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Sample records for hospital planning

  1. Enterprise resource planning for hospitals.

    PubMed

    van Merode, Godefridus G; Groothuis, Siebren; Hasman, Arie

    2004-06-30

    Integrated hospitals need a central planning and control system to plan patients' processes and the required capacity. Given the changes in healthcare one can ask the question what type of information systems can best support these healthcare delivery organizations. We focus in this review on the potential of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems for healthcare delivery organizations. First ERP systems are explained. An overview is then presented of the characteristics of the planning process in hospital environments. Problems with ERP that are due to the special characteristics of healthcare are presented. The situations in which ERP can or cannot be used are discussed. It is suggested to divide hospitals in a part that is concerned only with deterministic processes and a part that is concerned with non-deterministic processes. ERP can be very useful for planning and controlling the deterministic processes.

  2. Hospital mutual aid evacuation plan.

    PubMed

    Phillips, R

    1997-02-01

    Health care facilities need to be prepared for disasters such as floods, tornadoes and earthquakes. Rochester, NY, and its surrounding communities devised a hospital mutual aid evacuation plan in the event a disaster occurs and also to comply with the Joint Commission. This document discusses the plan's development process and also provides the end result.

  3. Report: hospitals need more sophisticated planning efforts.

    PubMed

    Anderson, H J

    1990-09-20

    Sophisticated planning efforts are increasing among hospitals. However, hospital planners and marketers still have far to go before they can match their counterparts in industry. This is according to a report on hospital planning recently released by the Society for Healthcare Planning and Marketing of the American Hospital Association, Chicago.

  4. Hospital strategic preparedness planning: the new imperative.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Peter M; Duncan, W Jack; Abdolrasulnia, Maziar

    2007-01-01

    Strategic preparedness planning is an important new imperative for many hospitals. Strategic preparedness planning goes beyond traditional product/market strategic planning by focusing on disaster prevention, containment, and response roles. Hospitals, because of their unique mission, size, complexity, the types of materials they handle, and the types of patients they encounter, are especially vulnerable to natural and human-initiated disasters. In addition, when disasters occur, hospitals must develop well-conceived first responder (receiver) strategies. This paper argues the case for strategic preparedness planning for hospitals and proposes a process for this relatively new and much needed type of planning.

  5. Strategic planning processes and hospital financial performance.

    PubMed

    Kaissi, Amer A; Begun, James W

    2008-01-01

    Many common management practices in healthcare organizations, including the practice of strategic planning, have not been subject to widespread assessment through empirical research. If management practice is to be evidence-based, evaluations of such common practices need to be undertaken. The purpose of this research is to provide evidence on the extent of strategic planning practices and the association between hospital strategic planning processes and financial performance. In 2006, we surveyed a sample of 138 chief executive officers (CEOs) of hospitals in the state of Texas about strategic planning in their organizations and collected financial information on the hospitals for 2003. Among the sample hospitals, 87 percent reported having a strategic plan, and most reported that they followed a variety of common practices recommended for strategic planning-having a comprehensive plan, involving physicians, involving the board, and implementing the plan. About one-half of the hospitals assigned responsibility for the plan to the CEO. We tested the association between these planning characteristics in 2006 and two measures of financial performance for 2003. Three dimensions of the strategic planning process--having a strategic plan, assigning the CEO responsibility for the plan, and involving the board--are positively associated with earlier financial performance. Further longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the cause-and-effect relationship between planning and performance.

  6. Developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Dychtwald, K; Zitter, M

    1988-09-01

    The initial stages of developing a strategic marketing plan for hospitals are explored in this excerpt from the book, The Role of the Hospital in an Aging Society: A Blueprint for Action. The elderly have unique perceptual, cognitive, social, and psychological needs and preferences, and a marketing strategy for eldercare services must reflect these factors, as well as the financial role of third-party payers and the decision-making influence of families and physicians. Among the elements the hospital must address when developing a marketing strategy are market selection and segmentation, targeting markets with specific services, pricing, and positioning the hospital for a maximum share of the eldercare market.

  7. COLOR PLANNING FOR HOSPITALS AND SCHOOLS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobil Finishes Co., Inc., Chicago, IL.

    THE AIM OF THIS MANUAL PREPARED FOR ARCHITECTS AND BUILDERS IS TO PROVIDE FOR COLOR PLANNING IN HOSPITALS AND SCHOOLS AND ALTHOUGH APPROPRIATE FOR THE SELECTION OF ALL INTERIOR SURFACE MATERIALS IN NEW CONSTRUCTION. IN SCHOOL, AND INDIVIDUAL'S EXPOSURE TO DECORATION IS REPEATED DAILY FOR BOTH STUDENTS AND STAFF ATTEND AT LEAST FOR THE SCHOOL…

  8. Planned Parenthood services in teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    1973-06-01

    As a contribution to the continuing discussion stimulated by the WHO Study Group on education and training for family planning in health services (December 1971, Geneva), the Regional Medical Executive Committee of IPPF commissioned articles on planned parenthood services and training in the university hospital context in both Austria and Belgium. In Vienna, Graz, and Innsbruck medical students receive regular instruction in the physiology and pathology of reproduction and contraceptive methods. Training in methods of fertility regulation is integrated into the gynecology curriculum in both lectures and group discussion. Planned parenthood and social medicine are at present not essential examination subjects. In obligatory practical work in gynecology clinics there are only 2 periods of 6 days in which the student can obtain only a very superficial picture of gynecology and obstetrics. If a qualified physician remains in a university clinic to specialize in these fields, instruction includes complete training in family planning with the possibility of comprehensive practical experience. In Belgium the introduction of planned parenthood into departmental policy and the attainment of national uniformity in thinking and application are recent, due mainly to the coincidence the present chairmen of most departments of obstetrics and gynecology regard planned parenthood as socially indispensable. It is imperative that the education and training of both providers and users be not limited to technical knowledge but expanded to include the all- important psychological, socioeconomic, and health aspects and implications of sexuality. The theory and practice of family planning must be transmitted to the mediical profession, the paramedical professions, and such nonmedical professions as pharmacy. It is noted that the most important new accomplishments of the teaching hospitals lie in the provision of planned parenthood service.

  9. Hospital bioterrorism planning and burn surge.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B; Rich, Preston B; Hultman, C Scott; Charles, Anthony G; Jones, Samuel W; Schmits, Grace L; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity.

  10. Hospital Bioterrorism Planning and Burn Surge

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Brent; Cairns, Charles B.; Rich, Preston B.; Hultman, C. Scott; Charles, Anthony G.; Jones, Samuel W.; Schmits, Grace L.; Skarote, Mary Beth; Holmes, James H.; Cairns, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    On the morning of June 9, 2009, an explosion occurred at a manufacturing plant in Garner, North Carolina. By the end of the day, 68 injured patients had been evaluated at the 3 Level I trauma centers and 3 community hospitals in the Raleigh/Durham metro area (3 people who were buried in the structural collapse died at the scene). Approximately 300 employees were present at the time of the explosion, when natural gas being vented during the repair of a hot water heater ignited. The concussion from the explosion led to structural failure in multiple locations and breached additional natural gas, electrical, and ammonia lines that ran overhead in the 1-story concrete industrial plant. Intent is the major difference between this type of accident and a terrorist using an incendiary device to terrorize a targeted population. But while this disaster lacked intent, the response, rescue, and outcomes were improved as a result of bioterrorism preparedness. This article discusses how bioterrorism hospital preparedness planning, with an all-hazards approach, became the basis for coordinated burn surge disaster preparedness. This real-world disaster challenged a variety of systems, hospitals, and healthcare providers to work efficiently and effectively to manage multiple survivors. Burn-injured patients served as a focus for this work. We describe the response, rescue, and resuscitation provided by first responders and first receivers as well as efforts made to develop burn care capabilities and surge capacity. PMID:24527874

  11. Hospital and medical staff strategic planning: developing an integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, A M

    1994-08-01

    The physician as the principal customer of the hospital is a relatively new concept, indicative of the shift to a more complete market orientation in strategic planning. Although medical staff and medical community dynamics receive increasing attention in strategic planning, much more sophistication is now needed to involve physicians constructively in strategic planning for the hospital and medical staff. While full consonance of physician and hospital plans may be achievable only in a completely integrated delivery system, there is considerable room for improvement in current organizational models.

  12. Incorporating efficiency in hospital-capacity planning in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Ludwig; Scholtes, Stefan; Vera, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Hospital occupancy is a key metric in hospital-capacity planning in Germany, even though this metric neglects important drivers of economic efficiency, for example treatment costs and case mix. We suggest an alternative metric, which incorporates economic efficiency explicitly, and illustrate how this metric can be used in the hospital-capacity planning cycle. The practical setting of this study is the hospital capacity planning process in the German federal state of Rheinland-Pfalz. The planning process involves all 92 acute-care hospitals of this federal state. The study is based on standard hospital data, including annual costs, number of cases--disaggregated by medical departments and ICD codes, respectively--length-of-stay, certified beds, and occupancy rates. Using the developed metric, we identified 18 of the 92 hospitals as inefficient and targets for over-proportional capacity cuts. On the upside, we identified 15 efficient hospitals. The developed model and analysis has affected the federal state's most recent medium term planning cycle.

  13. Does health plan generosity enhance hospital market power?

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Kessler, Daniel P

    2015-12-01

    We test whether the generosity of employer-sponsored health insurance facilitates the exercise of market power by hospitals. We construct indices of health plan generosity and the price and volume of hospital services using data from Truven MarketScan for 601 counties from 2001 to 2007. We use variation in the industry and union status of covered workers within a county over time to identify the causal effects of generosity. Although OLS estimates fail to reject the hypothesis that generosity facilitates the exercise of hospital market power, IV estimates show a statistically significant and economically important positive effect of plan generosity on hospital prices in uncompetitive markets, but not in competitive markets. Our results suggest that most of the aggregate effect of hospital market structure on prices found in previous work may be coming from areas with generous plans.

  14. Succession planning: perspectives of chief executive officers in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K

    2009-01-01

    A study was conducted to explore the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origins of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study examined how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry.

  15. Children's hospitals and PACS: six profiles of planning and implementation.

    PubMed

    Keen, C

    1999-01-01

    Six pediatric hospitals were interviewed at length about the status of PACS in their facilities. Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio entered electronic imaging communications in 1993. Several nearby clinics were connected through teleradiology and by 1998, the radiology department had developed a business plan for the implementation of PACS. Two hospitals in Atlanta, Egleston Hospital and Scottish Rite Children's. Medical Center, merged in 1998 to become one entity with two medical campuses. They now treat 60 percent of Atlanta's pediatric patients. Merging incompatible systems has been the administrator's most immediate problem. One director of imaging services is responsible for the recently merged Mary Bridge Children's Hospital and Tacoma General Hospital, plus a network of clinics and medical facilities scatted throughout Tacoma and the South Puget Sound area in Washington state. A state-of-the-art mini-PACS and teleradiology system were implemented at Primary Children's Medical Center, Salt Lake City, in 1991. Over the years, it has added modalities into an electronic system that now results in significantly improved use of physicians' time and patient relations. St. Louis Children's Hospital, with both a director of radiology and a PACS administrator, has implemented teleradiology and an ultrasound mini-PACS, and has plans for an enterprise-wide PACS. Children's Hospital in Birmingham, Ala., a major trauma center, provides specialized pediatric care to nearly all 67 counties in Alabama. With a 20-year history of online computerization, it is now reengineering its emergency department and will implement CR there first.

  16. Resource Requirements Planning for Hospitals Treating Serious Infectious Disease Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Vugrin, Eric D.; Verzi, Stephen Joseph; Finley, Patrick D.; Turnquist, Mark A.; Wyte-Lake, Tamar; Griffin, Ann R.; Ricci, Karen J.; Plotinsky, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    This report presents a mathematical model of the way in which a hospital uses a variety of resources, utilities and consumables to provide care to a set of in-patients, and how that hospital might adapt to provide treatment to a few patients with a serious infectious disease, like the Ebola virus. The intended purpose of the model is to support requirements planning studies, so that hospitals may be better prepared for situations that are likely to strain their available resources. The current model is a prototype designed to present the basic structural elements of a requirements planning analysis. Some simple illustrati ve experiments establish the mo del's general capabilities. With additional inve stment in model enhancement a nd calibration, this prototype could be developed into a useful planning tool for ho spital administrators and health care policy makers.

  17. Pharmacy Leader's Role in Hospital Emergency Preparedness Planning.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Daniel, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    The Director's Forum column is designed to guide pharmacy leaders in establishing patient-centered services in hospitals and health systems. Environmental disasters and terrorist attacks demonstrate that it is imperative for both a hospital and community to have an emergency preparedness plan. The goal of this article is to provide health-system pharmacy leaders with a practical approach in developing an emergency operations plan (EOP) that can be activated in the event of a disaster. Pharmacy leaders should (1) review government and community disaster responses and understand the movement of drug supply for each response, (2) create a pharmacy disaster plan, (3) list the essential medications and determine their inventory levels, and (4) establish a staff training program to enhance understanding and implementation of the EOP. If successfully developed and executed, a hospital pharmacy department's EOP has a high rating of success in meeting patient-centered needs in the unforeseen event of a disaster.

  18. How many years can hospital master plans be effective.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yasushi

    2003-01-01

    This paper considers the effectiveness of master planning for hospitals based on recent surveys carried out in the UK and Japan. In the UK, Northwick Park Hospital, built in the 1970s, was selected for surveys in 1999 and 2002 because of being a typical example representing John Weeks' 1960s concept of 'indeterminate architecture' to cope with growth and change. In Japan, the Chiba Cancer Center, also built in the 1970s, was selected to survey in 2002 because of being a good example of a 'multi-wing type' configuration developed in Japan for growth and change. The paper concludes with the determination that the master plans for both these hospitals have been generally successful, despite the fact that changes were often not anticipated by the architectural proposals. In addition, it is seen that a master plan can be effective for at least a period of 30 years given certain conditions.

  19. Hospital capacity planning: from measuring stocks to modelling flows

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen; Barlow, James; McKee, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The metric of “bed numbers” is commonly used in hospital planning, but it fails to capture key aspects of how hospital services are delivered. Drawing on a study of innovative hospital projects in Europe, we argue that hospital capacity planning should not be based on beds, but rather on the ability to deliver processes. We propose using approaches that are based on manufacturing theory such as “lean thinking” that focuses on the value that different processes add for the primary customer, i.e. the patient. We argue that it is beneficial to look at the hospital, not from the perspective of beds or specialties, but rather from the path taken by the patients who are treated in them, the respective processes delivered by health professionals and the facilities appropriate to those processes. Systematized care pathways seem to offer one avenue for achieving these goals. However, they need to be underpinned by a better understanding of the flows of patients, work and goods within a hospital, the bottlenecks that occur, and translation of this understanding into new capacity planning tools. PMID:20680129

  20. Hospital capacity planning: from measuring stocks to modelling flows.

    PubMed

    Rechel, Bernd; Wright, Stephen; Barlow, James; McKee, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The metric of "bed numbers" is commonly used in hospital planning, but it fails to capture key aspects of how hospital services are delivered. Drawing on a study of innovative hospital projects in Europe, we argue that hospital capacity planning should not be based on beds, but rather on the ability to deliver processes. We propose using approaches that are based on manufacturing theory such as "lean thinking" that focuses on the value that different processes add for the primary customer, i.e. the patient. We argue that it is beneficial to look at the hospital, not from the perspective of beds or specialties, but rather from the path taken by the patients who are treated in them, the respective processes delivered by health professionals and the facilities appropriate to those processes. Systematized care pathways seem to offer one avenue for achieving these goals. However, they need to be underpinned by a better understanding of the flows of patients, work and goods within a hospital, the bottlenecks that occur, and translation of this understanding into new capacity planning tools.

  1. Medicare Advantage Plans Pay Hospitals Less Than Traditional Medicare Pays.

    PubMed

    Baker, Laurence C; Bundorf, M Kate; Devlin, Aileen M; Kessler, Daniel P

    2016-08-01

    There is ongoing debate about how prices paid to providers by Medicare Advantage plans compare to prices paid by fee-for-service Medicare. We used data from Medicare and the Health Care Cost Institute to identify the prices paid for hospital services by fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare, Medicare Advantage plans, and commercial insurers in 2009 and 2012. We calculated the average price per admission, and its trend over time, in each of the three types of insurance for fixed baskets of hospital admissions across metropolitan areas. After accounting for differences in hospital networks, geographic areas, and case-mix between Medicare Advantage and FFS Medicare, we found that Medicare Advantage plans paid 5.6 percent less for hospital services than FFS Medicare did. Without taking into account the narrower networks of Medicare Advantage, the program paid 8.0 percent less than FFS Medicare. We also found that the rates paid by commercial plans were much higher than those of either Medicare Advantage or FFS Medicare, and growing. At least some of this difference comes from the much higher prices that commercial plans pay for profitable service lines.

  2. Development of a statewide hospital plan for radiologic emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Dainiak, Nicholas . E-mail: pndain@bpthosp.org; Delli Carpini, Domenico; Bohan, Michael; Werdmann, Michael; Wilds, Edward; Barlow, Agnus; Beck, Charles; Cheng, David; Daly, Nancy; Glazer, Peter; Mas, Peter; Nath, Ravinder; Piontek, Gregory; Price, Kenneth; Albanese, Joseph; Roberts, Kenneth; Salner, Andrew L.; Rockwell, Sara

    2006-05-01

    Although general guidelines have been developed for triage of victims in the field and for hospitals to plan for a radiologic event, specific information for clinicians and administrators is not available for guidance in efficient management of radiation victims during their early encounter in the hospital. A consensus document was developed by staff members of four Connecticut hospitals, two institutions of higher learning, and the State of Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and Office of Emergency Preparedness, with assistance of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. The objective was to write a practical manual for clinicians (including radiation oncologists, emergency room physicians, and nursing staff), hospital administrators, radiation safety officers, and other individuals knowledgeable in radiation monitoring that would be useful for evaluation and management of radiation injury. The rationale for and process by which the radiation response plan was developed and implemented in the State of Connecticut are reviewed. Hospital admission pathways are described, based on classification of victims as exposed, contaminated, and/or physically injured. This manual will be of value to those involved in planning the health care response to a radiologic event.

  3. Hospital discharge plan for patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Andrietta, Maria Paula; Lopes Moreira, Rita Simone; Bottura Leite de Barros, Alba Lucia

    2011-01-01

    This integrative review investigates how nurses plan the hospital discharge of patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) since an inadequate discharge plan and patients' subsequent non-adherence to instruction provided upon discharge are indicated as potential factors for re-hospitalization. A total of 24 papers were found in a search carried out in the LILACS and MEDLINE databases between 2004 and 2008, which given the inclusion criteria, were reduced to 14 papers. The papers were analyzed and categorized into "Health Education", and "Nursing Care". The synthesis of results indicates that the discharge plan devised by nurses is based on two categories. The actions of nurses to promote health education can enable patients with CHF to improve self-care.

  4. Planning an outing from hospital for ventilator-dependent children.

    PubMed

    Gilgoff, I S; Helgren, J

    1992-10-01

    Returning ventilator-dependent children to the home environment has become a well-accepted occurrence. The success of a home program depends on careful pre-discharge planning in order to ensure the child's medical safety, and adequate preparation to ensure the child's and family's adjustment to an active community life after discharge. To achieve this, involvement in community activities must begin while the child is still in hospital. As part of a complete rehabilitation program, nine ventilator-dependent children were taken on an inpatient outing to Disneyland. The planning and goals of the outing are described.

  5. A financial planning model for estimating hospital debt capacity.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, D S; Heath, D; Levin, P J

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based financial planning model was formulated to measure the impact of a major capital improvement project on the fiscal health of Stanford University Hospital. The model had to be responsive to many variables and easy to use, so as to allow for the testing of numerous alternatives. Special efforts were made to identify the key variables that needed to be presented in the model and to include all known links between capital investment, debt, and hospital operating expenses. Growth in the number of patient days of care was singled out as a major source of uncertainty that would have profound effects on the hospital's finances. Therefore this variable was subjected to special scrutiny in terms of efforts to gauge expected demographic trends and market forces. In addition, alternative base runs of the model were made under three distinct patient-demand assumptions. Use of the model enabled planners at the Stanford University Hospital (a) to determine that a proposed modernization plan was financially feasible under a reasonable (that is, not unduly optimistic) set of assumptions and (b) to examine the major sources of risk. Other than patient demand, these sources were found to be gross revenues per patient, operating costs, and future limitations on government reimbursement programs. When the likely financial consequences of these risks were estimated, both separately and in combination, it was determined that even if two or more assumptions took a somewhat more negative turn than was expected, the hospital would be able to offset adverse consequences by a relatively minor reduction in operating costs. PMID:7111658

  6. A financial planning model for estimating hospital debt capacity.

    PubMed

    Hopkins, D S; Heath, D; Levin, P J

    1982-01-01

    A computer-based financial planning model was formulated to measure the impact of a major capital improvement project on the fiscal health of Stanford University Hospital. The model had to be responsive to many variables and easy to use, so as to allow for the testing of numerous alternatives. Special efforts were made to identify the key variables that needed to be presented in the model and to include all known links between capital investment, debt, and hospital operating expenses. Growth in the number of patient days of care was singled out as a major source of uncertainty that would have profound effects on the hospital's finances. Therefore this variable was subjected to special scrutiny in terms of efforts to gauge expected demographic trends and market forces. In addition, alternative base runs of the model were made under three distinct patient-demand assumptions. Use of the model enabled planners at the Stanford University Hospital (a) to determine that a proposed modernization plan was financially feasible under a reasonable (that is, not unduly optimistic) set of assumptions and (b) to examine the major sources of risk. Other than patient demand, these sources were found to be gross revenues per patient, operating costs, and future limitations on government reimbursement programs. When the likely financial consequences of these risks were estimated, both separately and in combination, it was determined that even if two or more assumptions took a somewhat more negative turn than was expected, the hospital would be able to offset adverse consequences by a relatively minor reduction in operating costs.

  7. Hospital-based expert model for health technology procurement planning in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Miniati, R; Cecconi, G; Frosini, F; Dori, F; Regolini, J; Iadanza, E; Biffi Gentili, G

    2014-01-01

    Although in the last years technology innovation in healthcare brought big improvements in care level and patient quality of life, hospital complexity and management cost became higher. For this reason, necessity of planning for medical equipment procurement within hospitals is getting more and more important in order to sustainable provide appropriate technology for both routine activity and innovative procedures. In order to support hospital decision makers for technology procurement planning, an expert model was designed as reported in the following paper. It combines the most widely used approaches for technology evaluation by taking into consideration Health Technology Assessment (HTA) and Medical Equipment Replacement Model (MERM). The designing phases include a first definition of prioritization algorithms, then the weighting process through experts' interviews and a final step for the model validation that included both statistical testing and comparison with real decisions. In conclusion, the designed model was able to provide a semi-automated tool that through the use of multidisciplinary information is able to prioritize different requests of technology acquisition in hospitals. Validation outcomes improved the model accuracy and created different "user profiles" according to the specific needs of decision makers.

  8. [Strategic planning: an important economic action for German hospitals].

    PubMed

    Wiese, Christoph H R; Zink, Wolfgang; Russo, Sebastian G

    2011-11-01

    In medical systems, economic issues and means of action are in the course of dwindling human (physicians and nurses) and financial resources are more important. For this reason, physicians must understand basic economic principles. Only in this way, there may be medical autonomy from social systems and hospital administrators. The current work is an approach to present a model for strategic planning of an anesthesia department. For this, a "strengths", "weaknesses", "opportunities", and "threats" (SWOT) analysis is used. This display is an example of an exemplary anaesthetic department.

  9. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required...

  10. 42 CFR 456.201 - UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient mental hospital... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirements § 456.201 UR plan required...

  11. Social Work Discharge Planning in Acute Care Hospitals in Israel: Clients' Evaluation of the Discharge Planning Process and Adequacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soskolne, Varda; Kaplan, Giora; Ben-Shahar, Ilana; Stanger, Varda; Auslander, Gail. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations of patients' characteristics, hospitalization factors, and the patients' or family assessment of the discharge planning process, with their evaluation of adequacy of the discharge plan. Method: A prospective study. Social workers from 11 acute care hospitals in Israel provided data on 1426 discharged…

  12. Landscape Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Landscape Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  13. First Floor Plan U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Therapeutic Exercise Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  14. The third stage of hospital long-range planning: the marketing approach.

    PubMed

    Rynne, T J

    1980-01-01

    Today most hospital administrators are convinced they should implement long-range planning. The marketing approach to long-range planning is an effective strategy that is consumer oriented. It starts the planning process with the consumer, letting the consumer's needs and wants guide the organization's planning.

  15. HCA Richmond Hospitals' new marketing strategy a winning plan.

    PubMed

    Rees, Tom

    2003-01-01

    HCA Richmond Hospitals, a five-hospital system in Richmond, Va., is positioning itself as a winner in a highly competitive, healthcare-saturated market since overhauling is marketing strategy a little over a year ago. The marketing strategy enables individual hospital to target their own unique constituencies. "Understanding the intricate marketing dynamics of hospital systems is today of critical importance and equal complexity," said Tony Bejamin, principal of Oxygen Advertising Inc., New York, the agency that remodeled HCA Richmond Hospitals' marketing strategy.

  16. How a new 'public plan' could affect hospitals' finances and private insurance premiums.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Allen; DaVanzo, Joan E; El-Gamil, Audrey M; Berger, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Two key health reform bills in the House of Representatives and Senate include the option of a "public plan" as an additional source of health coverage. At least initially, the plan would primarily be structured to cover many of the uninsured and those who now have individual coverage. Because it is possible, and perhaps even likely, that this new public payer would pay less than private payers for the same services, such a plan could negatively affect hospital margins. Hospitals may attempt to recoup losses by shifting costs to private payers. We outline the financial pressures that hospitals and private payers could experience under various assumptions. High uninsured enrollment in a public plan would bolster hospital margins; however, this effect is reversed if the privately insured enter a public plan in large proportions, potentially stressing the hospital industry and increasing private insurance premiums.

  17. Strategic Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation Processes in Hospital Systems: A Survey From Iran

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim & Background: Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. Methods: The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. Results: All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items “the rate of the compliance to requirements” and “the quantity of planning facilitators” (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved. PMID:25716385

  18. Characteristics of acute care hospitals with diversity plans and translation services.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Charles B; Shen, Jay J; Ginn, Gregory O

    2011-01-01

    Hospitals provide diversity activities for a number of reasons. The authors examined community demand, resource availability, managed care, institutional pressure, and external orientation related variables that were associated with acute care hospital diversity plans and translation services. The authors used multiple logistic regression to analyze the data for 478 hospitals in the 2006 National Inpatient Sample (NIS) dataset that had available data on the racial and ethnic status of their discharges. We also used 2004 and 2006 American Hospital Association (AHA) data to measure the two dependent diversity variables and the other independent variables. We found that resource, managed care, and external orientation variables were associated with having a diversity plan and that resource, managed care, institutional, and external orientation variables were associated with providing translation services. The authors concluded that more evidence for diversity's impact, additional resources, and more institutional pressure may be needed to motivate more hospitals to provide diversity planning and translation services.

  19. Ground Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  20. First Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. Second Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. First Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    First Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  3. Ground Floor Plan (Section A) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Ground Floor Plan (Section A) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  4. Second Floor Plan (Section B) U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Second Floor Plan (Section B) - U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  5. Planning among nurse managers in district hospitals in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Asamani, James Avoka; Kwafo, Esther Oforiwaa; Ansah-Ofei, Adelaide Maria

    2013-12-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored the planning practices of nurse managers at ward level, their knowledge of planning process and the factors that influence effective planning. Although the practice of planning was almost universal, half the participants had no knowledge of the process, and this knowledge gap was traced to a lack of educational preparation before their appointment. In-service training, support from management and staff, and funding were identified as major factors influencing effective planning at ward level. The authors recommend that prospective nurse managers have educational preparation before they take up these positions and nurse managers already in post have capacity-building training in planning.

  6. Optimization-based decision support to assist in logistics planning for hospital evacuations.

    PubMed

    Glick, Roger; Bish, Douglas R; Agca, Esra

    2013-01-01

    The evacuation of the hospital is a very complex process and evacuation planning is an important part of a hospital's emergency management plan. There are numerous factors that affect the evacuation plan including the nature of threat, availability of resources and staff the characteristics of the evacuee population, and risk to patients and staff. The safety and health of patients is of fundamental importance, but safely moving patients to alternative care facilities while under threat is a very challenging task. This article describes the logistical issues and complexities involved in planning and execution of hospital evacuations. Furthermore, this article provides examples of how optimization-based decision support tools can help evacuation planners to better plan for complex evacuations by providing real-world solutions to various evacuation scenarios.

  7. Hospital to Home: Plan for a Smooth Transition

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Make sure to order all the needed equipment and supplies. A member of your hospital team can help ... get these? ■ Will my insurance pay for the equipment and supplies? What type of care will I need when ...

  8. Business planning in Hong Kong hospitals: the emergence of a seamless health care management process.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the progress made by public hospitals in Hong Kong in implementing a business planning approach. A review of available literature suggests two main exploratory themes. The first establishes the key features of business planning in the private sector. The second theme discusses the problems of adapting this approach to the distinctive requirements of the public sector. The literature also suggests three dimensions for evaluating planning: incremental-developmental; reactive-proactive; ends-means. Qualitative data were collected by scrutinizing relevant organizational documentation and by discussions with focus groups formed by participants in the planning process. The data were analyzed against eight key elements of a business plan identified from the literature and from panels of business experts. These elements were found to be present in the Hospital Authority's plans but were less evident in hospital level plans. Because of the unitary nature of hospital organization in Hong Kong, it has been difficult for hospitals to break out of a reactive, incremental and ends-based pattern to a more imaginative identification of the distinctive business and market that they may be in. This is, however, changing rapidly and it is clear that there is in place a robust and 'seamless' health care management process.

  9. Strategic plan modelling by hospital senior administration to integrate diversity management.

    PubMed

    Newhouse, John J

    2010-11-01

    Limited research suggests that some hospital senior administrators and chief executive officers (CEOs) have employed a strategic planning function to achieve diversity management practices. As the hospital industry struggles with how to integrate diversity practices to improve patient satisfaction, increase the quality of care and enhance clinical outcomes for minority populations, understanding the planning process involved in this endeavour becomes significant for senior hospital administrators. What is not well understood is what this strategic planning process represents and how it is applied to integrate diversity management. Scant research exists about the type of strategic models that hospital CEOs employ when they wish to reposition their organizations through diversity management. This study examines the strategic planning models used by senior administrators to integrate diversity management for an institutional-wide agenda. A qualitative survey process was used for CEOs in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. The key research questions dealt with what type of strategic plan approach senior administrators used for integrating diversity management and what rationale they used to pursue this. Significant differences were reported between three types of strategic plan modelling used by CEOs. Also, when comparing past and current practices over time, such differences existed. The need to integrate diversity management is underscored by this study. How senior hospital administrators apply strategic plan models and what impact these approaches have represent the major implications that this study offers.

  10. A terrorism response plan for hospital security and safety officers.

    PubMed

    White, Donald E

    2002-01-01

    Security and Safety managers in today's healthcare facilities need to factor terrorism response into their emergency management plans, separate from the customary disaster plans and the comparatively recent security plans. Terrorism incidents will likely be security occurrences that use a weapon of mass destruction to magnify the incidents into disasters. Facility Y2K Plans can provide an excellent framework for the detailed contingency planning needed for terrorism response by healthcare facilities. Tabbed binder notebooks, with bulleted procedures and contact points for each functional section, can provide security and safety officers with at-a-glance instructions for quick 24/7 implementation. Each functional section should focus upon what activities or severity levels trigger activation of the backup processes. Network with your countywide, regional, and/or state organizations to learn what your peers are doing. Comprehensively inventory your state, local, and commercial resources so that you have alternate providers readily available 24/7 to assist your facility upon disasters.

  11. [Problems and prospects of improving hospital care planning in the USSR].

    PubMed

    Korchagin, V P; Kravchenko, N A; Epifantsev, V I; Matveev, E N

    1989-01-01

    The necessity of planning the hospital network (bed capacity and its structure) in combination with social security institutions is validated. Thus, planning of the hospital network should be carried out in combination with social security institutions, the degree of development of other forms of medical services (hospitals at home, day hospitals, curative and diagnostic complexes, etc.) being taken into account. By preliminary estimates the demand for hospital beds is 127 per 10,000, 13 for chronic patients and the elderly in medicosocial facilities, 38.9 in social security institutions. Realization of the principles of differentiated hospital treatment of patients according to the degree of its intensity enables one to use hospital resources more effectively and to raise the quality of inpatient care. It is recommended to differentiate specific investments in hospital construction (25,000-70,000 rubles per a bed) according to the demand in hospital beds at different stages of treatment intensity and hierarchial level of medical care organization. Equal possibilities in the provision of inpatient care for the whole population can be achieved within the framework of unified regional models of the network of health care facilities, based on the standard target approach to the utilization of hospital resources.

  12. Consumer research and strategic planning for hospitals: a second opinion.

    PubMed

    Muller, A

    1984-01-01

    Strategic planning based on a market orientation requires close attention to consumers' needs and preferences. Therefore, consumer research is a prerequisite for strategic planning. However, problems and limitations have been pointed out in business fields which have had over 30 years' experience with consumer research. These shortcomings also apply to consumer research in healthcare. Several examples are presented to illustrate this point. Some recommendations follow which should make consumer research more useful for strategic planning. Yet, the importance of consumer research should not be overestimated.

  13. Succession planning in hospitals and the association with organizational performance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Effective succession planning is the heart of leadership development and an essential business strategy because it enhances the ability to achieve orderly transitions and maintain productivity levels. The results of this study are consistent with previous studies that exhibit a positive association of previous years' performance with internal succession planning. The key to successful succession planning lies in building a solid foundation of profitability. Having successors ready to fill key vacancies helps improve operational condition and the bottom line, and thus, gives a competitive edge in the market. Preparing successors for leadership may determine which organizations simply survive and which thrive and lead their markets down the road.

  14. Brave new world: integrating electronics into a hospital security plan.

    PubMed

    Van Vlack, Bill; York, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Although approximately 90% of cameras that are currently installed in hospitals are analog-based, the trend is to switch to IP network-based digital cameras. How IT, security, and other departments can work together to successfully implement the new systems is explained in this article.

  15. Financing and planning of public and private not-for-profit hospitals in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ceri R; McKee, Martin

    2004-03-01

    While much has been written about health care financing in Europe in recent years, discussion has almost entirely focused on revenue. In contrast, there has been remarkably little written on financing of capital investment in European health care systems. Yet major changes are underway in several countries, in particular involving new forms of public-private partnerships (PPP). At the same time, there is growing recognition of the way in which the inherited structure of the health care delivery system constrains the system's ability to adapt to changing circumstances. This paper reports the results of a survey undertaken among key informants in the member states of the European Union to begin to ascertain existing practices and future plans in relation to hospital planning and financing amongst public and private not-for-profit hospitals. The locus of hospital planning decisions reflect the constitutional framework of the country involved, and thus the emphasis on national or local plans. There has been an expansion of private sector involvement, with four basic models identified: private loans direct to the hospital; private loans to a regional health body; a PPP where the private sector's role is to build, design and operate the non-clinical functions of the hospital; and, finally, a PPP, where the private sector's involvement also includes management of the clinical functions of the hospital. It is too early to say whether these approaches will be more successful than the models they are replacing.

  16. OCLC for the hospital library: the justification plan for hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Allen, C W; Branson, J R

    1982-07-01

    This paper delineates the necessary steps to provide hospital administrators with the information needed to evaluate an automated system, OCLC, for addition to the medical library. Based on experience at the Norton-Children's Hospitals, included are: (1) cost analyses of present technical processing systems and cost comparisons with OCLC; (2) delineation of start-up costs for installing OCLC; (3) budgetary requirements for 1981; (4) the impact of automation on library systems, personnel, and services; (5) potential as a shared service; and (6) preparation of the proposal for administrative review.

  17. [Terrorists' target World Cup 2006: disaster medicine on the sidelines?! Aspects of hospital disaster planning].

    PubMed

    Weidringer, J W; Ansorg, J; Ulrich, B C; Polonius, M-J; Domres, B D

    2004-09-01

    Focussing on possible mass casualty situations during events such as the soccer world championship in 2006, the Professional Board of Surgeons in Germany and the German Society for Surgery canvassed surgeons-in-chief in the last quarter of 2003 concerning disaster plans for hospitals. The rate of returned questionnaires amounted to 26% covering the following areas of interest: plans-ready to use, known by the employees as well as by the rescue coordination center, performance of exercises, and concepts on decontamination and detoxification. Based on past numbers of casualties during soccer disasters, an excursus into details also includes a description of an approach to reduce the danger of bottleneck effects at doors. A preliminary concept based on the upcoming system for funding hospitals in Germany and including new partnerships is outlined, succeeded by some hopefully helpful hints for a web-based hospital disaster plan.

  18. Development of a nurse case management service: a proposed business plan for rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Adams, Marsha Howell; Crow, Carolyn S

    2005-01-01

    The nurse case management service (NCMS) for rural hospitals is an entrepreneurial endeavor designed to provide rural patients with quality, cost-effective healthcare. This article describes the development of an NCMS. A detailed marketing and financial plan, a review of industry trends, and the legal structure and risks associated with the development of the venture are presented. The financial plan projects a minimum savings of 223,200 dollars for rural institutions annually. To improve quality and reduce cost for rural hospitals, the authors recommend implementation of an NCMS.

  19. Succession planning: trends regarding the perspectives of Chief Executive Officers in US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard C; Matthews, Eric; Collins, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted to revisit the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding the origin of leadership and how they felt about internally developed successors versus externally recruited successors. Furthermore, the study sought to develop understanding of how this group of executives utilizes the succession planning process, what factors impact successor identification, what positions are applicable for succession planning activities, and who is ultimately held responsible for leadership continuity within the hospital industry. The results of this 2012 study were compared with a previous study conducted in 2007 to determine if the perceptions had changed over time.

  20. The need for strategic tax planning among nonprofit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela C

    2005-01-01

    Strategic tax planning issues are important to the nonprofit health care sector, despite its philanthropic mission. The consolidation of the industry has led management to fight for resources and develop alternative strategies for raising money. When management evaluates alternative collaborative structures to increase efficiency, the impact on governance structures must also be considered. The increased governmental scrutiny of joint ventures within the health care sector warrants management's attention as well. The financial incentives must be considered, along with the various tax policy implications of cross-sector collaborations.

  1. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  2. California hospital networks are narrower in Marketplace than in commercial plans, but access and quality are similar.

