-reporting of Parkinson's disease admissions on the SUS database is repeated nationally, expenditure on Parkinson's disease admissions in England is under-estimated by approximately £61 million per year. Copyright © 2016 The Royal

  11. Managing aggression in a psychiatric hospital using a behaviour plan: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bisconer, S W; Green, M; Mallon-Czajka, J; Johnson, J S

    2006-10-01

    This paper focuses on the critical role of nursing in implementing a behaviour plan in a psychiatric hospital. The plan was implemented with a 40-year-old man with a long history of aggression towards others and self. The study used a single-subject research design with baseline and intervention phases (AB Design). Data were collected on (1) frequency of incidents of aggression towards others and self; (2) use of restrictive interventions to manage aggression (i.e. restraints, pro re nata medication, 1:1 special observation); and (3) frequency of staff injury. The data show a decrease in frequency of aggression towards others and self, a concurrent reduction in the use of restrictive interventions to manage aggression, and a decrease in incidents of staff injury. The behaviour plan helped staff maintain a safe and therapeutic milieu. The behaviour plan has given the patient an opportunity to learn positive replacement behaviours and skills, and the opportunity eventually to leave the hospital to live in a less restrictive community home.

  12. A Study to Determine the Optimal Strategic Planning Process for Controlling and Coordinating the In-House Development of an Integrated Computer- Supported Hospital Information System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    This study examines Strategic Planning concepts and how they relate to the development of Hospital Information Systems. The author recommends that... Strategic Planning methods be utilized in the development of Hospital Information Systems, and provides guidance on how to do so. Keywords: Theses...Integrated information systems; Hospital administration; Computer networks; Information exchange; Health care; Strategic planning ; Information systems.

  13. [Dementia-friendly hospital wards : Expert recommendations for planning and design].

    PubMed

    Büter, K; Motzek, T; Dietz, B; Hofrichter, L; Junge, M; Kopf, D; von Lützau-Hohlbein, H; Traxler, S; Zieschang, T; Marquardt, G

    2017-01-01

    Hospitals face great challenges in the necessity of providing care for the rising number of elderly patients with dementia. The adaptation of the spatial environment represents an important component to improve the care situation of patients with dementia. For more than 30 years research results from long-term care have provided evidence on the therapeutic effect of numerous architectural features on people with dementia. Due to specific medical and organizational requirements in hospitals, the transferability of these findings is, however, limited. An interdisciplinary workshop with experts from the fields of medicine, nursing, gerontology, self-help and architecture was conducted in July 2015. Based on existing research findings and experiences from pilot projects, the spatial requirements for dementia-friendly hospital wards were collated, suggested solutions were discussed from different perspectives and finally design recommendations were derived. The article gives a first comprehensive overview of architectural measures that are required for the design of dementia-friendly hospital wards. The recommendations provided range from architectural criteria, such as the size and spatial structure of hospital wards, to interior design elements, including orientation and navigation aids and the use of light and colors. Furthermore, information about the planning process are given.

  14. [Effect of a Discharge Planning Educational Program in a University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shima; Ohori, Yoko; Tanaka, Yuko; Sato, Yukiko; Watanabe, Ami; Fujii, Junko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a discharge planning educational program on multidisciplinary team staff in a community. We provided training to nurses of a university hospital. The training covered an introduction to discharge planning, decision-making support, home care medicine and home nursing care, the medical social welfare system, and case review meetings. It was conducted every year from September through February between 2012 and 2015. Before and after the training, the awareness of nurses was evaluated by using self-administered questionnaires and the Discharge Planning scale for Ward Nurses(DPWN), and discharge planning satisfaction was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The study process was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Tokyo Women's Medical University. The questionnaires were distributed to 96 nurses; of these, responses of 72 nurses(pre- and post-training)were analyzed(response rate: 75.0%). The average number of years of nursing experience was 8.5± 7.7. The total score of the DPWN and its subscales, as well as the VAS, with regard to satisfaction level significantly increased after the training(p<0.01), indicating that training improved nurses' awareness of discharge planning practices.

  15. Vulnerable Populations in Hospital and Health Care Emergency Preparedness Planning: A Comprehensive Framework for Inclusion.

    PubMed

    Kreisberg, Debra; Thomas, Deborah S K; Valley, Morgan; Newell, Shannon; Janes, Enessa; Little, Charles

    2016-04-01

    As attention to emergency preparedness becomes a critical element of health care facility operations planning, efforts to recognize and integrate the needs of vulnerable populations in a comprehensive manner have lagged. This not only results in decreased levels of equitable service, but also affects the functioning of the health care system in disasters. While this report emphasizes the United States context, the concepts and approaches apply beyond this setting. This report: (1) describes a conceptual framework that provides a model for the inclusion of vulnerable populations into integrated health care and public health preparedness; and (2) applies this model to a pilot study. The framework is derived from literature, hospital regulatory policy, and health care standards, laying out the communication and relational interfaces that must occur at the systems, organizational, and community levels for a successful multi-level health care systems response that is inclusive of diverse populations explicitly. The pilot study illustrates the application of key elements of the framework, using a four-pronged approach that incorporates both quantitative and qualitative methods for deriving information that can inform hospital and health facility preparedness planning. The conceptual framework and model, applied to a pilot project, guide expanded work that ultimately can result in methodologically robust approaches to comprehensively incorporating vulnerable populations into the fabric of hospital disaster preparedness at levels from local to national, thus supporting best practices for a community resilience approach to disaster preparedness.

  16. Normalising advance care planning in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Rajakaruna, Nalaka; Shah, Darshan; Miller, Leyton; Reymond, Elizabeth; Daly, Michael

    2015-11-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop, implement and explore the effects of a program in advance care planning (ACP) within a tertiary hospital general medicine service.Methods Before-after exploratory mixed-methods analysis was conducted of an ACP program comprising seven components designed to overcome well-documented barriers to ACP in clinical practice. The results of pre-ACP program audits performed in June 2014 were compared with those of post-ACP audits performed over 5 months from July to November 2014. The main outcome measure was the number of advance care plans completed in patients considered eligible for ACP based on a life expectancy of 12 months or less as assessed by two prognostication instruments. Questionnaire surveys ascertained staff perceptions of ACP and the usefulness of training and resources in ACP.Results Pre-ACP program analysis of 166 consecutive patients deemed eligible for ACP revealed that only 1% had a documented advance care plan. Following ACP implementation, 115 of 215 (53%) potentially eligible patients were considered able to participate in ACP discussions and were approached to do so before discharge, of whom 89 (77.4%) completed an advance care plan, whereas 26 (23.6%) declined. This equated to an overall completion rate for all potentially eligible patients of 41% compared to 1% pre-ACP (P < 0.001). Major barriers to ACP perceived by at least 30% of questionnaire respondents included the reluctance of patients and family to discuss ACP, insufficient time to initiate or complete ACP, patient and/or family factors that rendered ACP impractical, inadequate communication skills around end-of-life issues, confusion about who was primarily responsible for conducting ACP and difficulty using ACP documentation forms. Enabling factors included dedicated ACP workshops, facilitator and resource packages for staff, and ACP brochures for patients and family.Conclusion A multifaceted ACP program in a general medicine

  17. Pediatric hospital medicine: a strategic planning roundtable to chart the future.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A; Lye, Patricia S; Carlson, Douglas; Daru, Jennifer A; Narang, Steve; Srivastava, Rajendu; Melzer, Sanford; Conway, Patrick H

    2012-04-01

    Given the growing field of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) and the need to define strategic direction, the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association sponsored a roundtable to discuss the future of the field. Twenty-one leaders were invited plus a facilitator utilizing established health care strategic planning methods. A "vision statement" was developed. Specific initiatives in 4 domains (clinical practice, quality of care, research, and workforce) were identified that would advance PHM with a plan to complete each initiative. Review of the current issues demonstrated gaps between the current state of affairs and the full vision of the potential impact of PHM. Clinical initiatives were to develop an educational plan supporting the PHM Core Competencies and a clinical practice monitoring dashboard template. Quality initiatives included an environmental assessment of PHM participation on key committees, societies, and agencies to ensure appropriate PHM representation. Three QI collaboratives are underway. A Research Leadership Task Force was created and the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network was refocused, defining a strategic framework for PRIS, and developing a funding strategy. Workforce initiatives were to develop a descriptive statement that can be used by any PHM physician, a communications tool describing "value added" of PHM; and a tool to assess career satisfaction among PHM physicians. We believe the Roundtable was successful in describing the current state of PHM and laying a course for the near future.

  18. Benefits plans focus on flexibility. Hospitals increase choices for employees as emphasis moves from recruitment to retention.

    PubMed

    Berg, E

    1991-09-23

    As hospitals turn their attention from employee recruitment to employee retention, flexible benefits plans are becoming increasingly popular as a means of meeting workers' preference for choice when it comes to issues such as healthcare coverage, insurance and vacation days. At the same time, such programs can help hospitals hold down their long-term costs.

  19. A Community-Based Continuing Care Program for the Elderly Disabled. An Evaluation of Planned Intermittent Hospital Readmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Duncan; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing flexible community-supporting services integrated with a hospital-based program of planned intermittent relief of the patients' supporters, patients (N=50) were maintained in the community at an average cost of 79.5 hospital bed days per patient per annum. The Continuing Care Program is an alternative to institutionalization. (Author)

  20. Technical and organisational aspects in enterprise resource planning systems implementation: lessons from a Spanish public hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Escobar-Pérez, Bernabe; Monge-Lozano, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Public resources should always be managed efficiently, more so in times of crisis. Due to the specific characteristics of the healthcare sector, there is a need for special attention, especially in regards to hospitals. Administrators need useful tools to be able to efficiently manage available resources, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Therefore, an analysis of the effects of their implementation and use in hospitals is valuable. This study has two purposes. One is to analyse the role ERP systems play in aiding the integration of hospital data, with focus on user satisfaction as well as possible resistance to change. The other purpose is to analyse the effects of implanting and using ERP systems in the hospital environment and identifying how certain variables influence the process, especially the existence of different organisational cultures. Results indicate that clinical information has become notably more integrated, despite the lack of flow in the economic-financial area. The heterogeneous nature of the different groups, clinical (Medical, Nursing) and non-clinical (Economic-Financial, Accounting), had a negative influence on the implementation process, and limited the integration of information as well as the system's performance.

  1. Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  2. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs.

  3. Acceptance of family planning amongst patients attending Dhulikhel hospital obstetrics and gynecology department.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, A; Kayastha, B; Manandhar, S; Chawla, C D

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of contraceptive methods is an important factor for an individual to use or not use of family planning methods. In Nepal, at least one modern method of family planning is universal amongst both men and women. To assess the knowledge, attitude regarding various family planning methods and practice of contraceptives amongst couples attending Dhulikhel Hospital Obstetrics and Gynecology Department. Five hundred and fifteen couples were interviewed. Their knowledge, attitude and practice of contraception were evaluated with the help of pre-evaluated questionnaire. The other variable used were the age of the couple, parity, educational status and economic status having effect on the contraceptive acceptance were taken into consideration. Descriptive analysis was conducted to obtain percentages. We observed that 74.98% of women were in the age group of 20-29 years and 59.22% of men were within the age group of 20-29 years. Teen age mothers were 17.86% and teen age fathers were 1.35%. In our study, we observed that higher the educational level better was the acceptance for family planning methods. The higher income group had less number of children compared to lesser income group. In our study, we noticed that all the couples knew about different methods of family planning, main sources of information were television, pamphlets and healthworkers. Only 16 males had undergone vasectomy and 32 women had undergone tubectomy. Fewer number of vasectomy was due to the belief that undergoing vasectomy will make the male partner weak physically. 13.20% of women preferred Depot medroxy progesterone as a temporary method of family planning, 13% of males preferred condom as a temporary method of family planning. We conclude that education plays a vital role in the acceptance of family planning. As couples who have higher education level tend to have higher income and they have lesser number of children. They are more receptive towards counseling and agree upon the various

  4. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  5. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan... revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  6. What's the Plan? Needing Assistance with Plan of Care Is Associated with In-Hospital Death for ICU Patients Referred for Palliative Care Consultation.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Ayano; Bell, Christina L; Masaki, Kamal; Fischberg, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    To inform earlier identification of intensive care unit (ICU) patients needing palliative care, we examined factors associated with in-hospital death among ICU patients (N=260) receiving palliative care consultations at a 542-bed tertiary care hospital (2005-2009). High pre-consultation length of stay (LOS, ≥7 days) (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=5.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.5-9.9, P<.01) and consultations for assistance with plan of care (aOR=11.6, 95% CI=5.6-23.9, P<.01) were independently associated with in-hospital death. Patients with both consultation for plan of care and high pre-consult LOS had the highest odds of in-hospital death (aOR=36.3, 95% CI=14.9-88.5, P<.001), followed by patients with consultation for plan of care and shorter pre-consult LOS (aOR=9.8, 95% CI=4.3-22.1, P<.001), and patients with long pre-consult LOS but no consultation for plan of care (aOR=4.7, 95% CI=1.8-12.4, P=.002). Our findings suggest that ICU patients who require assistance with plan of care need to be identified early to optimize end-of-life care and avoid in-hospital death.

  7. A Trend Analysis of Succession Planning in Health Care as Perceived by Chief Executive Officers in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard; Lieneck, Cristian; Watts, Sandra

    A study was conducted to analyze the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding leadership development and succession planning. Results of the study were compared to identical surveys delivered in previous years for the purposes of identifying possible trends and changing perspectives related to how executives use succession planning in their facilities, what factors influence the identification of successors, what positions are the more likely to use succession planning efforts, and who specifically should be responsible for building the leadership pipeline.

  8. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, C

    1982-03-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters.

  9. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, C.

    1982-03-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters.

  10. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, C

    1982-01-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters. PMID:7058968

  11. What are the career planning and development practices for nurses in hospitals? Is there a difference between private and public hospitals?

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Betul; Yildirim, Aytolan

    2009-12-01

    The aim was to determine the opinions of nurse managers about career planning and development for nurses in hospitals. Career planning and development are defined as an important and necessary tool in the development of nurses as professionals and in retaining nurses in a facility. A descriptive survey. The research population comprised nurse managers in 200+ bed hospitals on the European side of Istanbul province (n = 668). The entire population was targeted and 373 nurse managers were included in the study (55.8% return rate). Data were collected with a 32-item survey form that had three sections to determine the nurse managers' demographic characteristics, the career development practices at the facility where they worked, the nurse managers' responsibilities for career development and their expected competencies and recommendations. The findings of this study suggest that the most common technique used for nurses for career development was education programs, the career development practices of private hospitals were more developed than public hospitals and the nurse managers' perceptions about career development were different according to their management level, age group and educational level (p < 0.05). Although different practices were found in public and private hospitals in Turkey there were no effective career development practices identified and the nurse managers did not have agreement on the subject of career development. Hospitals which provide opportunity for horizontal and vertical promotion and have clear development policies will be successful hospitals which are preferred by high quality nurses. This study draws attention to the importance of career planning in nursing and the need for nurse managers to take an active role in career planning and development.

  12. The new Northwestern Memorial Hospital: planned, constructed, and operated through the patients first philosophy.

    PubMed

    Briggs, P J; Barnard, M C

    2000-05-01

    On May 1, 1999, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, after ten years of planning and construction, opened a 2 million-square-foot replacement hospital and ambulatory care center designed to deliver patient-centered care well into the 21st century. More than 1000 persons, including physicians, patients and families, volunteers, board members, neighborhood residents, and employees, made up the 125 functional user groups that assessed every aspect of the building plan, from structural configuration and space usage to signage and control of infectious disease. Senior management developed guiding assumptions and objectives for the replacement facility: Promote patient convenience and comfort; support staff and improve service/operational efficiencies; eliminate duplication of costly technologies; introduce leading-edge innovations in infection control, information technology, communications, and other areas; and provide flexibility for future technologies and growth. The new building has accomplished its core goals. Patients receive all their medical care without leaving the facility. Inpatient and outpatient services have been separated to provide enhanced privacy, greater comfort, and efficiency for all patients. The $580 million project was completed on time and on budget. The physical move of patients on this date occurred smoothly and quickly, with no patient care or employee safety problems. Most of the unexpected problems were minor and easily rectified. During the first six weeks, key management team members met daily to debrief on new issues identified and old ones resolved, and issued e-mail bulletins to highlight improvements and solicit feedback and other ideas.

  13. Nonprofit to for-profit conversions by hospitals, health insurers, and health plans.

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, J

    1999-01-01

    Conversion of hospitals, health insurers, and health plans from nonprofit to for-profit ownership has become a focus of national debate. The author examines why nonprofit ownership has been dominant in the US health system and assesses the strength of the argument that nonprofits provide community benefits that would be threatened by for-profit conversion. The author concludes that many of the specific community benefits offered by nonprofits, such as care for the poor, could be maintained or replaced by adequate funding of public programs and that quality and fairness in treatment can be better assured through clear standards of care and adequate monitoring systems. As health care becomes increasingly commercialized, the most difficult parts of nonprofits' historic mission to preserve are the community orientation, leadership role, and innovation that nonprofit hospitals and health plans have provided out of their commitment to a community beyond those to whom they sell services. Images p109-a p110-a p115-a p116-a PMID:10199712

  14. [Evaluation of the vital emergency action plan at the Navarre Hospital (Spain)].

    PubMed

    Tirapu, Belén; Rodrigo, Isabel; Gost, Javier; Aranguren, María Isabel; Ezcurra, Paz

    2010-07-01

    Healthcare organizations are placing great emphasis on the care of patients with cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) since interventions based on the scientific evidence can decrease both the mortality rate and sequelae. Nevertheless, there are limited comprehensive assessments covering all the resources and interventions required when a vital emergency arises. To evaluate the effectiveness of the vital emergency action plan at the Navarre Hospital by analyzing a panel of 70 indicators. Structure and process indicators were assessed in 25 clinical units at the Navarre Hospital from April to June 2008. The structure and review process of CPR carts were analyzed, defibrillators were tested and 40 simulations involving 144 professionals were evaluated. Nonconformities were found in 86% of the indicators evaluated. The percentages of compliance in the indicators of structure ranged from 39.6% to 100%. In the evaluation of process, conformity ranged from 2.5% to 100%. The percentages of simulations meeting time standards varied between 17.5% and 45%. In 37.5% of the simulations, at least 50% of trained staff were present in the unit. In 32.3% of the simulations, the standard for the number of people in the unit who participated in the simulations was achieved. This study identified problems in the structure and process of a vital emergency action plan without, at this stage, evaluating patient outcomes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. A biobjective model for the locational planning of hospitals and health centers.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Panagiotis; Mitropoulos, Ioannis; Giannikos, Ioannis; Sissouras, Aris

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new location-allocation structure, in an effort to improve the operational shortcomings of the existing locations of primary health care centers. These shortcomings are mainly caused by the preference of patients to use local hospitals rather than health centers. The method is based on a biobjective mathematical programming model for locating hospitals and primary health care centers. Two objectives are considered: (1) minimization of distance between patients and facilities, (2) equitable distribution of the facilities among citizens. We formulate the model taking into consideration the interdependence of the locations i.e., the general hospitals and health centers. This approach enables us to introduce a new aspect to the location problem, namely public preferences and also to consider the decentralization of the health care system. In order to represent the available information we employ Geographic Information Systems (GIS). We apply this model in the area of Western Greece and then compare our results with the solution originally selected by planners. Demographic data concerning the major and minor population centers of the area were based on the latest census of 2001. The results confirm the necessity of applied scientific approaches for regulating the health care system in order to establish rational strategic planning and ensure the best use of the available resources.

  16. Transfers to hospital in planned home birth in four Nordic countries - a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Blix, Ellen; Kumle, Merethe H; Ingversen, Karen; Huitfeldt, Anette S; Hegaard, Hanne K; Ólafsdóttir, Ólöf Á; Øian, Pål; Lindgren, Helena

    2016-04-01

    Women planning a home birth are transferred to hospital in case of complications or elevated risk for adverse outcomes. The aim of the present study was to describe the indications for transfer to hospital in planned home births, and the proportion of cases in which this occurs. Women in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Iceland who had opted for, and were accepted for, home birth at the onset of labor, were included in the study. Data from 3068 women, 572 nulliparas and 2446 multiparas, were analyzed for proportion of transfers during labor and within 72 h after birth, indications for transfer, how long before or after birth the transfer started, time from birth to start of transfer, duration and mode of transfer, and whether the transfer was classified as potentially urgent. Analyses were stratified for nulliparity and multiparity. One-third (186/572) of the nulliparas were transferred to hospital, 137 (24.0%) during labor and 49 (8.6%) after the birth. Of the multiparas, 195/2446 (8.0%) were transferred, 118 (4.8%) during labor and 77 (3.2%) after birth. The most common indication for transfers during labor was slow progress. In transfers after birth, postpartum hemorrhage, tears and neonatal respiratory problems were the most common indications. A total of 116 of the 3068 women had transfers classified as potentially urgent. One-third of all nulliparous and 8.0% of multiparous women were transferred during labor or within 72 h of the birth. The proportion of potentially urgent transfers was 3.8%. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Improvement of efficiency and safety in hospitals starts in the beginning of the planning phase and influences patient safety, staff, hygiene as well as logistics, and efficiency within the entire hospital.

    PubMed

    Matern, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    To increase patient safety and hospital efficiency a new stepwise planning methodology including an early peer review of the future design is shown in the article as well as innovative training concepts for hospital staff.

  18. A nationwide hospital survey on patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals: setting priorities at the launch of a 5-year patient safety plan.

    PubMed

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Peleman, Hilde; Schrooten, Ward

    2012-09-01

    To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. 90 acute, 42 psychiatric and 11 long-term care hospitals submitted their data for comparison to other hospitals. The benchmark database included 55 225 completed questionnaires (53.7% response rate). Overall dimensional scores were low, although scores were found to be higher for psychiatric and long-term care hospitals than for acute hospitals. The overall perception of patient safety was lower in French-speaking hospitals. Hierarchical clustering of dimensions resulted in two distinct clusters. Cluster I grouped supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety, organisational learning-continuous improvement, teamwork within units and communication openness, while Cluster II included feedback and communication about error, overall perceptions of patient safety, non-punitive response to error, frequency of events reported, teamwork across units, handoffs and transitions, staffing and management support for patient safety. The nationwide safety culture assessment confirms the need for a long-term national initiative to improve patient safety culture and provides each hospital with a baseline patient safety culture profile to direct an intervention plan. The identification of clusters of safety culture dimensions indicates the need for a different approach and context towards the implementation of interventions aimed at improving the safety culture. Certain clusters require unit level improvements, whereas others demand a hospital-wide policy.

  19. Developing a Hospital Disaster Preparedness Plan for Mass Casualty Incidents: Lessons Learned From the Downtown Beirut Bombing.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Mazen; Chami, Ali F; Hitti, Eveline

    2017-09-20

    Mass casualty incidents (MCIs) are becoming more frequent worldwide, especially in the Middle East where violence in Syria has spilled over to many neighboring countries. Lebanon lacks a coordinated prehospital response system to deal with MCIs; therefore, hospital preparedness plans are essential to deal with the surge of casualties. This report describes our experience in dealing with an MCI involving a car bomb in an urban area of downtown Beirut, Lebanon. It uses general response principles to propose a simplified response model for hospitals to use during MCIs. A summary of the debriefings following the event was developed and an analysis was performed with the aim of modifying our hospital's existing disaster preparedness plan. Casualties' arrival to our emergency department (ED), the performance of our hospital staff during the event, communication, and the coordination of resources, in addition to the response of the different departments, were examined. In dealing with MCIs, hospital plans should focus on triage area, patient registration and tracking, communication, resource coordination, essential staff functions, as well as on security issues and crowd control. Hospitals in other countries that lack a coordinated prehospital disaster response system can use the principles described here to improve their hospital's resilience and response to MCIs. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017; page 1 of 7).

  20. Adapting the "managing by walking around" methodology as a leadership strategy to communicate a hospital-wide strategic plan.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Marcie Sara; Stone, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Hospital Center (MHC) in East Harlem, New York, has undergone significant leadership changes within the past few years, and the current leadership team developed a long-term strategic plan for the organization that it wanted to effectively communicate to all hospital staff. The spread of information is a challenge at MHC, as it is in many hospitals, because of the large number of staff working various shifts, and the inability of staff to leave their units at the same time to attend general staff meetings. Because of the recent success of the hospital's Executive WalkRounds Program and Breakthough Program, which embody principles of the leadership strategy Managing By Walking Around (MBWA), the senior leadership team decided to roll out their new strategic plan in a 2-week series of rounds to each unit/department throughout the hospital during each shift. Utilizing this method, 69 percent of MHC staff attended the rounds, and 88.9 percent of management level staff and 64.5 percent of unionized/labor who participated in the hospital's Employee Satisfaction Survey stated that they understood the hospital's new strategic plan. MHC's successful strategy is easily applicable within other similar settings.

  1. Standardised care plans for in hospital stroke care improve documentation of health care assessments.

    PubMed

    Pöder, Ulrika; Dahm, Marie Fogelberg; Karlsson, Nina; Wadensten, Barbro

    2015-10-01

    To compare stroke unit staff members' documentation of care in line with evidence-based guidelines pre- and postimplementation of a multi-professional, evidence-based standardised care plan for stroke care in the electronic health record. Rapid and effective measures for patients with stroke or suspected stroke can limit the extent of damage; it is imperative that patients be observed, assessed and treated in accordance with evidence-based practice in hospital. Quantitative, comparative. Structured retrospective health record reviews were made prior to (n 60) and one and a half years after implementation (n 60) of a multi-professional evidence-based standardised care plan with a quality standard for stroke care in the electronic health record. Significant improvements were found in documentation of assessed vital signs, except for body temperature, Day 1 post compared with preimplementation. Documentation frequency regarding body temperature Day 1 and blood pressure and pulse Day 2 decreased post compared with preimplementation. Improvements were also detected in documented observations of patients' micturition capacity, swallowing capacity and mouth status and the proportion of physiotherapist-documented aid assessments. Observations of blood glucose, mobilisation ability and speech and communication ability were unchanged. An evidence-based standardised care plan in an electronic health record assists staff in improving documentation of health status assessments during the first days after a stroke diagnosis. Use of a standardised care plan seems to have the potential to help staff adhere to evidence-based patient care and, thereby, to increase patient safety. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The 'terrifying' Seattle/Olympia earthquake: a learning experience for area hospitals about disaster plans.

    PubMed

    2001-04-01

    A 6.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the Seattle/Olympia area about an hour before lunchtime on Wednesday, February 28, caused an estimated $2 billion in damage but resulted in only one death. The quake was centered near Washington's state capital, Olympia, about 50 miles from Seattle. Scientists attribute the relatively small amount of damage to the fact that the quake was a deep one centered about 30 miles below the earth's surface. Experts also credit modern building codes, which require new buildings to be quake-resistant, and the retrofitting of older buildings to resist quakes for the lack of damage and casualties (less than 400 injuries). Hospitals in the region escaped serious damage and emergency rooms received relatively few casualties. However, in carrying out disaster plans, security and safety officials uncovered a number of problems that could have had serious impact in another emergency situation.

  3. Thinking ahead. Three hospitals demonstrate that you can plan for the future, even if you can't forsee it.

    PubMed

    Selvam, Ashok

    2002-01-01

    Predicting the future is next to impossible, but that doesn't grant health care administrators a pass at planning for it. How do hospitals build new facilities to anticipate trends that they haven't heard of yet? Here's a look at three hospitals--a rural facility, a new set of operating rooms and a new ED--that are taking the risk.

  4. Hospitalization in older adults: association with multimorbidity, primary health care and private health plan.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Bruno Pereira; Soares, Mariangela Uhlmann; Wachs, Louriele Soares; Volz, Pâmela Moraes; Saes, Mirelle de Oliveira; Duro, Suele Manjourany Silva; Thumé, Elaine; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-05-04

    Evaluate the association of multimorbidity, primary health care model and possession of a private health plan with hospitalization. A population-based cross-sectional study with 1,593 elderly individuals (60 years old or older) living in the urban area of the city of Bagé, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The outcome was hospitalization in the year preceding the interview. The multimorbidity was evaluated through two cut-off points (≥ 2 and ≥ 3). The primary health care model was defined by residence in areas covered by traditional care or by Family Health Strategy. The older adults mentioned the possession of a private health plan. We performed a gross and adjusted analysis by Poisson regression using a hierarchical model. The adjustment included demographic, socioeconomic, functional capacity disability and health services variables. The occurrence of overall and non-surgical hospitalization was 17.7% (95%CI 15.8-19.6) and 10.6% (95%CI 9.1-12.1), respectively. Older adults with multimorbidity were admitted to hospitals more often when to older adults without multimorbidity, regardless of the exhibition' form of operation. Having a private health plan increased the hospitalization by 1.71 (95%CI 1.09-2.69) times among residents in the areas of the Family Health Strategy when compared to elderly residents in traditional areas without a private health plan. The multimorbidity increased the occurrence of hospitalizations, especially non-surgical ones. Hospitalization was more frequent in older adults with private health plan and those living in Family Health Strategy areas, regardless of the presence of multiple diseases. Avaliar a associação da multimorbidade, modelo de atenção básica e posse de plano de saúde com hospitalização. Estudo transversal de base populacional com 1.593 idosos (60 anos ou mais) residentes na zona urbana do município de Bagé, Rio Grande do Sul. O desfecho foi a hospitalização no ano anterior à entrevista. A

  5. [Analysis of the educational requirements and planning in a large public hospital].

