Science.gov

Sample records for hospital saturday workplace

  1. 'Saturday flit, short sit'--a strong influence of a superstition on the timing of hospital discharges?

    PubMed

    Keane, E M; O'Leary, P; Walsh, J B

    1997-01-01

    'Saturday Flit, Short Sit' is a phrase recognised by 58% of our patient population. The superstition implies that leaving hospital on a Saturday is bad luck and will mean early re-admission to hospital. 13.7% of all patients interviewed would refuse to go home on a Saturday and 40% of doctors would allow postponement of discharge because of the patients superstition.

  2. Hospitals should be exemplars of healthy workplaces.

    PubMed

    Russell, Lesley M; Anstey, Matthew H R; Wells, Susan

    2015-05-04

    As major employers and flagship health care organisations, hospitals can influence the norms of the communities they serve by adopting model policies and practices that promote the health of patients, visitors, employees, students and trainees. Hospitals must become healthy workplaces in every sense and extend their role to focus on health and wellness, not just illness. Reorienting hospital policies can: ensure the provision and stewardship of healthy, ecologically sound and sustainable environments; increase the focus on promoting health and prevention; foster interpersonal safety; and improve workplace safety. Such efforts deliver improvements in health outcomes and savings in hospital budgets.

  3. Determinants of workplace violence against clinical physicians in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jeng-Cheng; Tung, Tao-Hsin; Chen, Peter Y; Chen, Ying-Lin; Lin, Yu-Wen; Chen, Fu-Li

    2015-01-01

    Workplace violence in the health sector is a worldwide concern. Physicians play an essential role in health-care teamwork; thus, understanding how organizational factors influence workplace violence against physicians is critical. A total of 189 physicians from three public hospitals and one private hospital in Northern Taiwan completed a survey, and the response rate was 47.1%. This study was approved by the institutional review board of each participating hospital. The 189 physicians were selected from the Taipei area, Taiwan. The results showed that 41.5% of the respondents had received at least one workplace-related physical or verbal violent threat, and that 9.8% of the respondents had experienced at least one episode of sexual harassment in the 3 months before the survey. Logistic regression analysis revealed that physicians in psychiatry or emergency medicine departments received more violent threats and sexual harassment than physicians in other departments. Furthermore, physicians with a lower workplace safety climate (OR=0.89; 95% CI=0.81-0.98) and more job demands (OR=1.15; 95% CI=1.02-1.30) were more likely to receive violent threats. This study found that workplace violence was associated with job demands and the workplace safety climate. Therefore, determining how to develop a workplace safety climate and ensure a safe job environment for physicians is a crucial management policy issue for health-care systems.

  4. Workplace violence prevention programs in hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Casteel, Carri; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nocera, MaryAlice; Goldmacher, Suzi; OHagan, Emily; Blando, James; Valiante, David; Gillen, Marion; Harrison, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Hospital violence is a growing concern, yet little is known about existing programs. This study compared workplace violence programs in high-risk emergency departments among a representative sample of 116 hospitals in California and 50 hospitals in New Jersey. Information was collected through interviews, a facility walk-through, and review of written policies, procedures, and training material. Programs were scored on the components of training, policies and procedures, security, and environmental approaches. California had significantly higher scores for training and policies and procedures, but there was no difference for security and environmental approaches. Program component scores were not highly correlated. For example, hospitals with a strong training program were not more likely to have strong policies and procedures. Most hospitals in California and New Jersey had implemented a workplace violence prevention program, but important gaps were found.

  5. Workplace Bullying Among the Nursing Staff of Greek Public Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Karatza, Christine; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2017-02-01

    In this quantitative, cross-sectional study, the authors identified the impact of workplace bullying on nursing staff employed at select Greek public hospitals. They conducted the study using the Negative Acts Questionnaire with a convenience sample of 841 participants employed by five Greek hospitals in the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica. One third of the respondents reported having been psychologically harassed at work in the past 6 months. According to the results, the impact workplace bullying has on nursing staff varies depending on the existence of a supportive familial or friend environment and if nurses parent children. These findings demonstrate the value of family and friend support when coping with workplace bullying.

  6. Psychosocial antecedents and consequences of workplace aggression for hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Demir, Defne; Rodwell, John

    2012-12-01

    To test a full model of the antecedents to and consequences of various forms of workplace aggression, considering psychosocial factors, for hospital nursing staff. Cross-sectional survey design. Two hundred and seven nurses and midwives working across wards within a medium to large Australian hospital completed the survey. The survey response rate was 26.9%. High frequencies of nurses reported exposure to workplace bullying and internal and external emotional abuse violence types. In terms of antecedents, bullying was linked to high negative affectivity (NA), as well as low supervisor support and coworker support. Internal emotional abuse was associated with low levels of these support variables, as well as high outside work support and low job control. External threat of assault was related to high job demands and NA. In terms of consequences, bullying and verbal sexual harassment were linked to increased psychological distress levels. Bullying and internal emotional abuse were related to lowered organizational commitment. Changes in job satisfaction were not found for any of the workplace aggression types. NA was a significant covariate for all analyses examining consequences of aggression. Different combinations of work conditions (job demands-resources) and individual levels of NA predicted certain types of aggression. Further, nurse perceptions of psychological distress and organizational commitment were affected by exposure to several types of aggression, even after controlling for NA as a potential perceptual bias. This study therefore extends previous research on workplace bullying as a stressor to other types of workplace aggression for nurses. The findings highlight factors that are important in considering effective prevention and intervention of workplace aggression among nursing staff, particularly those working in hospital settings. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  7. Is your hospital safe? Disruptive behavior and workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Martin, William F

    2008-01-01

    The author defines disruptive behavior; distinguishes among disruptive, impaired, and incompetent behavior; describes the prevalence of disruptive behavior; and identifies some recommendations to prevent and resolve disruptive behavior in hospitals. The proactive prevention and management of workplace bullying have implications on managing costs, quality, and satisfaction in hospitals among patients, families, staff, and physicians. The author describes an evidence-based framework and recommends that hospital administrators use it to design an organizational approach to promoting a work environment that is psychologically and physiologically safe and that enables staff to focus on delivering high-quality, cost-effective, and satisfying care.

  8. Workplace violence against nursing staff in a Saudi university hospital.

    PubMed

    Alkorashy, Hanan A Ezzat; Al Moalad, Fawziah Bakheet

    2016-06-01

    Violence against nurses is a major challenge for healthcare administrators. It is gaining more attention because it has a negative impact on nurses, the quality of health care and health organization. Common types of violence include physical harassment, sexual abuse, aggression, mobbing and bullying. Patients, their relatives and co-workers are considered the main perpetrators. To determine the prevalence rate of workplace violence against nursing professionals in a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, most frequent type and perpetrators as well as the contributing factors. This quantitative cross-sectional study adapted a survey questionnaire from the Massachusetts Nurses Association Survey on Workplace Violence/Abuse to collect data from a quota sample of 370 nursing personnel. Almost half of the participants had experienced violence in the professional setting during the 12 months prior to the study. The majority of subjects perceived workplace violence as verbal abuse. Nearly all nursing professionals identified patients as the leading cause. Slightly more than half mentioned understaffing, misunderstandings, long waits for service and lack of staff training and policies for preventing crisis as contributing factors. The prevalence rate is extremely high among nurses in the targeted Saudi university hospital. Saudi health as well as university hospitals' administration and policy makers should adopt and introduce a 'zero tolerance policy', set standards and develop practical measures for preventing the incidence and for controlling the prevalence of violence against nurses. Besides, healthcare organizations, particularly hospitals, can fulfil their obligations to provide both staff and patients with more secure environment. Further research on the topic is needed. © 2016 International Council of Nurses.

  9. Hospital Workplace Violence Prevention in California: New Regulations.

    PubMed

    Gooch, Patricia Pidge

    2017-10-01

    In response to startling statistics in the increasing number of workplace violence (WPV) incidents against health care workers, California employers across the continuum of care are preparing their organizations to comply with California Occupational Safety and Health Administration (CAL/OSHA) regulation SB 1299. This groundbreaking legislation requires hospitals and other health care settings to implement written strategic prevention plans and broaden the identification and reporting of incidents related to WPV. Also included in the law is a minimum staff education requirement and formal risk identification and mitigation plans. The occupational health nurse will play a critical role in preparing health care organizations and staff in this endeavor.

  10. Antineoplastic drugs contamination of workplace surfaces in two Portuguese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Susana; Pádua, Mário; Veiga, Ana Costa; Carolino, Elisabete; Gomes, Mário

    2014-11-01

    Despite the classification as known or suspected human carcinogens, by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, the antineoplastic drugs are extensively used in cancer treatment due to their specificity and efficacy. As human carcinogens, these drugs represent a serious threat to the healthcare workers involved in their preparation and administration. This work aims to contribute to better characterize the occupational exposure of healthcare professionals to antineoplastic drugs, by assessing workplace surfaces contamination of pharmacy and administration units of two Portuguese hospitals. Surface contamination was assessed by the determination of cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, and paclitaxel. These three drugs were used as surrogate markers for surfaces contamination by cytotoxic drugs. Wipe samples were taken and analyzed by HPLC-DAD. From the total of 327 analyzed samples, in 121 (37 %) was possible to detect and quantify at least one drug. Additionally, 28 samples (8.6 %) indicate contamination by more than one antineoplastic drug, mainly in the administration unit, in both hospitals. Considering the findings in both hospitals, specific measures should be taken, particularly those related with the promotion of good practices and safety procedures and also routine monitoring of surfaces contamination in order to guarantee the appliance of safety measures.

  11. Workplace and personal factors associated with physical and mental health in hospital nurses in China.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Vickie A; Lambert, Clinton E; Petrini, Marcia; Li, Xiao Mei; Zhang, Yi Jin

    2007-06-01

    Limited research exists on the workplace and personal factors that might be associated with the physical and mental health of nurses working in China. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to examine, in Chinese hospital nurses, the most frequently occurring workplace stressor, the most often used coping strategy, and the relationships that exist among workplace stressors, coping strategies, psychological hardiness, demographic characteristics, and physical and mental health. Four-hundred-and-eighty hospital nurses from five hospitals in three major Chinese cities were administered five self-report questionnaires. The findings indicated the most frequently cited workplace stressor was workload, while the most commonly used coping strategy was positive reappraisal. Numerous positive and negative correlations were found, suggesting the importance that workplace stress, coping strategies, psychological hardiness, and demographic characteristics play in relationship to each other, as well as to both the physical and mental health of Chinese nurses.

  12. Hospital nurses' attitudes, negative perceptions, and negative acts regarding workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chien, Tsair-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Workplace bullying is a prevalent problem in today's work places that has adverse effects on both bullying victims and organizations. To investigate the predictors of workplace bullying is an important task to prevent bullying victims of nurses in hospitals. This study aims to explore the relationships among nurses' attitudes, negative perceptions, and negative acts regarding workplace bullying under the framework of the theory of planned behavior (TPB). A total of 811 nurses from three hospitals in Taiwan were surveyed. Nurses' responses to the 201 items of 10 scales were calibrated using Rasch analysis and then subjected to path analysis with partial least-squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). The instrumental attitude was significant predictors of nurses' negative perceptions to be bullied in the workplace. Instead, the other TPB components of subjective norm and perceived behavioral control were not effective predictors of nurses' negative acts regarding workplace bullying. The findings provided hospital nurse management with important implications for prevention of bullying, particularly to them who are tasked with providing safer and more productive workplaces to hospital nurses. Awareness of workplace bullying was recommended to other kinds of workplaces for further studies in future.

  13. Workplace exposure to secondhand smoke among non-smoking hospitality employees.

    PubMed

    Lawhorn, Nikki A; Lirette, David K; Klink, Jenna L; Hu, Chih-Yang; Contreras, Cassandra; Ajori Bryant, Ty-Runet Pinkney; Brown, Lisanne F; Diaz, James H

    2013-02-01

    This article examines salivary cotinine concentrations to characterize secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among non-smoking hospitality employees (bar and casino employees and musicians who perform in bars) who are exposed to SHS in the workplace. A pre-post test study design was implemented to assess SHS exposure in the workplace. The convenience sample of 41 non-smoking hospitality employees included 10 controls (non-smoking hospitality employees not exposed to SHS in the workplace). The findings demonstrate that post-shift saliva cotinine levels of hospitality employees who are exposed to SHS in the workplace are significantly higher than controls who work in smoke-free venues. Findings also suggested a statistically significant increase between pre- and post-shift saliva cotinine levels of hospitality employees who are exposed in the workplace. No statistically significant difference was noted across labor categories, suggesting that all exposed employees are at increased risk. The study results indicate that non-smoking hospitality employees exposed to SHS in the workplace have significantly higher cotinine concentration levels compared with their counterparts who work in smoke-free venues. Findings from other studies suggest that these increased cotinine levels are harmful to health. Given the potential impact on the health of exposed employees, this study further supports the efforts of tobacco prevention and control programs in advocating for comprehensive smoke-free air policies to protect bar and casino employees.

  14. Using database reports to reduce workplace violence: Perceptions of hospital stakeholders.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, Judith E; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Aranyos, Deanna; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J; Luborsky, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Documented incidents of violence provide the foundation for any workplace violence prevention program. However, no published research to date has examined stakeholders' preferences for workplace violence data reports in healthcare settings. If relevant data are not readily available and effectively summarized and presented, the likelihood is low that they will be utilized by stakeholders in targeted efforts to reduce violence. To discover and describe hospital system stakeholders' perceptions of database-generated workplace violence data reports. Eight hospital system stakeholders representing Human Resources, Security, Occupational Health Services, Quality and Safety, and Labor in a large, metropolitan hospital system. The hospital system utilizes a central database for reporting adverse workplace events, including incidents of violence. A focus group was conducted to identify stakeholders' preferences and specifications for standardized, computerized reports of workplace violence data to be generated by the central database. The discussion was audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, processed as text, and analyzed using stepwise content analysis. Five distinct themes emerged from participant responses: Concerns, Etiology, Customization, Use, and Outcomes. In general, stakeholders wanted data reports to provide ``the big picture,'' i.e., rates of occurrence; reasons for and details regarding incident occurrence; consequences for the individual employee and/or the workplace; and organizational efforts that were employed to deal with the incident. Exploring stakeholder views regarding workplace violence summary reports provided concrete information on the preferred content, format, and use of workplace violence data. Participants desired both epidemiological and incident-specific data in order to better understand and work to prevent the workplace violence occurring in their hospital system.

  15. Using database reports to reduce workplace violence: Perceptions of hospital stakeholders

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Aranyos, Deanna; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Upfal, Mark J.; Luborsky, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Documented incidents of violence provide the foundation for any workplace violence prevention program. However, no published research to date has examined stakeholders’ preferences for workplace violence data reports in healthcare settings. If relevant data are not readily available and effectively summarized and presented, the likelihood is low that they will be utilized by stakeholders in targeted efforts to reduce violence. OBJECTIVE To discover and describe hospital system stakeholders’ perceptions of database-generated workplace violence data reports. PARTICIPANTS Eight hospital system stakeholders representing Human Resources, Security, Occupational Health Services, Quality and Safety, and Labor in a large, metropolitan hospital system. METHODS The hospital system utilizes a central database for reporting adverse workplace events, including incidents of violence. A focus group was conducted to identify stakeholders’ preferences and specifications for standardized, computerized reports of workplace violence data to be generated by the central database. The discussion was audio-taped, transcribed verbatim, processed as text, and analyzed using stepwise content analysis. RESULTS Five distinct themes emerged from participant responses: Concerns, Etiology, Customization, Use, and Outcomes. In general, stakeholders wanted data reports to provide “the big picture,” i.e., rates of occurrence; reasons for and details regarding incident occurrence; consequences for the individual employee and/or the workplace; and organizational efforts that were employed to deal with the incident. CONCLUSIONS Exploring stakeholder views regarding workplace violence summary reports provided concrete information on the preferred content, format, and use of workplace violence data. Participants desired both epidemiological and incident-specific data in order to better understand and work to prevent the workplace violence occurring in their hospital system. PMID

  16. Development of a Supervisory Skills Course for Hospital Pharmacy Workplaces

    PubMed Central

    Woloschuk, Donna M M; Raymond, Colette B

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objective: Many Canadian hospital pharmacies are experiencing difficulties recruiting supervisory personnel. It was expected that, through a “learning-by-doing” course, pharmacy staff would learn to apply basic skills in the day-to-day supervision of pharmacy operations and human resources and to apply the principles of supervisory documentation. Methods: A supervisory skills course targeted to pharmacy staff members was developed and implemented by the pharmacy department of a large urban health region. The course was initially offered to practising pharmacy technicians. The course design emphasized a constructivist framework incorporating authentic learning and reflective practice during seminars, with experiential and self-directed learning in the workplace. Preceptors assisted learners to achieve the course goals. Learners and preceptors provided feedback about hours spent (as the course progressed) and about their satisfaction with the course itself (at the end of the course). Learners and preceptors completed a post-program evaluation 2 months after completing the course to help in the assessment of the transfer of learning (lasting impact) associated with the course. Overall performance in the course was assessed on a pass/fail basis. Results: Eighteen pharmacy technicians were admitted to the program, but one withdrew because of a job change. All learners successfully completed the course. Two months after the course, learners and preceptors described enhanced organization, time management, leadership, communication, and conflict-resolution skills on the part of learners, as well as their increased confidence, maturity, and ability to supervise staff. Learners’ evaluations revealed a broadened perspective of pharmacy. The preceptors valued the enhancement of learners’ skills and their increased enthusiasm. At the time of writing, 6 of the participants had secured supervisory positions. Conclusion: Creating formal instruction that

  17. Development of a supervisory skills course for hospital pharmacy workplaces.

    PubMed

    Woloschuk, Donna M M; Raymond, Colette B

    2010-07-01

    Many Canadian hospital pharmacies are experiencing difficulties recruiting supervisory personnel. It was expected that, through a "learning-by-doing" course, pharmacy staff would learn to apply basic skills in the day-to-day supervision of pharmacy operations and human resources and to apply the principles of supervisory documentation. A supervisory skills course targeted to pharmacy staff members was developed and implemented by the pharmacy department of a large urban health region. The course was initially offered to practising pharmacy technicians. The course design emphasized a constructivist framework incorporating authentic learning and reflective practice during seminars, with experiential and self-directed learning in the workplace. Preceptors assisted learners to achieve the course goals. Learners and preceptors provided feedback about hours spent (as the course progressed) and about their satisfaction with the course itself (at the end of the course). Learners and preceptors completed a post-program evaluation 2 months after completing the course to help in the assessment of the transfer of learning (lasting impact) associated with the course. Overall performance in the course was assessed on a pass/fail basis. Eighteen pharmacy technicians were admitted to the program, but one withdrew because of a job change. All learners successfully completed the course. Two months after the course, learners and preceptors described enhanced organization, time management, leadership, communication, and conflict-resolution skills on the part of learners, as well as their increased confidence, maturity, and ability to supervise staff. Learners' evaluations revealed a broadened perspective of pharmacy. The preceptors valued the enhancement of learners' skills and their increased enthusiasm. At the time of writing, 6 of the participants had secured supervisory positions. Creating formal instruction that engages pharmacy staff to pursue management positions is challenging

  18. Workplace physical violence among hospital nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan.

    PubMed

    AbuAlRub, Raeda Fawzi; Al Khawaldeh, Abdullah Talal

    2014-07-01

    To: (1) examine the incidence, frequency and contributing factors to workplace violence among nurses and physicians in underserved areas in Jordan, and (2) identify the existing policies and the management modalities to tackle workplace violence. Workplace violence is a major problem in healthcare organisations. An understanding of the nature of violence is essential to implementing successful management. A descriptive exploratory research design. The questionnaire that was developed in 2003 by the International Labor Office, the International Council of Nurses, the World Health Organization, and the Public Services International was used to collect data from a convenience sample of 521 Jordanian physicians and nurses (396 nurses, 125 physicians) who worked in hospitals located in underserved areas. Around 15% of the participants were exposed to physical violence. The factors that contributed to workplace violence were related to absence of policies, inadequate staffing and lack of communication skills. Only 16·9% of participants indicated that there were specific policies available for dealing with physical workplace violence. Strengthening security and providing training were some of the important factors indicated by participants for decreasing violence in the workplace. Workplace violence is a problem in underserved areas that needs attention from administrators. Most participants were very dissatisfied with the way the administrators dealt with the incidents. Instituting firm policies against perpetrators and developing protective violence guidelines to support healthcare staff in managing workplace violence are paramount to tackle the problem of workplace violence. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Prospectus for Workplace Learning in the Hospitality Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teare, Richard E., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    Includes "Relating Strategy, Structure and Performance" (Richard E. Teare, Jorge Costa, Gavin Eccles); "Interpreting and Responding to Customer Needs" (Richard E. Teare); "Developing a Curriculum for Organisational Learning" (Richard E. Teare); and "Implementing Virtual Support for Workplace Learning"…

  20. Saturday opening of the RAS Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingley, P. D.

    2011-02-01

    BAA members are reminded that the Library of the Royal Astronomical Society at Burlington House in Piccadilly is open on twelve Saturdays a year, normally the first Saturday of a month unless that is a Bank Holiday weekend, in which case it is the second Saturday. This facility is specifically intended for spare time researchers and amateur astronomers who may find it difficult to get to Piccadilly on a weekday.

  1. Violence in the nursing workplace - a descriptive correlational study in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang-Pan; Ku, Yan-Chiou; Yang, Hsiu-Fan

    2013-03-01

    To explore the prevalence, types and sources of violence in the nursing workplace and to assess the factors related to violence. Workplace violence in nursing is not a new phenomenon; in recent years, much more attention has been paid to the issue in Taiwan. Few studies, however, have investigated the overall distribution of violence and the reasons for not reporting these incidents in nursing workplaces. This descriptive, correlational study used structured questionnaires to collecting information about workplace violence experienced by nurses over the last year. Nurses (n = 880) working in a public hospital in southern Taiwan were invited to complete the questionnaires, with a response rate of 89·9%. Nurses working in outpatient units and emergency rooms experienced more frequent violence than those on surgical wards and intensive care units. These findings provide evidence of workplace violence in hospitals and may aid hospital and nursing administration to reduce and control violence. RELEVANCE TO NURSING PRACTICE: These results provide evidence in relation to the importance of effective communication training to nurses and will assist hospital administrations in establishing higher-quality, healthy workplace environments. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Workplace Discrimination Is Associated With Alcohol Abuse Among Ethnically Diverse Hospital Staff.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, Angela D; Wells, Anita M; Spencer, S Melinda; Cofie, Leslie; Yen, Irene H

    2016-05-01

    Research suggests that workplace discrimination plays a role in absenteeism, productivity, and turnover. A link among workplace discrimination, mental health, and health disparities may also exist. The purpose of this study was to determine whether self-reported workplace discrimination is associated with alcohol abuse among hospital workers. Cross-sectional analysis of baseline data collected from a prospective cohort study of workers in two healthcare institutions (n = 664) was conducted. Workplace discrimination in the previous 12 months was reported by 14% (n = 91) of participants who were four times more likely to score higher on likely alcohol abuse than their peers. White participants who reported any discrimination were more likely to score higher on likely alcohol abuse than racial/ethnic minority participants who reported any discrimination. Given a diversifying workforce, further research is needed on how workplace discrimination contributes to stress and maladaptive coping, and ultimately health disparities. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Workplace Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms: A Study of Multi-Ethnic Hospital Employees.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Wizdom Powell; Gillen, Marion; Yen, Irene H

    2010-03-01

    Workplace discrimination reports have recently increased in the U.S. Few studies have examined racial/ethnic differences and the mental health consequences of this exposure. We examined the association between self-reported workplace discrimination and depressive symptoms among a multi-ethnic sample of hospital employees. Data came from the prospective case-control Gradients of Occupational Health in Hospital Workers (GROW) study (N = 664). We used the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) to assess depressive symptoms and measured the occurrence, types, and frequency of workplace discrimination. African Americans were more likely than other racial/ethnic employees to report frequent and multiple types of discrimination exposure. Multivariate relationships were examined while controlling for socio-demographic factors, job strain, and general social stressors. After adjustment, workplace discrimination occurrence and frequency were positively associated with depressive symptoms. The positive association between workplace discrimination and depressive symptoms was similar across racial and ethnic groups. Reducing workplace discrimination may improve psychosocial functioning among racial/ethnic minority hospital employees at greatest risk of exposure.

  4. Worksite Walkthrough Intervention: Data-driven Prevention of Workplace Violence on Hospital Units.

    PubMed

    Hamblin, Lydia E; Essenmacher, Lynnette; Luborsky, Mark; Russell, Jim; Janisse, James; Upfal, Mark; Arnetz, Judith

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the implementation of a data-driven, unit-based walkthrough intervention shown to be effective in reducing the risk of workplace violence in hospitals. A structured worksite walkthrough was conducted on 21 hospital units. Unit-level workplace violence data were reviewed and a checklist of possible prevention strategies and an Action Plan form guided development of unit-specific intervention. Unit supervisor perceptions of the walkthrough and implemented prevention strategies were reported via questionnaires. Prevention strategies were categorized as environmental, behavioral, or administrative. A majority of units implemented strategies within 12 months' postintervention. Participants found the walkthrough useful, practical, and worthy of continued use. Structured worksite walkthroughs provide a feasible method for workplace violence reduction in hospitals. Core elements are standardized yet flexible, promoting fidelity and transferability of this intervention.

  5. Does difference matter? Diversity and human rights in a hospital workplace.

    PubMed

    Sulman, Joanne; Kanee, Marylin; Stewart, Paulette; Savage, Diane

    2007-01-01

    The urban hospital workplace is a dynamic environment that mirrors the cultural and social diversity of the modern city. This paper explores the literature relating to diversity in the workplace and then describes an urban Canadian teaching hospital's comprehensive approach to the promotion of an equitable and inclusive diverse environment. With this goal, four years ago the hospital established an office of Diversity and Human Rights staffed by a social worker. The office provides education, training, policy development and complaints management. The administration also convened a hospital-wide committee to advise on the outcomes, and to plan a process for diversity and human rights organizational change. The committee worked with a social work research consultant to design a qualitative focus group study, currently ongoing, to explore the perspectives of hospital staff. The lessons learned from the process have the potential to increase overall cultural competency of staff that can translate into more sensitive work with patients.

  6. Sources of Meaningfulness in the Workplace: A Study in the US Hospitality Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of meaningfulness at the workplace, according to the perceptions of hospitality employees from different national cultures in one US-based hotel, based on Dimitrov's empirical study about the features of the humane organization. Design/methodology/approach: This was an exploratory…

  7. Sources of Meaningfulness in the Workplace: A Study in the US Hospitality Sector

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrov, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of meaningfulness at the workplace, according to the perceptions of hospitality employees from different national cultures in one US-based hotel, based on Dimitrov's empirical study about the features of the humane organization. Design/methodology/approach: This was an exploratory…

  8. Improving Basic Skills in the Workplace. A Core Course for the Catering and Hospitality Industries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Lorraine

    This training pack is designed for use with employees in the catering and hospitality industries. The material takes common workplace procedures and terminology and uses these as the basis for improving reading, writing, oral communication, and math skills. The pack is designed as a complete course of 13 modules over a period of 32-48 hours, but…

  9. Menu Selection Assistance--A Workplace Literacy Curriculum for Hospital Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tri-County Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc., Harrisburg, PA.

    This curriculum guide was developed to help literacy practitioners present an eight-lesson workplace literacy course for hospital workers who assist patients in completing their daily menus. Presented in the introduction are the following: overview of the curriculum development project, project activity schedule, course overview, and course time…

  10. Examining the characteristics of workplace violence in one non-tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Rose; Styles, Irene; Perry, Laura; Combs, Shane

    2010-02-01

    This study sought to determine the prevalence and characteristics of workplace violence directed at a volunteer sample of nurses at one non-tertiary hospital. Respondents' reasons for not reporting these incidents were also investigated. Incidents of workplace violence are increasing worldwide. However, no studies have investigated this phenomenon from the perspective of nurses in Western Australian non-tertiary hospitals. Survey. A survey was distributed to all 332 nurses working in several areas of one non-tertiary hospital in Western Australia to determine their experiences of workplace violence over a 12 month period. Of the 113 nurses who agreed to participate in this study, 75% reported experiencing workplace violence in the previous twelve months. When asked about their most recent incident, 50% of the nurses said they had reported it verbally, mostly to more senior staff. Only 16% of the nurses completed an official incident report. Reasons for not reporting included the view that WPV is just part of the job and the perception that management would not be responsive. This study showed that for this sample of nurses violent events are occurring at a rate that is similar to those reported in other studies. This finding should be of great concern to the organisation and the community in general. Organisations are obliged to improve the safety of the workplace environment for both staff and patients. The findings of our study may be of help to healthcare institutions in developing education programmes for nurses, patients and their friends and relatives to reduce the impact and frequency of workplace violence.

  11. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peihang; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Yihua; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Xing, Kai; Kang, Zheng; Ning, Ning; Fu, Yapeng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2017-01-19

    This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations). Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals.

  12. WATCH Scrubs: a video observational study of workplace-based learning at Sacred Heart Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rees, Eliot L; Sinha, Yashashwi; Davies, Benjamin; J Quinn, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Workplace-based learning remains the cornerstone of clinical training. Teaching in the clinical environment promotes active engagement as trainees are required to combine their competencies (e.g. skills in history taking, examination and clinical reasoning) to determine an appropriate course of action. High-quality clinical teaching supports and scaffolds trainees' learning in clinical workplaces. This study aimed to explore the quality of clinical teaching at a large teaching hospital. A retrospective video observational study of 9 years of workplace-based learning at Sacred Heart Hospital, a large private teaching hospital, was conducted. Each academic year was observed by one researcher. Clinical teaching encounters were identified and analysed using the Warwick Assessment insTrument for Clinical teacHing (WATCH). Descriptive observation notes were recorded and analysed thematically. A total of 131 teaching encounters provided by 12 tutors were identified. The 15-item instrument demonstrated a Cronbach's alpha of 0.89. The hidden curriculum, role modelling and reflection played prominent roles in trainees' personal and professional development. Trainees' learning in clinical workplaces extends beyond the formal teaching they receive to include the development of professional behaviours through role modelling and reflection on clinical encounters. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. Workplace Violence against Health Care Workers in North Chinese Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peihang; Zhang, Xue; Sun, Yihua; Ma, Hongkun; Jiao, Mingli; Xing, Kai; Kang, Zheng; Ning, Ning; Fu, Yapeng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to determine the prevalence of workplace violence (WPV) against healthcare workers, explore the frequency distribution of violence in different occupational groups, and determine which healthcare occupation suffers from WPV most frequently. Furthermore, the current study aimed to compare risk factors affecting different types of WPV in Chinese hospitals. A cross-sectional design was utilized. A total of 1899 healthcare workers from Heilongjiang, a province in Northeastern China, completed the questionnaire. Of the respondents, 83.3% reported exposure to workplace violence, and 68.9% reported non-physical violence. Gender, education, shift work, anxiety level, and occupation were significantly correlated with physical violence (p < 0.05 for all correlations). Additionally, age, professional title, and occupation were correlated with non-physical violence, which critically affected doctors. Thus, gender, age, profession, anxiety, and shift work were predictive of workplace violence toward healthcare workers. Doctors appeared to experience non-physical workplace violence with particularly higher frequency when compared to nurses and other workers in hospitals. For healthcare workers, interventions aimed at WPV reduction should be enacted according to the types of violence, profession, and other factors underlying the various types of WPV in hospitals. PMID:28106851

  14. Nurses exposure to workplace violence in a large teaching hospital in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Teymourzadeh, Ehsan; Rashidian, Arash; Arab, Mohammad; Akbari-Sari, Ali; Hakimzadeh, Seyyed Mostafa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workplace violence is one of the factors which can strongly reduce job satisfaction and the quality of working life of nurses. The aim of this study was to measure nurses’ exposure to workplace violence in one of the major teaching hospitals in Tehran in 2010. Methods: We surveyed the nurses in a cross-sectional design in 2010. The questionnaire was adapted from a standardized questionnaire designed collaboratively by the International Labor Office (ILO), the International Health Organization (IHO), the International Council of Nurses (ICN), and the Public Services International (PSI). Finally, in order to analyze the relationships among different variables in the study, T-test and Chi-Square test were used. Results: Three hundred and one nurses responded to the questionnaire (a response rate of 73%). Over 70% of the nurses felt worried about workplace violence. The participants reported exposure to verbal abuse (64% CI: 59-70%), bullying-mobbing (29% CI: 24-34%) and physical violence (12% CI: 9-16%) at least once during the previous year. Relatives of hospital patients were responsible for most of the violence. Nurses working in the emergency department and outpatient clinics were more likely to report having experienced violence. Nurses were unlikely to report violence to hospital managers, and 40% of nurses were unaware of any existing policies within the hospital for reducing violence. Conclusion: We observed a considerable level of nurse exposure to workplace violence. The high rate of reported workplace violence demonstrates that the existing safeguards that aim to protect the staff from abusive patients and relatives are inadequate. PMID:25396205

  15. [Prevalence of workplace bullying in a population of nurses at three Italian hospitals].

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Giulio; Giorgi, Gabriele; Ferrero, Claudia; Mucci, Nicola; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Negative behaviors could be considered as a risk index of workplace bullying; researching on these events is useful for the planning of preventive interventions. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of negative actions in a population of nurses and their possible association with issues related to mental health. We administered a proper questionnaire, based both on the NAQ-R and on the GHQ12, to 206 subjects, who worked in three hospitals, located in the center and south of Italy. Our results confirmed that the nursing profession presents a clear bullying risk in the workplace, without any notable differences regarding gender or demographics. The prevalence of negative actions was noteworthy, mainly with regard to the job position and the task. Our study also showed that workplace bullying may interfere with the overall health of nurses, particularly connected to psycho-emotional issues.

  16. Negotiating jurisdiction in the workplace: a multiple-case study of nurse prescribing in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Kroezen, M; Mistiaen, P; van Dijk, L; Groenewegen, P P; Francke, A L

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports on a multiple-case study of prescribing by nurse specialists in Dutch hospital settings. Most analyses of interprofessional negotiations over professional boundaries take a macro sociological approach and ignore workplace jurisdictions. Yet boundary blurring takes place and healthcare professionals renegotiate formal policies in the workplace. This paper studies the division of jurisdictional control over prescribing between nurse specialists and medical specialists in the workplace, and examines the relationship between workplace jurisdiction and legal jurisdiction over prescribing. Data collection took place in the Netherlands during the first half of 2013. The study used in-depth interviews with fifteen nurse specialists and fourteen medical specialists, non-participant observation of nurse specialists' prescribing consultations and document analysis. Great variety was found in the extent to which and way in which nurse specialists' legal prescriptive authority had been implemented. These findings suggest that there is considerable discrepancy between the division of jurisdictional control over prescribing at the macro (legal) level and the division at the micro (workplace) level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Workplace empowerment and magnet hospital characteristics as predictors of patient safety climate.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Kevin; Laschinger, Heather; Wong, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This study tested a theoretical model derived from Kanter's theory of workplace empowerment by surveying a random sample of 300 registered nurses employed in acute care hospitals across the Canadian province of Ontario. The results of this study effectively replicated the findings of a previous exploratory study. Specific nursing practice environment characteristics that positively influence the climate of patient safety were identified. This study provides nurse leaders with ideas for improving the patient safety climate by improving the quality of nurses' work environments.

  18. Application and Implementation of the Hazard Risk Matrix to Identify Hospital Workplaces at Risk for Violence

    PubMed Central

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Hamblin, Lydia; Ager, Joel; Aranyos, Deanna; Upfal, Mark J.; Luborsky, Mark; Russell, Jim; Essenmacher, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    Background A key barrier to preventing workplace violence injury is the lack of methodology for prioritizing the allocation of limited prevention resources. The hazard risk matrix was used to categorize the probability and severity of violence in hospitals to enable prioritization of units for safety intervention. Methods Probability of violence was based on violence incidence rates; severity was based on lost time management claims for violence-related injuries. Cells of the hazard risk matrix were populated with hospital units categorized as low, medium, or high probability and severity. Hospital stakeholders reviewed the matrix after categorization to address the possible confounding of underreporting. Results Forty-one hospital units were categorized as medium or high on both severity and probability and were prioritized for forthcoming interventions. Probability and severity were highest in psychiatric care units. Conclusions This risk analysis tool may be useful for hospital administrators in prioritizing units for violence injury prevention efforts. PMID:25223739

  19. Substance abuse and dependence in the hospital workplace: detection and handling.

    PubMed

    Ossi, J

    1991-01-01

    A hospital can take many avenues in dealing with an employee or professional who is impaired by substance abuse or dependence. The most difficult aspect of dealing with the problem is detection. Fortunately, increasing public awareness and concern regarding workplace substance abuse is forcing legislators to address the issue and expose the problem. The legislative response appears to be geared toward treatment and education rather than punishment, which in the opinion of this author is a desirable approach. The pharmacy department can be a valuable asset to the hospital risk manager in detecting diversion of controlled substances and educating employees as to the clinical signs and symptoms of impairment.

  20. Workplace bullying and general health status among the nursing staff of Greek public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Karatza, Christina; Zyga, Sofia; Tziaferi, Styliani; Prezerakos, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    The arduous emotional and physical nurses' work, the gradual nursing staff cutbacks and the lack of recognition that nurses feel regarding their skills and overall capabilities are some of the factors that act of bullying between nursing staff and management, between nurses and patients/families or even among nurses themselves. Workplace bullying has physical and psychological effects on worker-victims and, by extension, patients themselves. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the phenomenon of workplace bullying and general health status among the nursing staff of Greek public hospitals. A cross-sectional study was conducted on a convenience sample of 841 members of the nursing staff working in five major hospitals of the 1st Regional Health Authority of Attica, located in Athens. The response rate was 84.1 %. The respondents completed the Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and also their demographic characteristics. The appropriate permissions were obtained by the Hospitals' Ethics Committees and the questionnaire's authors. Data were collected from March to July 2013. Data analysis was performed with IBM SPSS 21.0 and included t test, χ (2) test and regression analysis. The two-tailed significance level was set ≤0.05. 30.2 % of the respondents reported that they had been psychologically harassed in their workplaces during the preceding 6 months. Statistical analysis revealed that relative to other respondents, respondents who had received support from their families and friends enjoyed better health but respondents who perceived their work environments more negatively because of work-related bullying suffered from worse general health. Workplace bullying among nursing staff is a major concern in Greece. Support systems play a crucial role in addressing the negative effects of bullying and they should be taken into account when designing prevention and troubleshooting policies

  1. Super Science Saturdays: Developing Hawaii's Natural Treasures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapai, Marlene Nachbar; Sing, David Kekaulike

    1994-01-01

    Takes a closer look at Super Science Saturday, held by the Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children/University of Hawaii at Hilo. These children are known to Hawaiians as Na Pua No'eau, which refers to Hawaii's children as "flowers blossoming toward self-discovery." (ZWH)

  2. When Children Go to College on Saturday.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flack, Jerry; Friedberg, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Super Saturday program of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. The program's objectives are to enrich elementary and middle school students' intellectual skills and to promote greater interest in and desire for learning. The program builds on students' strengths, and the courses fall into the following three categories:…

  3. When Children Go to College on Saturday.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flack, Jerry; Friedberg, Janet

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Super Saturday program of the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. The program's objectives are to enrich elementary and middle school students' intellectual skills and to promote greater interest in and desire for learning. The program builds on students' strengths, and the courses fall into the following three categories:…

  4. Weekend College: Teaching Biology on Saturdays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pflanzer, Richard G.; East, James R.