    PubMed

    Haeder, Simon F; Weimer, David L; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-05-01

    Do insurance plans offered through the Marketplace implemented by the State of California under the Affordable Care Act restrict consumers' access to hospitals relative to plans offered on the commercial market? And are the hospitals included in Marketplace networks of lower quality compared to those included in the commercial plans? To answer these questions, we analyzed differences in hospital networks across similar plan types offered both in the Marketplace and commercially, by region and insurer. We found that the common belief that Marketplace plans have narrower networks than their commercial counterparts appears empirically valid. However, there does not appear to be a substantive difference in geographic access as measured by the percentage of people residing in at least one hospital market area. More surprisingly, depending on the measure of hospital quality employed, the Marketplace plans have networks with comparable or even higher average quality than the networks of their commercial counterparts.

  3. [Building Process and Architectural Planning Characteristics of Daehan Hospital Main Building].

    PubMed

    Lee, Geauchul

    2016-04-01

    This paper explores the introduction process of Daehan Hospital from Japan as the modern medical facility in Korea, and the architectural planning characteristics as a medical facility through the detailed building process of Daehan Hospital main building. The most noticeable characteristic of Daehan Hospital is that it was designed and constructed not by Korean engineers but by Japanese engineers. Therefore, Daehan Hospital was influenced by Japanese early modern medical facility, and Japanese engineers modeled Daehan Hospital main building on Tokyo Medical School main building which was constructed in 1876 as the first national medical school and hospital. The architectural type of Tokyo Medical School main building was a typical school architecture in early Japanese modern period which had a middle corridor and a pseudo Western-style tower, but Tokyo Medical School main building became the model of a medical facility as the symbol of the medical department in Tokyo Imperial University. This was the introduction and transplantation process of Japanese modern 'model' like as other modern systems and technologies during the Korean modern transition period. However, unlike Tokyo Medical School main building, Daehan Hospital main building was constructed not as a wooden building but as a masonry building. Comparing with the function of Daehan Hospital main building, its architectural form and construction costs was excessive scale, which was because Japanese Resident-General of Korea had the intention of ostentation that Japanese modernity was superior to Korean Empire.

  4. Optimal administrative scale for planning public services: a social cost model applied to Flemish hospital care.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart

    2015-01-01

    In choosing the scale of public services, such as hospitals, both economic and public administrative considerations play important roles. The scale and the corresponding spatial distribution of public institutions have consequences for social costs, defined as the institutions' operating costs and the users' travel costs (which include the money and time costs). Insight into the relationship between scale and spatial distribution and social costs provides a practical guide for the best possible administrative planning level. This article presents a purely economic model that is suitable for deriving the optimal scale for public services. The model also reveals the corresponding optimal administrative planning level from an economic perspective. We applied this model to hospital care in Flanders for three different types of care. For its application, we examined the social costs of hospital services at different levels of administrative planning. The outcomes show that the social costs of rehabilitation in Flanders with planning at the urban level (38 areas) are 11% higher than those at the provincial level (five provinces). At the regional level (18 areas), the social costs of rehabilitation are virtually equal to those at the provincial level. For radiotherapy, there is a difference of 88% in the social costs between the urban and the provincial level. For general care, there are hardly any cost differences between the three administrative levels. Thus, purely from the perspective of social costs, rehabilitation should preferably be planned at the regional level, general services at the urban level and radiotherapy at the provincial level.

  5. [State of emergency plans for massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    D'Alessandro, D; Fizzano, M R; Barletta, C; Pietrantonio, F

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the level of implementation of plans for the massive influx of injured (PEMAF) in Italian hospitals. An anonymous questionnaire was administered to a sample of 100 hospitals selected through the network of the Italian Society of Emergency Medicine (SIMEU). Each answer of the questionnaire was assigned a score, then reported on a scale of compliance (maximum 65 points, threshold 35 points). The average scores were analyzed by hospital's venue, level of activity and previous experience of managing a real emergency. Student's t-test was used to compare means. Thirty-two hospitals sent the questionnaire, representing 33% of those selected. Five were excluded for incomplete data. The data analyzed refers to 27 hospitals of various levels of complexity, from all around the country: 55.6% from the Northern Section, 22.2% from the Centre and 22.2% from the Southern section and the Islands; and only 55.6% are above the minimum threshold of compliance. The weakest PEMAF's area is the one related to the specific training of health workers, therefore the percentage of hospitals complying the requirements in this field is down to 37%. Ten hospitals (37%) had managed a real maxi-emergence in the past: belonging to such group of hospitals is associated with an average level of compliance significantly higher than the others (p < 0.005). Due to a limited percentage of responders, the study involved so far a too small amount of hospitals; happily, they were evenly distributed in the different sections of the Country; therefore it will be appropriate to obtain a larger compliance before reaching clear-cut conclusions, but it already appears that the most critical point is the lack of specific education to maxi-emergencies in the hospital personnel.

  6. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities

  7. Setting healthcare priorities: a description and evaluation of the budgeting and planning process in county hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Barasa, Edwine W.; Cleary, Susan; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the budgeting and planning processes in public hospitals in Kenya. We used a qualitative case study approach to examine these processes in two hospitals in Kenya. We collected data by in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), a review of documents, and non-participant observations within the hospitals over a 7 month period. We applied an evaluative framework that considers both consequentialist and proceduralist conditions as important to the quality of priority-setting processes. The budgeting and planning process in the case study hospitals was characterized by lack of alignment, inadequate role clarity and the use of informal priority-setting criteria. With regard to consequentialist conditions, the hospitals incorporated economic criteria by considering the affordability of alternatives, but rarely considered the equity of allocative decisions. In the first hospital, stakeholders were aware of - and somewhat satisfied with - the budgeting and planning process, while in the second hospital they were not. Decision making in both hospitals did not result in reallocation of resources. With regard to proceduralist conditions, the budgeting and planning process in the first hospital was more inclusive and transparent, with the stakeholders more empowered compared to the second hospital. In both hospitals, decisions were not based on evidence, implementation of decisions was poor and the community was not included. There were no mechanisms for appeals or to ensure that the proceduralist conditions were met in both hospitals. Public hospitals in Kenya could improve their budgeting and planning processes by harmonizing these processes, improving role clarity, using explicit priority-setting criteria, and by incorporating both consequentialist (efficiency, equity, stakeholder satisfaction and understanding, shifted priorities, implementation

  8. Framework for preventing accidental falls in hospitals - management plan for ADL, medication and medical conditions.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shogo; Tsuru, Satoko; Iizuka, Yoshinori

    2009-01-01

    Prevention and reduction of medical accidents is essential. Among medical accidents, accidental falls remain a serious problem. While "assessment score sheets" have already been used in hospitals to prevent accidental falls, satisfactory results have not actually been achieved. In this study, we aim to establish a methodology for preventing accidental falls. We consider that the 'management plan' for each patient includes three factors. A plan of instructions for patients on actions they can take for safety in their ADL (Activities of Daily Living) is essential as a base. Second, a plan to keep up with any short term change in a patient's state is needed, because the state of a hospitalized patient will usually be temporarily affected by medication and changing medical conditions. We develop a model for preventing accidental falls, which enable us to design appropriate management plan for each patient. Then, we develop a prototype system based on the designed model. Finally, we address the result of verification of the model, by applying the prototype system into actual cases in hospitals.

  9. Strategic planning for clinical services: St. Joseph Hospital and Health Care Center.

    PubMed

    Linggi, A; Pelham, L D

    1986-09-01

    A pharmacy department at a 340-bed community hospital based its strategic plan for developing patient-oriented services on a sound drug distribution system, a credible work-measurement program, and fiscal responsibility. In 1982 the department of pharmacy and i.v. therapy implemented a strategic plan for improving pharmaceutical services. The plan involved developing goals and objectives for the department; marketing the department's services and fiscal management to hospital administrators, medical staff, and nursing staff; building teamwork among the pharmacy staff; and improving the drug distribution system before instituting clinical services. Hiring of additional pharmacy staff was justified on the basis of work-measurement data. By adjusting staffing levels every two weeks based on work-measurement data, the department increased the efficiency of drug distribution activities; the pharmacy also implemented cost-saving programs like selection of therapeutic alternates and formulary restrictions. The savings were then reinvested in labor-intensive patient-oriented pharmaceutical services. A staff development program using staff pharmacists as preceptors expanded the breadth and depth of pharmacists' clinical skills. The planning efforts were successful because the needs of hospital administrators, the pharmacy department, and staff members were addressed.

  10. Planning and verification in radiotherapy: our experience in a filmless hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torresin, A.; Carbonini, C.; Ferrari, M. B.; Asnaghi, D.; Botturi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In our hospital we have recently installed a new radiotherapy treatment planning and verification system. Our system allows to follow the normal clinical workflow: from patient identification to follow-up through the treatment delivery with the study of the best irradiation geometry. We designed a new technical solutions relating to the use of four linear accelerators, a Record and Verify system, a Treatment Planning System (TPS) and a clinical folder, completely paperless. All the procedures for treatment planning, setup and verification are integrated in our digital imaging long-term archive. The integration is based on the existing HL7 and DICOM standard protocols described in the International Committee and IHE RO Technical Framework, which is able to support the workflow. All the images used for planning and setup are stored in the Oncentra DICOM archive server for short-term archiving and then are sent to the Agfa DICOM long-term archive for legal and scientific purposes.

  11. A health plan work in progress: hospital-physician price and quality transparency.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Ann; Liebhaber, Allison; Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-08-01

    Responding to large employers' interest in greater health care price and quality transparency, health plans are developing consumer tools to compare price and quality information across hospitals and physicians, but the tools' pervasiveness and usefulness are limited, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2007 site visits to 12 nationally representative metropolitan communities. Many large employers view price and quality transparency as key to a broader consumerism strategy, where employees take more responsibility for medical costs, lifestyle choices and treatment decisions. Some health plans believe providing price and quality information to enrollees is a competitive advantage, while others are skeptical about the benefits and are proceeding cautiously to avoid potential unintended consequences. Health plans are in various stages of making price information available to enrollees. Plans generally provide some type of price information on inpatient and outpatient procedures and services from data based on their own negotiated prices or through aggregated health plan claims data obtained through a vendor; few plans provide price information on services in physician offices. However, the information provided often lacks specificity about individual providers, and its availability is often limited to enrollees in specific geographic areas. Health plans generally rely on third-party sources to package publicly available quality information instead of using information gleaned from their own claims or other data. Health plans' ability to advance price and quality comparison tools to the point where a critical mass of consumers trust and use the information to choose physicians and hospitals will likely have considerable influence on the ultimate success of broader health consumerism efforts.

  12. Hospital and Health Plan Partnerships: The Affordable Care Act's Impact on Promoting Health and Wellness

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Michelle; White, Annesha; Kelley, Virginia P.; Hopper, Jennifer Kuca; Liu, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Background The Affordable Care Act (ACA) healthcare reforms, centered on achieving the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) Triple Aim goals of improving patient care quality and satisfaction, improving population health, and reducing costs, have led to increasing partnerships between hospitals and insurance companies and the implementation of employee wellness programs. Hospitals and insurance companies have opted to partner to distribute the risk and resources and increase coordination of care. Objective To examine the ACA's impact on the health and wellness programs that have resulted from the joint ventures of hospitals and health plans based on the published literature. Method We conducted a review of the literature to identify successful mergers and best practices of health and wellness programs. Articles published between January 2007 and January 2015 were compiled from various search engines, using the search terms “corporate,” “health and wellness program,” “health plan,” “insurance plan,” “hospital,” “joint venture,” and “vertical merger.” Publications that described consolidations or wellness programs not tied to health insurance plans were excluded. Noteworthy characteristics of these programs were summarized and tabulated. Results A total of 44 eligible articles were included in the analysis. The findings showed that despite rising healthcare costs, joint ventures prevent hospitals from trading-off quality and services for cost reductions. Administrators believed that partnering would allow the companies to meet ACA standards for improving clinical outcomes at reduced costs. Before the implementation of the ACA, some employers had wellness programs, but these were not standardized and did not need to produce measurable results. The ACA encouraged improvement of employee wellness programs by providing funding for expanded health services and by mandating quality care. Successful workplace health and wellness

  13. Strategic competition: the application of business planning techniques to the hospital marketplace.

    PubMed

    Morris, D E; Rau, S E

    1985-01-01

    Survival in the increasingly turbulent and uncertain health care environment should raise the application of business planning and corporate strategy to the highest levels of institutional consciousness. With hospital mergers and networking arrangements expected to account for over 60% of the hospital beds in the nation by 1990, and with government and business cost containment efforts squeezing hospital margins, the survivors are going to be those institutions able to develop and maintain a sustainable economic advantage over the competition in the programs and services that comprise the major portion of their business. The successful players will be those that allow the institution to identify and exploit new opportunities and concentrate management and financial resources in those segments of the market where competitive advantages are real and attainable.

  14. Planning for Hospital IT Implementation: A New Look at the Business Case

    PubMed Central

    Menachemi, Nir; Randeree, Ebrahim; Burke, Darrell E.; Ford, Eric W.

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary Compared to organizations in other industries, hospitals are slow to adopt information technology (IT). Those planning for system implementation must understand the barriers to IT adoption which, in healthcare, include the relatively high acquisition and maintenance costs of sophisticated administrative and clinical information systems. Understanding the overall business case is particularly important for hospital IT planners. This paper describes the literature that examines benefits from using health IT. In addition, we focus on a series of studies conducted in Florida that provide generalizable evidence regarding the overall business case associated with hospital adoption for information systems. These studies focus broadly on the improved financial, operational, and clinical performance associated with IT. PMID:27429553

  15. Customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering move hospital towards in-house stockless program.

    PubMed

    Burton, R; Mauk, D

    1993-03-01

    By integrating customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering techniques when examining internal costs and efficiencies, materiel managers are able to better realize what concepts will best meet their customers' needs. Defining your customer(s), applying industrial engineering techniques, completing work sampling studies, itemizing recommendations and benefits to each alternative, performing feasibility and cost-analysis matrixes and utilizing resources through productivity monitoring will get you on the right path toward selecting concepts to use. This article reviews the above procedures as they applied to one hospital's decision-making process to determine whether to incorporate a stockless inventory program. Through an analysis of customer demand, the hospital realized that stockless was the way to go, but not by outsourcing the function--the hospital incorporated an in-house stockless inventory program.

  16. A Study on Strategic Planning and Procurement of Medicals in Uganda's Regional Referral Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Masembe, Ishak Kamaradi

    2016-12-31

    This study was an analysis of the effect of strategic planning on procurement of medicals in Uganda's regional referral hospitals (RRH's). Medicals were defined as essential medicines, medical devices and medical equipment. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has been carrying out strategic planning for the last 15 years via the Health Sector Strategic Plans. Their assumption was that strategic planning would translate to strategic procurement and consequently, availability of medicals in the RRH's. However, despite the existence of these plans, there have been many complaints about expired drugs and shortages in RRH's. For this purpose, a third variable was important because it served the role of mediation. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on perceptions of 206 respondents who were selected using simple random sampling. 8 key informant interviews were held, 2 in each RRH. 4 Focus Group Discussions were held, 1 for each RRH, and between 5 and 8 staff took part as discussants for approximately three hours. The findings suggested that strategic planning was affected by funding to approximately 34% while the relationship between funding and procurement was 35%. The direct relationship between strategic planning and procurement was 18%. However when the total causal effect was computed it turned out that strategic planning and the related variable of funding contributed 77% to procurement of medicals under the current hierarchical model where MOH is charged with development of strategic plans for the entire health sector. Since even with this contribution there were complaints, the study proposed a new model called CALF which according to a simulation, if adopted by MOH, strategic planning would contribute 87% to effectiveness in procurement of medicals.

  17. A Study on Strategic Planning and Procurement of Medicals in Uganda’s Regional Referral Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This study was an analysis of the effect of strategic planning on procurement of medicals in Uganda’s regional referral hospitals (RRH’s). Medicals were defined as essential medicines, medical devices and medical equipment. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has been carrying out strategic planning for the last 15 years via the Health Sector Strategic Plans. Their assumption was that strategic planning would translate to strategic procurement and consequently, availability of medicals in the RRH’s. However, despite the existence of these plans, there have been many complaints about expired drugs and shortages in RRH’s. For this purpose, a third variable was important because it served the role of mediation. A questionnaire was used to obtain information on perceptions of 206 respondents who were selected using simple random sampling. 8 key informant interviews were held, 2 in each RRH. 4 Focus Group Discussions were held, 1 for each RRH, and between 5 and 8 staff took part as discussants for approximately three hours. The findings suggested that strategic planning was affected by funding to approximately 34% while the relationship between funding and procurement was 35%. The direct relationship between strategic planning and procurement was 18%. However when the total causal effect was computed it turned out that strategic planning and the related variable of funding contributed 77% to procurement of medicals under the current hierarchical model where MOH is charged with development of strategic plans for the entire health sector. Since even with this contribution there were complaints, the study proposed a new model called CALF which according to a simulation, if adopted by MOH, strategic planning would contribute 87% to effectiveness in procurement of medicals. PMID:28299158

  18. A management plan for hospitals and medical centers facing radiation incidents

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Fereshteh; Zahed, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nowadays, application of nuclear technology in different industries has largely expanded worldwide. Proportionately, the risk of nuclear incidents and the resulting injuries have, therefore, increased in recent years. Preparedness is an important part of the crisis management cycle; therefore efficient preplanning seems crucial to any crisis management plan. Equipped with facilities and experienced personnel, hospitals naturally engage with the response to disasters. The main purpose of our study was to present a practical management pattern for hospitals and medical centers in case they encounter a nuclear emergency. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive qualitative study, data were collected through experimental observations, sources like Safety manuals released by the International Atomic Energy Agency and interviews with experts to gather their ideas along with Delphi method for polling, and brainstorming. In addition, the 45 experts were interviewed on three targeted using brainstorming and Delphi method. Results: We finally proposed a management plan along with a set of practicality standards for hospitals and medical centers to optimally respond to nuclear medical emergencies when a radiation incident happens nearby. Conclusion: With respect to the great importance of preparedness against nuclear incidents adoption and regular practice of nuclear crisis management codes for hospitals and medical centers seems quite necessary. PMID:26759575

  19. [Implementation of a safety and health planning system in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    Mariani, F; Bravi, C; Dolcetti, L; Moretto, A; Palermo, A; Ronchin, M; Tonelli, F; Carrer, P

    2007-01-01

    University Hospital "L. Sacco" had started in 2006 a two-year project in order to set up a "Health and Safety Management System (HSMS)" referring to the technical guideline OHSAS 18001:1999 and the UNI and INAIL "Guidelines for a health and safety management system at workplace". So far, the following operations had been implemented: Setting up of a specific Commission within the Risk Management Committee; Identification and appointment of Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Carrying out of a training course addressed to Workers Representatives for Safety and Departmental Representatives of HSMS; Development of an Integrated Informative System for Prevention and Safety; Auditors qualification; Inspection of the Occupational Health Unit and the Prevention and Safety Service: reporting of critical situations and monitoring solutions adopted. Short term objectives are: Self-evaluation through check-lists of each department; Sharing of the Improvement Plan among the departments of the hospital; Planning of Health and Safety training activities in the framework of the Hospital Training Plan; Safety audit.

  20. A Study to Determine the Optimal Strategic Planning Process for Controlling and Coordinating the In-House Development of an Integrated Computer- Supported Hospital Information System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    This study examines Strategic Planning concepts and how they relate to the development of Hospital Information Systems. The author recommends that... Strategic Planning methods be utilized in the development of Hospital Information Systems, and provides guidance on how to do so. Keywords: Theses...Integrated information systems; Hospital administration; Computer networks; Information exchange; Health care; Strategic planning ; Information systems.

  1. Benefits plans focus on flexibility. Hospitals increase choices for employees as emphasis moves from recruitment to retention.

    PubMed

    Berg, E

    1991-09-23

    As hospitals turn their attention from employee recruitment to employee retention, flexible benefits plans are becoming increasingly popular as a means of meeting workers' preference for choice when it comes to issues such as healthcare coverage, insurance and vacation days. At the same time, such programs can help hospitals hold down their long-term costs.

  2. A Community-Based Continuing Care Program for the Elderly Disabled. An Evaluation of Planned Intermittent Hospital Readmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Duncan; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Utilizing flexible community-supporting services integrated with a hospital-based program of planned intermittent relief of the patients' supporters, patients (N=50) were maintained in the community at an average cost of 79.5 hospital bed days per patient per annum. The Continuing Care Program is an alternative to institutionalization. (Author)

  3. Normalising advance care planning in a general medicine service of a tertiary hospital: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ian A; Rajakaruna, Nalaka; Shah, Darshan; Miller, Leyton; Reymond, Elizabeth; Daly, Michael

    2015-11-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop, implement and explore the effects of a program in advance care planning (ACP) within a tertiary hospital general medicine service.Methods Before-after exploratory mixed-methods analysis was conducted of an ACP program comprising seven components designed to overcome well-documented barriers to ACP in clinical practice. The results of pre-ACP program audits performed in June 2014 were compared with those of post-ACP audits performed over 5 months from July to November 2014. The main outcome measure was the number of advance care plans completed in patients considered eligible for ACP based on a life expectancy of 12 months or less as assessed by two prognostication instruments. Questionnaire surveys ascertained staff perceptions of ACP and the usefulness of training and resources in ACP.Results Pre-ACP program analysis of 166 consecutive patients deemed eligible for ACP revealed that only 1% had a documented advance care plan. Following ACP implementation, 115 of 215 (53%) potentially eligible patients were considered able to participate in ACP discussions and were approached to do so before discharge, of whom 89 (77.4%) completed an advance care plan, whereas 26 (23.6%) declined. This equated to an overall completion rate for all potentially eligible patients of 41% compared to 1% pre-ACP (P < 0.001). Major barriers to ACP perceived by at least 30% of questionnaire respondents included the reluctance of patients and family to discuss ACP, insufficient time to initiate or complete ACP, patient and/or family factors that rendered ACP impractical, inadequate communication skills around end-of-life issues, confusion about who was primarily responsible for conducting ACP and difficulty using ACP documentation forms. Enabling factors included dedicated ACP workshops, facilitator and resource packages for staff, and ACP brochures for patients and family.Conclusion A multifaceted ACP program in a general medicine

  4. [Effect of a Discharge Planning Educational Program in a University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shima; Ohori, Yoko; Tanaka, Yuko; Sato, Yukiko; Watanabe, Ami; Fujii, Junko

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of a discharge planning educational program on multidisciplinary team staff in a community. We provided training to nurses of a university hospital. The training covered an introduction to discharge planning, decision-making support, home care medicine and home nursing care, the medical social welfare system, and case review meetings. It was conducted every year from September through February between 2012 and 2015. Before and after the training, the awareness of nurses was evaluated by using self-administered questionnaires and the Discharge Planning scale for Ward Nurses(DPWN), and discharge planning satisfaction was measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The study process was reviewed and approved by the Ethics Committee of Tokyo Women's Medical University. The questionnaires were distributed to 96 nurses; of these, responses of 72 nurses(pre- and post-training)were analyzed(response rate: 75.0%). The average number of years of nursing experience was 8.5± 7.7. The total score of the DPWN and its subscales, as well as the VAS, with regard to satisfaction level significantly increased after the training(p<0.01), indicating that training improved nurses' awareness of discharge planning practices.

  5. Pediatric hospital medicine: a strategic planning roundtable to chart the future.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A; Lye, Patricia S; Carlson, Douglas; Daru, Jennifer A; Narang, Steve; Srivastava, Rajendu; Melzer, Sanford; Conway, Patrick H

    2012-04-01

    Given the growing field of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM) and the need to define strategic direction, the Society of Hospital Medicine, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Academic Pediatric Association sponsored a roundtable to discuss the future of the field. Twenty-one leaders were invited plus a facilitator utilizing established health care strategic planning methods. A "vision statement" was developed. Specific initiatives in 4 domains (clinical practice, quality of care, research, and workforce) were identified that would advance PHM with a plan to complete each initiative. Review of the current issues demonstrated gaps between the current state of affairs and the full vision of the potential impact of PHM. Clinical initiatives were to develop an educational plan supporting the PHM Core Competencies and a clinical practice monitoring dashboard template. Quality initiatives included an environmental assessment of PHM participation on key committees, societies, and agencies to ensure appropriate PHM representation. Three QI collaboratives are underway. A Research Leadership Task Force was created and the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings (PRIS) network was refocused, defining a strategic framework for PRIS, and developing a funding strategy. Workforce initiatives were to develop a descriptive statement that can be used by any PHM physician, a communications tool describing "value added" of PHM; and a tool to assess career satisfaction among PHM physicians. We believe the Roundtable was successful in describing the current state of PHM and laying a course for the near future.

  6. Technical and organisational aspects in enterprise resource planning systems implementation: lessons from a Spanish public hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Escobar-Pérez, Bernabe; Monge-Lozano, Pedro

    2014-09-01

    Public resources should always be managed efficiently, more so in times of crisis. Due to the specific characteristics of the healthcare sector, there is a need for special attention, especially in regards to hospitals. Administrators need useful tools to be able to efficiently manage available resources, such as enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Therefore, an analysis of the effects of their implementation and use in hospitals is valuable. This study has two purposes. One is to analyse the role ERP systems play in aiding the integration of hospital data, with focus on user satisfaction as well as possible resistance to change. The other purpose is to analyse the effects of implanting and using ERP systems in the hospital environment and identifying how certain variables influence the process, especially the existence of different organisational cultures. Results indicate that clinical information has become notably more integrated, despite the lack of flow in the economic-financial area. The heterogeneous nature of the different groups, clinical (Medical, Nursing) and non-clinical (Economic-Financial, Accounting), had a negative influence on the implementation process, and limited the integration of information as well as the system's performance.

  7. Designing HIGH-COST Medicine Hospital Surveys, Health Planning, and the Paradox of Progressive Reform

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas’ hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs. PMID:20019312

  8. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs.

  9. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan...' revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  10. 77 FR 24451 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 62 Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan... revised State Plan to control air pollutants from Hazardous/ Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators...

  11. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, C

    1982-03-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters.

  12. Hospital organizational response to the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island: implications for future-oriented disaster planning.

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, C

    1982-01-01

    The 1979 nuclear accident at Three Mile Island (TMI) near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, caused severe organizational problems for neighboring health care institutions. Dauphin County, just north of TMI, contained four hospitals ranging in distance from 9.5 to 13.5 miles from the stricken plant. Crash plans put into effect within 48 hours of the initial incident successfully reduced hospital census to below 50 per cent of capacity, but retained bedridden and critically ill patients within the risk-zone. No plans existed for area-wide evacuation of hospitalized patients. Future-oriented disaster planning should include resource files of host institution bed capacity and transportation capabilities for the crash evacuation of hospitalized patients during non-traditional disasters. PMID:7058968

  13. What's the Plan? Needing Assistance with Plan of Care Is Associated with In-Hospital Death for ICU Patients Referred for Palliative Care Consultation.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Ayano; Bell, Christina L; Masaki, Kamal; Fischberg, Daniel J

    2016-08-01

    To inform earlier identification of intensive care unit (ICU) patients needing palliative care, we examined factors associated with in-hospital death among ICU patients (N=260) receiving palliative care consultations at a 542-bed tertiary care hospital (2005-2009). High pre-consultation length of stay (LOS, ≥7 days) (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=5.0, 95% confidence interval (95% CI)=2.5-9.9, P<.01) and consultations for assistance with plan of care (aOR=11.6, 95% CI=5.6-23.9, P<.01) were independently associated with in-hospital death. Patients with both consultation for plan of care and high pre-consult LOS had the highest odds of in-hospital death (aOR=36.3, 95% CI=14.9-88.5, P<.001), followed by patients with consultation for plan of care and shorter pre-consult LOS (aOR=9.8, 95% CI=4.3-22.1, P<.001), and patients with long pre-consult LOS but no consultation for plan of care (aOR=4.7, 95% CI=1.8-12.4, P=.002). Our findings suggest that ICU patients who require assistance with plan of care need to be identified early to optimize end-of-life care and avoid in-hospital death.

  14. A Trend Analysis of Succession Planning in Health Care as Perceived by Chief Executive Officers in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard; Lieneck, Cristian; Watts, Sandra

    A study was conducted to analyze the perceptions of chief executive officers in US hospitals regarding leadership development and succession planning. Results of the study were compared to identical surveys delivered in previous years for the purposes of identifying possible trends and changing perspectives related to how executives use succession planning in their facilities, what factors influence the identification of successors, what positions are the more likely to use succession planning efforts, and who specifically should be responsible for building the leadership pipeline.

  15. Nonprofit to for-profit conversions by hospitals, health insurers, and health plans.

    PubMed Central

    Needleman, J

    1999-01-01

    Conversion of hospitals, health insurers, and health plans from nonprofit to for-profit ownership has become a focus of national debate. The author examines why nonprofit ownership has been dominant in the US health system and assesses the strength of the argument that nonprofits provide community benefits that would be threatened by for-profit conversion. The author concludes that many of the specific community benefits offered by nonprofits, such as care for the poor, could be maintained or replaced by adequate funding of public programs and that quality and fairness in treatment can be better assured through clear standards of care and adequate monitoring systems. As health care becomes increasingly commercialized, the most difficult parts of nonprofits' historic mission to preserve are the community orientation, leadership role, and innovation that nonprofit hospitals and health plans have provided out of their commitment to a community beyond those to whom they sell services. Images p109-a p110-a p115-a p116-a PMID:10199712

  16. Adapting the "managing by walking around" methodology as a leadership strategy to communicate a hospital-wide strategic plan.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Marcie Sara; Stone, Richard K

    2010-01-01

    Metropolitan Hospital Center (MHC) in East Harlem, New York, has undergone significant leadership changes within the past few years, and the current leadership team developed a long-term strategic plan for the organization that it wanted to effectively communicate to all hospital staff. The spread of information is a challenge at MHC, as it is in many hospitals, because of the large number of staff working various shifts, and the inability of staff to leave their units at the same time to attend general staff meetings. Because of the recent success of the hospital's Executive WalkRounds Program and Breakthough Program, which embody principles of the leadership strategy Managing By Walking Around (MBWA), the senior leadership team decided to roll out their new strategic plan in a 2-week series of rounds to each unit/department throughout the hospital during each shift. Utilizing this method, 69 percent of MHC staff attended the rounds, and 88.9 percent of management level staff and 64.5 percent of unionized/labor who participated in the hospital's Employee Satisfaction Survey stated that they understood the hospital's new strategic plan. MHC's successful strategy is easily applicable within other similar settings.

  17. The 'terrifying' Seattle/Olympia earthquake: a learning experience for area hospitals about disaster plans.

    PubMed

    2001-04-01

    A 6.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the Seattle/Olympia area about an hour before lunchtime on Wednesday, February 28, caused an estimated $2 billion in damage but resulted in only one death. The quake was centered near Washington's state capital, Olympia, about 50 miles from Seattle. Scientists attribute the relatively small amount of damage to the fact that the quake was a deep one centered about 30 miles below the earth's surface. Experts also credit modern building codes, which require new buildings to be quake-resistant, and the retrofitting of older buildings to resist quakes for the lack of damage and casualties (less than 400 injuries). Hospitals in the region escaped serious damage and emergency rooms received relatively few casualties. However, in carrying out disaster plans, security and safety officials uncovered a number of problems that could have had serious impact in another emergency situation.

  18. [Analysis of the educational requirements and planning in a large public hospital].

    PubMed

    Degan, Mario; Bragato, Laura; Duminuco, Leonardo; Bagno, Carla; Genova, Valeria; Sansoni, Julita

    2007-01-01

    The educational needs in a large hospital in the Venice region were analysed in order to plan continuing education programs for 2005-2006. The reference model was the analysis of the educational waiting lists in both operative and managerial professions. Two identical questionnaires were used: the first was distributed to all the professional staff of the hospital with university qualifications and asked them to give their opinion regarding educational priorities. The second was given to staff with managerial roles, asking them to indicate the educational priorities for the staff under their direction. Analysis of the data collected focused on : the priority given to the various areas and topics of education; differences of opinion identified between the various working environments between professional groups and between staff/managers; influence of social and personal factors on the opinions expressed. The fact that the fields of interest indicated varied according to the role and working activities of staff involved, indicate the need to offer educational procedures tailored to the requirements of each group.

  19. An Introduction to Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Pre-Hospital Phase. Emergency Medical Services Orientation, Lesson Plan No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Derrick P.

    Designed for use with interested students at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges, this lesson plan was developed to provide an introduction to the pre-hospital phase of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and to serve as a recruitment tool for the EMS Program at Kapiolani Community College (KCC) in Hawaii. The objectives of the…

  20. Study of Educational Hospital Employees’ Satisfaction with the Administration of the Health Reform Plan in Ghazvin, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Soheyla; Oveisi, Sonia; Ghamari, Fatemeh; Etedal, Mahboobeh Ghorban; Rajaee, Roya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Employee satisfaction is considered to be an important component in the promotion of service quality and increased efficiency and effectiveness in the reform plan for a healthcare system. Neglecting this issue could result in a lack of success in achieving the healthcare system’s objectives. The healthcare reform plan is being implemented to achieve the objectives of the healthcare system. Thus, given the key role of hospital employees in implementing the reform plan, the aim of this study was to determine the levels of hospital employees’ satisfaction with their jobs. Methods This was a qualitative study in 2015 that included thematic analysis, and 138 employees of the Kosar, Rajaii, and Ghods Hospitals participated. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, and the data were analyzed using content analysis. Results After analyzing the data collected by interviewing the employees, 132 codes were identified. The codes were classified into five general concepts including opinions about 1) the reform plan and its administrative barriers, 2) changes in visits, 3) changes in working conditions, 4) changes in salaries and 5) General satisfaction of personnel. Conclusion Increasing workloads, stagnant salaries, and the shortage of personnel were the main factors that reduced the satisfaction of the hospitals’ employees with the administration of the healthcare reform plan. PMID:26767104

  1. Planning and development of the Better Bites program: a pricing manipulation strategy to improve healthy eating in a hospital cafeteria.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Mina L; Patsch, Amy J; Smith, Jennifer Howard; Behrens, Timothy K; Charles, Tami; Bailey, Taryn R

    2013-07-01

    The Better Bites program, a hospital cafeteria nutrition intervention strategy, was developed by combining evidence-based practices with hospital-specific formative research, including key informant interviews, the Nutrition Environment Measures Study in Restaurants, hospital employee surveys, and nutrition services staff surveys. The primary program components are pricing manipulation and marketing to promote delicious, affordable, and healthy foods to hospital employees and other cafeteria patrons. The pricing manipulation component includes decreasing the price of the healthy items and increasing the price of the unhealthy items using a 35% price differential. Point-of-purchase marketing highlights taste, cost, and health benefits of the healthy items. The program aims to increase purchases of healthy foods and decrease purchases of unhealthy foods, while maintaining revenue neutrality. This article addresses the formative research, planning, and development that informed the Better Bites program.

  2. Leading quality through the development of a multi-year corporate quality plan: sharing The Ottawa Hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Linda; Myles, Joanne; Worthington, James R; Lebrun, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the background and process for developing a multi-year corporate quality plan. The Ottawa Hospital's goal is to be a top 10% performer in quality and patient safety in North America. In order to create long-term measurable and sustainable changes in the quality of patient care, The Ottawa Hospital embarked on the development of a three-year strategic corporate quality plan. This was accomplished by engaging the organization at all levels and defining quality frameworks, aligning with internal and external expectations, prioritizing strategic goals, articulating performance measurements and reporting to stakeholders while maintaining a transparent communication process. The plan was developed through an iterative process that engaged a broad base of health professionals, physicians, support staff, administration and senior management. A literature review of quality frameworks was undertaken, a Quality Plan Working Group was established, 25 key stakeholder interviews were conducted and 48 clinical and support staff consultations were held. The intent was to gather information on current quality initiatives and challenges encountered and to prioritize corporate goals and then create the quality plan. Goals were created and then prioritized through an affinity exercise. Action plans were developed for each goal and included objectives, tasks and activities, performance measures (structure, process and outcome), accountabilities and timelines. This collaborative methodology resulted in the development of a three-year quality plan. Six corporate goals were outlined by the tenets of the quality framework for The Ottawa Hospital: access to care, appropriate care (effective and efficient), safe care and satisfaction with care. Each of the six corporate goals identified objectives and supporting action plans with accountabilities outlining what would be accomplished in years one, two and three. The three-year quality plan was approved by senior

  3. Intentions of hospital nurses to work with computers: based on the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Snunith; Gonen, Ayala

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses' attitudes related to intent to use computers in the hospital setting as a predictor of their future behavior. The study was further aimed at identifying the relationship between these attitudes and selected sociological, professional, and personal factors and to describe a research model integrating these various factors. The study was based on the theory of planned behavior. A random sample of 411 registered nurses was selected from a single large medical center in Israel. The study tool was a Likert-style questionnaire. Nine different indices were used: (1) behavioral intention toward computer use; (2) general attitudes toward computer use; (3) nursing attitudes toward computer use; (4) threat involved in computer use; (5) challenge involved in computer use; (6) organizational climate; (7) departmental climate; (8) attraction to technological innovations/innovativeness; (9) self-efficacy, ability to control behavior. Strong significant positive correlations were found between the nurses' attitudes (general attitudes and nursing attitudes), self-efficacy, innovativeness, and intentions to use computers. Higher correlations were found between departmental climate and attitudes than between organizational climate and attitudes. The threat and challenge that are involved in computer use were shown as important mediating variables to the understanding of the process of predicting attitudes and intentions toward using computers.

  4. Disaster planning: the past, present, and future concepts and principles of managing a surge of burn injured patients for those involved in hospital facility planning and preparedness.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Randy D; Holmes, James H; Alson, Roy L; Cairns, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The 9/11 attacks reframed the narrative regarding disaster medicine. Bypass strategies have been replaced with absorption strategies and are more specifically described as "surge capacity." In the succeeding years, a consensus has coalesced around stratifying the surge capacity into three distinct tiers: conventional, contingency, and crisis surge capacities. For the purpose of this work, these three distinct tiers were adapted specifically to burn surge for disaster planning activities at hospitals where burn centers are not located. A review was conducted involving published plans, other related academic works, and findings from actual disasters as well as modeling. The aim was to create burn-specific definitions for surge capacity for hospitals where a burn center is not located. The three-tier consensus description of surge capacity is delineated in their respective stratifications by what will hereinafter be referred to as the three "S's"; staff, space, and supplies (also referred to as supplies, pharmaceuticals, and equipment). This effort also included the creation of a checklist for nonburn center hospitals to assist in their development of a burn surge plan. Patients with serious burn injuries should always be moved to and managed at burn centers, but during a medical disaster with significant numbers of burn injured patients, there may be impediments to meeting this goal. It may be necessary for burn injured patients to remain for hours in an outlying hospital until being moved to a burn center. This work was aimed at aiding local and regional hospitals in developing an extemporizing measure until their burn injured patients can be moved to and managed at a burn center(s).