    PubMed

    Degan, Mario; Bragato, Laura; Duminuco, Leonardo; Bagno, Carla; Genova, Valeria; Sansoni, Julita

    2007-01-01

    The educational needs in a large hospital in the Venice region were analysed in order to plan continuing education programs for 2005-2006. The reference model was the analysis of the educational waiting lists in both operative and managerial professions. Two identical questionnaires were used: the first was distributed to all the professional staff of the hospital with university qualifications and asked them to give their opinion regarding educational priorities. The second was given to staff with managerial roles, asking them to indicate the educational priorities for the staff under their direction. Analysis of the data collected focused on : the priority given to the various areas and topics of education; differences of opinion identified between the various working environments between professional groups and between staff/managers; influence of social and personal factors on the opinions expressed. The fact that the fields of interest indicated varied according to the role and working activities of staff involved, indicate the need to offer educational procedures tailored to the requirements of each group.

  6. Outcomes of a hospital-wide plan to improve care of comatose survivors of cardiac arrest

    PubMed Central

    Rittenberger, Jon. C.; Guyette, Francis X.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; DeVita, Michael A.; Alvarez, Rene J.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) improves outcomes in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Few hospitals have protocol-driven plans that include TH. We implemented a series of process interventions designed to increase TH use and improve outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) or in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA). Methods and Results Linked interventions including a TH order sheet, verbal and written feedback to individual providers, an educational program, TH “kit” and on-call consultants to assist with patient care and hypothermia induction were implemented between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2007 in a large, university-affiliated, tertiary care center. We then completed a retrospective review of all patients treated for cardiac arrest during the study period. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared analyses, or Fisher’s exact test were used as appropriate. A p value <0.05 was considered significant. 135 OHCA patients and 106 IHCA patients were eligible for post-arrest care. TH use increased each year in the OHCA group (from 6% to 65% to 76%; p<0.001) and IHCA group (from 0% to 36% to 53%; p=.02). A good outcome was achieved in 21% and 8% of comatose patients with OHCA and IHCA, respectively. Patients with OHCA and ventricular dysrhythmia were more likely to have a good outcome with TH treatment than without it (good outcome in 57% vs. 8%; p=.005). Conclusion Implementing a series of aggressive interventions increased appropriate TH use and was associated with improved outcomes in our facility. PMID:18951113

  7. Cost and Predictors of Hospitalizations for Ambulatory Care - Sensitive Conditions Among Medicaid Enrollees in Comprehensive Managed Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Chumbler, Neale R.; Yang, Kai; Saigal, Romesh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Preventable hospitalizations are responsible for increasing the cost of health care and reflect ineffectiveness of the health services in the primary care setting. The objective of this study was to assess expenditure for hospitalizations and utilize expenditure differentials to determine factors associated with ambulatory care - sensitive conditions (ACSCs) hospitalizations. Methods: A cross-sectional study of hospitalizations among Medicaid enrollees in comprehensive managed care plans in 2009 was conducted. A total of 25 581 patients were included in the analysis. Expenditures on hospitalizations were examined at the 50th, 75th, 90th, and 95th expenditure percentiles both at the bivariate level and in the logistic regression model to determine the impact of differing expenditure on ACSC hospitalizations. Results: Compared with patients without ACSC admissions, a larger proportion of patients with ACSC hospitalizations required advanced treatment or died on admission. Overall mean expenditures were higher for the ACSC group than for non-ACSC group (US$18 070 vs US$14 452). Whites and blacks had higher expenditures for ACSC hospitalization than Hispanics at all expenditure percentiles. Patient’s age remained a consistent predictor of ACSC hospitalization across all expenditure percentiles. Patients with ACSC were less likely to have a procedure on admission; however, the likelihood decreased as expenditure percentiles increased. At the median expenditure, blacks and Hispanics were more likely than other race/ethnic groups to have ACSC hospitalizations (odds ratio [OR]: 1.307, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.013-1.686 and OR 1.252, 95% CI: 1.060-1.479, respectively). Conclusion: Future review of delivery and monitoring of services at the primary care setting should include managed care plans in order to enhance access and overall quality of care for optimal utilization of the resources. PMID:28462282

  8. Pre-implementation studies of a workforce planning tool for nurse staffing and human resource management in university hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Oostveen, Catharina J; Ubbink, Dirk T; Mens, Marian A; Pompe, Edwin A; Vermeulen, Hester

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the reliability, validity and feasibility of the RAFAELA workforce planning system (including the Oulu patient classification system - OPCq), before deciding on implementation in Dutch hospitals. The complexity of care, budgetary restraints and demand for high-quality patient care have ignited the need for transparent hospital workforce planning. Nurses from 12 wards of two university hospitals were trained to test the reliability of the OPCq by investigating the absolute agreement of nursing care intensity (NCI) measurements among nurses. Validity was tested by assessing whether optimal NCI/nurse ratio, as calculated by a regression analysis in RAFAELA, was realistic. System feasibility was investigated through a questionnaire among all nurses involved. Almost 67 000 NCI measurements were performed between December 2013 and June 2014. Agreement using the OPCq varied between 38% and 91%. For only 1 in 12 wards was the optimal NCI area calculated judged as valid. Although the majority of respondents was positive about the applicability and user-friendliness, RAFAELA was not accepted as useful workforce planning system. Nurses' performance using the RAFAELA system did not warrant its implementation. Hospital managers should first focus on enlarging the readiness of nurses regarding the implementation of a workforce planning system. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  10. Framing in policy processes: a case study from hospital planning in the National Health Service in England.

    PubMed

    Jones, Lorelei; Exworthy, Mark

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports from an ethnographic study of hospital planning in England undertaken between 2006 and 2009. We explored how a policy to centralise hospital services was espoused in national policy documents, how this shifted over time and how it was translated in practice. We found that policy texts defined hospital planning as a clinical issue and framed decisions to close hospitals or hospital departments as based on the evidence and necessary to ensure safety. We interpreted this framing as a rhetorical strategy for implementing organisational change in the context of community resistance to service closure and a concomitant policy emphasising the importance of public and patient involvement in planning. Although the persuasive power of the framing was limited, a more insidious form of power was identified in the way the framing disguised the political nature of the issue by defining it as a clinical problem. We conclude by discussing how the clinical rationale constrains public participation in decisions about the delivery and organisation of healthcare and restricts the extent to which alternative courses of action can be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of Educational Hospital Employees’ Satisfaction with the Administration of the Health Reform Plan in Ghazvin, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Soheyla; Oveisi, Sonia; Ghamari, Fatemeh; Etedal, Mahboobeh Ghorban; Rajaee, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Employee satisfaction is considered to be an important component in the promotion of service quality and increased efficiency and effectiveness in the reform plan for a healthcare system. Neglecting this issue could result in a lack of success in achieving the healthcare system’s objectives. The healthcare reform plan is being implemented to achieve the objectives of the healthcare system. Thus, given the key role of hospital employees in implementing the reform plan, the aim of this study was to determine the levels of hospital employees’ satisfaction with their jobs. Methods This was a qualitative study in 2015 that included thematic analysis, and 138 employees of the Kosar, Rajaii, and Ghods Hospitals participated. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, and the data were analyzed using content analysis. Results After analyzing the data collected by interviewing the employees, 132 codes were identified. The codes were classified into five general concepts including opinions about 1) the reform plan and its administrative barriers, 2) changes in visits, 3) changes in working conditions, 4) changes in salaries and 5) General satisfaction of personnel. Conclusion Increasing workloads, stagnant salaries, and the shortage of personnel were the main factors that reduced the satisfaction of the hospitals’ employees with the administration of the healthcare reform plan. PMID:26767104

  12. Leading quality through the development of a multi-year corporate quality plan: sharing The Ottawa Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Linda; Myles, Joanne; Worthington, James R; Lebrun, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the background and process for developing a multi-year corporate quality plan. The Ottawa Hospital's goal is to be a top 10% performer in quality and patient safety in North America. In order to create long-term measurable and sustainable changes in the quality of patient care, The Ottawa Hospital embarked on the development of a three-year strategic corporate quality plan. This was accomplished by engaging the organization at all levels and defining quality frameworks, aligning with internal and external expectations, prioritizing strategic goals, articulating performance measurements and reporting to stakeholders while maintaining a transparent communication process. The plan was developed through an iterative process that engaged a broad base of health professionals, physicians, support staff, administration and senior management. A literature review of quality frameworks was undertaken, a Quality Plan Working Group was established, 25 key stakeholder interviews were conducted and 48 clinical and support staff consultations were held. The intent was to gather information on current quality initiatives and challenges encountered and to prioritize corporate goals and then create the quality plan. Goals were created and then prioritized through an affinity exercise. Action plans were developed for each goal and included objectives, tasks and activities, performance measures (structure, process and outcome), accountabilities and timelines. This collaborative methodology resulted in the development of a three-year quality plan. Six corporate goals were outlined by the tenets of the quality framework for The Ottawa Hospital: access to care, appropriate care (effective and efficient), safe care and satisfaction with care. Each of the six corporate goals identified objectives and supporting action plans with accountabilities outlining what would be accomplished in years one, two and three. The three-year quality plan was approved by senior

  13. Planning and development of the Better Bites program: a pricing manipulation strategy to improve healthy eating in a hospital cafeteria.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Mina L; Patsch, Amy J; Smith, Jennifer Howard; Behrens, Timothy K; Charles, Tami; Bailey, Taryn R

    2013-07-01

    The Better Bites program, a hospital cafeteria nutrition intervention strategy, was developed by combining evidence-based practices with hospital-specific formative research, including key informant interviews, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants, hospital employee surveys, and nutrition services staff surveys. The primary program components are pricing manipulation and marketing to promote delicious, affordable, and healthy foods to hospital employees and other cafeteria patrons. The pricing manipulation component includes decreasing the price of the healthy items and increasing the price of the unhealthy items using a 35% price differential. Point-of-purchase marketing highlights taste, cost, and health benefits of the healthy items. The program aims to increase purchases of healthy foods and decrease purchases of unhealthy foods, while maintaining revenue neutrality. This article addresses the formative research, planning, and development that informed the Better Bites program.

  14. Disaster planning: the past, present, and future concepts and principles of managing a surge of burn injured patients for those involved in hospital facility planning and preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Holmes, James H; Alson, Roy L; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The 9/11 attacks reframed the narrative regarding disaster medicine. Bypass strategies have been replaced with absorption strategies and are more specifically described as "surge capacity." In the succeeding years, a consensus has coalesced around stratifying the surge capacity into three distinct tiers: conventional, contingency, and crisis surge capacities. For the purpose of this work, these three distinct tiers were adapted specifically to burn surge for disaster planning activities at hospitals where burn centers are not located. A review was conducted involving published plans, other related academic works, and findings from actual disasters as well as modeling. The aim was to create burn-specific definitions for surge capacity for hospitals where a burn center is not located. The three-tier consensus description of surge capacity is delineated in their respective stratifications by what will hereinafter be referred to as the three "S's"; staff, space, and supplies (also referred to as supplies, pharmaceuticals, and equipment). This effort also included the creation of a checklist for nonburn center hospitals to assist in their development of a burn surge plan. Patients with serious burn injuries should always be moved to and managed at burn centers, but during a medical disaster with significant numbers of burn injured patients, there may be impediments to meeting this goal. It may be necessary for burn injured patients to remain for hours in an outlying hospital until being moved to a burn center. This work was aimed at aiding local and regional hospitals in developing an extemporizing measure until their burn injured patients can be moved to and managed at a burn center(s).

  15. How to plan workflow changes: a practical quality improvement tool used in an outpatient hospital pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Christine; Chau, Connie; Giridharan, Neha; Huh, Youchin; Cooley, Janet; Warholak, Terri L

    2013-06-01

    A quality improvement tool is provided to improve pharmacy workflow with the goal of minimizing errors caused by workflow issues. This study involved workflow evaluation and reorganization, and staff opinions of these proposed changes. The study pharmacy was an outpatient pharmacy in the Tucson area. However, the quality improvement tool may be applied in all pharmacy settings, including but not limited to community, hospital, and independent pharmacies. This tool can help the user to identify potential workflow problem spots, such as high-traffic areas through the creation of current and proposed workflow diagrams. Creating a visual representation can help the user to identify problem spots and to propose changes to optimize workflow. It may also be helpful to assess employees' opinions of these changes. The workflow improvement tool can be used to assess where improvements are needed in a pharmacy's floor plan and workflow. Suggestions for improvements in the study pharmacy included increasing the number of verification points and decreasing high traffic areas in the workflow. The employees of the study pharmacy felt that the proposed changes displayed greater continuity, sufficiency, accessibility, and space within the pharmacy.

  16. Intentions of hospital nurses to work with computers: based on the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Snunith; Gonen, Ayala

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses' attitudes related to intent to use computers in the hospital setting as a predictor of their future behavior. The study was further aimed at identifying the relationship between these attitudes and selected sociological, professional, and personal factors and to describe a research model integrating these various factors. The study was based on the theory of planned behavior. A random sample of 411 registered nurses was selected from a single large medical center in Israel. The study tool was a Likert-style questionnaire. Nine different indices were used: (1) behavioral intention toward computer use; (2) general attitudes toward computer use; (3) nursing attitudes toward computer use; (4) threat involved in computer use; (5) challenge involved in computer use; (6) organizational climate; (7) departmental climate; (8) attraction to technological innovations/innovativeness; (9) self-efficacy, ability to control behavior. Strong significant positive correlations were found between the nurses' attitudes (general attitudes and nursing attitudes), self-efficacy, innovativeness, and intentions to use computers. Higher correlations were found between departmental climate and attitudes than between organizational climate and attitudes. The threat and challenge that are involved in computer use were shown as important mediating variables to the understanding of the process of predicting attitudes and intentions toward using computers.

  17. Improving quality and outcomes of stroke care in hospitals: Protocol and statistical analysis plan for the Stroke123 implementation study.

    PubMed

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Kilkenny, Monique F; Hill, Kelvin; Grabsch, Brenda; Lannin, Natasha A; Thrift, Amanda G; Anderson, Craig S; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Middleton, Sandy; Grimley, Rohan

    2017-01-01

    Rationale The effectiveness of clinician-focused interventions to improve stroke care is uncertain. Aims To determine whether an organizational intervention can improve the quality of stroke care over usual care. Sample size estimates To detect an absolute 10% difference in overall performance (composite outcome), a minimum of 21 hospitals and 843 patients per group was determined. Methods and design Before and after controlled design in hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Intervention Externally facilitated program (StrokeLink) using outreach workshops incorporating clinical performance feedback, patient outcomes (survival, quality of life at 90-180 days), local barrier assessments to best practice care, action planning, and ongoing support. Descriptive and multivariable analyses adjusted for patient correlations by hospital (intention-to-treat method). Context Concurrent implementation of financial incentives to increase stroke unit access and use of the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry for performance monitoring. Study outcome(s) Primary outcome: net change in composite score (i.e. total number of process indicators achieved divided by the sum of eligible indicators for each cohort). change in individual indicators, change in composite score comparing hospitals that did or did not develop action plans (per-protocol analysis), impact on 90-180-day health outcomes. Sensitivity analyses: hospital self-rated status, alternate cross-sectional audit data (Stroke Foundation). To account for temporal effects, comparison of Queensland hospital performance relative to other Australian hospitals will also be undertaken. Discussion Twenty-one hospitals were recruited; however, one was unable to participate within the study time frame. Workshops were held between 11 March 2014 and 7 November 2014. Data are ready for analysis.

  18. Betting big on doc ownership. 'Boutique' chain blasts off with $1 billion investment, plans for 10 hospitals, and hopes to create healthcare model of the future.

    PubMed

    Zigmond, Jessica

    2006-12-11

    A new "boutique" chain is roaring out the gate with $1 billion to spend and plans for 10 hospitals. University General Hospital Systems, which aspires to offer the feel of a luxury hotel in its facilities, is wading into the thick of some of the most controversial issues in healthcare. All but one of its hospitals are planned for states without CON laws, according to W.J. "Bill" Burk, left.

  19. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities.

  20. [Design and analysis of the optimization of the hospital exam planning and scheduling model].

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhenzhen; Zeng, Xichuan

    2011-03-01

    Improve the electronic application appointment and scheduling methods in hospital to optimize patients appointment and improve utilization of hospital inspection equipment. Analyze the workflow of existing electronic application and put forward the improvement scheme. Developed a set of efficient appointment scheduling system, thus optimize the workflow of hospital exam. This system not only optimizes the patient's examination time, but also improves the utilization of hospital inspection equipment.

  1. Patient advocacy and advance care planning in the acute hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Seal, Marion

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explain the role of patient advocacy in the Advance Care Planning (ACP-ing) process. Nurses rate prolonging the dying process with inappropriate measures as their most disturbing ethical issue and protecting patients' rights to be of great concern (Johnston et al 2002). Paradoxically ethical codes assume nurses have the autonomy to uphold patients' health-care choices. Advance Directives (AD) designed to improve end-of-life care are poorly taken up and acute hospitals are generally not geared for the few they receive. The Respecting Patient Choices Program (RPCP) improves AD utilisation through providing a supportive framework for ACP-ing and primarily equipping nurses as RPC consultants. Assisting patients with this process requires attributes consistent with patient advocacy arising out of nursing's most basic tenet, the care of others. Likert Scales survey administered pre and six months post-intervention to pilot and control groups, with coinciding focus groups. Selected wards in an acute care public hospital in South Australia. Nurses on the palliative care, respiratory, renal and colo-rectal pilot wards and the haem-oncology, coronary care, cardiology and neurology/geriatric control wards. The RPCP during the 2004-2005 South Australian pilot of the (RPCP). The organisational endorsement of ACP-ing gave nurses the autonomy to be patient advocates with respect to end-of-life care, reconciling clinical practice to their code of ethics and easing distress about prolonging the dying process inappropriately. Statistically significant survey results in the post-intervention group showed nurses experienced: encouragement to ensure patients could make informed choices about their end-of-life treatment (84%); the ability to uphold these wishes in practice (73%); and job satisfaction from delivering appropriate end-of-life care (67%); compared to approximately half (42-55%) of respondents in the pre-intervention and control groups. Focus

  2. [The functional planning of a enteral nutrition unit for home care at a hospital in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Salomon, Ana Lúcia; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita

    2013-11-01

    Introducción: Con el objeto de garantizar la calidad del producto ofrecido a los clientes en sus domicilios, las unidades hospitalarias necesitan adecuar sus áreas físicas para poder desarrollar todas las actividades especializadas que conlleva la nutrición enteral. Objetivo: Proporcionar una planificación funcional y las herramientas para la reorganización del espacio físico de una unidad de nutrición enteral, describiendo el proceso de preparación, la descripción de sus características y funciones laborales. Métodos. Estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y documental, proporcionando las herramientas para la planificación funcional y de gestión de calidad en una unidad de preparación de la nutrición enteral en un hospital público del Distrito Federal, Brasil. Los datos fueron recolectados en el período comprendido entre los años 2000 y 2010. Resultados. A través de la creación de un programa de nutrición enteral en el Departamento de Salud Pública del Distrito Federal y según lo dispuesto por la legislación nacional, se efectuó un plan de alta complejidad respecto de la nutrición enteral en atención al perfil demográfico y epidemiológico de la población. Este trabajo consiste en una propuesta de implementación de terapia nutricional dentro de un plan de alta complejidad, y de acuerdo a lo prescrito por la legislación del Ministerio de Salud Brasileño. El número de pacientes atendidos por esta modalidad terapéutica se ha ido incrementando, por consiguiente se hace necesario garantizar la calidad del servicio, por medio de la organización de los espacios funcionales. Conclusión. Por medio de la planificación funcional de un Laboratorio de Nutrición Enteral, se puede garantizar la asistencia nutricional especializada y de calidad, a la población hospitalaria o domiciliaria, tomando las precauciones necesarias en la manipulación de las fórmulas enterales.

  3. Planning and Implementing a Disaster Recovery Capability for a Mainframe-Based Hospital Information System: Duke University Medical Center's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J. David; Walker, L. Phillip; Aaron, Walter H.; Whitesell, Judy J.; Stead, William W.

    1988-01-01

    Since October 1986, the Medical Center Information Systems Department at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) has been developing and implementing a plan to provide for the continuation of the functions performed by Duke Hospital's central computing system in the event of a disaster that would disable the central hardware configuration for an extended amount of time. The key characteristic of the plan is that it provides for the full function and performance of the system to be returned to the end users within twenty four hours of the primary system's failure.

  4. Impact of a predefined hospital mass casualty response plan in a limited resource setting with no pre-hospital care system.

    PubMed

    Shah, Adil Aijaz; Rehman, Abdul; Sayyed, Raza Hasnain; Haider, Adil Hussain; Bawa, Amber; Zafar, Syed Nabeel; Zia-Ur-Rehman; Ali, Kamran; Zafar, Hasnain

    2015-01-01

    Pre-hospital triage is an intricate part of any mass casualty response system. However, in settings where no such system exists, it is not known if hospital-based disaster response efforts are beneficial. This study describes in-hospital disaster response management and patient outcomes following a mass casualty event (MCE) involving 200 victims in a lower-middle income country in South Asia. We performed a single-center, retrospective review of bombing victims presenting to a trauma center in the spring of 2013, after a high energy car bomb leveled a residential building. Descriptive analysis was utilized to present demographic variables and physical injuries. A disaster plan was devised based on the canons of North-American trauma care; some adaptations to the local environment were incorporated. Relevant medical and surgical specialties were mobilized to the ED awaiting a massive influx of patients. ED waiting room served as the triage area. Operating rooms, ICU and blood bank were alerted. Seventy patients presented to the ED. Most victims (88%) were brought directly without prehospital triage or resuscitation. Four were pronounced dead on arrival. The mean age of victims was 27 (±14) years with a male preponderance (78%). Penetrating shrapnel injury was the most common mechanism of injury (71%). Most had a systolic blood pressure (SBP) >90 with a mean of 120.3 (±14.8). Mean pulse was 90.2 (±21.6) and most patients had full GCS. Extremities were the most common body region involved (64%) with orthopedics service being consulted most frequently. Surgery was performed on 36 patients, including 4 damage control surgeries. All patients survived. This overwhelming single mass-casualty incident was met with a swift multidisciplinary response. In countries with no prehospital triage system, implementing a pre-existing disaster plan with pre-defined interdisciplinary responsibilities can streamline in-hospital management of casualties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd

  5. [Care for elderly patients in Africa: Analysis of the financial implications of the SESAME plan on the budget of the regional hospital center in Thies, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Faye, A; Diousse, P; Seck, I; Diongue, M; Ndiaye, P; Diagne-Camara, M; Tal-Dia, A; Dia, La

    2010-04-01

    The SESAME plan has been implemented at the Thies Regional Hospital Center (TRHC) for one year. The purpose of this study was to analyze the financial implications of the plan on the hospital budget for the sustainability of care for persons aged 60 and over. This descriptive study included analysis of budget data from October 2006 to September 2007 plus information obtained by interviewing the accountant and head of SESAME plan. The number of patients managed, sources of CHRT funding, grants from various SESAME plan partners, and expenditures for each partner were determined. The weight of the SESAME plan in the CHRT operating budget was determined by calculating the ratio of the overall cost of care for elderly persons in relation to the hospital's revenues and SESAME grants. During the study period, the CHRT received a total of 17375 elderly persons including 89% with no pension or social security. The institute pension scheme (IPRES) covered 21% of the plan as compared to 79% for the state. Utilization plan grants in relation to funding source was 41% for IPRES and 124% for the State. The total cost of services provided to beneficiaries of the SESAME plan exceeded the aggregate amount by 26 083 847 CFA francs. The weight of the SESAME plan in the operating cost of the CHRT was 17%. Prefinancing a plan to cover elderly care in hospitals should be sufficient to prevent deficits from impacting negatively on the operating budget of the hospital.

  6. An Independent Review of the Design Plans for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Engineering, 1-35. Berkeley, California: Author. Barach, P. (2005, December). The Impact of Environmental Design on Patient Falls: Cutting-edge review and...Capital Planning Commission (NCPC) appear likely to have a detrimental impact on the operations of the WRNNMC. 9. The new WRNMMC facility design...locates the dialysis unit above several environmentally -sensitive areas of the hospital. The rationale for this is not obvious. 10. There does not

  7. Fired up to vanquish reform. Conservatives more determined after Florida ruling, but hospitals plan to move forward on implementation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joe

    2011-02-07

    While a federal judge in Florida ignited the latest skirmish over the healthcare law by ruling it unconstitutional, hospitals are still pushing ahead with implementation. "If the law stands, the implementation dates will stand," says Richard Morrison, right, of Adventist Health System's Florida Division. "If you're planning for it to be overturned, but it isn't, you're going to have a hard time in the new environment in 2014".

  8. Assessing the Planning and Implementation Strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS Coding Transition in Alabama Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Shannon H.; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians’ documentation in health records, coders’ process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers’ reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders’ productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS. PMID:23805061

  9. Assessing the planning and implementation strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition in Alabama hospitals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians' documentation in health records, coders' process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers' reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders' productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS.

  10. 78 FR 54766 - Federal Plan Requirements for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    .../Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On or Before December 1, 2008, and Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Correction In...

  11. [The relationship between hospitals and health plans organizations in the scope of ANS Health Insurance Qualification Program].

    PubMed

    Escrivão Junior, Alvaro; Koyama, Marcos Fumio

    2007-01-01

    In Brazilian health insurance sector, the fee-for-service model still remains the major payment method for health services, and predominates in the relationship between hospitals and private health insurance companies. After the creation of Health Insurance Qualification Program (HIQP), which focuses on the quality of the assistance given to consumers, the health insurance companies will be evaluated by health care performance indicators, established by this program. The present study discusses the impact of this pattern on the relationship between health insurance companies and hospitals, by analyzing data from interviews carried through with 18 health insurance managers, regarding the use - in hospital management - of performance indicators compatible to those adopted by HIQP. According to the managers perception, only three hospitals use this sort of indicators, two of them which are hospitals managed by the health insurance companies. The alignment of interests between health plans organizations and health care providers, at the HIQP proposed template, will imply changes in payment models between these market players, towards the inclusion of performance and quality of assistance given to users by providers, as components of wage determination.

  12. A Resource Planning Analysis of District Hospital Surgical Services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Sion, Melanie; Rajan, Dheepa; Kalambay, Hyppolite; Lokonga, Jean-Pierre; Bulakali, Joseph; Mossoko, Mathias; Kwete, Dieudonne; Schmets, Gerard; Kelley, Edward; Elongo, Tarcisse; Sambo, Luis; Cherian, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The impact of surgical conditions on global health, particularly on vulnerable populations, is gaining recognition. However, only 3.5% of the 234.2 million cases per year of major surgery are performed in countries where the world's poorest third reside, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Methods: Data on the availability of anesthesia and surgical services were gathered from 12 DRC district hospitals using the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Situation Analysis Tool. We complemented these data with an analysis of the costs of surgical services in a Congolese norms-based district hospital as well as in 2 of the 12 hospitals in which we conducted the situational analysis (Demba and Kabare District Hospitals). For the cost analysis, we used WHO's integrated Healthcare Technology Package tool. Results: Of the 32 surgical interventions surveyed, only 2 of the 12 hospitals provided all essential services. The deficits in procedures varied from no deficits to 17 services that could not be provided, with an average of 7 essential procedures unavailable. Many of the hospitals did not have basic infrastructure such as running water and electricity; 9 of 12 had no or interrupted water and 7 of 12 had no or interrupted electricity. On average, 21% of lifesaving surgical interventions were absent from the facilities, compared with the model normative hospital. According to the normative hospital, all surgical services would cost US$2.17 per inhabitant per year, representing 33.3% of the total patient caseload but only 18.3% of the total district hospital operating budget. At Demba Hospital, the operating budget required for surgical interventions was US$0.08 per inhabitant per year, and at Kabare Hospital, US$0.69 per inhabitant per year. Conclusion: A significant portion of the health problems addressed at Congolese district hospitals is surgical in nature, but there is a current inability to meet

  13. Questions and Answers Regarding the 2009 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emissions Guidelines, and State Plan Process for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 2011 document contains questions and answers on the Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI) regulations. The questions cover topics such as state plan requirements, compliance, applicability, operator training, and more.