    1984-01-01

    Indiana University-Purdue University at Indianapolis developed the Weekend College, a program specially planned for working adult learners. Describes this program (which offers courses on Saturdays and Sundays) and a five-credit laboratory course in human physiology. Instructional strategies used and advantages/disadvantages of weekend courses are…

  5. Workplace violence against resident doctors in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Anand, Tanu; Grover, Shekhar; Kumar, Rajesh; Kumar, Madhan; Ingle, Gopal Krishna

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers particularly doctors are at high risk of being victims of verbal and physical violence perpetrated by patients or their relatives. There is a paucity of studies on work-related violence against doctors in India. We aimed to assess the exposure of workplace violence among doctors, its consequences among those who experienced it and its perceived risk factors. This study was done among doctors working in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. Data were collected by using a self-administered questionnaire containing items for assessment of workplace violence against doctors, its consequences among those who were assaulted, reporting mechanisms and perceived risk factors. Of the 169 respondents, 104 (61.4%) were men. The mean (SD) age of the study group was 28.6 (4.2) years. Sixty-nine doctors (40.8%) reported being exposed to violence at their workplace in the past 12 months. However, there was no gender-wise difference in the exposure to violence (p=0.86). The point of delivery of emergency services was reported as the most common place for experiencing violence. Verbal abuse was the most common form of violence reported (n=52; 75.4%). Anger, frustration and irritability were the most common symptoms experienced by the doctors who were subjected to violence at the workplace. Only 44.2% of doctors reported the event to the authorities. 'Poor communication skills' was considered to be the most common physician factor responsible for workplace violence against doctors. A large proportion of doctors are victims of violence by their patients or relatives. Violence is being under-reported. There is a need to encourage reporting of violence and prepare healthcare facilities to tackle this emerging issue for the safety of physicians.

  6. Workplace stress in nursing workers from an emergency hospital: Job Stress Scale analysis.

    PubMed

    Urbanetto, Janete de Souza; da Silva, Priscila Costa; Hoffmeister, Eveline; de Negri, Bianca Souza; da Costa, Bartira Ercília Pinheiro; Poli de Figueiredo, Carlos Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    This study identifies workplace stress according to the Job Stress Scale and associates it with socio-demographic and occupational variables of nursing workers from an emergency hospital. This is a cross-sectional study and data were collected through a questionnaire applied to 388 nursing professionals. Descriptive statistics were applied; univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The results indicate there is a significant association with being a nursing technician or auxiliary, working in the position for more than 15 years, and having low social support, with 3.84, 2.25 and 4.79 times more chances of being placed in the 'high strain job' quadrant. The study reveals that aspects related to the workplace should be monitored by competent agencies in order to improve the quality of life of nursing workers.

  7. Incidence and cost of nurse workplace violence perpetrated by hospital patients or patient visitors.

    PubMed

    Speroni, Karen Gabel; Fitch, Tammy; Dawson, Elaine; Dugan, Lisa; Atherton, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Workplace violence against nurses is a serious problem. Nurses from a US urban/community hospital system employing more than 5,000 nurses researched the incidence of workplace violence against nurses perpetrated by patients or visitors in their hospital system. Survey research and retrospective database review methods were used. Nurse participants (all system-employed nurse types) completed a 34-item validated survey in electronic format. Retrospective database review provided annual nurse workplace violence injury treatment and indemnity charges. Institutional review board approval was received. Survey research participants (N = 762) were primarily white female registered nurses, aged 26 to 64 years, with more than 10 years of experience. Over the past year, 76.0% experienced violence (verbal abuse by patients, 54.2%; physical abuse by patients, 29.9%; verbal abuse by visitors, 32.9%; and physical by visitors, 3.5%), such as shouting or yelling (60.0% by patients and 35.8% by visitors), swearing or cursing (53.5% by patients and 24.9% by visitors), grabbing (37.8% by patients and 1.1% by visitors), and scratching or kicking (27.4% by patients and 0.8% by visitors). Emergency nurses (12.1%) experienced a significantly greater number of incidents (P < .001). Nurses noted more than 50 verbal (24.3%) and physical (7.3%) patient/visitor violence incidents over their careers. Most serious career violence incidents (n = 595, 78.1%) were physical (63.7%) (60.8% by patients and 2.9% by visitors), verbal (25.4%) (18.3% by patients and 7.1% by visitors), and threatened physical assault (10.9%) (6.9% by patients and 4.0% by visitors). Perpetrators were primarily white male patients, aged 26 to 35 years, who were confused or influenced by alcohol or drugs. Per database review, annual workplace violence charges for the 2.1% of nurses reporting injuries were $94,156 ($78,924 for treatment and $15,232 for indemnity). Nurses are too commonly exposed to workplace violence

  8. Workplace violence against physicians and nurses in Palestinian public hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence against healthcare workers in Palestinian hospitals is common. However, this issue is under researched and little evidence exists. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences and possible risk factors for workplace violence against nurses and physicians working in public Palestinian hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional approach was employed. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on different aspects of workplace violence against physicians and nurses in five public hospitals between June and July 2011. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 271 physicians and nurses, of which 240 (88.7%) were adequately completed. Pearson’s chi-square analysis was used to test the differences in exposure to physical and non-physical violence according to respondents’ characteristics. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were used to assess potential associations between exposure to violence (yes/no) and the respondents’ characteristics using logistic regression model. Results The majority of respondents (80.4%) reported exposure to violence in the previous 12 months; 20.8% physical and 59.6% non-physical. No statistical difference in exposure to violence between physicians and nurses was observed. Males’ significantly experienced higher exposure to physical violence in comparison with females. Logistic regression analysis indicated that less experienced (OR: 8.03; 95% CI 3.91-16.47), and a lower level of education (OR: 3; 95% CI 1.29-6.67) among respondents meant they were more likely to be victims of workplace violence than their counterparts. The assailants were mostly the patients' relatives or visitors, followed by the patients themselves, and co-workers. Consequences of both physical and non-physical violence were considerable. Only half of victims received any type of treatment. Non-reporting of violence was a concern, main reasons were lack of

  9. Workplace violence against medical staff of Chinese children's hospitals: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Yan, Chun-Mei; Shi, Lei; Mu, Hui-Tong; Li, Xin; Li, An-Qi; Zhao, Cheng-Song; Sun, Tao; Gao, Lei; Fan, Li-Hua; Mu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    In China, medical staff of children's hospitals are commonly exposed to violence. However, few studies on medical violence are conducted in the settings of children's hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences, and potential risk factors of workplace violence (WPV) against medical staff of children's hospitals. A retrospective cross-sectional design was used. A self-administered questionnaire was utilized to collect data on 12 children's hospitals. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 2,400 medical staff; 1,932 valid questionnaires were collected. A chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were conducted. A total of 68.6% of respondents had experienced at least one WPV incident involving non-physical and/or physical violence in the past year. The perpetrators were mainly family members of patients (94.9%). Most of the WPV occurred during the day shift (70.7%) and in wards (41.8%). Males were 1.979 times (95% CI, 1.378 to 2.841) more likely than females to experience physical violence. Emergency departments were more exposed to physical violence than other departments. Oncology was 2.733 times (95% CI, 1.126 to 6.633) more exposed to non-physical violence than the emergency department. As a result of WPV, victims felt aggrieved and angry, work enthusiasm declined, and work efficiency was reduced. However, only 5.6% of the victims received psychological counseling. Medical staff are at high risk of violence in China's children's hospitals. Hospital administrators and related departments should pay attention to the consequences of these incidents. There is a need for preventive measures to protect medical staff and provide a safer workplace environment. Our results can provide reference information for intervention strategies and safety measures.

  10. Workplace violence against medical staff of Chinese children's hospitals: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Hui-tong; Li, Xin; Li, An-qi; Zhao, Cheng-song; Sun, Tao; Gao, Lei; Fan, Li-hua; Mu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background In China, medical staff of children’s hospitals are commonly exposed to violence. However, few studies on medical violence are conducted in the settings of children’s hospitals. The aim of this study is to assess the incidence, magnitude, consequences, and potential risk factors of workplace violence (WPV) against medical staff of children’s hospitals. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional design was used. A self-administered questionnaire was utilized to collect data on 12 children’s hospitals. The questionnaires were distributed to a stratified proportional random sample of 2,400 medical staff; 1,932 valid questionnaires were collected. A chi-square test and multiple logistic regression analysis were conducted. Results A total of 68.6% of respondents had experienced at least one WPV incident involving non-physical and/or physical violence in the past year. The perpetrators were mainly family members of patients (94.9%). Most of the WPV occurred during the day shift (70.7%) and in wards (41.8%). Males were 1.979 times (95% CI, 1.378 to 2.841) more likely than females to experience physical violence. Emergency departments were more exposed to physical violence than other departments. Oncology was 2.733 times (95% CI, 1.126 to 6.633) more exposed to non-physical violence than the emergency department. As a result of WPV, victims felt aggrieved and angry, work enthusiasm declined, and work efficiency was reduced. However, only 5.6% of the victims received psychological counseling. Conclusion Medical staff are at high risk of violence in China’s children’s hospitals. Hospital administrators and related departments should pay attention to the consequences of these incidents. There is a need for preventive measures to protect medical staff and provide a safer workplace environment. Our results can provide reference information for intervention strategies and safety measures. PMID:28609441

  11. Work mistreatment and hospital administrative staff: policy implications for healthier workplaces.

    PubMed

    Harlos, Karen P; Axelrod, Lawrence J

    2008-08-01

    Research on work life quality in hospitals has focused on how nurses and physicians perceive or react to work conditions. We extend this focus to another major professional group - healthcare administrators - to learn more about how these employees experience the work environment. Administrators merit such attention given their key roles in sustaining the financial health of the hospital and in fulfilling management functions efficiently to support consistent, high-quality care. Specifically, we examined mistreatment in the workplace experienced by administrative staff from a hospital in a large Canadian city. Three dimensions of mistreatment - verbal abuse, work obstruction and emotional neglect - have been associated with diminished well-being, work satisfaction and organizational commitment, along with stronger intent to leave. In this paper, we provide additional support for interpreting these three dimensions as mistreatment and report on their frequencies in our sample. We then consider implications for policy development (e.g., communication and conflict resolution skills training, mentoring programs, respect-at-work policies) to make workplaces healthier for these neglected but important healthcare professionals. Copyright © 2008 Longwoods Publishing.

  12. Effects of perceived workplace politics in hospitals on nurses' behavioural intentions in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Atinga, Roger A; Domfeh, Kwame A; Kayi, Esinam; Abuosi, Aaron; Dzansi, Gladys

    2014-03-01

    To examine the effects of perceived workplace politics in hospitals on nurses' job satisfaction, commitment, exit intention, job neglect, absenteeism and performance. One of the factors contributing to nurses' poor advancement in clinical practice is the existence of petty politics, which has given rise to competing self-interest. However, little evidence exists to inform policy direction on the implication of politics on nurses' behaviour. A total of 610 nurses comprising associate and nursing professionals completed a structured questionnaire modelled on workplace politics and its outcome variables. Descriptive statistics and mean comparisons were used to analyse data. A multivariate regression model was computed to examine association between perceived politics and nurses' behavioural intentions. Perceived politics potentially leads to decline in job satisfaction, commitment and work performance. However, perceived workplace politics is associated with high intention to leave, negligent behaviour and absenteeism. Measures aimed at improving nursing management and health-care delivery should be directed at minimising the use of politics to promote self-interest. Evidence-based best practices in nursing management centred on the creation of an enabling environment for nurses to participate in decision-making should be given critical attention. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Workplace sexual harassment in two general hospitals in Taiwan: the incidence, perception, and gender differences.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Jen; Chen, Chih-Ken; Sheng, Yi-Chen; Lu, Pei-Wen; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Huei-Jun; Lin, Jyh-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine sexual harassment (SH) among hospital staffs in Taiwan, in terms of three-month incidence rate, the frequency of each type and the perception of SH, perpetrated by coworkers, patients and patients' families and to investigate the gender differences for these issues. The subjects were employees at two general hospitals in Taiwan. The self-administered "Hospital Sexual Harassment Questionnaire" was sent to eligible staff, and the voluntary respondents answered the questionnaire anonymously. There were 536 respondents available for analysis, with an overall response rate of 43.4%. The three-month incidence rates of SH by coworkers, patients, and patients' families in our study population were 2.4, 4.3, and 1.7%, respectively. Telling sexual jokes was the most common type of SH. The males had greater opportunities to be exposed to porn videos by their coworkers. The females were more frequently exposed to sex jokes and remarks made by patients and their family members and unwanted physical touching by patients in the workplace. There were significant differences with regard to the perception of sex jokes and sexually explicit verbal descriptions as SH or not between genders. The information in this study can be a helpful reference for administrators in hospitals when they are establishing education plans and policies. It might be possible to prevent sexual harassment and misunderstandings between genders and to further avoid the negative impact on the emotional well-being of workers in hospitals.

  14. Concern about Workplace Violence and Its Risk Factors in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Xing, Kai; Zhang, Xue; Jiao, Mingli; Cui, Yu; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jinghua; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuchong; Zhao, Yanming; Li, Ye; Liang, Libo; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2016-08-10

    Workplace violence in Chinese township hospitals is a major public health problem. We identified the risk factors of healthcare workers' worry about experiencing workplace violence in 90 Chinese township hospitals and determined specific measures for differing stages of violence (based on crisis management theory). Participants were 440 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from Heilongjiang Province, China (response rate 84.6%). One hundred and six (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Regarding psychological violence, the most common type reported was verbal abuse (46.0%). While most (85.2%) respondents had some degree of worry about suffering violence, 22.1% were worried or very worried. Ordinal regression analysis revealed that being ≤35 years of age, having a lower educational level, having less work experience, and working night shifts were all associated with worry about workplace violence. Furthermore, those without experience of such violence were more likely to worry about it. Respondents' suggested measures for controlling violence included "widening channels on medical dispute solutions," "improving doctor-patient communication," and "advocating for respect for medical workers via the media." Results suggest the target factors for reducing healthcare workers' worry by according to the type of education and training and possible measures for limiting workplace violence in township hospitals.

  15. Concern about Workplace Violence and Its Risk Factors in Chinese Township Hospitals: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Kai; Zhang, Xue; Jiao, Mingli; Cui, Yu; Lu, Yan; Liu, Jinghua; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuchong; Zhao, Yanming; Li, Ye; Liang, Libo; Kang, Zheng; Wu, Qunhong; Yin, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence in Chinese township hospitals is a major public health problem. We identified the risk factors of healthcare workers’ worry about experiencing workplace violence in 90 Chinese township hospitals and determined specific measures for differing stages of violence (based on crisis management theory). Participants were 440 general practitioners and 398 general nurses from Heilongjiang Province, China (response rate 84.6%). One hundred and six (12.6%) respondents reported being physically attacked in their workplace in the previous 12 months. Regarding psychological violence, the most common type reported was verbal abuse (46.0%). While most (85.2%) respondents had some degree of worry about suffering violence, 22.1% were worried or very worried. Ordinal regression analysis revealed that being ≤35 years of age, having a lower educational level, having less work experience, and working night shifts were all associated with worry about workplace violence. Furthermore, those without experience of such violence were more likely to worry about it. Respondents’ suggested measures for controlling violence included “widening channels on medical dispute solutions,” “improving doctor-patient communication,” and “advocating for respect for medical workers via the media.” Results suggest the target factors for reducing healthcare workers’ worry by according to the type of education and training and possible measures for limiting workplace violence in township hospitals. PMID:27517949

  16. Study on factors inducing workplace violence in Chinese hospitals based on the broken window theory: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chenyu; Mou, Huitong; Xu, Wen; Li, Zhe; Liu, Xin; Shi, Lei; Peng, Boshi; Zhao, Yan; Gao, Lei; Fan, Lihua

    2017-07-28

    To explore the potential components of hospital workplace violence (HWPV) from the perspectives of hospital administrators and patients, and put forward corresponding strategies for its prevention and control. Using convenience sampling methods, 116 hospitals in 14 provinces of China were surveyed using a self-designed questionnaire. A cross-sectional study was used. Hospital administrators and patients from 116 hospitals in 14 provinces of China. First, hospital administrators point of workplace factors included six factors, with the following weighting coefficients: hospital administrator factors (29.40%), patient-related factors (20.08%), hospital environmental factors (19.45%), policy and institutional factors (11.92%), social psychological factors (10.26%), objective events factors (8.89%). Second, patients from the hospital workplace predisposing factors included three common factors. The weight coefficients of these were hospital-related factors (60.27%), social and governmental factors (23.64%) and patient-related factors (16.09%). A wide range of factors according to hospital administrators, patients and in the hospital environment play important roles in HWPV. From the perspectives of hospital administrators, communication skills and attitude to the service are important factors for inducing HWPV. From the perspective of patients, the characteristics of staff personalities and medical cognition are more important inducing factors. As far as social factors are concerned, economic compensation of medical malpractice is an important inducing factor for HWPV. In terms of environmental factors, management of Chinese medical hospitals, medical procedures and the layout of departments are all potential factors for the occurrence of violence. Corresponding defects were exposed in the health legal system and the supervision system for influencing public opinion. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  17. [Workplace bullying during specialty training in a pediatric hospital in Mexico: a little-noticed phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Vildósola, Ana Carolina; Mota-Nova, Alma Rebeca; Fajardo-Dolci, Germán Enrique; Reyes-Lagunes, L Isabel

    2017-01-01

    Workplace bullying (WB) is a hostile or intimidating behavior that is practiced against workers and has a negative impact on health, job performance, and the learning process. The objective was to research WB magnitude and its associated factors in Mexico. Mixed method study. A survey was designed and administered to all the residents in a pediatric hospital in Mexico who agreed to participate. The survey was divided in two sections: a) resident self-reported events of workplace bullying and associated factors, b) situations and factors of abuse were interrogated in a targeted manner. 137 residents participated in the survey, out of which 32% spontaneously reported have been bullied, and 82.4% harassing behaviors in the targeted section. Personal factors that cause WB in this population were: gender, mental skills and physical appearance. Situations that predispose to harassment were: hierarchy, and lack of supervision. Teachers were more frequently the perpetrators. Factors identified as significant for WB were: being female, younger than 29, studying pediatrics, being unmarried, and having reported harassment spontaneously. The frequency of WB and associated factors are similar to those reported by other authors. Half of the residents did not report spontaneously harassing events, but identified them in the targeted section, which suggests that they consider them as part of the "costumes and habits" during their medical training, or they consider them irrelevant.

  18. Workplace violence directed at nursing staff at a general hospital in southern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kamchuchat, Chalermrat; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Oncheunjit, Suparnee; Yip, Teem Wing; Sangthong, Rassamee

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to document the characteristics of workplace violence directed at nursing staff, an issue which has rarely been studied in a developing country. Two study methods, a survey and a key informant interview, were conducted at a general hospital in southern Thailand. A total of 545 out of 594 questionnaires sent were returned for statistical analysis (response rate=91.7%). The 12-month prevalence of violence experience was 38.9% for verbal abuse, 3.1% for physical abuse, and 0.7% for sexual harassment. Psychological consequences including poor relationships with colleagues and family members were the major concerns. Patients and their relatives were the main perpetrators in verbal and physical abuse while co-workers were the main perpetrators in cases of sexual harassment. Common factors to incidents of violence were psychological setting, illness of the perpetrators, miscommunication, and alcohol use. Logistic regression analysis showed younger age to be a personal risk factor. Working in the out-patient unit, trauma and emergency unit, operating room, or medical or surgical unit increased the odds of violence by 80%. Training related to violence prevention and control was found to be effective and decreased the risk of being a victim of violence by 40%. We recommend providing training to high risk groups as a means of controlling workplace violence directed at nursing staff.

  19. Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    King, L A; McInerney, P A

    2006-11-01

    Hospital workplace experiences of registered nurses that have contributed to their resignation in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The purpose of this research was to explore and describe the hospital workplace experiences that had contributed to the resignations of Registered Nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area. The broad perspective governing this research is qualitative in nature. The researcher employed a phenomenological approach specifically because the researcher was interested in identifying, describing and understanding the subjective experiences of individual nurses at the two Private and two Provincial health care institutions selected to participate in the study - in respect of their decision (s) to resign from their employment, and/or to leave the nursing profession. Two semistructured interviews were conducted with each participant by the researcher. The researcher applied the principle of theoretical saturation and a total of fifteen participants were interviewed and thirty interviews were conducted. Experiential themes and subthemes in the data were identified by a process of meaning condensation, and the data were managed by means of a qualitative software package - NVIVO (QSR - NUD*IST). The resignations of registered nurses in the Durban Metropolitan Area were found to be linked to their respective hospital workplace experiences. These experiences related to their physical working conditions and environment and included the following: unsupportive management structures, autocratic and dehumanizing management styles, negative stereotypy of nurses and the nursing profession, lack of autonomy in the workplace, professional jealousies and fractures within the profession, sub-optimal physical working conditions and shortage of staff, equipment and lack of appropriate surgical supplies, concerns regarding occupational safety e.g. the increasing exposure of health care personnel to HIV and AIDS; lack of opportunities for promotion or continuing one

  20. Parents as Partners in Early Education: Saturday School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Florissant School District, Ferguson, MO.

    This report describes how one school district developed a program of parent involvement in a Saturday early education program. The relationship between the home and the school is fostered primarily in two ways: through parental involvement in the Saturday School teaching team once every two months and through the home teaching visits. A crucial…

  1. Hospital consultants and workplace based assessments: how foundation doctors view these educational interactions?

    PubMed

    McKavanagh, P; Smyth, A; Carragher, A

    2012-03-01

    To determine how foundation year 2 (F2) doctors view the input of hospital consultants into their workplace based assessments (WPBAs). F2 doctors in Northern Ireland participated in an electronic survey to evaluate their experiences of foundation programme WPBAs. The opportunity to participate was available to all F2 doctors. The survey was performed using questions displayed electronically and the responses were collated using Turning Point technology. Two weeks later a focus group was convened to assess the issues raised by the electronic survey. Consultant input into foundation doctor's WPBAs was an infrequent occurrence. The F2 doctors expressed a clear view that they valued consultant input, when this occurred. The WPBAs gave the foundation doctors an opportunity to have a one to one learning opportunity with their supervising consultants. However, many of the WPBAs were completed by other doctors in training, in the grades immediately above the foundation doctors. It was suggested that friendship could influence these assessments. Completion of foundation doctors' assessments by hospital consultants is viewed as a low priority. These assessments are being completed to a large extent by fellow doctors in training. The learning opportunities are consequently less educationally productive. F2 doctors want more opportunities for valued consultant interaction with timely feedback. Suggestions are proposed to improve WPBA implementation. The present WPBA process lacks integrity and a change in approach is urgently required.

  2. [Impact of the legislation for smoke-free workplaces on respiratory health in hospitality workers--review of epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Polańska, Kinga; Hanke, Wojciech; Konieczko, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Environmental tobacco smoke exposure (ETS) is a significant risk factor for the development of many diseases, including lung cancer, lower respiratory tract infections, asthma and eye, throat and nasal irritations. Hospitality workers form an occupational group with high exposure to ETS in their workplace. Taking into account the health consequences of ETS exposure and high prevalence of exposure in public places, including workplaces, many countries have implemented the smoking ban that prohibits or restricts smoking in workplaces, including restaurants and bars. The epidemiological studies have indicated a significant reduction in the exposure level after implementation of the smoking ban. Most studies have also indicated a significant reduction in respiratory and sensory symptoms. The impact of the smoking ban on the lung function measurements is still not clear.

  3. General self-efficacy and the effect of hospital workplace violence on doctors' stress and job satisfaction in China.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yongcheng; Wang, Wei; Wang, Faxuan; Yao, Wu

    2014-06-01

    This study aims at exploring associations of general self-efficacy (GSE), workplace violence and doctors' work-related attitudes. In this study a cross-sectional survey design was applied. Questionnaires were administrated to 758 doctors working in 9 hospitals of Zhengzhou, Henan province, China, between June and October 2010. General information on age, gender, and years of working was collected, and the doctors' experience and witnessing workplace violence, job satisfaction, job initiative, occupational stress as well as GSE were measured. General linear regression analysis was performed in association analyses. Both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence were significantly positively correlated with the level of occupational stress but significantly negatively correlated with job satisfaction, job initiative, and GSE. General self-efficacy significantly modified relationships between both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence with occupational stress (β = 0.49 for experiencing violence; β = 0.43 for witnessing violence; p < 0.001) and with job satisfaction (β = -0.35 and -0.34, respectively; p < 0.05). However, it did not modify the relationships between both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence with job initiative (p > 0.05). The levels of occupational stress declined significantly with the increase of GSE, while job satisfaction increased significantly along with its increase. The effects of GSE on occupational stress and job satisfaction weakened as the frequency of violence increased. The findings suggest that GSE can modify effects of workplace violence on health care workers' stress and job satisfaction. Enhancing GSE in combination with stress reduction may lead to facilitating health care workers' recovery from workplace violence, and thereby improving their work-related attitudes.

  4. Evaluation of a workplace bullying cognitive rehearsal program in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Sharon J; Sheridan, Daniel; Jones, Ruth Ann; Speroni, Karen Gabel

    2011-09-01

    Workplace bullying is a serious problem faced by nurses nationally. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of workplace bullying and evaluate the effectiveness of a training program on cognitive rehearsal of responses to common bullying behaviors. This program to increase staff nurses' knowledge of management of workplace bullying consisted of three components: pilot survey testing, a piloted Internet-based survey administered to the medical and surgical nurses, and a 2-hour cognitive rehearsal training program on management of workplace bullying. The results showed that 80% of the nurses surveyed had experienced workplace bullying over the previous year. After the training program, nurses' knowledge of workplace bullying management significantly increased. Additionally, nurses were significantly more likely to report that they had observed bullying and had bullied others. Further, nurses felt more adequately prepared to handle workplace bullying. Results of the research support the provision of a workplace bullying management program for nurses and the need for a specific policy on workplace bullying. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H.; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36–2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136–1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21–4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13–2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself. PMID:26086703

  6. Extent, Nature, and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence in Public Tertiary Hospitals in China: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Zhao, Siqi; Jiao, Mingli; Wang, Jingtao; Peters, David H; Qiao, Hong; Zhao, Yuchong; Li, Ye; Song, Lei; Xing, Kai; Lu, Yan; Wu, Qunhong

    2015-06-16

    Using a cross-sectional survey design from 11 public tertiary hospitals (a specialist hospital, four Chinese medicine hospitals, and six general hospitals) in the urban areas of Heilongjiang, we determined the nature of workplace violence that medical staff have encountered in Chinese hospitals and identified factors associated with those experiences of violence. A total of 1129 health workers participated. The specialist hospital had the highest prevalence of physical violence (35.4%), while the general hospitals had the highest prevalence of non-physical violence (76%). Inexperienced medical staff (p < 0.001) were more likely to suffer non-physical violence than physical violence in Chinese medicine hospitals compared to experienced staff. Medical units (p = 0.001) had a high risk of non-physical violence, while surgical units (p = 0.005) had a high risk of physical violence. In general hospitals, staff with higher levels of anxiety about workplace violence were more vulnerable to both physical violence (1.67, 95% CI 1.36-2.10) and non-physical violence (1.309, 95% CI 1.136-1.508) compared to those with lower levels of anxiety, while rotating shift workers had a higher odds of physical violence (2.2, 95% CI 1.21-4.17) and non-physical violence (1.65, 95% CI 1.13-2.41) compared to fixed day shift workers. Thus, prevention should focus not only on high-risk sections of hospitals, but also on the nature of the hospital itself.

  7. The exploding spark: workplace violence in an infectious disease hospital--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Magnavita, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Workplace violence (WV) is an important occupational hazard for healthcare workers (HCWs). A longitudinal study was carried out on HCWs from an infectious disease hospital. Work-related stress, anxiety, and depression were measured at baseline in 2003, and they were reassessed in 2005, along with the assaults that occurred in the previous year. One-year prevalences of 6.2% and 13.9% were reported for physical and verbal aggressions, respectively. Perpetrators were mainly patients. The professional groups most frequently attacked were physicians, followed by nurses. Workers with job strain at baseline had a significant risk of being subject to aggression (OR 7.7; CI 95%, 3.3-17.9) in the following year. The relationship between job strain and subsequent WV remained significant even after correction for anxiety, depression, and other confounders. Conversely, experiencing WV was associated with a high risk of job strain and effort-reward imbalance in the following year. The final levels of anxiety and depression were predicted using regression models that included physical aggression among predictive variables. WV is the spark that sets off a problematic work situation. Effective prevention of WV can only be achieved within the framework of an overall improvement in the quality of work.

  8. Workplace empowerment and organizational commitment among nurses working at the Main University Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Ibrahem, Samaa Z; Elhoseeny, Taghareed; Mahmoud, Rasha A

    2013-08-01

    High-quality patient care depends on a nursing workforce that is empowered to provide care according to professional nursing standards. Numerous studies have established positive relationships between empowerment and important nursing outcomes such as work effectiveness, job satisfaction, and organizational commitment. A cross-sectional study design was used to assess the relationships between structural and psychological empowerment and their effects on hospital nurses' organizational commitment at the Main University Hospital in Alexandria governorate. The total number of nurses who participated in the study was 150 nurses, and four interview questionnaires were used to measure the study variables. The mean score percentage was higher for overall psychological empowerment (68.75%) than for overall structural empowerment (46.25%). There was a significant direct intermediate correlation between nurses' perceptions of overall structural and psychological work empowerment and their overall organizational commitment. There was no significant relationship between structural and psychological empowerment, organizational commitment and sociodemographic characteristics of nurses except for the overall organizational commitment with age (r=0.260), overall structural empowerment in the working department (P=0.031), and overall organizational commitment with nursing experience (significance=0.025). Overall psychological empowerment achieved a higher mean score percentage compared with overall structural empowerment. Changing workplace structures is within the mandate of nurses' managers in their roles as advocates for and facilitators of high-quality care. The most significant opportunity for improvement is in the area of formal power, including flexibility, adaptability, creativity associated with discretionary decision-making, visibility, and centrality to organizational purpose and goals.

  9. [External workplace violence against doctors in hospital services in Lima Metropolitana, Peru 2014].

    PubMed

    Tuya-Figueroa, Ximena; Mezones-Holguin, Edward; Monge, Eduardo; Arones, Ricardo; Mier, Milagros; Saravia, Mercedes; Torres, Jose; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2016-01-01

    . To calculate the frequency and factors associated with external workplace violence (EWV) against doctors in health inpatient services in the metropolitan area of Lima (Spanish: Lima Metropolitana), Peru. . A cross-sectional analytic study, which included doctors from the Ministry of Health (MINSA), Social Security (EsSalud), and the private subsector, was carried out. The frequency of EWV was measured throughout the entire professional practice during the previous 12 months and during the last month. Variables related to the doctor, assailant, and health service were measured. Raw and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated by means of a Poisson-family generalized linear model with non-parametric bootstrapping. . A total of 406 doctors participated; 31.5% were victims of EWV at least once during their professional practice, with 19.9% over the past 12 months and 7.6% during the last month. The chances of being threatened in the last 12 months increased if the doctor was male (adjusted PR [aPR]: 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1- 2.8), had graduated from a Peruvian university outside of the metropolitan area of Lima (aPR: 1.5; 95% CI = 1.1-2.4), worked at MINSA (aPR: 7.9; 95% CI = 2.24-50.73) or EsSalud (RR: 8.68; 95% CI = 2.26-56.17), and worked in the emergency (aPR: 1.9; 95% CI = 1.2-3.6) or operating room (aPR: 1.6; 95% CI = 1.1-2.3). Age, years of professional practice, or being a medical resident were not associated with EWV. . In the hospitals studied, a large number of doctors have been victims of EWV. Working in public services increases the possibility of violence. Implementation of support, identification, and primary prevention strategies in hospitals is recommended.

  10. The population impact of smoke-free workplace and hospitality industry legislation on smoking behaviour. Findings from a national population survey.

    PubMed

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Willemsen, Marc C; de Vries, Hein

    2011-04-01

    To study the impact of implementing smoke-free workplace and hospitality industry legislation on smoking behaviour. A cross-sectional population survey from 2001 to 2008 (n ≈ 18,000 per year) was used to assess trends and seasonal patterns in smoking and quitting, and to examine whether changes could be observed after the workplace smoking ban in the Netherlands in 2004 and the hospitality industry ban in 2008. Outcome measures were smoking prevalence, quit attempts and successful quit attempts. Interactions with educational level (socio-economic status) and bar visiting (exposure to the hospitality industry ban) were tested. The workplace ban was followed by a decrease in smoking prevalence (OR = 0.91, P < 0.001), but the hospitality industry ban was not (OR = 0.96, P = 0.127). Both bans, especially the workplace ban, were followed by an increase in quit attempts and successful quit attempts: workplace ban, OR = 1.31, P < 0.001; OR = 1.49, P < 0.001; hospitality industry ban, OR = 1.13, P = 0.013; OR = 1.44, P < 0.001. The workplace ban had a larger effect on successful quitting among higher-educated (OR = 0.35, P < 0.001) than on lower-educated respondents (OR = 0.74, P = 0.052). The hospitality industry ban had a larger effect on quit attempts among frequent bar visitors (OR = 1.48, P = 0.003) than on non-bar visitors (OR = 0.71, P = 0.014). A workplace smoking ban in the Netherlands was followed by more changes in smoking and quitting than a hospitality industry ban. The hospitality industry ban only appeared to have an impact on quit attempts, and not on smoking prevalence. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Workplace Violence toward Mental Health Staff Departments in Jordanian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Al-Azzam, Manar; Tawalbeh, Loai; Sulaiman, Mohammad; Al-Sagarat, Ahmad Yahya; Harb, Eman

    2017-02-06

    A cross-sectional study (n = 262) was conducted to assess the prevalence of workplace violence among mental health departments staff in Jordan. The findings showed that 67.2% of the respondents were victims of at least one violent incident in the last year. Verbal abuse was the most reported type of violence. Patients were considered as the main source of violence. The contributing factors to workplace violence include being unmarried and working longer shifts. Sadly, just being a healthcare worker was found to also be a factor in the incidence of increased workplace violence. As a result of these findings, workplace violence policies and legislation should be instituted, and mental health department staff should be trained on violence-management policies.

  12. Workplace violence against nurses--prevalence and association with hospital organizational characteristics and health-promotion efforts: Cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ching-Yao; Chiou, Shu-Ti; Chien, Li-Yin; Huang, Nicole

    2016-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of workplace violence and explore the role of hospital organizational characteristics and health promotion efforts in reducing hospital violence among nurses in Taiwan. Cross-sectional survey. One hundred hospitals across Taiwan. The final sample in our study comprised responses from 26,979 nurses. The data were obtained from a nationwide hospital survey, Physical and Mental Health and Safety Needs in Full-Time Health Care Staff, which was developed and conducted by the Bureau of Health Promotion, Taiwan, in 2011. The main dependent variable was whether nurses had experienced violence within the past year. Physical violence, threatened or intimidated personal safety, verbal violence or sexual harassment were all included. Of the 26,979 nurses, 13,392 nurses (49.6%) had experienced at least one episode of any type of violence in the past year; 5150 nurses (19.1%) had been exposed to physical violence, and 12,491 nurses (46.3%) had been exposed to non-physical violence. The prevalence of having experienced any violence varied widely and ranged from the highest (55.5%) in an emergency room or intensive care unit to the lowest (28.3%) among those aged 55-65 years. After adjusting for other characteristics, younger nurses were significantly more likely to be exposed to any violent threat. Nurses working in public hospitals had a significantly higher risk of workplace violence than those working in private hospitals. Significant variations were also observed among work units. Although nurses working in a certified health promoting hospital (HPH) did not have a lower risk of workplace violence, those working in an outstanding HPH had a significantly lower risk of workplace violence. A similar pattern was observed for non-physical violence. Workplace violence is a major challenge to workplace safety for nurses in hospitals. This large scale nurse survey identified individual, work and hospital characteristics associated with workplace violence

  13. Barriers to Effective Implementation of Programs for the Prevention of Workplace Violence in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blando, James; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hartley, Daniel; Casteel, Carri

    2014-12-04

    Effective workplace violence (WPV) prevention programs are essential, yet challenging to implement in healthcare. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers to implementation of effective violence prevention programs. After reviewing the related literature, the authors describe their research methods and analysis and report the following seven themes as major barriers to effective implementation of workplace violence programs: a lack of action despite reporting; varying perceptions of violence; bullying; profit-driven management models; lack of management accountability; a focus on customer service; and weak social service and law enforcement approaches to mentally ill patients. The authors discuss their findings in light of previous studies and experiences and offer suggestions for decreasing WPV in healthcare settings. They conclude that although many of these challenges to effective implementation of workplace violence programs are both within the program itself and relate to broader industry and societal issues, creative innovations can address these issues and improve WPV prevention programs.

  14. Barriers to Effective Implementation of Programs for the Prevention of Workplace Violence in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Blando, James; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hartley, Daniel; Casteel, Carri

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace violence (WPV) prevention programs are essential, yet challenging to implement in healthcare. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers to implementation of effective violence prevention programs. After reviewing the related literature, the authors describe their research methods and analysis and report the following seven themes as major barriers to effective implementation of workplace violence programs: a lack of action despite reporting; varying perceptions of violence; bullying; profit-driven management models; lack of management accountability; a focus on customer service; and weak social service and law enforcement approaches to mentally ill patients. The authors discuss their findings in light of previous studies and experiences and offer suggestions for decreasing WPV in healthcare settings. They conclude that although many of these challenges to effective implementation of workplace violence programs are both within the program itself and relate to broader industry and societal issues, creative innovations can address these issues and improve WPV prevention programs. PMID:26807016

  15. Barriers to Effective Implementation of Programs for the Prevention of Workplace Violence in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Blando, James; Ridenour, Marilyn; Hartley, Daniel; Casteel, Carri

    2015-01-01

    Effective workplace violence (WPV) prevention programs are essential, yet challenging to implement in healthcare. The aim of this study was to identify major barriers to implementation of effective violence prevention programs. After reviewing the related literature, the authors describe their research methods and analysis and report the following seven themes as major barriers to effective implementation of workplace violence programs: a lack of action despite reporting; varying perceptions of violence; bullying; profit-driven management models; lack of management accountability; a focus on customer service; and weak social service and law enforcement approaches to mentally ill patients. The authors discuss their findings in light of previous studies and experiences and offer suggestions for decreasing WPV in healthcare settings. They conclude that although many of these challenges to effective implementation of workplace violence programs are both within the program itself and relate to broader industry and societal issues, creative innovations can address these issues and improve WPV prevention programs.

  16. Patients' bill of rights and effective factors of workplace violence against female nurses on duty at Ilam teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aivazi, Ali-Ashraf; Menati, Waleyeh; Tavan, Hamed; Navkhasi, Sasan; Mehrdadi, Abuzar

    2017-01-01

    Workplace violence against female nurses is an increasing problem. In addition, recognition the rights of patients can reduce such violence against female nurses. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate workplace violence against female nurses in respect with patients' bill of rights at two public hospitals of Ilam in 2012. In a descriptive cross-sectional research, workplace violence against female nurses was studied. Data were gathered employing a researcher made questionnaire filled out by 106 female nurses. The questionnaire was on workplace, physical and verbal violence of patients and their attendants, and also the patient's rights as respected by nursing staff. Permission of university ethics committee was obtained. Data analyses were done by T-test and ANOVA in SPSS software. Totally, 90.6 % and 15.1 % of the participants were subjected to verbal and physical assaults by patients, respectively during last year of the study. Further, 92.5% and 11.3% of nurses experienced verbal and physical assaults by the patients' attendants, respectively. Most of the nursing staff believed that reporting aggressive attacks to the concerned officials would not be useful. A negative significant correlation was found between the aggressions of patients with age as well as marital status of nurses, (P= 0.04). Furthermore, a significant association was seen between physical violence of patients and the nurses' recognition of the patients' bill of rights (P= 0.03). Due to high rate of violence against female nurses, some proper and effective actions such as employing a trained security force along with legal punitive charges against violators through responsible officials are highly suggested. © 2017 KUMS, All rights reserved.