  5. Including Internet insurance as part of a hospital computer network security plan.

    PubMed

    Riccardi, Ken

    2002-01-01

    Cyber attacks on a hospital's computer network is a new crime to be reckoned with. Should your hospital consider internet insurance? The author explains this new phenomenon and presents a risk assessment for determining network vulnerabilities.

  6. Planning and Implementing a Disaster Recovery Capability for a Mainframe-Based Hospital Information System: Duke University Medical Center's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, J. David; Walker, L. Phillip; Aaron, Walter H.; Whitesell, Judy J.; Stead, William W.

    1988-01-01

    Since October 1986, the Medical Center Information Systems Department at Duke University Medical Center (DUMC) has been developing and implementing a plan to provide for the continuation of the functions performed by Duke Hospital's central computing system in the event of a disaster that would disable the central hardware configuration for an extended amount of time. The key characteristic of the plan is that it provides for the full function and performance of the system to be returned to the end users within twenty four hours of the primary system's failure.

  7. [The functional planning of a enteral nutrition unit for home care at a hospital in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Salomon, Ana Lúcia; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita

    2013-11-01

    Introducción: Con el objeto de garantizar la calidad del producto ofrecido a los clientes en sus domicilios, las unidades hospitalarias necesitan adecuar sus áreas físicas para poder desarrollar todas las actividades especializadas que conlleva la nutrición enteral. Objetivo: Proporcionar una planificación funcional y las herramientas para la reorganización del espacio físico de una unidad de nutrición enteral, describiendo el proceso de preparación, la descripción de sus características y funciones laborales. Métodos. Estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y documental, proporcionando las herramientas para la planificación funcional y de gestión de calidad en una unidad de preparación de la nutrición enteral en un hospital público del Distrito Federal, Brasil. Los datos fueron recolectados en el período comprendido entre los años 2000 y 2010. Resultados. A través de la creación de un programa de nutrición enteral en el Departamento de Salud Pública del Distrito Federal y según lo dispuesto por la legislación nacional, se efectuó un plan de alta complejidad respecto de la nutrición enteral en atención al perfil demográfico y epidemiológico de la población. Este trabajo consiste en una propuesta de implementación de terapia nutricional dentro de un plan de alta complejidad, y de acuerdo a lo prescrito por la legislación del Ministerio de Salud Brasileño. El número de pacientes atendidos por esta modalidad terapéutica se ha ido incrementando, por consiguiente se hace necesario garantizar la calidad del servicio, por medio de la organización de los espacios funcionales. Conclusión. Por medio de la planificación funcional de un Laboratorio de Nutrición Enteral, se puede garantizar la asistencia nutricional especializada y de calidad, a la población hospitalaria o domiciliaria, tomando las precauciones necesarias en la manipulación de las fórmulas enterales.

  8. Assessing the planning and implementation strategies for the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition in Alabama hospitals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Shannon H; Morgan, Darius; Clements, Kay; Hart-Hester, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Health information management (HIM) professionals play a significant role in transitioning from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS. ICD-10-CM/PCS coding will impact many operational aspects of healthcare facilities, such as physicians' documentation in health records, coders' process for review of clinical information, the billing process, and the payers' reimbursement to the healthcare facilities. This article examines the level of readiness and planning for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation among hospitals in Alabama, identifies training methods/approaches to be used by the hospitals, and discusses the challenges to the ICD-10-CM/PCS coding transition. A 16-question survey was distributed to 116 Alabama hospital HIM directors in December 2011 with follow-up through February 2012. Fifty-three percent of respondent hospitals began the planning process in 2011, and most facilities were halfway or less than halfway to completion of specific implementation tasks. Hospital coders will be or are being trained using in-house training, through seminars/webinars, or by consultants. The impact of ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation can be minimized by training coders in advance, hiring new coders, and adjusting coders' productivity measures. Three major challenges to the transition were identified: the need to interact with physicians and other providers more often to obtain information needed to code in ICD-10-CM/PCS systems, education and training of coders and other ICD-10-CM/PCS users, and dependence on vendors for major technology upgrades for ICD-10-CM/PCS systems. Survey results provide beneficial information for HIM professionals and other users of coded data to assist in establishing sound practice standards for ICD-10-CM/PCS coding implementation. Adequate planning and preparation will be essential to the successful implementation of ICD-10-CM/PCS.

  9. Fired up to vanquish reform. Conservatives more determined after Florida ruling, but hospitals plan to move forward on implementation.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Joe

    2011-02-07

    While a federal judge in Florida ignited the latest skirmish over the healthcare law by ruling it unconstitutional, hospitals are still pushing ahead with implementation. "If the law stands, the implementation dates will stand," says Richard Morrison, right, of Adventist Health System's Florida Division. "If you're planning for it to be overturned, but it isn't, you're going to have a hard time in the new environment in 2014".

  10. An Implementation Plan for a Hospital-Wide Recycling Program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    enrgy costs. Establishing a hospital recycling program involves three steps: (1) forming a team that assists with the plans, iu.eenation, and on-going...was finding a market for materials and corivining recyclers that clean medical trash was safe if separated and handled correctly. Another challenge was...collection of mi par because In- .a’ate mterials and trash wmrs being placed in the containers. Wiite cUmP*ter paper turned cut to be the easiest and

  11. 78 FR 54766 - Federal Plan Requirements for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    .../Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On or Before December 1, 2008, and Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Correction In...

  12. [The relationship between hospitals and health plans organizations in the scope of ANS Health Insurance Qualification Program].

    PubMed

    Escrivão Junior, Alvaro; Koyama, Marcos Fumio

    2007-01-01

    In Brazilian health insurance sector, the fee-for-service model still remains the major payment method for health services, and predominates in the relationship between hospitals and private health insurance companies. After the creation of Health Insurance Qualification Program (HIQP), which focuses on the quality of the assistance given to consumers, the health insurance companies will be evaluated by health care performance indicators, established by this program. The present study discusses the impact of this pattern on the relationship between health insurance companies and hospitals, by analyzing data from interviews carried through with 18 health insurance managers, regarding the use - in hospital management - of performance indicators compatible to those adopted by HIQP. According to the managers perception, only three hospitals use this sort of indicators, two of them which are hospitals managed by the health insurance companies. The alignment of interests between health plans organizations and health care providers, at the HIQP proposed template, will imply changes in payment models between these market players, towards the inclusion of performance and quality of assistance given to users by providers, as components of wage determination.

  13. A Resource Planning Analysis of District Hospital Surgical Services in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    PubMed Central

    Sion, Melanie; Rajan, Dheepa; Kalambay, Hyppolite; Lokonga, Jean-Pierre; Bulakali, Joseph; Mossoko, Mathias; Kwete, Dieudonne; Schmets, Gerard; Kelley, Edward; Elongo, Tarcisse; Sambo, Luis; Cherian, Meena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The impact of surgical conditions on global health, particularly on vulnerable populations, is gaining recognition. However, only 3.5% of the 234.2 million cases per year of major surgery are performed in countries where the world's poorest third reside, such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). Methods: Data on the availability of anesthesia and surgical services were gathered from 12 DRC district hospitals using the World Health Organization's (WHO's) Emergency and Essential Surgical Care Situation Analysis Tool. We complemented these data with an analysis of the costs of surgical services in a Congolese norms-based district hospital as well as in 2 of the 12 hospitals in which we conducted the situational analysis (Demba and Kabare District Hospitals). For the cost analysis, we used WHO's integrated Healthcare Technology Package tool. Results: Of the 32 surgical interventions surveyed, only 2 of the 12 hospitals provided all essential services. The deficits in procedures varied from no deficits to 17 services that could not be provided, with an average of 7 essential procedures unavailable. Many of the hospitals did not have basic infrastructure such as running water and electricity; 9 of 12 had no or interrupted water and 7 of 12 had no or interrupted electricity. On average, 21% of lifesaving surgical interventions were absent from the facilities, compared with the model normative hospital. According to the normative hospital, all surgical services would cost US$2.17 per inhabitant per year, representing 33.3% of the total patient caseload but only 18.3% of the total district hospital operating budget. At Demba Hospital, the operating budget required for surgical interventions was US$0.08 per inhabitant per year, and at Kabare Hospital, US$0.69 per inhabitant per year. Conclusion: A significant portion of the health problems addressed at Congolese district hospitals is surgical in nature, but there is a current inability to meet

  14. Questions and Answers Regarding the 2009 New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) Emissions Guidelines, and State Plan Process for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 2011 document contains questions and answers on the Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI) regulations. The questions cover topics such as state plan requirements, compliance, applicability, operator training, and more.

  15. European hospital reforms in times of crisis: aligning cost containment needs with plans for structural redesign?

    PubMed

    Clemens, Timo; Michelsen, Kai; Commers, Matt; Garel, Pascal; Dowdeswell, Barrie; Brand, Helmut

    2014-07-01

    Hospitals have become a focal point for health care reform strategies in many European countries during the current financial crisis. It has been called for both, short-term reforms to reduce costs and long-term changes to improve the performance in the long run. On the basis of a literature and document analysis this study analyses how EU member states align short-term and long-term pressures for hospital reforms in times of the financial crisis and assesses the EU's influence on the national reform agenda. The results reveal that there has been an emphasis on cost containment measures rather than embarking on structural redesign of the hospital sector and its position within the broader health care system. The EU influences hospital reform efforts through its enhanced economic framework governance which determines key aspects of the financial context for hospitals in some countries. In addition, the EU health policy agenda which increasingly addresses health system questions stimulates the process of structural hospital reforms by knowledge generation, policy advice and financial incentives. We conclude that successful reforms in such a period would arguably need to address both the organisational and financing sides to hospital care. Moreover, critical to structural reform is a widely held acknowledgement of shortfalls in the current system and belief that new models of hospital care can deliver solutions to overcome these deficits. Advancing the structural redesign of the hospital sector while pressured to contain cost in the short-term is not an easy task and only slowly emerging in Europe.

  16. [Problems in career planning for novice medical technologists in Japanese national hospitals].

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Shu; Tsutaya, Shoji; Akimoto, Hiroyuki; Kojima, Keiya; Yabaka, Hiroyuki

    2012-12-01

    Skills and knowledge regarding many different types of test are required for medical technologists (MTs) to provide accurate information to help doctors and other medical specialists. In order to become an efficient MT, specialized training programs are required. Certification in specialized areas of clinical laboratory sciences or a doctoral degree in medical sciences may help MTs to realize career advancement, a higher earning potential, and expand the options in their career. However, most young MTs in national university hospitals are employed as part-time workers on a three-year contract, which is too short to obtain certifications or a doctoral degree. We have to leave the hospital without expanding our future. We need to take control of our own development in order to enhance our employability within the period. As teaching and training hospitals, national university hospitals in Japan are facing a difficult dilemma in nurturing MTs. I hope, as a novice medical technologist, that at least university hospitals in Japan create an appropriate workplace environment for novice MTs.

  17. Ketogenic Diet for Children with Epilepsy: A Practical Meal Plan in a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A ketogenic diet (KD) is a dietary approach to treat intractable epilepsy. The KD begins with hospitalization and the child and their parents can adapt to the KD for 1-2 weeks. Recently, various type of dietary intervention such as the modified Atkins diet (MAD) and the low glycemic index treatment (LGIT) have been performed. Since 2010, we carried out the KD, MAD, and LGIT for total of 802 patients; 489 patients (61%) for the KD, 147 patients (18.3%) with the MAD, and 166 patients (20.7%) for the LGIT. In this report, application of these dietary practices in Severance Hospital is shared. PMID:26839878

  18. Participatory Design and Development of a Patient-centered Toolkit to Engage Hospitalized Patients and Care Partners in their Plan of Care.

    PubMed

    Dykes, Patricia C; Stade, Diana; Chang, Frank; Dalal, Anuj; Getty, George; Kandala, Ravali; Lee, Jaeho; Lehman, Lisa; Leone, Kathleen; Massaro, Anthony F; Milone, Marsha; McNally, Kelly; Ohashi, Kumiko; Robbins, Katherine; Bates, David W; Collins, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Patient engagement has been identified as a key strategy for improving patient outcomes. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of a web-based patient centered toolkit (PCTK) prototype to improve access to health information and to engage hospitalized patients and caregivers in the plan of care. Individual and group interviews were used to identify plan of care functional and workflow requirements and user interface design enhancements. Qualitative methods within a participatory design approach supported the development of a PCTK prototype that will be implemented on intensive care and oncology units to engage patients and professional care team members developing their plan of care during an acute hospitalization.

  19. Effects of an Enhanced Discharge Planning Intervention for Hospitalized Older Adults: A Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altfeld, Susan J.; Shier, Gayle E.; Rooney, Madeleine; Johnson, Tricia J.; Golden, Robyn L.; Karavolos, Kelly; Avery, Elizabeth; Nandi, Vijay; Perry, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To identify needs encountered by older adult patients after hospital discharge and assess the impact of a telephone transitional care intervention on stress, health care utilization, readmissions, and mortality. Design and Methods: Older adult inpatients who met criteria for risk of post-discharge complications were…

  20. Hospital to home: a geriatric educational program on effective discharge planning.

    PubMed

    DeCaporale-Ryan, Lauren N; Cornell, Ann; McCann, Robert M; McCormick, Kevin; Speice, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    There has been increased attention on the needs of the burgeoning older adult population, with focus on the limited education and training experiences available in geriatric care. Older adults transitioning between levels of care often require increased attention, and the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Task Force on the Future of Geriatric Medicine has encouraged greater training opportunities be provided to better understand the needs of this population. The Hospital to Home Program is one model of geriatric training emphasizing many of the AGS recommendations. Through qualitative analyses of 51 internal medicine residents' reflections, the authors report how this educational program is meeting the above need and share how Hospital to Home is enhancing residents' skills in creating a safe discharge for geriatric patients and their families.

  1. Graduate Management Project (GMP). Developing a Health Information Plan for Bayne-Jones Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-06-01

    Mail ® on the new LAN which was not available on the hospital’s older system. MEDCOM, and most of the medical organizations in the Army were quickly...migrating to CC Mail ® as the primary means of communication of electronic mail (e- mail ) and required that executive staff be connected. Shortly...they could receive the deluge of information being passed along in the new application. Along with the use of CC Mail ®, other upgraded versions of

  2. Treatment Planning and Delivery of External Beam Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hua Chiaho Gray, Jonathan M.; Merchant, Thomas E.; Kun, Larry E.; Krasin, Matthew J.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: To describe and review the radiotherapy (RT) treatment planning and delivery techniques used for pediatric sarcoma patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. The treatment characteristics serve as a baseline for future comparison with developing treatment modalities. Patients and Methods: Since January 2003, we have prospectively treated pediatric and young-adult patients with soft-tissue and bone sarcomas on an institutional Phase II protocol evaluating local control and RT-related treatment effects from external-beam RT (conformal or intensity-modulated RT; 83.4%), low-dose-rate brachytherapy (8.3%), or both (8.3%). Here we describe the treatment dosimetry and delivery parameters of the initial 72 patients (median, 11.6 years; range, 1.4-21.6 years). Results: Cumulative doses from all RT modalities ranged from 41.4 to 70.2 Gy (median, 50.4 Gy). Median D{sub 95} and V{sub 95} of the planning target volume of external-beam RT plans were, respectively, 93.4% of the prescribed dose and 94.6% of the target volume for the primary phase and 97.8% and 99.2% for the cone-down/boost phase. The dose-volume histogram statistics for 27 critical organs varied greatly. The spinal cord in 13 of 36 patients received dose >45 Gy (up to 52 Gy in 1 cc) because of tumor proximity. Conclusions: Planning and delivery of complex multifield external beam RT is feasible in pediatric patients with sarcomas. Improvements on conformity and dose gradients are still desired in many cases with sensitive adjacent critical structures. Long-term follow-up will determine the risk of local failure and the benefit of normal tissue avoidance for this population.

  3. Planned home versus hospital care for preterm prelabour rupture of the membranes (PPROM) prior to 37 weeks’ gestation

    PubMed Central

    El Senoun, Ghada Abou; Dowswell, Therese; Mousa, Hatem A

    2014-01-01

    Background Preterm prelabour rupture of membranes (PPROM) is associated with increased risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Women with PPROM have been predominantly managed in hospital. It is possible that selected women could be managed at home after a period of observation. The safety, cost and women’s views about home management have not been established. Objectives To assess the safety, cost and women’s views about planned home versus hospital care for women with PPROM. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (January 2010) and the reference lists of all the identified articles. Selection criteria Randomised and quasi-randomised trials comparing planned home versus hospital management for women with PPROM before 37 weeks’ gestation. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed clinical trials for eligibility for inclusion, risk of bias, and carried out data extraction. Main results We included two trials (116 women) comparing planned home versus hospital management for PPROM. Overall, the number of included women in each trial was too small to allow adequate assessment of pre-specified outcomes. Investigators used strict inclusion criteria and in both studies relatively few of the women presenting with PPROM were eligible for inclusion. Women were monitored for 48 to 72 hours before randomisation. Perinatal mortality was reported in one trial and there was insufficient evidence to determine whether it differed between the two groups (risk ratio (RR) 1.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 20.05). There was no evidence of differences between groups for serious neonatal morbidity, chorioamnionitis, gestational age at delivery, birthweight and admission to neonatal intensive care. There was no information on serious maternal morbidity or mortality. There was some evidence that women managed in hospital were more likely to be delivered by caesarean section (RR

  4. Nursing personnel planning for rural hospitals in Burdwan District, West Bengal, India, using workload indicators of staffing needs.

    PubMed

    Shivam, Swapnil; Roy, Rabindra Nath; Dasgupta, Samir; Das Bhattacharyya, Krishna; Misra, Raghu Nath; Roy, Sima; Indranil, Saha

    2014-12-01

    Lack of appropriate human resources planning is an important factor in the inefficient use of the public health facilities. Workforce projections can be improved by using objective methods of staffing needs based on the workload and actual work undertaken by workers, a guideline developed by Peter J. Shipp in collaboration with WHO-Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN). A cross-sectional study was carried out to estimate the nursing stuff requirement for the rural hospitals and provide a quantitative description of imbalances, if there is any, in the allocation at the district level during 2011. The average WISN turns out to be 0.35 for entire district, which means only 35% of the required nurses is available or 65% understaffed. So, there is an urgent need for more allocations and deployment of staff so that workload can be tackled and evenly distributed among all nursing personnel.

  5. Developing a strategic marketing plan for physical and occupational therapy services: a collaborative project between a critical access hospital and a graduate program in health care management.

    PubMed

    Kash, Bita A; Deshmukh, A A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a marketing plan for the Physical and Occupational Therapy (PT/OT) department at a Critical Access Hospital (CAH). We took the approach of understanding and analyzing the rural community and health care environment, problems faced by the PT/OT department, and developing a strategic marketing plan to resolve those problems. We used hospital admissions data, public and physician surveys, a SWOT analysis, and tools to evaluate alternative strategies. Lack of awareness and negative perception were key issues. Recommended strategies included building relationships with physicians, partnering with the school district, and enhancing the wellness program.

  6. Can telemonitoring reduce hospitalization and cost of care? A health plan's experience in managing patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Daniel D; Starr, Alison E; Tomcavage, Janet F; Sciandra, Joann; Salek, Doreen; Griffith, David

    2014-12-01

    Telemonitoring provides a potentially useful tool for disease and case management of those patients who are likely to benefit from frequent and regular monitoring by health care providers. Since 2008, Geisinger Health Plan (GHP) has implemented a telemonitoring program that specifically targets those members with heart failure. This study assesses the impact of this telemonitoring program by examining claims data of those GHP Medicare Advantage plan members who were enrolled in the program, measuring its impact in terms of all-cause hospital admission rates, readmission rates, and total cost of care. The results indicate significant reductions in probability of all-cause admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.77; P<0.01), 30-day and 90-day readmission (OR 0.56, 0.62; P<0.05), and cost of care (11.3%; P<0.05). The estimated return on investment was 3.3. These findings imply that telemonitoring can be an effective add-on tool for managing elderly patients with heart failure.

  7. Using IT to improve quality at NewYork-Presybterian Hospital: a requirements-driven strategic planning process.

    PubMed

    Kuperman, Gilad J; Boyer, Aurelia; Cole, Curt; Forman, Bruce; Stetson, Peter D; Cooper, Mary

    2006-01-01

    At NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, we are committed to the delivery of high quality care. We have implemented a strategic planning process to determine the information technology initiatives that will best help us improve quality. The process began with the creation of a Clinical Quality and IT Committee. The Committee identified 2 high priority goals that would enable demonstrably high quality care: 1) excellence at data warehousing, and 2) optimal use of automated clinical documentation to capture encounter-related quality and safety data. For each high priority goal, a working group was created to develop specific recommendations. The Data Warehousing subgroup has recommended the implementation of an architecture management process and an improved ability for users to get access to aggregate data. The Structured Documentation subgroup is establishing recommendations for a documentation template creation process. The strategic planning process at times is slow, but assures that the organization is focusing on the information technology activities most likely to lead to improved quality.

  8. Using IT to Improve Quality at NewYork-Presybterian Hospital: A Requirements-Driven Strategic Planning Process

    PubMed Central

    Kuperman, Gilad J.; Boyer, Aurelia; Cole, Curt; Forman, Bruce; Stetson, Peter D.; Cooper, Mary

    2006-01-01

    At NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital, we are committed to the delivery of high quality care. We have implemented a strategic planning process to determine the information technology initiatives that will best help us improve quality. The process began with the creation of a Clinical Quality and IT Committee. The Committee identified 2 high priority goals that would enable demonstrably high quality care: 1) excellence at data warehousing, and 2) optimal use of automated clinical documentation to capture encounter-related quality and safety data. For each high priority goal, a working group was created to develop specific recommendations. The Data Warehousing subgroup has recommended the implementation of an architecture management process and an improved ability for users to get access to aggregate data. The Structured Documentation subgroup is establishing recommendations for a documentation template creation process. The strategic planning process at times is slow, but assures that the organization is focusing on the information technology activities most likely to lead to improved quality. PMID:17238381

  9. Planning, expectation, and image evaluation for PACS at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franken, E. A., Jr.; Smith, Wilbur L.; Berbaum, Kevin S.; Owen, David A.; Hilsenrath, Peter

    1990-08-01

    Our strategy in studying PACS is to evaluate its clinical implementation working with equipment supplied by an established manufacturer. Fiscal and personnel resources required to design and integrate the hardware components and operational software to develop a functional PACS precluded a bottom up development approach at our institution. Imaging equipment vendors possess more abundant design development resources for this task and therefore can support a more rapid development of the initial components of PACS. For this reason we have chosen to serve as a beta test site to study the viability of the basic PACS components in a clinical setting. Our efforts primarily focus on: (1) image quality; (2) cost effectiveness; (3) PACS/HIS/RIS integration; (4) equipment and software reliability; and (5) overall system performance. The results of our studies are shared with the vendor for future PACS development and refi nement. To attain our investigational goals we have formed an interdisciplinary team of Radiologists, Perceptual Psychologist, Economist, Electrical and Industrial Engineers, Hospital Information System personnel and key departmental administrative staff. For several reasons Pediatric Radiology was targeted as the initial area for our PACS study: a small area representative of the overall operation,tight operational controls and willingness of physicians. We used a step-wise approach, the first step being the installation of PACS exclusively within the physical confines of Pediatric Radiology.

  10. A Developmental Curriculum Plan To Achieve a Sequenced Curriculum between High School Courses in Food Preparation and the Mattatuck Community College Hospitality/Food Services Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattatuck Community Coll., Waterbury, CT.

    This document contains a developmental curriculum plan for an articulated curriculum in hospitality/food service for Connecticut's Mattatuck Community College and area high schools. The curriculum guide includes a course description, criteria for evaluation, attendance policy, objectives, a curriculum area outline, 17 content area objectives, a…

  11. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    PubMed

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  12. The Development and Analysis of a Strategic Planning Process at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and analyze a strategic planning process which culminated in a strategic plan for Blanchfield Army...identifying key stakeholders, and selecting committee members. Phase two was an educational phase in which committee members were oriented to strategic planning and...The final phase focused on the revision of the strategic planning document A review and analysis of the planning process revealed three areas for

  13. Train crash disasters and emergency plans of suburban hospitals in the New York City and Washington, DC areas: what went right; what could have been improved.

    PubMed

    1996-06-01

    Two major train crashes in February--one in Northern New Jersey and the other in Silver Spring, MD, near Washington, DC--posed severe challenges to the disaster plans of area hospitals. The first crash involving two commuter trains near Secaucus, NJ, tested the effectiveness of emergency plans at the Jersey City Medical Center, Jersey City, NJ, and the Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center, Secaucus. The incident occurred at approximately 8:40 a.m. and resulted in three deaths and 162 injuries. The Silver Spring crash, which took place a week after the one in New Jersey, occurred in early evening and involved an Amtrak and a commuter train. It resulted in 11 deaths and 26 injuries. Holy Cross Hospital, Silver Spring, was the primary caregiver. In this report, we'll provide details on how the incidents impacted on nearby hospitals and their security staffs; how challenges, anticipated and unanticipated, were met; and what conclusions were reached in follow-up critiques.

  14. [The planned home care transfer by a local medical support hospital and the introduction to home intravenous hyper alimentation--the making of a home care patient's instruction plan document].

    PubMed

    Shinobu, Akiko; Ohtsu, Yoko

    2004-12-01

    It is important to offer continuous medical service without interrupting everyone's various job functions at the Tama Numbu-Chiiki Hospitals in order to secure the quality and safety of home medical care to patients and their families. From 1998 up to the present, home intravenous hyper alimentation (home IVH) has been introduced by individually exchanging information that was based on items such as clinical case, doctor and caregiver in charge of the day, and introductory information. Five years have passed since we started an introduction of home IVH, and it appears that the medical cooperation of home IVH between the Minami-tama medical region and its neighboring area has been established. Then, we arranged an examination of the past 2 years based on the 57 patients who elected to choose home IVH instruction. Consequently, we created "home IVH introduction plan document" in standardizing a flow from home IVH introduction to post-hospital intervention. Since November of 2003, the plan document has been utilized and carried out to 5 patients by the end of February in 2004. This home IVH introduction plan document was able to clarify the role of medical person in connection with the patient. Therefore, we could not only share the information, but also could transfer medical care smoothly from the hospital to the patient's home.

  15. Examination of psychosocial predictors of Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services using the theory of planned behaviour: a cross-sectional questionnaire study

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Yang, Fan; Mu, Dongqin; Xing, Yuan; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Main study aim was as follows: (1) to explore the usefulness of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model in predicting Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide clinical pharmacy services (CPSs), including auxiliary CPSs and core CPSs; (2) to identify the main factors affecting the Chinese hospital pharmacists' intention to provide core CPSs based on TPB quantitatively. Design Cross-sectional questionnaire study. Setting The study was conducted in 22 general hospitals in seven cities located in the eastern and western part of China. Participants 416 hospital pharmacists (292 (70.2%) female) entered and completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quantitative responses with hospital pharmacists' intention, attitude, subjective norms (SNs) and perceived behavioural control (PBC) over provision of CPSs and their past behaviour (PB)-related CPSs. Results The structural equation model analysis found that attitude (p=0.0079, β=0.12), SN (p=0.038, β=0.10) and the pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs (p=0.0001, β=0.63) significantly predicted of their intention to provide core CPSs, accounting for 54.0% of its variance. Attitude (p=0.0001, β=0.35), PBC (p=0.0182, β=0.12) and PB (p=0.0009, β=0.15) are significant predictors of pharmacists' intention, accounting for 21% of the variance in pharmacists' intention to provide auxiliary CPSs. Conclusions The TPB with the addition of PB is a useful framework for predicting pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs in Chinese hospital care context. Strategies to improve hospital pharmacists' intention to provide CPSs should focus on helping the individuals related medical care see the value of CPSs, altering their perception of social pressure towards core CPSs and the removal of obstacles that impede the translation of intentions into behaviour. PMID:27707835

  16. Insights Into French Emergency Planning, Response, and Resilience Procedures From a Hospital Managerial Perspective Following the Paris Terrorist Attacks of Friday, November 13, 2015.

    PubMed

    Ghanchi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    On Friday, November 13, 2015, Paris was subjected to a multiple terrorist attack that caused widespread carnage. Although French emergency planning, response, and resilience procedures (Plan Blanc) anticipated crisis management of a major incident, these had to be adapted to the local context of Pitié-Salpêtrière University Teaching Hospital. Health care workers had undergone Plan Blanc training and exercises and it was fortunate that such a drill had occurred on the morning of the attack. The procedures were observed to work well because this type of eventuality had been fully anticipated, and staff performance exceeded expectations owing to prior in-depth training and preparations. Staff performance was also facilitated by overwhelming staff solidarity and professionalism, ensuring the smooth running of crisis management and improving victim survival rates. Although lessons learned are ongoing, an initial debriefing of managers found organizational improvements to be made. These included improvements to the activation of Plan Blanc and how staff were alerted, bed management, emergency morgue facilities, and public relations. In conclusion, our preparations for an eventual terrorist attack on this unprecedented scale ensured a successful medical response. Even though anticipating the unthinkable is difficult, contingency plans are being made to face other possible terrorist threats including chemical or biological agents. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  17. Psychological effects of patient surge in large-scale emergencies: a quality improvement tool for hospital and clinic capacity planning and response.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Lisa S; Zazzali, James L; Shields, Sandra; Eisenman, David P; Alsabagh, Halla

    2010-01-01

    Although information is available to guide hospitals and clinics on the medical aspects of disaster surge, there is little guidance on how to manage the expected surge of persons needing psychological assessment and response after a catastrophic event. This neglected area of disaster medicine is addressed by presenting a novel and practical quality improvement tool for hospitals and clinics to use in planning for and responding to the psychological consequences of catastrophic events that create a surge of psychological casualties presenting for health care. Industrial quality improvement processes, already widely adopted in the healthcare sector, translate well when applied to disaster medicine and public health preparedness. This paper describes the development of the tool, presents data on facility preparedness from 31 hospitals and clinics in Los Angeles County, and discusses how the tool can be used as a benchmark for targeting improvement. The tool can serve to increase facility awareness of which components of disaster preparedness and response must be addressed through hospitals' and clinics' existing quality improvement programs. It also can provide information for periodic assessment and evaluation of progress over time.

  18. A Study to Develop a Method of Assessing the Effectiveness of Discharge Planning in a Military Hospital.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    means of documenting discharge planning effectiveness. Fourthly, the Chief of Professional Services, as Chairman of the Medical Care Evaluation Committee... Medical Care Evaluation Committee for direct screening (see Appendix G). The Committee Chairperson prepares and distributes the agenda for each...monthly reports to the Medical Care Evaluation (MCE) Committee and represents the Discharge Planning Coordination Committee at the MCE Committee

  19. Bed Capacity Planning Using Stochastic Simulation Approach in Cardiac-surgery Department of Teaching Hospitals, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    TORABIPOUR, Amin; ZERAATI, Hojjat; ARAB, Mohammad; RASHIDIAN, Arash; AKBARI SARI, Ali; SARZAIEM, Mahmuod Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the hospital required beds using stochastic simulation approach in cardiac surgery departments. Methods: This study was performed from Mar 2011 to Jul 2012 in three phases: First, collection data from 649 patients in cardiac surgery departments of two large teaching hospitals (in Tehran, Iran). Second, statistical analysis and formulate a multivariate linier regression model to determine factors that affect patient's length of stay. Third, develop a stochastic simulation system (from admission to discharge) based on key parameters to estimate required bed capacity. Results: Current cardiac surgery department with 33 beds can only admit patients in 90.7% of days. (4535 d) and will be required to over the 33 beds only in 9.3% of days (efficient cut off point). According to simulation method, studied cardiac surgery department will requires 41–52 beds for admission of all patients in the 12 next years. Finally, one-day reduction of length of stay lead to decrease need for two hospital beds annually. Conclusion: Variation of length of stay and its affecting factors can affect required beds. Statistic and stochastic simulation model are applied and useful methods to estimate and manage hospital beds based on key hospital parameters. PMID:27957466

  20. Questions and Answers Regarding the 1997 State Plan Requirements for Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This November 1997 document contains questions and answers on the state plan requirements for HMIWI regulations. The questions cover topics such as re-opening existing sources, timelines for submission, consequences for failure to submit, and more.

  1. Factors Affecting Nurse Staffing in Acute Care Hospitals: A Review and Critique of the Literature. Nurse Planning Information Series 17.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, John P.; And Others

    A critical review of literature on factors affecting nurse staffing in acute care hospitals, with particular regard for the consequences of a movement from team nursing to primary nursing care, was conducted. The literature search revealed a need for more research on the philosophy of nursing and nursing goals and policy as they relate to nurse…

  2. Best practices of hospital security planning for patient surge--a comparative analysis of three national systems.

    PubMed

    Downey, Erin; Hebert, Anjanette

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines three international healthcare security systems as they relate to patient surge in Canada, Israel, and the United States. Its purpose is to compare the systems, to highlight unique characteristics that define those systems, and to initiate the development of best practices that transcend national boundaries. Several significant national characteristics of demographics, healthcare systems, and political climate, among others, present challenges to translating best practices among these three countries. However, we have found that best practice strategies exist in areas of communications, coordination, building design, space adaptability, and patient routing (both from the community to the hospital, as well as within the hospital) that can be shared and incorporated into the healthcare preparedness efforts in all three countries.

  3. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  4. 77 FR 24403 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    .... Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere Section, Air Toxics and Assessment Branch (AT-18J), U.S.... Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere Section, Air Toxics and Assessment Branch (AT-18J), U.S... HMIWI State Plan and identification of the enforceable mechanisms. Illinois has provided a detailed...

  5. 77 FR 24405 - Direct Final Approval of Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators State Plan for Designated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ....carlton@epa.gov . 3. Fax: (312) 886-6030. 4. Mail: Carlton T. Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere... Boulevard, Chicago, Illinois 60604. 5. Hand Delivery: Carlton T. Nash, Chief, Toxics and Global Atmosphere... out the HMIWI State Plan and identified the enforceable mechanisms. Indiana has provided a...

  6. Current and planned palliative care service provision for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients in 239 UK hospital units: comparison with the gold standards framework.

    PubMed

    Buxton, Katherine L; Stone, Robert A; Buckingham, Rhona J; Pursey, Nancy A; Roberts, Christopher M

    2010-07-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease report a symptom burden similar in magnitude to terminal cancer patients yet service provision and access has been reported as poor. In the absence of a specific national chronic obstructive pulmonary disease service framework the gold standards framework might support service developments. We surveyed 239 UK acute hospital units admitting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, comprising 98% of all acute trusts, about their current and planned provision for palliative care services. Only 49% of units had a formal referral pathway for palliative care and only 13% had a policy of initiating end-of-life discussions with appropriate patients. Whilst 66% of units had plans to develop palliative care services, when mapped against the gold standards framework few were directly relevant and only three of the seven key standards were covered to any significant degree. We conclude that service provision remains poor and access is hindered by a lack of proactive initiation of discussion. Planned developments in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease palliative care services also lack a strategic framework that risks holistic design.

  7. A vision of long-term care. To care for tomorrow's elderly, hospitals must plan now, not react later.

    PubMed

    Kodner, D L

    1989-12-01

    In the next two decades, rapid, fundamental changes will take place in the way we finance, organize, and provide long-term care services. Because the elderly make up such a large portion of the patient population, America's hospitals should be concerned--and involved. There are six keys to the future of long-term care: a sharp increase in elderly population, a new generation of elderly, restrained government role, intergenerational strains, growing corporate concern, and the rise of "gerotechnology." These trends and countertrends will result in a new look in the long-term care landscape. By the year 2010, changes will include a true public-private financing system, provider reimbursement on the basis of capitation and prospective payment, coordinated access to services, dominant alternative delivery systems, a different breed of nursing homes, fewer staffing problems, patient-centered care, a new importance in housing, and an emphasis on prevention. For hospitals, this future vision of long-term care means that significant opportunities will open up to meet the needs of the elderly-at-risk and to achieve a competitive position in the burgeoning elderly care industry.

  8. Determination of Knowledge and Behavior of Women Working at a Hospital on Breast Cancer Early Detection Methods, and Investigation of Efficiency of Planned Education

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Ayla; Çehreli, Rüksan; Ellidokuz, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate knowledge and attitude of women working in the hospital on breast cancer, their behaviors related to early diagnostic methods, and to determine the effectiveness of training in order to increase awareness on breast cancer. Materials and Methods The study group consisted of women working in the Dokuz Eylül University Hospital. The data of this cross-sectional study were collected by a questionnaire. Within the scope of this study, a training program on breast cancer was organized. The effectiveness of this training was evaluated by a preliminary survey and a final survey. Data were expressed as number and percentage, and paired t test and chi-square test were used for comparison. Results 161 women participated in the study with a mean age of 35 ± 8. It was determined that 81.4% of women knew early diagnosis and screening methods for breast cancer. 49.1% of women stated that they perform breast self-examination, but only 6.2% practiced it once a month. 32.9% of women had clinical breast examination, 22.4% had a breast ultrasound, and 22.3% had mammography. Most of the women did not perform any of these methods. The average knowledge level of women was significantly increased after completion of the planned training as compared to pre-training levels (p <0.001). Conclusion It was determined that the majority of women were informed on breast cancer early diagnosis and screening methods, but did not practice these methods on themselves. Information and awareness of women against breast cancer have increased with the use of planned training programs on breast cancer, early detection and screening methods.

  9. Dosimetric Verification of the System of Planning Brainscan for Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Oncology Department of the General Hospital of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez R, J. T.; Salinas, B.; Tovar M, V. M.; Villasenor O, L. F.; Molero M, A. C.

    2006-09-08

    The verification consists on the planning and administration of stereotactic treatments by means of conformed static beams, several polyethylene capsules with powder TLD 100 (type IAEA) located inside the head of a phantom Alderson-Rando. Because the planning system corrects for no-homogeneity in the density from the tomographic information, it is assumed that the absorbed dose in the tumor volume (capsule) corresponds to the dose absorbed to LiF: DLiF. Applying different cavity theories, the percent deviations to the nominal dose are: -1.81%{<=}{delta}%{<=}0.71%, which are consistent with the order of the U%'s. The values of DW are calculated from two calibration curve: TL Response (nC) vs DW for the energy of the 60Co corrected for energy dependence to the accelerator photon beam quality D20/D10=0.57. Once curve for 0.5 to 5 Gy and other for 5 to 35 Gy. The traceability for the Dwater is obtained by means of a secondary standard ionization chamber Farmer PTW 30013 calibrated at the NRC.