  14. European hospital reforms in times of crisis: aligning cost containment needs with plans for structural redesign?

    PubMed

    Clemens, Timo; Michelsen, Kai; Commers, Matt; Garel, Pascal; Dowdeswell, Barrie; Brand, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Hospitals have become a focal point for health care reform strategies in many European countries during the current financial crisis. It has been called for both, short-term reforms to reduce costs and long-term changes to improve the performance in the long run. On the basis of a literature and document analysis this study analyses how EU member states align short-term and long-term pressures for hospital reforms in times of the financial crisis and assesses the EU's influence on the national reform agenda. The results reveal that there has been an emphasis on cost containment measures rather than embarking on structural redesign of the hospital sector and its position within the broader health care system. The EU influences hospital reform efforts through its enhanced economic framework governance which determines key aspects of the financial context for hospitals in some countries. In addition, the EU health policy agenda which increasingly addresses health system questions stimulates the process of structural hospital reforms by knowledge generation, policy advice and financial incentives. We conclude that successful reforms in such a period would arguably need to address both the organisational and financing sides to hospital care. Moreover, critical to structural reform is a widely held acknowledgement of shortfalls in the current system and belief that new models of hospital care can deliver solutions to overcome these deficits. Advancing the structural redesign of the hospital sector while pressured to contain cost in the short-term is not an easy task and only slowly emerging in Europe.

  15. Quality of family planning counseling among women attending prenatal care at a hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Teshome, Abel; Birara, Malede; Rominski, Sarah D

    2017-05-01

    To assess the quality of family planning counseling among women attending a prenatal clinic in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. In a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted between February and April, 2015, at the prenatal care clinic of Saint Paul's Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, pregnant women in their third trimester were interviewed about their experience of family planning counseling. Data were collected via a questionnaire. Logistic regression was used to assess predictors of satisfaction with the counseling service. During the study period, 400 women were interviewed. Only 139 women (34.8%) were counseled about family planning. Among those counseled, 126 (90.6%) decided to use a contraceptive method after delivery and 46 (36.7%) decided to use an injectable contraceptive. Women were more likely to report high satisfaction when their provider asked about their partner's attitude toward contraceptive methods (adjusted odds ratio 6.6; P<0.001), and when asked about their concerns and worries regarding family planning methods (adjusted odds ratio 5.1; P<0.001). Very few women were counseled about contraception during prenatal care. Asking about a partner's attitude toward contraceptives and discussing women's fears or worries about contraceptives should be considered during family planning counseling to improve satisfaction and quality of care. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  16. Hospital planning for acts of terrorism and other public health emergencies involving children.

    PubMed

    Chung, S; Shannon, M

    2005-12-01

    In today's world the increased potential of terrorist attacks places unique burdens and consequences on health care workers. Hospitals and hospital personnel must now be prepared to react immediately to such events. They must also implement, in advance, policies to protect their own health care personnel while providing care to victims. In this review, we discuss the four major forms of mass casualty terrorism (biological, chemical, nuclear, and thermomechanical) including clinical signs and symptoms for each, the impact on health care personnel, and special considerations for children. We will then outline key principles of hospital preparation with regard to paediatrics in anticipation of such emergencies.

  17. What happened to the no-wait hospital? A case study of implementation of operational plans for reduced waits.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Johan; Tolf, Sara; Øvretveit, John; Carlsson, Jan; Brommels, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Both research and practice show that waiting lists are hard to reduce. Implementing complex interventions for reduced waits is an intricate and challenging process that requires special attention for surrounding factors helping and hindering the implementation. This article reports a case study of a hospital implementation of operational plans for reduced waits, with an emphasis on the process of change. A case study research design, theoretically informed by the Pettigrew and Whipp model of strategic change, was applied. Data were gathered from individual and focus group interviews with informants from different organizational levels at different times and from documents and plans. The findings revealed arrangements both helping and hindering the implementation work. Helping factors were the hospital's contemporary savings requirements and experiences from similar change initiatives. Those hindering the actions to plan and agree the changes were unclear support functions and unclear task prioritization. One contribution of this study is to demonstrate the advantages, disadvantages, and challenges of a contextualized case study for increased understanding of factors influencing organizational change implementation. One lesson for current policy is to regard context factors that are critical for successful implementation.

  18. Psychiatrist Health Human Resource Planning - An Essential Component of a Hospital-Based Mental Healthcare System Transformation.

    PubMed

    Jarmain, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) defines health human resource planning as "the process of estimating the number of persons and the kinds of knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to achieve predetermined health targets and ultimately health status objectives" (OHA 2015). Health human resource planning is a critical component of successful organizational and system transformation, and yet little has been written on how to do this for physicians at the local level. This paper will outline a framework for developing and managing key aspects of physician human resource planning related to both the quantity and quality of work within a hospital setting. Using the example of a complex multiphase hospital-based mental health transformation that involved both the reduction and divestment of beds and services, we will outline how we managed the physician human resource aspects to establish the number of psychiatrists needed and the desired attributes of those psychiatrists, and how we helped an existing workforce transition to meet the new expectations. The paper will describe a process for strategically aligning the selection and management of physicians to meet organizational vision and mandate.

  19. Examining the attitudes of hospital pharmacists to reporting medication safety incidents using the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Williams, Steven David; Phipps, Denham L; Ashcroft, Darren

    2015-08-01

    To assess the effect of factors within hospital pharmacists' practice on the likelihood of their reporting a medication safety incident. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) survey. Twenty-one general and teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Two hundred and seventy hospital pharmacists (response rate = 45%). Hospital pharmacists were invited to complete a TPB survey, based on a prescribing error scenario that had resulted in serious patient harm. Multiple regression was used to determine the relative influence of different TPB variables, and participant demographics, on the pharmacists' self-reported intention to report the medication safety incident. The TPB variables predicting intention to report: attitude towards behaviour, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control and descriptive norm. Overall, the hospital pharmacists held strong intentions to report the error, with senior pharmacists being more likely to report. Perceived behavioural control (ease or difficulty of reporting), Descriptive Norms (belief that other pharmacists would report) and Attitudes towards Behaviour (expected benefits of reporting) showed good correlation with, and were statistically significant predictors of, intention to report the error [R = 0.568, R(2) = 0.323, adjusted R(2) = 0.293, P < 0.001]. This study suggests that efforts to improve medication safety incident reporting by hospital pharmacists should focus on their behavioural and control beliefs about the reporting process. This should include instilling greater confidence about the benefits of reporting and not harming professional relationships with doctors, greater clarity about what/not to report and a simpler reporting system. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press in association with the International Society for Quality in Health Care; all rights reserved.

  20. Basewide energy systems plan for Fort Bragg. Womack Army Community Hospital. Energy audit: Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1984-04-01

    The results of the energy engineering analysis performed at Womack Army Community Hospital, located in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, are summarized herein. That work was performed by JRB Associates (JRB) for the Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, under a modification to contract No. DACA21-80-C-0014. The project included a detailed audit of the hospital and energy support facilities, utility meter plan development, and investigation of many energy conservation measures. Emphasis was put on Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCS). Analysis was performed with the assistance of the Building Loads and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) computer program developed by the Army Construction Engineering Research Lab (CERL). Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) documents were developed for recommended measures.

  1. A resource planning analysis of district hospital surgical services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    PubMed

    Sion, Melanie; Rajan, Dheepa; Kalambay, Hyppolite; Lokonga, Jean-Pierre; Bulakali, Joseph; Mossoko, Mathias; Kwete, Dieudonne; Schmets, Gerard; Kelley, Edward; Elongo, Tarcisse; Sambo, Luis; Cherian, Meena

    2015-03-01

    The impact of surgical conditions on global health, particularly on vulnerable populations, is gaining recognition. However, only 3.5% of the 234.2 million cases per year of major surgery are performed in countries where the world's poorest third reside, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Data on the availability of anesthesia and surgical services were gathered from 12 DRC district hospitals using the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Situation Analysis Tool. We complemented these data with an analysis of the costs of surgical services in a Congolese norms-based district hospital as well as in 2 of the 12 hospitals in which we conducted the situational analysis (Demba and Kabare District Hospitals). For the cost analysis, we used WHO's integrated Healthcare Technology Package tool. Of the 32 surgical interventions surveyed, only 2 of the 12 hospitals provided all essential services. The deficits in procedures varied from no deficits to 17 services that could not be provided, with an average of 7 essential procedures unavailable. Many of the hospitals did not have basic infrastructure such as running water and electricity; 9 of 12 had no or interrupted water and 7 of 12 had no or interrupted electricity. On average, 21% of lifesaving surgical interventions were absent from the facilities, compared with the model normative hospital. According to the normative hospital, all surgical services would cost US$2.17 per inhabitant per year, representing 33.3% of the total patient caseload but only 18.3% of the total district hospital operating budget. At Demba Hospital, the operating budget required for surgical interventions was US$0.08 per inhabitant per year, and at Kabare Hospital, US$0.69 per inhabitant per year. A significant portion of the health problems addressed at Congolese district hospitals is surgical in nature, but there is a current inability to meet this surgical need. The deficient services and

  2. Inpatients' awareness of admission reasons and management plans of their clinical conditions at a tertiary hospital in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Mabuza, Langalibalele H; Omole, Olufemi B; Govender, Indiran; Ndimande, John V; Schoeman, Herman S

    2015-03-06

    Inpatient awareness of the reason for their admission and the planned management enhances patient compliance and empowers patients to be resourceful in subsequent consultations. The objective of this study was to determine patients' awareness of their clinical conditions while admitted to an academic hospital. A survey was conducted at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital in Pretoria, from 6 to 17 December 2010, on 264 inpatients drawn from a population of 837 through a systematic sampling method. Data on inpatient awareness were collected using a researcher-administered questionnaire, which was available in English, as well as isiZulu and Setswana. Components of patients' global awareness were clinical diagnosis, necessity for admission, planned management, possible condition cause(s), duration of admission, and planned investigations, operations and procedures. We conducted regression analysis on possible predictors of global awareness: age, marital status, occupation and educational level. The SAS (Release 9.2) was used for data analysis. One hundred and thirty-six inpatients (51.5%) had global awareness of their clinical conditions and management plans. High degrees of awareness were reported on clinical diagnosis 206 (78.0%), reason for admission 203 (76.9%), planned management 206 (78.0%), and current medication 222 (84.1%). Fifty (18.9%) respondents were aware of their estimated admission duration. Patients who were informed of admission duration were likely to be informed of their planned management (p < 0.01). When health care practitioners did not volunteer information, most respondents (>69%) did not seek information. When information was provided, the majority of respondents (>70%) reported understanding the information. The proportion of patients who acknowledged the shared responsibility by the health care practitioner and the patient to raise awareness among the inpatients was significantly more than those who did not (p = 0.03). Patients' age

  3. A Computer-Based Surveillance System to Support Discharge Planning: An Implementation within a Hospital Information System

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, A.G.; Young, A.J.; Stephens, R.K.; Shinn, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an innovation designed to improve discharge planning and, potentially, reduce the length of inpatient stays. Unlike other approaches, this one has been implemented within a Hospital Information System. The rationale is that reports integrating clinical and non-clinical data gathered upon admission can enable the Social Work Manager to assign staff more effectively, i.e., to the most difficult cases, and can enable staff to perform discharge planning more effectively, i.e., more pro-actively. The paper reviews the use of computers in social work and provides a critique, not of the models proposed, but of the implementations attempted to date. We contend that our approach will prove more successful than those other implementations because ours is based on an integrated and almost totally-electronic medical record keeping system, encompassing observations by both clinical and non-clinical staff.

  4. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs.

  5. Ketogenic Diet for Children with Epilepsy: A Practical Meal Plan in a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A ketogenic diet (KD) is a dietary approach to treat intractable epilepsy. The KD begins with hospitalization and the child and their parents can adapt to the KD for 1-2 weeks. Recently, various type of dietary intervention such as the modified Atkins diet (MAD) and the low glycemic index treatment (LGIT) have been performed. Since 2010, we carried out the KD, MAD, and LGIT for total of 802 patients; 489 patients (61%) for the KD, 147 patients (18.3%) with the MAD, and 166 patients (20.7%) for the LGIT. In this report, application of these dietary practices in Severance Hospital is shared. PMID:26839878

  6. Does implementing a development plan for user participation in a mental hospital change patients' experience? A non-randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rise, Marit B; Steinsbekk, Aslak

    2015-10-01

    Governments in several countries attempt to strengthen user participation through instructing health-care organizations to implement user participation initiatives. There is, however, little knowledge on the effect on patients' experience from comprehensive plans for enhancing user participation in whole health service organizations. To investigate whether implementing a development plan intending to enhance user participation in a mental hospital had any effect on the patients' experience of user participation. A non-randomized controlled study including patients in three mental hospitals in Central Norway, one intervention hospital and two control hospitals. A development plan intended to enhance user participation was implemented in the intervention hospital as a part of a larger reorganizational process. The plan included establishment of a patient education centre and a user office, purchase of user expertise, appointment of contact professionals for next of kin and improvement of the centre's information and the professional culture. Perceptions of Care, Inpatient Treatment Alliance Scale and questions made for this study. A total of 1651 patients participated. Implementing a development plan in a mental hospital intending to enhance user participation had no significant effect on the patients' experience of user participation. The lack of effect can be due to inappropriate initiatives or challenges in implementation processes. Further research should ensure that initiatives and implementation processes are appropriate to impact the patients' experience. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Participatory Design and Development of a Patient-centered Toolkit to Engage Hospitalized Patients and Care Partners in their Plan of Care.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Stade, Diana; Chang, Frank; Dalal, Anuj; Getty, George; Kandala, Ravali; Lee, Jaeho; Lehman, Lisa; Leone, Kathleen; Massaro, Anthony F; Milone, Marsha; McNally, Kelly; Ohashi, Kumiko; Robbins, Katherine; Bates, David W; Collins, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Patient engagement has been identified as a key strategy for improving patient outcomes. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of a web-based patient centered toolkit (PCTK) prototype to improve access to health information and to engage hospitalized patients and caregivers in the plan of care. Individual and group interviews were used to identify plan of care functional and workflow requirements and user interface design enhancements. Qualitative methods within a participatory design approach supported the development of a PCTK prototype that will be implemented on intensive care and oncology units to engage patients and professional care team members developing their plan of care during an acute hospitalization.

  8. Critical Analysis to Framework Quality to HR Plan in Bankstown Hospital by SWOT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khudeir, Hamzeh; Khudeir, DUA'A

    2017-01-01

    This article has recognised the need for fundamental improvements in the HRM department of the Bankstown Hospital. Through the critical analysis and evaluation of internal systems and processes we were able to identify a number of issues as areas where improvement must be facilitated, each with varying degrees of seriousness. The key problem areas…

  9. Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

  10. Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

  11. An objective method for bed capacity planning in a hospital department - a comparison with target ratio methods.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, J M; Six, P; Chaussalet, T; Antonioli, D; Lombrail, P; Le Beux, P

    2007-01-01

    To propose an objective approach in order to determine the number of beds required for a hospital department by considering how recruitment fluctuates over time. To compare this approach with classical bed capacity planning techniques. A simulated data-based evaluation of the impact that the variability in hospital department activity produces upon the performance of methods used for determining the number of beds required. The evaluation criteria included productive efficiency measured by the bed occupancy rate, accessibility measured by the transfer rate of patients due to lack of available beds and a proxy of clinical effectiveness, by the proportion of days during which there is no possibility for unscheduled admission. When the variability of the number of daily patients increases, the Target Occupancy Rate favors productive efficiency at the expense of accessibility and proxy clinical effectiveness. On the contrary, when the variability of the department activity is marginal, the Target Activity Rate penalizes the proxy of clinical effectiveness, and the Target Occupancy Rate underoptimizes productive efficiency. The method we propose led to a superior performance in terms of accessibility and proxy of clinical effectiveness at the expense of productive efficiency. Such a situation is suitable for intensive care units. In the case of other departments, a weighting procedure should be used to improve productive efficiency. This approach could be considered as the first step of a family of methods for quantitative healthcare planning.

  12. Hospital to home: a geriatric educational program on effective discharge planning.

    PubMed

    DeCaporale-Ryan, Lauren N; Cornell, Ann; McCann, Robert M; McCormick, Kevin; Speice, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    There has been increased attention on the needs of the burgeoning older adult population, with focus on the limited education and training experiences available in geriatric care. Older adults transitioning between levels of care often require increased attention, and the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine has encouraged greater training opportunities be provided to better understand the needs of this population. The Hospital to Home Program is one model of geriatric training emphasizing many of the AGS recommendations. Through qualitative analyses of 51 internal medicine residents' reflections, the authors report how this educational program is meeting the above need and share how Hospital to Home is enhancing residents' skills in creating a safe discharge for geriatric patients and their families.

  13. Capacity planning in service operations: the case of hospital outpatient facilities.

    PubMed

    Ittig, P T

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents models that may be used to balance service capacity and demand in situations in which demand is external and, therefore, is not fixed but may fluctuate in response to factors that include the waiting time imposed upon customers. Such situations are common in retailing, financial services, health services, and other service sector industries. An application is shown to a hospital outpatient facility.

  14. Timeliness of outpatient follow-up: an evidence-based approach for planning after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carlos; Shahsahebi, Mohammad; Wedlake, Tiffany; DuBard, C Annette

    2015-03-01

    Timely outpatient follow-up has been promoted as a key strategy to reduce hospital readmissions, though one-half of patients readmitted within 30 days of hospital discharge do not have follow-up before the readmission. Guidance is needed to identify the optimal timing of hospital follow-up for patients with conditions of varying complexity. Using North Carolina Medicaid claims data for hospital-discharged patients from April 2012 through March 2013, we constructed variables indicating whether patients received follow-up visits within successive intervals and whether these patients were readmitted within 30 days. We constructed 7 clinical risk strata based on 3M Clinical Risk Groups (CRGs) and determined expected readmission rates within each CRG. We applied survival modeling to identify groups that appear to benefit from outpatient follow-up within 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days after discharge. The final study sample included 44,473 Medicaid recipients with 65,085 qualifying discharges. The benefit of early follow-up varied according to baseline readmission risk. For example, follow-up within 14 days after discharge was associated with 1.5%-point reduction in readmissions in the lowest risk strata (P <.001) and a 19.1%-point reduction in the highest risk strata (P <.001). Follow-up within 7 days was associated with meaningful reductions in readmission risk for patients with multiple chronic conditions and a greater than 20% baseline risk of readmission, a group that represented 24% of discharged patients. Most patients do not meaningfully benefit from early outpatient follow-up. Transitional care resources would be best allocated toward ensuring that highest risk patients receive follow-up within 7 days. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  15. Graduate Management Project (GMP). Developing a Health Information Plan for Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    Mail ® on the new LAN which was not available on the hospital’s older system. MEDCOM, and most of the medical organizations in the Army were quickly...migrating to CC Mail ® as the primary means of communication of electronic mail (e- mail ) and required that executive staff be connected. Shortly...they could receive the deluge of information being passed along in the new application. Along with the use of CC Mail ®, other upgraded versions of

  16. Are preventable hospitalizations sensitive to changes in access to primary care? The case of the Oregon Health Plan.

    PubMed

    Saha, Somnath; Solotaroff, Rachel; Oster, Ady; Bindman, Andrew B

    2007-08-01

    To examine whether preventable hospitalization (PH) rates are sensitive to the impact of policies aimed at improving access, such as the Oregon Health Plan (OHP), which expanded Medicaid coverage to all adults with incomes under the federal poverty level. We conducted a retrospective, time series analysis of PH rates in Oregon from 1990 to 2000. We calculated hospitalization rates for ambulatory-care sensitive conditions for the Medicaid + uninsured population and compared average annual rates from 1990 to 1993 (pre-OHP implementation) to those from 1995 to 2000 (post-OHP implementation). We compared changes in PH rates over time in the Medicaid + uninsured group to changes in the non-Medicaid insured population. We standardized rates by age and sex and used logistic regression models to compare rates. Contrary to our hypothesis, annual PH rates in the Medicaid + uninsured population increased after the eligibility expansion, from an average of 46.1 to 54.9 per 10,000 persons. This rise was significant compared with the non-Medicaid insured population, who experienced a slight decline in annual PH rates, from 26.9 to 26.1 per 10,000 (P < 0.001, after adjusting for age, sex, and rates of unpreventable hospitalizations). The increase in overall PH rates for the Medicaid + uninsured population can be explained by an increase in PH rates for the newly insured group. Our results suggest that PH rates may vary not only with access to primary care (inversely) but also with access to hospital care (directly). The use of PH rates as a marker of health care access should take into account these dual influences. Limitations in available data may also contribute to perceived variation in PH rates unrelated to health care access.

  17. Developing and testing a discharge planning decision support tool for hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Holland, Diane E; Conlon, Patricia M; Rohlik, Gina M; Gillard, Kris L; Tomlinson, Angie L; Raadt, Dawn M; Finseth, Onalee R; Rhudy, Lori M

    2014-04-01

    To develop and test a decision support tool that identifies patients who would benefit from early consult with discharge planners. A predictive, correlational design was used with parents/guardians of children (1 month to 18 years; N = 197). Data were collected by interviews and record reviews. Expert consensus determined referral to discharge planning. Mean age was 8.7 years; mean length of stay was 7.5 days. Forty percent (n = 79) were identified for early referral. The variable "substantial post-acute care needs" had the strongest association with expert consensus (internally validated AUC = 0.79). Findings from this study provide preliminary evidence for a decision support tool to improve the discharge planning process by reducing individual decision-making variability through systematic matching of patient needs to service delivery. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Emergency Preparedness Plan. DeWitt Army Community Hospital, Fort Belvoir, Virginia,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-31

    Organize patient flow, operating and recovery rooms. (2) Provide a senior surgeon to perform duties as Triage OIC for trauma related mass casualty...critical care pre-op and post-op patient care areas. (2) Be prepared to provide a Triage Team OIC for non- trauma mass casualty situations. (3) In...PREPAREDNESS PLAN MASS CASUALITY MANAGEMENT: CODE YELLOW non-critical admitted patients as necessary, opening beds for trauma patients. (4) On

  19. Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho Gray, Jonathan M.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To describe and review the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning and delivery techniques used for pediatric sarcoma patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The treatment characteristics serve as a baseline for future comparison with developing treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: Since January 2003, we have prospectively treated pediatric and young-adult patients with soft-tissue and bone sarcomas on an institutional Phase II protocol evaluating local control and RT-related treatment effects from external-beam RT (conformal or intensity-modulated RT; 83.4%), low-dose-rate brachytherapy (8.3%), or both (8.3%). Here we describe the treatment dosimetry and delivery parameters of the initial 72 patients (median, 11.6 years; range, 1.4-21.6 years). Results: Cumulative doses from all RT modalities ranged from 41.4 to 70.2 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy). Median D{sub 95} and V{sub 95} of the planning target volume of external-beam RT plans were, respectively, 93.4% of the prescribed dose and 94.6% of the target volume for the primary phase and 97.8% and 99.2% for the cone-down/boost phase. The dose-volume histogram statistics for 27 critical organs varied greatly. The spinal cord in 13 of 36 patients received dose >45 Gy (up to 52 Gy in 1 cc) because of tumor proximity. Conclusions: Planning and delivery of complex multifield external beam RT is feasible in pediatric patients with sarcomas. Improvements on conformity and dose gradients are still desired in many cases with sensitive adjacent critical structures. Long-term follow-up will determine the risk of local failure and the benefit of normal tissue avoidance for this population.

  20. Out-of-hospital death: advance care planning, decedent symptoms, and caregiver burden.

    PubMed

    Tilden, Virginia P; Tolle, Susan W; Drach, Linda L; Perrin, Nancy A

    2004-04-01

    To examine the end-of-life experiences of elderly decedents dying out of the hospital and their family caregivers in a state in which the vast majority of Medicare deaths occur in community settings. Telephone survey of family caregivers 2 to 5 months after decedents' deaths. Statewide (Oregon) random sample of death certificates. One thousand one hundred eighty-nine family caregivers of decedents aged 65 and older who died of natural deaths in community settings between 2000 and 2002. A 69-item telephone questionnaire with single-item indicators and embedded scales that indexed advance directives, use of life-sustaining treatments, hospice enrollment, decedent symptom experience and perceived distress, family financial hardship, out-of-pocket expenses, and caregiver strain. Most decedents had advance directives (78.3%) and were enrolled in hospice (62.4%). Although perceived decedent symptom distress was low overall, certain symptoms (e.g., pain, dyspnea, constipation) were distressing for approximately half of decedents experiencing them. Financial hardship, out-of-pocket expenses, and caregiver strain were frequently reported. American Indian race and younger age were associated with decedent symptom distress. Greater perceived decedent symptom distress, hospice enrollment, more caregiver involvement, and more financial burden were associated with greater caregiver strain. Despite high rates of advance directives and hospice enrollment, perceived symptom distress was high for a subset of decedents, and caregiver strain was common. As location of death increasingly shifts nationwide from hospital to community, unmet decedent and family needs require new clinical skills and healthcare policies.

  1. Nursing personnel planning for rural hospitals in Burdwan District, West Bengal, India, using workload indicators of staffing needs.

    PubMed

    Shivam, Swapnil; Roy, Rabindra Nath; Dasgupta, Samir; Das Bhattacharyya, Krishna; Misra, Raghu Nath; Roy, Sima; Indranil, Saha

    2014-12-01

    Lack of appropriate human resources planning is an important factor in the inefficient use of the public health facilities. Workforce projections can be improved by using objective methods of staffing needs based on the workload and actual work undertaken by workers, a guideline developed by Peter J. Shipp in collaboration with WHO-Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN). A cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate the nursing stuff requirement for the rural hospitals and provide a quantitative description of imbalances, if there is any, in the allocation at the district level during 2011. The average WISN turns out to be 0.35 for entire district, which means only 35% of the required nurses is available or 65% understaffed. So, there is an urgent need for more allocations and deployment of staff so that workload can be tackled and evenly distributed among all nursing personnel.

  2. Planned home versus hospital care for preterm prelabour rupture of the membranes (PPROM) prior to 37 weeks’ gestation

    PubMed Central

    El Senoun, Ghada Abou; Dowswell, Therese; Mousa, Hatem A

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) is associated with increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Women with PPROM have been predominantly managed in hospital. It is possible that selected women could be managed at home after a period of observation. The safety, cost and women’s views about home management have not been established. Objectives To assess the safety, cost and women’s views about planned home versus hospital care for women with PPROM. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (January 2010) and the reference lists of all the identified articles. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing planned home versus hospital management for women with PPROM before 37 weeks’ gestation. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed clinical trials for eligibility for inclusion, risk of bias, and carried out data extraction. Main results We included two trials (116 women) comparing planned home versus hospital management for PPROM. Overall, the number of included women in each trial was too small to allow adequate assessment of pre-specified outcomes. Investigators used strict inclusion criteria and in both studies relatively few of the women presenting with PPROM were eligible for inclusion. Women were monitored for 48 to 72 hours before randomisation. Perinatal mortality was reported in one trial and there was insufficient evidence to determine whether it differed between the two groups (risk ratio (RR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 20.05). There was no evidence of differences between groups for serious neonatal morbidity, chorioamnionitis, gestational age at delivery, birthweight and admission to neonatal intensive care. There was no information on serious maternal morbidity or mortality. There was some evidence that women managed in hospital were more likely to be delivered by caesarean section (RR

  3. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  4. Building the future of healthcare. Part I: wired for success. CIOs find themselves key players in construction planning for the digital hospital of the future (that's already here).

    PubMed

    Hagland, Mark

    2010-05-01

    As information technology advances rapidly, new construction projects are becoming far more complex to successfully plan, with regard to IT. CIOs and their teams must be at the planning table from the outset, working very closely together with facilities executives and other leaders within their organizations, to plan effectively and cost-effectively for new construction projects. As new hospital facilities are built more and more from the start as "digital hospitals," the degree of "fail-safe" technological reliability that must be built into them is rapidly intensifying. CIOs must work closely with their colleagues from all the other stakeholder disciplines to plan for potential changes in patient care delivery, as well as ongoing changes in information technology, years into the future, particularly given the lengths of time the facilities being built now will need to last.

  5. A tabletop exercise to assess a hospital emergency blood management contingency plan in a simulated acute blood shortage.