  17. Patients’ bill of rights and effective factors of workplace violence against female nurses on duty at Ilam teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aivazi, Ali Ashraf; Menati, Waleyeh; Tavan, Hamed; Navkhasi, Sasan; Mehrdadi, Abuzar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Workplace violence against female nurses is an increasing problem. In addition, recognizing the rights of patients can reduce such violence against female nurses. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to investigate workplace violence against female nurses in respect of patients' bill of rights at two public hospitals in Ilam in 2012. Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional research, workplace violence against female nurses was studied. Data were gathered employing a researcher made questionnaire filled out by 106 female nurses. The questionnaire was on workplace, physical and verbal violence of patients and their attendants, and also the patients' rights as respected by nursing staff. Permission of university ethics committee was obtained. Data analyses were done by T-test and ANOVA in SPSS software. Results: Totally, 90.6 % and 15.1 % of the participants were subjected to verbal and physical assaults by patients, respectively during last year of the study. Further, 92.5% and 11.3% of nurses experienced verbal and physical assaults by the patients' attendants, respectively. Most of the nursing staff believed that reporting aggressive attacks to the concerned officials would not be useful. A negative significant correlation was found between the aggressions of patients with age as well as marital status of nurses, (P= 0.04). Furthermore, a significant association was seen between physical violence of patients and the nurses’ recognition of the patients' bill of rights (P= 0.03). Conclusions: Due to high rate of violence against female nurses, some proper and effective actions such as employing a trained security force along with legal punitive charges against violators through responsible officials are highly suggested. PMID:28039684

  18. Project BELIEVE. Final Report. (A National Workplace Literacy Project with Bakery Europa and Straub Clinic & Hospital).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zane, Lawrence F. H.

    Bakery Europa and the Straub Clinic in Hawaii participated in Project BELIEVE, a 3-year (1995-98) workplace literacy project conducted in partnership with the University of Hawaii's College of Education. Instruction focused on the literacy, communication, interpersonal, and problem-solving skills needed to succeed in the baking and health care…

  19. Plan para las Escuelas "Sabatinas" (Plan for the "Saturday Schools").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campos, Miguel A.; Williams, David R.

    The Escuelas "Sabatinas" (Saturday Schools) program in Costa Rica will be for adults 18 and over who wish to obtain a primary school diploma on the basis of maturity, and who have enough general knowledge, intelligence, and maturity to undertake independent study supplemented by formal instruction. The course will run two years, 36 weeks…

  20. Saturday Morning Cartoons and Children's Perceptions of Social Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, Karen

    This paper examines the effects of Saturday morning cartoons on children's perceptions of social reality. The study consisted of an analysis of programs appearing between 8 and 11 o'clock in the morning on September 15, 1990, and June 9, 1992, focusing on the ethnicity, gender, and age of characters, the positive or negative portrayal of…

  1. Saturday Morning Children's Television Advertising: A Longitudinal Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Content of ads on Saturday children's television programs in 1993 (n=378) and 1999 (n=385) was compared with dietary recommendations and advertising guidelines. Cereals and foods high in sugar or fat dominated ads. Results were compared with earlier studies, finding that over 30 years, ads adhered to advertising guidelines but did not reflect…

  2. Team Teaching in the Saturday Morning Search for Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Pearl G.; And Others

    The Marie Curie Mathematics and Science Center at St. Thomas Aquinas College (New York), in a comprehensive effort to improve mathematics and science education, offers the Saturday Morning Search for Solutions enrichment program for area students in grades 7-12. The program is interdisciplinary, connecting technology and the study of societal…

  3. Saturday Morning Children's Television Advertising: A Longitudinal Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd-Bredbenner, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Content of ads on Saturday children's television programs in 1993 (n=378) and 1999 (n=385) was compared with dietary recommendations and advertising guidelines. Cereals and foods high in sugar or fat dominated ads. Results were compared with earlier studies, finding that over 30 years, ads adhered to advertising guidelines but did not reflect…

  4. Saturday Schools and Tutoring as Interventions. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Being clear about the reason for academic intervention programs is essential prior to establishing programs. Saturday School and tutoring are two approaches that can be helpful in student retention and increasing graduation rates but only if they are set up to meet the specific needs of the school's students. There are no common measures of the…

  5. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  6. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie J; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h(-1) and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h(-1) to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  7. Intention to leave the workplace among nurses working with cancer patients in acute care hospitals in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Lagerlund, Magdalena; Sharp, Lena; Lindqvist, Rikard; Runesdotter, Sara; Tishelman, Carol

    2015-12-01

    To examine associations between perceived leadership and intention to leave the workplace due to job dissatisfaction among registered nurses (RNs) who care for patients with cancer. We also examine intention to leave in relation to proportion of cancer patients, length of time in practice, perceived adequacy of cancer care education, and burnout. The data originated from the Swedish component of RN4CAST, based on a survey of RNs working with in-patient care in all acute care hospitals in Sweden. The 7412 RNs reporting ≥10% patients with cancer on their unit were included in this analysis. Data were collected on perceptions of work environment, burnout, future employment intentions, and demographic characteristics. Additional questions related to cancer care. About 1/3 of all RNs intended to leave their workplace within the next year. Intention to leave was more prevalent among RNs reporting less favourable perceptions of leadership, who had worked ≤ two years as RN, who reported having inadequate cancer care education, and with higher burnout scores. Associations between leadership and intention to leave were stronger among RNs in the profession > two years, who reported having adequate cancer care education, and with lower burnout scores. Perception of leadership is strongly associated with intention to leave among RNs in both specialized and general cancer care. This suggests a crucial area for improvement in order to reduce turnover rates. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. [Health promotion and obesity in the workplace among health care workers of a hospital in Catania (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Farruggia, E; Scialfa, Valentina; Bellia, S; Palermo, F; Bellia, M; Giammanco, G

    2012-01-01

    Italian Legislative Decree No. 81/2008 foresees the involvement of a "specialised physician" in activities for the promotion of health at the workplace. These activities are aimed at modifying erroneous lifestyles (such as smoking, drinking, bad diet, etc.) which are responsible for serious illnesses and also for repercussions on the assessment of fitness for a specific task. Obesity, as we know, represents the major risk factor in the onset of metabolic, neoplastic, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases and also in the increased incidence of accidents at the workplace and sick absence. A specific questionnaire was administered to 700 health care workers of a Hospital in Catania to estimate the incidence of factors which favour the onset of these diseases: factors such as familiarity, endocrinal dysfunction problems (diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism), shift work and little physical exercise. Statistical processing of the data confirmed, partially, that little physical exercise, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, familiarity in the > 36 age group were the major risk factors in the onset of obesity, as reported in the literature. However, contrary to the literature reports, shift work did not seem to be a risk factor in the sample under study. A programme of rehabilitation, on a voluntary basis, will be offered to those workers who are overweight/obese. This programme will involve professionals such as nutritionists, endocrinologists and psychologists, and it will aim at improving workers' health conditions as well as their work performance.

  9. Sexual life satisfaction and its associated socio-demographic and workplace factors among Chinese female nurses of tertiary general hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ji, Feng; Jiang, Deguo; Lin, Xiaodong; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Weifang; Cheng, Ce; Lin, Chongguang; Hu, Lirong; Zhuo, Chuanjun

    2017-08-15

    Adverse workplace factors such as job stress are reported to be associated with poor physical and mental health of nurses. However, associations between occupational factors and sexual life satisfaction (SLS) of nurses remain understudied. This study investigated SLS of Chinese female nurses of tertiary general hospitals and socio-demographic and occupational factors associated with reduced SLS of nurses. In this cross-sectional survey, 393 Chinese female nurses of four tertiary general hospitals completed a standardized socio-demographic and occupational characteristics questionnaire, Zung's Self-rating Scale for Depression, Job Content Questionnaire, and a self-report SLS question. Multiple ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors related to reduced SLS. Fourteen point five percent female nurses were dissatisfied with their current sex lives. In multiple regression, related factors for decreased SLS included being unmarried (OR = 1.49), shift work (OR = 1.92), contract employment (OR = 1.63), high job demands (OR = 2.21), low job control (OR = 1.88), inadequate social support (OR = 2.32), and depression (OR = 3.14). Chinese female nurses of tertiary general hospitals have poor SLS. Reducing job stress and providing psycho-social support may help improve SLS of nurses.

  10. 42. Open house at the site, Saturday, October 3, 1992. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Open house at the site, Saturday, October 3, 1992. View north/northwest. Photograph shows the lock support floor joists on sleepers and the mortised crib walls. The 1 inch board at the base of the crib wall is the pre-super construction 'footprint' for alignment. - Wabash & Erie Canal, Lock No. 2, 8 miles east of Fort Wayne, adjacent to U.S. Route 24, New Haven, Allen County, IN

  11. Impact of organizational policies and practices on workplace injuries in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Tveito, T H; Sembajwe, G; Boden, L I; Dennerlein, J T; Wagner, G R; Kenwood, C; Stoddard, A M; Reme, S E; Hopcia, K; Hashimoto, D; Shaw, W S; Sorensen, G

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to assess relationships between perceptions of organizational practices and policies (OPP), social support, and injury rates among workers in hospital units. A total of 1230 hospital workers provided survey data on OPP, job flexibility, and social support. Demographic data and unit injury rates were collected from the hospitals' administrative databases. Injury rates were lower in units where workers reported higher OPP scores and high social support. These relationships were mainly observed among registered nurses. Registered nurses perceived coworker support and OPP as less satisfactory than patient care associates (PCAs). Nevertheless, because of the low number of PCAs at each unit, results for the PCAs are preliminary and should be further researched in future studies with larger sample sizes. Employers aiming to reduce injuries in hospitals could focus on good OPP and supportive work environment.

  12. Critical care nurses' perceptions of workplace empowerment, magnet hospital traits and mental health.

    PubMed

    Tigert, Judy A; Laschinger, Heather K Spence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test Kanter's Theory (1977, 1993) of Structural Power in Organizations in a sample of Canadian critical care nurses. A secondary analysis of data from a larger descriptive correlational survey design was used to examine the relationships between perceived empowerment, perceived magnet hospital traits and critical care nurses' mental health (n = 75). The instruments in this study included the Conditions for Work Effectiveness Questionnaire II, the Job Activities Scale II, the Organizational Relationship Scale II, the Nurses Work Index-Revised, the Emotional Exhaustion Subscale, and the State of Mind Subscale. Empowerment was significantly and positively related to perceptions of magnet hospital traits (r = .49, p = 0.001). The combination of empowerment and magnet hospital traits explained a significant amount of the variance in mental health indicators: burn-out (19%) and state of mind (12%).

  13. Analysing workplace violence towards health care staff in public hospitals using alternative ordered response models: the case of north-eastern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ali Kemal; Oktay, Erkan; Çebi, Kübranur

    2017-09-01

    The main objective of this article is to determine key factors that may have a significant effect on the verbal abuse, emotional abuse and physical assault of health care workers in north-eastern Turkey. A self-administered survey was completed by 450 health care workers in three well-established hospitals in Erzurum, Turkey. Because of the discrete and ordered nature of the dependent variable of the survey, the data were analysed using four distinctive ordered response models. Results revealed that several key variables were found to be a significant determinant of workplace violence, such as the type of health institution, occupational position, weekly working hours, weekly shift hours, number of daily patient contacts, age group of the respondents, experience in the health sector, training against workplace violence and current policies of the hospitals and the Turkish Ministry of Health.

  14. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A; Bauer, Georg F; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effect of a change in second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3-12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine-specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose-dependent manner in the intervention group as compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI 0.2-4.4; p = 0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7% (95% CI 0.9-10.2; p = 0.02) higher high-frequency component and a 0.72% (95% CI 0.40-1.05; p < 0.001) lower PWV. PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk.

  15. The effect of workplace smoking bans on heart rate variability and pulse wave velocity of non-smoking hospitality workers

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Bauer, Georg F.; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Moeller, Alexander; Röösli, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of a change in second hand smoke (SHS) exposure on heart rate variability (HRV) and pulse wave velocity (PWV), this study utilized a quasi-experimental setting when a smoking ban was introduced. Methods HRV, a quantitative marker of autonomic activity of the nervous system, and PWV, a marker of arterial stiffness, were measured in 55 non-smoking hospitality workers before and 3 to 12 months after a smoking ban and compared to a control group that did not experience an exposure change. SHS exposure was determined with a nicotine specific badge and expressed as inhaled cigarette equivalents per day (CE/d). Results PWV and HRV parameters significantly changed in a dose dependent manner in the intervention group compared to the control group. A one CE/d decrease was associated with a 2.3% (95% CI: 0.2, 4.4; p=0.031) higher root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD), a 5.7 % (95% CI: 0.9, 10.2; p=0.02) higher high frequency component and a 0.72% (95 % CI: 0.40–1.05; p<0.001) lower PWV. Conclusions PWV and HRV significantly improved after introducing smoke-free workplaces indicating a decreased cardiovascular risk. PMID:24504155

  16. Workplace violence in different settings and among various health professionals in an Italian general hospital: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Paola; Silvestri, Monica; Artoni, Cecilia; Di Lorenzo, Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    Background Workplace violence (WPV) against health professionals is a global problem with an increasing incidence. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to examine the frequency and characteristics of WPV in different settings and professionals of a general hospital and 2) to identify the clinical and organizational factors related to this phenomenon. Methods The study was cross-sectional. In a 1-month period, we administered the “Violent Incident Form” to 745 professionals (physicians, head nurses, nurses, nursing assistants), who worked in 15 wards of a general hospital in northern Italy. Results With a response rate of 56%, 45% of professionals reported WPV. The most frequently assaulted were nurses (67%), followed by nursing assistants (18%) and physicians (12%). The first two categories were correlated, in a statistically significant way, with the risk of WPV (P=0.005, P=0.004, multiple logistic regression). The violent incidents more frequently occurred in psychiatry department (86%), emergency department (71%), and in geriatric wards (57%). The assailants more frequently were males whereas assaulted professionals more often were females. Men committed physical violence more frequently than women, in a statistically significant way (P=0.034, chi-squared test). Verbal violence (51%) was often committed by people in a lucid and normal state of consciousness; physical violence (49%) was most often perpetrated by assailants affected by dementia, mental retardation, drug and substance abuse, or other psychiatric disorders. The variables positively related to WPV were “calling for help during the attack” and “physical injuries suffered in violent attack” (P=0.02, P=0.03, multiple logistic regression). Conclusion This study suggests that violence is a significant phenomenon and that all health workers, especially nurses, are at risk of suffering aggressive assaults. WPV presented specific characteristics related to the health care settings, where

  17. Workplace violence in different settings and among various health professionals in an Italian general hospital: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Paola; Silvestri, Monica; Artoni, Cecilia; Di Lorenzo, Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    Workplace violence (WPV) against health professionals is a global problem with an increasing incidence. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to examine the frequency and characteristics of WPV in different settings and professionals of a general hospital and 2) to identify the clinical and organizational factors related to this phenomenon. The study was cross-sectional. In a 1-month period, we administered the "Violent Incident Form" to 745 professionals (physicians, head nurses, nurses, nursing assistants), who worked in 15 wards of a general hospital in northern Italy. With a response rate of 56%, 45% of professionals reported WPV. The most frequently assaulted were nurses (67%), followed by nursing assistants (18%) and physicians (12%). The first two categories were correlated, in a statistically significant way, with the risk of WPV (P=0.005, P=0.004, multiple logistic regression). The violent incidents more frequently occurred in psychiatry department (86%), emergency department (71%), and in geriatric wards (57%). The assailants more frequently were males whereas assaulted professionals more often were females. Men committed physical violence more frequently than women, in a statistically significant way (P=0.034, chi-squared test). Verbal violence (51%) was often committed by people in a lucid and normal state of consciousness; physical violence (49%) was most often perpetrated by assailants affected by dementia, mental retardation, drug and substance abuse, or other psychiatric disorders. The variables positively related to WPV were "calling for help during the attack" and "physical injuries suffered in violent attack" (P=0.02, P=0.03, multiple logistic regression). This study suggests that violence is a significant phenomenon and that all health workers, especially nurses, are at risk of suffering aggressive assaults. WPV presented specific characteristics related to the health care settings, where the aggression occurred. Prevention programs

  18. Psychosocial precursors and physical consequences of workplace violence towards nurses: a longitudinal examination with naturally occurring groups in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu-Qin; Spector, Paul E; Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Gallant-Roman, Mary; Powell, Julie

    2012-09-01

    Workplace violence towards nurses is prevalent and consequential, contributing to nurses' reduced health and safety, worsened job attitudes, and compromised productivity. To examine if organizational violence prevention climate as perceived by nurses predicts nurses' physical violence exposure and if physical violence exposure predicts nurses' somatic symptoms and musculoskeletal disorder symptoms. A two-wave longitudinal design with naturally occurring groups, with a 6-month interval. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression were applied to test the proposed hypotheses among 176 nurses from two hospitals in the U.S. who participated in both surveys required by this study. All nurses from the two hospitals were recruited to participate voluntarily. The response rate was 30% for the first survey and 36% for the follow-up survey. Among the subjects, only 8 were male. On average, the subjects were about 45 years old, had a job tenure of about 17 years, and worked approximately 37 h per week. Violence prevention climate, specifically the dimension of perceived pressure against violence prevention, predicted nurses' chance of being exposed to physical violence over six months (odds ratio 1.69), with no evidence found that violence exposure affected change in climate reports. In addition, results supported that nurses' physical violence exposure had effects on somatic symptoms, and upper body, lower extremity, and low back pain over six months. Findings of this study suggest that reducing organizational pressure against violence prevention will help decrease the chance of nurses' physical violence exposure and benefit their health and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Workplace physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing experienced by nurses at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Aksakal, Fatma Nur Baran; Karaşahin, Emine Füsun; Dikmen, Asiye Uğraş; Avci, Emine; Ozkan, Seçil

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of and risk factors for physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing experienced by nurses in a university hospital. This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Gazi University Medical Faculty Hospital. A questionnaire form recommended by the WHO and the International Labor Organization was administered through face-to-face interviews to determine the violence experienced in the past 12 months by nurses. The prevalence of physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing was 13.9%, 41.8%, and 17.1%, respectively. Working more than 40 h per week increased the risk of physical violence by 1.86 times. The majority of nurses who experienced verbal violence and mobbing were significantly more willing to change their work, their institution, and their profession if given the opportunity. Fewer than one-fourth of the victims indicated they reported any incident. We knew that the prevalence of physical violence, verbal violence, and mobbing were high among nurses and that incidents were underreported, and the study corroborated this information. What this study adds to the topic is that long working hours increased the prevalence of physical violence and was defined as an important contributory factor.

  20. Why Saturday could be both green and red in synesthesia.

    PubMed

    Miozzo, Michele; Laeng, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    It has long been observed that certain words induce multiple synesthetic colors, a phenomenon that has remained largely unexplored. We report here on the distinct synesthetic colors two synesthetes experienced with closed sets of concepts (digits, weekdays, months). For example, Saturday was associated with green, like other word starting with s; however, Saturday also had its specific color (red). Auditory priming and Visual Color Stroop tasks were used to understand the cognitive mechanisms supporting the distinct synesthetic colors. Results revealed that processing of word segments and whole words was specifically involved in each type of synesthetic colors. However, these mechanisms differed between participants, as they could relate either to orthography (and written words) or phonology (and spoken words). Further differences concerned the word representations, which varied as to whether or not they encoded serial positions. In addition to clarifying the cognitive mechanisms underlying the distinct synesthetic colors, our results offer some clues for understanding the neurocognitive underpinnings of a rather common form of synesthesia.

  1. The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretz, N.; Lamarche, P.; Lagin, L.; Ritter, C.; Carroll, D. L.

    1996-11-01

    The Science on Saturday Program at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory consists of a series of Saturday morning lectures on various topics in science by scientists, engineers, educators, and others with an interesting story. This program has been in existence for over twelve years and has been advertised to and primarily aimed at the high school level. Topics ranging from superconductivity to computer animation and gorilla conservation to pharmaceutical design have been covered. Lecturers from the staff of Princeton, Rutgers, AT and T, Bristol Meyers Squibb, and many others have participated. Speakers have ranged from Nobel prize winners, astronauts, industrialists, educators, engineers, and science writers. Typically, there are eight to ten lectures starting in January. A mailing list has been compiled for schools, science teachers, libraries, and museums in the Princeton area. For the past two years AT and T has sponsored buses for Trenton area students to come to these lectures and an effort has been made to publicize the program to these students. The series has been very popular, frequently overfilling the 300 seat PPPL auditorium. As a result, the lectures are videotaped and broadcast to a large screen TV for remote viewing. Lecturers are encouraged to interact with the audience and ample time is provided for questions.

  2. Saturday School: Keeping Students in Class and improving the Discipline Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stenerson, Roger W.; Stouffer, Jeffrey E.

    1994-01-01

    As a rural Maryland middle school found, Saturday school keeps students in class. Assigning students to 3.5 hours of school attendance on a Saturday can eliminate inschool suspension and reduce out-of-school suspension; provide a different discipline avenue for administrators; reduce the number of major disciplinary offenses; increase the total…

  3. Psychological outcomes following the Victorian Black Saturday bushfires.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Richard A; Waters, Elizabeth; Gibbs, Lisa; Gallagher, H Colin; Pattison, Philippa; Lusher, Dean; MacDougall, Colin; Harms, Louise; Block, Karen; Snowdon, Elyse; Sinnott, Vikki; Ireton, Greg; Richardson, John; Forbes, David

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to map the prevalence and predictors of psychological outcomes in affected communities 3-4 years after the Black Saturday bushfires in the state of Victoria, Australia. Baseline assessment of a longitudinal cohort study in high-, medium-, and low-affected communities in Victoria. Participants included 1017 residents of high-, medium-, and low-affected fire communities. Participants were surveyed by means of a telephone and web-based interview between December 2011 and January 2013. The survey included measures of fire-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and general PTSD from other traumatic events, major depressive episode, alcohol use, and general psychological distress. The majority of respondents in the high- (77.3%), medium- (81.3%), and low-affected (84.9%) communities reported no psychological distress on the K6 screening scale. More participants in the high-affected communities (15.6%) reported probable PTSD linked to the bushfires than medium- (7.2%) and low-affected (1.0%) communities (odds ratio (OR): 4.57, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.61-8.00, p = 0.000). Similar patterns were observed for depression (12.9%, 8.8%, 6.3%, respectively) (OR: 1.83, 95% CI: 1.17-2.85, p = 0.008) and severe psychological distress (9.8%, 5.0%, 4.9%, respectively) (OR: 2.08, 95% CI: 1.23-3.55, p = 0.007). All communities reported elevated rates of heavy drinking (24.7%, 18.7%, 19.6%, respectively); however, these were higher in the high-affected communities (OR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.01-1.89, p = 0.04). Severe psychological distress was predicted by fear for one's life in the bushfires, death of someone close to them in the bushfires, and subsequent stressors. One-third of those with severe psychological distress did not receive mental health assistance in the previous month. Several years following the Black Saturday bushfires the majority of affected people demonstrated resilience without indications of psychological distress. A significant minority of people

  4. Three-year follow-up of attitudes and smoking behaviour among hospital nurses following enactment of France's national smoke-free workplace law.

    PubMed

    Fathallah, Nadia; Maurel-Donnarel, Elodie; Baumstarck-Barrau, Karine; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated among hospital nurses the smoking status, knowledge and attitudes regarding smoking cessation services, and smoking behaviour 3years after the implementation of smoke-free workplace law (decree no. 2006-1386). A descriptive study was undertaken in a public referral hospital in the South of France. Between February and April 2010, a questionnaire was distributed to the nurses. Data on demographic information, smoking status, behaviour and attitudes regarding smoking addiction, and knowledge regarding smoking cessation services were collected. Changes in nurses' smoking habits were studied through a former study conducted in this hospital a year after the law had come into effect. Three years after the enactment of the smoking ban, 30% (30% in 2008) reported themselves as current smokers, 26% (25% in 2008) as ex-smokers and 44% (45% in 2008) as non-smokers. Among smokers, 72% (68% in 2008) declared they had decreased tobacco consumption during working hours and 50% (29% in 2008) daily cigarette consumption. The majority of nurses (88%) supported the smoke-free law. A higher percentage of smokers than non smokers have knowledge of smoking cessation services. The smoking prevalence among hospital nurses seemed to have remained constant between 2008 and 2010 despite a better compliance with the law. France's national smoke-free workplace law is associated with a reduction in tobacco consumption and exposure to second-hand smoke in nurses but not smoking prevalence. The other measures of the MPOWER package have to be reinforced. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SATURDAY: EPA Administrator to Deliver Remarks at Third Annual Broccoli Festival

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - On Saturday, April 25, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will give remarks at the Third Annual Broccoli City Festival's Earth Day celebration. Administrator McCarthy will speak about EPA's efforts to implement President Obama's Climate Ac

  6. A Study of Workplace Violence Experienced by Doctors and Associated Risk Factors in a Tertiary Care Hospital of South Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mukesh; Das, Timiresh; Pardeshi, Geeta; Kishore, Jugal; Padmanandan, Arun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The increasing incidences of violence against doctors in their workplaces are an important reason for stress among these healthcare workers. Many incidences of workplace violence against doctors have been reported in the past and are also being continuously reported from different parts of the country as well as the world. Aim To determine the prevalence of workplace violence among doctors and to study the associated risk factors in a tertiary care hospital of Delhi, India. Material and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered semi-structured questionnaire. The contents were: data related to the workplace, incidences at work, violence prevention policy of the institution, reporting of incidences and follow-up, education and training for violence management. A total of 151 doctors participated in the study. Results Total participants in the study were 151. The mean age of study participants was 26.73±4.24 years. Almost half (47.02%; 44.56% of males and 50.84% of females) of the doctors reported having an experience of violence during work hours in past 12 months. Among the cases, 39.4% were reported from Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology while Surgery, Medicine and other departments reported 29.6%, 26.8% and 4.2% respectively. Patients or their relatives were perpetrators in most of the cases. Maximum (87.3%) of the reported cases were of verbal violence while 8.6% of the cases were of physical violence. Younger doctors with less work experience were more prone to physical violence. Regarding the time of violence, 35.1% of such cases occurred during afternoon while 30.1% of them took place at night. Conclusion A large number of doctors had experienced violence in past 12 months in a tertiary care hospital of South Delhi, India. Verbal violence came out to be most common form of violence experienced by the doctors. Afternoon or night hours were the timings when majority of such cases were reported. PMID:28050406

  7. Localized enhancements in fire danger during the 'Black Saturday' fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, T. P.; Engel, C. B.; Reeder, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    On Saturday 7 February 2009 a series of fire complexes occurred over the state of Victoria, Australia. The fires caused more than 150 fatalities, the destruction of more than 2000 residences, and decimated a number of townships. The meteorological conditions on 7 February for the region were categorized as the worst fire weather conditions on record. Specifically, the maximum temperature exceeded 45 C (113 F) and gusty surface winds were sustained at 15 m/s (30 knots) for most of the day. These conditions were followed by the passage of a strong cold front in the late afternoon / early evening. Moreover, vegetation and fuels had suffered significant drying over the prior weeks due to a sequence of hot days and a record heatwave. In addition to these broad scale meteorological conditions, numerous mesoscale atmospheric processes contributed to localized enhancement in fire danger in the vicinity of many of the fires; these phenomena may have contributed to the extraordinary nature of some of the fires occurring that day. This study documents these localized processes using a combination of surface observations and an extremely high-resolution numerical weather prediction model with a horizontal resolution of 500 m. The observations and model forecast identify many notable phenomena of relevance to fire danger that persist throughout the day. These include enhanced down-slope surface winds and organized boundary layer horizontal convective rolls (HCRs). The HCRs are responsible for significant spatial variability in surface winds and forest fire danger index (FFDI). The model forecast elucidates the complex interaction between the cold front and the terrain, including the large variability in the timing and direction of the cool change. Finally, two nocturnal bores are identified that propagate ahead of the cool change; such bores have the potential to cause rapid, yet unexpected, changes to fire danger. In addition to documenting these important phenomena, the model

  8. Workplace Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... violence such as physical assaults, or threatening or violent behavior, are a growing problem in the workplace. ... experience workplace violence. Encourages prompt reporting of all violent incidents and recordkeeping of incidents to assess risk ...

  9. Effects of the Workplace Health Promotion Activities Soccer and Zumba on Muscle Pain, Work Ability and Perceived Physical Exertion among Female Hospital Employees.

    PubMed

    Barene, Svein; Krustrup, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This 40-week workplace physical training RCT investigated the effect of soccer and Zumba, respectively, on muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during work among female hospital employees. 107 hospital employees were cluster-randomized into two training groups, and a control group. The training was conducted outside working hours as two-three 1-h sessions per week for the first 12 weeks, and continued as one-two 1-h sessions per week for the last 28 weeks. Muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and RPE during work were measured at baseline and after 12 and 40 weeks. After 12 weeks, both the soccer (-1.9, 95% CI, -3.0, -0.8, P = 0.001) and the Zumba group (-1.3, 95% CI, -2.3, -0.3, P = 0.01) reduced the pain intensity (on a scale from 0 to 10) in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.109), whereas only the soccer group (-1.9, 95% CI, -3.2, -0.7, P = 0.002, eta squared = 0.092) showed a reduction after 40 weeks referencing the control group. After 40 weeks, both the soccer (-16.4 days, 95% CI, -29.6, -3.2, P<0.02) and the Zumba group (-16.6 days, 95% CI, -28.9, -4.2, P<0.01) reduced the pain duration during the past 3 months in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.077). No significant effects on intensity or duration of pain in the lower back, RPE during work or work ability were found. The present study indicates that workplace initiated soccer and Zumba training improve neck-shoulder pain intensity as well as duration among female hospital employees. International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN 61986892.

  10. The incidence and risk factors of workplace violence towards female nurses reported via internet in an acute psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Ching; Huang, Chuan-Ju; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Wang, Jung-Der

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a prospective follow-up study to explore incidence and risk factors related to workplace violence towards nurses. Seventy-seven volunteers were recruited to complete a baseline questionnaire. Participants then used a designated Web site to report violent incidents they encountered during a 6-month period. A generalized estimating equation was used for data analysis. A total of 74 members completed the study; 456 events were reported. The incidence rates of various types of violence are reported in this paper. Risk factors for violence included short duration of employment, marital status, and a high level of anxiety. Strategies to reduce future violence from psychiatric patients include preplacement education that targets this high-risk group of nurses and efforts to reduce the staff anxiety levels.

  11. Effects of the Workplace Health Promotion Activities Soccer and Zumba on Muscle Pain, Work Ability and Perceived Physical Exertion among Female Hospital Employees

    PubMed Central

    Barene, Svein; Krustrup, Peter; Holtermann, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This 40-week workplace physical training RCT investigated the effect of soccer and Zumba, respectively, on muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during work among female hospital employees. Methods 107 hospital employees were cluster-randomized into two training groups, and a control group. The training was conducted outside working hours as two-three 1-h sessions per week for the first 12 weeks, and continued as one-two 1-h sessions per week for the last 28 weeks. Muscle pain intensity and duration, work ability, and RPE during work were measured at baseline and after 12 and 40 weeks. Results After 12 weeks, both the soccer (−1.9, 95% CI, −3.0, −0.8, P = 0.001) and the Zumba group (−1.3, 95% CI, −2.3, −0.3, P = 0.01) reduced the pain intensity (on a scale from 0 to 10) in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.109), whereas only the soccer group (−1.9, 95% CI, −3.2, −0.7, P = 0.002, eta squared = 0.092) showed a reduction after 40 weeks referencing the control group. After 40 weeks, both the soccer (-16.4 days, 95% CI, −29.6, −3.2, P<0.02) and the Zumba group (-16.6 days, 95% CI, −28.9, −4.2, P<0.01) reduced the pain duration during the past 3 months in the neck-shoulder region (eta squared = 0.077). No significant effects on intensity or duration of pain in the lower back, RPE during work or work ability were found. Conclusions The present study indicates that workplace initiated soccer and Zumba training improve neck-shoulder pain intensity as well as duration among female hospital employees. Trial Registration International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number Register ISRCTN 61986892. PMID:25494175

  12. 12-month generic health status and psychological distress outcomes following an Australian natural disaster experience: 2009 Black Saturday Wildfires.

    PubMed

    Wasiak, J; Mahar, P; Lee, S; Paul, E; Spinks, A; Pfitzer, B; Cleland, H; Gabbe, B

    2013-11-01

    To describe the generic health status, health-related quality of life and psychological distress over a 12-month period of burns patients affected by the 2009 Black Saturday Wildfires. Cohort study with retrospective assessment of pre-injury status and prospective assessment of physical and psychosocial functioning in the Black Saturday Wildfires burns patients across time. Generic health status and burn specific quality of life using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Burn Specific Health Scale (BSHS) were collected at three, six and twelve months post-burn injury. In addition, similar time points were used to measure level of psychological distress and the presence of pain using the Kessler-10 questionnaire (K-10) and the McGill Pain Questionnaire. At 12 months post-injury, patients reported a mean 16.4 (standard error, SE: 3.2) reduction in physical health and a 5.3 (SE 2.5) reduction in mental health scores of the SF-36 as compared to their pre-injury scores, with significant decreases observed in the "bodily pain", "physical functioning", "role physical" and "vitality" subscales. High levels of psychological distress and persistent pain were experienced, with no significant changes during the study period to the overall burns specific quality of life. Even 12 months post-burn injury, patients affected by the 2009 Victorian Wildfires still experienced a significant reduction in generic health, increased psychological distress and persistent pain. The need for early and ongoing identification of physical and psychosocial impairments during hospital admission and upon discharge could be helpful to establish systematic interdisciplinary goals for long-term rehabilitation after severe burn injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antecedents of Medical Workplace Violence in South China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Wenzhi; Deng, Ling; Liu, Meng; Yu, Min

    2011-01-01

    It has been noted that workplace violence most frequently occurs in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore antecedents of workplace violence in south China. The authors conducted face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with 30 hospital staff who had experienced at least one incident of workplace violence from patients during…

  14. Antecedents of Medical Workplace Violence in South China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Wenzhi; Deng, Ling; Liu, Meng; Yu, Min

    2011-01-01

    It has been noted that workplace violence most frequently occurs in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore antecedents of workplace violence in south China. The authors conducted face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with 30 hospital staff who had experienced at least one incident of workplace violence from patients during…

  15. Getting the Message Across: Language, Literacy and Numeracy in Tourism and Hospitality Industry Training. A Guide for Workplace Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roddan, Tanya

    This kit of training strategies and case studies is designed to help trainers to become more successful with their communication and training in the tourism and hospitality industry and to train employees with low language, literacy, and numeracy skills more effectively and efficiently. It is intended for trainers who do some on-the-job skills…

  16. Heritage Language Maintenance and Cultural Identity Formation: The Case of a Turkish Saturday School in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otcu, Bahar

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the role of a Turkish Saturday school in the United States in helping students maintain the Turkish language and form a sense of Turkish cultural identity. This case study of one Turkish Saturday school in New York City builds on research in language maintenance and shift, and in language ideologies and linguistic identity…

  17. Strengthening German Programs through Community Engagement and Partnerships with Saturday Morning Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellebrandt, Josef

    2014-01-01

    German university programs can increase enrollments and diversify their curricula through academic community partnerships with surrounding schools. This article informs about two community-supported initiatives between the German Studies Program at Santa Clara University and the South Bay Deutscher Schulverein, a Saturday Morning School in…

  18. The Image of the Female Child on Saturday Morning Television Commercials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chulay, Cornell; Francis, Sara

    Combining two issues significant in contemporary broadcasting--the influence of television on children and the role of women as portrayed by the media, this study analyzed the image of female children in 294 television commercials shown from eight in the morning until noon every Saturday from November 10, 1973, until December 8, 1973. Although the…

  19. Saturday Children's Television; A Report of TV Programming and Advertising on Boston Commercial Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcus, F. Earle

    Saturday children's television programming in Boston was monitored and videotaped so that the content could be analyzed for a study to gather data relevant to content and commercial practices. Some of the major findings were that overall, about 77 percent of time is devoted to program content and 23 percent to announcements of various kinds; that…

  20. Saturday Morning Television: A Profile of the 1974-75 Children's Season.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Rita Wicks; And Others

    This research sought to analyze the content of children's Saturday morning fare during the 1974-75 season. The analysis focused on both aggressive and prosocial lessons to which young viewers might be exposed and on the underlying pattern of race and sex roles implicit in the material. The major purposes of the study were to determine if the…

  1. Parent Perceptions of the Effects of the Saturday Enrichment Program on Gifted Students' Talent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula; Lee, Seon-Young

    2004-01-01

    Based on survey responses from 187 parents of students who attended the Saturday Enrichment Program (SEP) at the Center for Talent Development (CTD) of Northwestern University, this study showed that overall, parents perceived favorable effects of the program on their children's talent development, especially academic talent development. As a…

  2. Research and Teaching: Investigating Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy through Saturday Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, David

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on preservice teachers' reported feelings of confidence with learning and teaching science relative to their participation in a science enrichment program. Through Saturday Science, local families are invited to explore various topics with hands-on activities designed and facilitated by students in an early childhood education…

  3. Heritage Language Development: Understanding the Roles of Ethnic Identity and Saturday School Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinen, Kiyomi; Tucker, G. Richard

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of 31 Japanese-American adolescents enrolled in a Saturday Japanese heritage school (JHL) in Los Angeles. The study examined the relationship of the participants' sense of ethnic identity, attitudes toward the JHL school and self-assessed proficiency in Japanese. The major finding of the study, consistent with…

  4. Saturday Institute for Manhood, Brotherhood Actualization. Replication Manual [and] Blueprint Resource Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wholistic Stress Control Inst., Atlanta, GA.

    The Saturday Institute for Manhood, Brotherhood Actualization (SIMBA) is a collaborative effort of 12 community organizations that combine resources and ideas to reduce risk factors and increase resilience for young African American males. The program offers youth, aged 9 to 16, who reside at the Lorenzo Benn Youth Development Campus, training…

  5. Saturday School: Implementing Project-Based Learning in an Urban School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catapano, Susan; Gray, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Expanding the university-school partnership in one urban district led to the development of a Saturday enrichment program with preservice teachers planning curricula based on project learning. Researchers asked if this program, a departure from the structured curriculum of Monday through Friday class, had an impact on learners involved. Data were…

  6. Research and Teaching: Investigating Preservice Teachers' Self-Efficacy through Saturday Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, David

    2015-01-01

    This study reports on preservice teachers' reported feelings of confidence with learning and teaching science relative to their participation in a science enrichment program. Through Saturday Science, local families are invited to explore various topics with hands-on activities designed and facilitated by students in an early childhood education…

  7. Massachusetts Offers Trilingual Reading Saturdays to Increase Reading Skills and Confidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vesey, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of some of the many families of the deaf and hard of hearing children who come to Shared Reading Saturdays at Northern Essex Community College (NECC) in Lawrence, Massachusetts. The program, which includes monthly gatherings and is coordinated by the NECC's Gallaudet University Regional Center, features deaf…

  8. Legal drug content in music video programs shown on Australian television on saturday mornings.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca; Croager, Emma; Pratt, Iain S; Khoo, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    To examine the extent to which legal drug references (alcohol and tobacco) are present in the music video clips shown on two music video programs broadcast in Australia on Saturday mornings. Further, to examine the music genres in which the references appeared and the dominant messages associated with the references. Music video clips shown on the music video programs 'Rage' (ABC TV) and [V] 'Music Video Chart' (Channel [V]) were viewed over 8 weeks from August 2011 to October 2011 and the number of clips containing verbal and/or visual drug references in each program was counted. The songs were classified by genre and the dominant messages associated with drug references were also classified and analysed. A considerable proportion of music videos (approximately one-third) contained drug references. Alcohol featured in 95% of the music videos that contained drug references. References to alcohol generally associated it with fun and humour, and alcohol and tobacco were both overwhelmingly presented in contexts that encouraged, rather than discouraged, their use. In Australia, Saturday morning is generally considered a children's television viewing timeslot, and several broadcaster Codes of Practice dictate that programs shown on Saturday mornings must be appropriate for viewing by audiences of all ages. Despite this, our findings show that music video programs aired on Saturday mornings contain a considerable level of drug-related content.