  10. [Promotion plan for the promotion of cancer: coping measures at Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital in Ehime prefecture - the current state of affairs at the hospital's cancer treatment promotion office].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Motohiro

    2013-05-01

    Recent cancer control strategies in Japan have been aimed at lowering morbidity and mortality rates, based on the Thirdterm Comprehensive 10-year Strategy for Cancer Control initiated by the Japanese government. In April 2007, the Cancer Control Basic Law was promulgated to necessitate promotion of cancer control by national and local authorities. In June 2007, the Japanese Health Ministry released a plan for the promotion of measures to cope with cancer. The cancer control measures adopted by the Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital(MRCH)in Ehime Prefecture were as follows: ·Progress in the promotion of measures to cope with cancer in Ehime, including a review of 2012, problems with new treatment methods for childhood cancer, employment of cancer patients, and promotion of home care. ·Cancer treatment measures adopted by MRCH as a hub medical institution for the past 5 years. ·The distinctive efforts of the intensive professionals team at the Cancer Treatment Promotion Office for cancer treatment at MRCH, and its work on cancer care from the 4 perspectives of the balanced scorecard in accordance with the basic policy of MRCH.

  11. Impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy plan delivery using the pretreatment portal dosimetry quality assurance and setting up the workflow at hospital levels

    PubMed Central

    Kaviarasu, Karunakaran; Raj, N. Arunai Nambi; Murthy, K. Krishna; Babu, A. Ananda Giri; Prasad, Bhaskar Laxman Durga

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of dose rate on accuracy of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan delivery by comparing the gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses by pretreatment quality assurance (QA) using electronic portal imaging device dosimetry and creating a workflow for the pretreatment IMRT QA at hospital levels. As the improvement in gamma agreement leads to increase in the quality of IMRT treatment delivery, gamma evaluation was carried out for the calculated and the measured portal images for the criteria of 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement (DTA). Three gamma parameters: Maximum gamma, average gamma, and percentage of the field area with a gamma value>1.0 were analyzed. Three gamma index parameters were evaluated for 40 IMRT plans (315 IMRT fields) which were calculated for 400 monitor units (MU)/min dose rate and maximum multileaf collimator (MLC) speed of 2.5 cm/s. Gamma parameters for all 315 fields are within acceptable limits set at our center. Further, to improve the gamma results, we set an action level for this study using the mean and standard deviation (SD) values from the 315 fields studied. Forty out of 315 IMRT fields showed low gamma agreement (gamma parameters>2 SD as per action level of the study). The parameters were recalculated and reanalyzed for the dose rates of 300, 400 and 500 MU/min. Lowering the dose rate helped in getting an enhanced gamma agreement between the calculated and measured portal doses of complicated fields. This may be attributed to the less complex motion of MLC over time and the MU of the field/segment. An IMRT QA work flow was prepared which will help in improving the quality of IMRT delivery. PMID:26865759

  12. Developing a strategic marketing plan.

    PubMed

    Zipin, M L

    1989-06-01

    Strategic planning is essential to the survival of today's hospital. Whether the hospital is an academic medical center, a community hospital or some other type of organization, the key to success is a thorough market planning process. The four-phase process described here focuses on an academic medical center, but it is equally applicable to other types of hospitals.

  13. Hospital Library Development. Hospital Library Handbooks No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    Addressed to the administrator of the hospital as well as the librarian, this handbook covers aspects of library service policy and long-range planning. While hospitals of all sizes are discussed, a special effort is made to cover problems of small hospitals (17 to 100 beds) in sparsely-settled regions. Contents: The library as a clinical service,…

  14. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  15. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  16. Sharing your culture with a new partner. Catholic system implements plan to integrate values when it acquires a for-profit hospital.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, M A

    1996-01-01

    In 1994 Orange County, CA's St. Joseph Health System (SJHS), aiming to strengthen its position in the regional market, acquired Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center, a for-profit hospital believed to be the premier healthcare facility in the southern part of the county. SJHS's leaders began integrating the two cultures at the top, replacing Mission's board but keeping its top managers in place. A member of the Sisters of St. Joseph joined the managers as the hospital's new vice president of sponsorship. In a series of orientation meetings, the hospital's leaders explained SJHS's mission and values to the staff, announcing that Mission would add a pastoral care department, emphasize care of the medically underserved, and discontinue abortion and sterilization procedures. Some Mission staff were disappointed when the hospital terminated a project that offered assisted reproductive technologies. In addition, capitation and exclusive contracting has caused conflict among area physicians, which affects the hospital. And Mission needs to further educate physicians and staff about bioethical issues. On the other hand, Mission has launched a center to help strengthen area families, a transportation system for senior citizens, and a dental clinic for underserved children. It has also taken over sponsorship of a clinic for underserved families. And, in 1994, the hospital opposed Proposition 187, which called for denying state services to illegal immigrants. Many Mission staff have been heartened to learn that the hospital considers justice a core value.

  17. Future pension accounting changes: implications for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Weld, Tim; Klein, Gina

    2011-05-01

    Proposed rules in accounting for defined benefit plans may affect hospitals' statement of operations and affect the time, effort, and cost to comply with periodic financial reporting requirements. The new standard would require immediate recognition of the full amount of plan amendments in determining operating income. Hospitals should consider the role of pension plans in their compensation programs.

  18. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  19. Tiered hospital networks.

    PubMed

    Yegian, Jill M

    2003-01-01

    As a result of rising health care costs, health plans are experimenting with insurance products that shift greater financial responsibility for medical care to consumers and create incentives for consumers to consider cost differences when choosing among providers. Based on an October 2002 roundtable discussion, this paper discusses insurance product trends, particularly tiered hospital networks. Issues addressed include these product features' potential to reduce system costs, the effect on the hospital-health plan relationship, consumers' ability to consider cost and quality in decision making, and financial barriers to care for the chronically ill.

  20. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings - Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH).

    PubMed

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first "Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals" (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section "Ventilation and air conditioning technology" attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care.

  1. Rotorcraft master plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwoschinsky, Peter V.

    1992-01-01

    The Rotorcraft Master Plan contains a comprehensive summary of active and planned FAA vertical flight research and development. Since the Master Plan is not sufficient for tracking project status and monitoring progress, the Vertical Flight Program Plan will provide that capability. It will be consistent with the Master Plan and, in conjunction with it, will serve to ensure a hospitable environment if the industry presents a practical vertical-flight initiative.

  2. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  3. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  4. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  5. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  6. 40 CFR 62.630 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.630 Identification of plan. The Arizona... Plan for Existing Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The submitted plan does...

  7. A Study to Determine a Training Plan for the Medical Record Technicians of Naval Hospital, San Diego in Preparation for the Implementation of the Diagnosis Related Group System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-13

    om0 Stufflebeam et al, stated that evaluation is "the 0 process of delineating, obtaining, and providing useful < z information for judging decision...in the Medical Records M z Department. Hospitals, pp. 100, 102, 104. K z -4 m Stufflebeam , D. (1971). Educational Evaluation and z Decision Making

  8. A Strategic Marketing Plan for Women and Infant Services, DeWitt Army Community Hospital and the DeWitt Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Manual of the American Psychological Association (4th ed.). (1996). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Reid, A. (1996). Marketing...personal communication, September 4, 1998) Potomac Hospital. [On-line]. Available: http://www.pcweb.com/potomachospital/ s_wome.html Publication

  9. [Problems of collaboration between community and hospital pharmacists for cancer chemotherapy and proposed corrective measures: KJ method based identification and planning workshop].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroki; Miki, Akiko; Maejima, Kazutoshi; Iizuka, Keiko; Yamaga, Shoichi; Sakashita, Kanako; Takano, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Tajiri, Kotaro; Takechi, Yoichiro; Shimada, Mitsuaki; Suzuki, Minoru; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a workshop that aimed to address the problems of collaboration between community and hospital pharmacists to provide safe outpatient chemotherapy and promote continuous collaboration. Thirty-nine pharmacists in Gunma were enrolled in the workshop and divided into five groups. Each group comprised similar number of community and hospital pharmacists in the neighboring area. Participants in these groups discussed using the KJ method and identified the following important and urgent problems; "lack of collaboration between hospitals and pharmacies" and "lack of exchanging patients' information, including regimen". To improve collaboration, the participants recommended a workshop or a study group and setting up a hotline, and to exchange patients' information, they proposed to utilize a medicine notebook and reconfirm how to use these notebook. Furthermore, usage of cloud storage as a means to exchange patients' information was discussed. Post-workshop questionnaire revealed that 97% participants acknowledged an increased awareness toward collaboration, and 90% participants were motivated to take more aggressive action for promoting collaboration; whereas, only 53% participants believed that they could summarize the problems and corrective measures in promoting collaboration. The workshop seemed to be productive in identifying the problems of collaboration and improving the awareness and motivation toward collaboration. However, it served only as a "trigger", and therefore it is important for valuable "results" to continuously collaborate face-to-face between community and hospital pharmacists.

  10. Understanding hospitality.

    PubMed

    Patten, C S

    1994-03-01

    Bridging patient/"customer" issues and business aspects can be aided through developing a specific nursing basis for hospitality. The ancient practice of hospitality has evolved into three distinct levels: public, personal and therapeutic. Understanding these levels is helpful in integrating various dimensions of guest relations programs in hospitals into a more comprehensive vision. Hospitality issues must become a greater part of today's nursing management.

  11. Educational Facilities in the Hospital for Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Alan C.

    1965-01-01

    Planning and design criteria are established for educational facilities in VA hospitals, rendering them more effective for medical education. Rather than developing plans for prototype teaching hospitals, guidelines are presented which may be utilized to meet the needs of a particular situation. Three broad categories of facilities are…

  12. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  13. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  14. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  15. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  16. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  17. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  18. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  19. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  20. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  1. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  2. 40 CFR 62.6358 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6358 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Missouri plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  3. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  4. 40 CFR 62.3914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.3914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Iowa plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators constructed on...

  5. 40 CFR 62.6914 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6914 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Nebraska plan for the control of air emissions from hospital/medical/infectious waste... of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators...

  6. Hygiene guideline for the planning, installation, and operation of ventilation and air-conditioning systems in health-care settings – Guideline of the German Society for Hospital Hygiene (DGKH)

    PubMed Central

    Külpmann, Rüdiger; Christiansen, Bärbel; Kramer, Axel; Lüderitz, Peter; Pitten, Frank-Albert; Wille, Frank; Zastrow, Klaus-Dieter; Lemm, Friederike; Sommer, Regina; Halabi, Milo

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the first “Hospital Hygiene Guideline for the implementation and operation of air conditioning systems (HVAC systems) in hospitals” (http://www.krankenhaushygiene.de/informationen/fachinformationen/leitlinien/12) in 2002, it was necessary due to the increase in knowledge, new regulations, improved air-conditioning systems and advanced test methods to revise the guideline. Based on the description of the basic features of ventilation concepts, its hygienic test and the usage-based requirements for ventilation, the DGKH section “Ventilation and air conditioning technology” attempts to provide answers for the major air quality issues in the planning, design and the hygienically safe operation of HVAC systems in rooms of health care. PMID:26958457

  7. Hospital mergers and market overlap.

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, G R; Jones, V G

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To address two questions: What are the characteristics of hospitals that affect the likelihood of their being involved in a merger? What characteristics of particular pairs of hospitals affect the likelihood of the pair engaging in a merger? DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Hospitals in the 12 county region surrounding the San Francisco Bay during the period 1983 to 1992 were the focus of the study. Data were drawn from secondary sources, including the Lexis/Nexis database, the American Hospital Association, and the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development of the State of California. STUDY DESIGN: Seventeen hospital mergers during the study period were identified. A random sample of pairs of hospitals that did not merge was drawn to establish a statistically efficient control set. Models constructed from hypotheses regarding hospital and market characteristics believed to be related to merger likelihood were tested using logistic regression analysis. DATA COLLECTION: See Data Sources/Study Setting. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The analysis shows that the likelihood of a merger between a particular pair of hospitals is positively related to the degree of market overlap that exists between them. Furthermore, market overlap and performance difference interact in their effect on merger likelihood. In an analysis of individual hospitals, conditions of rivalry, hospital market share, and hospital size were not found to influence the likelihood that a hospital will engage in a merger. CONCLUSIONS: Mergers between hospitals are not driven directly by considerations of market power or efficiency as much as by the existence of specific merger opportunities in the hospitals' local markets. Market overlap is a condition that enables a merger to occur, but other factors, such as the relative performance levels of the hospitals in question and their ownership and teaching status, also play a role in influencing the likelihood that a merger will in fact take place. PMID

  8. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center.

  9. The frontline hospital.

    PubMed

    Mein, P

    1983-01-01

    This brief description of the planning process for a frontline hospital is intended as a guide only: there will be a variety of approaches depending on local conditions. However, certain of the principles raised have universal relevance for the construction of health facilities where resources are limited. In brief, these: - The changing role of the frontline hospital should not be allowed to obscure the fact that the small hospital still has a significant role to play and that future, as yet undefined, functional changes will take place necessitating generalized designs that can accommodate those changes. - The erection of new buildings is not always the appropriate solution to apparent problems with facilities. Often a more relevant course is to adapt existing buildings or to provide community-level primary health care services not based on facilities. - The development of standardized, though flexible, briefs for hospitals of different sizes is essential, since ther will, for some years to come, be a shortage of the professional manpower needed to enable completely individual designs to be produced for each facility. Standardized briefs are infinitely preferable to standard or type plans, which tend to be inflexible and lead to overbuilding. - Local involvement in the planning process is essential, not only because it provides useful knowledge but primarily because local commitment is the only way of avoiding the construction of inappropriate facilities. - Architectural expertise must be available within the health system, since very often outside consultants are unable or unwilling, because of the system of payment, to design suitable hospital buildings. - The type of construction used should be the simplest and most economical that will provide an effective environment for the health tasks to be carried out so that the limited resources available can be stretched to serve as many people as possible. - Local building materials should always be preferred- to

  10. Patient need at the heart of workforce planning: the use of supply and demand analysis in a large teaching hospital's acute medical unit.

    PubMed

    Le Jeune, I R; Simmonds, M J R; Poole, L

    2012-08-01

    Timely medical assessment is integral to the safety and quality of healthcare delivery in acute medicine. Medical staff are an expensive resource. This study aimed to develop a modelling system that facilitated efficient workforce planning according to patient need on the acute medical unit. A realistic 24-hour 'supply' of junior doctors was calculated by adjusting the theoretical numbers on the rota for leave allowances, natural breaks and other ward duties by a combination of direct observation of working practice and junior doctor interviews. 'Demand' was analysed using detailed admission data. Supply and demand were then integrated with data from a survey of the time spent on the process of clerking and assessment of medical admissions. A robust modelling system that predicted the number of unclerked patients was developed. The utility of the model was assessed by demonstrating the impact of a regulation-compliant redesign of the rota using existing staff and by predicting the most efficient use of an additional shift. This simple modelling system has the potential to enhance quality of care and efficiency by linking workforce planning to patient need.

  11. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  12. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  13. 40 CFR 62.10360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Air Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.10360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  14. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  15. 40 CFR 62.10360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Air Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.10360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  16. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  17. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  18. 40 CFR 62.11120 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.11120 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  19. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  20. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  1. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  2. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  3. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  4. 40 CFR 62.12610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.12610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State...

  5. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  6. 40 CFR 62.11120 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.11120 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  7. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  8. 40 CFR 62.1360 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.1360 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in part...

  9. 40 CFR 62.8610 - Identification of Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Emissions from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.8610 Identification of Plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation...

  10. 40 CFR 62.6610 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... from Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.6610 Identification of plan. Section 111(d) Plan for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators and the associated State regulation in...

  11. Hospital marketing.

    PubMed

    Carter, Tony

    2003-01-01

    This article looks at a prescribed academic framework for various criteria that serve as a checklist for marketing performance that can be applied to hospital marketing organizations. These guidelines are drawn from some of Dr. Noel Capon of Columbia University's book Marketing Management in the 21st Century and applied to actual practices of hospital marketing organizations. In many ways this checklist can act as a "marketing" balanced scorecard to verify performance effectiveness and develop opportunities for innovation.

  12. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise.

  13. Disaster management and the emergency department: a framework for planning.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deborah H; Proctor, Pamela W; Amos, Linda K

    2002-03-01

    Recent changes in the Joint Commission Accrediting Hospital Organization (JCAHO) Environment of Care standards are forcing hospitals to revisit their disaster planning process. Emergency Management, a process that is familiar to municipal and industry planners is now part of hospital disaster planning. A framework for making the necessary changes to the hospital disaster plan is presented. Examples of tools that might be useful in the planning process are also included.

  14. The Status of Hospital Information Systems in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jahanbakhsh, Maryam; Sharifi, Mohammed; Ayat, Masar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The area of e-Health is broad and has an excellent growth potential. An increasing number of experts believe that e-Health will fuel the next breakthroughs in health system improvements throughout the world, but there is frequent evidence of unsustainable use of e-Health systems in medical centres, particularly hospitals, for different reasons in different countries. Iran is also a developing country which is presently adopting this promising technology for its traditional healthcare delivery but there is not much information about the use of e-Health systems in its hospitals, and the weakness and opportunities of utilization of such Hospital Information Systems (HIS). Methods: For this research, a number of Hospitals from Isfahan, Iran, are selected using convenient sampling. E-health research professionals went there to observe their HIS and collect required data as a qualitative survey. The design of interview questions was based on the researchers’ experiences and knowledge in this area along with elementary interviews with experts on HIS utilization in hospitals. Results: Efficient administration of e-health implementation improves the quality of healthcare, reduces costs and medical errors, makes healthcare resources available to rural areas, etc. However, there are numerous issues affecting the successful utilization of e-health in Hospitals, such as a lack of a perfect HIS implementation plan and well-defined strategy, inadequate IT-security for the protection of e-health-related data, improper training and educational issues, legal challenges, privacy concerns, improper documentation of lessons learned, resistance to the application of new technologies, and finally a lack of recovery plan and disaster management. These results along with some informative stories are extracted from interview sessions to uncover associated challenges of HIS utilization in Iranian hospitals. Conclusion: The utilization of e-health in Iranian hospitals

  15. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  16. Hospitals: Soft Target for Terrorism?

    PubMed

    De Cauwer, Harald; Somville, Francis; Sabbe, Marc; Mortelmans, Luc J

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, the world has been rocked repeatedly by terrorist attacks. Arguably, the most remarkable were: the series of four coordinated suicide plane attacks on September 11, 2001 on buildings in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, USA; and the recent series of two coordinated attacks in Brussels (Belgium), on March 22, 2016, involving two bombings at the departure hall of Brussels International Airport and a bombing at Maalbeek Metro Station located near the European Commission headquarters in the center of Brussels. This statement paper deals with different aspects of hospital policy and disaster response planning that interface with terrorism. Research shows that the availability of necessary equipment and facilities (eg, personal protective clothing, decontamination rooms, antidotes, and anti-viral drugs) in hospitals clearly is insufficient. Emergency teams are insufficiently prepared: adequate and repetitive training remain necessary. Unfortunately, there are many examples of health care workers and physicians or hospitals being targeted in both political or religious conflicts and wars. Many health workers were kidnapped and/or killed by insurgents of various ideology. Attacks on hospitals also could cause long-term effects: hospital units could be unavailable for a long time and replacing staff could take several months, further compounding hospital operations. Both physical and psychological (eg, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) after-effects of a terrorist attack can be detrimental to health care services. On the other hand, physicians and other hospital employees have shown to be involved in terrorism. As data show that some offenders had a previous history with the location of the terror incident, the possibility of hospitals or other health care services being targeted by insiders is discussed. The purpose of this report was to consider how past terrorist incidents can inform current hospital preparedness and disaster response planning

  17. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  18. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  19. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) § 62.8880 Identification of plan. (a) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators...). (b) Identification of sources. The plan applies to existing hospital/medical/infectious...

  20. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  1. Discharging patients from acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Helen

    2016-02-10

    Planning for patient discharge is an essential element of any admission to an acute setting, but may often be left until the patient is almost ready to leave hospital. This article emphasises why discharge planning is important and lists the essential principles that should be addressed to ensure that patients leave at an optimum time, feeling confident and safe to do so. Early assessment, early planning and co-ordination of all the teams involved in the patient's care are essential. Effective communication between the various teams and with the patient and their family or carer(s) is necessary. Patients should leave hospital with all the information, medications and equipment they require. Appropriate plans should have been developed and communicated to the receiving community or non-acute team. When patient discharge is effective, complications as a result of extended lengths of hospital stay are prevented, hospital beds are used efficiently and readmissions are reduced.

  2. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  3. Hospital finance.

    PubMed

    Herman, M J

    1998-01-01

    This article summarizes key areas of focus for the analysis of risk in the hospital segment of the health care industry. The article is written from a commercial bank lending perspective. Both for-profit (C-corporations) and 501 (c)(3) not-for-profit segments are addressed.

  4. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  5. Continuing Education for Rural Hospital Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Nancy; Pickard, Myrna R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a rural outreach program to provide continuing education in nursing practice to all levels of nursing personnel in rural hospitals. Covers difficulties in planning and implementing the programs and the steps taken to explain the program philosophy and gain the trust of hospital adminstration and staff. (MF)

  6. Quality Assurance in a Children's Psychiatric Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baggish, Rosemary C.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examined the use of short-term isolation (STI) in a children's psychiatric hospital. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals quality assurance mode was used. Studied the quality use of STI and its documentation. Data gathered served as the basis for recommendations that led to planned, informed program changes. (Author)

  7. Promoting Regional Disaster Preparedness among Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; Kang, JungEun; Silenas, Rasa

    2008-01-01

    Context and Purpose: Rural communities face substantial risks of natural disasters but rural hospitals face multiple obstacles to preparedness. The objective was to create and implement a simple and effective training and planning exercise to assist individual rural hospitals to improve disaster preparedness, as well as to enhance regional…

  8. [Remote radiation planning support system].

    PubMed

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We constructed a remote radiation planning support system between Kyushu University Hospital (KUH) in Fukuoka and Kyushu University Beppu Hospital (KBH) in Oita. Between two institutions, radiology information system for radiotherapy division (RT-RIS) and radiation planning system (RTPS) were connected by virtual private network (VPN). This system enables the radiation oncologists at KUH to perform radiotherapy planning for the patients at KBH. The detail of the remote radiation planning support system in our institutions is as follows: The radiation oncologist at KBH performs radiotherapy planning and the data of the patients are sent anonymously to the radiation oncologists at KUH. The radiation oncologists at KUH receive the patient's data, access to RTPS at KBH, verify or change the radiation planning at KBH: Radiation therapy is performed at KBH according to the confirmed plan by the radiation oncologists at KUH. Our remote radiation planning system is useful for providing radiation therapy with safety and accuracy.

  9. 42 CFR 456.501 - UR plans as a condition for FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.501 UR plans as a condition for FFP. (a) Except... services furnished by a hospital or mental hospital unless the facility has in effect a UR plan that...

  10. 42 CFR 456.501 - UR plans as a condition for FFP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals § 456.501 UR plans as a condition for FFP. (a) Except... services furnished by a hospital or mental hospital unless the facility has in effect a UR plan that...

  11. Recommendations for managing hospital closure.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, R; Bouthillette, F; Havlovic, S J

    1998-01-01

    An acute care hospital was closed by the British Columbia Ministry of Health in 1993. A research study was conducted to investigate the ways closure of the hospital affected hospital employees and to identify ways to facilitate the closure/reorganization process. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 25 employees around the time of closure and six months after the closure. In the category Living with Closure, six themes arose from the qualitative analysis. They related to (1) provision of information; (2) effect of closure on the working environment and colleagues; (3) perceived stress; (4) recognition of one's worth; (5) provision of support services; and (6) the process of having a new job. The authors offer recommendations stemming from the analysis, which are intended to assist others planning for future hospital reorganizations or closures.

  12. 40 CFR 62.5160 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis)(section 111(d)/129 Plan) § 62.5160 Identification of plan. Section 111(d)/129 plan for HMIWIs and the associated Code of Maryland (COMAR)...

  13. 40 CFR 62.5160 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis)(section 111(d)/129 Plan) § 62.5160 Identification of plan. Section 111(d)/129 plan for HMIWIs and the associated Code of Maryland (COMAR)...

  14. Leaving the hospital - your discharge plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... org/family-care-navigator Elder Care Locator -- www.eldercare.gov/Eldercare.NET/Public/Index.aspx What Will You Need? ... further problems. References Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Taking Care of Myself: A Guide for When ...

  15. Management strategies in hospitals: scenario planning.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Mohamed; Schnoor, Jörg; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard; Kuwatsch, Sandra; Bohn, Marco; Josten, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Das Krankenhausmanagement ist stets Herausforderungen ausgesetzt. Anstatt auf die Herausforderungen zu warten, sollten Ärzte und Manager im Voraus handeln, um ein optimiertes und nachhaltig wertorientiertes Gesundheitswesen zu sichern. Diese Arbeit unterstreicht die Bedeutung der Szenarienplanung in Krankenhäusern, schlägt eine ausgearbeitete Definition der Stakeholder eines Krankenhauses vor und definiert die Einflussfaktoren, denen Krankenhäuser ausgesetzt sind.Methodik: Basierend auf einer Literaturanalyse sowie auf persönlichen Interviews mit Stakeholdern eines Krankenhauses schlagen wir eine ausgearbeitete Definition von Stakeholdern vor und erarbeiteten einen Fragebogen. Dieser Fragebogen berücksichtigt folgende Einflussfaktoren, die entsprechende Auswirkungen auf das Krankenhaus-Management haben: politische/rechtliche, wirtschaftliche, soziale, technologische und Umweltkräfte.Diese Einflussfaktoren werden untersucht, um die so genannten kritischen Unsicherheiten zu entwickeln. Die gründliche Identifizierung von Unsicherheiten basierte auf „Stakeholder Feedback“.Ergebnisse: Zwei Haupt-Unsicherheiten wurden identifiziert und in dieser Studie berücksichtigt:die Entwicklung der Arbeitsbelastung für das medizinische Personaldie gewinnorientierte Leistung des medizinischen Personals.Entsprechend der entwickelten Szenarien konnten wir folgende Kernstrategie empfehlen: komplementäre Ausbildung sowohl des medizinischen Personals als auch der nicht-medizinischen Top-Führungskräfte und Manager von Krankenhäusern. Ergänzende szenariospezifische strategische Optionen sollen, falls erforderlich, in Betracht gezogen werden, um eine bestimmte zukünftige Entwicklung des medizinischen Umfeldes zu optimieren.Schlussfolgerung: Strategische Planung in Krankenhäusern ist wichtig, um nachhaltigen Erfolg zu gewährleisten. Diese Planung soll mehrere Situationen berücksichtigen und integriert interne und externe Ein- und Ausblicke. Darüber hinaus soll sie schwache Signale und „blinde Flecken“ identifizieren. Dieses fließt in eine solide Planung für mehrere strategische Optionen ein. Es ist eine State-of-the-Art-Methode, die dem Krankenhausmanagement erlaubt, mit zunehmenden Herausforderungen umzugehen.

  16. Hospitals' marketing challenge: influencing physician behavior.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R C

    1985-05-01

    Physicians' referring and admitting behavior as well as their clinical management practices are major determinants of hospitals' profitability under prospective payment. Four techniques are available to hospitals that seek to increase market share: Recruitment and retention strategies. In planning the mix of specialties represented on staff, hospitals should consider the effects of a physician's practice on the hospital's case mix. Peer pressure. Peer review programs in hospitals as well as through medical or specialty societies may help persuade physicians to alter their use of services. Education and information programs. Hospitals can assist physicians in patient management by conducting economic grand rounds, developing committees to study and communicate cost data to physicians, and providing information on alternatives to hospitalization. Incentives. Putting physicians at risk by linking planned expenditures to hospital financial performance can influence practice patterns. Other techniques include offering limited partnerships to medical staff members and merging the hospital and medical staff into one corporation. Hospitals may also need to influence physicians away from ventures that compete directly with the institution, such as ambulatory surgery centers.

  17. How to Pitch an Antibiotic Stewardship Program to the Hospital C-Suite

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, John G.; Gilbert, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitals will soon require antibiotic stewardship programs. Infectious diseases specialists must craft business plans to engage hospital leadership to fund such programs. In this article, we review key cost and revenue elements that should be covered in such plans. Society is placing increasing emphasis on the importance of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs). New regulatory standards require hospitals to implement ASPs. Infectious Diseases (ID) specialists will need to help design and implement such programs at hospitals. A critical component of establishing such programs is submitting a business plan to hospital leadership justifying the cost and structure of the ASP and explaining what benefits the hospital will gain in return. In this article, we explore typical elements of such business plans and describe how hospital leadership may evaluate and determine the value of such plans. Understanding hospital costs and revenue models is critical to creating a viable and realistic business plan to support ASPs. PMID:27844028

  18. ERISA and hospital charges: granting an inch, not a mile.

    PubMed

    Fedor, Frank

    2006-09-01

    Some claims review services" have cited ERISA as an authority allowing an ERISA plan administrator to reduce a hospital's billed charges based on "the reasonable value of services." However, nothing in ERISA allows a plan administrator to change the terms of a contract between a payer and a provider, or places any limitations on the structure or price of hospital charges.

  19. Managed care's price bargaining with hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vivian Y

    2009-03-01

    Research has shown that managed care (MC) slowed the rate of growth in health care spending in the 1990s, primarily via lower unit prices paid. However, the mechanism of MC's price bargaining has not been well studied. This article uses a unique panel dataset with actual hospital prices in Massachusetts between 1994 and 2000 to examine the sources of MC's bargaining power. I find two significant determinants of price discounts. First, plans with large memberships are able to extract volume discounts across hospitals. Second, health plans that are more successful at channeling patients can extract greater discounts. Patient channeling can add to the volume discount that plans negotiate.

  20. Potential for Hospital Based Corneal Retreival in Hassan District Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Melsakkare, Suresh Ramappa; Manipur, Sahana R.; Acharya, Pavana; Ramamurthy, Lakshmi Bomalapura

    2015-01-01

    Context In developing countries, corneal diseases are the second leading cause of blindness. This corneal blindness can be treated through corneal transplantation. Though the present infrastructure is strong enough to increase keratoplasty numbers at a required rate, India has largest corneal blind population in the world. So a constant supply of high quality donor corneal tissue is the key factor for reduction of prevalence of corneal blindness. Considering the magnitude of corneal blindness and shortage of donor cornea, there is a huge gap in the demand and supply. Aim To study the potential for hospital based retrieval of donor corneal tissue in Hassan district hospital after analysing the indicated and contraindicated causes of deaths, so that hospital corneal retrieval program in Hassan district hospital can be planned. Materials and Methods The cross-sectional, retrospective and record-based study included all hospital deaths with age group more than two years occurred during one year period (January 2014 to December 2014). Data regarding demographic profile, cause of death, treatment given and presence of any systemic diseases were collected. The causes of deaths which are contraindicated for the retrieval of corneas were analysed and noted. The contraindications were based on the NPCB guidelines for standard of eye banking in India 2009. Results Out of 855 deaths, number of deaths in males (565) was greater than females (290). Numbers of deaths were highest between 41-60 years age group (343). Deaths due to HIV, septicaemia, meningitis, encephalitis, disseminated malignancies were contraindicated for corneal retrieval. Corneas could be retrieved from 736 deaths out of 855. Potential for corneal retrieval in a period of one year in Hassan District hospital was 86%. Conclusion Hospital corneal retrieval program has got a great potential to bridge the gap between the need for the cornea and actually collected corneas which will contribute enormously in

  1. Information systems form large part of strategic plan.

    PubMed

    Landis, D

    1991-02-01

    Strategic planning is often a low priority for community hospitals because it is often too impractical. The difference for Ed McFall, chief information officer at Pitt County Memorial Hospital (PCMH) in Greenville, N.C., is that his hospital's and affiliated medical school's information systems plans work.

  2. Participatory management at Boston's Beth Israel Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, M T; Avakian, L

    1992-05-01

    In the mid-1980s, the senior management of Boston's Beth Israel Hospital became concerned that continuous cost-cutting efforts could lower the quality of the hospital's services and the morale of its staff. This led them to investigate organizational approaches to "participatory management" to determine whether any of these might be of value to the hospital. They decided that an approach developed in the 1930s called the "Scanlon Plan" would be compatible with the workplace culture of Beth Israel, could help the hospital meet the ongoing problems of change, and could help the staff at all levels develop a sense that they owned the problems of quality, productivity, and efficiency, which would motivate them to address these problems constructively in the face of necessary budget constraints. This plan has two mechanisms to foster employees' positive participation: (1) a process to ensure that all members of the organization have the opportunity to improve productivity, primarily through an open suggestion system and a responsive committee structure, and (2) a means of providing equitable rewards for all members of the organization as productivity and quality improve. This essay describes in some detail the plan and why it was selected, explains how it was adapted, prepared for, and finally implemented in 1989, and reports its success, lessons learned, and future plans as of early 1992. The authors believe Beth Israel's experience with the Scanlon Plan is noteworthy as an example of a leading teaching hospital's taking a quality improvement program seriously and making it work.

  3. 42 CFR 456.180 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.180 Section... Plan of Care § 456.180 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a mental hospital or... plan of care for each applicant or recipient. (b) The plan of care must include— (1)...

  4. 42 CFR 456.80 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Plan of Care § 456.80 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a hospital or before authorization for... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.80 Section...

  5. 42 CFR 456.80 - Individual written plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Individual written plan of care. 456.80 Section 456... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Hospitals Plan of Care § 456.80 Individual written plan of care. (a) Before admission to a hospital or before authorization...

  6. [The insigne and suntuoso Royal Hospital of Granada (I). Royal foundations and the hospital regrouping (1501-1526)].

    PubMed

    Valenzuela Candelario, José

    2003-01-01

    In the 1520s the local authorities planned to set up a new modern hospital in the city of Granada by combining two existing Royal Hospitals: Alhambra and Reyes. As a public institution and as a new building, the new hospital could develop the mandates of the original foundation and extend its care to become a general hospital. In this way it would strengthen its status as a charitable undertaking and legacy of the Catholic Monarchs and, secondly, as a great architectural monument.

  7. [Evaluation of satisfaction of patients hospitalized at the Kairouan Hospital].

    PubMed

    Mtiraoui, Ali; Alouini, Borhane

    2002-03-01

    The patients' satisfaction studies are more and more utilized to underline the health centers' deficiencies and consequently set improvement action plans. Our survey aims to measure inpatients' satisfaction in its different dimensions. A survey centered around a transversal inquiry has been conducted during a period going from February to April 2000 and reached a total number of 817 patients hospitalized in six service units at kairouan hospital. The data has been gathered by structured interviews led by a previously trained social worker. The investigation tool was a standardized questionnaire prepared by a group of experts from WHO in the Oriental Mediterranean region. The main results are as follow: High satisfaction level concerning the global evaluation of the hospital service units was recorded (score = 70%). The patient who are more satisfied are those who have the feeling that their health situation has considerably improved, and who will probably recommend this hospital to their surroundings. Big proportion of the patients (77%) was expecting better services. The main reason behind their unhappiness is the information emanated whether from the nurses or the doctors, the comfort and the cleanness of waiting room, linen, room comfort, food and the emergency. These results showed that the quality of care improvements priorities, according to patient expectations are especially in relation with the quality of information, the relational aspects and the hospital stay conditions.

  8. An alternate approach to hospital cost control: the Rochester project.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, A A; Saward, E W

    1978-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has demonstrated a need to control costs in general and hospital costs in particular. In New York State, efforts at control have followed one of several paths, including reduction of Medicaid program expenditures, elimination of hospital beds, and prospective reimbursement of hospital costs. Although some success has been achieved in each of these areas, hospital costs containment has not been as successful as had been hoped. A new project called MAXICAP, being developed in the Rochester region, seeks to link payment with regional hospital planning. MAXICAP represents a voluntary attempt by hospitals, third party payers, planners, consumers, and governmental agencies to devise a prospective hospital payment system. Under this system community hospital plans in the Rochester region would be integrated and a cap imposed on both revenues and expenses for acute hospital care. The principal advantage of the MAXICAP is that it offers a mechanism for linking hospital planning with payment functions on a regional basis. The principal disadvantage is that the success of the MAXICAP depends upon the voluntary cooperation of the vast majority of the acute care hospitals in the area--hospitals that may be scattered throughout a relatively large region. PMID:98805

  9. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples.

  10. Two years into the storm over pricing to and collecting from the uninsured--a hospital valuation expert examines the risk/return dynamics and asks: would fair pricing and fair medical debt repayment plans increase yields to hospitals and simultaneously mitigate these controversies?

    PubMed

    Unland, James J

    2005-01-01

    As the controversies over 501(c)(3) "charitable" hospitals' pricing, collections, and charity care practices that emerged in the winter and spring of 2003 continue unabated--now involving government officials from city councils and county boards to state attorneys general and Congress as well as numerous class action lawsuits--a hospital valuation expert and risk analyst looks at the fundamental economic and strategic issues, concluding that the risk/return dynamics are out of whack in that hospitals are facing mushrooming, multifaceted troubles over what has been a very low net yield patient population. After interviewing patient account representatives at hospitals and conducting other research, this analyst asks: Should attention have been focused at the national and state hospital association levels in 2003 to take steps to increase the net yield to hospitals from the uninsured population through more equitable pricing and better medical debt repayment terms, steps that might have mitigated these controversies? Many hospitals and hospital associations have been so intent on proving hospitals' legal right to charge "list price" to and sue the uninsured that they have overlooked a simple yet effective business premise that many hospital patient accounts representatives already fully know: Fair pricing and fair payment terms are actually good business. The author asserts that the controversies that emerged in 2003 actually represented a significant opportunity that, with a different approach, would likely have resulted in hospitals being able to collect significantly more money from the uninsured population while, at the same time, lessening or even avoiding the destructive ramifications that have occurred in the form of investigations, legislation, and lawsuits. To realize higher net yields from the uninsured, highly specific leadership steps need to be taken uniquely at national and state "association" levels in order to avoid the negative financial consequences

  11. Measuring nutritional risk in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Henrik H; Holst, Mette; Kondrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    About 20%–50% of patients in hospitals are undernourished. The number varies depending on the screening tool amended and clinical setting. A large number of these patients are undernourished when admitted to the hospital, and in most of these patients, undernutrition develops further during hospital stay. The nutrition course of the patient starts by nutritional screening and is linked to the prescription of a nutrition plan and monitoring. The purpose of nutritional screening is to predict the probability of a better or worse outcome due to nutritional factors and whether nutritional treatment is likely to influence this. Most screening tools address four basic questions: recent weight loss, recent food intake, current body mass index, and disease severity. Some screening tools, moreover, include other measurements for predicting the risk of malnutrition. The usefulness of screening methods recommended is based on the aspects of predictive validity, content validity, reliability, and practicability. Various tools are recommended depending on the setting, ie, in the community, in the hospital, and among elderly in institutions. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 seems to be the best validated screening tool, in terms of predictive validity ie, the clinical outcome improves when patients identified to be at risk are treated. For adult patients in hospital, thus, the NRS 2002 is recommended. PMID:21042553

  12. Changing hospital payments: implications for teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bentley, J D

    1983-09-01

    Hospitals cannot continue to view themselves only as social institutions whose performance will be assessed on the good they do. Teaching hospitals, in particular, cannot view themselves simply as distinctive combinations of social and educational institutions. Under Medicare's prospective pricing system, the hospital's role as production system is enhanced, and all hospitals must learn to balance the new economic realities as they work with their medical staff to adapt to a changed future.