    PubMed

    Galloway, M J; Jane, G; Sudlow, L; Trattles, J; Watson, J

    2008-10-01

    The objective was to assess both our local plan and the assumptions made in the national guidelines on how laboratories should prepare for an acute shortage of red cells. The Chief Medical Officer's National Blood Transfusion Committee for England and North Wales has issued guidance on how hospitals should prepare contingency plans to deal with a shortage of red cells for transfusion. This study has therefore assessed the practicalities of these proposals together with assessing how well local policies would deal with this situation. A tabletop exercise was carried out in which all requests over a 21-day period were assessed. The restrictions as suggested by the national blood transfusion committee were applied and the impact on the blood stocks during an acute blood shortage was assessed. The results show that application of the national guidelines on the restriction of the use of red cells during an acute blood shortage resulted in all transfusion requests for red cells being met. We also appear to have shown that the assumptions made by the national transfusion team are realistic. Carrying out a tabletop exercise is a useful method to assess local procedures for dealing with an acute reduction in the supply of red cells.

  6. Using IT to improve quality at NewYork-Presybterian Hospital: a requirements-driven strategic planning process.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Gilad J; Boyer, Aurelia; Cole, Curt; Forman, Bruce; Stetson, Peter D; Cooper, Mary

    2006-01-01

    At NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, we are committed to the delivery of high quality care. We have implemented a strategic planning process to determine the information technology initiatives that will best help us improve quality. The process began with the creation of a Clinical Quality and IT Committee. The Committee identified 2 high priority goals that would enable demonstrably high quality care: 1) excellence at data warehousing, and 2) optimal use of automated clinical documentation to capture encounter-related quality and safety data. For each high priority goal, a working group was created to develop specific recommendations. The Data Warehousing subgroup has recommended the implementation of an architecture management process and an improved ability for users to get access to aggregate data. The Structured Documentation subgroup is establishing recommendations for a documentation template creation process. The strategic planning process at times is slow, but assures that the organization is focusing on the information technology activities most likely to lead to improved quality.

  7. Using IT to Improve Quality at NewYork-Presybterian Hospital: A Requirements-Driven Strategic Planning Process

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Gilad J.; Boyer, Aurelia; Cole, Curt; Forman, Bruce; Stetson, Peter D.; Cooper, Mary

    2006-01-01

    At NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, we are committed to the delivery of high quality care. We have implemented a strategic planning process to determine the information technology initiatives that will best help us improve quality. The process began with the creation of a Clinical Quality and IT Committee. The Committee identified 2 high priority goals that would enable demonstrably high quality care: 1) excellence at data warehousing, and 2) optimal use of automated clinical documentation to capture encounter-related quality and safety data. For each high priority goal, a working group was created to develop specific recommendations. The Data Warehousing subgroup has recommended the implementation of an architecture management process and an improved ability for users to get access to aggregate data. The Structured Documentation subgroup is establishing recommendations for a documentation template creation process. The strategic planning process at times is slow, but assures that the organization is focusing on the information technology activities most likely to lead to improved quality. PMID:17238381

  8. Can telemonitoring reduce hospitalization and cost of care? A health plan's experience in managing patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Starr, Alison E; Tomcavage, Janet F; Sciandra, Joann; Salek, Doreen; Griffith, David

    2014-12-01

    Telemonitoring provides a potentially useful tool for disease and case management of those patients who are likely to benefit from frequent and regular monitoring by health care providers. Since 2008, Geisinger Health Plan (GHP) has implemented a telemonitoring program that specifically targets those members with heart failure. This study assesses the impact of this telemonitoring program by examining claims data of those GHP Medicare Advantage plan members who were enrolled in the program, measuring its impact in terms of all-cause hospital admission rates, readmission rates, and total cost of care. The results indicate significant reductions in probability of all-cause admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.77; P<0.01), 30-day and 90-day readmission (OR 0.56, 0.62; P<0.05), and cost of care (11.3%; P<0.05). The estimated return on investment was 3.3. These findings imply that telemonitoring can be an effective add-on tool for managing elderly patients with heart failure.

  9. Community-Engaged Public Health Research to Inform Hospital Campus Planning in a Low Socioeconomic Status Urban Neighborhood.

    PubMed

    Brittin, Jeri; Elijah-Barnwell, Sheila; Nam, Yunwoo; Araz, Ozgur; Friedow, Bethany; Jameton, Andrew; Drummond, Wayne; Huang, Terry T-K

    2015-01-01

    To compare sociodemographic and motivational factors for healthcare use and identify desirable health-promoting resources among groups in a low socioeconomic status (SES) community in Chicago, IL. Disparities in health services and outcomes are well established in low SES urban neighborhoods in the United States and many factors beyond service availability and quality impact community health. Yet there is no clear process for engaging communities in building resources to improve population-level health in such locales. A hospital building project led to a partnership of public health researchers, architects, and planners who conducted community-engaged research. We collected resident data and compared factors for healthcare use and choice and likelihood of engaging new health-promoting services. Neighborhood areas were strongly associated with ethnic groupings, and there were differences between groups in healthcare choice and service needs, such as, proximity to home was more important to Latinos than African Americans in choice of healthcare facility ( p adj = .001). Latinos expressed higher likelihood to use a fitness facility ( p adj = .001). Despite differences in vehicle ownership, >75% of all respondents indicated that nearby public transportation was important in choosing healthcare. Knowledge of community needs and heterogeneity is essential to decision makers of facility and community development plans. Partnerships between public health, urban planning, architecture, and local constituents should be cultivated toward focus on reducing health disparities. Further work to integrate community perspectives through the planning and design process and to evaluate the long-term impact of such efforts is needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Planning, expectation, and image evaluation for PACS at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, E. A., Jr.; Smith, Wilbur L.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Owen, David A.; Hilsenrath, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Our strategy in studying PACS is to evaluate its clinical implementation working with equipment supplied by an established manufacturer. Fiscal and personnel resources required to design and integrate the hardware components and operational software to develop a functional PACS precluded a bottom up development approach at our institution. Imaging equipment vendors possess more abundant design development resources for this task and therefore can support a more rapid development of the initial components of PACS. For this reason we have chosen to serve as a beta test site to study the viability of the basic PACS components in a clinical setting. Our efforts primarily focus on: (1) image quality; (2) cost effectiveness; (3) PACS/HIS/RIS integration; (4) equipment and software reliability; and (5) overall system performance. The results of our studies are shared with the vendor for future PACS development and refi nement. To attain our investigational goals we have formed an interdisciplinary team of Radiologists, Perceptual Psychologist, Economist, Electrical and Industrial Engineers, Hospital Information System personnel and key departmental administrative staff. For several reasons Pediatric Radiology was targeted as the initial area for our PACS study: a small area representative of the overall operation,tight operational controls and willingness of physicians. We used a step-wise approach, the first step being the installation of PACS exclusively within the physical confines of Pediatric Radiology.

  11. A blood center communication plan and guideline for assisting hospitals with the implementation of the new international uniform bar code-labeling standard.

    PubMed

    Kerr, M J

    1997-09-01

    Transition to the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT) bar code-labeling standard known as ISBT 128 is scheduled to begin July 1, 1997. Blood centers play a pivotal role in educating and assisting hospitals with the implementation of the new standard. A communication plan and hospital guidelines to facilitate the actual transition to ISBT 128 are integral parts of a blood center's comprehensive implementation strategy. In Phase 1, the blood center identified specific target groups within the hospitals and developed educational materials for them. A survey tool was used to identify unique hospital needs. Subsequent blood center newsletters and customer service forums included ISBT 128 updates. In Phase 2, guidelines to assist hospitals with the identification of critical elements, milestones, and target dates for the transition were developed with hospital staff input. Survey results on the change to ISBT 128 showed that many hospitals were unfamiliar with this change and its effects on operational issues. Various forums to disseminate information about ISBT 128 are needed to provide education and assistance to diverse groups within the hospital. A partnership approach between hospitals and the regional blood center should promote a successful transition from the current bar code symbology, American Blood Commission Codabar, to ISBT 128.

  12. A Developmental Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Food Preparation and the Mattatuck Community College Hospitality/Food Services Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in hospitality/food service for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum area outline, 17 content area objectives, a…

  13. Implementation of a quality improvement programme to support advance care planning in five hospitals across a health region.

    PubMed

    Schofield, G; Kreeger, L; Meyer, M; Swann, D; Wijeratne, A; Wood, J; Stone, P

    2015-03-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) can help patients with a terminal illness to prepare for the end of their lives. This report describes a regional service improvement initiative to increase the identification of hospital inpatients at this stage in their illnesses and to increase the number of such patients who are offered the opportunity to start the process of ACP. Data were collected prospectively over a 7 month period from four acute hospital trusts and a specialist cancer centre in the South-West London region. Each unit identified a specific patient population who were screened for eligibility to engage in the process of ACP. Data concerning the reasons for eligibility, the suitability for discussion and the various reasons why patients did not complete the process, were recorded. Over a 7 month period 1980 patients were screened and 559 (28.2%) were found to be potentially eligible for an ACP discussion. Of these 227/559 (40.6%) were deemed suitable for a discussion by medical staff. The majority of these patients (195/227; 86%) were offered the opportunity to undergo ACP discussions and 144/195 (73.8%) agreed to begin the process of ACP. This report shows that a targeted approach can result in increased uptake in the number of patients who engage in ACP. However, systematic identification of potentially eligible patients requires a significant investment of clinical time and resources. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  15. Hospital discharge on the first compared with the second day after a planned cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tan, Peng Chiong; Norazilah, Mat Jin; Omar, Siti Zawiah

    2012-12-01

    To compare patient satisfaction and exclusive breastfeeding rates for patients discharged from the hospital on postcesarean day 1 (next day) or day 2. Healthy women admitted for planned cesarean delivery were randomized to day 1 or day 2 discharge. Postoperative assessment for suitability for discharge was based on defined criteria. Primary outcomes were patient satisfaction with their discharge timing assessed at 2 weeks and reported exclusive breastfeeding at 6 weeks after discharge. Analyses were based on intention-to-treat and per-protocol discharge. Of the 360 women randomized, results of 170 compared with 172 and 142 compared with 148 (day 1 compared with day 2) were available for intention-to-treat and per-protocol analyses, respectively. Nine women fulfilled discharge criteria but declined day 1 discharge, and 12 women allocated to day 2 discharge took their own discharge on day 1. Intention-to-treat analysis showed that satisfaction with discharge protocol was expressed by 148 of 170 (87.1%) compared with 147 of 172 (85.5%) (relative risk 1.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6-2.1, P=.75) and exclusive breastfeeding (at 6 weeks) was reported by 76 of 170 (44.7%) compared with 77 of 172 (44.9%) (relative risk 1.0 95% CI 0.7-1.5 P=.99 for day 1 compared with day 2 discharges, respectively). All secondary outcomes assessed at up to 6 weeks after discharge including unscheduled maternal or infant medical consultations, rehospitalizations, maternal antibiotic use, and maternal well-being, anxiety, and depression status, were similar. Results on per-protocol analysis were also similar. Day 1 discharge compared with day 2 discharge after a planned cesarean delivery resulted in equivalent outcomes. ISRCTN Register, ISRCTN.org, ISRCTN27523895.

  16. The effectiveness of discharge planning on the knowledge, clinical symptoms and hospitalisation frequency of persons with schizophrenia: a longitudinal study in two hospitals in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Kahani, Shamsoddin; Malakouti, Kazem; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Sudhinaraset, May

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of discharge planning on the knowledge, clinical symptoms and frequency of hospitalisation of persons with schizophrenia. Discharge planning is associated with decreases in the duration of hospitalisation, readmission to hospitals and decreases in medical costs. Yet, there is little known about the effectiveness of discharge planning among persons with schizophrenia in Iran. Longitudinal clinical trial. In this longitudinal clinical trial, 46 persons with schizophrenia admitted to psychiatric hospitals were selected and classified into either intervention or control groups. For the intervention group, the discharge planning was designed using the nursing process model. The intervention was implemented across six sessions in the hospital and six sessions in patient's home (up to three months after discharge). Friedman test, independent t-tests, chi-squared test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Mc-Nemar's test were used to analyse demographic characteristics, knowledge scores, clinical symptoms and the frequency of hospitalisation. The intervention group demonstrated improved clinical symptoms between the time of discharge and three months after discharge and had higher knowledge levels compared with the control group. In addition, the frequency of patients' hospitalisation preintervention and three months postintervention was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group, while no such differences were found among the control group during this same time period. This study suggests that there are a number of advantages to discharge planning including an increase in the knowledge of patients, a decline in clinical symptoms and a reduction in the frequency of admission to hospitals. Due to high frequency of relapse, rehospitalisation and high remedial costs of persons with schizophrenia, it is important to consider discharge planning as a therapeutic approach for patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Radiology on Board the PLA(N) Peace Ark Hospital Ship During a Humanitarian Medical Relief Mission to the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ai-Jun; Sun, Tao; Wang, Hai-Wei; Ge, He-Quan; Ye, Hong-Jun

    2016-02-01

    From November 24 to December 10, 2013, the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy [PLA(N)] hospital ship Peace Ark was deployed to the Leyte Gulf in the Philippines to provide humanitarian medical relief in Tacloban after Typhoon Haiyan. The purpose of this study was to assess the radiological services aboard the ship to provide guidance for future missions. A retrospective review was performed on a cohort of 109 patients who underwent digital radiography (DR) and 59 patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) scans during a 16-day period during a humanitarian medical relief mission to the Philippines. Patient demographics, DR findings, and CT findings were analyzed. The mean age of the 109 DR patients was 39.7 years for the 64 males and 43.7 years for the 45 females. A total of 148 DR examinations were performed of the chest (n=109), extremities (n=35), and spine (n=4). The mean age of the 59 CT patients was 43.8 years for the 32 males and 49.1 years for the 27 females. A total of 72 CT scans were performed of the head and neck (n=36), thorax (n=24), abdomen (n=5), spine (n=4), and extremities (n=3). The imaging findings mainly included disaster-related and non-disaster-related fractures, pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary infection, acute brain infarction, intracranial hematoma, and occupying lesions. Analysis of radiological services during a humanitarian medical relief mission to the Philippines provided meaningful information for future humanitarian medical relief missions.

  18. Strategic information for hospital service planning: a linked data study to inform an urban Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer program in Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Miller, Laura J; Somerford, Peter; McEvoy, Suzanne; Bessarab, Dawn

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide descriptive planning data for a hospital-based Aboriginal Health Liaison Officer (AHLO) program, specifically quantifying episodes of care and outcomes within 28 days after discharge. A follow-up study of Aboriginal in-patient hospital episodes was undertaken using person-based linked administrative data from four South Metropolitan hospitals in Perth, Western Australia (2006-11). Outcomes included 28-day deaths, emergency department (ED) presentations and in-patient re-admissions. There were 8041 eligible index admissions among 5113 individuals, with episode volumes increasing by 31% over the study period. Among patients 25 years and older, the highest ranking comorbidities included injury (47%), drug and alcohol disorders (41%), heart disease (40%), infection (40%), mental illness (31%) and diabetes (31%). Most events (96%) ended in a regular discharge. Within 28 days, 24% of events resulted in ED presentations and 20% resulted in hospital readmissions. Emergency readmissions (13%) were twice as likely as booked re-admissions (7%). Stratified analyses showed poorer outcomes for older people, and for emergency and tertiary hospital admissions. Future planning must address the greater service volumes anticipated. The high prevalence of comorbidities requires intensive case management to address case complexity. These data will inform the refinement of the AHLO program to improve in-patient experiences and outcomes.

  19. The Development and Analysis of a Strategic Planning Process at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and analyze a strategic planning process which culminated in a strategic plan for Blanchfield Army...identifying key stakeholders, and selecting committee members. Phase two was an educational phase in which committee members were oriented to strategic planning and...The final phase focused on the revision of the strategic planning document A review and analysis of the planning process revealed three areas for

  20. [How to make regional medicine revive from the medical crisis or collapse due to the severe paucity of medical doctors: a plan with "the magnet hospital"].

    PubMed

    Itoh, Tsunetoshi

    2009-01-01

    In 2002-2003, the practice of doctors lending their names to appear as "staff" of hospitals became known. Problems regarding funds from public hospitals were also revealed. Tohoku University asked regional societies how to improve the medical situation, and redefined its responsibilities. The Educational Development Center for Local Medicine and Department of Local Medical Service System were set up (2005-2008). A severe shortage of medical doctors prevails in Japan: the number of doctors per population is at the 4th lowest among OECD countries, and the number per hospital bed is the lowest. We have no nursing homes whose beds are not counted as hospital beds. The number of faculty staff in Japanese medical schools is 1/3 to those of Western countries. The reported number of doctors working in hospitals and offices surpasses that by census for medical doctors by >40,000. Japanese doctors work for >60 hours per week. I propose essential plans to improve Japanese situation for medical service: 1. Immediately increase the number of doctors by at least 50%. Based on our calculation, we need 450,000 doctors. 2. When the shortage of doctors is severe, establish a magnet hospital with c.a. 500 beds for every 200,000 population, capable of treating highly emergency patients and attracting doctors who need medical training. Hospitals should not belong to each city or town. 3. Establish a comprehensive organization to nurture doctors on a long-term basis. It should consist of a medical school, hospitals, and the prefectural government. It should help doctors to move between hospitals, and be responsible both for designing doctors' career paths and for allocating them appropriately.

  1. Assessment of hospital disaster plans for conventional mass casualty incidents following terrorist explosions using a live exercise based upon the real data of actual patients.

    PubMed

    Ashkenazi, I; Ohana, A; Azaria, B; Gelfer, A; Nave, C; Deutch, Z; Gens, I; Fadlon, M; Dahan, Y; Rapaport, L; Kishkinov, D; Bar, A; Tal-Or, E; Vaknin, N; Blumenfeld, A; Kessel, B; Alfici, R; Olsha, O; Michaelson, M

    2012-04-01

    The National Committee for Hospital Preparedness for Conventional Mass Casualty Incidents and the Hospital Preparedness Division of the Home Front Command are in charge of preparing live exercises held yearly in public hospitals in Israel. Our experience is that live exercises are limited in their ability to test clinical decision making and its influence upon incident management. A live exercise was designed upon real patient data and tested in several public hospitals. The aim of the manuscript is to describe the impact of this new format on clinical decision making in large-scale live exercises. A database of histories, physical examination findings, laboratory results and imaging results for 420 patients treated following terrorist explosions was created using information derived from actual patient encounters. Similar information for 100 patients treated following motor vehicle accidents was also collected. Information from the database was used to create victim profiles used during the course of exercises held in eight public hospitals with 60-800-bed capacities. Before implementing the new injury tags, no conclusions could be made concerning the quality of clinical decision making. Conducting the exercise using the new format helped identify deficiencies in the hospital disaster plan in triage, emergency department management and in the proper utilisation of resources such as radiology, operating rooms and the secondary transfer of patients. Previous knowledge of patient diagnoses and resource needs allow the identification and quantification of deficiencies and problems identified in clinical decision making, resource utilisation and incident management.

  2. Train crash disasters and emergency plans of suburban hospitals in the New York City and Washington, DC areas: what went right; what could have been improved.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Two major train crashes in February--one in Northern New Jersey and the other in Silver Spring, MD, near Washington, DC--posed severe challenges to the disaster plans of area hospitals. The first crash involving two commuter trains near Secaucus, NJ, tested the effectiveness of emergency plans at the Jersey City Medical Center, Jersey City, NJ, and the Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center, Secaucus. The incident occurred at approximately 8:40 a.m. and resulted in three deaths and 162 injuries. The Silver Spring crash, which took place a week after the one in New Jersey, occurred in early evening and involved an Amtrak and a commuter train. It resulted in 11 deaths and 26 injuries. Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, was the primary caregiver. In this report, we'll provide details on how the incidents impacted on nearby hospitals and their security staffs; how challenges, anticipated and unanticipated, were met; and what conclusions were reached in follow-up critiques.

  3. [The planned home care transfer by a local medical support hospital and the introduction to home intravenous hyper alimentation--the making of a home care patient's instruction plan document].

    PubMed

    Shinobu, Akiko; Ohtsu, Yoko

    2004-12-01

    It is important to offer continuous medical service without interrupting everyone's various job functions at the Tama Numbu-Chiiki Hospitals in order to secure the quality and safety of home medical care to patients and their families. From 1998 up to the present, home intravenous hyper alimentation (home IVH) has been introduced by individually exchanging information that was based on items such as clinical case, doctor and caregiver in charge of the day, and introductory information. Five years have passed since we started an introduction of home IVH, and it appears that the medical cooperation of home IVH between the Minami-tama medical region and its neighboring area has been established. Then, we arranged an examination of the past 2 years based on the 57 patients who elected to choose home IVH instruction. Consequently, we created "home IVH introduction plan document" in standardizing a flow from home IVH introduction to post-hospital intervention. Since November of 2003, the plan document has been utilized and carried out to 5 patients by the end of February in 2004. This home IVH introduction plan document was able to clarify the role of medical person in connection with the patient. Therefore, we could not only share the information, but also could transfer medical care smoothly from the hospital to the patient's home.

  4. Physical aspects of total-body irradiation at the Middlesex Hospital (UCL group of hospitals), London 1988 - 1993: II. In vivo planning and dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planskoy, B.; Tapper, P. D.; Bedford, A. M.; Davis, F. M.

    1996-11-01

    Part II of this paper gives the results of applying the TBI methods described in part I, to in vivo patient planning and dosimetry. Patients are planned on nine CT based body slices, five of which pass through the lungs. Planned doses are verified with ten silicon diodes applied bi-laterally to five body sites, at each treatment. LiF TLDs are applied to seven other body sites at the first treatment only. For 84 patients and at least 1016 measurements per body site with the diodes, the mean measured total doses agreed with planned doses within at most 2% except at lung levels, where the mean measured dose was 3% too low. Standard deviations of the measurements about the mean were between 2.4 and 3.1%. For the LiF TLDs, the mean measured doses for all seven body sites were within of planned doses. A separate assessment of measured entrance and transmitted doses showed that the former agreed well with planned doses, but that the latter tended to be low, especially over the lungs, and that they had a wider dispersion. Possible reasons for this are discussed. These results show measurement uncertainties similar to those for non-TBI treatments of Nilsson et al, Leunens et al and Essers et al. An analysis of the treatment plans showed a mean dose inhomogeneity in the body (75 patients, nine slices) of (1 s.d.) and in the lungs (40 patients, five slices) of (1 s.d.). The conclusions are that, overall, the methods are reasonably satisfactory but that, with an extra effort, even closer agreement between measured and planned doses and a further limited reduction in the body dose inhomogeneity could be obtained. However, if it were thought desirable to make a substantial reduction in the dose inhomogeneity in the body and lungs, this could only

  5. Hospital diversification.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2005-01-01

    Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 168 hospitals during the period from 1999 to 2004. Diversification and the operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield a better financial position, and the better operating ratio allows the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition are also measured. An institution lifecycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered.

  6. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. Participants 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. Results The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. Conclusions The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. PMID:27707835

  7. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-10-05

    Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Cross-sectional questionnaire study. The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Insights Into French Emergency Planning, Response, and Resilience Procedures From a Hospital Managerial Perspective Following the Paris Terrorist Attacks of Friday, November 13, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ghanchi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    On Friday, November 13, 2015, Paris was subjected to a multiple terrorist attack that caused widespread carnage. Although French emergency planning, response, and resilience procedures (Plan Blanc) anticipated crisis management of a major incident, these had to be adapted to the local context of Pitié-Salpêtrière University Teaching Hospital. Health care workers had undergone Plan Blanc training and exercises and it was fortunate that such a drill had occurred on the morning of the attack. The procedures were observed to work well because this type of eventuality had been fully anticipated, and staff performance exceeded expectations owing to prior in-depth training and preparations. Staff performance was also facilitated by overwhelming staff solidarity and professionalism, ensuring the smooth running of crisis management and improving victim survival rates. Although lessons learned are ongoing, an initial debriefing of managers found organizational improvements to be made. These included improvements to the activation of Plan Blanc and how staff were alerted, bed management, emergency morgue facilities, and public relations. In conclusion, our preparations for an eventual terrorist attack on this unprecedented scale ensured a successful medical response. Even though anticipating the unthinkable is difficult, contingency plans are being made to face other possible terrorist threats including chemical or biological agents. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  9. A Study to Develop a Method of Assessing the Effectiveness of Discharge Planning in a Military Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    means of documenting discharge planning effectiveness. Fourthly, the Chief of Professional Services, as Chairman of the Medical Care Evaluation Committee... Medical Care Evaluation Committee for direct screening (see Appendix G). The Committee Chairperson prepares and distributes the agenda for each...monthly reports to the Medical Care Evaluation (MCE) Committee and represents the Discharge Planning Coordination Committee at the MCE Committee

  10. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 2: Collaboration Between Surgeons and Hospital Administrators to Develop a Funds Flow Model for Procedures Performed at an Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Although plastic surgeons make important contributions to the clinical, educational, and research missions of academic medical centers (AMCs), determining the financial value of a plastic surgery service can be difficult, due to complex cost accounting systems. We analyzed the financial impact of plastic surgery on an AMC, by examining the contribution margins and operating income of surgical procedures. We collaborated with hospital administrators to implement 3 types of strategic changes: (1) growth of areas with high contribution margin, (2) curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin, (3) improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption. Outcome measures included: facility charges, hospital collections, contribution margin, operating margin, and operating room times. We also studied the top 50 Current Procedural Terminology codes (total case number × charge/case), ranking procedures for profitability, as determined by operating margin. During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty; did not pursue any formal marketing; did not change our surgical fees, billing system, or payer mix; and maintained our commitment to indigent care. After rebalancing our case mix, through procedural portfolio planning, average hospital operating income/procedure increased from $-79 to $+816. Volume and diversity of cases increased, with no change in payer mix. Although charges/case decreased, both contribution margin and operating margin increased, due to improved throughput and decreased operating room times. The 5 most profitable procedures for the hospital were hernia repair, mandibular osteotomy, hand skin graft, free fibula flap, and head and neck flap, whereas the 5 least profitable were latissimus breast reconstruction, craniosynostosis repair, free-flap breast reconstruction, trunk skin graft, and cutaneous free flap. Total operating income for the hospital, from plastic surgery procedures, increased

  11. Psychological effects of patient surge in large-scale emergencies: a quality improvement tool for hospital and clinic capacity planning and response.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Lisa S; Zazzali, James L; Shields, Sandra; Eisenman, David P; Alsabagh, Halla

    2010-01-01

    Although information is available to guide hospitals and clinics on the medical aspects of disaster surge, there is little guidance on how to manage the expected surge of persons needing psychological assessment and response after a catastrophic event. This neglected area of disaster medicine is addressed by presenting a novel and practical quality improvement tool for hospitals and clinics to use in planning for and responding to the psychological consequences of catastrophic events that create a surge of psychological casualties presenting for health care. Industrial quality improvement processes, already widely adopted in the healthcare sector, translate well when applied to disaster medicine and public health preparedness. This paper describes the development of the tool, presents data on facility preparedness from 31 hospitals and clinics in Los Angeles County, and discusses how the tool can be used as a benchmark for targeting improvement. The tool can serve to increase facility awareness of which components of disaster preparedness and response must be addressed through hospitals' and clinics' existing quality improvement programs. It also can provide information for periodic assessment and evaluation of progress over time.

  12. Using a theory of planned behaviour framework to explore hand hygiene beliefs at the '5 critical moments' among Australian hospital-based nurses.

    PubMed

    White, Katherine M; Jimmieson, Nerina L; Obst, Patricia L; Graves, Nicholas; Barnett, Adrian; Cockshaw, Wendell; Gee, Phillip; Haneman, Lara; Page, Katie; Campbell, Megan; Martin, Elizabeth; Paterson, David

    2015-02-13

    Improving hand hygiene among health care workers (HCWs) is the single most effective intervention to reduce health care associated infections in hospitals. Understanding the cognitive determinants of hand hygiene decisions for HCWs with the greatest patient contact (nurses) is essential to improve compliance. The aim of this study was to explore hospital-based nurses' beliefs associated with performing hand hygiene guided by the World Health Organization's (WHO) 5 critical moments. Using the belief-base framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour, we examined attitudinal, normative, and control beliefs underpinning nurses' decisions to perform hand hygiene according to the recently implemented national guidelines. Thematic content analysis of qualitative data from focus group discussions with hospital-based registered nurses from 5 wards across 3 hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Important advantages (protection of patient and self), disadvantages (time, hand damage), referents (supportive: patients, colleagues; unsupportive: some doctors), barriers (being too busy, emergency situations), and facilitators (accessibility of sinks/products, training, reminders) were identified. There was some equivocation regarding the relative importance of hand washing following contact with patient surroundings. The belief base of the theory of planned behaviour provided a useful framework to explore systematically the underlying beliefs of nurses' hand hygiene decisions according to the 5 critical moments, allowing comparisons with previous belief studies. A commitment to improve nurses' hand hygiene practice across the 5 moments should focus on individual strategies to combat distraction from other duties, peer-based initiatives to foster a sense of shared responsibility, and management-driven solutions to tackle staffing and resource issues. Hand hygiene following touching a patient's surroundings continues to be reported as the most neglected opportunity for compliance.