  9. A System Pathology of an Organization: The Rise and Fall of the Old Saturday Evening Post

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Roger I.

    1976-01-01

    Examines the circumstances surrounding the demise of mass circulation magazines. System Dynamics methodology is applied to modeling a typical large magazine publishing company and the assumptions built into the model are tested by an empirical study of the old "Saturday Evening Post." (Author/IRT)

  10. Workplace violence in a tertiary care Israeli hospital - a systematic analysis of the types of violence, the perpetrators and hospital departments.

    PubMed

    Shafran-Tikva, Sigal; Zelker, Revital; Stern, Zvi; Chinitz, David

    2017-08-23

    Worldwide, there is a widespread and disturbing pattern of violence towards healthcare workers. However, violent occurrences in Israeli hospitals have often been unrecognized and underreported. Moreover, most studies have not sufficiently differentiated among the different types of violence. To examine the different types of violence experienced by nurses and physicians, the types of perpetrators and the specialty fields involved. A quantitative questionnaire was used to assess the incidence of a "basket" of violent behaviors, divided into eight types of violent manifestations. The study population consisted of 729 physicians and nurses in a variety of hospital divisions and departments (surgery, oncology, intensive care, ambulatory services including day care, and emergency room) in a large general hospital. Six hundred seventy-eight of them responded to the survey for a response rate of 93%; about two thirds of respondents (446) were nurses and about one third (232) were physicians. The questionnaires were completed during staff meetings and through subsequent follow-up efforts. In the 6 months preceding the survey, the respondents experienced about 700 incidents of passive aggressive behavior, 680 of verbal violence and 81 of sexual harassment. Types of violence differed between patients and companions; for example, the latter exhibited more verbal, threatening and passive aggressive behaviors. Violence was reported in all departments (ranging from 52-96%), with the departments most exposed to violence being the emergency room and outpatient clinics. Nurses in the emergency room were 5.5 times at a higher risk of being exposed to violence than nurses in the internal medicine department. Nurses were exposed to violence almost twice as much as physicians. There was a positive association between the physician's rank and his/her exposure to violence. A multiple regression model found that being older reduced the risk of being exposed to violence, for both

  11. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. 301.7503-1 Section 301.7503-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides that... falls on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, such act shall be considered performed timely...

  12. Outcomes of the Saturday School: a church-based approach to enhance achievement in reading & mathematics.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Karethy; Edwards, Boyze; Jones, Gail; Ham, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Excellence in reading and math enable children entry to all of the professions. This is especially true for the nursing profession. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to provide background information on the national crisis in reading and math achievement among school children, present the methodology of the Saturday School church-based approach to enhance reading and math skills, and the seven year outcomes.

  13. Frightening visual hallucinations: atypical presentation of Charles Bonnet syndrome triggered by the Black Saturday bushfires.

    PubMed

    Vukicevic, Meri

    2010-08-02

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a disorder in which psychologically normal people, often with vision impairment, experience complex visual hallucinations. The hallucinations are purely visual and do not occur in any other sensory modality, and people with CBS have full insight into the unreal nature of the hallucinations. This report describes the case of a CBS sufferer who experienced a distressing change in the nature of her visual hallucinations following a stressful event--the Black Saturday bushfires of February 2009.

  14. Developing a workplace resilience instrument.

    PubMed

    Mallak, Larry A; Yildiz, Mustafa

    2016-05-27

    Resilience benefits from the use of protective factors, as opposed to risk factors, which are associated with vulnerability. Considerable research and instrument development has been conducted in clinical settings for patients. The need existed for an instrument to be developed in a workplace setting to measure resilience of employees. This study developed and tested a resilience instrument for employees in the workplace. The research instrument was distributed to executives and nurses working in the United States in hospital settings. Five-hundred-forty completed and usable responses were obtained. The instrument contained an inventory of workplace resilience, a job stress questionnaire, and relevant demographics. The resilience items were written based on previous work by the lead author and inspired by Weick's [1] sense-making theory. A four-factor model yielded an instrument having psychometric properties showing good model fit. Twenty items were retained for the resulting Workplace Resilience Instrument (WRI). Parallel analysis was conducted with successive iterations of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Respondents were classified based on their employment with either a rural or an urban hospital. Executives had significantly higher WRI scores than nurses, controlling for gender. WRI scores were positively and significantly correlated with years of experience and the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. An instrument to measure individual resilience in the workplace (WRI) was developed. The WRI's four factors identify dimensions of workplace resilience for use in subsequent investigations: Active Problem-Solving, Team Efficacy, Confident Sense-Making, and Bricolage.

  15. Saturday Driving Restrictions Fail to Improve Air Quality in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Lucas W.

    2017-01-01

    Policymakers around the world are turning to license-plate based driving restrictions in an effort to address urban air pollution. The format differs across cities, but most programs restrict driving once or twice a week during weekdays. This paper focuses on Mexico City, home to one of the oldest and best-known driving restriction policies. For almost two decades Mexico City’s driving restrictions applied during weekdays only. This changed recently, however, when the program was expanded to include Saturdays. This paper uses hourly data from pollution monitoring stations to measure the effect of the Saturday expansion on air quality. Overall, there is little evidence that the program expansion improved air quality. Across eight major pollutants, the program expansion had virtually no discernible effect on pollution levels. These disappointing results stand in sharp contrast to estimates made before the expansion which predicted a 15%+ decrease in vehicle emissions on Saturdays. To understand why the program has been less effective than expected, the paper then turns to evidence from subway, bus, and light rail ridership, finding no evidence that the expansion was successful in getting drivers to switch to lower-emitting forms of transportation. PMID:28151487

  16. Saturday Driving Restrictions Fail to Improve Air Quality in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Lucas W.

    2017-02-01

    Policymakers around the world are turning to license-plate based driving restrictions in an effort to address urban air pollution. The format differs across cities, but most programs restrict driving once or twice a week during weekdays. This paper focuses on Mexico City, home to one of the oldest and best-known driving restriction policies. For almost two decades Mexico City’s driving restrictions applied during weekdays only. This changed recently, however, when the program was expanded to include Saturdays. This paper uses hourly data from pollution monitoring stations to measure the effect of the Saturday expansion on air quality. Overall, there is little evidence that the program expansion improved air quality. Across eight major pollutants, the program expansion had virtually no discernible effect on pollution levels. These disappointing results stand in sharp contrast to estimates made before the expansion which predicted a 15%+ decrease in vehicle emissions on Saturdays. To understand why the program has been less effective than expected, the paper then turns to evidence from subway, bus, and light rail ridership, finding no evidence that the expansion was successful in getting drivers to switch to lower-emitting forms of transportation.

  17. Saturday Driving Restrictions Fail to Improve Air Quality in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Davis, Lucas W

    2017-02-02

    Policymakers around the world are turning to license-plate based driving restrictions in an effort to address urban air pollution. The format differs across cities, but most programs restrict driving once or twice a week during weekdays. This paper focuses on Mexico City, home to one of the oldest and best-known driving restriction policies. For almost two decades Mexico City's driving restrictions applied during weekdays only. This changed recently, however, when the program was expanded to include Saturdays. This paper uses hourly data from pollution monitoring stations to measure the effect of the Saturday expansion on air quality. Overall, there is little evidence that the program expansion improved air quality. Across eight major pollutants, the program expansion had virtually no discernible effect on pollution levels. These disappointing results stand in sharp contrast to estimates made before the expansion which predicted a 15%+ decrease in vehicle emissions on Saturdays. To understand why the program has been less effective than expected, the paper then turns to evidence from subway, bus, and light rail ridership, finding no evidence that the expansion was successful in getting drivers to switch to lower-emitting forms of transportation.

  18. Food advertisements during children's Saturday morning television programming: are they consistent with dietary recommendations?

    PubMed

    Kotz, K; Story, M

    1994-11-01

    Children in the United States spend more time watching television than they do in any other activity except sleep. Given the number of food commercials to which children are exposed, we thought it would be of interest to examine current food advertising during children's television programs and to assess whether the products advertised are consistent with dietary recommendations for good health. The 52.5 hours of children's Saturday morning television we viewed from five major networks contained 997 commercials selling a product and 68 public service announcements. Of the 564 food advertisements (56.5% of all advertisements), 43.6% advertised foods classified in the fats, oils, and sweet food group. The most frequently advertised product was high-sugar cereals. We found that commercials broadcast during children's Saturday morning programming promote foods predominantly high in fat and/or sugar, many of which have relatively low nutritional value. As such, the diet presented on Saturday morning television is the antithesis of what is recommended for healthful eating for children. We conclude that the issue of television food advertising to young children be revisited on a national level.

  19. Labor/Management Workplace Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernow, Harneen

    This report includes two sections: (1) an overview of the issues involved in joint labor/management workplace education programs and (2) a description of such a program partnering two union locals, nine hospitals, and Bunker Hill Community College to implement a workplace-based career ladder program. The first section explains that unions and…

  20. Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howden, Gale

    The Palm Beach Post newspaper in Florida provides a workplace literacy program with six classes in three programs: adult basic education; English for speakers of other languages; and high school equivalency in preparation for a General Educational Development diploma. Employees receive work-release time or are paid to attend class. Class size is…

  1. Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    These four papers are from a symposium on changing workplaces. "Women Entrepreneurs: Maintaining Business Success through Human Resource Development" (Dominic G. Kamau , Gary N. McLean, Alexander Ardishvili) investigates contributions of human resource development (HRD) to business success and reports the following: (1) women can be…

  2. Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the changing workplace and its relationship to human resource development (HRD). In "Globalization, Immigration and Quality of Life Dynamics for Reverse Brain Drains" (Ben-Chieh Liu, Maw Lin Lee, Hau-Lien), the factors responsible for the brain drain from Taiwan to the United States…

  3. Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    These four papers are from a symposium on changing workplaces. "Women Entrepreneurs: Maintaining Business Success through Human Resource Development" (Dominic G. Kamau , Gary N. McLean, Alexander Ardishvili) investigates contributions of human resource development (HRD) to business success and reports the following: (1) women can be…

  4. Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on the changing workplace and its relationship to human resource development (HRD). In "Globalization, Immigration and Quality of Life Dynamics for Reverse Brain Drains" (Ben-Chieh Liu, Maw Lin Lee, Hau-Lien), the factors responsible for the brain drain from Taiwan to the United States…

  5. Beyond Reading and Writing: A Workplace Curriculum Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowry, Betsy; Sterling, Deb

    An evaluation of an 18-month workplace education program at 2 health care sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts, showed that the curriculum designed could be adapted for other workplace education programs. The workplace education program was designed to help improve the language skills of employees at Neville Manor and at the Cambridge Hospital. Of 35…

  6. Saturday Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugart, Cecil G.

    1976-01-01

    Describes the organization of demonstration oriented seminars in which the physics of toys, music, sports and other topics are investigated. Reports that this university based service has increased high school physics and science fair enrollments. (CP)

  7. Workplace Bullying Prevention: A Critical Discourse Analysis

    PubMed Central

    JOHNSON, Susan L.

    2016-01-01

    Aim To analyze the discourses of workplace bullying prevention of hospital nursing unit managers and in the official documents of the organizations where they worked. Background Workplace bullying can be a self-perpetuating problem in nursing units. As such, efforts to prevent this behavior may be more effective than efforts to stop the behavior. There is limited research on how healthcare organizations characterize their efforts to prevent workplace bullying. Design This was a qualitative study. Method Critical discourse analysis and Foucault’s writings on governmentality and discipline were used to analyze data from interviews with hospital nursing unit managers (n=15) and organizational documents (n=22). Data were collected in 2012. Findings The discourse of workplace bullying prevention centered around three themes: prevention of workplace bullying through managerial presence, normalizing behaviors and controlling behaviors. All three are individual level discourses of workplace bullying prevention. Conclusion Current research indicates that workplace bullying is a complex issue with antecedents at the individual, departmental and organizational level. However, the discourse of the participants in this study only focused on prevention of bullying by moulding the behaviors of individuals. The effective prevention of workplace bullying will require departmental and organizational initiatives. Leaders in all types of organizations can use the results of this study to examine their organizations’ discourses of workplace bullying prevention to determine where change is needed. PMID:26010268

  8. Workplace bullying prevention: a critical discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Susan L

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the discourses of workplace bullying prevention of hospital nursing unit managers and in the official documents of the organizations where they worked. Workplace bullying can be a self-perpetuating problem in nursing units. As such, efforts to prevent this behaviour may be more effective than efforts to stop ongoing bullying. There is limited research on how healthcare organizations characterize their efforts to prevent workplace bullying. This was a qualitative study. Critical discourse analysis and Foucault's writings on governmentality and discipline were used to analyse data from interviews with hospital nursing unit managers (n = 15) and organizational documents (n = 22). Data were collected in 2012. The discourse of workplace bullying prevention centred around three themes: prevention of workplace bullying through managerial presence, normalizing behaviours and controlling behaviours. All three are individual level discourses of workplace bullying prevention. Current research indicates that workplace bullying is a complex issue with antecedents at the individual, departmental and organizational level. However, the discourse of the participants in this study only focused on prevention of bullying by moulding the behaviours of individuals. The effective prevention of workplace bullying will require departmental and organizational initiatives. Leaders in all types of organizations can use the results of this study to examine their organizations' discourses of workplace bullying prevention to determine where change is needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Workplace Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Anthropometric Source Book was developed based on Johnson Space Center project of anthropometry, the study of the size, shape and motion characteristics of the human body. Designed primarily for use by NASA, the military services and aerospace contractors, the book was also intended to help non-aerospace engineers, architects, and others engaged in design of clothing, equipment and workplaces. An example of its use by Eastman Kodak Company is the company's application of the data to design efficient, productive and comfortable workplaces for employees in the Rochester, NY processing laboratories. The sourcebook was used to determine such dimensions as leg space, work surface height and thickness, employee reach distances, proper height for computer terminal screen, seat height and knee space.

  10. Saturday-morning television: do sponsors promote high-risk behavior for burn injury?

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Tina L; Aoki, Traci; Combs, Elena; Curri, Terese; Garma, Sylvia; Kaulkin, Cammie; Lawless, Mary Beth; Nelson, Kate; Sanders, Johanna; Warden, Nancy; Greenhalgh, David G

    2004-01-01

    Television has become an important tool for learning and socialization in children. Although television violence has been associated with adverse effects, data on depiction of fire and burn injury are lacking. We sought to determine whether Saturday-morning television programming, viewed primarily by children, depicts fire and burn injury as safe or without consequence, thus potentially increasing the incidence of burn injury in children. This was a prospective observational study. Saturday-morning children's television programs were videotaped from 7 AM to 11 AM for eight different television networks during a 6-month period. Tapes were scored for scenes depicting fire or smoke by independent observers. Recorded items included show category, scene type, gender target, context of fire, and outcome after exposure to flame. Fire events were documented during programs and their associated commercials. A total of 108 hours of children's programs, 16 hours per network, were recorded. Scenes depicting fire or smoke were identified 1960 times, with 39% of events occurring during the program itself and 61% in commercials. Fire was depicted as either safe or without consequence in 64% of incidents. Action adventure stories accounted for 56% of flame depictions. Overall, one incident involving flame and fire was portrayed for each 3 minutes of television programming. Saturday-morning television programming frequently depicts fire as safe, empowering, or exciting. The incidence of flame use in programming varies between stations but is most prevalent in action/adventure stories. Television commercials, although brief, provide the majority of the misinformation regarding fire. Medical professional societies should alert the public to this potential hazard and recommend responsible portrayal of fire in children's television programming.

  11. Workplace bullying among Nurses in South Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Li; Huang, Su-Hui; Fang, Shu-Hui

    2016-09-01

    This study was to investigate bullying among hospital nurses and its correlates. Chinese people were unlikely to express their opinions or pursue individual rights. Workplace bullying took place more easily among the educated people within Chinese culture. However, studies related to workplace bullying among hospital nurses in Taiwan were still limited. A cross-sectional design. Two hundred and eighty-five nurses who worked in the regional teaching hospital in south Taiwan were recruited. The significant predictors of workplace bullying were identified by using linear regression analysis. The mean of overall bullying was 1·47, showing that the frequency of the nurses having experienced workplace bullying was between 'never' and 'now and then'. The most frequent bullying item was 'being yelled at or being the target of anger', followed by 'being the objects of untruthful criticism' and 'having views ignored'. Hospital nurses working in the Emergency room would gain 10·888 points more in the overall bullying scale compared with those who worked in operation rooms or haemodialysis rooms. They were more likely to be bullied. Hospital nurses with one year increase in nursing experience were 0·207 points less likely to be bullied. Reducing workplace bullying among hospital nurses was an essential method to provide quality assurance to health care. Nurse managers should build up zero tolerance policy to decrease nurses' exposure to workplace bullying. Training programmes related to bullying prevention are suggested to avoid workplace bullying. The contents of the educational training programmes or workshops should incorporate the characteristics and consequences of the workplace bullying, and the strategies to deal with bullying. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Saturday Academay of Computing and Mathematics (SACAM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.N. )

    1991-01-01

    To be part of the impending Information Age, our students and teachers must be trained in the use of computers, logic, and mathematics. The Saturday Academy of Computing and Mathematics (SACAM) represents one facet of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) response to meet the challenge. SACAM attempts to provide the area's best high school students with a creative program that illustrates how researchers are using computing and mathematics tools to help solve nationally recognized problems in virtually all scientific fields. Each SACAM program is designed as eight 3-hour sessions. Each session outlines a current scientific question or research area. Sessions are presented on a Saturday morning by a speaker team of two to four ORNL scientists (mentors) working in that particular field. Approximately four students and one teacher from each of ten area high schools attend the eight sessions. Session topics cover diverse problems such as climate modeling cryptography and cryptology, high-energy physics, human genome sequencing, and even the use of probability in locating people lost in a national forest. Evaluations from students, teachers, and speakers indicate that the program has been well received, and a tracking program is being undertaken to determine long-range benefits. An analysis of the program's successes and lessons learned is presented as well as resources required for the program.

  13. Black Saturday bushfire smoke plumes as seen from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörner, Steffen; Pukite, Janis; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Fromm, Mike; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The so called Black Saturday bushfires started on the 7th of February 2009 in southeastern Victoria, Australia. Resulting smoke plumes contaminated the lower stratosphere in the following weeks as measured by a variety satellite instruments. Particle extinction profiles retrieved from SCIAMACHY measurements in limb geometry provide a complementary view on the development of the smoke plume, especially on the first days of the event when measurements of other instruments were sparse. Earlier studies showed that commonly used 1D retrieval algorithms for limb observations of particle extinction potentially underestimate optical thickness and altitude of such injections into the stratosphere. In this study, a 2D particle extinction retrieval algorithm for SCIAMACHY limb measurements is used to track optical thickness and plume altitude of the Black Saturday bushfires over the month of February. The required information about the horizontal distribution of the plume is determined by the absorbing aerosol index (AAI) derived from SCIAMACHY measurements in nadir geometry. First results indicate enhanced particle scattering above 18 km on the 9th of February while the smoke plume is drifting to the north east above the Pacific ocean.

  14. Australian 2009 Black Saturday Bushfire smoke plume in the UTLS region: transport, evolution, and effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddaway, Jason; Petelina, Svetlana

    We analyze vertical and horizontal transport and evolution of the Victorian Black Saturday bushfire smoke plume in the stratosphere during the 11 February -30 April 2009 period. Limb-scattered solar radiation measured by the Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System on the Odin satellite are used for this purpose. For higher aerosol/Rayleigh scattering ratio, the near infrared measurements around 800 nm are considered. According to OSIRIS observations, the smoke plume travelled westward and circled the globe in about 7 weeks from the event, remaining in the tropical channel mainly between 5° and 35° S. It gradually advected upwards from 19 km in mid-February to 23 km in April and its vertical extent varied from 2 to 6 km. During the February-April period, the net plume peak radiance, which is governed by the number, size, and chemical composition of smoke particles, decreased by half in about 19 days. The entire OSIRIS spectrum between 280 and 810 nm is analyzed in order to identify species that cause certain absorption features detected inside the smoke plume at its earlier stages. We also investigate an increase in the lower stratosphere background aerosol levels in 2009-2010, particularly in the southern hemisphere, due to the dispersion of the Black Saturday smoke plume material.

  15. Worker, workplace, and community/environmental risk factors for workplace violence in emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Gordon Lee; Pekar, Bunnany; Byczkowski, Terri L; Fisher, Bonnie S

    2017-03-04

    Workplace violence committed by patients and visitors has high propensity to occur against emergency department employees. This article reports the association of worker, workplace, and community/environmental factors with violence risks. A cross-sectional research design was used with 280 employees from six emergency departments in the Midwest United States. Respondents completed the Survey of Violence Experienced by Staff and a 10-item demographic questionnaire. Data were analyzed using frequencies, percentages, Chi-square tests, and adjusted relative risks with 95% confidence intervals. Over 80% of respondents experienced at least one type of workplace violence with their current employer and approximately 40% experienced all three types. Risks for workplace violence were significantly higher for registered nurses and hospital-based emergency departments. Workplace violence can impact all employees in the emergency department regardless of worker, workplace, and community/environmental factors.

  16. Workplace Health and Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Career Development Inst., Springfield.

    This booklet is one of six texts from a workplace literacy curriculum designed to assist learners in facing the increased demands of the workplace. It is a short guide to workplace health and safety issues, laws, and regulations, especially in Massachusetts. Topics covered include the following: (1) safety issues--workplace ergonomics, the…

  17. Bushfire disaster burn casualty management: the Australian "Black Saturday" bushfire experience.

    PubMed

    Seifman, Marc; Ek, Edmund W; Menezes, Hana; Rozen, Warren M; Whitaker, Iain S; Cleland, Heather J

    2011-11-01

    Mass burn disasters are among the most difficult disasters to manage, with major burns requiring complex management in a multidisciplinary setting and specialist burns services having limited capacity to deal with large numbers of complex patients. There is a paucity of literature addressing health system responses to mass burn disasters resulting from wildfires, with the events of the "Black Saturday" disaster in the state of Victoria, Australia, able to provide a unique opportunity to draw lessons and increase awareness of key management issues arising in mass burn casualty disasters. The event comprised the worst natural disaster in the state's history and one of the worst wildfire disasters in world history, claiming 173 lives and costing more than AUD 4 billion. This article draws on the national burns disaster plan instituted, Australian Mass Casualty Burn Disaster Plan (AUSBURNPLAN), and details the management of mass burn cases through a systems-based perspective.

  18. Effects of Maryland's law banning Saturday night special handguns on crime guns

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, J.; Webster, D.; Hepburn, L.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the effects of a 1988 Maryland law that banned "Saturday night special" handguns on the types of guns used in crime. To determine if controls on the lawful market for handguns affect the illegal market as well. Setting—Baltimore, Maryland, and 15 other US cities participating in a crime gun tracing project. Methods—Cross sectional comparison of the proportion of crime guns that are banned by the Maryland law, comparing Baltimore, MD with 15 other cities outside of Maryland. Multivariate linear regression analysis to determine if observed differences between Baltimore and 15 other cities are explained by demographic or regional differences among the cities rather than Maryland's law. Results—Among crime guns, a gun banned by Maryland's law is more than twice as likely (relative risk (RR) 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0 to 2.5) to be the subject of a crime gun trace request in 15 other cities combined, than in Baltimore. Among homicide guns, a crime especially relevant for public safety, a comparable difference (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1 to 4.2) was observed. The proportion of Baltimore's crime guns that are banned is 12 percentage points lower than would be expected based on its demographic and regional characteristics alone. Among crime guns purchased after 1990, a much smaller proportion in Baltimore are banned models than in 15 other cities. Conclusions—Maryland's law has reduced the use of banned Saturday night specials by criminals in Baltimore. Contrary to the claims of some opponents of gun control laws, regulation of the lawful market for firearms can also affect criminals. PMID:10628912

  19. Simulating the Black Saturday 2009 UTLS Smoke Plume with an Interactive Composition-Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. D.; Luo, M.; Fromm, M. D.; Voulgarakis, A.; Mangeon, S.; Worden, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Pyroconvective smoke plumes from large fires can be injected directly into the geostrophic flow and dry air at high altitudes. As a result, they are usually longer-lived, can be transported thousands of kilometers, and can cross the tropopause into the lower stratosphere. Because the emissions pulses are so abrupt relative to other non-volcanic sources, their evolution and decay can be easily separated from background levels of aerosols and trace gases. This makes them interesting natural experiments against which to evaluate models, and understand the fate and effects of surface emissions pulses. We have simulated the well-observed February 2009 Black Saturday smoke plume from southeast Australia using the NASA GISS Earth System Model. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first simulation of a high altitude smoke plume with a full-complexity composition-climate model. We compared simulated CO to a joint retrieval from the Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Microwave Limb Sounder instruments. Using an upper tropospheric injection height, we were able to simulate the plume's eastward transport and ascent over New Zealand, anticyclonic circulation and ascent over the Coral Sea, westward transport in the lower tropical stratosphere, and arrival over Africa at the end of February. Simulations were improved by taking into account hourly variability in emissions associated with extreme fire behavior observed by fire management agencies. We considered a range of emissions amounts, based on different assumptions about which of the Black Saturday fires were explosive enough to inject smoke to high altitudes, and accounting for emissions factor uncertainty. The best agreement between plume concentrations at the end of February was found for the highest emissions scenario. Three days after the fire, there was a linear relationship between emissions amount and plume concentration. Three weeks after the fire, the relationship was non-linear; we discuss

  20. Ecstasy (MDMA) effects upon mood and cognition: before, during and after a Saturday night dance.

    PubMed

    Parrott, A C; Lasky, J

    1998-10-01

    Three groups of young people (aged 19-30 years) were compared: 15 regular ecstasy users who had taken MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) on ten or more occasions; 15 novice ecstasy users who had taken MDMA on fewer than ten previous occasions; and 15 controls who had never taken MDMA. Each subject completed a cognitive test and mood scale battery four times: an initial drug-free baseline, at a Saturday night dance/club (on-drug), then 2 days later, and 7 days later. On the Saturday night, regular ecstasy users took an average of 1.80 MDMA tablets, novice users took 1.45 MDMA tablets, while controls mostly drank alcohol. The consumption of cannabis and cocaine at the club was similar across groups. All three groups reported positive moods at the dance club (on-drug), although there were borderline trends (P < 0.10) for less sadness/depression in the MDMA subgroups. However 2 days afterwards, the ecstasy users felt significantly more depressed, abnormal, unsociable, unpleasant, and less good tempered, than the controls. Cognitive performance on both tasks (verbal recall, visual scanning) was significantly reduced on-MDMA. Memory recall was also significantly impaired in drug-free MDMA users, with regular ecstasy users displaying the worst memory scores at every test session. This agrees with previous findings of memory impairments in drug-free ecstasy users. Animal data have shown that MDMA can generate long-term serotonergic neurodegeneration in various brain areas, including the hippocampus. The cognitive deficits in drug-free recreational ecstasy users, suggest that MDMA may also be neurotoxic in humans.

  1. Managerial and Organizational Discourses of Workplace Bullying.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Susan L; Boutain, Doris M; Tsai, Jenny H-C; de Castro, Arnold B

    2015-09-01

    To explore how workplace bullying is addressed by hospital nursing unit managers and organizational policies. Although workplace bullying is costly to organizations, nurses report that managers do not consistently address the issue. This study used discourse analysis to analyze interview data and policy documents. There were differences in the manner in which managers and the policy documents labeled bullying-type behaviors and discussed the roles and responsibilities of staff and managers. Policies did not clearly delineate how managers should respond to workplace bullying. These differences can allow management variation, not sanctioned by policy. Unclear policy language can also offer insufficient guidance to managers, resulting in differential enforcement of policies.

  2. Perceptions of managerial support after workplace violence.

    PubMed

    Christie, Wanda

    2015-11-01

    Workplace violence against nurses perpetrated by patients is a global problem, and healthcare organisations must take steps to ensure that staff feel safe at work and supported when incidents occur. A study was undertaken in a US teaching hospital to determine nurses' perceptions of management support following violent workplace incidents. This article describes the study and reports the results, which suggest that nurses want better implementation and enforcement of anti-violence policies, as well as more visible and immediate support from managers.

  3. Frequency and Types of Foods Advertised on Saturday Morning and Weekday Afternoon English- and Spanish-Language American Television Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert A.; Cassady, Diana; Culp, Jennifer; Alcalay, Rina

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe food advertised on networks serving children and youth, and to compare ads on English-language networks with ads on Spanish networks. Design: Analysis of television food advertisements appearing on Saturday morning and weekday afternoons in 2005-2006. A random sample of 1,130 advertisements appearing on 12 networks catering…

  4. Frequency and Types of Foods Advertised on Saturday Morning and Weekday Afternoon English- and Spanish-Language American Television Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Robert A.; Cassady, Diana; Culp, Jennifer; Alcalay, Rina

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To describe food advertised on networks serving children and youth, and to compare ads on English-language networks with ads on Spanish networks. Design: Analysis of television food advertisements appearing on Saturday morning and weekday afternoons in 2005-2006. A random sample of 1,130 advertisements appearing on 12 networks catering…

  5. [Workplace mobbing].

    PubMed

    Soljan, Ivana; Josipović-Jelić, Zeljka; Jelić Kis, I Anita

    2008-03-01

    Workplace mobbing is a hostile and unethical communication, systematically aimed from one or more individuals towards mostly one individual, who are forced into a helpless position and are held in it by constant bullying. This article describes some of the most important characteristics of mobbing: offensive behaviour, organizational and non-organizational causes of this behaviour, the victim and the consequences. Modern business environment is complex, dynamic, volatile, and requires better ability to adjust. Constant changes are a part of organizational reality, but they also produce an ideal environment for all kinds of conflicts. Conflicts are inevitable in every organization, but the task of its management is to identify them and resolve before they affect the workforce, productivity and costs. The idea is to avert psychological abuse and aberrant behaviour such as mobbing which that may cause physical and mental disorders. Mobbing is a problem of the modern society; as a violation of human rights it is relatively new and unrecognised in Croatia. Abuse is mostly psychological: it affects the victim's health and life, quality of work, productivity, profitability, and may lead to significant economic losses in the community. Mobbing can be averted by joint forces that would involve employee and management, medical and legal professionals, and even community as a whole. The more an organization pursues excellence based on trust and business ethics, the higher the probability that mobbing will be averted or stopped.

  6. Workplace bullying in nursing.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ozlem; Ovayolu, Nimet; Karadag, Gulendam

    2014-09-01

    This research was designed to determine whether nurses are bullied by other staff members and the effects of such behaviors on the nurse victims. This study reports on nurses' interpersonal workplace relationships in a culturally unique environment. The study was conducted with 260 nurses working in three public hospitals. Data were collected using a questionnaire. The majority of nurses were female with bachelor's degrees and reported being assigned duties outside their usual responsibilities, held responsible for coworkers' mistakes, and criticized for job performance although they thought they had done their work properly. Most of the nurses who were bullied experienced health and sleep problems,did not want to go to work, and had communication problems with other staff members. Nearly all of the study nurses received psychological support to solve their problems and believed that the best way to prevent bullying was education.

  7. Depression in the Workplace

    MedlinePlus

    ... You are here Home » Depression In The Workplace Depression In The Workplace Clinical depression has become one ... will die by suicide vi . Employees' Attitudes Towards Depression Often times a depressed employee will not seek ...

  8. Identifying risky drinking patterns over the course of Saturday evenings: An event-level study.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Otten, Roy; Labhart, Florian

    2015-09-01

    Gaining a better understanding of young adults' excessive drinking on nights out is crucial to ensure prevention efforts are effectively targeted. This study aims to identify Saturdays with similar evening drinking patterns and corresponding situation-specific and person-specific determinants. Growth mixture modeling and multilevel logistic regressions were based on 3,084 questionnaires completed by 164 young adults on 514 evenings via the Internet-based cell phone optimized assessment technique (ICAT). The results showed that the 2-group solution best fitted the data with a "stable low" drinking pattern (64.0% of all evenings, 0.2 drinks per hour on average, 1.5 drinks in total) and an "accelerated" drinking pattern (36.0%, increased drinking pace from about 1 drink per hour before 8 p.m. to about 2 drinks per hour after 10 p.m.; 11.5 drinks in total). The presence of more same-sex friends (ORwomen = 1.29, 95% CI [1.09-1.53]; ORmen = 1.35, 95% CI [1.15-1.58], engaging in predrinking (ORwomen = 2.80, 95% CI [1.35-5.81]; ORmen = 3.78, 95% CI [1.67-8.55] and more time spent in drinking establishments among men (ORmen = 1.46, 95% CI [1.12-1.90] predicted accelerated drinking evenings. Accelerated drinking was also likely among women scoring high on coping motives at baseline (ORwomen = 2.40, 95% CI [1.43-4.03] and among men scoring high on enhancement motives (ORmen = 2.36, 95% CI [1.46-3.80]. To conclude, with a total evening consumption that is almost twice the threshold for binge drinking, the identified accelerated drinking pattern signifies a burden for individual and public health. Promoting personal goal setting and commitment, and reinforcing self-efficacy and resistance skills training appear to be promising strategies to impede the acceleration of drinking pace on Saturday evenings. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Constituting the Workplace Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This paper advances some bases for a workplace curriculum. These are premised on conceptions of curriculum as intents directed to individual's progression towards full and effective workplace performance, yet whose enactment is shaped by workplace factors and is ultimately experienced by workers as learners. So whether the intentions will be…

  10. Unions and Workplace Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Bruce, Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this book focus on "The New American Workplace" and assess its adequacy or inadequacy as a guide for the U.S. labor movement in relation to new work systems. "Unions and Workplace Reorganization" (Bruce Nissen) introduces the subject. "The New American Workplace: A Labor Perspective" (AFL-CIO Committee on the Evolution of Work,…

  11. Unions and Workplace Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Bruce, Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this book focus on "The New American Workplace" and assess its adequacy or inadequacy as a guide for the U.S. labor movement in relation to new work systems. "Unions and Workplace Reorganization" (Bruce Nissen) introduces the subject. "The New American Workplace: A Labor Perspective" (AFL-CIO Committee on the Evolution of Work,…

  12. The Politics of Workplace Literacy: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowen, Sheryl Greenwood

    This book analyzes the response of employees at a southern hospital to a functional context literacy program. It uses ethnographic techniques, storytelling, and observations of workplace relations to illustrate how classism, racism, and sexism continue to be part of the workplace environment and how these factors contribute to employees'…

  13. Underage drinking on saturday nights, sociodemographic and environmental risk factors: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Excessive alcohol consumption in underage people is a rising phenomenon. A major proportion of the disease burden and deaths of young people in developed nations is attributable to alcohol abuse. The aim of this study was to investigate social, demographic and environmental factors that may raise the risk of Saturday night drinking and binge drinking among Italian school students. Methods The study was conducted on a sample of 845 Italian underage school students, by means of an anonymous, self-test questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to identify independent risk factors for alcohol drinking and binge drinking. Ordered logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for harmful drinking patterns. Results The independent variables that confer a higher risk of drinking in underage students are older age classes, male sex, returning home after midnight, belonging to a group with little respect for the rules, or to a group where young people are not seen as leaders. The higher the perception of alcohol consumption by the group, the higher the risk. Spending time in bars or discos coincides with a two-fold or four-fold increase, respectively, in the risk of alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our findings show that certain environmental and social risk factors are associated with underage drinking. The most important role for preventing young people's exposure to these factors lies with the family, because only parents can exert the necessary control and provide a barrier against potentially harmful situations. PMID:21729273

  14. School for Scientific Thought: Saturday sessions that bring high school and STEM graduate students together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, Elisabeth; Ibsen, Wendy

    2011-03-01

    The School for Scientific Thought (http://csep.cnsi.ucsb.edu/k12/sst) is a Saturday morning program that exposes high school students to current research in STEM fields, through 5-week miniclasses that are conceived, developed and taught by graduate students. Now in its second year of sponsorship by UCSB's California Nanosystems Institute, this NSF-supported program provides graduate students with a creative opportunity to communicate their own favorite science to a young audience. The experience solidifies the graduate student's own knowledge while developing expository skills during a limited time commitment that allows them to also progress in their research objectives. High school students make contact with positive scientist role models while learning about exciting topics that are beyond the high school curriculum. SST courses have ranged from ``Surfing the Waves of Light and Matter'' to ``Nanotechnology: Using the Very Small to Solve the World's Problems''. The selection of graduate student instructors and recruitment of high school students will be discussed. SST is an outgrowth of the NSF GK-12 program ``Let's Explore Applied Physical Science'' (LEAPS).

  15. School for Scientific Thought: Saturday sessions that bring high school and STEM graduate students together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwinn, Elisabeth

    2011-04-01

    The School for Scientific Thought (http://csep.cnsi.ucsb.edu/k12/sst) is a Saturday morning program that exposes high school students to current research in STEM fields, through 5-week miniclasses that are conceived, developed and taught by graduate students. Now in its second year of sponsorship by UCSB's California Nanosystems Institute, this NSF-supported program provides graduate students with a creative opportunity to communicate their own favorite science to a young audience. The experience solidifies the graduate student's own knowledge while developing expository skills during a limited time commitment that allows them to also progress in their research objectives. High school students make contact with positive scientist role models while learning about exciting topics that are beyond the high school curriculum. SST courses have ranged from ``Surfing the Waves of Light and Matter'' to ``Nanotechnology: Using the Very Small to Solve the World's Problems''. The selection of graduate student instructors and recruitment of high school students will be discussed. SST is an outgrowth of the NSF GK-12 program ``Let's Explore Applied Physical Science'' (LEAPS). Supported by the NSF GK-12 program

  16. Underage drinking on saturday nights, sociodemographic and environmental risk factors: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Gallimberti, Luigi; Chindamo, Sonia; Buja, Alessandra; Forza, Giovanni; Tognazzo, Federica; Galasso, Laura; Vinelli, Angela; Baldo, Vincenzo

    2011-07-05

    Excessive alcohol consumption in underage people is a rising phenomenon. A major proportion of the disease burden and deaths of young people in developed nations is attributable to alcohol abuse. The aim of this study was to investigate social, demographic and environmental factors that may raise the risk of Saturday night drinking and binge drinking among Italian school students. The study was conducted on a sample of 845 Italian underage school students, by means of an anonymous, self-test questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to identify independent risk factors for alcohol drinking and binge drinking. Ordered logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for harmful drinking patterns. The independent variables that confer a higher risk of drinking in underage students are older age classes, male sex, returning home after midnight, belonging to a group with little respect for the rules, or to a group where young people are not seen as leaders. The higher the perception of alcohol consumption by the group, the higher the risk. Spending time in bars or discos coincides with a two-fold or four-fold increase, respectively, in the risk of alcohol consumption. Our findings show that certain environmental and social risk factors are associated with underage drinking. The most important role for preventing young people's exposure to these factors lies with the family, because only parents can exert the necessary control and provide a barrier against potentially harmful situations.