  13. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Happens in the Operating Room? Going to the Hospital KidsHealth > For Kids > Going to the Hospital Print ... you flowers, balloons, or other treats! previous continue Hospital People You'll meet lots of people in ...

  14. 40 CFR 62.12150 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis) (section 111(d)/129 Plan... Control of Air Pollution from Combustion of Solid Waste in Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste...

  15. 40 CFR 62.12150 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwis) (section 111(d)/129 Plan... Control of Air Pollution from Combustion of Solid Waste in Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste...

  16. North Carolina State Plan for Technical Assistance and Energy Conservation Measures: Grant Programs for Schools and Hospitals and for Buildings Owned by Units of Local Government and Public Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Commerce, Raleigh. Energy Div.

    State guidelines for grant applications that follow the regulations of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 are presented for North Carolina institutions. Among the 17 procedures spelled out in detail are several that concern eligible institutions' involvement in the development of the state plan, notification of the plan, and…

  17. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... use requirements for Critical Access Hospitals related to Electronic Health Records (EHRs)? Critical Access Hospital (CAH) are eligible for Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive payments and can receive ...

  18. [Hospital readmissions: A reliable quality indicator?].

    PubMed

    van Galen, Louise S; Nanayakkara, Prabath W B

    2016-01-01

    The percentage of readmissions within 30 days after discharge is an official quality indicator for Dutch hospitals in 2016. In this commentary the authors argue why readmissions cannot be regarded as a reliable way of assessing quality of healthcare in a hospital. To date, policy makers have been struggling with its precise definition and the indicator has not been properly formulated yet. It does not distinguish between planned and unplanned readmissions and does not take into account the 'preventability'. Therefore the authors believe that the indicator in its current form might falsely interpret the quality of care of a hospital and it is questionable to use readmissions as a quality indicator.

  19. [Information use in public hospital management].

    PubMed

    Escrivão Junior, Alvaro

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates managerial perceptions of the use of information in health management and planning in 24 Public Hospitals in the São Paulo Metropolitan Region, analyzing its usefulness for the decision-making process. In addition, some characteristics of the existing information system are studied. The findings show that ample amounts of information and data are available in the hospitals covered by this study, despite some gaps, and that managers do not know about the existing data and do not use this information to guide hospital management.

  20. Leveraging hospital formularies for improved prescribing.

    PubMed

    Karas, Albert; Kuehl, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Hospital formularies, guided by the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, exist to optimize medication use by identifying and designating drugs of choice to guide rational prescribing, ultimately reducing patient risk and costs and improving patient outcomes. Guidelines and a framework exist to guide critical evaluations of medications for formulary listing; however, there may be opportunities to improve and standardize how a formulary change could be instituted in Canadian hospitals. A formulary change at an Ontario hospital revealed that there are some key challenges to the formulary change process including the importance of a robust project plan, appropriate resources, healthcare staff education, and acceptance.

  1. The impact of policy on hospital productivity: a time series analysis of Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; Eggink, Evelien

    2014-06-01

    The health care industry, in particular the hospital industry, is under an increasing degree of pressure, by an ageing population, advancing expensive medical technology a shrinking labor. The pressure on hospitals is further increased by the planned budget cuts in public spending by many current administrations as a result of the economic and financial crises. However, productivity increases may alleviate these problems. Therefore we study whether productivity in the hospital sector is growing, and whether this productivity growth can be influenced by government policy. Using an econometric time series analysis of the hospital sector in the Netherlands, productivity is estimated for the period 1972-2010. Then, productivity is linked to the different regulation regimes during that period, ranging from output funding in the 1970s to the current liberalized hospital market. The results indicate that the average productivity of the hospital sector in different periods differs and that these differences are related to the structure of regulation in those periods.

  2. Specialty hospitals: can general hospitals compete?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2005-07-13

    The rapid increase in specialty cardiac, surgical, and orthopedic hospitals has captured the attention of general hospitals and policymakers. Although the number of specialty hospitals remains small in absolute terms, their entry into certain health care markets has fueled arguments about the rules of "fair" competition among health care providers. To allow the smoke to clear, Congress effectively stalled the growth in new specialty hospitals by temporarily prohibiting physicians from referring Medicare or Medicaid patients to specialty hospitals in which they had an ownership interest. During this 18-month moratorium, which expired June 8, 2005, two mandated studies of specialty hospitals provided information to help assess their potential effect on health care delivery. This issue brief discusses the research on specialty hospitals, including their payments under Medicare's hospital inpatient payment system, the quality and cost of care they deliver, their effect on general hospitals and on overall health care delivery, and the regulatory and legal environment in which they have proliferated. It concludes with open issues concerning physician self-referral and the role of general hospitals in providing a range of health care services.

  3. The Impact of a Tiered Network on Hospital Choice

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Matthew B; Hsu, John; Landrum, Mary Beth; Chernew, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a tiered network on hospital choice for scheduled admissions. Data The 2009–2012 patient-level claims data from Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBSMA). Study Design BCBSMA's three-tiered hospital network employs large differential cost sharing to encourage patients to seek care at hospitals on the preferred tier. During the study period, 44 percent of hospitals were moved to a different tier based on changes in cost or quality performance. We relied on this longitudinal variation for identification and specified conditional logit models to estimate the effect of the tiered network (TN) on patients' hospital choices relative to a non-TN comparison group. Principal Findings The TN was associated with increased use of hospitals on the preferred and middle tiers relative to the nonpreferred tier for planned admissions. The results suggest that if all members were in a TN plan, relative to all members being in a non-TN plan, scheduled admissions to hospitals on the nonpreferred tier would drop by 7.6 percentage points, while those to middle and preferred tier hospitals would rise by 0.9 and 6.6 percentage points, respectively. Conclusion Differential cost sharing can steer patients toward preferred hospitals for planned admissions. PMID:25752219

  4. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  5. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature.

  6. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Noether, M

    1988-09-01

    The traditional view of hospital competition has posited that hospitals compete primarily along 'quality' dimensions, in the form of fancy equipment to attract admitting physicians and pleasant surroundings to entice patients. Price competition among hospitals is thought to be non-existent. This paper estimates the effects of various hospital market characteristics on hospital prices and expenses in an attempt to determine the form of hospital competition. The results suggest that both price and quality competition are greater in markets that are less concentrated, although the net effect of the two on prices is insignificant. It appears, therefore, that, despite important distortions, hospital markets are not immune to standard competitive forces.

  7. Accuracy of EMS Trauma Transport Destination Plans in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Moss, Chailee; Cowden, Christopher S; Atterton, Laurie Meyer; Arasaratnam, Meredith H; Fernandez, Antonio R; Evarts, Jeff S; Barrier, Brian; Lerner, E Brooke; Mann, N Clay; Lohmeier, Chad; Shofer, Frances S; Brice, Jane H

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. Planning for time-sensitive injury may allow emergency medical services (EMS) systems to more accurately triage patients meeting accepted criteria to facilities most capable of providing life-saving treatment. In 2010, North Carolina (NC) implemented statewide Trauma Triage and Destination Plans (TTDPs) in all 100 of North Carolina's county-defined EMS systems. Each system was responsible for identifying the specific destination hospitals with appropriate resources to treat trauma patients. We sought to characterize the accuracy of their hospital designations. Methods. In this cross-sectional study, we collected TTDPs for each county-defined EMS system, including their assigned hospital capabilities (i.e., trauma center or community hospital). We conducted a survey with each EMS system to determine how their TTDP was constructed and maintained, as well as with each TTDP-designated hospital to verify their capabilities. We determined the accuracy of the EMS assigned hospital designations by comparing them to the hospital's reported capabilities. Results. The 100 NC EMS systems provided 380 designations for 112 hospitals. TTDPs were created by EMS administrators and medical directors, with only 55% of EMS systems engaging a hospital representative in the plan creation. Compared to the actual hospital capabilities, 97% of the EMS TTDP designations were correct. Twelve hospital designations were incorrect and the majority (10) overestimated hospital capabilities. Of the 100 EMS systems, 7 misclassified hospitals in their TTDP. EMS systems that did not verify their local hospitals' capabilities during TTDP development were more likely to incorrectly categorize a hospital's capabilities (p = 0.001). Conclusions. A small number of EMS systems misclassified hospitals in their TTDP, but most plans accurately reflected hospital capabilities. Misclassification occurred more often in systems that did not consult local hospitals prior to developing their

  8. Discharge Planning in Chronic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    McMartin, K

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronically ill people experience frequent changes in health status accompanied by multiple transitions between care settings and care providers. Discharge planning provides support services, follow-up activities, and other interventions that span pre-hospital discharge to post-hospital settings. Objective To determine if discharge planning is effective at reducing health resource utilization and improving patient outcomes compared with standard care alone. Data Sources A standard systematic literature search was conducted for studies published from January 1, 2004, until December 13, 2011. Review Methods Reports, randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses with 1 month or more of follow-up and limited to specified chronic conditions were examined. Outcomes included mortality/survival, readmissions and emergency department (ED) visits, hospital length of stay (LOS), health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and patient satisfaction. Results One meta-analysis compared individualized discharge planning to usual care and found a significant reduction in readmissions favouring individualized discharge planning. A second meta-analysis compared comprehensive discharge planning with postdischarge support to usual care. There was a significant reduction in readmissions favouring discharge planning with postdischarge support. However, there was significant statistical heterogeneity. For both meta-analyses there was a nonsignificant reduction in mortality between the study arms. Limitations There was difficulty in distinguishing the relative contribution of each element within the terms “discharge planning” and “postdischarge support.” For most studies, “usual care” was not explicitly described. Conclusions Compared with usual care, there was moderate quality evidence that individualized discharge planning is more effective at reducing readmissions or hospital LOS but not mortality, and very low quality evidence that it is more

  9. Improved Planning Time and Plan Quality Through Multicriteria Optimization for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, David L.; Hong, Theodore S.; Shih, Helen A.; Bortfeld, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test whether multicriteria optimization (MCO) can reduce treatment planning time and improve plan quality in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten IMRT patients (5 with glioblastoma and 5 with locally advanced pancreatic cancers) were logged during the standard treatment planning procedure currently in use at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Planning durations and other relevant planning information were recorded. In parallel, the patients were planned using an MCO planning system, and similar planning time data were collected. The patients were treated with the standard plan, but each MCO plan was also approved by the physicians. Plans were then blindly reviewed 3 weeks after planning by the treating physician. Results: In all cases, the treatment planning time was vastly shorter for the MCO planning (average MCO treatment planning time was 12 min; average standard planning time was 135 min). The physician involvement time in the planning process increased from an average of 4.8 min for the standard process to 8.6 min for the MCO process. In all cases, the MCO plan was blindly identified as the superior plan. Conclusions: This provides the first concrete evidence that MCO-based planning is superior in terms of both planning efficiency and dose distribution quality compared with the current trial and error-based IMRT planning approach.

  10. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  11. Guide to Choosing a Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... your condition? Should you consider a specialty hospital, teaching hospital (usually part of a university), community hospital, ... been approved by Medicare. Hospitals may choose either method of evaluation. You can check with a hospital ...

  12. [Teaching and research in high specialty hospitals].

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Education and research are strategic activities leading to development and progress of a hospital, so planning on this matter is fundamental, both in terms of structure and infrastructure. Investment on faculty development and on researchers should be considered beyond the short term. Education should respond to the necessities and research to health priorities through formal agreements with universities and institutes.

  13. Marketing and planning in multihospital systems.

    PubMed

    Gourley, D R; Moore, M E

    1988-01-01

    Marketing and planning functions at the corporate level of multihospital systems are examined. Drawing on the experiences of executives in 30 multihospital systems located in the United States west of the Mississippi, this article describes the differences in the marketing and planning functions by for-profit, not-for-profit, and church-owned multihospital systems; examines the impact of age, number of hospitals, and average hospital bed size of the systems; provides insights regarding the primary persons involved in the marketing and planning functions; and highlights the important future of marketing and planning by the top management of multihospital systems.

  14. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders.

  15. Hospitals as complex adaptive systems: A case study of factors influencing priority setting practices at the hospital level in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Barasa, Edwine W; Molyneux, Sassy; English, Mike; Cleary, Susan

    2017-02-01

    There is a dearth of literature on priority setting and resource allocation (PSRA) practices in hospitals, particularly in low and middle income countries (LMICs). Using a case study approach, we examined PSRA practices in 2 public hospitals in coastal Kenya. We collected data through a combination of in-depth interviews of national level policy makers, hospital managers, and frontline practitioners in the case study hospitals (n = 72), review of documents such as hospital plans and budgets, minutes of meetings and accounting records, and non-participant observations of PSRA practices in case study hospitals over a period of 7 months. In this paper, we apply complex adaptive system (CAS) theory to examine the factors that influence PSRA practices. We found that PSRA practices in the case hospitals were influenced by, 1) inadequate financing level and poorly designed financing arrangements, 2) limited hospital autonomy and decision space, and 3) inadequate management and leadership capacity in the hospital. The case study hospitals exhibited properties of complex adaptive systems (CASs) that exist in a dynamic state with multiple interacting agents. Weaknesses in system 'hardware' (resource scarcity) and 'software' (including PSRA guidelines that reduced hospitals decision space, and poor leadership skills) led to the emergence of undesired properties. The capacity of hospitals to set priorities should be improved across these interacting aspects of the hospital organizational system. Interventions should however recognize that hospitals are CAS. Rather than rectifying isolated aspects of the system, they should endeavor to create conditions for productive emergence.

  16. Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Tulane's Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ian L.

    2007-01-01

    On Monday, August 29, 2005 Hurricane Katrina passed east of New Orleans causing minimal damage to Tulane's Medical Center. Later that day, levees that protected the city failed and several feet of water entered the hospitals and school buildings. Emergency generators provided power for 36 hours before running out of fuel. Temperatures in the hospitals soared into the upper 90's and conditions were made intolerable by 100% humidity and backed-up sewage. For several days, faculty, residents, nurses and hospital personnel performed heroically, caring for patients in appalling conditions, hand-ventilating critically ill patients in shifts. Approximately 200 patients, and 1500 additional personnel would be evacuated on Wednesday and Thursday from a makeshift heliport on Tulane's parking garage. Current disaster plans may be inadequate should facilities be inaccessible for months because of damage or contamination. Contingency plans also need to be made should outside disaster relief be markedly delayed as was the case with Katrina. PMID:18528490

  17. [Hospitals safe from disasters: a reflection on architecture and biosafety].

    PubMed

    Saba, Lucia Cristina de Paiva; Cardoso, Telma Abdalla de Oliveira; Navarro, Marli B M de Albuquerque

    2012-02-01

    One of the biggest challenges in today's society is facing adversity caused by disasters. Health facilities, especially hospitals, are considered essential in these situations. This article discusses the principles of architectural design of hospitals safe from disasters, as proposed by the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization. Designing a safe hospital requires multidisciplinary efforts, involving administrators, architects, engineers, physicians, and nurses. The planning of each hospital demands the analysis of specific risks and safety concerns. The concept of biosafety should also be addressed in planning safe hospitals. The balance between architectural aspects and biosafety provides an understanding of work-associated risks, facilitating the adequate planning of spaces to support response actions to emergencies. In short, the planning of a safe hospital requires the synthesis of various types of expertise, including those relating to biosafety and architecture. These principles should support the appraisal of safe hospitals and architectural planning with a focus on preparing facilities to function at full capacity even in the face of adverse situations.

  18. [Hospital integrated maintenance management system design and application].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li

    2011-03-01

    According to hospital medical equipment, information equipment and water, electricity and other equipment maintenance procedures, this paper planned and developed a comprehensive maintenance management system for hospitals. The system implements equipment maintenance, maintenance applications, maintenance registration, preventive maintenance, data quantitative analysis and other functions.

  19. Pediatric palliative care: starting a hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kaye

    2011-01-01

    The value of palliative care in pediatrics has received significant attention over the past 10 years. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the Institute of Medicine published recommendations involving children who have a life-limiting diagnosis in a palliative care program early in their disease process. Palliative care is intended to assure an emphasis on quality of life in addition to the current medical treatment, which may be focused on cure, symptom management, and/or end-of-life care. This article describes one hospital's experience in planning, implementing, and managing a pediatric palliative care program. Implementing a hospital-based palliative care program in a children's hospital can be accomplished through careful planning and analysis of need. Writing an official business plan formalized the request for organizational support for this program, including the mission and vision, plans for how services would be provided, expected financial implications, and initial plans for evaluation of success.

  20. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority.

  1. Help prevent hospital errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23330698 . The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2014 National Patient Safety Goals. www.jointcommission. ... October 24, 2014. Accessed October 27, 2016. The Joint Commission. Hospital: 2016 National Patient Safety Goals. Updated January ...

  2. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  3. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  4. Hospital design for better infection control

    PubMed Central

    Lateef, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    The physical design and infrastructure of a hospital or institution is an essential component of its infection control measure. Thus is must be a prerequisite to take these into consideration from the initial conception and planning stages of the building. The balance between designing a hospital to be an open, accessible and public place and the control to reduce the spread of infections diseases is a necessity. At Singapore General Hospital, many lessons were learnt during the SARS outbreak pertaining to this. During and subsequent to the SARS outbreak, many changes evolved in the hospital to enable us to handle and face any emerging infectious situation with calm, confidence and the knowledge that staff and patients will be in good stead. This paper will share some of our experiences as well as challenges PMID:20009307

  5. ERP implementation in hospitals: a case study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Divya; Garg, Poonam

    2012-01-01

    In a competitive healthcare sector, hospitals have to focus on their processes in order to deliver high-quality care while at the same time reducing costs. Many hospitals have decided to adopt one or another Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system to improve their businesses, but implementing an ERP system can be a demanding endeavour. The systems are so difficult to implement that some are successful; many have failed, causing multimillion dollar losses. The challenge of ERP solutions lie in implementation because they are complex, time consuming and expensive too. This paper describes the various process workflows and phases of ERP implementation at Fortis Hospital Cunningham Road, Bangalore, India. This knowledge will provide valuable insights for the researchers and practitioners to understand the different process workflows and to make informed decisions when implementing ERP in any hospital.

  6. Hospital Dermatology, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Fox, Lindy P

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology is emerging as a distinct dermatology subspecialty where dermatologists specialize in caring for patients hospitalized with skin disease. While the main focus of inpatient dermatology is the delivery of top-quality and timely dermatologic care to patients in the hospital setting, the practice of hospital-based dermatology has many additional components that are critical to its success.

  7. 42 CFR 456.523 - Revised UR plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time Requirements § 456.523 Revised... control over the utilization of services; and (2) Conducts reviews in a way that improves the quality...

  8. 42 CFR 456.523 - Revised UR plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Review Plans: FFP, Waivers, and Variances for Hospitals and Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Remote Facility Variances from Time Requirements § 456.523 Revised... control over the utilization of services; and (2) Conducts reviews in a way that improves the quality...

  9. 40 CFR 62.9825 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... from Existing Plants (Section 111(d) Plan). (b) The plan was officially submitted as follows: (1) Control of air emissions from existing hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators, submitted on August... categories of sources: (1) Hospital/medical/infectious waste incinerators. (2) Fluoride Emissions...

  10. Bio-terrorism, "dirty bombs," hospitals, and security issues.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jesse C

    2004-01-01

    In the event of a bio-terrorism event, the role of the hospital security department will be critical if the disaster plans of health care providers are to be successfully carried out. It is imperative, says the author, that security providers be involved in every step of disaster and emergency response planning.

  11. Positioning hospitals: a model for regional hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A C; Campbell, D P

    1993-01-01

    In an age of marketing warfare in the health care industry, hospitals need creative strategies to compete successfully. Lately, positioning concepts have been added to the health care marketer's arsenal of strategies. To blend theory with practice, the authors review basic positioning theory and present a framework for developing positioning strategies. They also evaluate the marketing strategies of a regional hospital to provide a case example.

  12. Business Planning for a Campus-Wide Biobank.

    PubMed

    Tarling, Tamsin E; Lasser, Frances; Carter, Candace; Matzke, Lise A M; Dhugga, Gurm; Arora, Nidhi; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Babinsky, Sindy; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Cheah, Stefanie; Watson, Peter; Vercauteren, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    Biobanks are resources that facilitate research. Many biobanks exist around the world, but most tend to focus on a specific disease or research area. BC Children's Hospital and BC Women's Hospital are located on the same campus (Oak Street Campus) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A campus-wide biobank has been established on the site of these two hospitals to collect specimens and annotated data from children or women seeking medical care at either of the hospitals. Such an initiative requires careful planning and consideration of many factors such as buy in and support of key stakeholders, governance, financial planning, and optimizing specimen collection. We developed a business plan to account for the many aspects associated with integrating the "BC Children's Hospital BioBank." This document describes the approach our business plan took for the implementation of our biobank and the progress, including deviations from the business plan. We also provide a perspective on the current status with a focus on sustainability.

  13. STATEWIDE PLANNING FOR NURSING EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEONE, LUCILE PETRY

    NEEDS IN NURSING EDUCATION ARE OUTLINED IN 5 IMPERATIVES--(1) AN IMMEDIATE NEED FOR COMPREHENSIVE PLANNING (BECAUSE OF UP TO 50 PERCENT VACANCIES IN NURSING POSITIONS IN SOME HOSPITALS, USE OF SUBPROFESSIONALS EXCEEDING THE SAFETY LEVEL, AND EXTREME SHORTAGE OF NURSES FOR POSITIONS OF HIGHEST RESPONSIBILITY, AND FUTURE OVERTAXING OF THE SUPPLY DUE…

  14. What does free cash flow tell us about hospital efficiency? A stochastic frontier analysis of cost inefficiency in California hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pratt, William R

    2010-01-01

    Hospitals are facing substantial financial and economic pressure as a result of health plan payment restructuring, unfunded mandates, and other factors. This article analyzes the relationship between free cash flow (FCF) and hospital efficiency given these financial challenges. Data from 270 California hospitals were used to estimate a stochastic frontier model of hospital cost efficiency that explicitly takes into account outpatient heterogeneity. The findings indicate that hospital FCF is significantly linked to firm efficiency/inefficiency. The results indicate that higher positive cash flows are related to lower cost inefficiency, but higher negative cash flows are related to higher cost inefficiency. Thus, cash flows not only impact the ability of hospitals to meet current liabilities, they are also related to the ability of the hospitals to use resources effectively.

  15. Production flow analysis: a tool for designing a lean hospital.

    PubMed

    Karvonen, Sauli; Korvenranta, Heikki; Paatela, Mikael; Seppälä, Timo

    2007-01-01

    Production flow analysis (PFA) was used in the planning process for a new acute care hospital. The PFA demonstrated that functional organisation--for example, with centralised medical imaging-- generates a lot of back and forth patient transfers between functional units. This to-and-fro patient flow increases lead times of care processes and also exposes the patients to unnecessary complications. PFA produced an ideal patient flow model and layout model for the acute care hospital. Thus, PFA revealed information for use in proximity ranking of different units of the hospital; the planning team then decided which units should be placed next to each other. Medical imaging should be essentially ubiquitous, to achieve simple, high-velocity patient flow. Thus, a modern decentralized layout model for medical imaging was planned. Furthermore, PFA enables optimizing transfer routes for patients and also, e.g., lift capacity in the hospital.

  16. Pandemic influenza and critical infrastructure dependencies: possible impact on hospitals.

    PubMed

    Itzwerth, Ralf L; Macintyre, C Raina; Shah, Smita; Plant, Aileen J

    2006-11-20

    Hospitals will be particularly challenged when pandemic influenza spreads. Within the health sector in general, existing pandemic plans focus on health interventions to control outbreaks. The critical relationship between the health sector and other sectors is not well understood and addressed. Hospitals depend on critical infrastructure external to the organisation itself. Existing plans do not adequately consider the complexity and interdependency of systems upon which hospitals rely. The failure of one such system can trigger a failure of another, causing cascading breakdowns. Health is only one of the many systems that struggle at maximum capacity during "normal" times, as current business models operate with no or minimal "excess" staff and have become irreducible operations. This makes interconnected systems highly vulnerable to acute disruptions, such as a pandemic. Companies use continuity plans and highly regulated business continuity management to overcome process interruptions. This methodology can be applied to hospitals to minimise the impact of a pandemic.

  17. Fire Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Power, June

    2011-01-01

    Many libraries have disaster recovery plans, but not all have prevention and action plans to prepare for an emergency in advance. This article presents the author's review of the prevention and action plans of several libraries: (1) Evergreen State College; (2) Interlochen Public Library; (3) University of Maryland, Baltimore-Marshall Law Library;…

  18. Planning Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; Mercure, Nancy

    This handbook was designed to assist advisory councils, program staff and administrators, and community members in planning community education programs and in managing those programs effectively. Chapter I defines and describes planning: what it is, why it is used, and how to engage in the process. The critical role of planning leaders is…

  19. Business planning. Reasons, definitions, and elements.

    PubMed

    Cardamone, Michael A; Shaver, Mark; Werthman, Ronald

    2004-04-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System has developed a centralized business planning structure that provides for creativity while incorporating a system of checks and balances. Combining standardization with flexibility allows for customization and variability. Using a team approach, the organization allows key players to contribute their experience and expertise to the planning for each new project.

  20. Consumer-directed health plans: what happened?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Jeff

    2007-08-01

    CDHPs can stabilize growth in health costs, but the health plan-subscriber relationship should be more transparent. CFOs should ensure that increased cost exposure in CDHPs is paired with broad, deep disease management and employee assistance support. Hospitals should plan for the likelihood that, one way or another, consumers will be paying more of their healthcare bill.

  1. Hospital readmission from a transitional care unit.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary Ann; Tyler, Denice; Helms, Lelia B; Hanson, Kathleen S; Sparbel, Kathleen J H

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to characterize patients readmitted to the hospital during a stay in a transitional care unit (TCUT). Typically, readmitted patients were females, widowed, with 8 medical diagnoses, and taking 12 different medications. Readmission from the TCU occurred within 7 days as a result of a newly developed problem. Most patients did not return home after readmission from the TCU. Understanding high-risk patients' characteristics that lead to costly hospital readmission during a stay in the TCU can assist clinicians and healthcare providers to plan and implement timely and effective interventions, and help facility personnel in fiscal and resource management issues.

  2. Average length of stay in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Egawa, H

    1984-03-01

    The average length of stay is essentially an important and appropriate index for hospital bed administration. However, from the position that it is not necessarily an appropriate index in Japan, an analysis is made of the difference in the health care facility system between the United States and Japan. Concerning the length of stay in Japanese hospitals, the median appeared to better represent the situation. It is emphasized that in order for the average length of stay to become an appropriate index, there is need to promote regional health, especially facility planning.

  3. Exploration on Construction of Hospital "Talent Tree" Project.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lihua; Wei, Lei; Hao, Aimin; Hu, Minmin; Xu, Xinzhou

    2015-05-01

    Talent is the core competitive force of a hospital's development. Wuxi No. 2 People's Hospital followed the characteristics that medical talents mature slowly and their growth requires a long period. The innovated "talent tree" project, trained classified talents corresponding to "base-trunk-crown" of a tree, formed an individualized professional training plan with different levels and at different periods. We carried out a relay of the "talent tree" to bring their initiative into play. In practice, we gradually found this as a unique way of the talent construction, which conforms to our hospital's condition. This guarantees sustained development and innovative force of the hospital.

  4. Self-insured health plans

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Patricia; Guttenberg, Abbie; Greenberg, Leonard; Arnett, Ross H.

    1986-01-01

    Nationwide, 8 percent of all employment-related health plans were self-insured in 1984, which translates into more than 175,000 self-insured plans according to our latest study of independent health plans. The propensity of an organization to self-insure differs primarily by its size, with large establishments more likely to self-insure. In the overwhelming majority of cases, the self-insured benefit was hospital and/or medical. Among employers who self-insure, 23 percent self-administer, and the remaining 77 percent hire a commercial insurance company, Blue Cross/Blue Shield plan, or an independent third-party administrator to administer the health plan. PMID:10312008

  5. Marketing strategies of hospital service organizations in Nigeria: a study of selected privately owned hospitals in Port Harcourt.

    PubMed

    Okwandu, Gabriel A

    2002-01-01

    This study was centered on the identification of the marketing strategies of hospitals and the factors that militate against their effective adoption and implementation. A total of 80 hospitals in Port Harcourt responded to a structured questionnaire administered on them. It was found, among other things, that many hospital organizations apply marketing strategies, and that hospitals that adopt effective marketing strategies perform better than those that do not. Some of the factors militating against the effective adoption and implementation of marketing strategies include lack of planning, lack of top management support, and non-utilization of all the promotional mix elements.

  6. [Problems of modernization of historic hospitals].

    PubMed

    Gerber, Piotr

    Adapting buildings and the technical infrastructure of hospitals to the requirements of modern technology, workflow and legal regulations is a difficult and costly process. A proper plan, taking into account the necessary changes, has a significant influence on the future functioning of the hospital. The assumptions and priorities of the project determine the quality of services provided in the future. The modernization process is more complicated when it concerns hospital complexes with a historic pedigree. Combining functionality, modernity and efficiency while retaining historical features is a difficult undertaking: Decisions must be made basing on a thorough analysis. Of the 70 hospitals in Lower Silesia, 23 are historic structures. The majority of them do not meet the demands of modern medical technology and workflow, or the requirements of the Ministry of Health. The subject of modernization of historic hospital facilities is a very important contemporary topic, but is subjected to very little research. The work presented is one phase of a larger study intending to develop model solutions for the optimization of design processes in the modernization of a historic hospital.

  7. [Suggestions for buying medical equipment in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Trontzos, Christos

    2004-01-01

    TO THE EDITOR: Both in Greece and in other European countries there are plans to buy more medical equipment. If the whole procedure is not effective, it may result to a large deficit in the hospital budget. The total hospital deficit now in Greece is about 2.5 billion euros. It is suggested that in every hospital, the Authorized Committee for Medical Equipment Purchasing, should include the following: One Director of a Medical Department related to the equipment to be bought and another Director of a Medical Department, unrelated. One accountant. One legal advisor specialized in hospital affairs. One economical advisor specialized in banking who will be able to suggest leasing or other means of financing the purchase of the relevant equipment. A cost accounting analysis described by a detailed report, should be provided to secure that the equipment to be bought should be cost-effective and leaving a reasonable surplus after not more than 10 years from the time it is installed. Finally, the possibility of using one expensive equipment to cover the needs of more than one hospitals either by moving the equipment (i.e. the PET/CT camera by a large vehicle) or by transferring the patients to a central hospital, may be provided by the above Authorized Committee.

  8. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  9. Measuring hospital competition.

    PubMed

    White, S L; Chirikos, T N

    1988-03-01

    This paper appraises the use of the Herfindahl market share index as an exogenous competition variable in empirical studies of the hospital sector. An analysis of cross-sectional Florida data shows that this index itself is significantly influenced by the demand and supply factors commonly included in econometric models of hospital performance. The analysis then illustrates that biased inferences about the effects of market competition on the costs of hospital care may result unless the values of the Herfindahl Index are treated endogenously in hospital cost models.

  10. [Tele-cooperation for innovative care using the example of the University Hospital Aachen. Telematics in intensive care medicine, emergency medicine, and telemedical intersectoral rehabilitation planning in geriatric trauma].

    PubMed

    Marx, Gernot; Beckers, Rainer; Brokmann, Jörg Christian; Deisz, Robert; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2015-10-01

    The demographic challenge of the ageing society is associated with increasing comorbidity. On the other hand, there will be an ageing workforce in medicine, resulting in an imbalance between the demand and supply of medical care in the near future. In rural areas in particular, this imbalance is already present today. Based on three best practice projects carried out by our telemedical center in Aachen, including emergency medicine, intensive care medicine, and the rehabilitation planning of geriatric trauma care, some experience and the potential of the intersectoral provision of care, supported by telemedicine, are demonstrated. Telemedicine is the provision of medical services over a geographical distance by using tele-communication and data transfer. It has been proven to ensure a constant quality of health care. Telemedical support enables shared expertise independent of time and space, and allows efficient allocation of resources. A review of international experience supports this notion.

  11. The health care market: can hospitals survive?

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, J C

    1980-01-01

    Does it sound familiar? Resources are scarce, competition is tough, and government regulations and a balanced budget are increasingly hard to meet at the same time. This is not the automobile or oil industry but the health care industry, and hospital managers are facing the same problems. And, maintains the author of this article, they must borrow some proven marketing techniques from business to survive in the new health care market. He first describes the features of the new market (the increasing economic power of physicians, new forms of health care delivery, prepaid health plans, and the changing regulatory environment) and then the possible marketing strategies for dealing with them (competing hard for physicians who control the patient flow and diversifying and promoting the mix of services). He also describes various planning solutions that make the most of a community's hospital facilities and affiliations.

  12. Hospital marketing is here to stay.

    PubMed

    Fontana, J P

    1984-01-01

    In 1983, a study was conducted to determine to what extent privately owned acute care general hospitals used formalized public relations and marketing programs in the management of their institutions. The results indicate three major concerns common to all respondents: (1) The potential for developing new services and community programs; (2) The need to reevaluate and redefine the target market of the institution's services; and (3) The need for more accurate and comprehensive strategic planning, both short and long-term.

  13. Safe Transitions from Hospital to Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-26

    Management 49 Home Health 40 Social Work 36 Behavioral Health 16 Hospice 16 Specialist 12 Care Planning/Coordination 2011 MHS Conference 19 Patient...reduce unplanned readmissions  Readmissions are sometimes preventable - Nationwide, between 9% and 48% of readmitted patients receive substandard care ...during or following the index hospitalization (Archives Internal Medicine 2000) 2011 MHS Conference 6 Transitions " Care transitions is a team sport

  14. 8 strategies for hospital borrowers in 2011.

    PubMed

    Blake, James W; Jordahl, Eric A; Majka, Andrew J

    2011-04-01

    Given the likelihood that volatility and unexpected events will continue to challenge the capital markets, healthcare borrowers should implement the following strategic responses: Protect the organization's credit rating. Identify and address organizationwide risk. Establish a global capital strategy for the hospital. Diversify debt and investments. Anticipate challenges in the banking market. Anticipate challenges in the municipal bond market. Fully integrate leasing into the organization's capital structure strategy. Ensure the solidity of the organization's financial plan and future strategies.

  15. Uninterrupted service on the hospital menu.

    PubMed

    Vines, Lee

    2014-09-01

    Lee Vines, sales and marketing director at PKL Group, a leading supplier of temporary and permanent catering infrastructure, considers the challenges facing hospital caterers and estates managers in ensuring that catering equipment is kept up-to-date and fit-for-purpose. He also discusses the options available to make sure kitchen services are able to run without interruption during planned or unplanned periods of kitchen 'downtime'.

  16. An enlightened age: building the naval hospitals.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Emmakate MacQueen

    2005-01-01

    Summerson writes that, in the spirit of the Enlightenment, the notion of 'bienfaisance', literally meaning the desire to render society more reasonable and more humane, liberated the scope of both hospital and prison planning. Both types of institution housed people who were deprived of their freedom either by disability or by force of law; therefore, we find similarities in the disposition of space and in the degree of humanitarianism expressed in their outward appearance. This observation can be transferred to naval hospital design, where architecture was combined to fulfil a twofold purpose. The high walls, sturdy massing and pared-down details intimated a strict economy of means, but also a strong sense of gravitas and authority. This visual authoritarian character was fundamental to the identity of a naval hospital, for whilst the prime intention was to provide efficient medical care, an equally important consideration was to maintain discipline and prevent sailors from escaping.

  17. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  18. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  19. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  20. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  1. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  2. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  3. Hospital benefit segmentation.

    PubMed

    Finn, D W; Lamb, C W

    1986-12-01

    Market segmentation is an important topic to both health care practitioners and researchers. The authors explore the relative importance that health care consumers attach to various benefits available in a major metropolitan area hospital. The purposes of the study are to test, and provide data to illustrate, the efficacy of one approach to hospital benefit segmentation analysis.

  4. Leading a hospital closure.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Paula A

    2002-01-01

    Hospital closures have become more common. The challenges facing a nursing leader in this situation are complex and difficult. This author suggests that looking for new beginnings rather than focusing on endings created an approach to closing a public hospital. The article includes approaches to employee morale, staffing, and patient care.

  5. Broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holen, Øyunn; Alberg, Torunn; Blix, Hege Salvesen; Smith, Ingrid; Neteland, Marion Iren; Eriksen, Hanne Merete

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND One of the objectives in the action plan to reduce antimicrobial resistance in the health services in Norway is to reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals. This study describes the use of certain broad-spectrum antibiotics mentioned in the action plan in Norwegian hospitals, and assesses prescribing practices in relation to the Norwegian guidelines for antibiotic use in hospitals.MATERIAL AND METHOD Data were analysed from a nationwide non-identifiable point prevalence survey in May 2016 where all systemic use of antibiotics was recorded.RESULTS Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for 33 % of all antibiotics prescribed. Altogether 84 % of all broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed as treatment, 8 % were for prophylactic use, and 8 % were classified as other/unknown. Lower respiratory tract infections were the most frequent indication for treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, involving 30 % of all broad-spectrum treatment.INTERPRETATION This point prevalence survey in Norwegian hospitals in spring 2016 indicates a possibility for reducing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections and for prophylactic use. Reduction of healthcare-associated infections may also contribute.

  6. Competition among hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gaynor, Martin; Vogt, William B

    2003-01-01

    We examine competition in the hospital industry, in particular the effect of ownership type (for-profit, not-for-profit, government). We estimate a structural model of demand and pricing in the hospital industry in California, then use the estimates to simulate the effect of a merger. California hospitals in 1995 face an average price elasticity of demand of -4.85. Not-for-profit hospitals face less elastic demand and act as if they have lower marginal costs. Their prices are lower than those of for-profits, but markups are higher. We simulate the effects of the 1997 merger of two hospital chains. In San Luis Obispo County, where the merger creates a near monopoly, prices rise by up to 53%, and the predicted price increase would not be substantially smaller were the chains not-for-profit.