  13. Integrating an EMR-based Transition Planning Tool for CYSHCN at a Children's Hospital: A Quality Improvement Project to Increase Provider Use and Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Wiemann, Constance M.; Hergenroeder, Albert C.; Bartley, Krystle A.; Sanchez-Fournier, Blanca; Hilliard, Marisa E.; Warren, Laura J.; Graham, Sarah C.

    2016-01-01

    An electronic medical record (EMR)-based transition planning tool (TPT) designed to facilitate transition from pediatric to adult-based health care for youth (16–25 years) with special health care needs was introduced at a large children's hospital. Activities to increase provider use were implemented in five plan–do–study–act cycles. Overall, 22 of 25 (88%) consenting providers in four pediatric subspecialty services used the TPT during 303 patient encounters, with nurses and case-managers the top users and physicians the least likely users. Use was highest with intensive technical assistance and following the introduction of an upgraded tool. Provider satisfaction with the TPT and self-reported transition planning activities notably increased across the PDSA cycles. PMID:26209173

  14. Questions and Answers Regarding the 1997 State Plan Requirements for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 1997 document contains questions and answers on the state plan requirements for HMIWI regulations. The questions cover topics such as re-opening existing sources, timelines for submission, consequences for failure to submit, and more.

  15. Bed Capacity Planning Using Stochastic Simulation Approach in Cardiac-surgery Department of Teaching Hospitals, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    TORABIPOUR, Amin; ZERAATI, Hojjat; ARAB, Mohammad; RASHIDIAN, Arash; AKBARI SARI, Ali; SARZAIEM, Mahmuod Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the hospital required beds using stochastic simulation approach in cardiac surgery departments. Methods: This study was performed from Mar 2011 to Jul 2012 in three phases: First, collection data from 649 patients in cardiac surgery departments of two large teaching hospitals (in Tehran, Iran). Second, statistical analysis and formulate a multivariate linier regression model to determine factors that affect patient's length of stay. Third, develop a stochastic simulation system (from admission to discharge) based on key parameters to estimate required bed capacity. Results: Current cardiac surgery department with 33 beds can only admit patients in 90.7% of days. (4535 d) and will be required to over the 33 beds only in 9.3% of days (efficient cut off point). According to simulation method, studied cardiac surgery department will requires 41–52 beds for admission of all patients in the 12 next years. Finally, one-day reduction of length of stay lead to decrease need for two hospital beds annually. Conclusion: Variation of length of stay and its affecting factors can affect required beds. Statistic and stochastic simulation model are applied and useful methods to estimate and manage hospital beds based on key hospital parameters. PMID:27957466

  16. Bed Capacity Planning Using Stochastic Simulation Approach in Cardiac-surgery Department of Teaching Hospitals, Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Torabipour, Amin; Zeraati, Hojjat; Arab, Mohammad; Rashidian, Arash; Akbari Sari, Ali; Sarzaiem, Mahmuod Reza

    2016-09-01

    To determine the hospital required beds using stochastic simulation approach in cardiac surgery departments. This study was performed from Mar 2011 to Jul 2012 in three phases: First, collection data from 649 patients in cardiac surgery departments of two large teaching hospitals (in Tehran, Iran). Second, statistical analysis and formulate a multivariate linier regression model to determine factors that affect patient's length of stay. Third, develop a stochastic simulation system (from admission to discharge) based on key parameters to estimate required bed capacity. Current cardiac surgery department with 33 beds can only admit patients in 90.7% of days. (4535 d) and will be required to over the 33 beds only in 9.3% of days (efficient cut off point). According to simulation method, studied cardiac surgery department will requires 41-52 beds for admission of all patients in the 12 next years. Finally, one-day reduction of length of stay lead to decrease need for two hospital beds annually. Variation of length of stay and its affecting factors can affect required beds. Statistic and stochastic simulation model are applied and useful methods to estimate and manage hospital beds based on key hospital parameters.

  17. Measuring and managing radiologist workload: application of lean and constraint theories and production planning principles to planning radiology services in a major tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Sharyn L S; Cowan, Ian A; Floyd, Richard; Mackintosh, Stuart; Graham, Rob; Jenkins, Emma; Hamilton, Richard

    2013-10-01

    We describe how techniques traditionally used in the manufacturing industry (lean management, the theory of constraints and production planning) can be applied to planning radiology services to reduce the impact of constraints such as limited radiologist hours, and to subsequently reduce delays in accessing imaging and in report turnaround. Targets for imaging and reporting were set aligned with clinical needs. Capacity was quantified for each modality and for radiologists and recorded in activity lists. Demand was quantified and forecasting commenced based on historical referral rates. To try and mitigate the impact of radiologists as a constraint, lean management processes were applied to radiologist workflows. A production planning process was implemented. Outpatient waiting times to access imaging steadily decreased. Report turnaround times improved with the percentage of overnight/on-call reports completed by a 1030 target time increased from approximately 30% to 80 to 90%. The percentage of emergency and inpatient reports completed within one hour increased from approximately 15% to approximately 50% with 80 to 90% available within 4 hours. The number of unreported cases on the radiologist work-list at the end of the working day reduced. The average weekly accuracy for demand forecasts for emergency and inpatient CT, MRI and plain film imaging was 91%, 83% and 92% respectively. For outpatient CT, MRI and plain film imaging the accuracy was 60%, 55% and 77% respectively. Reliable routine weekly and medium to longer term service planning is now possible. Tools from industry can be successfully applied to diagnostic imaging services to improve performance. They allow an accurate understanding of the demands on a service, capacity, and can reliably predict the impact of changes in demand or capacity on service delivery. © 2013 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  18. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  19. Safety and quality assurance of chemotherapeutic preparations in a hospital production unit: acceptance sampling plan and economic impact.

    PubMed

    Paci, A; Borget, I; Mercier, L; Azar, Y; Desmaris, R P; Bourget, P

    2012-06-01

    The opportunity to apply a sampling plan was evaluated. Costs were computed by a microcosting study. In 2003, a sampling plan was defined to reduce the number of chemotherapy quality controls while preserving the same level of quality. Recent qualitative and quantitative changes led us to define a second sampling plan supplemented by an economic evaluation to determine the cost and cost-savings of quality control. The study considers preparation produced during four semesters classified into three groups. The first one includes drugs produced below 200 batches a semester. Group 2, those for which the lot of preparation lots would have been rejected twice among these four semesters. Group 3, those would have been accepted (≥3 'acceptable lot'). A single sampling plan by attributes was applied to this group with an acceptance quality level of 1.65% and a lot tolerance percent defective below 5%. A micro-costing study was conducted on quality control, from the sampling to the validation of the results. Among 39 cytotoxic drugs, 11 were sampled which enabled to avoid a mean of 17,512 control assays per year. Each batch of the 28 non-sampled drugs was however analyzed. Costs were estimated at 2.98€ and 5.25€ for control assays depending of the analytical method. The savings from the application of the sampling plans was 153,207€ in 6 years. The sampling plan allowed maintaining constancy in number of controls and the level of quality with significant costsavings, despite a substantial increase in drugs to assay and in the number of preparations produced.

  20. Out-of-Pocket and Informal Payment Before and After the Health Transformation Plan in Iran: Evidence from Hospitals Located in Kurdistan, Iran.

    PubMed

    Piroozi, Bakhtiar; Rashidian, Arash; Moradi, Ghobad; Takian, Amirhossein; Ghasri, Hooman; Ghadimi, Tayyeb

    2017-02-11

    One of the objectives of the health transformation plan (HTP) in Iran is to reduce out-of-pocket (OOP) payments for inpatient services and eradicate informal payments. The HTP has three phases: the first phase (launched in May 5, 2014) is focused on reducing OOP payments for inpatient services; the second phase (launched in May 22, 2014) is focused on primary healthcare (PHC) and the third phase utilizes an updated relative value units for health services (launched in September 29, 2014) and is focused on the elimination of informal payments. This aim of this study was to determine the OOP payments and the frequency of informal cash payments to physicians for inpatient services before and after the HTP in Kurdistan province, Iran. This quasi-experimental study used multistage sampling method to select and evaluate 265 patients discharged from hospitals in Kurdistan province. The study covered 3 phases (before the HTP, after the first, and third phases of the HTP). Part of the data was collected using a hospital information system form and the rest were collected using a questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Fisher exact test, logistic regression, and independent samples t test. The mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the first and third phases, respectively, were US$59.4, US$17.6, and US$14.3 in hospital affiliated to the Ministry of Health and Medical Education (MoHME), US$39.6, US$33.7, and US$13.7 in hospitals affiliated to Social Security Organization (SSO), and US$153.3, US$188.7, and US$66.4 in private hospitals. In hospitals affiliated to SSO and MoHME there was a significant difference between the mean OOP payments before the HTP and after the third phase (P<.05). The percentage of informal payments to physicians in hospitals affiliated to MoHME, SSO, and private sector, respectively, were 4.5%, 8.1%, and 12.5% before the HTP, and 0.0%, 7.1%, and 10.0% after the first phase. Contrary to the time before the HTP, no informal payment was reported

  1. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  2. Best practices of hospital security planning for patient surge--a comparative analysis of three national systems.

    PubMed

    Downey, Erin; Hebert, Anjanette

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines three international healthcare security systems as they relate to patient surge in Canada, Israel, and the United States. Its purpose is to compare the systems, to highlight unique characteristics that define those systems, and to initiate the development of best practices that transcend national boundaries. Several significant national characteristics of demographics, healthcare systems, and political climate, among others, present challenges to translating best practices among these three countries. However, we have found that best practice strategies exist in areas of communications, coordination, building design, space adaptability, and patient routing (both from the community to the hospital, as well as within the hospital) that can be shared and incorporated into the healthcare preparedness efforts in all three countries.

  3. Planning of traumatological hospital resources for a major winter sporting event as illustrated by the 2005 Winter Universiad.

    PubMed

    Oberladstaetter, J; Kamelger, F S; Rosenberger, R; Dallapozza, Ch; Struve, P; Luger, T; Fink, Ch; Attal, R

    2009-03-01

    The 22nd Student World Winter Games took place in January 2005 in Innsbruck and Seefeld, Austria. Exactly 1,500 athletes of 50 nationalities competed in 69 events in ten winter sports. A total number of 750 functionaries, 800 volunteers and 85,000 spectators participated in the second largest winter sports event behind the Olympic winter games. The aim of this study was to evaluate the needed resources to ensure traumatological care for an event of that size. At the medical "call-center" all consultations, as well as patient data, diagnosis, and medical treatment were recorded using a preset protocol. Further, all patients treated in the University Hospital Innsbruck were registered with an emphasis on trauma patients. Forty-eight of 65 patients transported to the hospital as a result of the Universiade were trauma patients, 37 of whom were athletes. The gender distribution was 34:14 (m:f). Ice hockey players had the highest rate of injury (25% of all injured athletes), followed by alpine skiers (20.8% of injured athletes). The highest ISS was nine. Forty-three patients got ambulatory treatment, five were admitted to the hospital and surgical treatment was conducted in three cases. Mean patient number was 4.8 per day. No additional personnel, structural, or technical hospital resources were needed to accommodate a large winter sports event like the Universiad. Thus, a level-B trauma center with an emergency room and independent traumatological department with around the clock surgical capability seems to be sufficient to provide traumatological care for an event of this size if the possibility of patient transport to a larger facility exists in the case of catastrophic events.

  4. Current and planned palliative care service provision for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in 239 UK hospital units: comparison with the gold standards framework.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Katherine L; Stone, Robert A; Buckingham, Rhona J; Pursey, Nancy A; Roberts, Christopher M

    2010-07-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease report a symptom burden similar in magnitude to terminal cancer patients yet service provision and access has been reported as poor. In the absence of a specific national chronic obstructive pulmonary disease service framework the gold standards framework might support service developments. We surveyed 239 UK acute hospital units admitting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, comprising 98% of all acute trusts, about their current and planned provision for palliative care services. Only 49% of units had a formal referral pathway for palliative care and only 13% had a policy of initiating end-of-life discussions with appropriate patients. Whilst 66% of units had plans to develop palliative care services, when mapped against the gold standards framework few were directly relevant and only three of the seven key standards were covered to any significant degree. We conclude that service provision remains poor and access is hindered by a lack of proactive initiation of discussion. Planned developments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease palliative care services also lack a strategic framework that risks holistic design.

  5. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to explore hospital-based nurses' intention to use peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a survey study.

    PubMed

    Bertani, Laura; Carone, Maria; Caricati, Luca; Demaria, Serena; Fantuzzi, Silvia; Guarasci, Alessandro; Pirazzoli, Luca

    2016-11-22

    The peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have become an alternative to the traditional CVC. PICCs are usually inserted by trained nurses who decided to attend and complete a special training on PICC insertion and management. The present work aimed to investigate the intention of using PICC in a sample of hospital-based nurses using the theory of planned behavior as theoretical framework. A cross-sectional design was used in which a questionnaire was delivered to 199 nurses. According to the theory of planned behavior, the attitude toward the use of PICC, subjective norms and perceived self-efficacy predicted the intention to use PICC. Contrary to the expectations, the effect of subjective norms on intention to use PICC was mediated by attitude and self-efficacy. Finally, age of participants was negatively related to the intention to use the PICC. The theory of planned behavior offers a useful framework to explain nurses' intention to use PICC. Shared norms favoring the use of PICC seem to increase both nurse's positive attitudes and self-efficacy whit respect to the use of these devices. Thus, it appears that to train professionals individually does not necessarily results in an increased use of PICC.

  6. Timeliness of second opinion appointed doctors' assessments of treatment plans for patients detained in medium security hospitals in London, UK.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Paula; Ajaz, Ali

    2014-07-01

    Mental health legislation in England & Wales requires assessment by a second opinion appointed doctor (SOAD) to safeguard the rights of patients detained in a hospital under this law if they are either refusing certain treatments or are deemed incapable of consenting to them. Our aim was to evaluate timeliness of SOAD assessments. Data were collected from the Mental Health Act administrator on all SOAD requests in 1 year for all in-patients in two English medium security hospital units. One hundred and six patients required a SOAD assessment during the 1-year period examined, of a combined resident total of 295, as did a further 14 patients who had been discharged from hospital and were subject to a community treatment order. About half of the inpatients were seen by a SOAD within 30 days and a further quarter within 60 days, but the remaining quarter waited up to 150 days or more. These results suggest that in these trusts, unlikely to be atypical, neither patients nor clinicians are being adequately protected by legal safeguards on decisions to treat with medication (or electroconvulsive therapy) in the event of impaired competence for decisions about mental health treatments. There should be clear standards for the appropriate length of time from referral to assessment by an independent doctor (SOAD). Compliance with standards should be transparent, so anonymised data on the matter should be routinely collected and stored by health trust Mental Health Act offices. Data should be monitored at agreed intervals by an independent body. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pre-pandemic planning survey of healthcare workers at a tertiary care children's hospital: ethical and workforce issues.

    PubMed

    Cowden, Jessica; Crane, Lori; Lezotte, Dennis; Glover, Jacqueline; Nyquist, Ann-Christine

    2010-07-01

    Prior to the development of written policies and procedures for pandemic influenza, worker perceptions of ethical and workforce issues must be identified. To determine the relationship between healthcare worker (HCW) reporting willingness to work during a pandemic and perception of job importance, belief that one will be asked to work, and sense of professionalism and to assess HCW's opinions regarding specific policy issues as well as barriers and motivators to work during a pandemic. A survey was conducted in HCWs at The Children's Hospital in Denver, Colorado, from February to June 2007. Characteristics of workers reporting willingness to work during a pandemic were compared with those who were unwilling or unsure. Importance of barriers and motivators was compared by gender and willingness to work. Sixty percent of respondents reported willingness to work (overall response rate of 31%). Belief one will be asked to work (OR 4.6, P  <  0.0001) and having a high level of professionalism (OR 8.6, P  <  0.0001) were associated with reporting willingness to work. Hospital infrastructure support staffs were less likely to report willingness to work during a pandemic than clinical healthcare professionals (OR 0.39, P  <  0.001). Concern for personal safety, concern for safety of family, family's concern for safety, and childcare issues were all important barriers to coming to work. Educational programs should focus on professional responsibility and the importance of staying home when ill. Targeted programs toward hospital infrastructure support and patient and family support staff stressing the essential nature of these jobs may improve willingness to work.

  8. A vision of long-term care. To care for tomorrow's elderly, hospitals must plan now, not react later.

    PubMed

    Kodner, D L

    1989-12-01

    In the next two decades, rapid, fundamental changes will take place in the way we finance, organize, and provide long-term care services. Because the elderly make up such a large portion of the patient population, America's hospitals should be concerned--and involved. There are six keys to the future of long-term care: a sharp increase in elderly population, a new generation of elderly, restrained government role, intergenerational strains, growing corporate concern, and the rise of "gerotechnology." These trends and countertrends will result in a new look in the long-term care landscape. By the year 2010, changes will include a true public-private financing system, provider reimbursement on the basis of capitation and prospective payment, coordinated access to services, dominant alternative delivery systems, a different breed of nursing homes, fewer staffing problems, patient-centered care, a new importance in housing, and an emphasis on prevention. For hospitals, this future vision of long-term care means that significant opportunities will open up to meet the needs of the elderly-at-risk and to achieve a competitive position in the burgeoning elderly care industry.

  9. Determination of Knowledge and Behavior of Women Working at a Hospital on Breast Cancer Early Detection Methods, and Investigation of Efficiency of Planned Education

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Ayla; Çehreli, Rüksan; Ellidokuz, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate knowledge and attitude of women working in the hospital on breast cancer, their behaviors related to early diagnostic methods, and to determine the effectiveness of training in order to increase awareness on breast cancer. Materials and Methods The study group consisted of women working in the Dokuz Eylül University Hospital. The data of this cross-sectional study were collected by a questionnaire. Within the scope of this study, a training program on breast cancer was organized. The effectiveness of this training was evaluated by a preliminary survey and a final survey. Data were expressed as number and percentage, and paired t test and chi-square test were used for comparison. Results 161 women participated in the study with a mean age of 35 ± 8. It was determined that 81.4% of women knew early diagnosis and screening methods for breast cancer. 49.1% of women stated that they perform breast self-examination, but only 6.2% practiced it once a month. 32.9% of women had clinical breast examination, 22.4% had a breast ultrasound, and 22.3% had mammography. Most of the women did not perform any of these methods. The average knowledge level of women was significantly increased after completion of the planned training as compared to pre-training levels (p <0.001). Conclusion It was determined that the majority of women were informed on breast cancer early diagnosis and screening methods, but did not practice these methods on themselves. Information and awareness of women against breast cancer have increased with the use of planned training programs on breast cancer, early detection and screening methods.

  10. Dosimetric Verification of the System of Planning Brainscan for Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Oncology Department of the General Hospital of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez R, J. T.; Salinas, B.; Tovar M, V. M.; Villasenor O, L. F.; Molero M, A. C.

    2006-09-08

    The verification consists on the planning and administration of stereotactic treatments by means of conformed static beams, several polyethylene capsules with powder TLD 100 (type IAEA) located inside the head of a phantom Alderson-Rando. Because the planning system corrects for no-homogeneity in the density from the tomographic information, it is assumed that the absorbed dose in the tumor volume (capsule) corresponds to the dose absorbed to LiF: DLiF. Applying different cavity theories, the percent deviations to the nominal dose are: -1.81%{<=}{delta}%{<=}0.71%, which are consistent with the order of the U%'s. The values of DW are calculated from two calibration curve: TL Response (nC) vs DW for the energy of the 60Co corrected for energy dependence to the accelerator photon beam quality D20/D10=0.57. Once curve for 0.5 to 5 Gy and other for 5 to 35 Gy. The traceability for the Dwater is obtained by means of a secondary standard ionization chamber Farmer PTW 30013 calibrated at the NRC.

  11. [SWOT analysis: the analytical method in the process of planning and its application in the development of orthopaedic hospital department].

    PubMed

    Terzić, Zorica; Vukasinović, Zoran; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Jovanović, Vesna; Janicić, Radmila

    2010-01-01

    SWOT analysis is a managerial tool used to evaluate internal and external environment through strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The aim was to demonstrate the application of the SWOT analysis on the example of the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. Qualitative research was conducted during December 2008 at the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" by applying the focus group technique. Participants were members of the medical staff and patients. In the first phase of the focus group brainstorming was applied to collect the factors of internal and external environment, and to identify strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, respectively. In the second phase the nominal group technique was applied in order to reduce the list of factors. The factors were assessed according to their influence on the Department. Factors ranked by the three point Likert scale from 3 (highest impact) to 1 (lowest impact). The most important strengths of the Department are competent and skilled staff, high quality of services, average hospital bed utilization, the Department providing the educational basis of the School of Medicine, satisfied patients, pleasant setting, and additional working hours. The weaknesses are: poor spatial organization, personnel unmotivated to refresh knowledge, lack of specifically trained personnel, inadequate sanitary facilities, and uncovered services by the Insurance Fund, long average hospital stay, and low economic status of patients. The opportunities are: legislative regulations, formed paediatric traumatology service at the City level, good regional position of the Institute, and extension of referral areas. The threats are: absent Department autonomy in the personnel policy of the Institute, competitions within the Institute, impossibility to increase the Department

  12. Family planning services in a tertiary hospital in a semi-urban area of south-western Nigeria: Uptake and determinants of contraceptive use.

    PubMed

    Adebayo, Ayodeji Matthew; Ojo, Temitope Olumuyiwa; Omotoso, Bridget Ama; Ayodeji, Oladele Olufemi

    2016-10-01

    An audit of 954 family planning clinic attendees, who received counselling from 2006 to 2010, was conducted at the only federal government owned tertiary hospital in Ondo state, Nigeria. Of these, 637 (66.8%) accepted a family planning method: 47.6% chose injectables, 23.2% intrauterine device, 19.5% oral contraceptive pills, 4.4% barrier methods, 3.3% implants and 2% tubal ligation. Clients who had some primary education [OR: 2.79; (95% CI: 1.14-6.84; p < 0.05] had statistically significant higher odds of accepting any contraceptive method while those with elevated blood pressure at first visit [OR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.12-0.45; p < 0.001] and those with previous episode(s) of induced abortion OR: 0.57; 95% CI: 0.43-0.76; p < 0.001] had statistically significant lower odds of using any method. Concerted efforts at increasing uptake is advocated to bridge the gap between client counselling and uptake.

  13. [Characteristics of 2829 women who obtained an abortion at the Family Planning Clinic at the Laval University Hospital Center].

    PubMed

    Guilbert, E

    1993-01-01

    Induced abortion rates have remained stable in Canada for the last ten years, while, in Quebec, they have been on the rise since 1970. This descriptive study was performed in a family planning clinic in Quebec City where induced abortion is available on demand until 16 weeks of gestational age and was obtained by 2,829 women over a period of 20 months during 1988-90. These women were mostly young unmarried and well educated; being at school or in the workforce, they used abortion to postpone childbearing. This study underlines the need for a better understanding of the determinants of both induced abortion and contraceptive use and of the psychosocial aspects of induced abortion.

  14. Zero-based print journal collection development in a community teaching hospital library: planning for the future

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Lora L.; Toedter, Lori J.; D'Agostino, Frank J.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: The paper describes and evaluates the success of a zero-based collection development approach to print serials in a community teaching hospital. Methods: The authors first assessed the environmental factors that would determine future needs of the medical library and its customers. Liaisons to various departments and constituencies were substantially involved in the data-gathering phase. Using newly defined collection parameters, a list of journals to consider was compiled and each journal was categorized justifying its inclusion. Any title not having a strong fit in at least one category was eliminated from further consideration. Results: Overall, 21 subscriptions were cancelled and 34 were added. Despite a 15% increase in total subscription costs, mostly due to normal annual journal price increases, the average cost per journal went down from $344 to $327. Journal usage went up over 30%, interlibrary loan lending went down 25%, and borrowing went up 20%. Conclusion: As resources available to libraries decline, it becomes critical that collections and services are continually and systematically reviewed with a view to keeping them aligned with the mission of the organization, needs of the customers, and emerging trends. Zero-based collection development can be a valuable tool in bringing a print journal collection into closer alignment with the needs of library customers. PMID:16239937

  15. Maternal and neonatal outcomes after implementation of a hospital policy to limit low-risk planned caesarean deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation: an interrupted time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Hutcheon, J A; Strumpf, E C; Harper, S; Giesbrecht, E

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the extent to which implementing a hospital policy to limit planned caesarean deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation improved neonatal health, maternal health, and healthcare costs. Retrospective cohort study. British Columbia Women's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada, in the period 2005-2012. Women with a low-risk planned repeat caesarean delivery. An interrupted time series design was used to evaluate the policy to limit planned caesarean deliveries before 39 weeks of gestation, introduced on 1 April 2008. Composite adverse neonatal health outcome (respiratory morbidity, 5-minute Apgar score of <7, neonatal intensive care unit admission, mortality), postpartum haemorrhage, obstetrical wound infection, out-of-hour deliveries, length of stay, and healthcare costs. Between 2005 and 2008, 60% (1204/2021) of low-risk planned caesarean deliveries were performed before 39 weeks of gestation. After the introduction of the policy, the proportion of planned caesareans dropped by 20 percentage points (adjusted risk difference of 20 fewer cases per 100 deliveries; 95% CI -25.8, -14.3) to 41% (1033/2518). The policy had no detectable impact on adverse neonatal outcomes (2.2 excess cases per 100; 95% CI -0.4, 4.8), maternal complications, or healthcare costs, but increased the risk of out-of-hours delivery from 16.2 to 21.1% (adjusted risk difference 6.3 per 100; 95% CI 1.6, 10.9). We found little evidence that a hospital policy to limit planned caesareans before 39 weeks of gestation reduced adverse neonatal outcomes. Hospital administrators intending to introduce such policies should anticipate, and plan for, modest increases in out-of-hours and emergency-timing. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  16. [Promotion plan for the promotion of cancer: coping measures at Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital in Ehime prefecture - the current state of affairs at the hospital's cancer treatment promotion office].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Motohiro

    2013-05-01

    Recent cancer control strategies in Japan have been aimed at lowering morbidity and mortality rates, based on the Thirdterm Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control initiated by the Japanese government. In April 2007, the Cancer Control Basic Law was promulgated to necessitate promotion of cancer control by national and local authorities. In June 2007, the Japanese Health Ministry released a plan for the promotion of measures to cope with cancer. The cancer control measures adopted by the Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital(MRCH)in Ehime Prefecture were as follows: ·Progress in the promotion of measures to cope with cancer in Ehime, including a review of 2012, problems with new treatment methods for childhood cancer, employment of cancer patients, and promotion of home care. ·Cancer treatment measures adopted by MRCH as a hub medical institution for the past 5 years. ·The distinctive efforts of the intensive professionals team at the Cancer Treatment Promotion Office for cancer treatment at MRCH, and its work on cancer care from the 4 perspectives of the balanced scorecard in accordance with the basic policy of MRCH.

  17. Plan to Have No Unplanned: A Collaborative, Hospital-Based Quality-Improvement Project to Reduce the Rate of Unplanned Extubations in the Pediatric ICU.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sandeep; Nunez, Denise J; Katyal, Chaavi; Ushay, H Michael

    2015-08-01

    Although under-reported and understudied, unplanned extubations carry a significant risk of patient harm and even death. They are an important yardstick of quality control of care of intubated patients in the ICU. A unit-based risk assessment and multidisciplinary approach is required to decrease the incidence of unplanned extubations. As part of a quality-improvement initiative of Children's Hospital at Montefiore, all planned and unplanned extubations in a multidisciplinary 20-bed pediatric ICU were evaluated over a 12-month period (January to December 2010). At the end of 6 months, an interim analysis was performed, and high-risk patient groups and patient care factors were identified. These factors were targeted in the second phase of the project. Over this period, there were a total of 267 extubations, of which 231 (87%) were planned extubations and 36 (13%) were unplanned. A patient care policy targeting the risk factors was instituted, along with extensive nursing and other personnel education in the second phase. As a result of this intervention, the unplanned extubation rate in the pediatric ICU decreased from 3.55 to 2.59/100 intubation days. All subjects who had an unplanned extubation during nursing procedures or transport required re-intubation, whereas none of the unplanned extubations during ventilator weaning required re-intubation. A targeted approach based on unit-specific risk factors is most effective in quality-improvement projects. A specific policy for sedation and weaning can be very helpful in managing intubated patients and preventing unintended harm. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  18. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    PubMed Central

    Kaviarasu, Karunakaran; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Murthy, K. Krishna; Babu, A. Ananda Giri; Prasad, Bhaskar Laxman Durga

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was carried out for the calculated and the measured portal images for the criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA). Three gamma parameters: Maximum gamma, average gamma, and percentage of the field area with a gamma value>1.0 were analyzed. Three gamma index parameters were evaluated for 40 IMRT plans (315 IMRT fields) which were calculated for 400 monitor units (MU)/min dose rate and maximum multileaf collimator (MLC) speed of 2.5 cm/s. Gamma parameters for all 315 fields are within acceptable limits set at our center. Further, to improve the gamma results, we set an action level for this study using the mean and standard deviation (SD) values from the 315 fields studied. Forty out of 315 IMRT fields showed low gamma agreement (gamma parameters>2 SD as per action level of the study). The parameters were recalculated and reanalyzed for the dose rates of 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Lowering the dose rate helped in getting an enhanced gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses of complicated fields. This may be attributed to the less complex motion of MLC over time and the MU of the field/segment. An IMRT QA work flow was prepared which will help in improving the quality of IMRT delivery. PMID:26865759

  19. Developing a strategic marketing plan.

    PubMed

    Zipin, M L

    1989-06-01

    Strategic planning is essential to the survival of today's hospital. Whether the hospital is an academic medical center, a community hospital or some other type of organization, the key to success is a thorough market planning process. The four-phase process described here focuses on an academic medical center, but it is equally applicable to other types of hospitals.