  17. How to Prevent Workplace Incivility?: Nurses' Perspective.

    PubMed

    Abdollahzadeh, Farahnaz; Asghari, Elnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Rahmani, Azad; Vahidi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Many articles have studied workplace incivility and its influence on outcomes, but very few have been conducted to assess how to prevent this issue. In this study, we aimed to determine how to prevent workplace incivility from the nurses' perspective. This was a qualitative study which was based on a conventional content analysis approach. Thirty four nurses (25 to 52 years old) from seven training hospitals in Tabriz, Iran were selected through purposive sampling. Thirty six semi-structured interviews and eight field notes were analyzed. The data analysis revealed 417 codes, ten categories, three subthemes and one theme, that is, A Need for a Comprehensive Attempt. Attempt of organization, nurses, and public as subthemes are needed to prevent workplace incivility. The findings of the study indicated that a comprehensive and systematic attempt was needed to prevent incivility. Nurses should try to improve their skills; officials should try to show the real image and position of nurses and hospitals to the community.

  18. Perpetrator, worker and workplace characteristics associated with patient and visitor perpetrated violence (Type II) on hospital workers: a review of the literature and existing occupational injury data.

    PubMed

    Pompeii, Lisa; Dement, John; Schoenfisch, Ashley; Lavery, Amy; Souder, Megan; Smith, Claudia; Lipscomb, Hester

    2013-02-01

    Non-fatal type II violence experienced by hospital workers (patient/visitor-on-worker violence) is not well described. Hospital administration data (2004-2009) were examined for purposes of calculating rates of type II violent events experienced by workers. We also conducted a review of the hospital-based literature (2000-2010) and summarized findings associated with type II violence. 484 physical assaults were identified in the data, with a rate of 1.75 events/100 full-time equivalents. Only few details about events were captured, while non-physical events were not captured. The literature yielded 17 studies, with a range proportion of verbal abuse (22%-90%), physical threats (12%-64%) and assaults (2%-32%) reported. The literature lacked rigorous methods for examining incidence and circumstances surrounding events or rates of events over time. For purposes of examining the impact of type II violence on worker safety, satisfaction and retention, rigorous surveillance efforts by hospital employers and researchers are warranted. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Workplace incivility and productivity losses among direct care staff.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Scott; Gates, Donna

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine incivility experienced by direct health care staff in their workplaces. The sample (N = 184) was 91% female and 77% White, with 71% of the participants having earned an associate degree or above and 81% being registered nurses. The Work Limitations Questionnaire and the Incivility in Healthcare Survey were distributed to all direct care staff at a major metropolitan hospital (22% response rate). Correlations were found between workplace incivility from direct supervisors and productivity (r = 0.284, p = .000) and workplace incivility from patients and productivity (r = 0.204, p = .006). Incivility from physicians, incivility from other direct care staff, and general environmental incivility were not shown to be significantly related to productivity. Demographics were not related to levels of workplace incivility. Workplace incivility from patients and management appears to have a greater impact on employees' productivity than workplace incivility from other sources.

  20. Leonardo DiCaprio visited Goddard Saturday to discuss Earth science with Piers Sellers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Academy Award®- winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on Saturday, April 23, 2016. During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio interviewed Dr. Piers Sellers, an Earth scientist, former astronaut and current deputy director of Goddard’s Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The two discussed the different missions NASA has underway to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere, water and land masses for a climate change documentary that Mr. DiCaprio has in production. Using a wall-size, high-definition display system that shows visual representations based on actual science data, Mr. DiCaprio and Dr. Sellers discussed data results from NASA’s fleet of satellites in Earth’s orbit. During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio also visited the facility holding NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope that is being developed as a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018, and will be a premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  1. Leonardo DiCaprio visited Goddard Saturday to discuss Earth science with Piers Sellers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Academy Award®- winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on Saturday, April 23, 2016. During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio interviewed Dr. Piers Sellers, an Earth scientist, former astronaut and current deputy director of Goddard’s Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The two discussed the different missions NASA has underway to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere, water and land masses for a climate change documentary that Mr. DiCaprio has in production. Using a wall-size, high-definition display system that shows visual representations based on actual science data, Mr. DiCaprio and Dr. Sellers discussed data results from NASA’s fleet of satellites in Earth’s orbit. The visual shows Hurricane Sandy. The visual uses data from Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) to simulate surface wind speeds across the Atlantic during Sandy’s lifecycle. svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=30465 During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio also visited the facility holding NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope that is being developed as a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018, and will be a premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  2. Leonardo DiCaprio visited Goddard Saturday to discuss Earth science with Piers Sellers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Academy Award®- winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on Saturday, April 23, 2016. During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio interviewed Dr. Piers Sellers, an Earth scientist, former astronaut and current deputy director of Goddard’s Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The two discussed the different missions NASA has underway to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere, water and land masses for a climate change documentary that Mr. DiCaprio has in production. Using a wall-size, high-definition display system that shows visual representations based on actual science data, Mr. DiCaprio and Dr. Sellers discussed data results from NASA’s fleet of satellites in Earth’s orbit. The background visual shows the biosphere with data from a NASA satellite instrument called the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS). svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=10704 During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio also visited the facility holding NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope that is being developed as a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018, and will be a premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. Health Care Industry. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Brief, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy in the health care industry and lists program contacts. The following 35 organizations operate basic skills upgrading programs for health care workers: American Hospital Association; Chinese American Civic Association; Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training; BostonWorks;…

  4. Health Care Industry. Workforce & Workplace Literacy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BCEL Brief, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This brief gives an overview of the topic of workplace literacy in the health care industry and lists program contacts. The following 35 organizations operate basic skills upgrading programs for health care workers: American Hospital Association; Chinese American Civic Association; Massachusetts Department of Employment and Training; BostonWorks;…

  5. Global Trends in Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2012-01-01

    The paradigm of human resource development has shifted to workplace learning and performance. Workplace can be an organization, an office, a kitchen, a shop, a farm, a website, even a home. Workplace learning is a dynamic process to solve workplace problems through learning. An identification of global trends of workplace learning can help us to…

  6. UNDERSTANDING HOW HEALTHY WORKPLACES ARE CREATED: IMPLICATIONS FOR DEVELOPING A NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE HEALTHY WORKPLACE PROGRAM.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Katrina M; Brand, Sarah; Ashby-Pepper, Julie; Abraham, Jane; Fleming, Lora E

    2015-01-01

    The workplace is an important setting for promoting health and well-being. We sought to understand how successful workplace health and well-being programs were developed and implemented to inform the development of a program for a National Health Service (NHS) hospital. Case studies of successful healthy workplace programs with 34 semi-structured employee interviews informed 12 interviews with NHS staff. Interviews were thematically analyzed using Nvivo. Themes were fed back to participants for further clarification and validation. Healthy workplace programs were characterized by senior management endorsement; collective sense of ownership; presence of visible "quick wins"; and a sense that participation was easy and fun, not mandated. Programs evolved organically, allowing trust to be built and activities to be developed with employees. Interviews with NHS staff suggested a lack of belief in the possibility of change in their workplace due to time and workload pressures, and a sense of an "us and them" relationship with management, as well as environmental barriers. A consistent pattern of how the conditions for a healthy workplace can be created, which map onto the results from the NHS ward staff, suggest that without creating an enabling environment for health-promoting behaviors, workplace programs will have poor uptake and retention.

  7. Leonardo DiCaprio visited Goddard Saturday to discuss Earth science with Piers Sellers

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Academy Award®- winning actor and environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio visited NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland on Saturday, April 23, 2016. During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio interviewed Dr. Piers Sellers, an Earth scientist, former astronaut and current deputy director of Goddard’s Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The two discussed the different missions NASA has underway to study changes in the Earth’s atmosphere, water and land masses for a climate change documentary that Mr. DiCaprio has in production. Using a wall-size, high-definition display system that shows visual representations based on actual science data, Mr. DiCaprio and Dr. Sellers discussed data results from NASA’s fleet of satellites in Earth’s orbit. The background image showing global sea surface circulation colored by temperature where reds are warm areas (32 degrees Celsius) and blues are cold regions (0 degrees Celsius). The data used for this visual is a joint MIT/JPL project called Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2). For more info on this visual, svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/cgi-bin/details.cgi?aid=3912 During his visit, Mr. DiCaprio also visited the facility holding NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope that is being developed as a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror. The telescope will be launched on an Ariane 5 rocket from French Guiana in October of 2018, and will be a premier observatory of the next decade, serving thousands of astronomers worldwide. Credit: NASA/Goddard/Rebecca Roth NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Antecedents of medical workplace violence in South China.

    PubMed

    Wenzhi Cai; Ling Deng; Meng Liu; Min Yu

    2011-01-01

    It has been noted that workplace violence most frequently occurs in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to explore antecedents of workplace violence in south China. The authors conducted face-to-face, in-depth, semistructured interviews with 30 hospital staff who had experienced at least one incident of workplace violence from patients during the past 12 months at three general hospitals in south China. The interviews were tape-recorded, then transcribed, and analyzed. The authors' analyses identified five major antecedents of workplace violence. First, 93.0% of medical workplace violence was related to insufficient communication between hospital staff and patients. Second, inadequate medical service quality was found to be a factor in 56.7% of the incidences. Third, unsatisfactory treatment outcome was reported in 60.0%. Fourth, heavy workload accounted for 43.3%. Fifth, patient frustration due to high medical expenses was reported in 40.0% of cases. The authors recommended a reengineering of hospital service delivery to create a more supportive and safer working environment for prevention of workplace violence.

  9. Workplace culture among operating room nurses.

    PubMed

    Eskola, Suvi; Roos, Mervi; McCormack, Brendan; Slater, Paul; Hahtela, Nina; Suominen, Tarja

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the workplace culture in the Operating Room (OR) environment and the factors associated with it. In health care, the workplace culture affects the delivery and experience of care. The OR can be a stressful practice environment, where nurses might have occasionally either job stress or job satisfaction based on their competence. A quantitative cross-sectional approach was used. The study consisted of 96 Finnish OR nurses. A Nursing Context Index instrument was used to obtain data by way of an electronic questionnaire. The primary role and working unit of respondents were the main components relating to workplace culture, and especially to job stress. Nurse anaesthetists were found to be slightly more stressed than scrub nurses. In local hospitals, job stress related to workload was perceived less than in university hospitals (P = 0.001). In addition, OR nurses in local hospitals were more satisfied with their profession (P = 0.007), particularly around issues concerning adequate staffing and resources (P = 0.001). It is essential that nurse managers learn to recognise the different expressions of workplace culture. In particular, this study raises a need to recognise the factors that cause job stress to nurse anaesthetists. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Proactive Copyright: Workplace Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rebecca P.; Parker, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Oftentimes, copyright is addressed in the workplace only after a blatant infringement is discovered or a cease-and-desist letter is received. Then, too, some workplaces may feel that they are immune to copyright issues due to their educational nature; while private organizations, businesses, and industry may feel that the term "fair use" will…

  11. Workplace Education Guide, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts State Dept. of Education, Boston.

    These eight chapters share diverse experiences, lessons, and tips gleaned by the Massachusetts Workplace Literacy Consortium. "Workplace Needs Analysis (WNA)" (Harneen Chernow, Emily Singer, Jenny Lee Utech) focuses on the Worker Education Program's (WEP's) strategy, including tools, access, interviews and focus groups, presenting findings to the…

  12. Combating Workplace Ageism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reio, Thomas G., Jr.; Sanders-Reio, Joanne

    1999-01-01

    Age discrimination in the workplace is widespread and often based on stereotypes. Research has demonstrated that older workers learn and perform well. Adult educators should eliminate ways in which educational practices perpetuate ageism, raise awareness of it in the workplace, and help older workers continue learning. (SK)

  13. Workplace ESL Teachers Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Andy F.

    The manual is intended for teachers in workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) programs, and contains ideas and techniques that both experienced and less experienced teachers in a wide variety of workplace ESL classes might find helpful. Sections address the following topics: (1) helpful hints for creating a successful educational environment…

  14. Canadian Chefs' Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier-MacBurnie, Paulette; Doyle, Wendy; Mombourquette, Peter; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs' learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured…

  15. Workplace Readiness Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Judith; Tibbetts, John; Sherman, Renee; Dlott, Michael

    This document is intended to help local adult education programs evaluate their programs to assess their capability of designing and delivering a specific workplace education program requested by an employer. The guide begins with an introductory section that discusses the following topics: differences between workplace programs and typical…

  16. Canadian Chefs' Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cormier-MacBurnie, Paulette; Doyle, Wendy; Mombourquette, Peter; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the formal and informal workplace learning of professional chefs. In particular, it considers chefs' learning strategies and outcomes as well as the barriers to and facilitators of their workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is based on in-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured…

  17. Proactive Copyright: Workplace Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Rebecca P.; Parker, Preston

    2009-01-01

    Oftentimes, copyright is addressed in the workplace only after a blatant infringement is discovered or a cease-and-desist letter is received. Then, too, some workplaces may feel that they are immune to copyright issues due to their educational nature; while private organizations, businesses, and industry may feel that the term "fair use" will…

  18. Intervention as Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkjaer, Bente; Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how workplace interventions may benefit from a simultaneous focus on individuals' learning and knowledge and on the situatedness of workplaces in the wider world of changing professional knowledge regimes. This is illustrated by the demand for evidence-based practice in health care.…

  19. Intervention as Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkjaer, Bente; Nickelsen, Niels Christian Mossfeldt

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how workplace interventions may benefit from a simultaneous focus on individuals' learning and knowledge and on the situatedness of workplaces in the wider world of changing professional knowledge regimes. This is illustrated by the demand for evidence-based practice in health care.…

  20. Speaking of workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Dzurec, Laura Cox; Bromley, Gail E

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing frequency of its reported incidence, especially in health care practice and education settings, workplace bullying seems to defy victims' clear understanding of its effects on them personally and to challenge their ability to provide cogent explanations about those effects to others. Especially, when it is subtle, as is the case in much of workplace bullying, the experience is emotionally confusing to its victims, and its inherent behaviors often seem absurd to those who have not lived through them firsthand. Moreover, the outwardly innocuous behaviors of subtle workplace bullying can yield long-term disorder for victims' coworkers and for employing organizations. Aptly capturing the mechanism of operation of workplace bullying, the concept of catastrophization may provide language to support understanding of victims' personal experiences of subtle workplace bullying and support administrators in recognizing bullying's paradoxical and long-term effects.

  1. Managerial and Organizational Discourses of Workplace Bullying

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan L.; Boutain, Doris M.; Tsai, Jenny H.-C.; de Castro, Arnold B.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore how workplace bullying is addressed by hospital nursing unit managers and organizational policies. BACKGROUND Although workplace bullying is costly to organizations, nurses report that managers do not consistently address the issue. METHODS This study used discourse analysis to analyze interview data and policy documents. RESULTS There were differences in the manner in which managers and the policy documents labeled bullying-type behaviors and discussed the roles and responsibilities of staff and managers. Policies did not clearly delineate how managers should respond to workplace bullying. CONCLUSIONS These differences can allow management variation, not sanctioned by policy. Unclear policy language can also offer insufficient guidance to managers, resulting in differential enforcement of policies. PMID:26301552

  2. Frequency and types of foods advertised on Saturday morning and weekday afternoon English- and Spanish-language American television programs.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert A; Cassady, Diana; Culp, Jennifer; Alcalay, Rina

    2009-01-01

    To describe food advertised on networks serving children and youth, and to compare ads on English-language networks with ads on Spanish networks. Analysis of television food advertisements appearing on Saturday morning and weekday afternoons in 2005-2006. A random sample of 1,130 advertisements appearing on 12 networks catering to Spanish-language, children, youth, Black youth, and general audiences were analyzed. Each advertisement was coded for the nature of the item promoted, the selling propositions used, and any nutritional claims made. Cross-tabulations using Fisher's exact test (P < .05 criterion). One-fifth of commercials were for food. Food ads were especially prevalent on Saturday programs and children's networks. Seventy percent of food ads were for items high in sugar or fat. More than one fourth of food advertisements were for fast-food restaurants, which were especially common on MTV and Spanish-language networks. Ads for fruits and vegetables were rare (1.7%). One nutrition-related public service announcement was found for every 63 food ads. Food advertisements continue to promote less-healthful items. Until marketing of high calorie, low-nutrient food to children is restricted, education and media literacy remain the best strategies for mitigating advertising effects.

  3. 2012 critical care transport workplace and salary survey.

    PubMed

    Greene, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Critical care transport (CCT) is provided in a unique and challenging out-of-hospital environment. The workplace and salaries for CCT staff are similarly unique and distinct within the health care industry. An industry-specific workplace and salary survey was conducted under Federal Safe Harbor guidelines to update information for 2012. As safety is a key concern for CCT workers and organizations, the survey elicited industry best practices under safety management system (SMS) categories.

  4. Learning in the workplace: the role of Nurse Managers.

    PubMed

    Yen, Margaret; Trede, Franziska; Patterson, Carmel

    2016-06-01

    Objective This research explores Nurse Managers' (NMs') influence on workplace learning. The facilitation of staff learning has implications for the role of NMs, who are responsible for the quality and safety of patient care. However, this aspect of their work is implicit and there is limited research in the area. Methods This paper discusses the findings from one hospital as part of a broader philosophical hermeneutic study conducted in two public hospitals over a 20-month timeframe. NMs participated in interviews, a period of observation, follow-up interviews and a focus group. Transcribed data was thematically analysed. Eraut's 'Two triangle theory of workplace learning' was used to interpret participants' accounts of how they facilitated workplace learning. Findings The analysis found that NMs worked to positively influence staff performance through learning in three domains: orientating new staff, assessing staff performance and managing underperformance. Conclusions This study purports that NMs influence workplace learning in ways that are seldom recognised. A more conscious understanding of the impact of their role can enable NMs to more purposefully influence workplace learning. Such understanding also has implications for the professional preparation of NMs for their role in the context of workplace learning, facilitating learning for change and enabling the advancement of quality and safety in healthcare. What is known about the topic? Studies exploring the influence of Nurse Managers in workplace learning have been limited to their role in the facilitation of formal learning. There is a paucity of research that examines their role in influencing informal learning. What does this paper add? The findings of this study draw on Eraut's 'Two triangle theory of workplace learning' to further define the interdependent relationship between management and educational practices. What are the implications for practitioners? NMs' awareness and deliberate use of

  5. Workplace stress: a hospital team approach.

    PubMed

    Blacklock, E

    1998-08-01

    Critical incident stress can adversely affect individuals both at work and at home. Debriefing offers a safe environment in which they can express their emotions. Stress management teams can benefit both staff and employers.

  6. [Workplace-related anxiety, workplace phobia and disorders of participation].

    PubMed

    Muschalla, B; Linden, M

    2009-06-01

    Work is an important domain of life. It is therefore clear that problems at the workplace and mental disorders will have negative interactions. Job-related anxieties are of special importance as any workplace causes or intensifies anxiety by its very nature. A common final pathway of mental disorders in general and workplace-related anxieties in particular is workplace phobia. Similarly to agoraphobia, it is characterised by panic when approaching or even thinking of the stimulus, in this case the workplace. Workplace phobia has serious negative consequences for the further course of illness. It impairs the ability to work, and can lead to sick leave and early retirement. It requires special therapeutic interventions. This paper describes workplace-related anxieties and workplace phobia and gives a conceptual framework for their understanding.

  7. Workplace in fluency management: factoring the workplace into fluency management.

    PubMed

    Cassar, M C; Neilson, M D

    1997-01-01

    This article addresses competency-based standards and guidelines for the involvement of speech-language pathologists in the workplace of clients who stutter. It advocates broadening customary practices in stuttering treatment and suggests that speech-language pathologists should extend their scope of service delivery to the workplace. It presents a sequence for the collaborative involvement of the employer and other workplace members and proposes strategies for evaluating workplace based fluency programs. Issues of fluency management, transfer, maintenance, and efficacy are discussed in the workplace context. Also addressed is workplace communication as well as such factors as stereotypes, discrimination, and resistance to change which may impinge on workplace intervention. It is argued that structured intervention, transfer, and generalization within a collaborative workplace framework facilitates best practice for the fluency clinician and more appropriate outcomes for the diversity of clients who stutter.

  8. Workplace violence prevention programs in psychiatric units and facilities.

    PubMed

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Casteel, Carri; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nocera, Maryalice; Goldmacher, Suzi; Ohagan, Emily; Blando, James; Valiante, David; Gillen, Marion; Harrison, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Psychiatric health care providers have high rates of workplace violence victimization, yet little is known about the strategies used by facilities to reduce violence. This study compared workplace violence prevention (WVP) programs in psychiatric units and facilities in California and New Jersey. Information was collected through interviews, a facility walk-through, and a review of written policies and training material. A similar proportion of hospitals in both states had WVP training programs. A higher proportion of hospitals in California had written WVP policies, and a higher proportion of New Jersey hospitals had implemented environmental and security modifications to reduce violence. Legislation is one of many potential approaches to increase workplace violence prevention programs in health care settings.

  9. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides that...

  10. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides that...

  11. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides that...

  12. 26 CFR 301.7503-1 - Time for performance of acts where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... expires on Thursday, November 23, 1995 (Thanksgiving Day), the suit will be timely if filed on Friday... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Time for performance of acts where last day... where last day falls on Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday. (a) In general. Section 7503 provides that...

  13. Workplace abuse: finding solutions.

    PubMed

    Christmas, Kate

    2007-01-01

    The atmosphere within the work setting speaks volumes about your culture, and is often a primary factor in recruitment and retention (or turnover) of staff. Workplace tension and abuse are significant contributing factors as to why nurses are exiting workplaces--and even leaving the profession. Abuse can take many forms from inappropriate interpersonal communication to sexual harassment and even violence. Administrators should adopt a zero tolerance policy towards abusive communication. Addressing peer behavior is essential, but positive behavior must also be authentically modeled from the CNO and other nursing leaders. Raising awareness and holding individuals accountable for their behavior can lead to a safer and more harmonious work environment.

  14. Workplace culture in psychiatric nursing described by nurses.

    PubMed

    Kurjenluoma, K; Rantanen, A; McCormack, B; Slater, P; Hahtela, N; Suominen, T

    2017-04-24

    This study looks to describe the workplace culture from the viewpoints of stress, job satisfaction and practice environment. Data were collected from nurses (n = 109) using a web-based survey, The Person-Centred Nursing Index, from two purposefully selected hospital districts in Finland. Data were statistically analysed. Nurses described their workplace culture in slightly positive terms. Nurses only occasionally experienced stress (mean = 2.56, SD = 0.55) and were fairly satisfied with their job (mean = 4.75, SD = 0.66) and their practice environment (mean = 4.42, SD = 0.81). Demographic variables such as the nurses' age, length of time in nursing, time at their present hospital, working shifts and their use of patient restriction were more frequently associated with their perceived workplace culture. Older nurses and those with a longer work history in the nursing profession tended to be more satisfied with their workplace culture in psychiatric nursing. Young and/or newly graduated nurses felt more negatively on their workplace culture; this issue should be recognised and addressed with appropriate support and mentoring. Nurses who used restrictive measures were more often less satisfied with their workplace culture. Continuous efforts are needed to reduce the use of coercive measures, which challenge also the managers to support nursing practice to be more person-centred. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  15. Creating an international nursing practice and education workplace.

    PubMed

    Hern, Marcia J; Vaughn, Gretchen; Mason, Debby; Weitkamp, Tina

    2005-02-01

    In today's global workplace, both nursing practice and education need to promote international health. Nurses from a comprehensive 373-patient-bed hospital at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and faculty from the College of Nursing, University of Cincinnati, in southwest Ohio have successfully collaborated to develop several unique international nursing exchange programs. The goals of these programs are to increase cultural sensitivity and nursing knowledge relevant to a global community. The essential components used in creating and implementing the programs with Scotland, Honduras, and Korea will serve as an international workplace model for others, especially for those settings focused on children and family health care.

  16. Collaborative Workplace Development: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folinsbee, Sue; Jurmo, Paul

    This booklet, which is intended for educators, human resource specialists, and others responsible for training and education and workplace development, presents principles of good practice and steps for planning and implementing collaborative workplace development initiatives. A collaborative method of workplace development is detailed that…

  17. Teamwork: building healthier workplaces and providing safer patient care.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    A changing healthcare landscape requires nurses to care for more patients with higher acuity during their shift than ever before. These more austere working conditions are leading to increased burnout. In addition, patient safety is not of the quality or level that is required. To build healthier workplaces where safe care is provided, formal teamwork training is recommended. Formal teamwork training programs, such as that provided by the MedTeams group, TeamSTEPPS (Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety), or participatory action research programs such as the Healthy Workplace Intervention, have decreased errors in the workplace, increased nurse satisfaction and retention rates, and decreased staff turnover. This article includes necessary determinants of teamwork, brief overviews of team-building programs, and examples of research programs that demonstrate how teamwork brings about healthier workplaces that are safer for patients. Teamwork programs can bring about these positive results when implemented and supported by the hospital system.

  18. How to prevent workplace violence incidents and improve security using baseline security assessments.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Caroline Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    To meet state and OSHA requirements for dealing with and reporting workplace violence, a growing number of hospitals, the author reports, are turning to baseline workplace violence assessments which survey employees in different roles, combined with a threat analysis and an analysis of existing controls and historical incidents that can be reviewed and tracked over time to show improvement or decline.

  19. How to Prevent Workplace Incivility?: Nurses' Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahzadeh, Farahnaz; Asghari, Elnaz; Ebrahimi, Hossein; Rahmani, Azad; Vahidi, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many articles have studied workplace incivility and its influence on outcomes, but very few have been conducted to assess how to prevent this issue. In this study, we aimed to determine how to prevent workplace incivility from the nurses' perspective. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative study which was based on a conventional content analysis approach. Thirty four nurses (25 to 52 years old) from seven training hospitals in Tabriz, Iran were selected through purposive sampling. Thirty six semi-structured interviews and eight field notes were analyzed. Results: The data analysis revealed 417 codes, ten categories, three subthemes and one theme, that is, A Need for a Comprehensive Attempt. Attempt of organization, nurses, and public as subthemes are needed to prevent workplace incivility. Conclusions: The findings of the study indicated that a comprehensive and systematic attempt was needed to prevent incivility. Nurses should try to improve their skills; officials should try to show the real image and position of nurses and hospitals to the community. PMID:28584555

  20. [Clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder --comparison with non-workplace-associated group].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Tsubasa; Kato, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with workplace-associated mood disorder. We conducted a clinical survey involving 84 clinical cases (regular employees suffering from mood disorder) who were hospitalized in the Psychiatry Department of Jichi Medical University Hospital, for a period over 8 years and 4 months between April 1st, 2000 and July 31st, 2008. The size of the workplace-associated group as a percentage of those patients in whom the onset of the symptom was occasioned by an evident issue at their workplace was 65%. This rate accounted for 74% of the total patients if clinical cases in which an evident issue at the workplace served as a significant trigger for the symptom were added to these patients in the case of an initial episode in the "non-workplace associated group". In the workplace-associated group, cases in which the premorbid character was a "depression-related personality" comprised only 42%, and was noticeably characterized by a perfection-oriented habit, enthusiastic character, conformity with other people, etc. Furthermore, the percentage of patients who were diagnosed with a "depression-related personality" comprised only 59% of the "overworked group", in which a heavy workload was evident in the workplace-associated group. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of cases involving managerial workers was significantly high; their rate as initial cases was significantly high, as well the proportion of favorable outcomes. In the workplace-associated group, the percentage of patients who showed unambiguous depression at the initial stage was significantly low. Likewise, a similar result was obtained in the overworked group. Workplace-associated mood disorder today tends to have a stress-related aspect, or aspect of adjustment disorder. There was a period in many cases during which the main symptoms were insomnia, headache, panic attack, etc., prior to the onset of unambiguous depression

  1. Workplace Counseling Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, James J.; Woody, Connie; Burns, Naomi; Howard, Sherrie; Rice, Misty

    This publication describes counseling approaches supervisors and human resource professionals can use to help marginal employees become better adjusted and more productive in the workplace. Three case studies are also provided for training purposes. The counseling tools are as follows: (1) Adlerian counseling, involving the belief that humans'…

  2. Mathematics in Masons' Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreira, Darlinda; Pardal, Eugénia

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents masons' professional practices, which are related to mathematics. It aims to contribute to the area of adult mathematics education and to enlarge knowledge about how mathematics is used at the workplace. Methodologically it was followed an ethnographic approach. The key informants of the study were four masons aged between 40…

  3. Workplace Diversity Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on workplace diversity issues. "Expanding Theories of Career Development: Adding the Voices of African American Women in the White Academy" (Mary V. Alfred) questions the validity of existing career development models for women and minority groups and examines the professional development of…

  4. Informal Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Re-conceptualizing Marsick and Watkins' Model of Informal and Incidental Learning in the Workplace" (Maria Cseh, Karen E. Watkins, Victoria J. Marsick) describes the use of a revised model to encompass the learning perspectives of small business owner-managers who work in the volatile…

  5. Workplace Pedagogic Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Discusses findings of an investigation of a model of guided workplace learning in a large processing plant. The model is composed of three interdependent planes: (1) everyday participation at work; (2) guided learning for work; and (3) guided learning for transfer. (Contains 18 references.) (JOW)

  6. Communication in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmerling, Leah

    Based on the National Communication Skills Modules taught at the TAFE (Technical and Further Education) level in Australia, this book is designed to enhance written and oral business communication skills. It covers interpersonal skills, teamwork, and presentation skills in six chapters on the following topics: workplace communication, writing…

  7. Diversity in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document contains three papers presented at a symposium on diversity in the workplace moderated by Sandra Johnson at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development (AHRD). "Diversity and Development: An Assessment of Equal Opportunities and the Role of HRD in the Police Service" (Rashmi Biswas, Penny Dick) examines…

  8. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  9. Communication in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shmerling, Leah

    Based on the National Communication Skills Modules taught at the TAFE (Technical and Further Education) level in Australia, this book is designed to enhance written and oral business communication skills. It covers interpersonal skills, teamwork, and presentation skills in six chapters on the following topics: workplace communication, writing…

  10. Improving Schoolteachers' Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodkinson, Heather; Hodkinson, Phil

    2005-01-01

    This paper is set in the context where there is a policy emphasis on teacher learning and development in a number of countries as a means towards school improvement. It reports on a longitudinal research project about the workplace learning of English secondary school teachers, carried out between 2000 and 2003. This was part of a Teaching and…

  11. Telecommunications in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Lorna; Lewandowski, Carol

    This guide is intended for use in conducting an eight-session workplace literacy course that will help employees in the manufacturing and service industries acquire necessary job-specific telephone usage skills. The instructional materials included in the guide are designed to teach students to accomplish the following: use professional answering…

  12. Workplace Literacy Demonstration Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kissack, Tessie Saenz, Comp.; Clymer-Spradling, Carol, Ed.

    A model workplace literacy program is described that was designed to upgrade the basic skills of adult workers and developed by El Paso Community College in partnership with J&J Register Company, a Texas division of Philips Industries with approximately 300 workers. Pre-assessment results indicated that about 95 percent of the workers had…

  13. Marketing Manual: Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fanshawe Coll., Strathroy (Ontario).

    This manual applies marketing concepts and methods, selling techniques and principles to the workplace literacy program for the purpose of assisting individuals involved in promoting and selling these programs. Part I provides a rationale for marketing and discusses the following: the role of the sponsor in marketing, market versus marketing,…

  14. Shaping an ethical workplace.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, S M

    1998-12-01

    Ethical choices in business are often troublesome because business ethics are not simply an extension of personal ethics. Moral standards learned from private experiences may not translate to the business world. This article analyzes choices in the workplace and offer suggestions to move toward more ethical business practices.

  15. Changing Families, Changing Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchi, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income…

  16. Multilingualism in European Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Britt-Louise

    2014-01-01

    This state-of-the-art article includes a review of past and recent studies on multilingualism at work in European environments. One aim is to provide the reader with a cross-cultural picture of workplace studies on various languages in Europe, another to discuss both positive and problem-based accounts of multilingualism at work. The overview…

  17. Informal Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    The first of the four papers in this symposium, "Re-conceptualizing Marsick and Watkins' Model of Informal and Incidental Learning in the Workplace" (Maria Cseh, Karen E. Watkins, Victoria J. Marsick) describes the use of a revised model to encompass the learning perspectives of small business owner-managers who work in the volatile…

  18. Workplace Diversity Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains three symposium papers on workplace diversity issues. "Expanding Theories of Career Development: Adding the Voices of African American Women in the White Academy" (Mary V. Alfred) questions the validity of existing career development models for women and minority groups and examines the professional development of…

  19. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  20. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  1. [Concept analysis of workplace bullying].

    PubMed

    Ma, Shu-Ching; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Chen, Jih-Yuan

    2011-08-01

    Workplace bullying is a complicated and imprecise concept. Research findings have highlighted it as an important issue in the nursing environment worldwide. Workplace bullying arises due to malfunctions in workplace organizational and cultural related antecedents and manifests in various forms. Many studies have reported that nurses experiencing workplace bullying face increased levels of physical, psychological and social distress, may adopt suicidal thoughts and negativity towards the nursing profession, and may even abandon the nursing profession completely. Although a large number of papers have discussed the antecedents, forms and interventions related to workplace bullying, there has yet been no systematic concept analysis of workplace bullying. This paper applied Walker and Avant's concept analysis process to verify concept definitions, identify defining attributes, antecedents, and consequences, and provide examples of model, borderline, and contrary cases. Findings can help nursing administrators understand and clarify the meaning of workplace bullying in order to take appropriate measures to improve the working environment for nursing professionals.

  2. Factors affecting workplace bullying and lateral violence among clinical nurses in Korea: descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyunjin; Uhm, Dong Choon; Yoon, Young Joo

    2016-04-01

    Workplace bullying and lateral violence are serious issues affecting the work life of hospital nurses. The purpose of this study was to identify the selected individual and institutional characteristics for workplace bullying and lateral violence using a conceptual framework. A descriptive survey design was used. A convenience sample of 255 nurses in tertiary hospitals, who had a minimum of 6 months clinical experience, completed the survey. Regression analysis was used to determine factors significantly associated with workplace bullying and lateral violence. The Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised and the Lateral Violence scale were used to measure workplace bullying and lateral violence. A negative affect, individualism and working in hospital specialty units predicted workplace bullying. Individualism, a negative affect, affiliated hospital and working hours predicted verbal abuse whereas the place of employment was significantly associated with lateral violence. The results of this study identified factors that are associated with bullying and violence but did not fully support the conceptual framework. The individual characteristic negative affect was significantly associated with most types of workplace bullying and lateral violence bully whereas the place of employment was an important factor in lateral violence. Nurse managers need to be aware that both individual and institutional factors may impact levels of workplace bullying and lateral violence in their hospitals and need to prepare specific strategies to address these multiple factors. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Saturday Morning Television Advertisements Aired on English and Spanish Language Networks along the Texas-Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Cristina S.; Rodriguez, Dianeth; Camacho, Perla L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this content analysis study is to characterize the TV advertisements aired to an at-risk child population along the Texas-Mexico border. Methods We characterized the early Saturday morning TV advertisements aired by three broadcast network categories (U.S. English language, U.S. Spanish language, and Mexican Spanish language) in Spring 2010. The number, type (food related vs. non-food related), target audience, and persuasion tactics used were recorded. Advertised foods, based on nutrition content, were categorized as meeting or not meeting current dietary guidelines. Results Most commercials were non-food related (82.7%, 397 of 480). The majority of the prepared foods (e.g., cereals, snacks, and drinks) advertised did not meet the current U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Additionally, nutrition content information was not available for many of the foods advertised on the Mexican Spanish language broadcast network category. Conclusions For U.S. children at risk for obesity along the Texas-Mexico border exposure to TV food advertisements may result in the continuation of sedentary behavior as well as an increased consumption of foods of poor nutritional quality. An international regulatory effort to monitor and enforce the reduction of child-oriented food advertising is needed. PMID:22209760

  4. Saturday Morning Television Advertisements Aired on English and Spanish Language Networks along the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Barroso, Cristina S; Rodriguez, Dianeth; Camacho, Perla L

    2011-10-18

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this content analysis study is to characterize the TV advertisements aired to an at-risk child population along the Texas-Mexico border. METHODS: We characterized the early Saturday morning TV advertisements aired by three broadcast network categories (U.S. English language, U.S. Spanish language, and Mexican Spanish language) in Spring 2010. The number, type (food related vs. non-food related), target audience, and persuasion tactics used were recorded. Advertised foods, based on nutrition content, were categorized as meeting or not meeting current dietary guidelines. RESULTS: Most commercials were non-food related (82.7%, 397 of 480). The majority of the prepared foods (e.g., cereals, snacks, and drinks) advertised did not meet the current U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Additionally, nutrition content information was not available for many of the foods advertised on the Mexican Spanish language broadcast network category. CONCLUSIONS: For U.S. children at risk for obesity along the Texas-Mexico border exposure to TV food advertisements may result in the continuation of sedentary behavior as well as an increased consumption of foods of poor nutritional quality. An international regulatory effort to monitor and enforce the reduction of child-oriented food advertising is needed.

  5. Transport and evolution of the 2009 Australian Black Saturday bushfire smoke in the lower stratosphere observed by OSIRIS on Odin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddaway, J. M.; Petelina, S. V.

    2011-03-01

    We report the transport and evolution of the Victorian Black Saturday bushfire smoke plume in the lower stratosphere during the February-June 2009 period. Vertical profiles of limb-scattered spectral solar radiation measured by the Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) instrument on the Odin satellite are used for this purpose. According to OSIRIS measurements, the main smoke material penetrated above the tropopause on 11 February 2009. It traveled westward and circled the globe in about 6 weeks from its first detection in the lower stratosphere, remaining in the tropical channel between 5°S and 25°S. The main plume gradually advected from ˜19 km in mid-February to ˜22 km in April, with a vertical extent varying from 2 to 6 km. The background radiances at corresponding altitudes and latitudes were subtracted from the plume-containing radiances to obtain net plume peak radiances. The latter parameter, governed by the number, size, and chemical composition of smoke particles, decreased by half every 19 days from 11 February until the end of April 2009. Pollution of the lower stratosphere at 18-22 km altitudes and 5°S-25°S latitudes, caused by the smoke plume dispersion, was up to 35% above the background. By mid-June 2009, OSIRIS radiances at these altitudes and latitudes had almost returned to their background levels.

  6. Arthrodesis after workplace injuries.

    PubMed

    Galey, Stephanie; Sferra, James J

    2002-06-01

    Many foot and ankle injuries are incurred in the workplace. Despite steel-toed shoes, metatarsal bars, and ankle-high boots, fractures which require arthrodesis procedures can occur. The area of the foot and ankle involved, any pre-existing conditions, and the patient's occupational requirements must be taken into account. When an employer is flexible, the patient can often return to a sit down job during the postoperative recovery, if intermittent elevation of the extremity is permitted and hours are gradually increased. Alternatively, manual laborers who operate heavy machinery or work on ladders or elevated surfaces will require a prolonged recovery period before being able to return to the workplace. Algorithms with return to work dates may be helpful, but because so many factors exist, a functional capacity evaluation is often necessary to determine what, if any, permanent restrictions will be required.