  7. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  8. Test plan :

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  9. Campus Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book suggests ways and means by which the development of campuses can be controlled so that functional goals can be aesthetically expressed. The first section, "Prospectus," defines campus planning, illuminating through historical examples the evolution of the campus as a design form, and describes the conditions that make campus planning so…

  10. Hospital management principles applicable to the veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Harris, Donna L; Lloyd, James W; Marrinan, Mike

    2004-01-01

    The Skills, Knowledge, Aptitude, and Attitude (SKA) Subcommittee of the National Commission on Veterinary Economic Issues (NCVEI) has identified the need for veterinary teaching hospitals (VTH) to be at the forefront of progressive business management to serve as a model for both students and practitioners to emulate. To provide a foundation for developing a model, this study reviewed pertinent literature applicable to the management of a VTH. Much of the literature relevant to VTH management relates to work completed for the human side of medicine (academic health centers, or AHCs) or to the private sector. This review explores management practices in strategic planning, financial management, human resource management, marketing, pricing, operations, and legal issues. It is concluded that strategic management is important to provide the foundation for success in the VTH. In addition, periodic financial reports are recommended, as are the development and use of benchmarks for financial management. Establishing positive, motivating human resource practices is also suggested, along with development of a marketing plan based on a clear understanding of VTH core competencies and the market's specific needs.

  11. Integrating COPD into Patient-Centered Hospital Readmissions Reduction Programs

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Jerry A.; Gussin, Hélène A.; Prieto-Centurion, Valentin; Sullivan, Jamie L.; Zaidi, Farhan; Thomashow, Byron M.

    2015-01-01

    About 1 in 5 patients hospitalized for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the United States are readmitted within 30 days. The U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently expanded its Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program to financially penalize hospitals with higher than expected all-cause 30-day readmission rates following a hospitalization for COPD exacerbation. In October 2013, the COPD Foundation convened a multi-stakeholder National COPD Readmissions Summit to summarize our understanding of how to reduce hospital readmissions in patients hospitalized for COPD exacerbations. Over 225 individuals participated in the Summit, including patients, clinicians, health service researchers, policy makers and representatives of academic health care centers, industry, and payers. Summit participants recommend that programs to reduce hospital readmissions: 1) Include specific recommendations about how to promote COPD self-management skills training for patients and their caregivers; 2) Adequately address co-existing disorders common to COPD in care plans during and after hospitalizations; 3) Include an evaluation of adverse events when implementing strategies to reduce hospital readmissions; and 4) Develop a strategy (e.g., a learning collaboratory) to connect groups who are engaged in developing, testing, and implementing programs to reduce hospital readmissions for COPD and other conditions. PMID:25927076

  12. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  13. Variation in Hospital Length of Stay: Do Physicians Adapt Their Length of Stay Decisions to What Is Usual in the Hospital Where They Work?

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Judith D; Westert, Gert P; Lagoe, Ronald; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that physicians who work in different hospitals adapt their length of stay decisions to what is usual in the hospital under consideration. Data Sources Secondary data were used, originating from the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS). SPARCS is a major management tool for assisting hospitals, agencies, and health care organizations with decision making in relation to financial planning and monitoring of inpatient and ambulatory surgery services and costs in New York state. Study Design Data on length of stay for surgical interventions and medical conditions (a total of seven diagnosis-related groups [DRGs]) were studied, to find out whether there is more variation between than within hospitals. Data (1999, 2000, and 2001) from all hospitals in New York state were used. The study examined physicians practicing in one hospital and physicians practicing in more than one hospital, to determine whether average length of stay differs according to the hospital of practice. Multilevel models were used to determine variation between and within hospitals. A t-test was used to test whether length of stay for patients of each multihospital physician differed from the average length of stay in each of the two hospitals. Principal Findings There is significantly (p<.05) more variation between than within hospitals in most of the study populations. Physicians working in two hospitals had patient lengths of stay comparable with the usual practice in the hospital where the procedure was performed. The proportion of physicians working in one hospital did not have a consistent effect for all DRGs on the variation within hospitals. Conclusion Physicians adapt to their colleagues or to the managerial demands of the particular hospital in which they work. The hospital and broader work environment should be taken into account when developing effective interventions to reduce variation in medical practice. PMID:16584454

  14. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made.

  15. Predicting hospital accounting costs

    PubMed Central

    Newhouse, Joseph P.; Cretin, Shan; Witsberger, Christina J.

    1989-01-01

    Two alternative methods to Medicare Cost Reports that provide information about hospital costs more promptly but less accurately are investigated. Both employ utilization data from current-year bills. The first attaches costs to utilization data using cost-charge ratios from the previous year's cost report; the second uses charges from current year's bills. The first method is the more accurate of the two, but even using it, only 40 percent of hospitals had predicted costs within plus or minus 5 percent of actual costs. The feasibility and cost of obtaining cost reports from a small, fast-track sample of hospitals should be investigated. PMID:10313352

  16. Change climate in the University Hospital Bratislava.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Hlavacka, S; Mazanec, V; Bacharova, L

    2001-01-01

    Organizational change can generate skepticism and resistance in employees, making it sometimes difficult or impossible to implement organizational improvements. To enable the University Hospital Bratislava to manage these realities in a most effective way, the assessment of attitudes to change was conducted among 304 full-time hospital employees in the summer of 1999. The assessment was based on the Change Climate Survey allowing for investigation of attitudes in four main areas: orientation towards change in general, understanding and acceptance of change, management of change, and change outcomes. In spite of some limitations due to the fact that the survey did not use a true random sample, in general, the results seem to be able to illustrate the University Hospital employees' attitudes to change. The findings indicate that, in general, the attitudes of the hospital employees towards change are rather positive. However, the mixed feelings prevail among the employees from the point of understanding and acceptance of the current changes. Similarly, the mixed feelings persist among the employees with respect to the way the change is managed, though with slightly positive attitudes towards the level of communication. From the practical point of view, the results imply that emphasizing the involvement of organization members in learning about their organization and how to change it might prove to be more effective in managing change in the University Hospital Bratislava, than the traditional approaches to planned change, where consultants carry out most of the change activities, with the agreement and collaboration of management. (Tab. 8, Ref. 28.)

  17. Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Third Floor Plan, Second Floor Plan, First Floor Plan, Ground Floor Plan, West Bunkhouse - Kennecott Copper Corporation, On Copper River & Northwestern Railroad, Kennicott, Valdez-Cordova Census Area, AK

  18. Southwest elevation, roof plan, site plan & main floor plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southwest elevation, roof plan, site plan & main floor plan, loft plan, section looking east, north window head detail - Richard Buckminster Fuller & Anne Hewlett Fuller Dome Home, 407 South Forest Avenue, Carbondale, Jackson County, IL

  19. Job embeddedness as a nurse retention strategy for rural hospitals.

    PubMed

    Stroth, Chandra

    2010-01-01

    RN turnover is expensive and disruptive for rural hospitals, constraining finances, impacting patient care, and stressing remaining nurses. Recent investigations have described a promising new construct related to employee retention: job embeddedness. Leaders in nonhealthcare organizations have adopted a job-embeddedness model to guide retention strategies and experienced a subsequent reduction in turnover. The author explores job embeddedness as an effective retention plan strategy for rural hospitals.

  20. [Hospital discharge criteria for very low birth weight newborns].

    PubMed

    Benavente Fernández, Isabel; Sánchez Redondo, María Dolores; Leante Castellanos, Jose Luis; Pérez Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Rite Gracia, Segundo; Ruiz Campillo, Cèsar W; Sanz López, Ester; Sánchez Luna, Manuel

    2017-01-04

    Hospital discharge criteria for the pre-term newborn are mainly based on physiological competences (thermoregulation, respiratory stability, and feeding skills), although family support and ability to care for the baby, as well as a well-planned discharge are also cornerstones to ensure a successful discharge. In this article, the Committee of Standards of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviews the current hospital discharge criteria in order for it to be useful as a clinical guide in Spanish neonatal units.

  1. [Convent nursing in Polish hospitals from 1939].

    PubMed

    Halat, M

    2000-01-01

    The author, Sister of Charity and Mother Superior of the Children's Home in Tarnów, describes the attitude of the authorities of the Polish People's Republic towards convent nursing in hospitals. The problem is exemplified by the situation of the Cracow Province of the Order of the Sisters of Charity. Apart from this main theme, Sister Mirosława Hałat says a little about the establishment of the Order and the role it played in Polish hospital care. Before presenting the fundamental problems related to the topic of the article, the author presents numerical data showing the Sisters of Charity's involvement in hospital care between World War I and World War II. This facilitates a comparison of the possibilities of providing hospital care by the Sisters of Charity at a later time. The author also describes the persecutions of the Sister of Charity by the German occupiers. Her main reflections are divided into several parts. The period from 1945 to 1949 covers the time when the Sisters of Charity tried to engage actively in the reconstruction of the ruined Polish hospital system. This involved leaving the former Polish eastern borderland and taking up duties in the so-called Regained Territories. The period from 1950 to 1989 describes the conscious, planned and ideologically directed policies of the authorities of the Polish People's Republic to nullify or at least diminish the role of the Sisters of Charity in Polish hospitals. Quoting numerous accounts and documents, the author tries to recreate the atmosphere of those times. She also writes about the Sisters of Charity's preparation for work in hospitals as well as the possibilities of their education after the war. The article presents the Sisters of Charity's activity under very difficult political conditions and is complemented by a great number of figures, graphs and source documents.

  2. Hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Christine M; Cuker, Adam

    2014-10-01

    The development of thrombocytopenia is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with increased mortality. Frequent and important causes of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients include etiologies related to the underlying illness for which the patient is admitted, such as infection and disseminated intravascular coagulation, and iatrogenic etiologies such as drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia, heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, hemodilution, major surgery, and extracorporeal circuitry. This review presents a brief discussion of the pathophysiology, distinguishing clinical features, and management of these etiologies, and provides a diagnostic approach to hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia that considers the timing and severity of the platelet count fall, the presence of hemorrhage or thrombosis, the clinical context, and the peripheral blood smear. This approach may offer guidance to clinicians in distinguishing among the various causes of hospital-acquired thrombocytopenia and providing management appropriate to the etiology.

  3. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    ... products that are not commonly stocked in hospital pharmacies. Examples include: Salagen ® , Evoxac ® , and Restasis ® Eye drops, ... prescription and OTC medications/products in their labeled pharmacy container or packaging. This is important in case ...

  4. Home versus hospital confinement

    PubMed Central

    Barry, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    The case for hospital rather than home delivery has been powerfully argued, especially in and since the Report of the Peel Committee. Nevertheless, evidence of comparison with other countries, notably the Netherlands, suggests the choice is not necessarily simple. Some general practitioner units are now reporting perinatal mortality rates which are consistently lower than those of specialist units, and recent statistical analyses suggest that the presence of more high risk cases in consultant units does not explain this. The only big controlled home-versus-hospital trial did not lead to a significantly lower perinatal mortality rate in the hospital group. The onus of proof now seems to lie with those who advocate 100 per cent hospital confinement. PMID:7373581

  5. Objections to hospital philosophers.

    PubMed Central

    Ruddick, W; Finn, W

    1985-01-01

    Like morally sensitive hospital staff, philosophers resist routine simplification of morally complex cases. Like hospital clergy, they favour reflective and principled decision-making. Like hospital lawyers, they refine and extend the language we use to formulate and defend our complex decisions. But hospital philosophers are not redundant: they have a wider range of principles and categories and a sharper eye for self-serving presuppositions and implicit contradictions within our practices. As semi-outsiders, they are often best able to take an 'external point of view,' unburdened by routine, details, and departmental loyalties. Their clarifications can temporarily disrupt routine, but can eventually improve staff morale, hence team practice and patient welfare. PMID:3981573

  6. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms.

  7. American Hospital Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hospitals & Health Networks H & HN Daily Trustee Research & Trends AHA Policy Research Health Research & Educational Trust AHA ... Associations unless otherwise indicated. AHA does not claim ownership of any content, including content incorporated by permission ...

  8. Pediatric hospitals' and physician strategies for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Thompson, J W; Chesney, R W; Stocks, R M; Shmerling, J; Herron, P

    1999-05-01

    Changes in market-driven health care economics are rapid and of great magnitude. This report describes a study of some of these changes in regard to children's health issues. We used a survey tool to assess long-range plans (next 10 years) and marketing strategies for major free-standing children's hospitals in different regions of the United States. We then used these assessments to draw conclusions about the impact of the plans and strategies on the practice of pediatric physicians and their workforce requirements. This may allow pediatric specialists and their programs to develop strategic plans and to take actions to contend with these market-driven economic changes. The tool was a questionnaire mailed to chief executive officers of 30 randomly chosen but geographically well-distributed children's hospitals. Seventeen children's hospitals responded (57%), providing information concerning each hospital and its current medical economic environment. The data were analyzed and trends were then identified from their responses. All institutions in this study expected to have fewer physicians on staff in the future. These institutions plan: (1) to improve quality and (2) to reduce costs. Quality will be improved by utilizing Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) and/or Benchmarking to Best Practices, both of which encourage physicians to follow standardized treatment protocols. Costs will be reduced by decreasing hospital staff size. Some children's hospitals have merged or will merge with larger, full-service adult hospitals, but most plan to remain autonomous. Many expect a continued decrease in revenues, and almost all expect to downsize both bed number and staff. Restructuring will reduce the number of specialists, particularly in the fields of hematology-oncology, psychiatry, endocrinology, nephrology, and cardiology, and will also reduce the number of surgical specialists. The administrators predicted that more nurse practitioners will be employed at these

  9. Hospital Ship Replacement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    designed to operate primarily when anchored to reduce the effects of roll. Quantum markets two separate zero speed active roll fin models for small ...ships. Feasibility of scaling fins to the size of the hospital ship requires validation. 3.12 Lifeboats and Liferafts The safety appliances designated ...for Innovation in Ship Design Technical Report Hospital Ship Replacement By Hannah Allison, Christopher Mehrvarzi, Rebecca Piks, Beau Lovdahl

  10. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made.

  11. Designing Hospital for better Infection Control: an Experience.

    PubMed

    Rao, Skm

    2004-01-01

    The physical design of hospital is an essential component of a hospital's infection control strategy, incorporating infection control issues to minimise the risk of infection transmission. Hospital design therefore, needs to consider the separation of dirty and clean areas, adequate ventilation, lighting and storage facilities and design of patient accommodation areas, including adequate number of wash hand basins and single bed facilities. A 250 bed general hospital was planned keeping in view structural and design elements necessary for success of a good infection control programme. Various National and International Standards like BSI recommendations, JCAHO, IC Standards, DHSS, ASHRAE, AIA and OSHA were studied and compared with our planning parameters. Planning of ward unit, ICU, Operation theatre and Isolation wards were especially reviewed in the light of recent knowledge available in the field of hospital acquired infection and modifications were carried out. Need for effective identification of potential infections, risks in the design of a hospital were stressed. Engineering controls required to reduce the concentration of infectious droplet nuclei in the air and prevention of transmission of disease were highlighted.

  12. Mental Illness Drives Hospitalizations for Detained California Youth

    PubMed Central

    Anoshiravani, Arash; Saynina, Olga; Chamberlain, Lisa; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Huffman, Lynne C; Wang, N Ewen; Wise, Paul H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe inpatient hospitalization patterns among detained and non-detained youth in a large, total population of hospitalized adolescents in California. Methods We examined the unmasked California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Patient Discharge Dataset from 1997-2011. We considered hospitalized youth aged 11-18 years “detained” if admitted to California hospitals from detention, transferred from hospital to detention, or both. We compared discharge diagnoses and length of stay (LOS) between detained youth and their non-detained counterparts in the general population. Results There were 11,367 hospitalizations for detained youth. Hospitalizations differed for detained versus non-detained youth: 63% of all detained youth had a primary diagnosis of mental health disorder (compared to 19.8% of non-detained youth). Detained girls were disproportionately affected, with 74% hospitalized for a primary mental health diagnosis. Detained youth hospitalized for mental health disorder had an increased median LOS compared to non-detained inpatient youth with mental illness (≥6 days versus 5 days, respectively). This group difference was heightened in the presence of minority status, public insurance, and concurrent substance abuse. Hospitalized detained youth discharged to chemical dependency treatment facilities had the longest hospital stays (≥43 days). Conclusions Detained juvenile offenders are hospitalized for very different reasons than the general adolescent population. Mental illness, often with comorbid substance abuse, requiring long inpatient stays, represents the major cause for hospitalization. These findings underscore the urgent need for effective, well-coordinated mental health services for youth before, during, and after detention. PMID:26208862

  13. Succession Planning and Financial Performance: Does Competition Matter?

    PubMed

    Patidar, Nitish; Gupta, Shivani; Azbik, Ginger; Weech-Maldonado, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Succession planning has been defined as the process by which one or more successors are identified for key positions, development activities are planned for identified successors, or both. Limited research exists pertaining to the relationship between hospital succession planning and financial performance, particularly in the context of market competition. We used the resource-based view framework to analyze the differential effect of succession planning on hospitals' financial performance based on market competition. According to RBV, organizations can achieve higher performance by using their superior resources and capabilities. We used a panel design consisting of a national sample of hospitals in the United States for 2006-2010. We analyzed data using multivariate linear regression with facility random effects and year and state fixed effects. The sample included 22,717 hospital-year observations; more than one half of the hospitals (55.4%) had a succession planning program. The study found a positive relationship between the presence of succession planning and financial performance (β = 1.41, p < .01), which was stronger in competitive markets (β = 2.31, p = .03) than in monopolistic markets (β = 1.06, p = .01). Hospitals can use these results to make informed decisions about investing in succession planning programs on the basis of competition in their market.

  14. Financial reserve. Hospitals leery of credit lines, factoring receivables.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D E; Hamilton, W C; Hauser, R

    1991-10-01

    Opening lines of credit and factoring (selling) accounts receivable are two ways to generate operating cash that non-healthcare industries have long used successfully. A recent survey of hospital officials across the nation, however, showed these techniques are used infrequently in health care. Among the 281 hospitals responding: Only 45 percent use lines of credit; Less than 5 percent pursue accounts receivable factoring; and Only 12 percent plan to begin factoring receivables in the future. As hospitals look for ways to offset depleted cash reserves, these percentages may increase.

  15. Segmentation of hospital markets: where do HMO enrollees get care?

    PubMed

    Escarce, J J; Shea, J A; Chen, W

    1997-01-01

    Commercially insured and Medicare patients who are not in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) tend to use different hospitals than HMO patients use. This phenomenon, called market segmentation, raises important questions about how hospitals that treat many HMO patients differ from those that treat few HMO patients, especially with regard to quality of care. This study of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery found no evidence that HMOs in southeast Florida systematically channel their patients to high-volume or low-mortality hospitals. These findings are consistent with other evidence that in many areas of the country, incentives for managed care plans to reduce costs may outweigh incentives to improve quality.

  16. Modeling hospitals' adaptive capacity during a loss of infrastructure services.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Resilience in hospitals - their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover from disruptive events - is vital to their role as part of national critical infrastructure. This paper presents a model to provide planning guidance to decision makers about how to make hospitals more resilient against possible disruption scenarios. This model represents a hospital's adaptive capacities that are leveraged to care for patients during loss of infrastructure services (power, water, etc.). The model is an optimization that reallocates and substitutes resources to keep patients in a high care state or allocates resources to allow evacuation if necessary. An illustrative example demonstrates how the model might be used in practice.

  17. Medicare payment system for hospital inpatients: diagnosis-related groups.

    PubMed

    Baker, Judith J

    2002-01-01

    Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRGs) are categories of patient conditions that demonstrate similar levels of hospital resources required to treat the conditions. Each inpatient that is discharged from an acute care hospital can be classified into one of the 506 DRGs currently utilized by the Medicare program. The Medicare DRG prospective payment methodology has been in use for almost two decades and is used by hospital managers for planning and decisionmaking. The viability of DRGs for future prospective payment depends on the ability to keep up with the times through updates of the current methodology.

  18. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    PubMed

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  19. Planning Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ira, Vanessa B.

    2012-01-01

    The reality is sobering. According to a report published on the online site of Children's Hospital Boston, about 57,000 babies weighing less than 1,500 grams (3 pounds, 4 ounces) are born annually in the United States. With medical advances, as of 2005, survival of these frail infants has increased from about 20 percent 15 years ago to nearly 90…

  20. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    PubMed

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  1. 3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Hospital Point, general view toward Portsmouth Naval Hospital Building showing cannon (at left) and Saunders Monument (at right in distance), view to southwest - Portsmouth Naval Hospital, Bounded by Elizabeth River, Crawford Street, Portsmouth General Hospital, Parkview Avenue, & Scotts Creek, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, VA

  2. Direct hospital marketing: an idea whose time has come.

    PubMed

    Dodson, D C; Dotson, M J; Cussimanio, L

    1990-01-01

    Health care marketing has arrived swiftly and with significant impact upon the hospital scene. From the early days of rejection and suspicion of only a few years ago, it has now taken its place with other hospital management functions. Still, however, hospitals have not yet reached the degree of expertise that exists in other sectors. One of the reasons why hospitals have not fully emerged to the level of marketing expertise as many of their traditional business counterparts is that many of the areas of both the science and art of marketing have not been fully developed. One such area is direct mail marketing. Presented here is an overview of the advantages and functions of hospital direct mail marketing. A variety of examples are given with a more thorough case example being provided by Lee's Summit Community Hospital in Lee's Summit, Missouri. The successful direct mail marketing campaign there should be both an inspiration and a model for success for other hospitals. Space limitations prevent the authors from some of the more exacting details of mail marketing and, of course, successful campaigns do not happen by magic. They take careful planning, strategy, and execution. They also require a coordinated organizational and human effort to be successful. But direct mail marketing does offer a potentially new arena of marketing for most hospitals. The expertise, skill, knowledge, and technology are in place. All that is really needed is the commitment on the part of the hospital leadership.

  3. Measuring service line competitive position. A systematic methodology for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, J

    1991-01-01

    To mount a broad effort aimed at improving their competitive position for some service or group of services, hospitals have begun to pursue product line management techniques. A few hospitals have even reorganized completely under the product line framework. The benefits include focusing accountability for operations and results, facilitating coordination between departments and functions, stimulating market segmentation, and promoting rigorous examination of new and existing programs. As part of its strategic planning process, a suburban Baltimore hospital developed a product line management methodology with six basic steps: (1) define the service lines (which they did by grouping all existing diagnosis-related groups into 35 service lines), (2) determine the contribution of each service line to total inpatient volume, (3) determine trends in service line volumes (by comparing data over time), (4) derive a useful comparison group (competing hospitals or groups of hospitals with comparable size, scope of services, payer mix, and financial status), (5) review multiple time frames, and (6) summarize the long- and short-term performance of the hospital's service lines to focus further analysis. This type of systematic and disciplined analysis can become part of a permanent strategic intelligence program. When hospitals have such a program in place, their market research, planning, budgeting, and operations will be tied together in a true management decision support system.

  4. Benchmarking for hospital evacuation: a critical data collection tool.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Auf der Heide, Erik; Olson, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In events such as earthquakes or terrorist attacks, hospitals may be victims of disasters. They may need to transfer patients to outside facilities rather than continue to provide on-site care. Following the Northridge earthquake, eight hospitals in the damaged area were the foci of a United States National Science Foundation study that examined the status of the hospitals' pre-event planning, post-event evacuation decision-making, and internal and external evacuation processes. Building on this experience, this paper offers a standardized data collection tool, which will enable researchers to record hospital evacuation information in a systematic manner so that comparable data can be accumulated, evacuation research methods can be improved, and consensus on methods can be reached. The study's principal subjects include: (1) hospital demographics; (2) description of existing disaster response plans; (3) an event's impacts on hospital operations; (4) decision-making and incident command; (5) movement of patients within the facility; (6) movement of patients to off-site institutions; and (7) hospital recovery.

  5. The impact of hospital discharge on inappropriate hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Panis, Lambert J G G; Verheggen, Frank W S M; Pop, Peter; Prins, Martin H

    2004-01-01

    Appropriate hospital stay should be effective, efficient and tailored to patient needs. Previous studies have found that on average 20 per cent of hospital stay is inappropriate. Within obstetrics, inappropriate hospital stay consists mostly of delays in hospital discharge. The specific goals of this study were to reduce inappropriate hospital stay by fine-tuning patient logistics, increasing efficiency and providing more comfortable surroundings. New policies using strict discharge criteria were implemented. Total inappropriate hospital stay decreased from 13.3 to 7.2 per cent. The delay in discharge procedures halved. P-charts showed a decrease in inappropriate hospital stay, indicating the current process to be stable. Concludes that a significant reduction in inappropriate hospital stay was found following the implementation of innovative hospital discharge policies, indicating greater efficiency and accessibility of hospital services.

  6. 40 CFR 62.14432 - When must my waste management plan be completed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false When must my waste management plan be... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On Or Before December 1, 2008 Waste Management Plan § 62.14432 When must my waste management plan be...

  7. 40 CFR 62.14432 - When must my waste management plan be completed?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false When must my waste management plan be... POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators Constructed On Or Before December 1, 2008 Waste Management Plan § 62.14432 When must my waste management plan be...

  8. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide that... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care...

  9. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies. (a) The UR plan must describe the methods that the committee uses to select and...

  10. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care... medical care evaluation studies under paragraph (b)(1) of this section. (b) The UR plan must provide...

  11. Mistakes to avoid when planning managed care strategies.

    PubMed

    Scheur, B S

    1997-06-01

    Hospital executives, steeped in hospital business traditions, sometimes fall victim to those traditions when planning their managed care strategies. They may fail to sufficiently evaluate their hospitals' market position or set appropriate priorities for their various business strategies. They may not recruit individuals with managed care expertise, develop effective marketing plans, or construct realistic physician networks. Some hospital executives may be ill-equipped to deal with cultural clashes and reluctant to share control of their managed care organizations with physicians. Or, they may not always understand the true nature of the arrangement they have entered into, the information and technology needs of the arrangement, and their own strategic advantages. Today's hospital executives must plan their managed care strategies carefully and execute them intelligently to ensure success.

  12. Hospital diversification: how to involve the pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Smith, J E; Black, B L

    1987-05-01

    Participation by hospital pharmacy departments in planning and development of diversified services is described. Diversification requires market planning. Seven basic marketing steps are identification of mission, goals, and objectives; identification of growth strategies (market penetration, market development, product development, and diversification); market analysis of external factors (size, growth, and logistics; reimbursement and financial considerations; competition; regulatory issues; and legal issues); market analysis of internal factors (departmental organization and reporting lines, demographics of the institution, and costs and productivity associated with the new service); program development and design; implementation; and evaluation. Hospitals can diversify by expanding acute-care services through management contracts and mergers; developing new services to include long-term-care, ambulatory-care, occupational-health, and wellness programs; starting other health-care ventures, such as consulting, continuing medical education, and continuing education for nurses; and expanding into non-health-care businesses. Vertical diversification is finding new markets for existing services; horizontal diversification is development of new services for new markets. To diversify, an institution may need to change its corporate structure; it may form a family of corporations that includes a university, nonprofit hospitals, holding companies, for-profit corporations, joint ventures, and service organizations. Through diversification, institutions and pharmacy departments can create alternative sources of funding and offer more comprehensive services to patients.

  13. Function of nurses and other staff to minimize hospital waste in selected hospitals in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Maroufi, Maryam; Javadi, Marzieh; yaghoubi, Maryam; Karimi, Saied

    2012-01-01

    Context: Medical waste (MW) is all waste materials generated at health care facilities. MW naturally is hazardous for environment and subsequently for human. Waste minimization (WM) is the latest alternative for risk reduction. All hospital staff generally and nurses specially can play an active role through education and the implementation of measures to reduce medical wastage and their environmental effects. Aims: This study is aimed to compare nurses and other staff functions in selected hospitals in Isfahan about waste minimization strategies. Settings and Design: This is a descriptive analytical study. The study tool was a researcher -designed questionnaire in five area of waste minimization based on WHO recommendation. Materials and Methods: There were 90 nurses and other staff from randomized selected public and private hospitals of Isfahan as the sample of this research. This study was done in 2009. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed by t-test using SPSS16. Results: Nurses mean score of WM performance was 58.16 (12), and others was 58.56 (12.18) (of max 100). There was no significant difference between nurses and others mean score of WM performance according to t-test. There was not significant difference between WM performances of two studied groups in public and private hospitals based on t-test. Comparing between two studied groups mean scores by waste minimization areas indicated that nurses have done significantly better in source reduction area and other staffs have acted better in waste segregation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: All of hospital staff specially, nurses have an important role in qualified waste management practice of hospitals. Totally mean score of WM performance in hospitals (nurses and other) was average. With regard to other countries activities, this result is disappointing. So, it is necessary to plan educational programs for hospital staff, especially nurses. PMID:23922587

  14. How was your hospital stay? Patients' reports about their care in Canadian hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Charles, C; Gauld, M; Chambers, L; O'Brien, B; Haynes, R B; Labelle, R

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To survey adult medical and surgical patients about their concerns and satisfaction with their care in Canadian hospitals. DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey undertaken from June 1991 to May 1992 with a standardized questionnaire. SETTING: Stratified random sample of public acute care hospitals in six provinces; 57 (79%) of the 72 hospitals approached agreed to participate. PATIENTS: Each participating hospital provided the study team with the names of 150 adult medical and surgical patients discharged home in consecutive order. A total of 4599 patients agreed to be interviewed (69% of eligible patients and 89% of patients contacted). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Satisfaction with (a) provider-patient communication (including information given), (b) provider's respect for patient's preferences, (c) attentiveness to patient's physical care needs, (d) education of patient regarding medication and tests, (e) quality of relationship between patient and physician in charge, (f) education of and communication with patient's family regarding care, (g) pain management and (h) hospital discharge planning. RESULTS: Most (61%) of the patients surveyed reported problems with 5 or fewer of the 39 specific care processes asked about in the study. Forty-one percent of the patients reported that they had not been told about the daily hospital routines. About 20% of the patients receiving medications reported that they had not been told about important side effects in a way they could understand; 20% of the patients who underwent tests reported similar problems with communication of the test results. Thirty-six percent of those having tests had not been told how much pain to expect. In discharge planning, the patients complained that they had not been told what danger signals to watch for at home (reported by 39%), when they could resume normal activities (by 32%) and what activities they could or could not do at home (by 29%). Over 90% of the patients reported that they

  15. 40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., glass, batteries, food waste, and metals (e.g., aluminum cans, metals-containing devices); segregation...: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator of...

  16. 40 CFR 60.55c - Waste management plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., glass, batteries, food waste, and metals (e.g., aluminum cans, metals-containing devices); segregation...: Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators § 60.55c Waste management plan. The owner or operator of...

  17. 40 CFR 62.1975 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators (hmiwi) (section 111(d)/129 Plan) § 62.1975... Resources, Division of Air and Waste Management, Regulation No. 20, section 29, as submitted on September...

  18. Designing tomorrow: creative and effective succession planning.

    PubMed

    Beglinger, Joan Ellis

    2013-10-01

    This department column is devoted to posing thought-provoking insights about transitions through, to, and from administrative roles in nursing. In this article, I explore an effective approach to succession planning for the role of director of surgical services, implemented in my role as chief nursing officer for a tertiary, acute care hospital. The plan provided a creative solution to the succession challenge and important lessons learned.

  19. Marketing the hospital library.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Many librarians do not see themselves as marketers, but marketing is an essential role for hospital librarians. Library work involves education, and there are parallels between marketing and education as described in this article. It is incumbent upon hospital librarians actively to pursue ways of reminding their customers about library services. This article reinforces the idea that marketing is an element in many of the things that librarians already do, and includes a list of suggested marketing strategies intended to remind administrators, physicians, and other customers that they have libraries in their organizations.

  20. Radiation decontamination unit for the community hospital.

    PubMed

    Waldron, R L; Danielson, R A; Shultz, H E; Eckert, D E; Hendricks, K O

    1981-05-01

    "Freestanding" radiation decontamination units including surgical capability can be developed and made operational in small/medium sized community hospitals at relatively small cost and with minimal plant reconstruction. Because of the development of nuclear power plants in relatively remote areas and widespread transportation of radioactive materials it is important for hospitals and physicians to be prepared to handle radiation accident victims. The Radiological Assistance Program of the United States Department of Energy and the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center Training Site of Oak Ridge Associated Universities are ready to support individual hospitals and physicians in this endeavor. Adequate planning rather than luck, should be used in dealing with potential radiation accident victims. The radiation emergency team is headed by a physician on duty in the hospital. It is important that the team leader be knowledgeable in radiation accident management and have personnel trained in radiation accident management as members of this team. The senior administrative person on duty is responsible for intramural and extramural communications. Rapid mobilization of the radiation decontamination unit is important. Periodic drills are necessary for this mobilization and the smooth operation of the unit.

  1. Radioactive waste management in a hospital.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shoukat; Syed, At; Ahmad, Reyaz; Rather, Tanveer A; Ajaz, M; Jan, Fa

    2010-01-01

    Most of the tertiary care hospitals use radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Safe disposal of the radioactive waste is a vital component of the overall management of the hospital waste. An important objective in radioactive waste management is to ensure that the radiation exposure to an individual (Public, Radiation worker, Patient) and the environment does not exceed the prescribed safe limits. Disposal of Radioactive waste in public domain is undertaken in accordance with the Atomic Energy (Safe disposal of radioactive waste) rules of 1987 promulgated by the Indian Central Government Atomic Energy Act 1962. Any prospective plan of a hospital that intends using radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures needs to have sufficient infrastructural and manpower resources to keep its ambient radiation levels within specified safe limits. Regular monitoring of hospital area and radiation workers is mandatory to assess the quality of radiation safety. Records should be maintained to identify the quality and quantity of radioactive waste generated and the mode of its disposal. Radiation Safety officer plays a key role in the waste disposal operations.

  2. Poverty, race, and hospitalization for childhood asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Wissow, L S; Gittelsohn, A M; Szklo, M; Starfield, B; Mussman, M

    1988-01-01

    This study uses Maryland hospital discharge data for the period 1979-82 to determine whether Black children are more likely to be hospitalized for asthma and whether this difference persists after adjustment for poverty. The average annual asthma discharge rate was 1.95/1000 children aged 1-19; 3.75/1000 for Black children, and 1.25/1000 for White. Medicaid-enrolled children of both races had increased discharge rates for asthma compared to those whose care was paid for by other sources: 5.68/1000 vs 2.99/1000 for Blacks, and 3.10/1000 vs 1.11/1000 for Whites. When ecologic analyses were performed, populations of Black and White children had nearly equal asthma discharge rates after adjustment for poverty. The statewide adjusted rate was 2.70/1000 (95% CL = 1.93, 3.78) for Black children and 2.10/1000 (1.66, 2.66) for White children. Among Maryland counties and health planning districts, variation in asthma discharge rates was not associated with the supply of hospital beds or the population to primary-care physician ratio. We conclude that Black children are at increased risk of hospitalization for asthma, but that some or all of this increase is related to poverty rather than to race. PMID:3381951

  3. The 1966 enactment of Medicare: its effect on discharges from Los Angeles County-operated hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Glassman, P A; Bell, R M; Tranquada, R E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Medicare on two public hospitals in Los Angeles County was analyzed by examining the percentage of patients 65 years of age and older among all discharges from 1958 through 1971. At Harbor General Hospital, discharges of elderly patients had dropped from 21.7% to 7.9% by late 1966; at Los Angeles County General Hospital, discharges decreased from 15.3% to 10.7% between 1966 and 1967. Monitoring public hospitals' demographic changes after enacting a national health plan may provide information on patients' and providers' acceptance of insurance and on resources needed by public hospitals to care for those left without coverage. PMID:8059897

  4. The 1966 enactment of Medicare: its effect on discharges from Los Angeles County-operated hospitals.

    PubMed

    Glassman, P A; Bell, R M; Tranquada, R E

    1994-08-01

    The effect of Medicare on two public hospitals in Los Angeles County was analyzed by examining the percentage of patients 65 years of age and older among all discharges from 1958 through 1971. At Harbor General Hospital, discharges of elderly patients had dropped from 21.7% to 7.9% by late 1966; at Los Angeles County General Hospital, discharges decreased from 15.3% to 10.7% between 1966 and 1967. Monitoring public hospitals' demographic changes after enacting a national health plan may provide information on patients' and providers' acceptance of insurance and on resources needed by public hospitals to care for those left without coverage.

  5. Planning and coordinating pharmaceutical purchasing.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, E C

    1984-09-01

    The planning and coordination of the pharmaceutical purchasing process are discussed. Planning for pharmaceutical purchasing should begin with decisions regarding why a purchasing policy is needed, what the institution's purchasing policy will be, and what departments will be involved in purchasing. General goals of purchasing and procedures for revising purchasing functions are presented, and the role of the pharmacy department, materials management, and other hospital departments in purchasing is discussed. Coordinating input on purchasing decisions from medical staff, administration, and clinical and technical pharmacy personnel to achieve purchasing goals and objectives is discussed. A well-designed pharmaceutical purchasing system provides for planned and scheduled purchases, competitive bidding, product standardization, group purchasing, information sharing, internal accountability, and quality assurance.

  6. 40 CFR 62.3340 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Gases, Organic Compounds and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Existing Hospital / Medical Infectious Waste... December 28, 2011, a revised State Plan for implementing the Emission Guidelines affecting Hospital/Medical.... Code Part 229. This rule was adopted by the Illinois Pollution Control Board on September 22, 2011...

  7. 40 CFR 62.3640 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gases, Organic Compounds and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical Infectious Waste... implementing the revised emission guidelines for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The enforceable mechanism for this revised State Plan is a State rule codified in 326 Indiana Administrative...

  8. 40 CFR 62.3640 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Gases, Organic Compounds and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Existing Hospital/medical Infectious Waste... implementing the revised emission guidelines for Hospital/Medical/Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI). The enforceable mechanism for this revised State Plan is a State rule codified in 326 Indiana Administrative...

  9. 40 CFR 62.3340 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gases, Organic Compounds and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Existing Hospital / Medical Infectious Waste... December 28, 2011, a revised State Plan for implementing the Emission Guidelines affecting Hospital/Medical.... Code Part 229. This rule was adopted by the Illinois Pollution Control Board on September 22, 2011...

  10. Hospital marketing: now more than ever.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A N

    1984-01-01

    To achieve success in any significant marketing endeavor, four basic ingredients are needed. 1. A product or service that the customer needs and wants. 2. A marketing organization capable of bringing the product or service in contact with the customer. 3. A marketing plan, endorsed by top management, which identifies ways to achieve desired goals. 4. Constant vigilance in the marketplace to determine the effectiveness of the marketing effort and course corrections needed in the future. The health care industry is overcoming many of its misconceptions about marketing, but there is a long way to go. In the end, the hospitals that provide good quality care, based on the needs of the patients, and that build relationships before the need arises, will be successful. These will be the hospitals that do real marketing.