  20. A hospital-based comparative study of the knowledge, attitudes and practices of family planning among women belonging to different socio-economic status.

    PubMed

    Zuberi, Sahar Khalid; Salman, Syeda Hafsah; Virji, Rashna Naozer; Sana, Syed; Kumari, Sulachhni; Zehra, Nosheen

    2015-05-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of family planning among women belonging to different socio-economic status. A cross sectional study was conducted in the outpatient department of three hospitals of Ziauddin University based on the socioeconomic divide. Total 351 married females of reproductive age group with at least one child were selected after informed consent through non probability convenience sampling. Data was analyzed by using SPSS version 21. The preferred method of contraception in all three groups was a male condom30.9%. The upper socioeconomic group relied more on the modern methods of contraception 92% while the middle socioeconomic group relied on modern 71.7% as well as natural methods of contraception 28.3%. Use of contraceptives was comparatively lower in the low socioeconomic group 19.5%. Lower socioeconomic group also had the most children per family with mean and standard deviation of 3.6±2.3 and also had the highest number of desired children with mean and standard deviation of 4±1.4. The general reasons for avoiding contraceptives were difficulty in getting pregnant (11.1%), the want for more children (10.2%), infrequent sexual intercourse (10.0%) and fear of side effects (6.9%). Awareness of contraception was found lowest in the lower socioeconomic class, with the elite class using a high percentage of contraceptives.

  1. The Global Trigger Tool shows that one out of seven patients suffers harm in Palestinian hospitals: challenges for launching a strategic safety plan.

    PubMed

    Najjar, Shahenaz; Hamdan, Motasem; Euwema, Martin C; Vleugels, Arthur; Sermeus, Walter; Massoud, Rashad; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patient safety levels in Palestinian hospitals and to provide guidance for policymakers involved in safety improvement efforts. Retrospective review of hospitalized patient records using the Global Trigger Tool. Two large hospitals in Palestine: a referral teaching hospital and a nonprofit, non-governmental hospital. A total of 640 random records of discharged patients were reviewed by experienced nurses and physicians from the selected hospitals. Assessment of adverse events. Prevalence of adverse events, their preventability and harm category. Descriptive statistics and Cohen kappa coefficients were calculated. One out of seven patients (91 [14.2%]) suffered harm. Fifty-four (59.3%) of these events were preventable; 64 (70.4%) resulted in temporary harm, requiring prolonged hospitalization. Good reliability was achieved among the independent reviewers in identifying adverse events. The Global Trigger Tool showed that adverse events in Palestinian hospitals likely occur at a rate of 20 times higher than previously reported. Although reviewers reported that detecting adverse events was feasible, we identified conditions suggesting that the tool may be challenging to use in daily practice. One out of seven patients suffers harm in Palestinian hospitals. Compromised safety represents serious problems for patients, hospitals and governments and should be a high priority public health issue. We argue that direct interventions should be launched immediately to improve safety. Additional costs associated with combating adverse events should be taken into consideration, especially in regions with limited resources, as in Palestine.

  2. Mapping infectious disease hospital surge threats to lessons learnt in Singapore: a systems analysis and development of a framework to inform how to DECIDE on planning and response strategies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta R; Coker, Richard; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J-M; Leo, Yee Sin; Chow, Angela; Lim, Poh Lian; Tan, Qinghui; Chen, Mark I-Cheng; Hildon, Zoe Jane-Lara

    2017-09-04

    Hospital usage and service demand during an Infectious Disease (ID) outbreak can tax the health system in different ways. Herein we conceptualize hospital surge elements, and lessons learnt from such events, to help build appropriately matched responses to future ID surge threats. We used the Interpretive Descriptive qualitative approach. Interviews (n = 35) were conducted with governance and public health specialists; hospital based staff; and General Practitioners. Key policy literature in tandem with the interview data were used to iteratively generate a Hospital ID Surge framework. We anchored our narrative account within this framework, which is used to structure our analysis. A spectrum of surge threats from combinations of capacity (for crowding) and capability (for treatment complexity) demands were identified. Starting with the Pyramid scenario, or an influx of high screening rates flooding Emergency Departments, alongside fewer and manageable admissions; the Reverse-Pyramid occurs when few cases are screened and admitted but those that are, are complex; during a 'Black' scenario, the system is overburdened by both crowding and complexity. The Singapore hospital system is highly adapted to crowding, functioning remarkably well at constant near-full capacity in Peacetime and resilient to Endemic surges. We catalogue 26 strategies from lessons learnt relating to staffing, space, supplies and systems, crystalizing institutional memory. The DECIDE model advocates linking these strategies to types of surge threats and offers a step-by-step guide for coordinating outbreak planning and response. Lack of a shared definition and decision making of surge threats had rendered the procedures somewhat duplicative. This burden was paradoxically exacerbated by a health system that highly prizes planning and forward thinking, but worked largely in silo until an ID crisis hit. Many such lessons can be put into play to further strengthen our current hospital governance

  3. Hospital capital funding.

    PubMed

    Hebert, M

    1992-01-01

    It is critical that hospitals have a long-range plan in place to ensure that buildings and equipment are replaced when necessary. A study undertaken in British Columbia contrasted the Greater Vancouver Regional Hospital District's capital plan (past and future) to a proposed capital replacement model. The model, developed using accepted industry standards and criteria, provided an asset value that was used for comparison purposes. Building and equipment expenditures of the Surrey Memorial Hospital were also compared against the model. Findings from both studies are presented in this article.

  4. Rotorcraft master plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwoschinsky, Peter V.

    1992-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Master Plan contains a comprehensive summary of active and planned FAA vertical flight research and development. Since the Master Plan is not sufficient for tracking project status and monitoring progress, the Vertical Flight Program Plan will provide that capability. It will be consistent with the Master Plan and, in conjunction with it, will serve to ensure a hospitable environment if the industry presents a practical vertical-flight initiative.

  5. Sharing your culture with a new partner. Catholic system implements plan to integrate values when it acquires a for-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, M A

    1996-01-01

    In 1994 Orange County, CA's St. Joseph Health System (SJHS), aiming to strengthen its position in the regional market, acquired Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, a for-profit hospital believed to be the premier healthcare facility in the southern part of the county. SJHS's leaders began integrating the two cultures at the top, replacing Mission's board but keeping its top managers in place. A member of the Sisters of St. Joseph joined the managers as the hospital's new vice president of sponsorship. In a series of orientation meetings, the hospital's leaders explained SJHS's mission and values to the staff, announcing that Mission would add a pastoral care department, emphasize care of the medically underserved, and discontinue abortion and sterilization procedures. Some Mission staff were disappointed when the hospital terminated a project that offered assisted reproductive technologies. In addition, capitation and exclusive contracting has caused conflict among area physicians, which affects the hospital. And Mission needs to further educate physicians and staff about bioethical issues. On the other hand, Mission has launched a center to help strengthen area families, a transportation system for senior citizens, and a dental clinic for underserved children. It has also taken over sponsorship of a clinic for underserved families. And, in 1994, the hospital opposed Proposition 187, which called for denying state services to illegal immigrants. Many Mission staff have been heartened to learn that the hospital considers justice a core value.

  6. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger.

  7. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  8. Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Plans in your area . Can I get my health care from any doctor, other health care provider, or hospital? In HMO Plans, you generally ... get your care and services from doctors, other health care providers, or hospitals in the plan's network, except: ...

  9. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  10. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  11. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  12. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  13. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  14. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings - Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH).

    PubMed

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first "Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals" (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section "Ventilation and air conditioning technology" attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  15. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  16. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  17. Future pension accounting changes: implications for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weld, Tim; Klein, Gina

    2011-05-01

    Proposed rules in accounting for defined benefit plans may affect hospitals' statement of operations and affect the time, effort, and cost to comply with periodic financial reporting requirements. The new standard would require immediate recognition of the full amount of plan amendments in determining operating income. Hospitals should consider the role of pension plans in their compensation programs.

  18. Tiered hospital networks.

    PubMed

    Yegian, Jill M

    2003-01-01

    As a result of rising health care costs, health plans are experimenting with insurance products that shift greater financial responsibility for medical care to consumers and create incentives for consumers to consider cost differences when choosing among providers. Based on an October 2002 roundtable discussion, this paper discusses insurance product trends, particularly tiered hospital networks. Issues addressed include these product features' potential to reduce system costs, the effect on the hospital-health plan relationship, consumers' ability to consider cost and quality in decision making, and financial barriers to care for the chronically ill.

  19. Telecommunications and the hospital.

    PubMed

    Tobias, T; Levine, J

    1986-04-01

    Telecommunications is a rapidly changing industry which currently offers the hospital administrator an opportunity to cut costs in the short run while providing for future needs. Like any important resource, this technology must be managed by skilled personnel who can recommend solutions consistent with the hospital's business philosophy and strategic plan. Three specific actions were recommended: first, consider modernizing your PBX; second, train an inhouse person or hire a telecommunications analyst to conduct the review of available systems and options and to supervise installation and operation; and third, when replacing computer systems and PBXs, develop a plan which will provide for current needs and future growth.

  20. A Study to Determine a Training Plan for the Medical Record Technicians of Naval Hospital, San Diego in Preparation for the Implementation of the Diagnosis Related Group System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-13

    om0 Stufflebeam et al, stated that evaluation is "the 0 process of delineating, obtaining, and providing useful < z information for judging decision...in the Medical Records M z Department. Hospitals, pp. 100, 102, 104. K z -4 m Stufflebeam , D. (1971). Educational Evaluation and z Decision Making

  1. A Strategic Marketing Plan for Women and Infant Services, DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th ed.). (1996). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Reid, A. (1996). Marketing...personal communication, September 4, 1998) Potomac Hospital. [On-line]. Available: http://www.pcweb.com/potomachospital/ s_wome.html Publication

  2. [Ophthalmological screening via a hospital boat: field study for planning future health care services in remote villages at the Volta Lake in Ghana].

    PubMed

    Frimpong-Boateng, A; Rüfer, F; Fiadoyor, S; Nkrumah-Mills, J; Mensah-Tetteh, F; Kudoadzi, N; Roider, J

    2009-09-01

    A maiden voyage on a hospital boat was carried out to determine the spectrum of ophthalmological diseases in a rural and secluded area on the Volta Lake in Ghana in order to improve future health care services. Portable water, electricity, and an operating theatre were available on the hospital boat. Visual acuity was determined using Snellen E charts, and Lea boards were used in children up to the age of 4 years. The anterior segments were examined using hand held slit lamps. After pupil dilation indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy was performed and tonometry was carried out using a Perkins tonometer A total of 1,246 citizens were examined. The mean age was 23.7 years and the mean visual acuity was 6/6 (log MAR 0.0+/-0.3. The main cause of blindness was a cataract with 45.8%, followed by pathological conditions of the optic disc with 29.2%. The hospital boat is suitable for screening and for carrying out minor extraocular operations. Looking just at the technical aspect, it is possible to perform major intraocular operations on the hospital boat. However, due to the lack of immediate follow-up visits, it is advisable to carry out major operations in the next eye clinic on shore.

  3. [Problems of collaboration between community and hospital pharmacists for cancer chemotherapy and proposed corrective measures: KJ method based identification and planning workshop].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Maejima, Kazutoshi; Iizuka, Keiko; Yamaga, Shoichi; Sakashita, Kanako; Takano, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Tajiri, Kotaro; Takechi, Yoichiro; Shimada, Mitsuaki; Suzuki, Minoru; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a workshop that aimed to address the problems of collaboration between community and hospital pharmacists to provide safe outpatient chemotherapy and promote continuous collaboration. Thirty-nine pharmacists in Gunma were enrolled in the workshop and divided into five groups. Each group comprised similar number of community and hospital pharmacists in the neighboring area. Participants in these groups discussed using the KJ method and identified the following important and urgent problems; "lack of collaboration between hospitals and pharmacies" and "lack of exchanging patients' information, including regimen". To improve collaboration, the participants recommended a workshop or a study group and setting up a hotline, and to exchange patients' information, they proposed to utilize a medicine notebook and reconfirm how to use these notebook. Furthermore, usage of cloud storage as a means to exchange patients' information was discussed. Post-workshop questionnaire revealed that 97% participants acknowledged an increased awareness toward collaboration, and 90% participants were motivated to take more aggressive action for promoting collaboration; whereas, only 53% participants believed that they could summarize the problems and corrective measures in promoting collaboration. The workshop seemed to be productive in identifying the problems of collaboration and improving the awareness and motivation toward collaboration. However, it served only as a "trigger", and therefore it is important for valuable "results" to continuously collaborate face-to-face between community and hospital pharmacists.

  4. A multivariate analysis of choice criteria for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Heischmidt, K A; Hekmat, F; Gordon, P

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the choice criteria used by consumers in selecting a hospital and provides information useful to hospital administrators in planning and implementing marketing efforts directed toward potential consumers. The findings suggest that physical plot, previous experience with the hospital, location of hospital, overall cost, and reputation of the hospital were important factors in selecting a hospital.

  5. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  6. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  7. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  8. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  9. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  10. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  11. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  12. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  13. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  14. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  15. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  16. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  17. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  18. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  19. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  20. Achieving World Class: An Independent Review of the Design Plans for the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and the Fort Belvoir Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    the new facility are inadequate. 7. The new facility design does not seem to account for expansion of support services (e.g., food service, day...should be addressed. 7. Current plans should be reviewed for their adequacy to address expected increased needs in support services such as food service...smart room” technology; wired/wireless internet access; extended patient services via electronic kiosks and public area media displays; patient

  1. Risk management and measuring productivity with POAS--Point of Act System--a medical information system as ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) for hospital management.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, M

    2007-01-01

    The concept of our system is not only to manage material flows, but also to provide an integrated management resource, a means of correcting errors in medical treatment, and applications to EBM (evidence-based medicine) through the data mining of medical records. Prior to the development of this system, electronic processing systems in hospitals did a poor job of accurately grasping medical practice and medical material flows. With POAS (Point of Act System), hospital managers can solve the so-called, "man, money, material, and information" issues inherent in the costs of healthcare. The POAS system synchronizes with each department system, from finance and accounting, to pharmacy, to imaging, and allows information exchange. We can manage Man (Business Process), Material (Medical Materials and Medicine), Money (Expenditure for purchase and Receipt), and Information (Medical Records) completely by this system. Our analysis has shown that this system has a remarkable investment effect - saving over four million dollars per year - through cost savings in logistics and business process efficiencies. In addition, the quality of care has been improved dramatically while error rates have been reduced - nearly to zero in some cases.

  2. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH)

    PubMed Central

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals” (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care. PMID:26958457

  3. Patient need at the heart of workforce planning: the use of supply and demand analysis in a large teaching hospital's acute medical unit.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, I R; Simmonds, M J R; Poole, L

    2012-08-01

    Timely medical assessment is integral to the safety and quality of healthcare delivery in acute medicine. Medical staff are an expensive resource. This study aimed to develop a modelling system that facilitated efficient workforce planning according to patient need on the acute medical unit. A realistic 24-hour 'supply' of junior doctors was calculated by adjusting the theoretical numbers on the rota for leave allowances, natural breaks and other ward duties by a combination of direct observation of working practice and junior doctor interviews. 'Demand' was analysed using detailed admission data. Supply and demand were then integrated with data from a survey of the time spent on the process of clerking and assessment of medical admissions. A robust modelling system that predicted the number of unclerked patients was developed. The utility of the model was assessed by demonstrating the impact of a regulation-compliant redesign of the rota using existing staff and by predicting the most efficient use of an additional shift. This simple modelling system has the potential to enhance quality of care and efficiency by linking workforce planning to patient need.

  4. Educational Facilities in the Hospital for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Alan C.

    1965-01-01

    Planning and design criteria are established for educational facilities in VA hospitals, rendering them more effective for medical education. Rather than developing plans for prototype teaching hospitals, guidelines are presented which may be utilized to meet the needs of a particular situation. Three broad categories of facilities are…

  5. Educational Facilities in the Hospital for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Alan C.

    1965-01-01

    Planning and design criteria are established for educational facilities in VA hospitals, rendering them more effective for medical education. Rather than developing plans for prototype teaching hospitals, guidelines are presented which may be utilized to meet the needs of a particular situation. Three broad categories of facilities are…

  6. Strategic planning: getting from here to there.

    PubMed

    Kaleba, Richard

    2006-11-01

    Hospitals should develop a strategic plan that defines specific actions in a realistic time frame. Hospitals can follow a five-phase process to develop a strategic plan. The strategic planning process requires a project leader and medical staff buy-in.

  7. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  8. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  9. Integrating financial and strategic planning.

    PubMed

    Pivnicny, V C

    1989-09-01

    As hospitals face mounting profitability and liquidity concerns, the need to integrate strategic and financial planning also will continue to grow. This article describes a process for integrating these planning functions and the ideal organizational framework to facilitate the process. Obstacles to the integration of these planning processes also are discussed.

  10. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  11. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  12. 40 CFR 62.10360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.10360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  13. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  14. 40 CFR 62.10360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.10360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  15. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  16. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  17. 40 CFR 62.11120 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.11120 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  18. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  19. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  20. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  1. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  2. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  3. 40 CFR 62.12610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.12610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  4. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  5. 40 CFR 62.11120 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.11120 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  6. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  7. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  8. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  9. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  10. Toward healthier hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mintzberg, H

    1997-01-01

    This article builds around a framework of cure, care, control, and community, with collaboration at the center, to consider 12 issues common to many hospitals. These include, among others, the fragmentation of efforts, confusion in mission (and in mission statements), the problems of bundling research with clinical work, selectivity in informing board members, the dangers of professional management, and the difficulties of combining external advocacy with internal reconciliation in the senior manager's job. The article concludes that hospitals could better learn how to solve systemic problems systemically, and that to do so will require not the wish lists of strategic planning and structural reorganizing, but tangible changes in their collective behavior.

  11. Child Care Services Provided by Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    In an attempt to determine the extent to which hospitals had established child care services for their personnel, a survey was conducted of 3,000 hospitals with 100 beds or more. Out of nearly 2,000 hospitals which responded, 98 were operating child care centers, with about 500 more planning or at least showing interest in such a program. The…

  12. Disaster management and the emergency department: a framework for planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deborah H; Proctor, Pamela W; Amos, Linda K

    2002-03-01

    Recent changes in the Joint Commission Accrediting Hospital Organization (JCAHO) Environment of Care standards are forcing hospitals to revisit their disaster planning process. Emergency Management, a process that is familiar to municipal and industry planners is now part of hospital disaster planning. A framework for making the necessary changes to the hospital disaster plan is presented. Examples of tools that might be useful in the planning process are also included.

  13. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  14. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  15. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  16. [Remote radiation planning support system].

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We constructed a remote radiation planning support system between Kyushu University Hospital (KUH) in Fukuoka and Kyushu University Beppu Hospital (KBH) in Oita. Between two institutions, radiology information system for radiotherapy division (RT-RIS) and radiation planning system (RTPS) were connected by virtual private network (VPN). This system enables the radiation oncologists at KUH to perform radiotherapy planning for the patients at KBH. The detail of the remote radiation planning support system in our institutions is as follows: The radiation oncologist at KBH performs radiotherapy planning and the data of the patients are sent anonymously to the radiation oncologists at KUH. The radiation oncologists at KUH receive the patient's data, access to RTPS at KBH, verify or change the radiation planning at KBH: Radiation therapy is performed at KBH according to the confirmed plan by the radiation oncologists at KUH. Our remote radiation planning system is useful for providing radiation therapy with safety and accuracy.

  17. 37. Roof Plan, Ground Floor Plan, Sections,and Details. Addition to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Roof Plan, Ground Floor Plan, Sections,and Details. Addition to Bacteriology Laboratory at Letterman General Hospital, San Francisco, Cal. June 1915. BUILDING 1006. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  18. The frontline hospital.

    PubMed

    Mein, P

    1983-01-01

    This brief description of the planning process for a frontline hospital is intended as a guide only: there will be a variety of approaches depending on local conditions. However, certain of the principles raised have universal relevance for the construction of health facilities where resources are limited. In brief, these: - The changing role of the frontline hospital should not be allowed to obscure the fact that the small hospital still has a significant role to play and that future, as yet undefined, functional changes will take place necessitating generalized designs that can accommodate those changes. - The erection of new buildings is not always the appropriate solution to apparent problems with facilities. Often a more relevant course is to adapt existing buildings or to provide community-level primary health care services not based on facilities. - The development of standardized, though flexible, briefs for hospitals of different sizes is essential, since ther will, for some years to come, be a shortage of the professional manpower needed to enable completely individual designs to be produced for each facility. Standardized briefs are infinitely preferable to standard or type plans, which tend to be inflexible and lead to overbuilding. - Local involvement in the planning process is essential, not only because it provides useful knowledge but primarily because local commitment is the only way of avoiding the construction of inappropriate facilities. - Architectural expertise must be available within the health system, since very often outside consultants are unable or unwilling, because of the system of payment, to design suitable hospital buildings. - The type of construction used should be the simplest and most economical that will provide an effective environment for the health tasks to be carried out so that the limited resources available can be stretched to serve as many people as possible. - Local building materials should always be preferred- to

  19. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  20. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-02-01

    To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. See Data Sources/Study Setting. The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place.

  1. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center.

  2. 40 CFR 62.5160 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis)(section 111(d)/129 Plan) § 62.5160 Identification of plan. Section 111(d)/129 plan for HMIWIs and the associated Code of Maryland (COMAR)...

  3. 40 CFR 62.5160 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis)(section 111(d)/129 Plan) § 62.5160 Identification of plan. Section 111(d)/129 plan for HMIWIs and the associated Code of Maryland (COMAR)...

  4. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.13 Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals...

  5. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols.

  6. 42 CFR 456.501 - UR plans as a condition for FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.501 UR plans as a condition for FFP. (a) Except... services furnished by a hospital or mental hospital unless the facility has in effect a UR plan that...

  7. 42 CFR 456.501 - UR plans as a condition for FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.501 UR plans as a condition for FFP. (a) Except... services furnished by a hospital or mental hospital unless the facility has in effect a UR plan that...

  8. [Redesigning the hospital discharge process].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ramos, M; Flores-Pardo, E; Uris-Sellés, J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show that the redesign and planning process of hospital discharge advances the departure time of the patient from a hospital environment. Quasi-experimental study conducted from January 2011 to April 2013, in a local hospital. The cases analysed were from medical and surgical nursing units. The process was redesigned to coordinate all the professionals involved in the process. The hospital discharge improvement process improvement was carried out by forming a working group, the analysis of retrospective data, identifying areas for improvement, and its redesign. The dependent variable was the time of patient administrative discharge. The sample was classified as pre-intervention, inter-intervention, and post-intervention, depending on the time point of the study. The final sample included 14,788 patients after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The mean discharge release time decreased significantly by 50 min between pre-intervention and post-intervention periods. The release time in patients with planned discharge was one hour and 25 min less than in patients with unplanned discharge. Process redesign is a useful strategy to improve the process of hospital discharge. Besides planning the discharge, it is shown that the patient leaving the hospital before 12 midday is a key factor. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Hospital Capital Investment During the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung

    2017-01-01

    Hospital capital investment is important for acquiring and maintaining technology and equipment needed to provide health care. Reduction in capital investment by a hospital has negative implications for patient outcomes. Most hospitals rely on debt and internal cash flow to fund capital investment. The great recession may have made it difficult for hospitals to borrow, thus reducing their capital investment. I investigated the impact of the great recession on capital investment made by California hospitals. Modeling how hospital capital investment may have been liquidity constrained during the recession is a novel contribution to the literature. I estimated the model with California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development data and system generalized method of moments. Findings suggest that not-for-profit and public hospitals were liquidity constrained during the recession. Comparing the changes in hospital capital investment between 2006 and 2009 showed that hospitals used cash flow to increase capital investment by $2.45 million, other things equal.

  10. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  11. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  12. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Das Krankenhausmanagement ist stets Herausforderungen ausgesetzt. Anstatt auf die Herausforderungen zu warten, sollten Ärzte und Manager im Voraus handeln, um ein optimiertes und nachhaltig wertorientiertes Gesundheitswesen zu sichern. Diese Arbeit unterstreicht die Bedeutung der Szenarienplanung in Krankenhäusern, schlägt eine ausgearbeitete Definition der Stakeholder eines Krankenhauses vor und definiert die Einflussfaktoren, denen Krankenhäuser ausgesetzt sind.Methodik: Basierend auf einer Literaturanalyse sowie auf persönlichen Interviews mit Stakeholdern eines Krankenhauses schlagen wir eine ausgearbeitete Definition von Stakeholdern vor und erarbeiteten einen Fragebogen. Dieser Fragebogen berücksichtigt folgende Einflussfaktoren, die entsprechende Auswirkungen auf das Krankenhaus-Management haben: politische/rechtliche, wirtschaftliche, soziale, technologische und Umweltkräfte.Diese Einflussfaktoren werden untersucht, um die so genannten kritischen Unsicherheiten zu entwickeln. Die gründliche Identifizierung von Unsicherheiten basierte auf „Stakeholder Feedback“.Ergebnisse: Zwei Haupt-Unsicherheiten wurden identifiziert und in dieser Studie berücksichtigt:die Entwicklung der Arbeitsbelastung für das medizinische Personaldie gewinnorientierte Leistung des medizinischen Personals.Entsprechend der entwickelten Szenarien konnten wir folgende Kernstrategie empfehlen: komplementäre Ausbildung sowohl des medizinischen Personals als auch der nicht-medizinischen Top-Führungskräfte und Manager von Krankenhäusern. Ergänzende szenariospezifische strategische Optionen sollen, falls erforderlich, in Betracht gezogen werden, um eine bestimmte zukünftige Entwicklung des medizinischen Umfeldes zu optimieren.Schlussfolgerung: Strategische Planung in Krankenhäusern ist wichtig, um nachhaltigen Erfolg zu gewährleisten. Diese Planung soll mehrere Situationen berücksichtigen und integriert interne und externe Ein- und Ausblicke. Darüber hinaus soll sie schwache Signale und „blinde Flecken“ identifizieren. Dieses fließt in eine solide Planung für mehrere strategische Optionen ein. Es ist eine State-of-the-Art-Methode, die dem Krankenhausmanagement erlaubt, mit zunehmenden Herausforderungen umzugehen.

  13. The status of hospital information systems in Iranian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-08-01

    The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers' experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals, particularly those in Isfahan, is subject to several

  14. The Status of Hospital Information Systems in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Methods: For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers’ experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Results: Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. Conclusion: The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals

  15. Discussion and documentation of future care: a before-and-after study examining the impact of an alternative approach to recording treatment decisions on advance care planning in an acute hospital.

    PubMed

    Malyon, Alexandra C; Forman, Julia R; Fuld, Jonathan P; Fritz, Zoë

    2017-09-01

    To determine whether discussion and documentation of decisions about future care was improved following the introduction of a new approach to recording treatment decisions: the Universal Form of Treatment Options (UFTO). Retrospective review of the medical records of patients who died within 90 days of admission to oncology or respiratory medicine wards over two 3-month periods, preimplementation and postimplementation of the UFTO. A sample size of 70 per group was required to provide 80% power to observe a change from 15% to 35% in discussion or documentation of advance care planning (ACP), using a two-sided test at the 5% significance level. On the oncology ward, introduction of the UFTO was associated with a statistically significant increase in cardiopulmonary resuscitation decisions documented for patients (pre-UFTO 52% to post-UFTO 77%, p=0.01) and an increase in discussions regarding ACP (pre-UFTO 27%, post-UFTO 49%, p=0.03). There were no demonstrable changes in practice on the respiratory ward. Only one patient came into hospital with a formal ACP document. Despite patients' proximity to the end-of-life, there was limited documentation of ACP and almost no evidence of formalised ACP. The introduction of the UFTO was associated with a change in practice on the oncology ward but this was not observed for respiratory patients. A new approach to recording treatment decisions may contribute to improving discussion and documentation about future care but further work is needed to ensure that all patients' preferences for treatment and care at the end-of-life are known. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  17. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  18. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  19. Preparing hospitals for toxicological mass casualties events.