  7. Human factors workplace considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    Computer workstations assume many different forms and play different functions today. In order for them to assume the effective interface role which they should play they must be properly designed to take into account the ubiguitous human factor. In addition, the entire workplace in which they are used should be properly configured so as to enhance the operational features of the individual workstation where possible. A number of general human factors workplace considerations are presented. This ongoing series of notes covers such topics as achieving comfort and good screen visibility, hardware issues (e.g., mouse maintenance), screen symbology features (e.g., labels, cursors, prompts), and various miscellaneous subjects. These notes are presented here in order to: (1) illustrate how one's workstation can be used to support telescience activities of many other people working within an organization, and (2) provide a single complete set of considerations for future reference.

  8. Workplace Literacy: From Survival to Empowerment and Human Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoder, Carol A.; French, Joyce N.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an effective literacy program in two hospitals, which benefited both the employer and employee by empowering participants to solve problems, think critically and creatively, and make decisions. Discusses criteria for effective workplace literacy programs, the program's framework, and program evaluation. (RS)

  9. The role of off-licence outlets in binge drinking: a survey of drinking practices last Saturday night among young adults in Australia.

    PubMed

    McKetin, Rebecca; Livingston, Michael; Chalmers, Jenny; Bright, David

    2014-01-01

    To examine where young adults purchase their alcohol on Saturday nights and how this relates to binge drinking. This study used an online survey of a non-probability-based quota sample of 2013 Australians aged 18-30 years who had consumed alcohol in the past year. Participants who purchased alcohol from off-licence outlets the Saturday night before answering the survey were compared with participants who purchased only from on-licence outlets with regard to how much they drank (binge drinking was defined as five or more drinks), how much they spent on alcohol, where they drank, their risk of an alcohol use disorder and other demographic factors. Of participants who drank the previous Saturday night (n=1106), 46% bought alcohol only from off-licence outlets (e.g. bottle shops), 19% bought from both off-licence and on-licence outlets (e.g. clubs, bars), and 23% bought only from on-licence outlets. Participants who bought alcohol from off-licence outlets were equally likely to binge-drink as participants who bought only from on-licence outlets (B=-0.02, P=0.912), but they drank more cheaply and usually drank at home. Participants who bought alcohol from both off-licence and on-licence outlets were more likely to binge-drink (B=1.39, P<0.001), drank both at home and in public places, were at higher risk of an alcohol use disorder and were more likely to have used stimulants the previous Saturday night. Off-licence outlets were a major source of alcohol in this sample of young Australian adults, many of whom binge-drank in private homes. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  10. Defining workplace bullying behaviour professional lay definitions of workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Paula; Huynh, Amy; Goodman-Delahunty, Jane

    2007-01-01

    As is commonly the case in new areas of research, workplace bullying researchers and practitioners have struggled to establish a single agreed-upon definition of this phenomenon. As a consequence, there are numerous definitions of workplace bullying currently in use around the world to investigate this serious workplace issue, to educate the workforce about this form of harassment and to assess claims involving allegations of workplace bullying. Additionally, little is known about how employees and people in general define workplace bullying behaviour, and whether current researcher, practitioner and legal definitions coincide with lay definitions of bullying. To compare researcher, practitioner and legal definitions of workplace bullying with lay definitions, the content of definitions composed by adults from diverse personal and professional backgrounds (N=1095) was analysed. Results confirmed that components commonly used by researchers and practitioners, including the occurrence of harmful and negative workplace behaviours, were frequently cited by participants as central defining components of bullying behaviour. In addition, lay definitions often included themes of fairness and respect. The emergence of these themes has important consequences for organisations responding to, and attempting to prevent the occurrence of workplace bullying behaviour in that organisations in which bullying is tolerated may violate both local laws as well as their ethical responsibility to provide employees with a safe, professional and respectful workplace.

  11. [Depression in the workplace].

    PubMed

    Mezerai, Mustapha; Dahane, Abdelkrim; Tachon, Jean-Paul

    2006-05-01

    Depression is the object of a dense literature, and synthesizing it is more of a utopian ideal rather than a concrete possibility. Several specific risk factors for mental health are found in the workplace: work overloads, defective communications, role conflicts, competitive climate, and tolerance of violence. At the same time, few preventive measures have been implemented against mental disorders at work, nor are many protective factors present. One worker in ten suffers from depression, anxiety, stress, or overwork. To be distinguished from "burnout", depressive symptoms must induce clinically significant suffering with substantial deterioration in functioning at work. For depression to be recognized as a workplace accident, the employee must show that it was triggered by an unforeseen and sudden event (or at least one certainly) due to or at work. The causal link between an event at work and the depression must be shown (in particular by expert medical testimony about stress factors and indicators of vulnerability to depression). Its recognition as an occupational disease can be based on the presence of psychosocial factors described by models of workplace stress and on its description by the occupational physician.

  12. Competing discourses of workplace health.

    PubMed

    Allender, Steven; Colquhoun, Derek; Kelly, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of workplace health programme discourses within an international information technology company. Discourse refers to a system of statements that share a common force and coherence and which are socially constitutive. The representation of entities such as workplace health can be subject to competition between discourses. A critical discourse analysis was undertaken on semi-structured interviews, participant observation and workplace health programme documents. Two competing discourses were identified: health as safety and health as lifestyle. Each discourse is described and shown to both implicitly and explicitly define health within this particular workplace. Lifestyle discourse encouraged moves towards linking of the employees' working and private lives while safety discourse defined health in the relationship between workers and their physical environment. Competition between discourses both constricts and opens spaces for alternative understandings of health in the workplace. The implications of this competition for workplace health policy and practice are discussed.

  13. Professional Development Project for Workplace Education Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blight, Bronwen; Nou, Georgina

    1993-01-01

    A training course for workplace education teachers had five modules: the changing workplace, its impact on workers, nonteaching roles of the practitioner, teaching skills for the workplace, and program management. Flexible delivery modes and mentoring were also featured. (SK)

  14. Champaign County National Workplace Literacy Program. Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champaign County Board of Education, Urbana, OH.

    This workplace literacy curriculum is based on neuropsychological brain behavior research and the principles of continuous improvement in a learning environment. Section 1 explains the choice of this model. Section 2 defines the need for this type of workplace curriculum. Sections 3 and 4 discuss the method of building the thematic units and…

  15. Workplace English: From Literature Classics to Workplace Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon-Krauss, Lisbeth; McClanahan, Linda

    This paper explains the rationale and methods for integrating workplace literacy with English literature instruction for high school or adult students. The workplace literacy/English literature activities presented include: (1) a newsletter format reporting on the major historical periods in English literature; (2) a business project report used…

  16. Partnering with the 21st century workplace: leveraging workplace ecology.

    PubMed

    Bricout, John C

    2003-01-01

    The 'accessible' job market of the 1990's has given way to a challenging job market in a climate of economic uncertainty in the early Twenty-First Century. For vocational rehabilitation professionals this change requires the strategic use of workplace supports to increase the value and sustainability of work performed by people with disabilities in competitive jobs. An analytical framework for leveraging the natural supports of the workplace is provided by the workplace ecology as a bounded environment in which relationships between workers and supervisors promote learning and enhanced performance. The dynamics of the workplace ecology are explored with particular reference to workers with disabilities receiving supported employment services. Recommendations are made for leveraging the workplace ecology to the benefit of the supported worker. Implications for supported employment services in the new millennium are discussed.

  17. Workplace Bullying in Surgery.

    PubMed

    Ling, Mary; Young, Christopher J; Shepherd, Heather L; Mak, Cindy; Saw, Robyn P M

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and nature of workplace bullying among General Surgery trainees and consultants in Australia. An online questionnaire survey of General Surgery trainees and consultant surgeons in Australia was conducted between March and May 2012. Prevalence of bullying was measured using both a definition of workplace bullying and the revised Negative Acts Questionnaire (NAQ-R). Sources of bullying were also examined, as well as the barriers and outcomes of formal reporting of bullying. The response rate was 34 % (370/1084) with 41 % (n = 152) of respondents being trainees. Overall, 47 % (n = 173) of respondents reported having been bullied to some degree and 68 % (n = 250) reported having witnessed bullying of surgical colleagues in the last 12 months. The prevalence of bullying was significantly higher in trainees and females, with 64 % of trainees and 57 % of females experiencing some degree of bullying. The majority of respondents (83 %) had experienced at least one negative behavior in the last 12 months, but 38 % experienced at least one negative behavior on a weekly or daily basis. The persistent negative behaviors that represent work-related bullying most commonly experienced were 'having opinions ignored' and 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload.' Consultant surgeons were the most common source of bullying for both trainees and consultants, with administration the next common source. Of those who reported being bullied, only 18 % (n = 32) made a formal complaint. Despite increased awareness and interventions, workplace bullying remains a significant problem within General Surgery in Australia. The findings in this study serve as a baseline for future questionnaires to monitor the effectiveness of implemented anti-bullying interventions.

  18. Saturday School. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Secretary of Education, Duncan, proclaimed to a group of teachers in Colorado that if students were to be more competitive with those from other countries, in particular, China and India, they needed to be in school six days a week for at least 11 months a year (Associated Press, 2009). Although longer school days, weeks and years are not…

  19. Saturday Afternoon Swim

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-06-29

    Hours after the June 28, 2014, test of NASA Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator over the U.S. Navy Pacific Missile Range, two members of the Navy Explosive Ordinance Disposal swim toward the test vehicle.

  20. Workplace Wellness Programs Study

    PubMed Central

    Mattke, Soeren; Liu, Hangsheng; Caloyeras, John; Huang, Christina Y.; Van Busum, Kristin R.; Khodyakov, Dmitry; Shier, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This article investigates the characteristics of workplace wellness programs, their prevalence, their impact on employee health and medical cost, facilitators of their success, and the role of incentives in such programs. The authors employ four data collection and analysis streams: a review of the scientific and trade literature, a national survey of employers, a longitudinal analysis of medical claims and wellness program data from a sample of employers, and five case studies of existing wellness programs in a diverse set of employers to gauge the effectiveness of wellness programs and employees' and employers' experiences. PMID:28083294

  1. Smoke-Free Workplace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-07

    8217 (FTý, . kIrcferred to a, secondhand or passive smoke . Exhaled and/or sidestream smoke emitted from smokers and the burning of cigarettes, cigars, and...DTIC S E 1519CDepartment of Defense fl "INSTRUCTIONC AD-A276 525 March 7, 1994 -- lil l1111 i 1tllilIi qlllllll NUMBER 1omo.is USD(A) SUBJECT : Smoke ...34Environmental Smoke in the Workplace," June 1991 (d) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Report, "Respiratory Health Effects of Passive Smoking : Lung Cancer and

  2. Exploring Environmental Factors in Nursing Workplaces That Promote Psychological Resilience: Constructing a Unified Theoretical Model

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, Lynette; Smith, Morgan; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare S.; Breen, Lauren J.; Witt, Regina R.; Rogers, Cath; Williams, Allison; Cross, Wendy; Cheung, Kin

    2016-01-01

    Building nurses' resilience to complex and stressful practice environments is necessary to keep skilled nurses in the workplace and ensuring safe patient care. A unified theoretical framework titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM), is presented to explain the environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. The framework builds on a previously-published theoretical model of individual resilience, which identified the key constructs of psychological resilience as self-efficacy, coping and mindfulness, but did not examine environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. This unified theoretical framework was developed using a literary synthesis drawing on data from international studies and literature reviews on the nursing workforce in hospitals. The most frequent workplace environmental factors were identified, extracted and clustered in alignment with key constructs for psychological resilience. Six major organizational concepts emerged that related to a positive resilience-building workplace and formed the foundation of the theoretical model. Three concepts related to nursing staff support (professional, practice, personal) and three related to nursing staff development (professional, practice, personal) within the workplace environment. The unified theoretical model incorporates these concepts within the workplace context, linking to the nurse, and then impacting on personal resilience and workplace outcomes, and its use has the potential to increase staff retention and quality of patient care. PMID:27242567

  3. Exploring Environmental Factors in Nursing Workplaces That Promote Psychological Resilience: Constructing a Unified Theoretical Model.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Lynette; Smith, Morgan; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare S; Breen, Lauren J; Witt, Regina R; Rogers, Cath; Williams, Allison; Cross, Wendy; Cheung, Kin

    2016-01-01

    Building nurses' resilience to complex and stressful practice environments is necessary to keep skilled nurses in the workplace and ensuring safe patient care. A unified theoretical framework titled Health Services Workplace Environmental Resilience Model (HSWERM), is presented to explain the environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. The framework builds on a previously-published theoretical model of individual resilience, which identified the key constructs of psychological resilience as self-efficacy, coping and mindfulness, but did not examine environmental factors in the workplace that promote nurses' resilience. This unified theoretical framework was developed using a literary synthesis drawing on data from international studies and literature reviews on the nursing workforce in hospitals. The most frequent workplace environmental factors were identified, extracted and clustered in alignment with key constructs for psychological resilience. Six major organizational concepts emerged that related to a positive resilience-building workplace and formed the foundation of the theoretical model. Three concepts related to nursing staff support (professional, practice, personal) and three related to nursing staff development (professional, practice, personal) within the workplace environment. The unified theoretical model incorporates these concepts within the workplace context, linking to the nurse, and then impacting on personal resilience and workplace outcomes, and its use has the potential to increase staff retention and quality of patient care.

  4. Relationship between workplace spirituality and organizational citizenship behavior among nurses through mediation of affective organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Kazemipour, Farahnaz; Mohamad Amin, Salmiah; Pourseidi, Bahram

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationships between workplace spirituality, organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), and affective organizational commitment among nurses, and whether affective commitment mediates the relationship between workplace spirituality and OCB. In the present correlational study, a cross-sectional design was employed, and data were collected using a questionnaire-based survey. Based on the random sampling, 305 nurses were chosen and questionnaires were distributed among respondents in four public and general hospitals located in Kerman, Iran. To analyze the data descriptive statistics, Pearson coefficient, simple and multiple regression, and path analyses were also conducted. Workplace spirituality has a positive influence on nurses' OCB and affective commitment. Workplace spirituality explained 16% of the variation in OCB, while it explained 35% of the variation in affective commitment among nurses. Moreover, affective organizational commitment mediated the impact of workplace spirituality on OCB. Workplace spirituality predicts nurses' OCB and affective organizational commitment. It emphasizes benefits from the new perspective of workplace spirituality, particularly among nurses who need to be motivated in their work. This study illustrates that there are potential benefits owing to the positive influence of workplace spirituality on OCB and affective commitment among nurses. Managers of nursing services should consider workplace spirituality and its positive influence on nurses' outcomes in order to improve their performance and, subsequently, the healthcare system. © 2012 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  5. Conceptions of Workplace University Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Elaine

    1998-01-01

    A study examined how academic staff involved in workplace supervision of students conceive of the workplace experience in four professional areas: engineering, business administration, health sciences, and social science. Five concepts are identified, and a relationship is seen between the conceptions and the quality of student learning. Staff…

  6. Evaluating Workplace Education Program Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing and delivering workplace education programs, explains the workplace education evaluation process, the main approaches to evaluation, and considerations in selecting appropriate evaluation instruments. Discussed first are the…

  7. Workplace Learning: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Karen

    2008-01-01

    As we move into being a knowledge society, the way an organisation learns can be key to its innovation and profitability. This literature review examines the nature of workplace learning, with a focus on nonprofessional occupations, including those closely associated with workplace training. It identifies the conditions that facilitate workplace…

  8. Marketing Workplace Education to Business.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff interested in marketing adult basic skills and workplace education programs to business, presents a six-step process for developing a marketing plan. Discussed first are the purposes of marketing and considerations in marketing workplace education to…

  9. Workplace Learning: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Karen

    2008-01-01

    As we move into being a knowledge society, the way an organisation learns can be key to its innovation and profitability. This literature review examines the nature of workplace learning, with a focus on nonprofessional occupations, including those closely associated with workplace training. It identifies the conditions that facilitate workplace…

  10. Workplace Education Sample Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozarjian, Bob; Uvin, Johan

    This sample evaluation report is part of a series of resources developed for and by workplace education practitioners in business, education, and labor partnerships funded through the Massachusetts Department of Education's Workplace Literacy Program. Data included in the report are based on Project Health, which integrates the experiences from…

  11. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  12. Workplace incivility: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Abolfazl Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the meaning of the concept 'workplace incivility' and promote consistency in its application in nursing research and practice. The methodology introduced by Walker and Avant was used to analyze this concept. A total number of 50 studies that had essentially addressed the concept of incivility in employees' work environment was selected. Ambiguous intent, violation of mutual respect, low intensity and lack of physical assault were identified as the defining attributes of workplace incivility. The necessary antecedent of workplace incivility consisted of the presence of two or more people, with one or more as the source of the incivility, and another or others as its target in the workplace. Moreover, certain individual and organisational factors were the potential antecedents of workplace incivility. Possible negative outcomes for victims, witnesses, organisations, society and perpetrators of such behaviours, such as increased cost for the organisation, reduced citizenship performance, psychological distress and anxiety were identified as outcomes of workplace incivility. Results of the current concept analysis can guide nurse managers to design interventions so that the occurrence of workplace incivility can be reduced. Further studies can focus on testing the psychometric properties of the existing workplace incivility scales, especially uncivil behaviours experienced by nurses across different societies or cultures.

  13. Black Boxes in Workplace Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julian; Wake, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    We ground Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) in studies of workplace practices from a mathematical point of view. We draw on multiple case study visits by college students and teacher-researchers to workplaces. By asking questions that "open boxes", we "outsiders and boundary-crossers" sought to expose contradictions between College and…

  14. Adult Learning in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This document contains four symposium papers on adult learning in the workplace. "The Relationship between Workplace Learning and Employee Satisfaction in Small Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden, Shamsuddin Ahmad) reports the results of a study of the nature and extent of HRD, level of job satisfaction among workers, and correlation between…

  15. The Toll of Workplace Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killoren, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Bullying may be more common than most people think. According to a study commissioned by the Workplace Bullying Institute, one in three employees experience bullying in the workplace either as a victim or as a witness suffering collateral damage. Bullying is a serious problem. Directors, managers, and staff members need to ensure that it does not…

  16. Experience, Competence and Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paloniemi, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job-competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the variety of conceptions related to experience, competence and workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on interview data from six Finnish small and…

  17. Experience, Competence and Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paloniemi, Susanna

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine employees' conceptions of the meaning of experience in job-competence and its development in workplace context. The aim is to bring out the variety of conceptions related to experience, competence and workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on interview data from six Finnish small and…

  18. Black Boxes in Workplace Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Julian; Wake, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    We ground Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) in studies of workplace practices from a mathematical point of view. We draw on multiple case study visits by college students and teacher-researchers to workplaces. By asking questions that "open boxes", we "outsiders and boundary-crossers" sought to expose contradictions between College and…

  19. Ohio Workplace Education Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest ABLE Resource Center, Toledo, OH.

    This manual is designed for adult basic education programs to use as a resource for workplace education (WE). It begins with a section of introductory materials, including a WE definition, scope of work, and survey results. The next section contains a program profile; director/coordinator profile; instructor profiles; Ohio ABLE workplace site…

  20. Communication Skills for Workplace Assessors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Deborah

    This document is designed to help develop the communication skills of individuals training for the position of workplace assessor in Australia's National Training Framework and practicing workplace assessors who require additional assistance with on-the-job communication skills. The document consists of 11 units of study that each contain some or…

  1. Developing Literacy for the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Meg

    This paper presents a case and some ideas for integrating basic skills development with occupational training. Explaining why traditional instructional methods do not work in the workplace, the paper summarizes learning theories that support work force literacy programs. It explains how to identify the skills needed in the workplace, provides…

  2. Workplace discrimination and cancer.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Maureen A; Fabian, Ellen; Hurley, Jessica E; McMahon, Brian T; West, Steven L

    2007-01-01

    Data from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) Integrated Mission System database were analyzed with specific reference to allegations of workplace discrimination filed by individuals with cancer under ADA Title One. These 6,832 allegations, filed between July 27, 1992 and September 30, 2003, were compared to 167,798 allegations from a general disability population on the following dimensions: type of workplace discrimination; demographic characteristics of the charging parties (CPs); the industry designation, location, and size of employers; and the outcome or resolution of EEOC investigations. Results showed allegations derived from CPs with cancer were more likely than those in the general disability population to include issues involving discharge, terms and conditions of employment, lay-off, wages, and demotion. Compared to the general disability group, CPs with cancer were more likely to be female, older, and White. Allegations derived from CPs with cancer were also more likely to be filed against smaller employers (15-100 workers) or those in service industries. Finally, the resolution of allegations by CPs with cancer were more likely to be meritorious than those filed from the general disability population; that is, actual discrimination is more likely to have occurred.

  3. Countering workplace aggression: an urban tertiary care institutional exemplar.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this process improvement project was to provide nursing staff with evidence-based knowledge and skills to manage patients and/or visitors with the potential for violence. Current statistics describing workplace violence in healthcare settings are alarming. Workplace violence significantly impacts nursing practice and may contribute to physical injuries, psychological trauma, decreased productivity, and low morale among nurses. This is particularly germane to those nurses who have been inadequately trained to manage aggressive patients and/or family behaviors. Following a series of disruptive episodes on the pulmonary-medical service that occurred at our facility in the winter of 2006, an employee safety team was formed to address the issue of workplace violence. Around this same time frame, a team comprising system hospital representatives was also initiated to globally address workplace violence. A Workplace Violence Education Program was devised to equip nurses with information, skills, and practical tools that will empower them when encountering clinical situations characterized by disruptive or abusive patient and/or family behaviors. The ultimate goal was to diffuse progressive, escalating aggressive behaviors in the clinical setting. FINDINGS/OUTCOMES: Evidence-based approaches formed the basis of an educational offering focusing on workplace violence prevention and management. This informational intervention was devised to empower clinical nursing staff with knowledge to enhance judgment, decision making, and implementation of behavioral strategies to reduce the likelihood of patient/family behaviors escalating to aggression. Interdisciplinary collaboration that included clinical experience, expertise, and knowledge generated from current literature reviews contributed to a successful educational program for nurses focusing on a historically neglected topic--workplace violence.

  4. Moving beyond misperceptions: the provision of workplace accommodations.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Brigida; McDonald, Katherine; Lepera, Nicole; Shahna, Monna; Wang, T Arthur; Levy, Joel M

    2009-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the provision of workplace accommodations in the health care, hospitality, and retail sectors. First, focus groups with administrators from each sector revealed that accommodations costs were viewed as minimal (although frontline managers were perceived as having misperceptions). Second, the provision of accommodations as documented through human resources records for health care and hospitality indicated that accommodations were infrequent, not costly, and provided to employees with disabilities. Finally, retail employees (irrespective of disability status) reported many more accommodations than health care and hospitality workers. To dispel misperceptions related to accommodations, education is critical and social workers are well-positioned for this role.

  5. Relationship between Organizational Culture and Workplace Bullying among Korean Nurses.

    PubMed

    An, Yuseon; Kang, Jiyeon

    2016-09-01

    To identify the relationship between organizational culture and experience of workplace bullying among Korean nurses. Participants were 298 hospital nurses in Busan, South Korea. We assessed nursing organizational culture and workplace bullying among nurses using structured questionnaires from July 1 through August 15, 2014. Most participants considered their organizational culture as hierarchy-oriented (45.5%), followed by relation-oriented (36.0%), innovation-oriented (10.4%), and task-oriented (8.1%). According to the operational bullying criteria, the prevalence of workplace bullying was 15.8%. A multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds of being a victim of bullying were 2.58 times as high among nurses in a hierarchy-oriented culture as among nurses in a relation-oriented culture [95% confidence interval (1.12, 5.94)]. The results suggest that the types of nursing organizational culture are related to workplace bullying in Korean nurses. Further research is needed to develop interventions that can foster relation-oriented cultures to prevent workplace bullying in nurses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Work-related asthma symptoms and attitudes to the workplace.

    PubMed

    Bradshaw, Lisa M; Barber, Christopher M; Davies, Jo; Curran, Andrew D; Fishwick, David

    2007-01-01

    The Health & Safety Executive estimate that between 1500-3000 UK workers develop asthma through potentially avoidable workplace exposures each year. To assess the perception of health, safety and the work environment by workers with symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma. A total of 97 workers referred to hospital specialists with symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma were studied in order to investigate their attitudes to the workplace, safety and health. A qualitative study design using semi-structured telephone interviews at 2 months and 12 months following enrolment was used at 6 national UK centres with a special interest in occupational asthma. Many workers in the study felt let down by the workplace and management and perceived that a lack of health and safety measures had contributed to the development of their asthma symptoms. Many workers felt that their employers were 'uncaring' and were pursuing or considering medico-legal cases against them. Workers' perception of risk influences their behaviour in the workplace, and their own health beliefs potentially create barriers to changing this. It is essential to consider workers' perceptions when developing strategies to effect change within the workplace.

  7. [Workplace bullying and sickness absenteeism].

    PubMed

    Campanini, Paolo; Conway, Paul Maurice; Neri, Luca; Punzi, Silvia; Camerino, Donatella; Costa, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    To assess the relationship between workplace bullying and sickness absenteeism in a large sample of Italian workers. A cross-sectional study conducted by means of questionnaires. In all, 8,992 subjects filled in a questionnaire to detect workplace bullying, the presence of work stress factors and days of sickness absence in the last year. Workplace bullying and psychosocial stressor were measured by the means of the CDL 2.0 questionnaire. Days of sickness absence reported by the subjects. On average, days of sickness absence were 7.4, and 7.2% of the respondents were defined as bullied. Results from logistic regression analyses showed that a workplace bullying was associated with more days of sickness absence after controlling for gender, age, professional qualification, company sector and juridical nature and other psychosocial factors (men: OR =1.62; women: OR =2.15). The present study confirms that workers exposed to a workplace bullying reported higher sickness absenteeism as compared with non-exposed subjects, also when a potentially highly stressful work environment is considered. The results of the present study support that workplace bullying may be viewed as an extreme stressful condition. Interventions to avoid workplace bullying not only favoure workers' health, but also avoid the company costs associated with workers' sickness absenteeism.

  8. Workplace Learning as a Cultural Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Nicky

    2001-01-01

    Despite the raised status of learning in workplace culture, workplace learning may be experienced as oppressive or disempowering when it must conform to cultural norms or learner differences are made invisible. Workplace educators should understand culture as an evolving entity and challenge oppressive workplace practices. (Contains 16…

  9. Reading Work: Literacies in the New Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belfiore, Mary Ellen; Defoe, Tracy A.; Folinsbee, Sue; Hunter, Judy; Jackson, Nancy S.; Hunter, Judith M.

    2004-01-01

    This book explores changing understandings of literacy and its place in contemporary workplace settings. It points to new questions and dilemmas to consider in planning and teaching workplace education. By taking a social perspective on literacies in the workplace, this book challenges traditional thinking about workplace literacy as functional…

  10. Workplace bullying in nurses.

    PubMed

    Quine, L

    2001-01-01

    The article reports a study of workplace bullying in community nurses in an NHS trust. The aims were to determine the prevalence of bullying, to examine the association between bullying and occupational health outcomes, and to investigate whether support at work could moderate the effects of bullying. Forty-four percent of nurses reported experiencing one or more types of bullying in the previous 12 months, compared to 35 percent of other staff. Fifty percent of nurses had witnessed the bullying of others. Nurses who had been bullied reported significantly lower levels of job satisfaction and significantly higher levels of anxiety, depression and propensity to leave. They were also more critical of aspects of the organizational climate of the trust. Support at work was able to protect nurses from some of the damaging effects of bullying.

  11. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  12. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  13. Antiferromagnetic character of workplace stress.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Jun-ichiro; Akitomi, Tomoaki; Ara, Koji; Yano, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    We study the nature of workplace stress from the aspect of human-human interactions. We investigated the distribution of Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale scores, a measure of the degree of stress, in workplaces. We found that the degree of stress people experience when around other highly stressed people tends to be low, and vice versa. A simulation based on a model describing microlevel human-human interaction reproduced this observed phenomena and revealed that the energy state of a face-to-face communication network correlates with workplace stress macroscopically.

  14. Workplace bullying: the effectiveness of a workplace program.

    PubMed

    Stagg, Sharon J; Sheridan, Daniel J; Jones, Ruth A; Speroni, Karen Gabel

    2013-08-01

    Workplace bullying can not only cost thousands of dollars to replace an affected nurse, but also have detrimental economic effects on health care organizations. Occupational health nurses can provide leadership in preventing or eliminating workplace bullying. This pilot study determined that attendance at a cognitive rehearsal program decreased workplace bullying. The study used an Internet-based survey administered 6 months after nurses completed the 2-hour cognitive rehearsal program. Half of the nurses reported witnessing bullying behaviors since attending the program; 70% of the nurses reported changing their own behaviors following the course; and 40% of the nurses reported a decrease in bullying behaviors during the past 6 months. Although 70% of the nurses believed they could intervene in bullying situations, only 16% reported they responded to bullying at the time of occurrence. This study illuminates the need to continue searching for other effective methods to prevent and manage workplace bullying. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Junior physicians' workplace experiences in clinical fields in German-speaking Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Klaghofer, Richard; Abel, Thomas; Buddeberg, Claus

    2005-01-08

    To date, there have been several prospective cohort studies investigating the workplace experiences of junior physicians, but with limited focus on gender issues. The objective of the present study is to explore the workplace experiences of first-year residents according to gender, type of training hospital, and clinical field. Data reported are from the second assessment of the longitudinal Swiss physicians' career development study, begun in 2001. In 2003, 497 residents (54.7% females, 45.3% males) assessed their workplace conditions, social support at work, and effort-reward imbalance. There are few, but relevant, gender related differences in workplace experiences, with female physicians experiencing less mentoring and higher over-commitment, yet more positive social relationships at work. In a multivariate model, significant differences in some workplace variables with regard to type of training hospital and/or clinical field are found: workplace conditions are rated worse in type "A" hospitals (university and cantonal hospitals) than in type "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals (regional hospitals and highly specialised units), and in surgical fields than in internal medicine. In "A" hospitals mentoring is assessed as better, but positive social relationships as worse. Both scales are rated worse in surgical fields than in internal medicine. The effort-reward imbalance (ERI) is rated significantly higher (unfavourable) in "A" hospitals than in "B"/"C"/"D" hospitals, regardless of gender and clinical field. Significantly more subjects with an ERI quotient above 1 (which is unfavourable) work in "A" hospitals, and in surgical fields regardless of hospital type. Of the total sample, 81 subjects (16.3%), 41 males and 40 females, show an ERI quotient above 1. The greater the workload, the worse the rating of workplace conditions, effort-reward imbalance, and over-commitment. Institutional determinants are crucial factors for the workplace experiences and first career steps of

  16. Workplace ostracism and employee silence in nursing: the mediating role of organizational identification.

    PubMed

    Gkorezis, Panagiotis; Panagiotou, Maria; Theodorou, Mamas

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effect, through organizational identification, of workplace ostracism on nurses' silence towards patient safety. Employee silence in nursing has recently received attention in relation to its antecedents. Yet, very little is known about the role of workplace ostracism in generating nurses' silence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a public hospital in Cyprus. Data were collected from 157 nurses employed in a public hospital of Cyprus between November 2014-January 2015. To examine the present hypotheses bootstrapping analysis and Sobel test were conducted. Results demonstrated that workplace ostracism has an effect on nurses' silence towards patient safety. Moreover, this effect was partially mediated through organizational identification. Workplace ostracism among nurses significantly affects both nurses' attitude and behaviour namely organizational identification and employee silence. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Central Services PREP (A Curriculum for Sterilization Technicians in the Workplace). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tri-County Opportunities Industrialization Center, Inc., Harrisburg, PA.

    A workplace literacy curriculum for entry-level hospital workers who sterilize medical equipment for doctors and nurses was developed, tested, and published in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. An assessment was conducted to identify the needs of the hospital's management and the literacy skills needed by its central services prep department, and…

  18. Workplace Success Project. New Paradigm for Effective Workforce Skills. [Employee Guide and Supervisor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO. Workplace Literacy Services Center.

    These two documents are part of the workplace success training program provided to employees of a large metropolitan hospital. The first manual is intended for hospital employees, and the second is intended for supervisors. Included in the employee guide are an ice breaker activity, participant self-evaluation, and learning styles inventory and…

  19. Workplace bullying in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Randle, Jacqueline

    2011-11-01

    Bullying is a sensitive issue which is no longer confined to the school playground; adults are increasingly aware that workplace bullying is on the rise. Healthcare workers as well as patients are affected by bullying which can result in anxiety, dismay and powerlessness. The impact of workplace bullying on patient care is identified in this article as this is an under-researched area. The influence of the environment on workplace bullying is also considered. The NHS, like any other organisation, is characterised by circumstances that make bullying and harassment likely. Healthcare workers can minimise these and strategies are offered in this paper to make the workplace environment more positive from both an individual and an organisational perspective.

  20. Growing Concerns With Workplace Incivility.

    PubMed

    Collins, Natasha Renee; Rogers, Bonnie

    2017-07-01

    Workplace incivility (WPI) is a growing issue across all public and private sectors. Occupational and environmental health nurses can educate employees and management about WPI, its risk factors and characteristics, and ways to reduce incidents of WPI.

  1. Stress within the academic workplace.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole A; Pressler, Jana L

    2014-01-01

    Many new nursing leaders assuming deanships, assistant deanships, or interim deanships have limited education, experience, or background to prepare them to deal with workplace stress. To assist new deans and those aspiring to be deans, the authors of this department offer survival tips based on their personal experiences and insights. They address common issues such as time management, handling workplace bullying, and negotiating deadlines and assignments. The authors welcome counterpoint discussions with readers.

  2. LGBT Workplace Climate in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudi, B. S.; Danner, R.; Dixon, W. V.; Henderson, C. B.; Kay, L. E.

    2013-01-01

    The AAS Working Group on LGBTIQ Equality (WGLE) held a town hall meeting at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage to explore the workplace climate for LGBTIQ individuals working in Astronomy and related fields. Topics of discussion included anti-discrimination practices, general workplace climate, and pay and benefit policies. Four employment sectors were represented: industry, the federal government, private colleges, and public universities. We will summarize and expand on the town hall discussions and findings of the panel members.

  3. Workplace violence in nursing today.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Susan; Sofield, Laura

    2011-12-01

    Workplace violence is not a new phenomenon and is often sensationalized by the media when an incident occurs. Verbal abuse is a form of workplace violence that leaves no scars. However, for nurses, the emotional damage to the individual can affect productivity, increase medication errors, incur absenteeism, and decrease morale and overall satisfaction within the nursing profession. This results in staffing turnover and creates a hostile work environment that affects the culture within the organization.

  4. Visual ergonomics in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Anshel, Jeffrey R

    2007-10-01

    This article provides information about visual function and its role in workplace productivity. By understanding the connection among comfort, health, and productivity and knowing the many options for effective ergonomic workplace lighting, the occupational health nurse can be sensitive to potential visual stress that can affect all areas of performance. Computer vision syndrome-the eye and vision problems associated with near work experienced during or related to computer use-is defined and solutions to it are discussed.

  5. Nine out of 10 food advertisements shown during Saturday morning children's television programming are for foods high in fat, sodium, or added sugars, or low in nutrients.

    PubMed

    Batada, Ameena; Seitz, Maia Dock; Wootan, Margo G; Story, Mary

    2008-04-01

    A 2005 review by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies concluded that food marketing influences children's food preferences, consumption, and health. Given the powerful influence of marketing on children's diets, this cross-sectional study examined the types of foods, the nutritional quality of those foods, and the marketing techniques and messages used in food advertising during Saturday morning children's television programming. During 27.5 hours of programming in May 2005, 49% of advertisements shown were for food (281 food advertisements out of 572 total advertisements). The most commonly advertised food categories were ready-to-eat breakfast cereal and cereal bars (27% of all food advertisements), restaurants (19% of food advertisements), and snack foods (18% of food advertisements). Ninety-one percent of food advertisements were for foods or beverages high in fat, sodium, or added sugars or were low in nutrients. Cartoon characters were used in 74% of food advertisements, and toy or other giveaways were used in 26% of food advertisements. About half of food advertisements contained health/nutrition or physical activity messages and 86% of food advertisements contained emotional appeals. This study provides food and nutrition professionals with information about the amount and types of food children are encouraged to eat during Saturday morning television programming. The findings can help food and nutrition professionals counsel children about healthful eating and/or develop programs or policies to balance those advertisements with healthful eating messages.

  6. Workplace homicides of Texas males.

    PubMed

    Davis, H

    1987-10-01

    A review of Texas death certificates for 1975-84 identified 779 civilian males whose deaths were homicides that occurred in the workplace. Injuries from firearms caused 81 per cent of the deaths. The overall rate of workplace homicide was 2.1/100,000 male workers/year. Males employed in taxicab service had the highest rate of workplace homicide. 78.2/100,000 male workers/year. Males employed in certain retail trade industries, law enforcement, and the private-security industry also had high rates of workplace homicide. Male workers greater than or equal to 65 years old were at especially high risk, with a workplace-homicide rate 3.5 times that of younger workers. A review of medical examiners' records in five urban counties indicated that 32 per cent of victims who had worked in eating-and-drinking places and 5 per cent of other workers had blood or cerebrospinal-fluid alcohol levels greater than or equal to 0.10 g/dl. These results provide a base for designing effective strategies to prevent workplace homicides.

  7. Changing families, changing workplaces.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Suzanne M

    2011-01-01

    American families and workplaces have both changed dramatically over the past half-century. Paid work by women has increased sharply, as has family instability. Education-related inequality in work hours and income has grown. These changes, says Suzanne Bianchi, pose differing work-life issues for parents at different points along the income distribution. Between 1975 and 2009, the labor force rate of mothers with children under age eighteen increased from 47.4 percent to 71.6 percent. Mothers today also return to work much sooner after the birth of a child than did mothers half a century ago. High divorce rates and a sharp rise in the share of births to unmarried mothers mean that more children are being raised by a single parent, usually their mother. Workplaces too have changed, observes Bianchi. Today's employees increasingly work nonstandard hours. The well-being of highly skilled workers and less-skilled workers has been diverging. For the former, work hours may be long, but income has soared. For lower-skill workers, the lack of "good jobs" disconnects fathers from family obligations. Men who cannot find work or have low earnings potential are much less likely to marry. For low-income women, many of whom are single parents, the work-family dilemma is how to care adequately for children and work enough hours to support them financially. Jobs for working-class and lower middle-class workers are relatively stable, except in economic downturns, but pay is low, and both parents must work full time to make ends meet. Family income is too high to qualify for government subsidized child care, but too low to afford high-quality care in the private market. These families struggle to have a reasonable family life and provide for their family's economic well-being. Bianchi concludes that the "work and family" problem has no one solution because it is not one problem. Some workers need more work and more money. Some need to take time off around the birth of a child

  8. Workplace phobia--a first explorative study on its relation to established anxiety disorders, sick leave, and work-directed treatment.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2009-10-01

    Workplace phobia is defined as a phobic anxiety reaction with symptoms of panic occurring when thinking of or approaching the workplace. People suffering from workplace phobia regularly avoid confrontation with the workplace and are often on sick leave. The specific characteristics of workplace phobia are investigated empirically in comparison to established anxiety disorders. Two hundred thirty patients from an inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation hospital were interviewed concerning workplace phobia and established anxiety disorders. Additionally, the patients filled in self-rating questionnaires on general and workplace phobic symptom load. Subjectively perceived degree of work load, sick leave, and therapy participation were assessed. Participants with workplace phobia reached significantly higher scores in workplace phobia self-rating than did participants with established anxiety disorders. A similar significant difference was not found concerning the general psychosomatic symptom load. Workplace phobics were more often on sick leave than patients with established anxiety disorders. Workplace phobia can occur as an alonestanding anxiety disorder. It has an own clinical value due to its specific consequences for work participation. Workplace phobia requires special therapeutic attention and treatment instead of purely 'sick leave' certification.