  11. Crisis management and disaster planning: some recent lessons.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    Two recent disasters--Hurricane Hugo and the San Francisco-Oakland area earthquake--put a number of hospitals (and their disaster plans) to the text this fall. In future issues, we will present details on how hospitals faced those emergencies. The need for crisis management and disaster planning, however, is not limited to natural disasters like hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, or floods. Man-made disasters, both internal and external, can occur virtually at any time. These include accidents, terrorists bombs, fires, explosions, and toxic chemical spills. In this report, we will present the key elements of a crisis management plan, as well as some expert pointers on what to include in a disaster plan. We will give you details on how two hospitals fared when a major air crash occurred in their community. We will tell you some of the things they would do differently, and we will also describe how an interagency disaster planning committee responded.

  12. Schoolhouse Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials, Chicago, IL.

    This publication was developed to suggest approaches to solving some of the basic problems faced by those planning new facilities and renovations or alterations of existing buildings. It is not intended as a total resource reference for school construction. The chapters in the book are presented in the same sequence as their subjects would…

  13. Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan Bridgeport ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Reflected Deck Plan, Reflected Roof Plan, Deck Plan - Bridgeport Covered Bridge, Spanning South Fork of Yuba River at bypassed section of Pleasant Valley Road (originally Virginia Turnpike) in South Yuba River State Park , Bridgeport, Nevada County, CA

  14. Seamless Care: Safe Patient Transitions From Hospital to Home

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    contributed to unscheduled readmissions. High-risk patient targeting, improved communications (including a greater emphasis on language barriers and...following treatment plans, inability to be present or retain information at discharge, language barriers ) Safe Transitions from Hospital to Home...management, and cultural and language barriers . A summary of patient comments regarding these themes can be found at http://www.patientsafetycenter.com

  15. A Post-Hospital Nursing Home Rehabilitation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petchers, Marcia K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes program of short-term rehabilitation care provided to elderly patients through collaboration between hospital and nursing home. Discusses program planning and implementation experiences, patient satisfaction, and rehabilitation outcomes. Notes that program, although successful, was discontinued due to financial and interorganizational…

  16. ESL for Hotel/Hospitality Industry. Level: Beginner.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Northport, NY.

    This document contains eight lesson plans for a beginning course in work-related English for non-English or limited-English speaking entry-level employees in the hotel and hospitality industry. Course objectives include the following: helping participants understand and use job-specific vocabulary; receive and understand job-related instructions;…

  17. University Center and Community Hospital: Problems in Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarlov, Alvin R.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    A case study of the University of Chicago Medical Center highlights the tensions, strains, and resistances that inhibit the development of an urban health care system. It raises questions about the role of the research and teaching hospital in regional health care planning, especially as suburban facilities are drawing away patients. (Author/LBH)

  18. Predictors of Emotional Well-Being in Elderly after Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Elinore; And Others

    In previous research, two major sets of variables have been identified as correlates of emotional well-being among the elderly: measures of physical health and of social support. To suggest variables predictive of in-hospital discharge planning, and of emotional well-being after a severe incident of ill health, the Posthospital Support Study…

  19. Toilet privacy in hospital.

    PubMed

    Logan, Karen

    Good practice in toilet management and continence promotion can help hospital patients to maintain their dignity. This article reports on an audit that highlighted the issues important to patients and nurses in terms of improving privacy and dignity for inpatients using the toilet.

  20. Drama Therapies in Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Judith; Prosperi, Mario

    1976-01-01

    Explores the use of drama as a therapeutic tool at various hospitals and records specific therapy groups dialogues. Available from: The Drama Review, 51 West 4th Street, Room 300, New York, N.Y. 10012. Subscription Rates: $12.50 per year. (MH)

  1. Mechanical engineering in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wallington, J W

    1980-10-01

    The design of a modern hospital owes more to engineering than the layman may realize. In this context, many engineers are in the position of laymen, being unfamiliar with the multitude of services that lies behind the impressive facade of a modern hospital. In recent years medicine and surgery themselves have taken on many of the characteristics of a technology. This has required a matching development of the services both mechanical and electrical that are required in modern health care buildings. In medical terms, if the architectural features provide the 'skin' of the hospital, the mechanical and electrical engineering services provide the nerves and sinews. If we take as an example the recently completed Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, (Fig. 1), which cost 10 million pounds at current cost, the service network was responsible for about half the total cost. About 400 miles (643 km) of electrical wiring and more than 40 mile (64.5 km) of copper and steel piping were used to service 3000 separate rooms. This compares with percentages of between 18 and 25 per cent for other large buildings such as office blocks, hotels and sports complexes.

  2. Speech intelligibility in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ryherd, Erica E; Moeller, Michael; Hsu, Timothy

    2013-07-01

    Effective communication between staff members is key to patient safety in hospitals. A variety of patient care activities including admittance, evaluation, and treatment rely on oral communication. Surprisingly, published information on speech intelligibility in hospitals is extremely limited. In this study, speech intelligibility measurements and occupant evaluations were conducted in 20 units of five different U.S. hospitals. A variety of unit types and locations were studied. Results show that overall, no unit had "good" intelligibility based on the speech intelligibility index (SII > 0.75) and several locations found to have "poor" intelligibility (SII < 0.45). Further, occupied spaces were found to have 10%-15% lower SII than unoccupied spaces on average. Additionally, staff perception of communication problems at nurse stations was significantly correlated with SII ratings. In a targeted second phase, a unit treated with sound absorption had higher SII ratings for a larger percentage of time as compared to an identical untreated unit. Taken as a whole, the study provides an extensive baseline evaluation of speech intelligibility across a variety of hospitals and unit types, offers some evidence of the positive impact of absorption on intelligibility, and identifies areas for future research.

  3. Innovations in Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dzhandzhugazova, Elena A.; Blinova, Ekaterina A.; Orlova, Liubov N.; Romanova, Marianna M.

    2016-01-01

    The article focuses on the study of the role and importance of innovation, its classification, the problems of its application in the hotel industry with emphasis on the application of sensory marketing tools in the development of the innovative marketing mix within the hospitality industry. The article provides an analysis of the "seven…

  4. Going to the Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking care of you — to explain. continue Your Room Once you're in the hospital, you may have a room all to yourself or you might share one with another kid. Your room will have a bed, usually with buttons to ...

  5. Responsible Hospitality. Prevention Updates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colthurst, Tom

    2004-01-01

    Responsible Hospitality (RH)--also called Responsible Beverage Service (RBS)--encompasses a variety of strategies for reducing risks associated with the sale and service of alcoholic beverages. RH programs have three goals: (1) to prevent illegal alcohol service to minors; (2) to reduce the likelihood of drinkers becoming intoxicated; and (3) to…

  6. Hospital perceived value.

    PubMed

    Moliner, Miguel A

    2006-01-01

    The creation, distribution and communication of value have been considered to be the key element of marketing (American Marketing Association, 2004, www.marketingpower.com). The aim of this article is to identify the indicators of perceived value in a hospital context. The results show that perceived quality and emotions are key dimensions of perceived value.

  7. Cost characteristics of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smet, Mike

    2002-09-01

    Modern hospitals are complex multi-product organisations. The analysis of a hospital's production and/or cost structure should therefore use the appropriate techniques. Flexible functional forms based on the neo-classical theory of the firm seem to be most suitable. Using neo-classical cost functions implicitly assumes minimisation of (variable) costs given that input prices and outputs are exogenous. Local and global properties of flexible functional forms and short-run versus long-run equilibrium are further issues that require thorough investigation. In order to put the results based on econometric estimations of cost functions in the right perspective, it is important to keep these considerations in mind when using flexible functional forms. The more recent studies seem to agree that hospitals generally do not operate in their long-run equilibrium (they tend to over-invest in capital (capacity and equipment)) and that it is therefore appropriate to estimate a short-run variable cost function. However, few studies explicitly take into account the implicit assumptions and restrictions embedded in the models they use. An alternative method to explain differences in costs uses management accounting techniques to identify the cost drivers of overhead costs. Related issues such as cost-shifting and cost-adjusting behaviour of hospitals and the influence of market structure on competition, prices and costs are also discussed shortly.

  8. Reengineering hospital materiel management.

    PubMed

    Giunipero, L C

    1995-08-01

    Reengineering involves significant change and dramatic rethinking of the business process. The expected result of these changed processes is dramatic improvement. Hospital cost pressures and technological change necessitate review or reengineering the process to enhance customer service at a lower cost. Three areas that yield significant results include reducing the cost of purchasing, implementing new technologies, and empowering teams to accomplish customer driven goals.

  9. Smart Information System for Gachon University Gil Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Young; Jeong, Byung Hui; Moon, Byung Chan; Kang, Hyung Wook; Tchah, Hann; Han, Gi Seong; Cheng, Woo Sung; Lee, Young Ho

    2012-01-01

    Objectives In this research, the hospital information system of Gachon University Gil hospital is introduced and a future strategy for hospital information systems is proposed. Methods This research introduces the development conditions of hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital, information about the development of the enterprise resource planning (ERP), a medical service process improvement system, and the personal health record (PHR) system. Results The medical service process and work efficiency were improved through the medical service process improvement system, which is the most common hospital information system at Gachon University Gil hospital and which includes an emergency medical service system, an online evaluation system and a round support system. Conclusions Gachon University Gil hospital developed medical service improvement systems to increase work efficiency of medical team and optimized the systems to prove the availability of high-quality medical services for patients and their families. The PHR-based personalized health care solution is under development and will provide higher quality medical service for more patients in the future. PMID:22509476

  10. Hospital marketing orientation and managed care processes: are they coordinated?

    PubMed

    White, K R; Thompson, J M; Patel, U B

    2001-01-01

    The hospital marketing function has been widely adopted as a way to learn about markets, attract sufficient resources, develop appropriate services, and communicate the availability of such goods to those who may be able to purchase such services. The structure, tasks, and effectiveness of the marketing function have been the subject of increased inquiry by researchers and practitioners alike. A specific understanding of hospital marketing in a growing managed care environment and the relationship between marketing and managed care processes in hospitals is a growing concern. Using Kotler and Clarke's framework for assessing marketing orientation, we examined the marketing orientation of hospitals in a single state at two points in time--1993 and 1999. Study findings show that the overall marketing orientation score decreased from 1993 to 1999 for the respondent hospitals. The five elements of the Kotler and Clarke definition of marketing orientation remained relatively stable, with slightly lower scores related to customer philosophy. In addition, we evaluated the degree to which selected managed care activities are carried out as part of its marketing function. A significant (p < .05) decrease in managed care processes coordinated with the formal marketing function was evident from 1993 to 1999. With increasing numbers of managed care plan enrollees, hospitals are likely focusing on organizational buyers as important customers. In order to appeal to organizational buyers, hospital executives may be focusing more on clinical quality and cost efficiency in the production of services, which will improve a hospital's position with organizational buyers.

  11. Validity of repeating patient origin studies for rural hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Meade, J M

    1976-01-01

    Recent research in southwest Idaho and southeast Oregon indicates that hospital service areas in this rural locality have not changed over time. The 12-county study area includes approximately 42,000 square miles inhabited by only 265,491 people. The focal point of hospital care in this region is Boise, Idaho, with adjacent smaller centers. Data used in the paper came from two sources-a patient-origin study completed in 1968 and a health interview survey completed in 1973. In both studies information was collected on patients' places of residence and where they went to receive hospital care. Because of the 6-year timespan between the studies, it was suspected that there may have been changes in the hospitals' service areas. An examination of some variables that customarily influence hospital service areas, such as number of physicians, number of hospital beds, and size of population, revealed that, despite sizable changes in all these variables, no appreciable changes were noted in the spatial patterns of the hospitals' service areas. This result was unexpected, but it may indicate to others engaged in planning for rural hospitals that updating patient origin studies in their areas may produce only marginal benefits. PMID:815936

  12. 42 CFR 456.242 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS UTILIZATION CONTROL Utilization Control: Mental Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.242 UR plan requirements for medical care... evaluation studies in the mental hospital; (2) Documents for each study— (i) Its results; and (ii) How...

  13. Challenges for rear hospital care of Wenchuan earthquake casualties: experience from West China Hospital.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying-kang; Wang, Lan-lan; Lin, Yi-dan; Pei, Fu-xing; Kang, Yan Me

    2010-06-01

    To review the challenges and countermeasures in the hospital care for Wenchuan earthquake casualties and draw lessons for the protective response in the future. Medical records and laboratory findings of the victims admitted in West China Hospital (WCH) were retrospectively analyzed. Related data were compared between beforemath and aftermath of the earthquake and between WCH and frontier county hospitals. One thousand and thirty-one earthquake survivors were hospitalized, 1 358 victims underwent surgery and 142 victims were transferred to intensive care unit. The incidence of infection, crush syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was 39.6%, 20.7% and 2.3% respectively. Wound classification showed that the incidence of extremity damage was 72%, while the incidence of chest trauma, abdominal trauma and brain trauma was less than 10% respectively. Isolating rates of environmental pathogens were increased in the aftermath of earthquake, and the spectrum of the pathogens and related antibiotic sensitivities were quite different from those in the beforemath of earthquake. The social economic and population conditions in the earthquake-stricken areas affected the composition of the victims and the geographic features restricted the efficiency of rescue. Trauma-induced MODS, crush syndrome and severe infections all constituted the dilemma for the hospital care, to resolve whether the multidiscipline team work was proved to be an optimizing choice. For a more effective disaster protective response in the future, the study on rescue plan and the ladder therapies for massive casualties should be potentiated.

  14. [Hospital organizational analysis based on the Mintzberg model: the case of Sheikh Zayed Hospital, Rabat].

    PubMed

    Makhloufi, Imane; Saadi, Janad; El Hiki, Lahcen; El Hassani, Amine

    2012-01-01

    The new system of hospital governance requires health institutions to develop new managerial, financial and social skills beyond their public service duties. As part of this new approach, the organizational modernization of hospitals involves introducing good management practices. However, managing the transition requires taking into account the specificities of existing organizational systems. Organizational systems are generally difficult to model and involve diverse and sometimes competing interests, concerns, habits, languages, cultures, tools and representations. This explains the high failure rate observed in hospital development projects at an organizational level. A number of organizational theories from a range of disciplines (sociology, biology, history, etc.) have examined the question of organization in hospitals. The many theories developed in this area are not incompatible. Rather, they form a set of useful tools for the analysis of organizational management. The purpose of this study was to conduct an organizational analysis of Sheikh Zayed Hospital (Rabat) based on the Mintzberg model as a prerequisite for the development and implementation of a restructuring plan.

  15. Public-private settlement and hospital mortality per sources of payment

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Juliana Pires; Martins, Mônica; Leite, Iuri da Costa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze if the adjusted hospital mortality varies according to source of payment of hospital admissions, legal nature, and financing settlement of hospitals. METHODS Cros-ssectional study with information source in administrative databases. Specific hospital admission reasons were selected considering the volume of hospital admissions and the list of quality indicators proposed by the North-American Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Were analyzed 852,864 hospital admissions of adults, occurred in 789 hospitals between 2008 and 2010, in Sao Paulo and Rio Grande do Sul, applying multilevel logistic regression. RESULTS At hospital admission level, showed higher chances of death male patients in more advanced age groups, with comorbidity, who used intensive care unit, and had the Brazilian Unified Health System as source of payment. At the level of hospitals, in those located in the mean of the distribution, the adjusted probability of death in hospital admissions financed by plan or private was 5.0%, against 9.0% when reimbursed by the Brazilian Unified Health System. This probability increased in hospital admissions financed by the Brazilian Unified Health System in hospitals to two standard deviations above the mean, reaching 29.0%. CONCLUSIONS In addition to structural characteristics of the hospitals and the profile of the patients, interventions aimed at improving care should also consider the coverage of the population by health plans, the network shared between beneficiaries of plans and users of the Brazilian Unified Health System, the standard of care to the various sources of payment by hospitals and, most importantly, how these factors influence the clinical performance. PMID:27463256

  16. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Establishing a Wellness Center at Martin Army Community Hospital

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-06

    MTF) establish a Wellness/Health Promotion Center to provide the services needed to support the wellness concepto (Department of the Army, 1984). 2...Directive 1010.10 (Health Promotion). 6. It is recommended that a marketing plan be developed for the wellness center. The plan should include articles for...1981). Wellness programs attract new markets for hospitals. Hospitals, 55(22), 115-116, 119. Manring, S.L. (1985). Evaluating corporate wellness and

  17. Planning a Tech Prep Program in Hospitality. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago City Colleges, IL. Chicago City-Wide Coll.

    A project conducted to establish tech prep articulation training agreements between City Colleges of Chicago and several public secondary schools is described in this report. Project activities were as follows: (1) developed a handbook to define the tech prep experience and guide committee members on how tech prep can be a valuable asset to…

  18. Hospital-Based First Responder Mass Prophylaxis Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    Have you ever had any of the following medical conditions? Asthma/Emphysema/ COPD Yes No Diabetes...prophylaxis is a costly venture that includes regulatory, personal privacy considerations, and a strict adherence to medical guidelines, but the result of not

  19. Suspect SARS patient puts hospital's plan on defense.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas J

    2005-01-01

    A patient possibly infected with SARS posed issues for protecting healthcare workers and others that had not been faced before. The article gives the results of an internal critique of problems that arose and their solution.

  20. A Menu Planning Guide for Large Army Hospitals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1970-01-01

    enced by "the physiologic, psychologic , biochemical, social, educational, and sensory reactions of individuals who move in a framework of race, religion...liked the idea. In general the five-meal plai, consists of a continental breakfast, brunch , dinner, and an afternoon and bedtime snack. Advantages...food because of additional preparation time available between the two main meals ( brunch and dinner), and more than 20 per cent reduction in

  1. Hospital Discharge Planning: A Guide for Families and Caregivers

    MedlinePlus

    ... family member after he or she returns home: Personal care: bathing, eating, dressing, toileting Household care: cooking, ... the other hand, there may be a more personal relationship if you hire an individual directly, and ...

  2. Improving Hospital Discharge Time

    PubMed Central

    El-Eid, Ghada R.; Kaddoum, Roland; Tamim, Hani; Hitti, Eveline A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Delays in discharging patients can impact hospital and emergency department (ED) throughput. The discharge process is complex and involves setting specific challenges that limit generalizability of solutions. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of using Six Sigma methods to improve the patient discharge process. This is a quantitative pre and post-intervention study. Three hundred and eighty-six bed tertiary care hospital. A series of Six Sigma driven interventions over a 10-month period. The primary outcome was discharge time (time from discharge order to patient leaving the room). Secondary outcome measures included percent of patients whose discharge order was written before noon, percent of patients leaving the room by noon, hospital length of stay (LOS), and LOS of admitted ED patients. Discharge time decreased by 22.7% from 2.2 hours during the preintervention period to 1.7 hours post-intervention (P < 0.001). A greater proportion of patients left their room before noon in the postintervention period (P < 0.001), though there was no statistical difference in before noon discharge. Hospital LOS dropped from 3.4 to 3.1 days postintervention (P < 0.001). ED mean LOS of patients admitted to the hospital was significantly lower in the postintervention period (6.9 ± 7.8 vs 5.9 ± 7.7 hours; P < 0.001). Six Sigma methodology can be an effective change management tool to improve discharge time. The focus of institutions aspiring to tackle delays in the discharge process should be on adopting the core principles of Six Sigma rather than specific interventions that may be institution-specific. PMID:25816029

  3. [Leadership in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Schrappe, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Current concepts in leadership and governance on the level of supervisory board, management and departments are often considered as insufficient to cope with the profound structural change which actually takes place in the German health care system. While vertical and horizontal disconnecting is typical of the professional bureaucracy of hospitals, transition from functional to divisional structure further increases this risk. Accordingly, medical experts are oriented towards their professional peers and patient care on the one side; on the other side the management gets isolated and looses operative and strategic control. Several studies provide evidence for the relevance of role models to serve as agents of change, which are now developed into the concept of "Clinical Governance": evidence-based medicine, guidelines, continuous quality improvement, safety culture, resource accountability and organisational learning. The present situation makes it necessary to extend this conception, which focuses on the departmental level in an organisation with divisional features, to one of "Clinical Corporate Governance". This term, which also includes supervisory structures and the management board and is relevant for the total hospital and company, respectively, is based on the corporate governance concept. Inside the hospital, the management and the heads of the departments have to agree that (1) experts really need to be integrated into the decision process, and that (2) the outcomes of the entire hospital have to be regarded as equal or superior to the aims of a single department. The public image of the hospital should be one of a strong and reliable partner in health care and health care business on a local, regional and national level. Members of the supervisory board should clearly put corporate aspects above political and other implications and pay attention to personal independence from the leaders of the medical departments.

  4. Planned Parenthood v. Sunquist.

    PubMed

    2000-01-01

    Court Decision: 38 South Western Reporter, 3d Series 1; 2000 Sep 15 (date of decision). The Supreme Court of Tennessee held that Tennessee abortion laws that regulate the circumstances under which a woman may have an abortion and that impose criminal liability on physicians for failing to adhere to other abortion statutes are unconstitutional. Planned Parenthood of Middle Tennessee filed a suit challenging the constitutionality of Tennessee abortion laws. The laws required that second-trimester abortions be performed in a hospital, that physicians alone counsel patients about aspects of the procedure, a two-day mandatory waiting period, and certain medical emergency exceptions. The Supreme Court of Tennessee first held that a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy is protected under the right of privacy and is a fundamental right. The court then held that the Tennessee laws were unconstitutional because they were not narrowly tailored to further a compelling state interest. Specifically, the second-trimester hospital requirement was not narrowly tailored to promote maternal health because there is substantial evidence that abortions can be performed safely outside a hospital through the first 18 weeks. The physician-only counseling requirement was rejected because it is not necessary for a physician to personally impart the required information. The two-day waiting period was not narrowly tailored to further the state's interest in maternal health, and the medical emergency exceptions were not tailored to protect maternal health, but merely to protect the woman's life. Because none of the abortion laws furthered a compelling state interest, they did not pass a strict scrutiny standard of review and were therefore unconstitutional. The court permanently enjoined enforcement of the laws.

  5. Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002 with 2004 revisions.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The Medical Library Association's Standards for Hospital Libraries 2002 has been developed as a guide for hospital administrators, librarians, and accrediting bodies to ensure that hospitals have the resources and services to effectively meet their needs for knowledge-based information. Specific requirements for knowledge-based information include that the library be a separate department with its own budget. Knowledge-based information in the library should be directed by a qualified librarian who functions as a department head and is a member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. The standards define the role of the medical librarian and the links between knowledge-based information and other functions such as patient care, patient education, performance improvement, and education. In addition, the standards address the development and implementation of the knowledge-based information needs assessment and plan, the promotion and publicity of the KBI services, and the physical space and staffing requirements. The role, qualifications, and functions of a hospital library consultant are outlined. The health sciences library is positioned to play a key role in the hospital. The increasing use of the Internet and new information technologies by medical, nursing, and allied health staffs, patients and the community require new strategies, strategic planning, allocation of adequate resources, and selection and evaluation of appropriate information resources and technologies. The Hospital Library Standards Committee has developed this document as a guideline to be used in facing these challenges together.

  6. How consumers view hospital advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1988-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine: (a) consumers' attitudes toward advertising by hospitals; (b) which media consumers feel are appropriate for hospital advertising; and (c) whether consumers are seeing hospital advertisements, and if so, through which media. It was found that consumers indeed have a favorable attitude toward hospitals that advertise. It was also found that consumers feel that most media are appropriate for hospital advertising. Finally, it was found that most consumers have seen hospitals advertise their services, especially on television and radio and in the newspaper.

  7. The politics of hospital payment.

    PubMed

    Feder, J; Spitz, B

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes the politics of hospital payment over the last decade. The authors explain how provider interests and judgments became a standard for appropriate hospital payment: the impact of that standard on hospital costs; and the political obstacles to imposing an alternative standard and controlling hospital costs. The authors draw lessons from this experience, here and in other countries, to propose an alternative approach to hospital payment that would allow policymakers, accountable to the public, to make explicit choices about the level and nature of hospital expenditures.

  8. Organizational decisions for food procurement in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Unklesbay, N F; David, B D

    1977-08-01

    Effective food procurement is an important foodservice management function and has been established as a complex managerial process facilitated through organizational decision-making. Although the importance of decisions made by dietetic professionals responsible for food purchasing is currently increasing because of world and national concerns, the findings of this survey revealed a gap between theory and practice of food procurement. Some trends were revealed concerning the academic preparation for food procurement in the curricula of various educational programs. Entry-level competencies in buying food need to be defined. To educate students to be competent in food procurement decisions, effective planning and working relationships among administrative personnel in hospital foodservice operations and college and university educators are necessary. The twenty criteria for effective food purchasing and the associated specific practices provide a basic approach for such effective planning and working relationships.

  9. Tools and Checklists Used for the Evaluation of Hospital Disaster Preparedness: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Nekoie-Moghadam, Mahmood; Kurland, Lisa; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi; Della Corte, Francesco; Djalali, Ahmadreza

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals need to be fully operative during disasters. It is therefore essential to be able to evaluate hospital preparedness. However, there is no consensus of a standardized, comprehensive and reliable tool with which to measure hospital preparedness. The aim of the current study was to perform a systematic review of evaluation tools for hospital disaster preparedness. A systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. The key words "crisis," "disaster," "disaster medicine," "emergency," "mass casualty," "hospital preparedness," "hospital readiness," "hospital assessment," "hospital evaluation," "hospital appraisal," "planning," "checklist," and "medical facility" were used in combination with the Boolean operators "OR" and "AND." PubMed (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD), ISI Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, New York, NY), and Scopus (Elsevier, New York, NY) were searched. A total of 51,809 publications were screened. The following themes were required for relevance: logistics, planning, human resources, triage, communication, command and control, structural and nonstructural preparedness, training, evacuation, recovery after disaster, coordination, transportation, surge capacity, and safety. The results from 15 publications are presented. Fifteen articles fulfilled the criteria of relevance and considered at least 1 of the 14 predetermined themes. None of the evaluated checklists and tools included all dimensions required for an appropriate hospital preparedness evaluation. The results of the current systematic review could be used as a basis for designing an evaluation tool for hospital disaster preparedness. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 8).

  10. Hospital-acquired infections - when are hospitals legally liable?

    PubMed

    McQuoid-Mason, David

    2012-04-12

    Hospital-acquired infections (nosocomial infections) are acquired in healthcare settings by patients admitted for reasons unrelated to the infection or not previously infected when admitted to the facility. Liability for hospital-acquired infections depends on whether the hospital: (i) has introduced best practice infection control measures; (ii) has implemented best practice infection control measures; or (iii) will be vicariously liable for negligent or intentional failures by staff to comply with the infection control measures implemented. A hospital and hospital administrators may be held directly liable for not introducing or implementing best practice infection control measures, resulting in harm to patients. The hospital may also be held vicariously liable where patients have been harmed because hospital staff negligently or intentionally failed to comply with the infection control measures that have been implemented by the hospital, during the course and scope of their employment.

  11. 42 CFR 412.130 - Retroactive adjustments for incorrectly excluded hospitals and units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... part regarding the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat during that cost reporting period, if the inpatient population actually treated in the hospital during that cost reporting period did... October 1, 1991, based on a certification under § 412.30(a) regarding the inpatient population...

  12. Hospital to School Transitions for Children: A Multiple Case Study of Family Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Rhiannon Y.

    2013-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders often present with significant impairments in social, emotional, and academic functioning. For those with the most severe impairments, hospitalization is an essential intervention. Prior to releasing children from the hospital, a discharge plan is typically created in order to facilitate successful…

  13. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  14. How to create a marketing strategy based on hospital characteristics that attract physicians.

    PubMed

    Nordstrom, R D; Horton, D E; Hatcher, M E

    1987-03-01

    Through use of multivariate statistical and research techniques, the authors analyzed 30 hospital features that contribute to a physician's image of a hospital as being a good or a poor place for patient admission and in which to practice. Use of the data obtained in this study can enable a hospital administrator to monitor changes in physicians' attitudes, plan strategies to encourage quality physicians to admit their patients, improve aspects perceived to be weak or unresponsive, and capitalize on strengths.

  15. Hospital malnutrition: a 33-hospital screening study.

    PubMed

    Kamath, S K; Lawler, M; Smith, A E; Kalat, T; Olson, R

    1986-02-01

    A collaborative study involving nutrition screening of 3,047 patients (excluding 125 pregnant women) at admission to 33 hospitals in and around the greater Chicago area was carried out to identify patients at nutritional risk. Information on sex, age, admitting diagnosis, serum albumin, hemoglobin, total lymphocyte count, and height and weight was collected from the medical chart within 48 hours of admission. Nutrition screening could not be completed for a larger number of patients (60%) because data at admission were not available. Of the remaining 40% of patients, more than 50% had below normal values for one or more of the variables studied: serum albumin, hemoglobin, and total lymphocyte count. A large number of the patients (40%) also were considered at nutritional risk as judged by the criteria of weight/height (measured only). Early nutrition intervention for high-risk patients cannot be implemented, nor can the efficacy of nutrition services be evaluated, unless nutrition screening is carried out on patients at admission.

  16. [Hospital clinical ethics committees].

    PubMed

    Gómez Velásquez, Luis; Gómez Espinosa, Luis Néstor

    2007-01-01

    The scientific and technological advances have been surprising, more in the two last decades, but they don't go united with to the ethical values of the medical professional practice, it has been totally escaped, specially when the biological subsistence, the maintenance of the life through apparatuses and the mechanisms that prolong the existence are who undergoes an alteration that until recently time was mortal shortly lapse. It is common listening that exist a crisis in the medical profession, but what really is it of human values, which as soon and taken into nowadays, actually professional account, which gives rise to a dehumanization towards the life, the health, the disease, the suffering and the death. The ideal of the doctor to give to service to the man in its life and health, as well to be conscious that the last biological process that must fulfill is the death, and when it appears, does not have considered as a actually professional failure. It has protect to the patient as the extreme cruelty therapeutic, that it has right a worthy death. It's taking to the birth of the hospital ethics committees, they have like function to analyze, to advise and to think about the ethical dilemmas that appear actually clinical or in the biomedical investigation. In 1982 in the UEA only 1% of its hospitals had a ethics committees; by 1988, it was 67% and the 100% in 2000. In Mexico the process of the formation by these committees begins, only in the Military Central Hospital, to count the ethics committee on 1983, also the Hospital no. 14 of the IMSS in Guadalajara, it works with regularity from 1995, with internal teaching of bioethic. The Secretariat of Health has asked the formation of the bioethical committees in each hospital, and order the it was be coordinated by the National Committee of Bioética. The integration of these committees is indispensable that their members have the knowledge necessary of bioética. The Mexican Society of Ortopedia, conscious of

  17. [Care management: nurses' actions in a hospital emergency service].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze care management actions performed by nurses in a hospital emergency service. This is a qualiative research of the case study type, carried out with nurses from the Emergency Service of a University Hospital in southern Brazil. The data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The results show nurses' actions in care planning, forecasting and provisioning of resources, supervision, leadership and training of the nursing team. In care planning, there is the execution of the nursing process and the control of the realization of laboratory and radiological tests. The actions of forecasting and provisioning of resources were: elaboration of the monthly schedule of employees, daily distribution of the staff and the management of material resources. Leadership encourages the planning of care, the coordination of the nursing staff and the delegation of activities.

  18. [Ergonomics in planning and reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Baglioni, A; Capolongo, S

    2002-01-01

    The state of well being of people is not represented only by any illness, but also by the satisfaction of all environmental components around him. For this reason, the hospitals demand new and more project attentions and in particular they demand specific attentions for all the environmental qualities (light, colours, indoor air qualities, and temperature), the equipment, the furniture and the privacy. This new attention to the requirements of people, during the phase of planning, needs the ergonomic studies. This kind of discipline, in fact, has got the objective of good relationships between men and context where they live. The study of ergonomic qualities needs different competence of multiple areas of acquaintance, that collaborate to analyse the requirements of sanitary structure, and in particular they analyse needs of different categories of people that work or stay in this place (the patients, visitors and sanitary staff). Moreover ergonomic studies concurs to analyse the various factors of complexity, of the buildings, that are very important for the project of hospital. From the scientific literature, we say that some physical environmental characteristics (light, colour, noise,) can influence the psychological conditions of people, and in particular they can generate three different categories of reactions: behavioural, neuropsychological, neuroendocrinal. For this reason the study of all the environmental factors, simple and composed, is a primary necessity in the hospital planning. In this way we can guarantee to the patient, a better sanitary service and a better comfort, and we can guarantee to all sanitary staff adequate conditions of security and functionality.

  19. [Family planning in Bangladesh].

    PubMed

    Saito, S

    1981-03-01

    The author participated in the family planning project in Bangladesh from August 1, 1977 to December 31, 1979. The population of Bangladesh was 81 million in 1977 with annual increase of 3%, and the government was aiming at zero population growth. The government guidelines emphasized family planning as an effort integrated with other community programs. The use of adult education classes, mass media, and agricultural field workers and the training of paramedical personnel were proposed. The project members' activities involved motivating the public to delay marriages, to space births and to limit the family size to two children (average family size 6.5 children) as well as distributing contraceptives, promoting IUD and sterilization. Sterilization campaign for women in DNN district, 30 km south of Dacca, was carried out as follows. The women who had signed up in advance arrived at the elementary school classroom, where 2 medical teams performed operations using the teachers' desks and the equipment rented from a hospital in Dacca. The general procedure involved a physical examination by a female doctor, checking blood pressure, changing into a brand new native gown, premedication by injection, total anesthesia and operation itself. The equipment was sterilized by boiling. The patients were carried on the stretchers to the other classroom where they recuperated, staying overnight on the straw mats on the mud floor. They went home on foot the next day. The shortage of food and resources, high unemployment rate and low standard of living are some of the social problems Bangladesh faces along with overpopulation.

  20. Confronting Rhetorical Disability: A Critical Analysis of Women's Birth Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Kim Hensley

    2009-01-01

    Through its analysis of birth plans, documents some women create to guide their birth attendants' actions during hospital births, this article reveals the rhetorical complexity of childbirth and analyzes women's attempts to harness birth plans as tools of resistance and self-education. Asserting that technologies can both silence and give voice,…

  1. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Ohio Emissions from...) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI), submitted by the Ohio EPA on October 18, 2005. Rules 3745-75-01, 3745-75-02, 3745-75-03,...

  2. 40 CFR 62.8880 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Ohio Emissions from...) Identification of plan. Ohio rules to Control Emissions from Hospital, Medical, and Infectious Waste Incinerators (HMIWI), submitted by the Ohio EPA on October 18, 2005. Rules 3745-75-01, 3745-75-02, 3745-75-03,...

  3. 32. Plan of Bookcase and Fireplace / Section thru Bookcase ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Plan of Bookcase and Fireplace / Section thru Bookcase / Elevation of Living Room Looking North / Part South Wall Boys Living Room / West Wall of Boys Living Room / Front Elevation / Fireplace in Boy's Living Room, Plan of Fireplace (drawing 9) - Whittier State School, Hospital & Receiving Building, 11850 East Whittier Boulevard, Whittier, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. Implementation of Discharge Plans for Chronically Ill Elders Discharged Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Enola K.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Addresses the extent to which discharge plans for elderly patients with congestive heart failure were implemented as planned, tested the consequences of implementation problems, and identified factors associated with implementation problems. Implications for hospital discharge planners and home health care are discussed. (KW)

  5. 40 CFR 62.4179 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Identification of plan. 62.4179 Section 62.4179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.4179 Identification of plan....

  6. 40 CFR 62.4179 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Identification of plan. 62.4179 Section 62.4179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.4179 Identification of plan....

  7. 40 CFR 62.4179 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Identification of plan. 62.4179 Section 62.4179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.4179 Identification of plan....

  8. 40 CFR 62.4179 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Identification of plan. 62.4179 Section 62.4179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.4179 Identification of plan....

  9. 40 CFR 62.4179 - Identification of plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identification of plan. 62.4179 Section 62.4179 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Existing Hospital/medical/infectious Waste Incinerators § 62.4179 Identification of plan....

  10. Development of the breastfeeding quality improvement in hospitals learning collaborative in New York state.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Eileen; Dennison, Barbara A; Welge, Sara Bonam; Hisgen, Stephanie; Boyce, Patricia Simino; Waniewski, Patricia A

    2013-06-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is a public health priority. A strong body of evidence links maternity care practices, based on the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding, to increased breastfeeding initiation, duration and exclusivity. Despite having written breastfeeding policies, New York (NY) hospitals vary widely in reported maternity care practices and in prevalence rates of breastfeeding, especially exclusive breastfeeding, during the birth hospitalization. To improve hospital maternity care practices, breastfeeding support, and the percentage of infants exclusively breastfeeding, the NY State Department of Health developed the Breastfeeding Quality Improvement in Hospitals (BQIH) Learning Collaborative. The BQIH Learning Collaborative was the first to use the Institute for Health Care Improvement's Breakthrough Series methodology to specifically focus on increasing hospital breastfeeding support. The evidence-based maternity care practices from the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding provided the basis for the Change Package and Data Measurement Plan. The present article describes the development of the BQIH Learning Collaborative. The engagement of breastfeeding experts, partners, and stakeholders in refining the Learning Collaborative design and content, in defining the strategies and interventions (Change Package) that drive hospital systems change, and in developing the Data Measurement Plan to assess progress in meeting the Learning Collaborative goals and hospital aims is illustrated. The BQIH Learning Collaborative is a model program that was implemented in a group of NY hospitals with plans to spread to additional hospitals in NY and across the country.

  11. Hospitals report on cancer centers.

    PubMed

    Rees, T

    2001-01-01

    Woman's Hospital, Baton Rouge, La., is first-place winner among cancer centers. Holy Cross Hospital's Michael and Dianne Bienes Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., is named second; and, Cardinal Health System's Ball Cancer Center, Muncie, Ind., third.