    PubMed

    Tur-Kaspa, I; Lev, E I; Hendler, I; Siebner, R; Shapira, Y; Shemer, J

    1999-05-01

    For most hospital staffs, treatment of chemical casualties presents an obscure and even frightening situation. We report our unique experience from hospital drills in order to improve hospital preparedness for patient management under mass casualty conditions involving hazardous chemicals. Twenty-one major hospitals in Israel. A unique hospital deployment plan for the management of chemical casualties was developed, and hospitals were required to have a full chemical practice drill every 3 to 5 yrs. These drills were designed as realistically as possible, and all included the use of personal protective equipment, decontamination, and treatment of simulated patients. Twenty-five percent of these patients, simulating children and adults, required intensive care and ventilation support. Hospitals were inspected and reviewed on the quality of treatment given and the overall continuity of care as well as on their administrative performance. Between 1986 to 1994, 30 full chemical practice drills were conducted in 21 major hospitals. Each drill included treatment of 100 to 400 simulated patients. The lessons from the hospital drills are described and were incorporated in the proposed revised hospital deployment plan. All hospitals significantly improved their ability to respond appropriately to these incidents. The level of preparedness for a chemical mass casualty scenario should be established according to the existing threat and the available resources. The proposed plan can serve as a basis for hospital planning and staff training worldwide, thus facilitating optimal care in the event of an incident involving toxic chemicals. A cost-effective scale for hospital preparation levels according to the existing threat is suggested.

  20. What is your hospitality quotient?

    PubMed

    DeSilets, Lyn

    2015-03-01

    In addition to the behind-the-scenes work involved with planning and implementing continuing nursing education activities, there are additional ways we can enhance the learner's experience. This article presents ideas on how to improve your hospitality quotient. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  2. Engaging Chicago hospitals in the baby-friendly hospital initiative.

    PubMed

    Schoenfelder, Samantha L; Wych, Sadie; Willows, Catherine A; Harrington, Joseph; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer; Becker, Adam B

    2013-11-01

    Breastfeeding is now widely recognized as a vital obesity prevention strategy and hospitals play a primary role in promoting, supporting and helping mothers to initiate and maintain breastfeeding. The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) provides an evidence-based model that hospitals can use to plan and implement breastfeeding quality improvement (QI) projects. Funding under Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW), administered by the CDC, brought together key Chicago partners to provide individualized support and technical assistance with breastfeeding QI projects to the 19 maternity hospitals in Chicago. A community organizing approach was taken to mobilize hospital interest in breastfeeding QI projects, leading to successes, e.g. 12/19 (63 %) Chicago hospitals registered with Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. (BFUSA) to pursue official Baby-Friendly designation. Key factors that fostered this success included: involving all levels of hospital staff, financial incentives, and ongoing tailored technical assistance. To assist other communities in similar work, this article discusses the approach the project took to mobilize hospitals to improve breastfeeding support practices based on the BFHI, as well as successes and lessons learned.

  3. Steering Patients to Safer Hospitals? The Effect of a Tiered Hospital Network on Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety “leaps.” The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Study Design Changes in hospital admissions’ patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Principal Findings Patients affiliated with the engineers’ union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists’ union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Conclusions Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear. PMID:18761676

  4. EDUCATIONAL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADAMS, DON

    SIX ARTICLES CRITICALLY EXAMINE THE PROCESS OF EDUCATIONAL PLANNING FROM THE UNDERLYING ASSUMPTIONS TO THE PRACTICAL PROBLEMS OF IMPLEMENTATION. ANDERSON AND BOWMAN IN "THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN EDUCATIONAL PLANNING" DISCUSS SUCH TOPICS AS THE DEFINITION OF PLANNING, EDUCATIONAL PLANNING AND SOCIAL DEMOCRATIZATION, PLANNING FOR…

  5. 42 CFR 456.180 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.180 Section... Plan of Care § 456.180 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or... plan of care for each applicant or recipient. (b) The plan of care must include— (1)...

  6. Geothermal conversion at Veterans Hospital, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Engen, I.A.; Metzger, S.W.

    1982-02-01

    A geothermal resource near the Veterans Administration Hospital facilities in Boise, Idaho, has been used since the turn of the century for space heating of homes. A plan for using this resource in some of the Veterans Hospital facilities is discussed. Preliminary cost estimates are presented, economic evaluation criteria are given, and heating system alternatives for the facilities are compared.

  7. Continuing Education for Rural Hospital Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Nancy; Pickard, Myrna R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a rural outreach program to provide continuing education in nursing practice to all levels of nursing personnel in rural hospitals. Covers difficulties in planning and implementing the programs and the steps taken to explain the program philosophy and gain the trust of hospital adminstration and staff. (MF)

  8. Promoting Regional Disaster Preparedness among Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; Kang, JungEun; Silenas, Rasa

    2008-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural communities face substantial risks of natural disasters but rural hospitals face multiple obstacles to preparedness. The objective was to create and implement a simple and effective training and planning exercise to assist individual rural hospitals to improve disaster preparedness, as well as to enhance regional…

  9. New operating room suite for hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkin, C.W.

    1996-07-01

    Hospital renovation always is a sensitive issue. The needs of patients and staff are prime concerns in the planning and design processes. One of the most difficult areas to renovate is the operating room suite. This article describes the HVAC portion of the renovation of the OR suite for the Columbia LaGrange Memorial Hospital, LaGrange, Ill.

  10. Quality Assurance in a Children's Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggish, Rosemary C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examined the use of short-term isolation (STI) in a children's psychiatric hospital. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals quality assurance mode was used. Studied the quality use of STI and its documentation. Data gathered served as the basis for recommendations that led to planned, informed program changes. (Author)

  11. Managing constipation in older people in hospital.

    PubMed

    Wessel-Cessieux, Elizabeth

    Constipation is a distressing disorder that is common among older patients in hospital. It is often underdiagnosed and undertreated, and can lead to increased morbidity and prolonged hospital stays. In most cases this common problem can be treated successfully if the correct management plan is adopted. This article reviews the prevention and management strategies available to address the issue.

  12. Promoting Regional Disaster Preparedness among Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; Kang, JungEun; Silenas, Rasa

    2008-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural communities face substantial risks of natural disasters but rural hospitals face multiple obstacles to preparedness. The objective was to create and implement a simple and effective training and planning exercise to assist individual rural hospitals to improve disaster preparedness, as well as to enhance regional…

  13. [Flexibility and safety in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fara, G M; Barni, M

    2011-01-01

    The paper explains the reasons according to which the newly-planned hospitals must adopt the concept of advanced flexibility (structural, technological, organizational, diagnostic and therapeutic), in order to avoid the risk of being already obsolete at the moment of their opening, and this due to the fact that too much time elapses in this Country between the moment of planning a new hospital and the moment of the start of its activity. Flexibility is needed at different levels: at low or medium levels for what concerns administrative spaces and also patient rooms (except, in this latter case, when differential intensity of care is adopted); at advanced levelfor what concerns diagnostic and therapeutic areas, which must be rapidly adaptable to new solutions offered by advances in technology and organization. From a different standpoint, flexibility applies also to the fact that hospital must increasingly become a node of a large net including territorial health services: the latter devoted to take care of chronicity, while hospitals should concentrate on acute pathology. Of course the territory surrounding the hospital, through its outpatient service and consultories, is in charge also for first level diagnosy and therapy, leaving the hospital to more sophisticated activities.

  14. Information systems form large part of strategic plan.

    PubMed

    Landis, D

    1991-02-01

    Strategic planning is often a low priority for community hospitals because it is often too impractical. The difference for Ed McFall, chief information officer at Pitt County Memorial Hospital (PCMH) in Greenville, N.C., is that his hospital's and affiliated medical school's information systems plans work.

  15. Hospital finance.

    PubMed

    Herman, M J

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes key areas of focus for the analysis of risk in the hospital segment of the health care industry. The article is written from a commercial bank lending perspective. Both for-profit (C-corporations) and 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit segments are addressed.

  16. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  17. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  18. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  19. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  20. Plan well, plan often

    Treesearch

    Bill Block

    2013-01-01

    This issue includes an invited paper by Courtney Schultz and her colleagues commenting on the application of the newly adopted U.S. Forest Service Planning Rule (hereafter, the rule) for wildlife. The rule is basically implementing language to interpret the spirit and intent of the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) of 1976. Laws such as NFMA require additional...

  1. Missed opportunities: postpartum family planning in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J

    1993-10-01

    Interviews conducted in 1992 by the Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception with 1000 Kenyan women revealed a strong unmet need for postpartum family planning services. 800 of the women were interviewed at prenatal and child welfare clinics; the remaining 200 subjects had just given birth in hospital maternity wards. 90% expressed a desire to use contraception in the postpartum period, despite the fact that the majority had never used a family planning method. 94% of the postpartum patients indicated a definite interest in receiving information on family planning, preferably before hospital discharge. However, only 20% were exposed to a family planning talk during their hospital stay and just 2% were discharged with a method. Study subjects expressed a reluctance to initiate discussions about family planning with a nurse or other health care worker, generally because of embarrassment or a lack of privacy, and instead waited for hospital staff to raise the topic. Maternity ward nurses indicated an awareness of the large demand for family planning information and methods, but expressed a lack of confidence in their own knowledge base. Clinic nurse identified lack of time and privacy as the major barriers to such counseling. The following recommendations were suggested by investigators to remedy this situation: 1) availability of family planning services throughout hospitals, not just in maternal-child health and family planning clinics; 2) training of maternity ward staff in family planning by hospital family planning staff; 3) greater initiative in raising the issue of family planning on the part of staff in hospitals and clinics; 4) availability of private space for family planning discussions; and 5) access to family planning literature for all women who attend clinics, regardless of the reason for the visit.

  2. 42 CFR 456.80 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.80 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Plan of Care § 456.80 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a hospital or before authorization...

  3. 42 CFR 456.80 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Plan of Care § 456.80 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a hospital or before authorization for... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.80 Section...

  4. Diversification in the hospital industry.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2008-01-01

    An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. Hospital diversification and its impact on the operating ratio are studied for 172 hospitals during the period 2002-2007. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as being jointly dependant. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits allow the institution the wherewithal to diversify. The impact of external government planning and hospital competition is also measured. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Management's attitude concerning risk and reward is considered.

  5. Recommendations for managing hospital closure.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, R; Bouthillette, F; Havlovic, S J

    1998-01-01

    An acute care hospital was closed by the British Columbia Ministry of Health in 1993. A research study was conducted to investigate the ways closure of the hospital affected hospital employees and to identify ways to facilitate the closure/reorganization process. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 25 employees around the time of closure and six months after the closure. In the category Living with Closure, six themes arose from the qualitative analysis. They related to (1) provision of information; (2) effect of closure on the working environment and colleagues; (3) perceived stress; (4) recognition of one's worth; (5) provision of support services; and (6) the process of having a new job. The authors offer recommendations stemming from the analysis, which are intended to assist others planning for future hospital reorganizations or closures.

  6. Establishing a Hospital Response Network Among Children's Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bartenfeld, Michael T; Griese, Stephanie E; Krug, Steven E; Andreadis, Joanne; Peacock, Georgina

    A timely and effective response to public health threats requires a broad-reaching infrastructure. Children's hospitals are focused on evaluating and managing some of the most vulnerable patients and thus have unique preparedness and response planning needs. A virtual forum was established specifically for children's hospitals during the 2014-15 Ebola outbreak, and it demonstrated the importance and utility of connecting these specialty hospitals to discuss their shared concerns. Developing a successful children's hospital response network could build the national infrastructure for addressing children's needs in preparedness and response and for enhancing preparedness and response to high-consequence pathogens. Using the Laboratory Response Network and tiered-hospital network as models, a network of children's hospitals could work together, and with government and nongovernment partners, to establish and refine best practices for treating children with pathogens of public health concern. This network could more evenly distribute hospital readiness and tertiary pediatric patient care capabilities for highly infectious diseases across the country, thus reducing the need to transport pediatric patients across the country and increasing the national capacity to care for children infected with high-consequence pathogens.

  7. Bioterrorism and mass casualty preparedness in hospitals: United States, 2003.

    PubMed

    Niska, Richard W; Burt, Catharine W

    2005-09-27

    This study examined the content of hospital terrorism preparedness emergency response plans; whether those plans had been updated since September 11, 2001; collaboration of hospitals with outside organizations; clinician training in the management of biological, chemical, explosive, and nuclear exposures; drills on the response plans; and equipment and bed capacity. The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is an annual survey of a probability sample of approximately 500 non-Federal general and short-stay hospitals in the United States. A Bioterrorism and Mass Casualty Supplement was included in the 2003 survey and provided the data for this analysis. Almost all hospitals have plans for responding to natural disasters (97.3 percent). Most have plans for responding to chemical (85.5 percent), biological (84.8 percent), nuclear or radiological (77.2 percent), and explosive incidents (76.9 percent). About three-quarters of hospitals were integrated into community-wide disaster plans (76.4 percent), and 75.9 percent specifically reported a cooperative planning process with other local health care facilities. Despite these plans, only 46.1 percent reported written memoranda of understanding with these facilities to accept inpatients during a declared disaster. Hospitals varied widely in their plans for re-arranging schedules and space in the event of a disaster. Training for hospital incident command and smallpox, anthrax, chemical, and radiological exposures was ahead of training for other infectious diseases. The percentage of hospitals training their staff in any exposure varied from 92.1 percent for nurses to 49.2 percent for medical residents. Drills for natural disasters occurred more often than those for chemical, biological, explosive, nuclear, and epidemic incidents. More hospitals staged drills for biological attacks than for severe epidemics. Despite explosions being the most common form of terrorism, drills for these were staged by only

  8. How to Pitch an Antibiotic Stewardship Program to the Hospital C-Suite

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John G.; Gilbert, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals will soon require antibiotic stewardship programs. Infectious diseases specialists must craft business plans to engage hospital leadership to fund such programs. In this article, we review key cost and revenue elements that should be covered in such plans. Society is placing increasing emphasis on the importance of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs). New regulatory standards require hospitals to implement ASPs. Infectious Diseases (ID) specialists will need to help design and implement such programs at hospitals. A critical component of establishing such programs is submitting a business plan to hospital leadership justifying the cost and structure of the ASP and explaining what benefits the hospital will gain in return. In this article, we explore typical elements of such business plans and describe how hospital leadership may evaluate and determine the value of such plans. Understanding hospital costs and revenue models is critical to creating a viable and realistic business plan to support ASPs. PMID:27844028

  9. ERISA and hospital charges: granting an inch, not a mile.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Frank

    2006-09-01

    Some claims review services" have cited ERISA as an authority allowing an ERISA plan administrator to reduce a hospital's billed charges based on "the reasonable value of services." However, nothing in ERISA allows a plan administrator to change the terms of a contract between a payer and a provider, or places any limitations on the structure or price of hospital charges.

  10. Managed care's price bargaining with hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vivian Y

    2009-03-01

    Research has shown that managed care (MC) slowed the rate of growth in health care spending in the 1990s, primarily via lower unit prices paid. However, the mechanism of MC's price bargaining has not been well studied. This article uses a unique panel dataset with actual hospital prices in Massachusetts between 1994 and 2000 to examine the sources of MC's bargaining power. I find two significant determinants of price discounts. First, plans with large memberships are able to extract volume discounts across hospitals. Second, health plans that are more successful at channeling patients can extract greater discounts. Patient channeling can add to the volume discount that plans negotiate.

  11. Planning pitfalls

    Treesearch

    James H. Freeman

    1977-01-01

    The subject this morning is planning and the problems peculiar to planning for management on public lands. As I am sure you know, we could devote entire seminars to problems encountered in planning. However, within the scope of the program today, we have the opportunity to touch briefly on some of the more important highlights of planning with the focus on major...

  12. Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    This handbook is intended to provide school officials and members of school councils and advisory committees with helpful information about different ways to plan for school improvement. It focuses on the process of planning, rather than on the process of writing a plan, and therefore does not include any planning forms or instructions for using…

  13. Hospitals' marketing challenge: influencing physician behavior.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R C

    1985-05-01

    Physicians' referring and admitting behavior as well as their clinical management practices are major determinants of hospitals' profitability under prospective payment. Four techniques are available to hospitals that seek to increase market share: Recruitment and retention strategies. In planning the mix of specialties represented on staff, hospitals should consider the effects of a physician's practice on the hospital's case mix. Peer pressure. Peer review programs in hospitals as well as through medical or specialty societies may help persuade physicians to alter their use of services. Education and information programs. Hospitals can assist physicians in patient management by conducting economic grand rounds, developing committees to study and communicate cost data to physicians, and providing information on alternatives to hospitalization. Incentives. Putting physicians at risk by linking planned expenditures to hospital financial performance can influence practice patterns. Other techniques include offering limited partnerships to medical staff members and merging the hospital and medical staff into one corporation. Hospitals may also need to influence physicians away from ventures that compete directly with the institution, such as ambulatory surgery centers.

  14. 35. Plan of Proposed Improvements on Roads, Walks, Gutters, Curbs, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Plan of Proposed Improvements on Roads, Walks, Gutters, Curbs, Drains, Etc. Letterman General Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco. August 1915. SHOWING LOCATION OF BUILDINGS 1006 AND 1049 IN LETTERMAN HOSPITAL COMPLEX IN 1915. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Post Engineer Office, Presidio of San Francisco. Plot Plan, Letterman Army Hospital, San Francisco, Calif. 1958. SHOWING LOCATION OF BUILDINGS 1006 AND 1049 IN LETTERMAN HOSPITAL COMPLEX IN 1958. - Presidio of San Francisco, Letterman General Hospital, Building No. 27, Letterman Hospital Complex, Edie Road, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. North Carolina State Plan for Technical Assistance and Energy Conservation Measures: Grant Programs for Schools and Hospitals and for Buildings Owned by Units of Local Government and Public Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Commerce, Raleigh. Energy Div.

    State guidelines for grant applications that follow the regulations of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 are presented for North Carolina institutions. Among the 17 procedures spelled out in detail are several that concern eligible institutions' involvement in the development of the state plan, notification of the plan, and…

  17. North Carolina State Plan for Technical Assistance and Energy Conservation Measures: Grant Programs for Schools and Hospitals and for Buildings Owned by Units of Local Government and Public Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Commerce, Raleigh. Energy Div.

    State guidelines for grant applications that follow the regulations of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 are presented for North Carolina institutions. Among the 17 procedures spelled out in detail are several that concern eligible institutions' involvement in the development of the state plan, notification of the plan, and…

  18. 40 CFR 62.12150 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis) (section 111(d)/129 Plan... Control of Air Pollution from Combustion of Solid Waste in Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste...

  19. 40 CFR 62.12150 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis) (section 111(d)/129 Plan... Control of Air Pollution from Combustion of Solid Waste in Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste...

  20. Improved planning time and plan quality through multicriteria optimization for intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Craft, David L; Hong, Theodore S; Shih, Helen A; Bortfeld, Thomas R

    2012-01-01

    To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. IMPROVED PLANNING TIME AND PLAN QUALITY THROUGH MULTICRITERIA OPTIMIZATION FOR INTENSITY-MODULATED RADIOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error–based IMRT planning approach. PMID:21300448

  2. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach.

  3. Non-Disease Specific Risk Factors Affecting Hospital Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ron L.; And Others

    Extended hospital stay after medical treatment has been completed represents a major problem in health care. Space misuse can occur late in the hospitalization, often because planning is not initiated until discharge is imminent. This study sought to determine if variables assessed soon after hospital admission could be used to screen patients at…

  4. MANPOWER RESOURCES IN HOSPITALS, 1966. SUMMARY REPORT OF A SURVEY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Hospital Association, Chicago, IL.

    QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES FROM 5,369 (77 PERCENT) OF THE 6,993 HOSPITALS CONTACTED PROVIDED INFORMATION NEEDED FOR PLANNING EDUCATIONAL AND RECRUITMENT PROGRAMS. PERSONNEL IN ALL CATEGORIES EMPLOYED BY THE RESPONDING HOSPITALS TOTALED 1,750,545. PROJECTED ESTIMATES FOR ALL HOSPITALS, SHOWED 1,332,052 PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL WORKERS EMPLOYED AND…

  5. Standards for hospital libraries 2002

    PubMed Central

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr; Hassig, Robin Ackley; Balogh, Leeni; Bandy, Margaret; Doyle, Jacqueline Donaldson; Kronenfeld, Michael R.; Lindner, Katherine Lois; Murray, Kathleen; Petersen, JoAn; Rand, Debra C.

    2002-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” have been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified librarian who functions as a department head and is a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. The standards define the role of the medical librarian and the links between knowledge-based information and other functions such as patient care, patient education, performance improvement, and education. In addition, the standards address the development and implementation of the knowledge-based information needs assessment and plans, the promotion and publicity of the knowledge-based information services, and the physical space and staffing requirements. The role, qualifications, and functions of a hospital library consultant are outlined. The health sciences library is positioned to play a key role in the hospital. The increasing use of the Internet and new information technologies by medical, nursing, and allied health staffs; patients; and the community require new strategies, strategic planning, allocation of adequate resources, and selection and evaluation of appropriate information resources and technologies. The Hospital Library Standards Committee has developed this document as a guideline to be used in facing these challenges. Editor's Note: The “Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002” were approved by the members of the Hospital Library Section during MLA '02 in Dallas, Texas. They were subsequently approved by Section Council and received final approval from the MLA Board of Directors in June 2002. They succeed the Standards for Hospital Libraries

  6. Hospital Workers Disaster Management and Hospital Nonstructural: A Study in Bandar Abbas, Iran.

    PubMed

    Lakbala, Parvin

    2015-09-01

    A devastating earthquake is inevitable in the long term and likely in the near future in Iran. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge of hospital staff to disaster management system in hospital and to determine nonstructural safety assessment in Shahid Mohammadi hospital in Bandar Abbas city of Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province with a capacity of about 450 beds and the highest patient admissions. The cross-sectional study was conducted in 2013 on 200 healthcare workers at Shahid Mohammadi hospital, in the city of Bandar Abbas, Iran. This hospital is the main referral hospital in Hormozgan province and has a capacity of about 450 beds with highest numbers of patient admissions. Questionnaire and checklist used for assessing health workers knowledge and awareness towards disaster management and nonstructural safety this hospital. This study found that knowledge, awareness, and disaster preparedness of hospital staff need continual reinforcement to improve self efficacy for disaster management. Equipping health care facilities at the time of natural disasters, especially earthquakes are of great importance all over the world, especially in Iran. This requires the national strategies and planning for all health facilities. It seems due to limitations of hospital beds, insufficient of personnel, and medical equipment, health care providers paid greater attention to this issue. Since this hospital is the only educational public hospital in the province, it is essential to pay much attention to the risk management not only to this hospital but at the national level to health facilities.

  7. Family planning education.

    PubMed

    Hamburg, M V

    1983-02-01

    17 days were spent devoted to the effort of learning about China's educational approach to family planning in the hope of discovering how they are achieving their remarkable success in reducing population growth. As a member of the 1981 New York University/SIECUS Colloquim in China, it was necessary to rely on the translation provided by the excellent guides. Discussions were focused on questions prepared in advance about the topics that concerned the group. These observations, based on a short and limited exposure, cover the following areas: marriage and family planning policies; the family planning program; school programs; adult education; family planning workers; and unique aspects of the program. China has an official position on marriage and family planning that continues to undergo revisions. The new marriage law sets the minimum ages of marriage at 22 for men and 20 for women. Almost everyone marries, and an unmarried person over age 28 is a rarity. The family planning program in China is carried out by an extensive organizational network at national, provincial, and local government levels. Officials termed it a "propaganda campaign." Hospitals, clinics, and factories invariably displayed posters; a popular set of four presents the advantages of the 1 child family as follows: late marriage is best, for it allows more time to work and study; 1 child is best for the health of the mother; one gets free medical care for his/her child if a family has only 1 child; and there is more time to teach 1 child. The state operated television regularly explains the 1 child policy utilizing special films. According to 1 family planning official, "before marriage there is little sex." There are few abortions for unmarried women. Education about sex is for adults, for those persons who are about to be married. There is little if any sex education in schools. Sexual teaching is not generally acceptable, especially in the rural areas. By contrast, in Shanghai the physiology

  8. Discharge Planning in Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McMartin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronically ill people experience frequent changes in health status accompanied by multiple transitions between care settings and care providers. Discharge planning provides support services, follow-up activities, and other interventions that span pre-hospital discharge to post-hospital settings. Objective To determine if discharge planning is effective at reducing health resource utilization and improving patient outcomes compared with standard care alone. Data Sources A standard systematic literature search was conducted for studies published from January 1, 2004, until December 13, 2011. Review Methods Reports, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses with 1 month or more of follow-up and limited to specified chronic conditions were examined. Outcomes included mortality/survival, readmissions and emergency department (ED) visits, hospital length of stay (LOS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and patient satisfaction. Results One meta-analysis compared individualized discharge planning to usual care and found a significant reduction in readmissions favouring individualized discharge planning. A second meta-analysis compared comprehensive discharge planning with postdischarge support to usual care. There was a significant reduction in readmissions favouring discharge planning with postdischarge support. However, there was significant statistical heterogeneity. For both meta-analyses there was a nonsignificant reduction in mortality between the study arms. Limitations There was difficulty in distinguishing the relative contribution of each element within the terms “discharge planning” and “postdischarge support.” For most studies, “usual care” was not explicitly described. Conclusions Compared with usual care, there was moderate quality evidence that individualized discharge planning is more effective at reducing readmissions or hospital LOS but not mortality, and very low quality evidence that it is more

  9. A hospital response to a soccer stadium stampede in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Madzimbamuto, F D

    2003-11-01

    When a soccer stadium stampede occurred in Zimbabwe on 9 July 2000, the hospital disaster (medical emergency) plan failed. This report describes the use of the audit technique to change the hospital's disaster preparedness. A literature review was done to establish international standards of best practice in major medical incident response. The hospital disaster plan (major medical incident plan) was reviewed and used as local standard. Written submissions and unstructured interviews technique were used to collect information from staff present on the day and involved in the care of the stampede victims and from staff specified in the hospital disaster plan. This was presented as a report to the Hospital Clinical Audit and Quality Assurance Committee (CAQAC), with recommendations. The hospital's response to the disaster was suboptimal. The initial recommendations were accepted. Implementation is ongoing while discussion is drawing in other people and agencies. An integrated prehospital care system is required. The casualty department needs to develop into a modern accident and emergency department. Individual departments need to develop their own disaster plans that link into the hospital plan. A system for future audits of the hospital's performance after a disaster need to be put in place. Implementation of these recommendations is changing disaster preparedness in and out of the hospital. The exercise was very useful in raising awareness and the value of audit and specific issues were defined for improvement. Long term and short term goals were set. Despite the shortage of resources, change was felt to be necessary and possible.

  10. Hometown Hospitals: The Weakest Link? Bioterrorism Readiness in America’s Rural Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    O’Brien, RN, BSN, CIC, Doctor’s Hospital , Maryland Cheryl Peterson, RN, MSN, American Nurses Association Richard A. Raymond, M.D., Nebraska Health and...Committee, Minnesota Department of Health, “Rural and Urban Reimbursement: Hospitals , Nursing Homes, and the Minnesota Advantage Health Plan,” Jan. 22, 2002...one visiting medical specialists support a variety of outpatient clinical services. The hospital employs 16 full-time registered nurses and four

  11. The marketing of partial hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Millsap, P; Brown, E; Kiser, L; Pruitt, D

    1987-09-01

    Health-care professionals are currently operating in the context of a rapidly changing health-care delivery system, including the move away from inpatient services to outpatient services in order to control costs. Those who practice in partial-hospital settings are in a position to offer effective, cost-efficient services; however, there continue to be obstacles which hinder appropriate utilization of the modality. The development and use of a well-designed marketing plan is one strategy for removing these obstacles. This paper presents a brief overview of the marketing process, ideas for developing a marketing plan, and several examples of specific marketing strategies as well as ways to monitor their effectiveness. Partial-hospital providers must take an active role in answering the calls for alternative sources of psychiatric care. A comprehensive, education-oriented marketing approach will increase the public's awareness of such alternatives and enable programs to survive in a competitive environment.

  12. Two years into the storm over pricing to and collecting from the uninsured--a hospital valuation expert examines the risk/return dynamics and asks: would fair pricing and fair medical debt repayment plans increase yields to hospitals and simultaneously mitigate these controversies?