  9. Interpersonal conflict and sarcasm in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, K R

    2000-11-01

    Violence and aggression in the workplace are problems that most Americans confront on a daily basis. The present study is an exploration of the predisposition to conflict in a work environment in which personality traits responsible for increased sarcasm and increased anger in response to sarcasm are identified. Participants represented two subdepartments within a city general hospital. The Keirsey Temperament Sorter (D. Keirsey, 1998) test for departmental temperament and a sarcasm survey designed by the author were used to test for frequency of sarcasm and anger in relation to differing categories of sarcasm. Angry reactions were gauged in relation to sarcasm directed at job performance, personal life, behavior, and appearance. Conclusions from this study point to many variables as causes for workplace anger; these include influences from organizational culture, work environment, psychological defense mechanisms, leadership decisions, stress, task orientation, and personality differences. Sarcasm trigger points leading to anger may be predicted based on a work group's personality composition. A homogeneous personality composition within a work group may involve factors such as personality characteristics common to a particular profession, organizational demands, and hiring practices.

  10. The cost of alcohol in the workplace in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Juan; Jacques, Denis; Annemans, Lieven

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that alcohol problems have a major impact in the workplace. It has long been recognized that misuse can have serious consequences for the productivity of workers. The extent of the problem is still an uncalculated cost. Few studies provide clear evidence of a cause, effect or relationship between substance abuse and workplace costs and valuable guidance to employers in evaluating the cost of substance abuse in their workplaces is missing. To estimate the awareness, policies and cost to employers of drinking in the workplace in Belgium and to illustrate the potential gains from drinking cessation provision. Costs vary with type of industry and policy in place; therefore, to estimate these costs, results from a survey were combined with evidence drawn from a review of literature. An Internet survey of 216 workplaces in Belgium, based on a stratified random sample of workplaces with 50 or more employees, was conducted in 2005. Further information was collected from 150 occupational physicians. Additional evidence was compiled from a review of the literature of drinking-related costs. 216 General Directors or HR Directors completed a questionnaire related to awareness, policy and costs. 150 occupational physicians completed a questionnaire related to awareness and policy. Companies are unaware or underestimate alcohol misuse among their employees. At least 84% of companies have no education or information policy about substance abuse. Absenteeism, accidents and turnover account for 0.87% of the wage bill. Reduced productivity/ (presenteeism accounts for 2.8%. The construction industry, postal services, hospitality industry (hotel/restaurants and catering) and sanitation industry (collection, street cleaning) are the most problematic sectors. Awareness: many companies are totally unaware of the impact of substance abuse and those that are aware underestimate the problem. Sectors are heterogeneous; some are more problematic than others. Policy

  11. Racial/Ethnic Workplace Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Laura J.; Ornelas, India J.; Lyles, Courtney R.; Williams, Emily C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Experiences of discrimination are associated with tobacco and alcohol use, and work is a common setting where individuals experience racial/ethnic discrimination. Few studies have evaluated the association between workplace discrimination and these behaviors, and none have described associations across race/ethnicity. Purpose To examine the association between workplace discrimination and tobacco and alcohol use in a large, multistate sample of U.S. adult respondents to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey Reactions to Race Module (2004–2010). Methods Multivariable logistic regression analyses evaluated cross-sectional associations between self-reported workplace discrimination and tobacco (current and daily smoking) and alcohol use (any and heavy use, and binge drinking) among all participants and stratified by race/ethnicity, adjusting for relevant covariates. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results Among respondents, 70,080 completed the workplace discrimination measure. Discrimination was more common among black non-Hispanic (21%), Hispanic (12%), and other race respondents (11%) than white non-Hispanics (4%) (p<0.001). In the total sample, discrimination was associated with current smoking (risk ratio [RR]=1.32, 95% CI=1.19, 1.47), daily smoking (RR=1.41, 95% CI=1.24, 1.61), and heavy drinking (RR=1.11, 95% CI=1.01, 1.22), but not binge or any drinking. Among Hispanics, workplace discrimination was associated with increased heavy and binge drinking, but not any alcohol use or smoking. Workplace discrimination among black non-Hispanics and white Non-Hispanics was associated with increased current and daily smoking, but not alcohol outcomes. Conclusions Workplace discrimination is common, associated with smoking and alcohol use, and merits further policy attention given the impact of these behaviors on morbidity and mortality. PMID:25441232

  12. HIV disclosure in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Degroote, S; Vogelaers, D; Koeck, R; Borms, R; De Meulemeester, L; Vandijck, D

    2014-06-01

    As HIV is currently a chronic and manageable disease, an increasing amount of people living with HIV (PLHIV) are (again) active on the labour market. Since research on this topic is scarce, this study aimed to explore experiences of PLHIV in the workplace, especially concerning disclosure and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. A questionnaire was developed and validated in collaboration with Sensoa (Flemish expertise centre for sexual health) and participants were recruited using flyers and announcements on websites. A total of 54 PLHIV completed the questionnaire, among whom 50 (92·6%) males. Half of the participants did not disclose their HIV status in the workplace, mostly due to being afraid of social or professional consequences. Those who disclosed, reported no changes in the workplace or even reported receiving more empathy. A minority of participants have to take antiretroviral medication at work and they reported no particular problems related to medication intake. Despite improved solidarity and information campaigns, many PLHIV still do not disclose their HIV status in the workplace, most frequently due to fear for discrimination. More actions are warranted, as well as addressing possible self-stigma. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in the workplace posed little or no problems.

  13. Smoking cessation in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Fishwick, D; Carroll, C; McGregor, M; Drury, M; Webster, J; Bradshaw, L; Rick, J; Leaviss, J

    2013-12-01

    The workplace is an important setting for reaching potentially large numbers of smokers. To review the evidence about smoking cessation in the workplace. Literature review including a synthesis of findings from recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses of workplace smoking cessation programmes, a separate review of the qualitative evidence, case studies and an expert panel assessment. We found advantages, identified or confirmed from the mixed methods used in this work to holding smoking cessation programmes in the workplace. These included: (i) easy access to large numbers of worker populations for large workplaces, (ii) the potential improved recruitment to such programmes given this, (iii) the opportunity to access young men, traditionally difficult to achieve, (iv) access to occupational health and other staff who can assist with support and delivery and (v) ability for workers to attend relatively easily. Evidence on the importance of developing peer support at work was mixed. The simple provision or availability of programmes and interventions was unlikely to provide any beneficial behaviour change. Interventions should target workers that actively want to stop smoking, use elements that workers have identified as useful or focus on altering beliefs about smoking and the need to stop. Smoking cessation programmes at work can provide useful support for workers wishing to stop smoking. They are only likely to be effective if participants have moved beyond the contemplation stage regarding smoking cessation, so that stopping smoking is a personal priority.

  14. Social capital and workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Pihl, Patricia; Albertsen, Karen; Hogh, Annie; Andersen, Lars Peter Sønderbo

    2017-01-01

    Workplace bullying is a serious stressor with devastating short- and long-term consequences. The concept of organizational social capital may provide insights into the interactional and communicative dynamics of the bullying process and opportunities for prevention. This study aimed to explore the association between organizational social capital and being a target or observer of workplace bullying. Based on self-reported cross-sectional data from a large representative sample of the Danish working population (n = 10.037), logistic regression analyses were conducted to explore at the individual level the associations between vertical and horizontal organizational social capital with being a target or observer of workplace bullying. In the fully adjusted models, low organizational social capital (vertical and horizontal) was associated with significantly increased odds ratios of both self-labelled (vertical: OR = 3.25; CI = 2.34-4.51; horizontal: OR = 3.17; CI = 2.41-4.18) and observed workplace bullying (vertical: OR = 2.09; CI = 1.70-2.56; horizontal: OR = 1.60; CI = 1.35-1.89), when compared with high organizational social capital. This study supports that characteristics of the psychosocial work environment are of importance in the development of workplace bullying, and provides focus on the importance of self-reported organizational social capital.

  15. [A Grounded Theory Approach on Nurses' Experience with Workplace Bullying].

    PubMed

    Kang, Jiyeon; Yun, Seonyoung

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the workplace bullying experience of Korean nurses. Participants were twenty current or former hospital nurses who had experienced workplace bullying. Data were collected through focus group and individual in-depth interviews from February to May, 2015. Theoretical sampling method was applied to the point of theoretical saturation. Transcribed interview contents were analyzed using Corbin and Strauss's grounded theory method. A total of 110 concepts, 48 sub-categories, and 17 categories were identified through the open coding process. As a result of axial coding based on the paradigm model, the central phenomenon of nurses' workplace bullying experience was revealed as 'teaching that has become bullying', and the core category was extracted as 'surviving in love-hate teaching' consisting of a four-step process: confronting reality, trial and error, relationship formation, and settlement. The relationship formation was considered to be the key phase to proceed to the positive settlement phase, and the participants utilized various strategies such as having an open mind, developing human relationships, understanding each other in this phase. The in-depth understanding of the workplace bullying experience has highlighted the importance of effective communication for cultivating desirable human relationships between nurses.

  16. Learning and teaching clinical communication in the clinical workplace.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jo; Dearnaley, Jo

    2016-08-01

    Clinical communication teaching and learning has become increasingly separate from the clinical workplace over the last 20 years in the UK, and in many medical schools is front-loaded to the early years of the curriculum. Many reasons exist to explain this separation, including the increasing use of simulation. However, learning by simulation alone is not ideal, and the literature now points towards a new direction that blends simulation with authentic experiences in the clinical workplace to aid the transition to clinical life. This article presents a practical example of collaboration between a London medical school and a hospital trust to provide an integrated clinical communication learning experience for students by situating teaching on the clinical wards for senior medical students. Clinical communication teaching and learning has become increasingly separate from the clinical workplace We outline a new teaching initiative, the 'Communication on the wards' pilot project, that blends clinical communication teaching with ward-based learning in an authentic environment, with patients, medical students and teachers working together. This teaching initiative was a practical attempt to bridge the theory-practice gap in clinical communication education, and to place learning in the clinical workplace for students. As such, it was enjoyed by all those who took part, and may be the way forward for clinical communication teaching and learning in the future. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Workplace bullying in nursing: The case of Azerbaijan province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Esfahani, Ali Nasr; Shahbazi, Gholamreza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Workplace bullying is a significant issue confronting the nursing profession both in Iran and internationally. This study examined workplace bullying among a group of Iranian nurses. Materials and Methods: The prevalence rate of bullying behavior among nurses was determined. Data were collected from 162 nurses who worked in four hospitals located in West Azerbaijan province, Iran. Results: Results showed that only 9% of nurses who participated in this study had frequently been exposed to bullying behavior, 22% had occasionally been bullied, and 69% had never been exposed to these behaviors during the last year. The most common type of workplace bullying experienced by nurses was verbal bullying. Forty percent of the nurses reported exposure to verbal bullying behavior frequently or occasionally. Conclusions: To be able to intervene with bullying behavior in the workplace, there is a need to pay greater attention to the problem by the entire range of managers, lawyers, industrial–organizational psychologists, counselors, social workers, and local authorities. PMID:25183984

  18. Belongingness in the workplace: a study of Malaysian nurses' experiences.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Z; Newton, J M; McKenna, L

    2014-03-01

    The need to belong has been proposed as the most basic need for human psychological well-being. Lack of belongingness has been associated with stress, anxiety and lack of esteem. Social and psychological functioning in the workplace has been linked to nurses' interconnection with others and their perceptions of belongingness. To explore factors contributing to Malaysian nurses' sense of belonging in the workplace. A descriptive questionnaire survey of registered nurses (n = 437) working in two Malaysian hospitals was conducted in 2011. Previously validated questionnaires translated into the Malay language were used. Data were analysed using SPSS 19.0. Nurses enhanced their sense of belonging through acceptance, 'fitting in', respect and group harmony. There were no specific demographic factors contributing to the nurses' perceptions. The findings suggest that these priorities for belongingness were contextually influenced by factors such as elements of Malaysian culture, the nature of nurses' teamwork and stereotypical values on the nursing profession. Data were collected in only two hospitals. Experiences of nurses in other hospitals and areas of Malaysia may not be similar. The influence of Malaysian culture in this study raises issues about utilization of a measurement scale developed in Western cultures, which may not directly accord with cultural values of an Eastern ethnicity. Aspects of belongingness in Malaysian nurses reflect those of nurses elsewhere. However, there are specific cultural influences at play. Therefore, development of a measurement scale based on Eastern culture would help in increasing understanding of workplace practices among these groups. Workplaces that perpetuate an environment that is not conducive to generating a sense of belonging may have an untoward impact on care delivery. Healthcare policies need to ensure patient care has a focus on engaging practitioners within multidisciplinary teams. © 2013 International Council of

  19. Substance Abuse Taxes the American Workplace

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164283.html Substance Abuse Taxes the American Workplace Survey, analysis reveal the ... 24, 2017 FRIDAY, March 24, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Substance abuse exacts a heavy toll on the American workplace, ...

  20. Workplace Safety and Health: Body Art

    MedlinePlus

    ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Workplace Safety & Health Topics Body Art Get Vaccinated Prevent Needlestick ... Pinterest Twitter YouTube NIOSH Homepage NIOSH A-Z Workplace Safety & Health Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH ...

  1. A qualitative study on the attributes of nurses' workplace social capital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Norikoshi, Kensuke; Kobayashi, Toshio; Tabuchi, Keiji

    2017-09-25

    To identify attributes of nurses' workplace social capital in Japan. Much attention has been paid to nurses' workplace social capital to improve the quality of the work environment; however, few studies are available on the attributes of nurses' workplace social capital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 32 nurses at seven hospitals. Nurses reported on the attributes of workplace social capital, such as characteristics facilitating individual positive action in an organisation, which were qualitatively analysed using the Kawakita Jiro method. The attributes of nurses' workplace social capital were organised into six groups: affirmation; exchange of appreciation; unrestricted information sharing; ability to trust; access to the strength; and altruistic reciprocity. The attributes of nurses' workplace social capital included a social structure that allowed nurses to make full use of their abilities both vertically and horizontally and were supported by a sense of security. In particular, newly emerged exchange of appreciation and altruistic reciprocity were important for nurses in Japan in building cooperative relationships with others. Managing human relationships, such as exchange of appreciation and altruistic reciprocity, in clinical settings based on nurses' workplace social capital may promote positive emotions in the organisation, positive ideas among staff and cooperative teamwork, which may lead to high-quality patient care. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Empowering workplace and wellbeing among healthcare professionals: the buffering role of job control.

    PubMed

    Galletta, Maura; Portoghese, Igor; Fabbri, Daniele; Pilia, Ilaria; Campagna, Marcello

    2016-05-26

    Health care workers are exposed to several job stressors that can adversely affect their wellbeing. Workplace incivility is a growing organizational concern with the potential to create workplaces harmful to individuals' wellbeing and increase occupational health risks. Based on the Job Demands-Resources (JD-R) model, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of two resources (organizational empowerment and job control) on individuals' well-being (emotional exhaustion) and attitude at work (unit affective commitment). A total of 210 hospital workers completed a self-administered questionnaire that was used to measure organizational empowerment, workplace incivility, job control, exhaustion, and affective commitment. Data were collected in 2014. Data were examined via linear regression analyses. The results showed that workplace incivility was positively related to emotional exhaustion and negatively related to affective commitment. Workplace empowerment was positively related to affective commitment and negatively related to emotional exhaustion. Furthermore, the positive relationship between workplace empowerment and affective commitment was significantly moderated by job control. Our results found support for the JD-R model. Specifically, results showed the buffering effect of job control in the relationship between empowerment and affective commitment. Our findings may concretely contribute to the stress literature and offer additional suggestions to promote healthy workplaces.

  3. Oppression and exposure as differentiating predictors of types of workplace violence for nurses.

    PubMed

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne

    2012-08-01

    To extend a model of the antecedents of workplace bullying to apply to a wider range of types of workplace aggression, including bullying and several types of violence, among nurses. Research that has focused on workplace bullying has found that the Demand-Control-Support model, negative affectivity and certain demographic factors play important roles as antecedents of bullying. A cross-sectional design. A validated questionnaire was sent to the work addresses of all nursing and midwifery staff in a medium-to-large hospital in Australia. A total of 273 nurses and midwives returned their completed questionnaires. Ordinal regressions were conducted to assess the antecedents of workplace aggression across bullying and violence. Aspects of the Demand-Control-Support model and job tenure significantly predicted particular forms of violence, while negative affectivity and work schedule were significant for bullying. The patterns of the results suggest key mechanisms that characterise certain forms of violence and distinguish between bullying and types of violence across the range of workplace aggression. In particular, oppression and exposure appear to differentiate types of workplace violence. The study suggests ways in which nursing and hospital managers may act to reduce the likelihood of certain forms of aggression, particularly violence, from occurring. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Retracted: Nurses learning in the workplace: a comparison of workplace attributes in acute care settings in Australia and Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, S W; Chan, M F; Lee, S-Y; Henderson, A

    2014-03-01

    Workplaces need to foster teaching and learning interactions so staff collaborate and learn from each other. Internationally, many countries provide support to graduates and experienced staff to foster engagement necessary for learning and quality care. Workplace attributes can differ across countries depending on managerial, contextual, social and policy issues. This study compared workplace attributes of two Australian hospitals with a Singaporean hospital. A representative sample of nurses in two acute care facilities in Australia (n = 203) and a comparable facility in Singapore (n = 154) during 2010 and 2011 responded to a survey requesting demographic data and responses about workplace attributes. Attributes were determined through validated tools that measure staff perception of support when facilitating others learning (Support Instrument for Nurses Facilitating the Learning of Others) and the clinical learning organizational culture (Clinical Learning Organizational Culture Survey). Results indicated Singaporean nurses rated perception of acknowledgement, workload management and teamwork support in facilitating learners in their hospital as significantly better than the Australian cohort despite similar provisions for support and development. There were no significant differences across the two sites in the clinical learning culture. Analysis across three health facilities only provides a snapshot. Targeting more facilities would assist in confirming the extent of reported trends. Findings indicate differences in nurses' perceptions of support when facilitating learners. Further exploration of Singaporean nurses' increased perceptions of support is worthy. Clinical learning organizational culture findings across Australian and Singaporean acute care facilities suggest common attributes within the nursing profession that transcend contextual factors, for example, a strong sense of task accomplishment. Nurses across both countries demonstrate

  5. Mobbing: Workplace Violence in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, Jeanmarie; McDermott, J. Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Incidents of workplace violence are becoming all too common at colleges and universities. Generally, one thinks of shootings and assaults in relation to campus workplace violence. However, mobbing and bullying of faculty by other faculty are types of workplace violence that, while very common, are rarely discussed or reported. This article raises…

  6. Workplace Education Programs. Adult Education Supervisor's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Averitt, Sallie Dowling

    This guidebook was designed to be a practical guide in developing workplace education programs. The handbook includes the following three sections: (1) background information, including details and supporting information about workplace education; (2) workplace education worksheets that adult education supervisors can take to the worksite to use…

  7. Key Issues for Workplace Literacy Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikulecky, Larry; And Others

    The research on workplace literacy programs during the past two decades has revealed a great deal about the requisites for successful workplace literacy programs. The following have been identified as characteristics of effective workplace literacy programs: active involvement by all project partners; employee involvement in the early stages of…

  8. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  9. Workplace Learning of High Performance Sports Coaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rynne, Steven B.; Mallett, Clifford J.; Tinning, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Australian coaching workplace (to be referred to as the State Institute of Sport; SIS) under consideration in this study employs significant numbers of full-time performance sport coaches and can be accurately characterized as a genuine workplace. Through a consideration of the interaction between what the workplace (SIS) affords the…

  10. Combatting Racism in the Workplace. Readings Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Barb; Novogrodsky, Charles

    Readings and exercises for use with a course for Canadian workers on racism and the workplace are included in this book. The materials are organized to reflect the themes of the ten sessions of the course: (1) racism hurts workers; (2) analysing racial situations in the workplace; (3) the employer connection to racism in the workplace; (4)…

  11. Firefighter Workplace Learning: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracey, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite there being a significant amount of research investigating workplace learning, research exploring firefighter workplace learning is almost nonexistent. The purpose of this qualitative multi-case study was to explore how firefighters conceptualize, report, and practice workplace learning. The researcher also investigated how firefighters…

  12. Workplace Learning in Malaysia: The Learner's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Idris, Khairuddin

    2005-01-01

    This paper offers a scenario of workplace learning as practiced in Malaysia. Based on survey research, the article describes learner profiles, learning provision and pattern. The analysis shows that Malaysians participate in formal workplace learning as part of their employment activities. Workplace learning in Malaysia is contextual, promoted by…

  13. Mobbing: Workplace Violence in the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keim, Jeanmarie; McDermott, J. Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Incidents of workplace violence are becoming all too common at colleges and universities. Generally, one thinks of shootings and assaults in relation to campus workplace violence. However, mobbing and bullying of faculty by other faculty are types of workplace violence that, while very common, are rarely discussed or reported. This article raises…

  14. Promoting Workplace Literacy and Basic Skills Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Elizabeth A.; Ott, Joyce; Wilson, Kathleen

    This document is intended to help literacy practitioners and others in South Carolina promote workplace literacy and basic skills development programs. The introduction examines the following topics: South Carolina's current workforce and its outlook; the definitions of literacy and workplace literacy; the need for workplace literacy and basic…

  15. A Healthier Workplace? Implementation of Fruit Boxes in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pescud, Melanie; Waterworth, Pippa; Shilton, Trevor; Teal, Renee; Slevin, Terry; Ledger, Melissa; Lester, Leanne; Rosenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether making fruit boxes available in the workplace is a successful health promotion strategy. Design: A quasi-experimental study involving three conditions--free fruit, 50c per piece of fruit and $1 per piece of fruit--to investigate the effect of a contribution scheme on employees' fruit…

  16. Workplace Literacy: Raising the Floor of Education in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, David M.

    Changes in the workplace have raised the level of literacy needed by workers to full twelfth grade at least and outstripped manufacturers' ability to retrain workers. Even workers with high school diplomas may not be able to read. Although defined as literate, 40 percent of workers cannot meet the demands of the new technology. In order to achieve…

  17. Workplace Bullying: Curing the Cancer of the American Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glendinning, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    A literature review concluded that supervisor/supervisee relationships are critical to job satisfaction; workplace bullying in the form of a management style of aggressive and intimidating behaviors is widespread; certain types of organizations foster bullying; and bullying has high costs for the targeted employee and the organization. (Contains…

  18. A Healthier Workplace? Implementation of Fruit Boxes in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pescud, Melanie; Waterworth, Pippa; Shilton, Trevor; Teal, Renee; Slevin, Terry; Ledger, Melissa; Lester, Leanne; Rosenberg, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether making fruit boxes available in the workplace is a successful health promotion strategy. Design: A quasi-experimental study involving three conditions--free fruit, 50c per piece of fruit and $1 per piece of fruit--to investigate the effect of a contribution scheme on employees' fruit…

  19. Team behavioral norms: a shared vision for a healthy patient care workplace.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Mickey L; Clark, Paul; Marshall, Michelle; Cornett, Patricia A

    2007-01-01

    Leaders are bombarded with healthy workplace articles and advice. This article outlines a strategy for laying the foundation for healthy patient care workplaces at the pivotal unit level. This process facilitates the nursing unit staff to create and implement a shared vision for staff working relationships. Fourteen acute care hospital units, all participants in a healthy workplace intervention, were selected for this analysis because they chose team behavioral norms as a top priority to begin to implement their vision for a desired future for their units, a healthy workplace. These units developed specific team behavioral norms for their expectations of each other. The findings revealed 3 major norm themes and attributes: norms for effective communication, positive attitude, and accountability. Attributes of each norm are described to assist nurses to positively influence their core unit work culture.

  20. Workplace bullying in the OR: Results of a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Chipps, Esther; Stelmaschuk, Stephanie; Albert, Nancy M; Bernhard, Linda; Holloman, Christopher

    2013-11-01

    This study describes the incidence of workplace bullying among perioperative RNs, surgical technologists, and unlicensed perioperative personnel in two academic medical centers. The study sought to determine whether the demographic variables of gender, ethnicity, hospital, years of experience on the unit, years in the profession, and job title predict the experience of workplace bullying; whether a relationship exists between workplace bullying and emotional exhaustion; and whether bullying is associated with perceptions of patient safety in the OR. The cross-sectional design included perioperative nurses, surgical technologists, and unlicensed perioperative personnel (N = 167). Fifty-nine percent of the study participants reported witnessing coworker bullying weekly, and 34% reported at least two bullying acts weekly. Having one's opinion ignored is the most common bullying act, with 28% of respondents experiencing being ignored. Differences in the experience of bullying can be found between hospitals and among ethnicities. Emotional exhaustion also was correlated with bullying. The participants did not perceive bullying as affecting patient safety. Copyright © 2013 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. An Exploration of Managers' Discourses of Workplace Bullying.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Susan L; Boutain, Doris M; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Beaton, Randal; de Castro, Arnold B

    2015-01-01

    To identify discourses used by hospital nursing unit managers to characterize workplace bullying, and their roles and responsibilities in workplace bullying management. Nurses around the world have reported being the targets of bullying. These nurses often report that their managers do not effectively help them resolve the issue. There is scant research that examines this topic from the perspective of managers. This was a descriptive, qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with hospital nursing unit managers who were recruited via purposive and snowball sampling. Data were analyzed using Willig's Foucauldian discourse analysis. Managers characterized bullying as an interpersonal issue involving the target and the perpetrator, as an intrapersonal issue attributable to characteristics of the perpetrator, or as an ambiguous situation. For interpersonal bullying, managers described supporting target's efforts to end bullying; for intrapersonal bullying, they described taking primary responsibility; and for ambiguous situations, they described several actions, including doing nothing. Managers have different responses to different categories of bullying. Efforts need to be made to make sure they are correctly identifying and appropriately responding to incidents of workplace bullying. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. An Exploration of Managers’ Discourses of Workplace Bullying

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan L.; Boutain, Doris M.; Tsai, Jenny Hsin-Chun; Beaton, Randal; de Castro, Arnold B.

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify discourses used by hospital nursing unit managers to characterize workplace bullying, and their roles and responsibilities in workplace bullying management. BACKGROUND Nurses around the world have reported being the targets of bullying. These nurses often report that their managers do not effectively help them resolve the issue. There is scant research that examines this topic from the perspective of managers. METHODS This was a descriptive, qualitative study. Interviews were conducted with hospital nursing unit managers who were recruited via purposive and snowball sampling. Data were analyzed using Willig’s Foucauldian discourse analysis. RESULTS Managers characterized bullying as an interpersonal issue involving the target and the perpetrator, as an intrapersonal issue attributable to characteristics of the perpetrator, or as an ambiguous situation. For interpersonal bullying, managers described supporting target’s efforts to end bullying; for intrapersonal bullying, they described taking primary responsibility; and for ambiguous situations, they described several actions, including doing nothing. CONCLUSION Managers have different responses to different categories of bullying. Efforts need to be made to make sure they are correctly identifying and appropriately responding to incidents of workplace bullying. PMID:25597260

  3. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Paci, Michael; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Marcoux, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Work-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are not well documented in the literature. Published studies mostly rely on worker databases that fail to provide clinically relevant information. Our objective is to describe the characteristics of hospitalized patients and their work-related TBI. We used the Québec provincial trauma and TBI program databases to identify all patients with a diagnosis of work-related TBI admitted to the Montreal General Hospital, a level 1 trauma center, between 2000 and 2014. Data from their medical records were extracted using a predetermined information sheet. Simple descriptive statistics (means and percentages) were used to summarize the data. A total of 285 cases were analyzed. Workplace TBI patients were middle-aged (mean, 43.62 years), overwhelmingly male (male:female 18:1), mostly healthy, and had completed a high school level education. Most workers were from the construction industry; falling was the most common mechanism of injury. The majority of patients (76.8%) presented with a mild TBI; only a minority (14%) required neurosurgery. The most common finding on computed tomography was skull fracture. The median length of hospitalization was 7 days, after which most patients were discharged directly home. A total of 8.1% died of their injuries. Our study found that most hospitalized victims of work-related TBI had mild injury; however, some required neurosurgical intervention and a non-negligible proportion died of their injury. Improving fall prevention, accurately document helmet use and increasing the safety practice in the construction industry may help decrease work-related TBI burden.

  4. Flipped Learning in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nederveld, Allison; Berge, Zane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a summary of resources on flipped learning for workplace learning professionals. A recent buzzword in the training world is "flipped". Flipped learning and the flipped classroom are hot topics that have emerged in K-12 education, made their way to the university and are now being noticed…

  5. Internet Gambling in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to gambling--and more specifically internet gambling--in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, this paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of gambling and problem gambling,…

  6. University Courses in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, William Lynn; Nardone, Virginia E.

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of 187 New England Telephone workers participating in a workplace education program of the University of Rhode Island and 187 on-campus students showed them alike in terms of persistence, but workers earned fewer College-Level Examination Program credits and matriculated more slowly. Supportive work environments affected matriculation.…

  7. Workplace Literacy Tutor Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janney-Pace, Priscilla; Fox, Laurie

    This manual contains a workshop curriculum that offers background information and activities rooted in the whole language approach. It is designed to address needs of employees with skill levels below fifth grade. Section I is an introduction to the changing workplace environment. Sections II-V cover problem solving, communication (speaking…

  8. Internet Gambling in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to overview the issues, concerns and challenges relating to gambling--and more specifically internet gambling--in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach: Using psychological literature, this paper outlines a number of important and inter-related areas including brief overviews of gambling and problem gambling,…

  9. Educators' Understanding of Workplace Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wet, Corene

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at educators' understanding of workplace bullying through the lens of a two- dimensional model of bullying. Educators, who were furthering their studies at the University of the Free State, were invited to take part in a study on different types of bullying. Deductive, directed content analysis was used to analyse 59…

  10. Promoting Civility in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    There is more to achieving civility in the workplace than following imposed rules and regulations outlined in an institution's policy manual. Oftentimes, circumstances and situations arise that are not addressed in any policy manual, but which nonetheless compromise respect, trust and decency in the office. In this article, a manager of…

  11. Results Orientated Workplace Literacy Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Virginia, Comp.

    Cuyahoga Community College's (CCC) Unified Technologies Center (UTC) collaborated with three Cleveland area manufacturing companies in a workplace literacy project. The project provided job-related mathematics and communications programs for 302 employees who needed basic skills upgrading to improve their job performance. The project…

  12. Self-Directed Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on self-directed workplace learning. "Self-Directed Work Teams: Implementation and Performance" (Marcel van der Klink, Hilde ter Horst) discusses the results of a study examining the implementation and effects of self-directed work teams in a land register office and the role of the…

  13. Workplace Education: The Changing Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.

    The 23 chapters of this book are as follows: "A Framework for Developing Partnerships" (Wendy M. Doughty); "Partnership Building in Nova Scotia" (Marjorie Davison, Paul Temple); "What Makes a Successful Workplace Education Partnership?" (Rob Despins et al.); "Building Linkages in Large Organizations: The Syncrude…

  14. Health & Hygiene in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snapp, Mary

    Developed by educators from the Emily Griffith Opportunity School with input from employees--both workplace literacy students and nonstudents--this guide contains activities for teaching health and hygiene on the job. Flowing from a perspective of respecting cultural diversity and guided by a common thread of good work practices, the activities…

  15. Information Literacy in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oman, Julie N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for information literacy in the workplace in the face of information overload and problems related to end user information skills. Explains how to improve information literacy by assessing the organization's infrastructure, including available information technologies and information processes; considering demographics; and…

  16. Canadian Accountants: Examining Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Bagg, Robert; Doyle, Wendy; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine workplace learning strategies, learning facilitators and learning barriers of public accountants in Canada across three professional levels--trainees, managers, and partners. Design/methodology/approach: Volunteer participants from public accounting firms in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick completed a demographic…

  17. Facilitating learning in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Morris, Clare

    2010-01-01

    Workplace-based learning has been at the heart of medical education and training for centuries. However, radical reform of the NHS means we have to re-think traditional approaches to apprenticeship and find new ways to ensure that students and trainees can learn 'on-the-job' while doing the job.

  18. Workplace Training at SBS Radio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Lynette

    2001-01-01

    Notes that at Australia's Special Broadcasting Services Radio, workplace training is an essential requirement for on-air staff but a degree in journalism or communications is an enormous advantage. Describes several in-house accredited competency-based modules in journalism and broadcasting. (RS)

  19. Expansive Learning across Workplace Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerosuo, Hannele; Toiviainen, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses a collaborative effort of learning across workplace boundaries in a regional learning network of South Savo, Finland. The focus is on the "Forum of In-house Development" in the network. Our objective is to highlight a dialectical approach to boundaries that draws from the ideas of cultural-historical activity theory.…

  20. Social Ecology of the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadsey-Rusch, Janis; And Others

    The collection contains six papers of studies which investigated the social ecology of the workplace and associated implications for friendship formations between adults with and without mental retardation. The papers' authors, Janis Chadsey-Rusch, Frank Rusch, Patricia Gonzalez, Jeffrey Tines, Kathleen Minch, and Carolyn Hughes, observed…

  1. University Courses in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinney, William Lynn; Nardone, Virginia E.

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of 187 New England Telephone workers participating in a workplace education program of the University of Rhode Island and 187 on-campus students showed them alike in terms of persistence, but workers earned fewer College-Level Examination Program credits and matriculated more slowly. Supportive work environments affected matriculation.…

  2. Foreign Language in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Richard D., Ed.; Moore, Sarah Jane, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Articles in this theme issue of the journal, devoted to the subject of languages in the workplace, include: "Language Use in International Research" (Eugene Garfield, Alfred Welljams-Dorof); "The Foreign Language Needs of U.S.-Based Corporations" (Carol S. Fixman); "Foreign Language Use Among International Business…

  3. Adult Development and the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, James M.

    Little attention has been given to how adults develop through their lifetimes and what roles their workplace environments play in that development. Research and theory regarding adult psychosocial development have confirmed the developmental life-cycle phases of adulthood. These are: leaving the family (ages 16-22), getting into the adult world…

  4. Self-Directed Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on self-directed workplace learning. "Self-Directed Work Teams: Implementation and Performance" (Marcel van der Klink, Hilde ter Horst) discusses the results of a study examining the implementation and effects of self-directed work teams in a land register office and the role of the…

  5. Making Spaces: Teacher Workplace Topologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the workplace of teachers commonly focus on the spaces of the classroom, staffroom and school as pre-given and bounded entities. This article explores the possibilities of moving beyond such topographies of enclosure, towards seeing space(-time) as recursively constructed with social relations and so made and remade. Boundaries are then…

  6. Flipped Learning in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nederveld, Allison; Berge, Zane L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to serve as a summary of resources on flipped learning for workplace learning professionals. A recent buzzword in the training world is "flipped". Flipped learning and the flipped classroom are hot topics that have emerged in K-12 education, made their way to the university and are now being noticed…

  7. Workplace Education: The Changing Landscape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Maurice C., Ed.

    The 23 chapters of this book are as follows: "A Framework for Developing Partnerships" (Wendy M. Doughty); "Partnership Building in Nova Scotia" (Marjorie Davison, Paul Temple); "What Makes a Successful Workplace Education Partnership?" (Rob Despins et al.); "Building Linkages in Large Organizations: The Syncrude…

  8. Interpersonal Relationships in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danner, Jean Ortowski; And Others

    This curriculum guide on interpersonal relations in the workplace give techniques for instructors to use in evaluating these skills in their students. Eighteen competencies are included in this guide: adaptability; attendance; attitude; communication (nonverbal); communication (verbal); communication (written); confidence; cooperation; enthusiasm;…

  9. Information Literacy in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oman, Julie N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the need for information literacy in the workplace in the face of information overload and problems related to end user information skills. Explains how to improve information literacy by assessing the organization's infrastructure, including available information technologies and information processes; considering demographics; and…

  10. Making Spaces: Teacher Workplace Topologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the workplace of teachers commonly focus on the spaces of the classroom, staffroom and school as pre-given and bounded entities. This article explores the possibilities of moving beyond such topographies of enclosure, towards seeing space(-time) as recursively constructed with social relations and so made and remade. Boundaries are then…

  11. Expansive Learning across Workplace Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerosuo, Hannele; Toiviainen, Hanna

    2011-01-01

    The article analyses a collaborative effort of learning across workplace boundaries in a regional learning network of South Savo, Finland. The focus is on the "Forum of In-house Development" in the network. Our objective is to highlight a dialectical approach to boundaries that draws from the ideas of cultural-historical activity theory.…

  12. Canadian Accountants: Examining Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Elizabeth; Bagg, Robert; Doyle, Wendy; Young, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to examine workplace learning strategies, learning facilitators and learning barriers of public accountants in Canada across three professional levels--trainees, managers, and partners. Design/methodology/approach: Volunteer participants from public accounting firms in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick completed a demographic…

  13. Epistemological Agency in the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss research that sought to explore how the individually purposeful nature of new employee workplace learning might be understood through its conception as epistemological agency, that is, the personally mediated construction of knowledge. Design/methodology/approach: Using a sociocultural…

  14. Workplace Violence in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Edward D.

    2003-01-01

    Addresses workplace violence prevention, beginning by defining violence, why people become violent, and the cycle of violence. Then discusses steps in prevention, including pre-incident planning, an incident management team, threat management, assessment, post-incident response, and training. (EV)

  15. Reaction to the Changing Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    1985-01-01

    While agreeing on balance with the four preceding articles on the changing workplace, the author cites some research that indicates that the net effect of technology is to lower skill requirements of jobs. Concludes that we will need a flexible, well-educated work force. (SK)

  16. Diversity in the Workplace. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    Three papers comprise this symposium on diversity in the workplace. "Factors That Assist and Barriers That Hinder the Success of Diversity Initiatives in Multinational Corporations" (Rose Mary Wentling) reports that factors that assisted in the success were classified under diversity department, human, and work environment; barriers were…

  17. Evaluating Workplace English Language Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekkens, Kristin; Winke, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Companies across the United States provide workplace English classes to non-native-English-speaking employees to increase productivity, retention, and on-the-job safety. Institutions that financially support the programs often require evidence of learning through standardized tests as a prerequisite for continued funding. However, the tests…

  18. Family-Focused Workplace Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SERVE: SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education.

    The relationship between family and the workplace and the impact of both on school readiness are well documented. As society changes, home, work, and school relationships are being reassessed and retooled. Noting that employers are taking an increasing role in helping families cope with societal changes, this handbook offers information to…

  19. Workshop III: Improving the Workplace Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Igle; Butcher, Gillian

    2015-12-01

    Research has shown that companies with more diversity and a better workplace perform better. So what makes a good workplace in physics, where women and men can work to their full potential? In the Improving the Workplace Environment workshop of the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, participants heard about initiatives taking place in Canada, the UK, Japan, and India to improve the workplace environment and shared good practices from around the world. Some of the less tangible aspects of the workplace environment, such as unconscious bias and accumulation of advantage and disadvantage, were explored.

  20. Nurses' views on workplace wellbeing programmes.

    PubMed

    Wright, Nicola; Zakarin, Melissa; Blake, Holly

    2016-11-24

    Workplace stress is prevalent among nurses. Healthcare employers have implemented complementary and alternative therapies (CATs) for relaxation and stress management within workplace wellbeing programmes. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 registered nurses to explore the perceptions and experiences of nurses towards accessing CATs in and outside the workplace. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed using conventional, qualitative thematic techniques. Themes identified were 'perceptions of complementary and alternative therapies for stress management' and 'engagement with workplace wellness schemes'. CATs have a role within workplace wellbeing programmes and nurses are not averse to accessing them, although there are barriers to access that need to be addressed.