  12. Spatial Distribution Balance Analysis of Hospitals in Wuhan

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nai; Chen, Shiyi; Hu, Weilu; Wu, Zhongheng; Chao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution pattern of hospitals in Wuhan indicates a core in the central urban areas and a sparse distribution in the suburbs, particularly at the center of suburbs. This study aims to improve the gravity and Huff models to analyze healthcare accessibility and resources. Results indicate that healthcare accessibility in central urban areas is better than in the suburbs, where it increasingly worsens for the suburbs. A shortage of healthcare resources is observed in large-scale and high-class hospitals in central urban areas, whereas the resources of some hospitals in the suburbs are redundant. This study proposes the multi-criteria evaluation (MCE) analysis model for the location assessment in constructing new hospitals, which can effectively ameliorate healthcare accessibility in suburban areas. This study presents implications for the planning of urban healthcare facilities. PMID:27706069

  13. Telephone calls postdischarge from hospital to home: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Hand, Kristin E; Cunningham, Regina S

    2014-02-01

    The oncology population is particularly affected by hospital readmissions because hospitalized patients with cancer often have complex needs. The complexity and diversity of care requirements create substantial challenges in planning for appropriate postdischarge support. Implementing postdischarge telephone calls in the population of patients with cancer could offer a low-cost intervention to address the complex needs of patients during the transition from hospital to home. The goal of the current literature review is to provide an understanding about postdischarge telephone calls in patients with cancer. Findings from this review support the notion that discharge phone calls could improve care continuity for patients transitioning from hospital to home. The literature review outlines information related to telephone call content, timing, and structure for healthcare systems that want to use a postdischarge telephone intervention for patients with cancer. However, additional research is needed to develop and test cancer-specific protocols.

  14. Community Hospital Telehealth Consortium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    project involving the purchase of a neonatal retinal camera . This clinic transmits images from Lake Charles Memorial Hospital to a neonatal...ophthalmologist in New Orleans and assists in diagnosing Retinopathy of prematurity ( ROP ), a potentially blinding eye disorder that primarily affects...weeks). The smaller a baby is at birth, the more likely that baby is to develop ROP . This disorder—which usually develops in both eyes—is one of

  15. [Homicide crimes in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Dürwald, W

    1993-02-01

    Report of some cases of willful homicide in hospitals of the former GDR. In no case the patient has wished his death. Besides compassion the cause of the homicide was a large carefully expense and in two cases the attempt to prove the incapability of the competent doctor. The patients were only means to an end. All the cases are discovered by the great number of obscure death.

  16. Smoking Cessation in Cardiac Patients: The Influence of Action Plans, Coping Plans and Self-Efficacy on Quitting Smoking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Hoog, Natascha; Bolman, Catherine; Berndt, Nadine; Kers, Esther; Mudde, Aart; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2016-01-01

    Smoking cessation is the most effective action for cardiac patients who smoke to improve their prognosis, yet more than one-half of cardiac patients continue to smoke after hospital admission. This study examined the influence of action plans, coping plans and self-efficacy on intention to quit and smoking cessation in cardiac patients. Cardiac…

  17. Relationships between in-hospital and 30-day standardized hospital mortality: implications for profiling hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, G. E.; Baker, D. W.; Norris, D. G.; Way, L. E.; Harper, D. L.; Snow, R. J.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of in-hospital and 30-day mortality rates and the association between in-hospital mortality and hospital discharge practices. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: A secondary analysis of data for 13,834 patients with congestive heart failure who were admitted to 30 hospitals in northeast Ohio in 1992-1994. DESIGN: A retrospective cohort study was conducted. DATA COLLECTION: Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' medical records and were used to develop multivariable models that estimated the risk of in-hospital and 30-day (post-admission) mortality. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for in-hospital and 30-day mortality were determined by dividing observed death rates by predicted death rates. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In-hospital SMRs ranged from 0.54 to 1.42, and six hospitals were classified as statistical outliers (p <.05); 30-day SMRs ranged from 0.63 to 1.73, and seven hospitals were outliers. Although the correlation between in-hospital SMRs and 30-day SMRs was substantial (R = 0.78, p < .001), outlier status changed for seven of the 30 hospitals. Nonetheless, changes in outlier status reflected relatively small differences between in-hospital and 30-day SMRs. Rates of discharge to nursing homes or other inpatient facilities varied from 5.4 percent to 34.2 percent across hospitals. However, relationships between discharge rates to such facilities and in-hospital SMRs (R = 0.08; p = .65) and early post-discharge mortality rates (R = 0.23; p = .21) were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: SMRs based on in-hospital and 30-day mortality were relatively similar, although classification of hospitals as statistical outliers often differed. However, there was no evidence that in-hospital SMRs were biased by differences in post-discharge mortality or discharge practices. PMID:10737447

  18. Library Hospitality: Some Preliminary Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Eric D. M.; Kazmer, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Library scholars and practitioners have frequently reflected on the various factors that in combination make up a hospitable library, but there has been little theoretical synthesis of the notion of the library as a place of hospitality. The hospitality industry provides a rich vein of theoretical material from which to draw definitions of…

  19. Childrens Hospital Inservice Education Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Joan

    A description is provided of a 15-month, in-service nursing education program at Childrens Hospital (Los Angeles, California). The first sections of the paper describe Childrens Hospital and provide a rationale for the hospital-based program. A listing of program goals and objectives is also provided, indicating that the curriculum is designed to…

  20. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  1. Hospitality Studies: Escaping the Tyranny?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashley, Conrad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore current strands in hospitality management education and research, and suggest that future programs should reflect a more social science informed content. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews current research in hospitality management education and in the study of hospitality and…

  2. Planning and Implementing a Hospital Recycling Program at Naval Hospital, Camp Pendleton, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    the depletion of’ the base landfill; and is not taking advantage of the additional MWR funds that could )e made available through the sale of recycable ...information published about why individuals and businesses need to recycle, the benefits associated with recycling, and the steps involved in starting...have been slow to embrace recycling. Although they share similar types of waste disposal problems with business and industry--such as office waste

  3. Limited Use of Price and Quality Advertising Among American Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Wilks, Chrisanne E A; Richter, Jason P

    2013-01-01

    Background Consumer-directed policies, including health savings accounts, have been proposed and implemented to involve individuals more directly with the cost of their health care. The hope is this will ultimately encourage providers to compete for patients based on price or quality, resulting in lower health care costs and better health outcomes. Objective To evaluate American hospital websites to learn whether hospitals advertise directly to consumers using price or quality data. Methods Structured review of websites of 10% of American hospitals (N=474) to evaluate whether price or quality information is available to consumers and identify what hospitals advertise about to attract consumers. Results On their websites, 1.3% (6/474) of hospitals advertised about price and 19.0% (90/474) had some price information available; 5.7% (27/474) of hospitals advertised about quality outcomes information and 40.9% (194/474) had some quality outcome data available. Price and quality information that was available was limited and of minimal use to compare hospitals. Hospitals were more likely to advertise about service lines (56.5%, 268/474), access (49.6%, 235/474), awards (34.0%, 161/474), and amenities (30.8%, 146/474). Conclusions Insufficient information currently exists for consumers to choose hospitals on the basis of price or quality, making current consumer-directed policies unlikely to realize improved quality or lower costs. Consumers may be more interested in information not related to cost or clinical factors when choosing a hospital, so consumer-directed strategies may be better served before choosing a provider, such as when choosing a health plan. PMID:23988296

  4. Quality Management Systems Implementation Compared With Organizational Maturity in Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Tayebeh; Jafari, Mehdi; Maleki, Mohammad Reza; Naghdi, Seyran; Ghiyasvand, Hesam

    2016-01-01

    Background: A quality management system can provide a framework for continuous improvement in order to increase the probability of customers and other stakeholders’ satisfaction. The test maturity model helps organizations to assess the degree of maturity in implementing effective and sustained quality management systems; plan based on the current realities of the organization and prioritize their improvement programs. Objectives: We aim to investigate and compare the level of organizational maturity in hospitals with the status of quality management systems implementation. Materials and Methods: This analytical cross sectional study was conducted among hospital administrators and quality experts working in hospitals with over 200 beds located in Tehran. In the first step, 32 hospitals were selected and then 96 employees working in the selected hospitals were studied. The data were gathered using the implementation checklist of quality management systems and the organization maturity questionnaire derived from ISO 10014. The content validity was calculated using Lawshe method and the reliability was estimated using test - retest method and calculation of Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data using SPSS 18 software. Results: According to the table, the mean score of organizational maturity among hospitals in the first stage of quality management systems implementation was equal to those in the third stage and hypothesis was rejected (p-value = 0.093). In general, there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the first and third level hospitals (in terms of implementation of quality management systems). Conclusions: Overall, the findings of the study show that there is no significant difference in the organizational maturity between the hospitals in different levels of the quality management systems implementation and in fact, the maturity of the organizations cannot be

  5. A Relational Approach to Measuring Competition Among Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Min-Woong

    2002-01-01

    Objective To present a new, relational approach to measuring competition in hospital markets and to compare this relational approach with alternative methods of measuring competition. Data Sources The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development patient discharge abstracts and financial disclosure files for 1991. Study Design Patient discharge abstracts for an entire year were used to derive patient flows, which were combined to calculate the extent of overlap in patient pools for each pair of hospitals. This produces a cross-sectional measure of market competition among hospitals. Principal Findings The relational approach produces measures of competition between each and every pair of hospitals in the study sample, allowing us to examine a much more “local” as well as dyadic effect of competition. Preliminary analyses show the following: (1) Hospital markets are smaller than thought. (2) For-profit hospitals received considerably more competition from their neighbors than either nonprofit or government hospitals. (3) The size of a hospital does not matter in the amount of competition received, but the larger hospitals generated significantly more competition than smaller ones. Comparisons of this method to the other methods show considerable differences in identifying competitors, indicating that these methods are not as comparable as previously thought. Conclusion The relational approach measures competition in a more detailed way and allows researchers to conduct more fine-grained analyses of market competition. This approach allows one to model market structure in a manner that goes far beyond the traditional categories of monopoly, oligopoly, and perfect competition. It also opens up an entirely new range of analytic possibilities in examining the effect of competition on hospital performance, price of medical care, changes in the market, technology acquisition, and many other phenomena in the health care field. PMID:12036003

  6. Organizational renewal and strategic planning: a winning combination.

    PubMed

    Cercone, R; McDonald, D; Tarrant, L; Tremblay, K

    1994-01-01

    Several approaches to organizational renewal have been described, but few are reported for health care institutions in Canada. In contrast, approaches to strategic planning in health care facilities have been well documented. From our experience over the past six years, the theory and practice of organizational renewal complement the focused activities of strategic planning. This combination can be an effective means to enhance organizational performance, employee commitment and a shared vision among the various stakeholders within the hospital and community. This article outlines the process and benefits that can accrue through such efforts. It demonstrates how the investment of organizational renewal strategies can produce sustainable, operational and strategic planning benefits for community hospitals.

  7. Critical Resources for Hospital Surge Capacity: An Expert Consensus Panel

    PubMed Central

    Bayram, Jamil D.; Sauer, Lauren M.; Catlett, Christina; Levin, Scott; Cole, Gai; Kirsch, Thomas D.; Toerper, Matthew; Kelen, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hospital surge capacity (HSC) is dependent on the ability to increase or conserve resources. The hospital surge model put forth by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) estimates the resources needed by hospitals to treat casualties resulting from 13 national planning scenarios. However, emergency planners need to know which hospital resource are most critical in order to develop a more accurate plan for HSC in the event of a disaster. Objective: To identify critical hospital resources required in four specific catastrophic scenarios; namely, pandemic influenza, radiation, explosive, and nerve gas. Methods: We convened an expert consensus panel comprised of 23 participants representing health providers (i.e., nurses and physicians), administrators, emergency planners, and specialists. Four disaster scenarios were examined by the panel. Participants were divided into 4 groups of five or six members, each of which were assigned two of four scenarios. They were asked to consider 132 hospital patient care resources- extracted from the AHRQ's hospital surge model- in order to identify the ones that would be critical in their opinion to patient care. The definition for a critical hospital resource was the following: absence of the resource is likely to have a major impact on patient outcomes, i.e., high likelihood of untoward event, possibly death. For items with any disagreement in ranking, we conducted a facilitated discussion (modified Delphi technique) until consensus was reached, which was defined as more than 50% agreement. Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICC) were calculated for each scenario, and across all scenarios as a measure of participant agreement on critical resources. For the critical resources common to all scenarios, Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to measure the distribution of scores across all scenarios. Results: Of the 132 hospital resources, 25 were considered critical for all four scenarios by more than 50% of

  8. Modeling Evacuation of a Hospital without Electric Power.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-06-01

    Hospital evacuations that occur during, or as a result of, infrastructure outages are complicated and demanding. Loss of infrastructure services can initiate a chain of events with corresponding management challenges. This report describes a modeling case study of the 2001 evacuation of the Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas (USA). The study uses a model designed to track such cascading events following loss of infrastructure services and to identify the staff, resources, and operational adaptations required to sustain patient care and/or conduct an evacuation. The model is based on the assumption that a hospital's primary mission is to provide necessary medical care to all of its patients, even when critical infrastructure services to the hospital and surrounding areas are disrupted. Model logic evaluates the hospital's ability to provide an adequate level of care for all of its patients throughout a period of disruption. If hospital resources are insufficient to provide such care, the model recommends an evacuation. Model features also provide information to support evacuation and resource allocation decisions for optimizing care over the entire population of patients. This report documents the application of the model to a scenario designed to resemble the 2001 evacuation of the Memorial Hermann Hospital, demonstrating the model's ability to recreate the timeline of an actual evacuation. The model is also applied to scenarios demonstrating how its output can inform evacuation planning activities and timing.

  9. Uninsured patients require creative discharge plans.

    PubMed

    2012-04-01

    Case managers are being challenged to find a discharge destination for patients who are uninsured or underinsured and who need services after hospitalization.These patients often stay in the hospital longer than necessary, at the hospital's expense. Case managers should develop a network of community resources that can assist with care for unfunded patients after discharge. In some cases, it makes sense for the hospital to pay for a lower level of care rather than keeping patients in acute care beds that could be occupied by paying patients. Case managers often are under pressure to move patients through the continuum of care, making it a challenge to create an effective discharge plan for patients with limited financial resources. Many unfunded patients are eligible for financial assistance with their healthcare needs, but they aren't aware of it and don't know how to apply.

  10. Meaning and Problems of Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brieve, Fred J.; Johnston, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    Examines the educational planning process. Discusses what planning is, how methodological planning can work in education, misunderstandings about planning, and difficulties in applying the planning methodology. (DN)

  11. Organizational and market factors associated with leadership development programs in hospitals: a national study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Thompson, Jon M

    2012-01-01

    Effective leadership in hospitals is widely recognized as the key to organizational performance. Clinical, financial, and operational performance is increasingly being linked to the leadership practices of hospital managers. Moreover, effective leadership has been described as a means to achieve competitive advantage. Recent environmental forces, including reimbursement changes and increased competition, have prompted many hospitals to focus on building leadership competencies to successfully address these challenges. Using the resource dependence theory as our conceptual framework, we present results from a national study of hospitals examining the association of organizational and market factors with the provision of leadership development program activities, including the presence of a leadership development program, a diversity plan, a program for succession planning, and career development resources. The data are taken from the American Hospital Association's (AHA) 2008 Survey of Hospitals, the Area Resource File, and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The results of multilevel logistic regressions of each leadership development program activity on organizational and market factors indicate that hospital size, system and network affiliation, and accreditation are significantly and positively associated with all leadership development program activities. The market factors significantly associated with all leadership development activities include a positive odds ratio for metropolitan statistical area location and a negative odds ratio for the percentage of the hospital's service area population that is female and minority. For-profit hospitals are less likely to provide leadership development program activities. Additional findings are presented, and the implications for hospital management are discussed.

  12. The preparedness of hospital Health Information Services for system failures due to internal disasters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheens; Robinson, Kerin M; Wendt, Kate; Williamson, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    The unimpeded functioning of hospital Health Information Services (HIS) is essential for patient care, clinical governance, organisational performance measurement, funding and research. In an investigation of hospital Health Information Services' preparedness for internal disasters, all hospitals in the state of Victoria with the following characteristics were surveyed: they have a Health Information Service/ Department; there is a Manager of the Health Information Service/Department; and their inpatient capacity is greater than 80 beds. Fifty percent of the respondents have experienced an internal disaster within the past decade, the majority affecting the Health Information Service. The most commonly occurring internal disasters were computer system failure and floods. Two-thirds of the hospitals have internal disaster plans; the most frequently occurring scenarios provided for are computer system failure, power failure and fire. More large hospitals have established back-up systems than medium- and small-size hospitals. Fifty-three percent of hospitals have a recovery plan for internal disasters. Hospitals typically self-rate as having a 'medium' level of internal disaster preparedness. Overall, large hospitals are better prepared for internal disasters than medium and small hospitals, and preparation for disruption of computer systems and medical record services is relatively high on their agendas.

  13. Hospital closure and economic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Capps, Cory; Dranove, David; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2010-01-01

    We present a new framework for assessing the effects of hospital closures on social welfare and the local economy. While patient welfare necessarily declines when patients lose access to a hospital, closures also tend to reduce costs. We study five hospital closures in two states and find that urban hospital bailouts reduce aggregate social welfare: on balance, the cost savings from closures more than offset the reduction in patient welfare. However, because some of the cost savings are shared nationally, total surplus in the local community may decline following a hospital closure.

  14. The 1983 distribution of hospitals and hospital beds in the RSA by area, race, ownership and type.

    PubMed

    Zwarenstein, M F; Price, M R

    1990-05-05

    This study used published data to analyse the 1983 distribution of hospitals and hospital beds in South Africa by 'race', geographical area, type of hospital (academic, specialist, general or other) and the nature of ownership (e.g. state, for-profit). Hospitals and hospital beds were found to be inequitably distributed. Overall bed ratios were 150 whites per bed compared with 260 blacks/Asians/coloureds per bed. The distribution of beds by geographical area was 130 people per bed for urban whites, 260 for rural whites and 150, 460 and 300 for urban, rural non-'homeland', and 'homeland' blacks/Asians/coloureds respectively. These differentials are inefficient and unjust, and should be regularly documented to spur their decline. The continued collection of population group information from health service users is required to monitor changes in 'race' disparities. The analysis of distribution by ownership and type suggested that only the public sector is able to provide a hospital service with the appropriate balance of all levels of care for the entire population; but within this sector the dominant position of tertiary care needs to be re-examined. The study highlighted the absence of adequate information on health care resource allocation and utillisation. Appropriate studies in these areas are required and consideration should be given to unifying the planning and management of all hospital resources.

  15. [Success factors in hospital management].

    PubMed

    Heberer, M

    1998-12-01

    The hospital environment of most Western countries is currently undergoing dramatic changes. Competition among hospitals is increasing, and economic issues have become decisive factors for the allocation of medical care. Hospitals therefore require management tools to respond to these changes adequately. The balanced scorecard is a method of enabling development and implementation of a business strategy that equally respects the financial requirements, the needs of the customers, process development, and organizational learning. This method was used to derive generally valid success factors for hospital management based on an analysis of an academic hospital in Switzerland. Strategic management, the focus of medical services, customer orientation, and integration of professional groups across the hospital value chain were identified as success factors for hospital management.

  16. Hospital clowning: a paediatrician's view.

    PubMed

    van Venrooij, Lennard T; Barnhoorn, Pieter C

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the current position of hospital clowns from the perspective of paediatricians and paediatric residents. A total of 14 attending paediatricians and paediatric residents participated in two focus group sessions. Data were analysed using Atlas.ti 5.0. In general, physicians reported positive experiences regarding the interaction between hospital clowns and paediatric patients on the ward. Physicians were more interested in research on children's perception of hospital clowns than in research on the clinical efficacy of hospital clowning. No direct collaboration between physicians and hospital clowns was reported. However, physicians proposed conditions which may streamline their encounters with hospital clowns such as clear communication prior to hospital clown visits, and the condition that visits do not impede medical interventions.

  17. [Practical aspects of implementation quality management system ISO 9001:2000 by hospital infection control team].

    PubMed

    Kuziemski, Arkadiusz; Czerniak, Beata; Frankowska, Krystyna; Gonia, Ewa; Salińska, Teresa; Motuk, Andrzej; Sobociński, Zbigniew

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the Board of the Jan Biziel Hospital in Bydgoszcz decided to include procedures of health services in the implementation process within the confines of ISO 9001:2000 certification. The hospital infection control team that has operated in the hospital since 1989 performed the analysis of the forms of activities to date and on that basis the team prepared original plan of quality management. In April 2007, this plan was successfully accepted by the certifying team. The aim of this study is to present the aforementioned plan which is the result of 18 years experience of the team. At the same time, I hope that this study will be very helpful for all professionals interested in hospital epidemiology, especially in the context of implementing quality management systems.

  18. Hospital Charge and Health-Care Quality in Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana A; Yang, Jie; Altieri, Maria; Talamini, Mark; Zhang, Qiao; Pryor, Aurora D

    2017-02-01

    To determine if hospital charges correlate with patient outcomes after bariatric surgery. A retrospective review of 46,180 patients who underwent bariatric surgery from 2004-2010 was performed. Patients were identified using the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database. Hospitals were categorized on estimates from a multiple linear regression model for charge: low (<$25,027.00), medium ($25,027.00-$35,449.00), and high (≥$35,449.01). Patient outcomes were compared among the charge classification. Of the 46,180 patients, 24 per cent underwent operations in low-, 26 per cent in medium-, and 23,082 (50%) in high-charge hospitals. Controlling for patient demographics, comorbidity, insurance, and operative procedure, multivariable logistic regression demonstrated no significant difference in major complication or mortality among charges. Hospital charge does not correlate with improved outcomes. This is significant given the adverse association between price inflation and rising insurance premiums. Inflated hospital charges may also discriminate against certain patient populations including the uninsured and those with high-deductible insurance plans.

  19. Trauma response to the Asian tsunami: Krabi Hospital, Southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Luke J; Travis, Angela R

    2006-04-01

    The date 26 December 2004 saw a massive tidal wave propagated from a 9.0 Richter scale suboceanic earthquake off the coast of Sumatra in South-East Asia. It swept across the Indian Ocean over a matter of hours leaving destruction in its wake. In Southern Thailand, Krabi Hospital, that province's major tertiary health centre, received the majority of the region's tsunami victims. Well-rehearsed contingency plans were in place to cope with 10, 20 and 40 trauma victims in the case of an extreme event. By the end of 26 December some 500 injured people had been treated at Krabi Hospital: well in excess of the 'worst case scenario' planning. Over the following days a total of 1357 tsunami victims were treated. Over the course of the day victims were able to move through the hospitals' system and gain appropriate treatment. This was achieved through the almost superhuman dedication of the hospitals' well-trained nursing and medical staff. In addition to this were large numbers of both Thai and foreign volunteers, who aided people with basic necessities such as providing them with food, water and clothing as well as simple human comfort, some also acting as translators for the health-care workers and the masses of injured and displaced people. Makeshift wards were constructed in halls and little used areas of the hospital, using army style stretchers to accommodate the wounded. Even though the disaster contingency plans at Krabi Hospital were utterly overrun, the fact that well-thought out and practised strategies were in place saved incalculable lives. The message is clear: practised responses to mass trauma situations will save lives and allows health-care teams to coordinate well in the face of overwhelming odds without panic. All centres should routinely practise disaster response through scenario-based training.

  20. Planning documents: a business planning strategy.

    PubMed

    Kaehrle, P A

    2000-06-01

    Strategic planning and business plan development are essential nursing management skills in today's competitive, fast paced, continually changing health care environment. Even in times of great uncertainty, nurse managers need to plan and forecast for the future. A well-written business plan allows nurse managers to communicate their expertise and proactively contribute to the programmatic decisions and changes occurring within their patient population or service area. This article presents the use of planning documents as a practical, strategic business planning strategy. Although the model addresses orthopedic services specifically, nurse managers can gain an understanding and working knowledge of planning concepts that can be applied to all patient populations.

  1. Hospitality and Collegial Community: An Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Explains a collegial ethic of hospitality as a cardinal academic virtue and suggests a way of building a "collegium," the covenantal community of academe. Discusses how academicians can develop hospitable teaching, hospitable scholarship, and hospitable service. (Author/SLD)

  2. A telehealth nursing intervention reduces hospitalizations in children with complex health conditions.

    PubMed

    Cady, Rhonda; Finkelstein, Stanley; Kelly, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The U Special Kids Program (USK) at the University of Minnesota provides care coordination and case management services by telephone to children with special health-care needs. We measured the effect of the USK programme on hospital resource utilization using a retrospective record review. Information on hospitalizations was collected for children enrolled in the programme for at least two years and validated for accuracy against inpatient claims data. Hospitalizations were classified as planned, unplanned or due to lack of home care. A total of 43 children enrolled in the USK programme between July 1996 and December 2006 met the study criteria. The children had multiple, complex conditions. During the period of the study, there were 61 planned hospitalizations, 184 unplanned hospitalizations and 3 hospitalizations due to lack of home care. The number of unplanned hospitalizations decreased from 74 in the first year of enrolment to 35 in the second; this reduction was significant (P < 0.007). In the subsequent years, the rate of unplanned admissions stabilized. In contrast, the rate of planned hospitalizations was relatively constant over the five-year enrolment period. Telephone-based care coordination and case management is a promising approach for children with multiple, complex health conditions.

  3. Ethical issues in pandemic planning.

    PubMed

    Torda, Adrienne

    2006-11-20

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, many ethical issues will arise in terms of health risks, resource allocation, and management decisions. Planning decisions may be controversial, such as rationing of antivirals, resource allocation (including hospital beds and vaccinations), occupational risk, rostering of staff, responsibilities of health care workers, quarantine measures, and governance issues. A clear ethical framework is needed to enable understanding of the decision-making process and optimise acceptance of decisions by health care workers and other members of an affected community. Planning decisions need to start being examined now, and will require input from a broad group of experts: health care providers, infrastructure managers, lawyers, ethicists, public health physicians, and community members. The process will need to be open, honest and dynamic.

  4. Hospital customer service in a changing healthcare world: does it matter?

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    1999-01-01

    The healthcare industry is undergoing a rapid transformation to meet the ever-increasing needs and demands of the patient population. Employers and health plans such as HMOs are demanding better service and higher quality care, and hospitals are trying to tackle reimbursement cutbacks, streamline services, and serve a diverse population. Hospitals have begun to realize that to overcome these obstacles and meet the needs of the health care plans and consumers, they must focus on the demands of the customer. Customer service initiatives increase patient satisfaction and loyalty and overall hospital quality, and many hospitals have found that consumer demands can be met through initiating and maintaining a customer service program. This article describes how the administrator can create, implement, and manage customer service initiatives within the hospital.

  5. Plan Representations for Distributed Planning and Execution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Representation Planning is commonly associated with intelligent behavior in agents [Russell and Norvig , 2003]. The activity of planning can be defined...formulation [Russell and Norvig , 2003], is essential for enabling efficient problem-solving though search [Amarel, 1968]. The Planning Domain Definition... Norvig , 2003]. Preprocessing of planning domains is a technique that has been used to speed up the planning pro- cess [Dawson and Siklossy, 1977]. Perhaps

  6. Pain Assessment in Hospitalized Older Adults With Dementia and Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Paulson, Christina May; Monroe, Todd; Mion, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    Pain can have negative effects leading to prolonged hospital stays. Determining the presence of uncontrolled and untreated pain in patients with cognitive impairments such as delirium, dementia, and delirium superimposed on dementia (DSD) is challenging. One tool commonly suggested for use in assessment of pain in older adults with cognitive impairment is the Pain Assessment In Advanced Dementia (PAINAD) scale. Proper use of the PAINAD scale as part of a comprehensive pain management plan can help reduce the likelihood of a patient experiencing unrecognized and untreated pain. Using an individual example, this article illustrates best practices in pain assessment and management for a woman experiencing DSD during an acute hospitalization. PMID:24800815

  7. [Should disease management be feared? (1): hospital care].

    PubMed

    Gaspoz, J M; Rutschmann, O

    2005-11-23

    The goals of disease management are: (1) an integrated health care delivery system; (2) knowledge-based care; (3) elaborate information systems; (4) continuous quality improvement. In-hospital disease management and, more specifically, critical pathways, establish standardized care plans, set goals and time actions to reach these goals. They can reduce variations in practice patterns and resource utilization without compromising quality of care. Such strategies participate to quality improvement programs in hospitals when they involve and empower all actors of a given process of care, are not imposed from outside, and use sound and rigorous development and evaluation methods.

  8. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  9. Succession planning.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Thomas E

    2006-03-01

    This article provides the reader with an appreciation of the diverse elements that go into a buy-sell, affiliation, or merger situation for veterinary practices. In the changing market place of American veterinary medicine, old paradigms no longer hold comfort. The generational differences are briefly explored herein as well as the new economic realities. A few examples are offered to illustrate just how much variability exists in the current business of veterinary medicine and the subsequent practice transitions needed to enhance value. Functioning models are explored, as well as affiliation and merger options. Practice valuation is discussed in general terms, referencing the cutting-edge factors. The six-point summary provides almost all practices a solid operational base for daily operations and succession planning.

  10. Joint Venture Health Plans May Give ACOs a Run for Their Money.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Joint venture plans are starting to demonstrate their ability to implement clinical management and financial management reforms. A JV health plan replaces the offloading of financial risk by health plans to ill-equipped providers with an executive-level cost management committee stated jointly by the hospital and payer.

  11. 42 CFR 456.142 - UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... studies. 456.142 Section 456.142 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF...: Hospitals Ur Plan: Medical Care Evaluation Studies § 456.142 UR plan requirements for medical care evaluation studies. (a) The UR plan must describe the methods that the committee uses to select and...

  12. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    PubMed Central

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M.; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O.

    2015-01-01

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors. PMID:26729142

  13. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    PubMed

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  14. Changing the balance. In ordering Evanston Northwestern to divest a hospital, the FTC could give insurers more power in negotiating with providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark

    2005-10-24

    As officials at Evanston Northwestern Healthcare plan their appeal of an order to divest one of its three hospitals, hospitals around the country ponder the national implications of the ruling. Industry observers say the action means hospitals may have a harder time merging to gain leverage with insurers. The AHA's Melinda Hatton, right, says she was "deeply disappointed" but not surprised by the ruling.

  15. A Reengineered Hospital Discharge Program to Decrease Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Jack, Brian W.; Chetty, Veerappa K.; Anthony, David; Greenwald, Jeffrey L.; Sanchez, Gail M.; Johnson, Anna E.; Forsythe, Shaula R.; O'Donnell, Julie K.; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K.; Manasseh, Christopher; Martin, Stephen; Culpepper, Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background: Emergency department visits and rehospitalization are common after hospital discharge. Objective: To test the effects of an intervention designed to minimize hospital utilization after discharge. Design: Randomized trial using block randomization of 6 and 8. Randomly arranged index cards were placed in opaque envelopes labeled consecutively with study numbers, and participants were assigned a study group by revealing the index card. Setting: General medical service at an urban, academic, safety-net hospital. Patients: 749 English-speaking hospitalized adults (mean age, 49.9 years). Intervention: A nurse discharge advocate worked with patients during their hospital stay to arrange follow-up appointments, confirm medication reconciliation, and conduct patient education with an individualized instruction booklet that was sent to their primary care provider. A clinical pharmacist called patients 2 to 4 days after discharge to reinforce the discharge plan and review medications. Participants and providers were not blinded to treatment assignment. Measurements: Primary outcomes were emergency department visits and hospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Secondary outcomes were self-reported preparedness for discharge and frequency of primary care providers′ follow-up within 30 days of discharge. Research staff doing follow-up were blinded to study group assignment. Results: Participants in the intervention group (n = 370) had a lower rate of hospital utilization than those receiving usual care (n = 368) (0.314 vs. 0.451 visit per person per month; incidence rate ratio, 0.695 [95% CI, 0.515 to 0.937]; P = 0.009). The intervention was most effective among participants with hospital utilization in the 6 months before index admission (P = 0.014). Adverse events were not assessed; these data were collected but are still being analyzed. Limitation: This was a single-center study in which not all potentially eligible patients could be enrolled, and outcome

  16. Relationship Between Hospital Financial Performance and Publicly Reported Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Oanh Kieu; Halm, Ethan A.; Makam, Anil N.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hospitals that have robust financial performance may have improved publicly reported outcomes. Objectives To assess the relationship between hospital financial performance and publicly reported outcomes of care, and to assess whether improved outcome metrics affect subsequent hospital financial performance. Design Observational cohort study. Setting And Patients Hospital financial data from the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development in California in 2008 and 2012 were linked to data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Compare website. Measurements Hospital financial performance was measured by net revenue by operations, operating margin, and total margin. Outcomes were 30-day risk-standardized mortality and readmission rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia (PNA). Results Among 279 hospitals, there was no consistent relationship between measures of financial performance in 2008 and publicly reported outcomes from 2008 to 2011 for AMI and PNA. However, improved hospital financial performance (by any of the 3 measures) was associated with a modest increase in CHF mortality rates (ie, 0.26% increase in CHF mortality rate for every 10% increase in operating margin [95% confidence interval: 0.07%-0.45%]). Conversely, there were no significant associations between outcomes from 2008 to 2011 and subsequent financial performance in 2012 (P > 0.05 for all). Conclusions Robust financial performance is not associated with improved publicly reported outcomes for AMI, CHF, and PNA. Financial incentives in addition to public reporting, such as readmissions penalties, may help motivate hospitals with robust financial performance to further improve publicly reported outcomes. Reassuringly, improved mortality and readmission rates do not necessarily lead to loss of revenue. PMID:26929094

  17. Using 'reverse triage' to create hospital surge capacity: Royal Darwin Hospital's response to the Ashmore Reef disaster.

    PubMed

    Satterthwaite, Peter S; Atkinson, Carol J

    2012-02-01

    This report analyses the impact of reverse triage, as described by Kelen, to rapidly assess the need for continuing inpatient care and to expedite patient discharge to create surge capacity for disaster victims. The Royal Darwin Hospital was asked to take up to 30 casualties suffering from blast injuries from a boat carrying asylum seekers that had exploded 840 km west of Darwin. The hospital was full, with a backlog of cases awaiting admission in the emergency department. The Disaster Response Team convened at 10:00 to develop the surge capacity to admit up to 30 casualties. By 14:00, 56 beds (16% of capacity) were predicted to be available by 18:00. The special circumstances of a disaster enabled staff to suspend their usual activities and place a priority on triaging inpatients' suitability for discharge. The External Disaster Plan was activated and response protocols were followed. Normal elective activity was suspended. Multidisciplinary teams immediately assessed patients and completed the necessary clinical and administrative requirements to discharge them quickly. As per the Plan there was increased use of community care options: respite nursing home beds and community nursing services. Through a combination of cancellation of all planned admissions, discharging 19 patients at least 1 day earlier than planned and discharging all patients earlier in the day surge capacity was made available in Royal Darwin Hospital to accommodate blast victims. Notably, reverse triage resulted in no increase in clinical risk with only one patient who was discharged early returning for further treatment.

  18. Assessment of Hospital Pharmacy Preparedness for Mass Casualty Events

    PubMed Central

    Awad, Nadia I.; Cocchio, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the preparedness of hospital pharmacies in New Jersey to provide pharmaceutical services in mass casualty scenarios. Methods: An electronic cross-sectional survey was developed to assess the general knowledge of available resources and attitudes toward the preparedness of the pharmacy department. Results: Out of 60 invitations to participate, 18 surveys (30%) were completed. Respondents practiced at community hospitals (12, 66.6%) with no trauma center designation (11, 67.4%) that served more than 500 licensed beds (five, 29.4%). Six respondents (35.3%) indicated that 75,000 to 100,000 patients visited their emergency departments annually. Seventeen sites (94.4%) reported the existence of an institutional disaster preparedness protocol; 10 (55.5%) indicated that there is a specific plan for the pharmacy department. Most respondents (10, 55.5%) were unsure whether their hospitals had an adequate supply of analgesics, rapid sequence intubation agents, vasopressors, antiemetics, respiratory medications, ophthalmics, oral antimicrobials, and chemical-weapon-specific antidotes. Five (27.7%) agreed that the pharmacy disaster plan included processes to ensure care for patients already hospitalized, and four (22.2%) agreed that the quantity of medication was adequate to treat patients and hospital employees if necessary. Medication stock and quantities were determined based on national or international guidelines at three (16.6%) institutions surveyed. Conclusion: This survey demonstrates a lack of general consensus regarding hospital pharmacy preparedness for mass casualty scenarios despite individualized institutional protocols for disaster preparedness. Standardized recommendations from government and/or professional pharmacy organizations should be developed to guide the preparation of hospital pharmacy departments for mass casualty scenarios. PMID:25859121

  19. Factors Influencing Fourth-Year Pharmacy Students’ Decisions to Pursue a Hospital Pharmacy Residency

    PubMed Central

    Dupuis, Sébastien; Martel, Alexis; Arfa, Taha; Valma, Joannah; Williamson, David R; Perreault, Marc M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists promotes the recruitment of residency-trained pharmacists for work in hospitals and related health care settings. However, Quebec hospitals are still hiring non–residency trained pharmacists, in part because of a severe shortage of hospital pharmacists. To date, no studies have examined the factors influencing the career choices of fourth-year pharmacy students in Canada. Objectives: To identify motivating factors and barriers influencing students’ decision to pursue a hospital pharmacy residency. Methods: All 186 fourth-year students in the Faculty of Pharmacy, Université de Montréal, were invited by e-mail to participate in a validated and institutionally approved survey that was available online between March and May 2014. Results: Of the 138 respondents who returned a completed survey (74% response rate), 36 (26%) planned to apply for a hospital pharmacy residency. Those planning to apply for a residency were older (p = 0.037) and had more hospital work experience (36% versus 3%, p < 0.001) than those not planning to apply. The most important motivators for pursuing a residency were potential gains in knowledge (reported by 88% of respondents, whether or not they were planning to pursue a residency), experience (80%), and self-confidence (62%). The most frequently reported barriers were recognition that a hospital pharmacy residency is a highly demanding program (65%), having work available upon graduation from the undergraduate program (43%), and financial obligations (34%). Hospital experiential rotations influenced, either positively or negatively, 23 (72%) of the 32 students who changed their decision to pursue or not pursue residency training over the course of their studies. Conclusions: The potential gain in knowledge and experience acquired through residency, the fact that it is considered a highly demanding program, and having work available upon graduation from undergraduate studies were

  20. "Guji, Guji, Angela]" Family planning programme.

    PubMed

    She, W

    1997-08-01

    Demand for contraception and sterilization among women in Tibet is high. In 1966, when a family planning service team was sent to Namling County by the Maternal and Child Health Hospital (MCHH) of the Region, more than 500 women from six local townships arrived at the county MCHH seeking surgical sterilization. Since only one doctor was available to do ligation, most of the women were turned away; however, they would not leave until they were given a written appointment for a future date. In 1996, a 27-year-old Tibetan mother from Baxoi County, who had 5 children, traveled for 2 days, with 2 of her children, to a county town to be sterilized. A woman from Tingri County, who had 4 children, reached a county hospital only to be asked to return home; again, there were only one or two doctors available. She gave birth to a 5th child and returned to the hospital; again, the doctor was unavailable. Since then, she has delivered a 6th child. According to Bai Lang (secretary of the County Party committee), who spoke before the Regional Family Planning Committee, Namling County's nationally recognized poverty could have been alleviated if family planning had been implemented earlier. Family planning policy has been accepted well there.