    PubMed

    Unland, James J

    2005-01-01

    As the controversies over 501(c)(3) "charitable" hospitals' pricing, collections, and charity care practices that emerged in the winter and spring of 2003 continue unabated--now involving government officials from city councils and county boards to state attorneys general and Congress as well as numerous class action lawsuits--a hospital valuation expert and risk analyst looks at the fundamental economic and strategic issues, concluding that the risk/return dynamics are out of whack in that hospitals are facing mushrooming, multifaceted troubles over what has been a very low net yield patient population. After interviewing patient account representatives at hospitals and conducting other research, this analyst asks: Should attention have been focused at the national and state hospital association levels in 2003 to take steps to increase the net yield to hospitals from the uninsured population through more equitable pricing and better medical debt repayment terms, steps that might have mitigated these controversies? Many hospitals and hospital associations have been so intent on proving hospitals' legal right to charge "list price" to and sue the uninsured that they have overlooked a simple yet effective business premise that many hospital patient accounts representatives already fully know: Fair pricing and fair payment terms are actually good business. The author asserts that the controversies that emerged in 2003 actually represented a significant opportunity that, with a different approach, would likely have resulted in hospitals being able to collect significantly more money from the uninsured population while, at the same time, lessening or even avoiding the destructive ramifications that have occurred in the form of investigations, legislation, and lawsuits. To realize higher net yields from the uninsured, highly specific leadership steps need to be taken uniquely at national and state "association" levels in order to avoid the negative financial consequences

  13. Participatory management at Boston's Beth Israel Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, M T; Avakian, L

    1992-05-01

    In the mid-1980s, the senior management of Boston's Beth Israel Hospital became concerned that continuous cost-cutting efforts could lower the quality of the hospital's services and the morale of its staff. This led them to investigate organizational approaches to "participatory management" to determine whether any of these might be of value to the hospital. They decided that an approach developed in the 1930s called the "Scanlon Plan" would be compatible with the workplace culture of Beth Israel, could help the hospital meet the ongoing problems of change, and could help the staff at all levels develop a sense that they owned the problems of quality, productivity, and efficiency, which would motivate them to address these problems constructively in the face of necessary budget constraints. This plan has two mechanisms to foster employees' positive participation: (1) a process to ensure that all members of the organization have the opportunity to improve productivity, primarily through an open suggestion system and a responsive committee structure, and (2) a means of providing equitable rewards for all members of the organization as productivity and quality improve. This essay describes in some detail the plan and why it was selected, explains how it was adapted, prepared for, and finally implemented in 1989, and reports its success, lessons learned, and future plans as of early 1992. The authors believe Beth Israel's experience with the Scanlon Plan is noteworthy as an example of a leading teaching hospital's taking a quality improvement program seriously and making it work.

  14. Marketing and planning in multihospital systems.

    PubMed

    Gourley, D R; Moore, M E

    1988-01-01

    Marketing and planning functions at the corporate level of multihospital systems are examined. Drawing on the experiences of executives in 30 multihospital systems located in the United States west of the Mississippi, this article describes the differences in the marketing and planning functions by for-profit, not-for-profit, and church-owned multihospital systems; examines the impact of age, number of hospitals, and average hospital bed size of the systems; provides insights regarding the primary persons involved in the marketing and planning functions; and highlights the important future of marketing and planning by the top management of multihospital systems.

  15. The risk of unintentional out-of-network encounters with hospital-based physicians at in-network hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence H; Weston, Robert A; Gough, John E

    2017-09-01

    When hospital-based specialists including emergency physicians, anesthesiologists, pathologists and radiologists are not included in the same insurance networks as their parent hospitals, it creates confusion and leads to unexpected costs for patients. This study explored the frequency with which hospital-based physicians at academic medical centers are not included in the network directories for the same insurance networks as their parent teaching hospitals. We studied teaching hospitals with residency programs in all four hospital-based specialties. Using insurance plan provider directories, we determined whether each teaching hospital was in-network for randomly selected locally available insurance plans offered through the federal and state marketplace exchanges. For each established hospital-network relationship, we then determined whether hospital-based specialists were included in the provider network directory by searching for the name of each specialty's residency program director and the name of the physician practice group. We identified 79 teaching hospitals participating in 144 locally available insurance plan networks. Hospital-based specialist inclusion in these hospital-network relationships was: emergency physicians: 50.0% (CI: 40%-59%); anesthesiologists: 50.0% (CI: 42%-58%); pathologists: 45.4% (CI: 37%-54%); and radiologists: 55.1% (46%-64%). Inclusion of all four hospital-based specialties occurred in only 45.0% (CI: 36%-54%) of the hospital-network relationships. For insurance plans offered through the federal and state marketplace exchanges, hospital-based specialists frequently are not included in the directories for the insurance networks in which their parent teaching hospitals participate. Further research is needed to explore this issue at non-academic hospitals and for off-exchange insurance products, and to determine effective policy solutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  17. Global budgeting of hospitals in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chu, D K

    1992-10-01

    Policy-makers in industrialized countries face the dilemma of having to contain soaring hospital costs while resisting any reduction in the quality and quantity of hospital services. Among the many hospital financing systems, centralized control via global budgeting is advocated by some to be the most effective in containing hospital costs. Containing hospital costs, however, is but one aspect of the trade-off between cost containment and quality of care. The hospital financing system of Hong Kong provides some insights into the extent to which cost control can be achieved through global budgeting; and its impact on the accessibility of hospital care. The case of Hong Kong highlights three necessary conditions for effective cost control: (1) the payer must have a clear policy stance on overall public spending; (2) the payer must have a clear policy stance on the importance of hospital care relative to other goods and services; and (3) the payer must also have the will and ability to limit hospital spending within finalized global budgets. However, successful cost containment in Hong Kong affects the accessibility of hospital care. In a time of population growth and economic prosperity, new community needs seem to have preceded government plans and actions to build hospital facilities.

  18. [Gene therapy and hospital strategy].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, B

    1993-10-01

    Gene therapy raises strong interrogations among hospital managers. Actually, hospital environment is disturbed and moving as well in a legislative political and statutory level as in an economical (competition, consumerism, proximity of the establishments) and demographic one (ageing, new pathologies). The fast development of medical technologies amplifies this disturbance. In front of that environment, the hospital has to anticipate the arriving of gene therapy without underestimating the deontological, medical, economical and judicial risks. The decisions of implantation have to be taken in a collective way, and seriously planned and estimated on a medical and economical level. The way to train people and to forecast their careers don't have to be underestimated in consideration of the challenge which is represented by the gene therapy.

  19. Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; Mercure, Nancy

    This handbook was designed to assist advisory councils, program staff and administrators, and community members in planning community education programs and in managing those programs effectively. Chapter I defines and describes planning: what it is, why it is used, and how to engage in the process. The critical role of planning leaders is…

  20. Fire Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have disaster recovery plans, but not all have prevention and action plans to prepare for an emergency in advance. This article presents the author's review of the prevention and action plans of several libraries: (1) Evergreen State College; (2) Interlochen Public Library; (3) University of Maryland, Baltimore-Marshall Law Library;…

  1. Fire Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have disaster recovery plans, but not all have prevention and action plans to prepare for an emergency in advance. This article presents the author's review of the prevention and action plans of several libraries: (1) Evergreen State College; (2) Interlochen Public Library; (3) University of Maryland, Baltimore-Marshall Law Library;…

  2. Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; Mercure, Nancy

    This handbook was designed to assist advisory councils, program staff and administrators, and community members in planning community education programs and in managing those programs effectively. Chapter I defines and describes planning: what it is, why it is used, and how to engage in the process. The critical role of planning leaders is…

  3. Marketing strategy determinants in rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, H L; Haley, D; Piland, N F

    1993-01-01

    Rural hospitals confront an inauspicious environment due to changes in patient reimbursement and medical practice. Facing a situation of declining revenues, marketing presents an option for rural hospitals to adapt to the growing constraints. This paper analyzes the determinants of marketing strategy emphasis in rural hospitals. The conceptual model adopted in this study predicts that prior performance and contextual variables explain marketing strategy emphasis. The relationships are examined in a case study of rural New Mexico hospitals. Results suggest that prior performance and several contextual variables explain variations in marketing strategy emphasis. In particular, higher gross patient revenues are associated with more emphasis on television and radio advertising. Furthermore, rural New Mexico hospitals with high numbers of licensed beds and medical staff members, or that are affiliated with a chain organization, place greater emphasis on market research and market planning. The implications for marketing practice in rural hospitals are discussed.

  4. Accuracy of EMS Trauma Transport Destination Plans in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Moss, Chailee; Cowden, Christopher S; Atterton, Laurie Meyer; Arasaratnam, Meredith H; Fernandez, Antonio R; Evarts, Jeff S; Barrier, Brian; Lerner, E Brooke; Mann, N Clay; Lohmeier, Chad; Shofer, Frances S; Brice, Jane H

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Planning for time-sensitive injury may allow emergency medical services (EMS) systems to more accurately triage patients meeting accepted criteria to facilities most capable of providing life-saving treatment. In 2010, North Carolina (NC) implemented statewide Trauma Triage and Destination Plans (TTDPs) in all 100 of North Carolina's county-defined EMS systems. Each system was responsible for identifying the specific destination hospitals with appropriate resources to treat trauma patients. We sought to characterize the accuracy of their hospital designations. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, we collected TTDPs for each county-defined EMS system, including their assigned hospital capabilities (i.e., trauma center or community hospital). We conducted a survey with each EMS system to determine how their TTDP was constructed and maintained, as well as with each TTDP-designated hospital to verify their capabilities. We determined the accuracy of the EMS assigned hospital designations by comparing them to the hospital's reported capabilities. Results. The 100 NC EMS systems provided 380 designations for 112 hospitals. TTDPs were created by EMS administrators and medical directors, with only 55% of EMS systems engaging a hospital representative in the plan creation. Compared to the actual hospital capabilities, 97% of the EMS TTDP designations were correct. Twelve hospital designations were incorrect and the majority (10) overestimated hospital capabilities. Of the 100 EMS systems, 7 misclassified hospitals in their TTDP. EMS systems that did not verify their local hospitals' capabilities during TTDP development were more likely to incorrectly categorize a hospital's capabilities (p = 0.001). Conclusions. A small number of EMS systems misclassified hospitals in their TTDP, but most plans accurately reflected hospital capabilities. Misclassification occurred more often in systems that did not consult local hospitals prior to developing their

  5. [The insigne and suntuoso Royal Hospital of Granada (I). Royal foundations and the hospital regrouping (1501-1526)].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Candelario, José

    2003-01-01

    In the 1520s the local authorities planned to set up a new modern hospital in the city of Granada by combining two existing Royal Hospitals: Alhambra and Reyes. As a public institution and as a new building, the new hospital could develop the mandates of the original foundation and extend its care to become a general hospital. In this way it would strengthen its status as a charitable undertaking and legacy of the Catholic Monarchs and, secondly, as a great architectural monument.

  6. An alternate approach to hospital cost control: the Rochester project.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, A A; Saward, E W

    1978-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has demonstrated a need to control costs in general and hospital costs in particular. In New York State, efforts at control have followed one of several paths, including reduction of Medicaid program expenditures, elimination of hospital beds, and prospective reimbursement of hospital costs. Although some success has been achieved in each of these areas, hospital costs containment has not been as successful as had been hoped. A new project called MAXICAP, being developed in the Rochester region, seeks to link payment with regional hospital planning. MAXICAP represents a voluntary attempt by hospitals, third party payers, planners, consumers, and governmental agencies to devise a prospective hospital payment system. Under this system community hospital plans in the Rochester region would be integrated and a cap imposed on both revenues and expenses for acute hospital care. The principal advantage of the MAXICAP is that it offers a mechanism for linking hospital planning with payment functions on a regional basis. The principal disadvantage is that the success of the MAXICAP depends upon the voluntary cooperation of the vast majority of the acute care hospitals in the area--hospitals that may be scattered throughout a relatively large region. PMID:98805

  7. The TAPS Project 42: the last to leave hospital--a profile of residual long-stay populations and plans for their resettlement. Team for the Assessment of Psychiatric Services.

    PubMed

    Trieman, N; Hughes, J; Leff, J

    1998-11-01

    This study aims to assess the service needs of residual hospital populations and the adequacy of the alternative facilities provided for them following the closure of psychiatric hospitals. The remaining 368 long-stay patients in four representative English hospitals scheduled for closure within 1 year were assessed by means of a standardized schedule devised to rate problem behaviours. The residual populations consisted predominantly of elderly, male and very long-stay patients. The most frequent problem behaviours were hostility, physical aggression and incontinence. The one hospital which allowed new admissions to continue indefinitely had the highest proportion of problematic patients. Alternative care facilities were provided by a diverse range of agencies. Large residential homes were the predominant type of provision for most patients, and private nursing homes often accommodated mixed groups of elderly people. NHS trusts catered for most of the 'difficult to place' patients within specialized facilities, based in the community. There were some indications that compromises led to insufficient and understaffed specialist facilities. In view of the increasing demand for long-term intensively staffed facilities, this policy might put an extra burden on the local health services.

  8. [Evaluation of satisfaction of patients hospitalized at the Kairouan Hospital].

    PubMed

    Mtiraoui, Ali; Alouini, Borhane

    2002-03-01

    The patients' satisfaction studies are more and more utilized to underline the health centers' deficiencies and consequently set improvement action plans. Our survey aims to measure inpatients' satisfaction in its different dimensions. A survey centered around a transversal inquiry has been conducted during a period going from February to April 2000 and reached a total number of 817 patients hospitalized in six service units at kairouan hospital. The data has been gathered by structured interviews led by a previously trained social worker. The investigation tool was a standardized questionnaire prepared by a group of experts from WHO in the Oriental Mediterranean region. The main results are as follow: High satisfaction level concerning the global evaluation of the hospital service units was recorded (score = 70%). The patient who are more satisfied are those who have the feeling that their health situation has considerably improved, and who will probably recommend this hospital to their surroundings. Big proportion of the patients (77%) was expecting better services. The main reason behind their unhappiness is the information emanated whether from the nurses or the doctors, the comfort and the cleanness of waiting room, linen, room comfort, food and the emergency. These results showed that the quality of care improvements priorities, according to patient expectations are especially in relation with the quality of information, the relational aspects and the hospital stay conditions.

  9. Measuring nutritional risk in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik H; Holst, Mette; Kondrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    About 20%–50% of patients in hospitals are undernourished. The number varies depending on the screening tool amended and clinical setting. A large number of these patients are undernourished when admitted to the hospital, and in most of these patients, undernutrition develops further during hospital stay. The nutrition course of the patient starts by nutritional screening and is linked to the prescription of a nutrition plan and monitoring. The purpose of nutritional screening is to predict the probability of a better or worse outcome due to nutritional factors and whether nutritional treatment is likely to influence this. Most screening tools address four basic questions: recent weight loss, recent food intake, current body mass index, and disease severity. Some screening tools, moreover, include other measurements for predicting the risk of malnutrition. The usefulness of screening methods recommended is based on the aspects of predictive validity, content validity, reliability, and practicability. Various tools are recommended depending on the setting, ie, in the community, in the hospital, and among elderly in institutions. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 seems to be the best validated screening tool, in terms of predictive validity ie, the clinical outcome improves when patients identified to be at risk are treated. For adult patients in hospital, thus, the NRS 2002 is recommended. PMID:21042553

  10. STATEWIDE PLANNING FOR NURSING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEONE, LUCILE PETRY

    NEEDS IN NURSING EDUCATION ARE OUTLINED IN 5 IMPERATIVES--(1) AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING (BECAUSE OF UP TO 50 PERCENT VACANCIES IN NURSING POSITIONS IN SOME HOSPITALS, USE OF SUBPROFESSIONALS EXCEEDING THE SAFETY LEVEL, AND EXTREME SHORTAGE OF NURSES FOR POSITIONS OF HIGHEST RESPONSIBILITY, AND FUTURE OVERTAXING OF THE SUPPLY DUE…

  11. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples.

  12. Input-output analysis and the hospital budgeting process.

    PubMed Central

    Cleverly, W O

    1975-01-01

    Two hospitals budget systems, a conventional budget and an input-output budget, are compared to determine how they affect management decisions in pricing, output, planning, and cost control. Analysis of data from a 210-bed not-for-profit hospital indicates that adoption of the input-output budget could cause substantial changes in posted hospital rates in individual departments but probably would have no impact on hospital output determination. The input-output approach promises to be a more accurate system for cost control and planning because, unlike the conventional approach, it generates objective signals for investigating variances of expenses from budgeted levels. PMID:1205865

  13. 5 CFR 890.905 - Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Limits on inpatient hospital and... Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit Payments § 890.905 Limits on inpatient hospital and physician charges. (a) Hospitals may not collect from FEHB plans and retired enrolled...

  14. Changing hospital payments: implications for teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J D

    1983-09-01

    Hospitals cannot continue to view themselves only as social institutions whose performance will be assessed on the good they do. Teaching hospitals, in particular, cannot view themselves simply as distinctive combinations of social and educational institutions. Under Medicare's prospective pricing system, the hospital's role as production system is enhanced, and all hospitals must learn to balance the new economic realities as they work with their medical staff to adapt to a changed future.

  15. Self-insured health plans

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Patricia; Guttenberg, Abbie; Greenberg, Leonard; Arnett, Ross H.

    1986-01-01

    Nationwide, 8 percent of all employment-related health plans were self-insured in 1984, which translates into more than 175,000 self-insured plans according to our latest study of independent health plans. The propensity of an organization to self-insure differs primarily by its size, with large establishments more likely to self-insure. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the self-insured benefit was hospital and/or medical. Among employers who self-insure, 23 percent self-administer, and the remaining 77 percent hire a commercial insurance company, Blue Cross/Blue Shield plan, or an independent third-party administrator to administer the health plan. PMID:10312008

  16. 40 CFR 62.9825 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Plants (Section 111(d) Plan). (b) The plan was officially submitted as follows: (1) Control of air emissions from existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators, submitted on August... categories of sources: (1) Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators. (2) Fluoride Emissions...

  17. 42 CFR 456.523 - Revised UR plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time Requirements § 456.523 Revised... control over the utilization of services; and (2) Conducts reviews in a way that improves the quality...

  18. 42 CFR 456.523 - Revised UR plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time Requirements § 456.523 Revised... control over the utilization of services; and (2) Conducts reviews in a way that improves the quality...

  19. 40 CFR 62.9825 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Existing Plants (Section 111(d) Plan). (b) The plan was officially submitted as follows: (1) Control of air emissions from existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators, submitted on August... categories of sources: (1) Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators. (2) Fluoride Emissions From...

  20. 42 CFR 409.43 - Plan of care requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plan of care requirements. 409.43 Section 409.43... PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Home Health Services Under Hospital Insurance § 409.43 Plan of care... be countersigned and dated by the physician before the HHA bills for the care. (e) Frequency of...

  1. Multiple Hospital Systems and the Teaching Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Mark S.

    1979-01-01

    Although a substantial portion of hospital beds are in institutions that are in multiple hospital systems, the possible benefits to be gained through participation in such systems do not appear to be of sufficient magnitude to either core teaching hospitals or their parent universities to persuade them to join or form a multiple system.…

  2. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Access Hospital from CMS and Critical Access Hospital Finance 101 Manual from TASC. Furthermore, the Joint Commission ... Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program – helps rural healthcare facilities finance new construction, refinance debt, or purchase new equipment ...

  3. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000881.htm Understanding your hospital bill To use the sharing features on this ... help you save money. Charges Listed on Your Hospital Bill A hospital bill will list the major ...

  4. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Hospital Print ... you flowers, balloons, or other treats! previous continue Hospital People You'll meet lots of people in ...

  5. Consumer-directed health plans: what happened?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Jeff

    2007-08-01

    CDHPs can stabilize growth in health costs, but the health plan-subscriber relationship should be more transparent. CFOs should ensure that increased cost exposure in CDHPs is paired with broad, deep disease management and employee assistance support. Hospitals should plan for the likelihood that, one way or another, consumers will be paying more of their healthcare bill.

  6. Understanding the variables in planning infrastructure projects.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Michael

    2011-11-01

    When planning for an infrastructure renovation or expansion, hospital executives should ask five questions to guide the decision-making process: What is the best way to plan for infrastructure improvements? What funding options exist? What is the best way to manage risk? What outcomes should I expect from my investment? When complete, will my project support the intended use?

  7. OR construction project: from planning to execution.

    PubMed

    Worley, Dorothea J; Hohler, Sharon E

    2008-12-01

    Operating room renovation projects require planning and collaboration among physicians, hospital staff members, and vendors. Renovation involves many details, from how many electrical plugs to install in each OR to integration of the latest technologies. Details of a multiphase OR renovation project undertaken at Saint Francis Medical Center in Cape Girardeau, MO, provide information and tools that any facility planning a renovation can use.

  8. Business planning. Reasons, definitions, and elements.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Michael A; Shaver, Mark; Werthman, Ronald

    2004-04-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System has developed a centralized business planning structure that provides for creativity while incorporating a system of checks and balances. Combining standardization with flexibility allows for customization and variability. Using a team approach, the organization allows key players to contribute their experience and expertise to the planning for each new project.

  9. [Hospital readmissions: A reliable quality indicator?].

    PubMed

    van Galen, Louise S; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B

    2016-01-01

    The percentage of readmissions within 30 days after discharge is an official quality indicator for Dutch hospitals in 2016. In this commentary the authors argue why readmissions cannot be regarded as a reliable way of assessing quality of healthcare in a hospital. To date, policy makers have been struggling with its precise definition and the indicator has not been properly formulated yet. It does not distinguish between planned and unplanned readmissions and does not take into account the 'preventability'. Therefore the authors believe that the indicator in its current form might falsely interpret the quality of care of a hospital and it is questionable to use readmissions as a quality indicator.

  10. A managerial accounting analysis of hospital costs.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, W G

    1976-01-01

    Variance analysis, an accounting technique, is applied to an eight-component model of hospital costs to determine the contribution each component makes to cost increases. The method is illustrated by application to data on total costs from 1950 to 1973 for all U.S. nongovernmental not-for-profit short-term general hospitals. The costs of a single hospital are analyzed and compared to the group costs. The potential uses and limitations of the method as a planning and research tool are discussed. PMID:965233

  11. [Information use in public hospital management].

    PubMed

    Escrivão Junior, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates managerial perceptions of the use of information in health management and planning in 24 Public Hospitals in the São Paulo Metropolitan Region, analyzing its usefulness for the decision-making process. In addition, some characteristics of the existing information system are studied. The findings show that ample amounts of information and data are available in the hospitals covered by this study, despite some gaps, and that managers do not know about the existing data and do not use this information to guide hospital management.

  12. Leveraging hospital formularies for improved prescribing.

    PubMed

    Karas, Albert; Kuehl, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Hospital formularies, guided by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, exist to optimize medication use by identifying and designating drugs of choice to guide rational prescribing, ultimately reducing patient risk and costs and improving patient outcomes. Guidelines and a framework exist to guide critical evaluations of medications for formulary listing; however, there may be opportunities to improve and standardize how a formulary change could be instituted in Canadian hospitals. A formulary change at an Ontario hospital revealed that there are some key challenges to the formulary change process including the importance of a robust project plan, appropriate resources, healthcare staff education, and acceptance.

  13. Pediatric readmission prevalence and variability across hospitals.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jay G; Toomey, Sara L; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Jha, Ashish K; Nakamura, Mari M; Klein, David J; Feng, Jeremy Y; Shulman, Shanna; Chiang, Vincent W; Chiang, Vincent K; Kaplan, William; Hall, Matt; Schuster, Mark A

    2013-01-23

    Readmission rates are used as an indicator of the quality of care that patients receive during a hospital admission and after discharge. To determine the prevalence of pediatric readmissions and the magnitude of variation in pediatric readmission rates across hospitals. We analyzed 568,845 admissions at 72 children's hospitals between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2010, in the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions Case Mix Comparative data set. We estimated hierarchical regression models for 30-day readmission rates by hospital, accounting for age and Chronic Condition Indicators. Hospitals with adjusted readmission rates that were 1 SD above and below the mean were defined as having "high" and "low" rates, respectively. Thirty-day unplanned readmissions following admission for any diagnosis and for the 10 admission diagnoses with the highest readmission prevalence. Planned readmissions were identified with procedure codes from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. The 30-day unadjusted readmission rate for all hospitalized children was 6.5% (n = 36,734). Adjusted rates were 28.6% greater in hospitals with high vs low readmission rates (7.2% [95% CI, 7.1%-7.2%] vs 5.6% [95% CI, 5.6%-5.6%]). For the 10 admission diagnoses with the highest readmission prevalence, the adjusted rates were 17.0% to 66.0% greater in hospitals with high vs low readmission rates. For example, sickle cell rates were 20.1% (95% CI, 20.0%-20.3%) vs 12.7% (95% CI, 12.6%-12.8%) in high vs low hospitals, respectively. Among patients admitted to acute care pediatric hospitals, the rate of unplanned readmissions at 30 days was 6.5%. There was significant variability in readmission rates across conditions and hospitals. These data may be useful for hospitals' quality improvement efforts.

  14. Business Planning for a Campus-Wide Biobank.

    PubMed

    Tarling, Tamsin E; Lasser, Frances; Carter, Candace; Matzke, Lise A M; Dhugga, Gurm; Arora, Nidhi; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Babinsky, Sindy; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Cheah, Stefanie; Watson, Peter; Vercauteren, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    Biobanks are resources that facilitate research. Many biobanks exist around the world, but most tend to focus on a specific disease or research area. BC Children's Hospital and BC Women's Hospital are located on the same campus (Oak Street Campus) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A campus-wide biobank has been established on the site of these two hospitals to collect specimens and annotated data from children or women seeking medical care at either of the hospitals. Such an initiative requires careful planning and consideration of many factors such as buy in and support of key stakeholders, governance, financial planning, and optimizing specimen collection. We developed a business plan to account for the many aspects associated with integrating the "BC Children's Hospital BioBank." This document describes the approach our business plan took for the implementation of our biobank and the progress, including deviations from the business plan. We also provide a perspective on the current status with a focus on sustainability.

  15. Hospital information system survey in qatar.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Rashid; Reti, Shane; Feldman, Henry; Safran, Charles; Niaz, Rashid; Erskine, Alistair; Elmagarmid, Ahmed; Al-Musleh, Abdulwahab

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare can be enhanced by the effective use of information technology to improve the quality and safety of care and many healthcare providers are adopting advanced health information technology to improve their healthcare delivery process. Qatar is a relatively young Middle Eastern country with an ambitious and progressive national strategy to develop its healthcare system, including an advanced e-health infrastructure delivering the right medical information at the right time to clinicians and patients. To assess the effectiveness of such programs, it is important to have a pre-intervention baseline from which comparisons, performance against target measures and forward thinking strategic planning can be grounded. This study presents the first published campus wide survey of Hospital Information Systems in large public and private hospitals in Qatar. To qualitatively assess and describe the current state of Hospital Information Systems in large hospitals in Qatar, and to establish a baseline or reference point for Qatar's readiness for, and adoption of Hospital Information Systems.

  16. Campus Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book suggests ways and means by which the development of campuses can be controlled so that functional goals can be aesthetically expressed. The first section, "Prospectus," defines campus planning, illuminating through historical examples the evolution of the campus as a design form, and describes the conditions that make campus planning so…

  17. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  18. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  19. Expedition Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Planning an expedition, particularly an expedition to climb Mount McKinley, can appear monumental. Not only must the obvious items like food, equipment and personnel be carefully planned, but attention must also focus on "insignificant" items like applications and reservations which, if forgotten, could mean the difference between a…

  20. Reconfiguration of acute care hospitals in post-socialist Serbia: spatial distribution of hospital beds.

    PubMed

    Matejic, Marko

    2017-04-01

    In the context of healthcare reforms in post-socialist Serbia, this research analyses the reconfiguration of acute care hospitals from the aspect of the spatial distribution of hospital beds among and within state-owned hospitals. The research builds a relationship between the macro or national level and the micro or hospital level of the spatial distribution of hospital beds. The aim of the study is to point out that a high level of efficiency in hospital functionality is difficult to achieve within the current hospital network and architectural-urban patterns of hospitals, and to draw attention to the necessity of a strategically planned hospital spatial reconfiguration, conducted simultaneously with other segments of the healthcare system reform. The research analyses published and unpublished data presented in tables and diagrams. The theoretical platform of the research covers earlier discussions of the Yugoslav healthcare system, its post-socialist reforms and the experiences of developed countries. The results show that the hospital bed distribution has not undergone significant changes, while the hospital spatial reconfiguration has either not been carried out at all or, if it has, only on a small scale. All this has contributed to overall inadequate, inflexible, inefficient, defragmented and unequal bed distribution. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.