  1. Workplace bullying among nurses and their related factors in Japan: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Mami; Suzuki, Miho; Takai, Yukari; Igarashi, Ayumi; Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2016-09-01

    To explore the association between workplace bullying and workplace environment factors among nurses in Japan. Workplace bullying among nurses is increasing globally and occurs more frequently than among other professions. However, there is little information on the impact of workplace environment factors on nurse bullying in Japan. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were 1152 nurses recruited at seminars or training courses outside of their workplaces in Tokyo. Workplace bullying was measured using the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised. Participants were considered to have been 'bullied' if they reported experiencing at least one negative act on a daily or weekly basis. Workplace environment factors were measured using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, which comprises five domains: nurse participation in hospital affairs; nursing foundations for quality of care; nurse manager ability, leadership and support of nurses; staffing and resource adequacy; and collegial nurse-physician relationships. A total of 898 (78·0%) questionnaires were returned, of which 825 (71·6%) were analysed. Altogether, 153 (18·5%) nurses were considered 'bullied.' The three most frequent negative acts reported as occurring on a weekly or daily basis were 'someone withholding information which affects your performance' (6·7%), 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload' (4·4%) and 'being shouted at or being the target of spontaneous anger (or rage)' (3·6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that 'bullied' were associated with low scores on two work environment domains: nurse manager ability, leadership and support of nurses and staffing and resource adequacy. Effective nurse manager leadership and support as well as appropriate staffing management may positively influence workplace bullying among nurses in Japan. Authentic leadership styles and allowing nurses to easily request days off might also be important

  2. Resilience as an underexplored outcome of workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    van Heugten, Kate

    2013-03-01

    The problem of workplace bullying appears to be especially common in the hospitality industry and in health, education, and social services. Bullying results in negative effects on the psychological and physical health and well-being of targets, bystanders, and those accused of bullying. I undertook a qualitative research project to investigate the experiences of 17 New Zealand social workers who identified themselves as having been targets of workplace bullying. All participants had experienced negative physical and psychological health impacts. I also found, however, that in the aftermath of their difficult experiences, most considered that they had eventually developed greater resilience. Resilience was enhanced when participants' sense of control over their situation improved and when they received support from witnesses and managers. I make recommendations to indicate how these resilience-promoting conditions can be achieved in the organizational setting.

  3. Unreported workplace violence in nursing.

    PubMed

    Kvas, A; Seljak, J

    2014-09-01

    Workplace violence occurs on a frequent basis in nursing. Most violent acts remain unreported. Consequently, we do not know the actual frequency of the occurrence of workplace violence. This requires research of nurses' actions following workplace violence and identification of reasons why most victims do not report violent acts in the appropriate manner. To explore violence in nursing as experienced by nurses in Slovenia. A survey was carried out with a representative sample of nurses in Slovenia. The questionnaire Workplace Violence in Nursing was submitted to 3756 nurses, with 692 completing the questionnaire. A total of 61.6% of the nurses surveyed had been exposed to violence in the past year. Most victims were exposed to psychological (60.1%) and economic violence (28.9%). Victims reported acts of violence in formal written form in a range from 6.5% (psychological violence) to 10.9% (physical violence). The largest share of victims who did not report violence and did not speak to anyone about it were victims of sexual violence (17.9%). The main reason for not reporting the violence was the belief that reporting it would not change anything, followed by the fear of losing one's job. Only a small share of the respondents reported violence in written form, the main reason being the victims' belief that reporting it would not change anything. This represents a severe criticism of the system for preventing workplace violence for it reveals the failure of response by leadership structures in healthcare organizations. Professional associations and the education system must prepare nurses for the prevention of violence and appropriate actions in the event of violent acts. Healthcare organizations must ensure the necessary conditions for enabling and encouraging appropriate actions following violent acts according to relevant protocols. © 2014 International Council of Nurses.

  4. Workplace bullying: an emergent issue.

    PubMed

    Essen, S Donovan; Esquivel, Cynthia; Jha, Pankaj

    2014-09-01

    All companies, including dentists, rely on their staff to represent their firms in the most positive and effective manner. Today's managers face a multitude of issues, and as such, they must walk a fine line of fostering a productive, harmonious and safe working environment for their employees. Over the last several decades it is apparent that on the- job sexual harassment is no longer the leading issue of employee complaints. Rather, the organization issue which was investigated is workplace bullying, also commonly referred to as employee harassment. Risk management is no longer limited to avoiding malpractice issues but also preventing litigation created by poor organizational behavior. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the background of workplace bullying and how it affects today's managers and their employees, customers and suppliers. In other words, the scope of this paper will feature research on past studies, results and conclusions. Since workplace bullying affects all levels of a corporation, it must be stated that the concern and focus of this paper is for today's manager to understand the background and history of workplace bullying, and what they can do to foster a safe working environment and prevent the bully from creating mental and physical harm to their employees. This paper details the history of workplace bullying and how management, employees and suppliers deal with and address the issue. Lastly, this treatise looks at risk management from a manger/dentist's perspective, the assessment/conclusion summarizes the implications for managers regarding how they must handle the issue or risk harm to the employee and/or serious legal ramifications.

  5. Importance and effects of altered workplace ergonomics in modern radiology suites.

    PubMed

    Harisinghani, Mukesh G; Blake, Michael A; Saksena, Mansi; Hahn, Peter F; Gervais, Debra; Zalis, Michael; da Silva Dias Fernandes, Leonor; Mueller, Peter R

    2004-01-01

    The transition from a film-based to a filmless soft-copy picture archiving and communication system (PACS)-based environment has resulted in improved work flow as well as increased productivity, diagnostic accuracy, and job satisfaction. Adapting to this filmless environment in an efficient manner requires seamless integration of various components such as PACS workstations, the Internet and hospital intranet, speech recognition software, paperless electronic hospital medical records, e-mail, office software, and telecommunications. However, the importance of optimizing workplace ergonomics has received little attention. Factors such as the position of the work chair, workstation table, keyboard, mouse, and monitors, along with monitor refresh rates and ambient room lighting, have become secondary considerations. Paying close attention to the basics of workplace ergonomics can go a long way in increasing productivity and reducing fatigue, thus allowing full realization of the potential benefits of a PACS. Optimization of workplace ergonomics should be considered in the basic design of any modern radiology suite.

  6. Wired to the Workplace: The Relationship Between Electronic Connectedness to Work and Nurse Manager Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Candace; Hailey, Amy; Nguyen, Christi; Prichard, Charlsea; Newcomb, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the beliefs and behaviors of nurse leaders regarding electronic connectedness with their workplace and workplace support. Electronic communication enables leaders' continuous availability to the workplace. This may blur home-work boundaries and contribute to burnout. This mixed-methods study surveyed nurses in 6 acute care hospitals in north Texas. A qualitative phase employed focus groups composed of nurses from participating hospitals to validate and enrich data collected in the quantitative phase. Data showed that leader support directly influenced work-related electronic communication by influencing expectations regarding connectedness. Furthermore, leaders who frequently thought of leaving employment reported significantly lower levels of supervisor support and stronger beliefs that work interfered with home life than other respondents did. Focus group data supported survey findings. Electronic availability of nurse leaders did not directly affect satisfaction, but supervisor support and perception that work interferes with home life strongly and directly affected satisfaction.

  7. The impact of workplace spirituality dimensions on organisational citizenship behaviour among nurses with the mediating effect of affective organisational commitment.

    PubMed

    Kazemipour, Farahnaz; Mohd Amin, Salmiah

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the relationship between workplace spirituality dimensions and organisational citizenship behaviour (OCB) among nurses through the mediating effect of affective organisational commitment. Nurses' OCB has been considered recently to improve the quality of services to patients and subsequently, their performance. As an influential attitude, affective organisational commitment has been recognized to influence OCB, and ultimately, organisational performance. Meanwhile, workplace spirituality is introduced as a new organisational behaviour concept to increase affective commitment influencing employees' OCB. The cross-sectional study and the respective data were collected with a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaires were distributed to 305 nurses employed in four public and general Iranian hospitals. To analyse the data, descriptive statistics, Pearson coefficient, simple regression, multiple regression and path analyses were also conducted. The results indicated that workplace spirituality dimensions including meaningful work, a sense of community and an alignment with organisational values have a significant positive relationship with OCB. Moreover, affective organisational commitment mediated the impact of workplace spirituality on OCB. The concept of workplace spirituality through its dimensions predicts nurses' OCB, and affective organisational commitment partially mediated the relationship between workplace spirituality and OCB. Nurses' managers should consider the potentially positive influence of workplace spirituality on OCB and affective commitment among their nurses. With any plan to increase workplace spirituality, the respective managers can improve nurses' performance and would be of considerable importance in the healthcare system. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. A Men's Workplace Health Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Steven T.; Stolp, Sean; Seaton, Cherisse; Sharp, Paul; Caperchione, Cristina M.; Bottorff, Joan L.; Oliffe, John L.; Jones-Bricker, Margaret; Lamont, Sonia; Medhurst, Kerensa; Errey, Sally; Healy, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore physical activity and eating behaviors among men following the implementation of a gender-sensitive, workplace health promotion program. Methods: Using a pre-post within-subjects design, computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI) was used to collect health-related information along with physical activity and fruit/vegetable intake at baseline and after 6 months. Results: At baseline, participants (N = 139) consumed 3.58 servings of fruit and vegetables/day and engaged in an average of 229.77 min/week moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). At 6 months, daily fruit/vegetable intake did not increase, whereas MVPA increased by 112.3 min/week. Conclusions: The POWERPLAY program successfully increased weekly MVPA. Engaging men in health promotion can be a challenge; here, the workplace served as a valuable environment for achieving positive change. PMID:27281710

  9. Workplace aggression: beginning a dialogue.

    PubMed

    McLemore, Monica R

    2006-08-01

    The June 2005 Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing editorial titled "Communication: Whose Problem Is It?" (Griffin-Sobel, 2005) was written to begin a dialogue about a phenomenon frequently experienced yet rarely discussed: workplace aggression, also known as disruptive behavior. Prompted by a groundbreaking study published in the American Journal of Nursing by Rosenstein and O'Daniel (2005), the editorial challenged oncology nurses to begin to fix problems of communication. After reflecting on both of the articles and considering my own experience as a nurse manager, clinician, and scholar, I decided to explore the topic as it relates to nurse-to-nurse workplace aggression. The following is a summary of interviews with nurse managers, nurse practitioners, and nurse scientists about root causes and effective strategies to manage these sometimes complicated situations. This article is meant to continue the dialogue about the very sensitive issue. Confidentiality has been maintained, and I welcome your comments.

  10. Innovative Training for Occupational Health and Infection Control Workplace Assessment in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Lyndsay; Bryce, Elizabeth Ann; Scharf, Sydney; Yassi, Annalee

    2012-01-01

    A user-friendly, high quality workplace assessment field guide and an accompanying worksheet are invaluable tools for recognizing hazards in the hospital environment. These tools ensure that both front line workers as well as health and safety and infection control professionals can systematically evaluate hazards and formulate recommendations.…

  11. An Integrated Model of Communication, Stress, and Burnout in the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Katherine I.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes research conducted among employees of a private psychiatric hospital regarding a job stress and burnout model. Concludes that both participation in decision making and social support have impacts on perceived workplace stress, burnout, satisfaction, and commitment for caregivers and support personnel. Discusses implications of the model…

  12. Student Writings for Home Care Challenge. Volumes I-II. National Workplace Literacy Grant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll Community Coll., Westminster, MD.

    These two volumes contain research papers and personal reflections developed as culminating projects by adult students involved in workplace literacy classes in nursing homes, hospitals, and home care agencies. The first volume contains 18 papers: "What You Need to Know about Cancer" (Grace Bopst); "What Nursing Assistants Need to Know about Heart…

  13. Developing a healthy OR workplace.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Mickey L; Newcomb, Marie

    2007-06-01

    Innovation is required to develop a positive work environment in the OR. Components of a healthy or workplace identified by staff members of three surgical departments are quality practice standards, excellence in patient care systems, a functional physical environment, effective staff systems, meaningful role definition and clarity, and identified guidelines for teamwork. In one or, staff members working on a communication team developed and implemented an action plan to enhance respect in the OR setting.

  14. Bias in the nursing workplace: implications for Latino(a) nurses.

    PubMed

    Moceri, Joane T

    2012-01-01

    The nursing shortage coupled with health inequities makes it imperative to retain nurses from diverse backgrounds in the workplace. Since Latinos are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the U.S., the issue is of particular importance. Thus, the purpose of this study was to measure the prevalence of bias in the nursing workplace as experienced by Latino(a) nurses. This descriptive study of Latino(a) nurses measured the prevalence of bias, its relationship to nurse retention in the nursing workplace, and additional factors in the workplace that were associated with bias. Results included that Latino(a) nurses both experienced and witnessed bias on a regular basis, along with negative comments by peers about their ethnicity. Significant correlations were found between experiences of bias and the study variables of witnessing bias, perceived levels of support, and time planning to remain in the workplace. As the nursing shortage continues and increases in severity, retaining nurses becomes as important as creating new nurses. Nurse managers, hospital administrators, and nurse educators must develop strategies to educate staff and promote non-biased interactions between nurses in the workplace, as well as to support nurses from diverse backgrounds.

  15. Sexual assault in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Garrett, Linda H

    2011-01-01

    Women are sexually assaulted at an alarming rate, and the workplace is a frequent arena for assault. However, in recent decades, attention has been given to improving responses to sexual assault. Sexual assault is a frequent cause of injury and death for women in the United States. One in five American women admit they have experienced a completed rape during their lifetime. These estimates are conservative because sexual assault and sexual violence are both underreported and underprosecuted. Fear of job loss and discrimination are frequent reasons women do not report sexual assault in the workplace. Women are entering the workplace in greater numbers due in part to more single parent families and the depressed economy. Also, women are entering work environments that have traditionally been the domain of male workers: corporate headquarters, semi trucks, health care providers' offices, rural farms, and rural factories. Employers must have a plan to protect female employees and effectively address any incidents of sexual assault or violence. Occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners can assist both employees and employers to prevent sexual assault and resolve the aftermath of sexual assault. However, to accomplish this goal, occupational health nurses and nurse practitioners must be trained in sexual assault and violence response as well as preventive interventions.

  16. Airflow patterns in complex workplaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, J.; Selby, J.M.; Lynch, T.P.; Langer, G.; Vallario, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    There are many considerations in obtaining an accurate evaluation of aerosols. One aspect that has been neglected is the study of airflow patterns within the workplace. In many nuclear facilities, the operations performed required extensive equipment (e.g., glove boxes, piping) that create complex arrangements of physical barriers to flow. To provide samples of the airborne materials, particularly particles, knowledge of these complex airflow patterns is required for sampler placement. Recent studies have shown that materials introduced into the air flow within a workplace act as plumes embedded in major airflow streams. Portions of the plumes can recycle through the ventilated area, be lost to dead air pockets, or exhaust through unusual, unexpected outlets. Unusual flow patterns are observed even in relatively uncomplicated arrangements of equipment. This behavior must be factored into sampling/monitoring programs for evaluation of the airborne hazard to personnel within the workplace consistent with the objective of the program. Other factors that also must be considered to provide valid samples of airborne particulate materials are objectives of the sampling program, characteristics of the airborne particulate materials, nonsegregatory transport for the extracted materials, and requirements for the measurement techniques used.

  17. Discrimination, harassment, abuse, and bullying in the workplace: contribution of workplace injustice to occupational health disparities.

    PubMed

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Souza, Kerry; Davis, Kelly D; de Castro, A Butch

    2014-05-01

    This paper synthesizes research on the contribution of workplace injustices to occupational health disparities. We conducted a broad review of research and other reports on the impact of workplace discrimination, harassment, and bullying on workers' health and on family and job outcomes. Members of demographic minority groups are more likely to be victims of workplace injustice and suffer more adverse outcomes when exposed to workplace injustice compared to demographic majority groups. A growing body of research links workplace injustice to poor psychological and physical health, and a smaller body of evidence links workplace injustice to unhealthy behaviors. Although not as well studied, studies show that workplace injustice can influence workers' health through effects on workers' family life and job-related outcomes. Injustice is a key contributor to occupational health injustice and prospective studies with oversample of disadvantaged workers and refinement of methods for characterizing workplace injustices are needed. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Motivation in a multigenerational radiologic science workplace.

    PubMed

    Kalar, Traci

    2008-01-01

    For the first time in history, radiologic science (RS) workplaces consist of 4 generational cohorts. As each cohort possess their own attitudes, values, work habits, and expectations, motivating a generational diverse workplace is challenging. Through the understanding of generational differences, managers are better able to accommodate individual as well as generational needs and help create a more productive and higher performing workplace. The purpose of this paper is to assist managers in the understanding and utilization of generational differences to effectively motivate staff in an RS workplace. Generational cohorts will be defined and discussed along with an in-depth discussion on each of the generations performing in today's RS workplace. Motivators and how they impact the different generational cohorts will be addressed along with how to best motivate a multigenerational RS workplace.

  19. Workplace conversations: building and maintaining collaborative capital.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Glenda; Vickers, Margaret H; Mohan, Shantala; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra

    2010-01-01

    Heavy, pressured workloads are a feature of health workplaces internationally, presenting challenges to communication and contributing to tension and negative emotions. This paper explores supportive and unsupportive workplace conversations between nurses and midwives and their colleagues. The findings focus on qualitative interviews of ten nurses and midwives that were audio-taped and analysed for perceptions about the role of workplace conversations. Conversations between colleagues were significant for building and maintaining collaborative capital, but unsupportive conversations also threatened it. Findings suggest the need for considering the impact of co-worker conversations on workplace culture. Nurse managers and management may play a pivotal role in establishing and maintaining supportive conversations. Recognising the role and potential of workplace conversations for building capacities for support, conflict resolution, job satisfaction and the personal resilience of nurses and midwives can raise the collaborative capital of the workplace.

  20. Physical activity and body mass index: the contribution of age and workplace characteristics.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Candace C; Wagner, Gregory R; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J; Buxton, Orfeu M; Kenwood, Christopher T; Sabbath, Erika L; Hashimoto, Dean M; Hopcia, Karen; Allen, Jennifer; Sorensen, Glorian

    2014-03-01

    The workplace is an important domain for adults, and many effective interventions targeting physical activity and weight reduction have been implemented in the workplace. However, the U.S. workforce is aging, and few studies have examined the relationship of BMI, physical activity, and age as they relate to workplace characteristics. This paper reports on the distribution of physical activity and BMI by age in a population of hospital-based healthcare workers and investigates the relationships among workplace characteristics, physical activity, and BMI. Data from a survey of patient care workers in two large academic hospitals in the Boston area were collected in late 2009 and analyzed in early 2013. In multivariate models, workers reporting greater decision latitude (OR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01, 1.03) and job flexibility (OR=1.05, 95% CI=1.01, 1.10) reported greater physical activity. Overweight and obesity increased with age (p<0.01), even after adjusting for workplace characteristics. Sleep deficiency (OR=1.56, 95% CI=1.15, 2.12) and workplace harassment (OR=1.62, 95% CI=1.20, 2.18) were also associated with obesity. These findings underscore the persistent impact of the work environment for workers of all ages. Based on these results, programs or policies aimed at improving the work environment, especially decision latitude, job flexibility, and workplace harassment should be included in the design of worksite-based health promotion interventions targeting physical activity or obesity. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Midwives׳ experiences of workplace resilience.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Billie; Warren, Lucie

    2014-08-01

    many UK midwives experience workplace adversity resulting from a national shortage of midwives, rise in birth rate and increased numbers of women entering pregnancy with complex care needs. Research evidence suggests that workplace pressures, and the emotional demands of the job, may increase midwives׳ experience of stress and contribute to low morale, sickness and attrition. Much less is known about midwives who demonstrate resilience in the face of adversity. Resilience has been investigated in studies of other health and social care workers, but there is a gap in knowledge regarding midwives׳ experiences. to explore clinical midwives׳ understanding and experience of professional resilience and to identify the personal, professional and contextual factors considered to contribute to or act as barriers to resilience. an exploratory qualitative descriptive study. In Stage One, a closed online professional discussion group was conducted over a one month period. Midwives discussed workplace adversity and their resilient responses to this. In Stage Two, the data were discussed with an Expert Panel with representatives from midwifery workforce and resilience research, in order to enhance data interpretation and refine the concept modelling. the online discussion group was hosted by the Royal College of Midwives, UK online professional networking hub: 'Communities'. 11 practising midwives with 15 or more years of 'hands on clinical experience', and who self-identified as being resilient, took part in the online discussion group. thematic analysis of the data identified four themes: challenges to resilience, managing and coping, self-awareness and building resilience. The participants identified 'critical moments' in their careers when midwives were especially vulnerable to workplace adversity. Resilience was seen as a learned process which was facilitated by a range of coping strategies, including accessing support and developing self-awareness and protection of self

  2. An intervention strategy for workplace stress.

    PubMed

    Cooper, C L; Cartwright, S

    1997-07-01

    This article explores a range of sources of workplace stress and a three-prong intervention strategy for managing pressures at work. The three approaches highlighted are primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention interventions. Primary is concerned with stressor reduction, secondary with stress management and tertiary with remedial support. In addition, a number of wider policy issues are suggested, such as risk assessment, economic incentives, and specific measures to help small- and medium-sized workplaces in managing workplace stress.

  3. Workplace incivility: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Scott A

    2006-01-01

    The financial cost of workplace violence is 4.2 billion dollars a year. Workplace incivility may initiate a spiral that for 1,000 people a year ends in death at work. If an initial minor incident such as incivility could be mitigated, then the financial and human capital that could be realized by the healthcare organization is immense. This article is an in-depth look at the literature and theoretical frameworks related to workplace incivility.

  4. Role ambiguity, employee gender, and workplace friendship.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Yu; Mao, Hsiao-Yen; Hsieh, An-Tien

    2012-06-01

    The importance of workplace friendship is recognized by researchers and practitioners, but its antecedents with respect to work roles are not well understood. Employees' gender might moderate a relationship between work roles and friendships. Data from a survey of 221 international tourist hotel employees showed that a key aspect of job support, role ambiguity, was negatively related to having workplace friendships. However, employees' gender did not moderate this relationship. Role clarity (the opposite of role ambiguity) may facilitate workplace friendships.

  5. Reducing workplace bullying in healthcare organisations.

    PubMed

    Randle, Jacqueline; Stevenson, Keith; Grayling, Ian

    Workplace bullying in the NHS is an important issue that is growing in significance as it becomes clear that bullying is not just a personal matter but also an organisational one. It may be that healthcare organisations, such as the NHS, foster or sustain workplace bullying. This article provides an overview of the key issues in workplace bullying and suggests individual, team and organisational solutions to reduce its incidence.

  6. [Stress management in hospitals].

    PubMed

    Miki, Akiko

    2002-11-01

    Job stress in employees in hospitals has been recognized as a key issue in the workplace. In this paper, characteristics of job stress in the medical profession, especially in doctors and nurses, and the effectiveness of stress management are overviewed. The important points in stress management in hospitals are summarized as follows: 1) improvement of work environment, 2) assurance of participation and autonomy, 3) education or training to reduce job stress (ex. coping behavior, self-care, relaxation), 4) career development, 5) total support among medical professions. Some reports have demonstrated that the establishment of constant meetings is an effective method of reducing job stress and improving mental health in the medical profession, but few prospective intervention studies have been carried out. Further research is necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of stress reduction and to develop effective intervention programs for medical professions in hospitals.

  7. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S.; Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-01-01

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers’ perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses. PMID:26729144

  8. Nurses' perspectives on workplace mistreatment: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Vagharseyyedin, Seyyed Abolfazl

    2016-03-01

    An accurate understanding of workplace mistreatment and its impacts on nurses is crucial to hospital managers. A qualitative approach using conventional content analysis was adopted in this study to describe the perspectives of a sample of Iranian nurses concerning workplace mistreatment. After analyzing the transcribed interviews, three main themes emerged: (i) Demand for a more humanistic and appreciative environment; this theme consisted of three categories: "incompetent management practice", "invisibility of nurses", and "unethical behaviors"; (ii) Unprofessional interpersonal encounters which included three categories: "poorly defined job characteristics", "nurses' poor performance", and "inefficient supportive means and structures"; and (iii) Inaction despite injury, consisting of two categories: "passive and ineffective ways of coping with mistreatment", and "personal and professional negative impacts". Findings from this study can guide further investigation within diverse populations of Iranian nurses, as well as worldwide, in order for firm conclusions to be drawn. Future research could compare the perspectives of other stakeholders - patients and relatives, physicians, and managers concerning workplace mistreatment. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Occupational Heat Stress Profiles in Selected Workplaces in India.

    PubMed

    Venugopal, Vidhya; Chinnadurai, Jeremiah S; Lucas, Rebekah A I; Kjellstrom, Tord

    2015-12-29

    Health and productivity impacts from occupational heat stress have significant ramifications for the large workforce of India. This study profiled occupational heat stress impacts on the health and productivity of workers in select organized and unorganized Indian work sectors. During hotter and cooler seasons, Wet Bulb Globe Temperatures (WBGT) were used to quantify the risk of heat stress, according to International workplace guidelines. Questionnaires assessed workers' perceived health and productivity impacts from heat stress. A total of 442 workers from 18 Indian workplaces participated (22% and 78% from the organized and unorganized sector, respectively). Overall 82% and 42% of workers were exposed to higher than recommended WBGT during hotter and cooler periods, respectively. Workers with heavy workloads reported more heat-related health issues (chi square = 23.67, p ≤ 0.001) and reduced productivity (chi square = 15.82, p ≤ 0.001), especially the outdoor workers. Heat-rashes, dehydration, heat-syncope and urinogenital symptoms were self-reported health issues. Cited reasons for productivity losses were: extended-work hours due to fatigue/exhaustion, sickness/hospitalization and wages lost. Reducing workplace heat stress will benefit industries and workers via improving worker health and productivity. Adaptation and mitigation measures to tackle heat stress are imperative to protect the present and future workforce as climate change progresses.

  10. Exposure to secondhand smoke in Finnish workplaces and compliance with national smoke-free workplace legislation.

    PubMed

    Heloma, Antero; Helakorpi, Satu; Honkonen, Jarkko; Danielsson, Petri; Uutela, Antti

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined time trends and associations in exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at work in Finland in 1985-2008 and compliance with national smoke-free workplace legislation that has been enforced since 1995. The study population comprised respondents of nationally representative annual postal surveys from 1985 to 2008. The differences in the prevalence of SHS-exposed respondents were measured with particular reference to workplace size and workplace smoking arrangements. From 1985 to 2008 daily exposure to SHS at work decreased in all workplaces. The annual decrease was largest in 1994-95 when the smoke-free workplace legislation was enacted. The proportion of exposed employees in workplaces with designated smoking rooms was two-fold compared to employees in workplaces where no one smoked, and this ratio remained unchanged between 1995 and 2008. Employees in small workplaces were exposed most and exposure to SHS was lowest in the largest workplaces. Totally smoke-free workplaces give better protection against the exposure to SHS than workplaces with designated smoking areas. We urge a law reform that does not allow any designated smoking rooms indoors. In the prevention of SHS exposure, special attention should be directed to small workplaces.

  11. Relevance of workplace social mixing during influenza pandemics: an experimental modelling study of workplace cultures.

    PubMed

    Timpka, T; Eriksson, H; Holm, E; Strömgren, M; Ekberg, J; Spreco, A; Dahlström, Ö

    2016-07-01

    Workplaces are one of the most important regular meeting places in society. The aim of this study was to use simulation experiments to examine the impact of different workplace cultures on influenza dissemination during pandemics. The impact is investigated by experiments with defined social-mixing patterns at workplaces using semi-virtual models based on authentic sociodemographic and geographical data from a North European community (population 136 000). A simulated pandemic outbreak was found to affect 33% of the total population in the community with the reference academic-creative workplace culture; virus transmission at the workplace accounted for 10·6% of the cases. A model with a prevailing industrial-administrative workplace culture generated 11% lower incidence than the reference model, while the model with a self-employed workplace culture (also corresponding to a hypothetical scenario with all workplaces closed) produced 20% fewer cases. The model representing an academic-creative workplace culture with restricted workplace interaction generated 12% lower cumulative incidence compared to the reference model. The results display important theoretical associations between workplace social-mixing cultures and community-level incidence rates during influenza pandemics. Social interaction patterns at workplaces should be taken into consideration when analysing virus transmission patterns during influenza pandemics.

  12. Relationship of workplace incivility, stress, and burnout on nurses' turnover intentions and psychological empowerment.

    PubMed

    Oyeleye, Olubunmi; Hanson, Patricia; O'Connor, Nancy; Dunn, Deborah

    2013-10-01

    This study explored the relationships among perceived workplace incivility, stress, burnout, perceived turnover intentions, and perceived level of psychological empowerment among acute care nurses (medical-surgical and critical care) in community and tertiary hospitals through the lens of complexity science. An exploratory study was conducted, and findings demonstrate significant relationships among workplace incivility, stress, burnout, turnover intentions, total years of nursing experience, and RN education levels. Creating targeted retention strategies and policies that will be sensitive to the needs and interests of nurses at high risk for leaving their organizations is imperative for nurse executives.

  13. Skills and Training for the Hospitality Sector: A Review of Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Addresses the skills debate in hospitality in four key areas: the nature of work and skills in hospitality, considering skills in terms of personal attributes, job requirements, and work settings; deskilling within the hospitality workplace; the technical/generic skills debate; and the education/training process in hospitality. Concludes that…

  14. Workplace prevention and promotion strategies.

    PubMed

    Vézina, Michel; Bourbonnais, Renée; Brisson, Chantal; Trudel, Louis

    2004-01-01

    Psychosocial factors refer to all organizational factors and interpersonal relationships in the workplace that may affect the health of the workers. Currently, two psychosocial risk models are universally recognized for producing solid scientific knowledge regarding the vital link between social or psychological phenomena at work and the development of several diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases or depression. The first is the "job demand-contro-support" model, which was defined by Karasek and to which the concept of social support has been added; the second is the "effort/reward imbalance" model defined by Siegrist. The public health perspective calls for theoretical models based on certain psychosocial attributes of the work environment for which there is empirical evidence of their pathogenic potential for exposed workers. Not only do these models reduce the complexity of the psychosocial reality of the work to components that are significant in terms of health risks, but they also facilitate the development and implementation of workplace interventions. Psychosocial risk intervention strategies currently implemented by companies are predominantly individual-oriented and aim chiefly at reducing the effects of stressful work situations by improving individual ability to adapt to the situation and manage stress. Like personal protection equipment for exposure to physical or chemical risks, these secondary prevention measures are commendable but insufficient, because they aim to reduce only the symptoms and not the cause of problems. Any intervention program for these risks should necessarily include a primary prevention component with a view to eliminating, or at least reducing, the psychosocial pathogenic agents in the workplace. Several authors have suggested that well-structured organizational approaches are most effective and should generate more important, longer-lasting effects than individual approaches. However, the evidence should be strengthened by

  15. Stress reduction in the workplace.

    PubMed

    DiPaola, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The modern radiology department operates within an environment of competition, increased regulation, and decreasing budgets. Functioning in this setting may lead the radiology manager to experience job related stress. Stress in the workplace has been linked to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disorders. While there are a number of triggers for job related stress, it is important to identify the early warning signs and knee-jerk reactions. Emotional intelligence (EI) is one of several techniques that can be used to reduce job related stress. The key components of EI are self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management.

  16. Sweetwater National Workplace Literacy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweetwater Union High School District, Chula Vista, CA.

    The Sweetwater National Workplace Literacy Project was undertaken to develop the following: (1) industry/company-specific individualized literacy skills training for currently employed adults and (2) individualized, preemployment workplace literacy and job-specific skills training for unemployed or underemployed adults. The following site-specific…

  17. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide...

  18. Guidelines for Implementing Workplace Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jester, Marie H.

    This document provides guidelines for implementing workplace literacy programs. Project leadership selection, characteristics and skills, education and experience, and roles and responsibilities are reviewed. Community and business involvement, partnership development, and the voluntary advisory council components of a marketing workplace literacy…

  19. Routine-Generating and Regenerative Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kira, Mari

    2010-01-01

    The research discussed in this article focuses on workplace learning in industrial manufacturing work. Everyday work episodes contributing to workplace learning are investigated in four companies operating in the Finnish and Swedish package-supplier sectors. The research adopts a qualitative, interpretive approach. Interviews with employees and…

  20. Workplace Learning as Co-Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    A study conceptualized bases for learning in workplaces, examining reciprocity between how individuals are afforded access to workplace activities and guidance and how workers elect to engage in what they are offered. These reciprocal bases for thinking, acting, and learning are called "co-participation at work." The contributions that…

  1. Workplace Educational Skills Analysis. Training Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manly, Donna; And Others

    Basic skills instruction can be tied to work performed on the job by conducting a Workplace Educational Skills Analysis (WESA). WESA is a systematic process used by the Wisconsin Workplace Partnership Training Program to identify and analyze the basic educational skills required on the job. Basic skills are identified in seven areas: (1)…

  2. National Workplace Literacy Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Eastern Community Colleges, Olney.

    The Snap-On Tools Workplace Literacy Grant developed a curriculum for training adult workers in technical math and reading, English as a Second Language (ESL), and blueprint reading. Curriculum development was based on a workplace audit. Reading levels increased an average of 0.8 of a grade level. Flexibility and implementation of adult student…

  3. Federal Workplace Literacy Project. Internal Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matuszak, David J.

    This report describes the following components of the Nestle Workplace Literacy Project: six job task analyses, curricula for six workplace basic skills training programs, delivery of courses using these curricula, and evaluation of the process. These six job categories were targeted for training: forklift loader/checker, BB's processing systems…

  4. Workplace Engagement and Generational Differences in Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schullery, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes literature on workplace engagement, an issue that affects organizations' financial results and individuals' personal lives. The newest of the four generations in the workplace, Millennials, were recently shown to have different values than the other two prevalent generations. Surveys taken by 16,000 high school seniors of…

  5. Consider Workplace Needs When Purchasing Office Furniture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Bob

    1999-01-01

    Examines furniture-buying tips, involving workplace-needs assessment, that can help make the organization's workplace more effective. Stresses the importance of planning, tying the furniture purchasing into the strategic business, considering alternatives to furniture ownership, evaluating employee health and safety, and understanding any added…

  6. Routine-Generating and Regenerative Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kira, Mari

    2010-01-01

    The research discussed in this article focuses on workplace learning in industrial manufacturing work. Everyday work episodes contributing to workplace learning are investigated in four companies operating in the Finnish and Swedish package-supplier sectors. The research adopts a qualitative, interpretive approach. Interviews with employees and…

  7. Educating Managers to Create Healthy Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This article provides management educators with a comprehensive, research-based set of concepts they can use to enrich students' understanding of how to create healthy workplaces. To assist with that endeavor, learning objectives related to creating healthy workplaces are provided. Work environment stressors are discussed along with human and…

  8. Workplace Friendship in the Electronically Connected Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Patricia M.; Pedersen, Hannah; Gallagher, Erin B.; Kopaneva, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This study examined information communication technologies and workplace friendship dynamics. Employees reported factors that influenced their initiation of friendship with a coworker and reported patterns and perceptions of communication with their workplace friend via different communication methods. Results indicated that personality, shared…

  9. Workplace Oral Communications I. A Working Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Kenneth

    This curriculum is aimed at improving the oral communications skills of blue collar and lower management personnel as they interact in the workplace. It is intended to be workplace specific and to move the learner toward a full 12th-grade level attainment. Designed for use in a variety of settings and formats, the curriculum is divided into five…

  10. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide that...

  11. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide that...

  12. Workplace Basics: The Skills Employers Want.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; And Others

    A two-year research project was conducted to determine the skills employers consider necessary for the workplace. Recent changes in the economy have made employers begin to realize that they must assist their current and future workers in achieving competency in workplace basics if they are to be competitive. Employers have come to realize the…

  13. Significant Workplace Change: Perspectives of Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing pace of workplace change is well documented in the literature, yet little is known about how an individual adapts to significant change in the workplace. Continuous learning is key to successful adaptation; however, are employees' adaptation to change influenced by their approaches to learning? The purpose of this study was to…

  14. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide that...

  15. 10 CFR 835.1003 - Workplace controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Workplace controls. 835.1003 Section 835.1003 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Design and Control § 835.1003 Workplace controls. During routine operations, the combination of engineered and administrative controls shall provide that...

  16. Workplace Learning in Dual Higher Professional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poortman, Cindy L.; Reenalda, Marloes; Nijhof, Wim J.; Nieuwenhuis, Loek F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Workplace learning is considered an effective strategy for the development of vocation, career and professional identity. Dual training programs, in which learning at a vocational school and learning at work in a company are combined, are seen as strong carriers for skill formation processes. In this study we explore workplace learning in dual…

  17. New Work: The Revolution in Today's Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. economy, workplace, and work are in the midst of historic change. New ways of organizing and managing the workplace and new ways of working are becoming increasingly common. Large companies are giving way to smaller and leaner organizations. Today, the typical business establishment employs 15 people. Across all industries, smaller…

  18. Mobilizing Workplaces: Actors, Discipline and Governmentality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Nicoll, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Foucault, and to a lesser extent actor-network theory, this article examines some of their methodological and theoretical implications for conceptions of workplace learning. We suggest that workplaces need to be examined for the spatio-temporal ordering of practices and the actors drawn into them in order to move beyond the…

  19. Workplace Friendship in the Electronically Connected Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sias, Patricia M.; Pedersen, Hannah; Gallagher, Erin B.; Kopaneva, Irina

    2012-01-01

    This study examined information communication technologies and workplace friendship dynamics. Employees reported factors that influenced their initiation of friendship with a coworker and reported patterns and perceptions of communication with their workplace friend via different communication methods. Results indicated that personality, shared…

  20. The Embedded Character of Workplace Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    The workplace is embedded in three force fields: the macro field of globalization/technology, the meso field of transnational production networks, and the micro field of local labor markets and organizations. Each field influences the way flexibility and cost reduction are prioritized and has consequences for workplace structures and relations.…

  1. Workplace Engagement and Generational Differences in Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schullery, Nancy M.

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes literature on workplace engagement, an issue that affects organizations' financial results and individuals' personal lives. The newest of the four generations in the workplace, Millennials, were recently shown to have different values than the other two prevalent generations. Surveys taken by 16,000 high school seniors of…

  2. Creating a Comprehensive Workplace TESOL & Literacy Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bean, Robert

    The evolution of the Workplace Education Service that operates in South Australia is chronicled. Begun as a single program designed to integrate workplace literacy, English as a Second Language, and literacy education for both native and non-native English-speakers in an automobile plant, the project grew into a network of programs and services in…

  3. Workplace Skills Enhancement Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Private Industry Council, Seattle, WA.

    The Workplace Skills Enhancement Project was provided by the Seattle-King County Private Industry Council in Partnership with the Employment Opportunities Center and the Refugee Federation Service Center. Of the 150 participants in the program, 137 were Asian. Workplace literacy training was generally advertised as a voluntary program available to…

  4. Significant Workplace Change: Perspectives of Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohut, Ann Marie

    2010-01-01

    The ever-increasing pace of workplace change is well documented in the literature, yet little is known about how an individual adapts to significant change in the workplace. Continuous learning is key to successful adaptation; however, are employees' adaptation to change influenced by their approaches to learning? The purpose of this study was to…

  5. A Developmental Perspective on College & Workplace Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Laura; Atienza, Astrid; Rivers, Andrew; Keith, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a developmental perspective on what competencies young people need to be ready for college, the workplace, and the transition to adulthood. National hand-wringing about the lack of preparedness of high school graduates for college and the workplace has catalyzed researchers, educators, and policymakers to define the skills and…

  6. Preparing for Workplace Numeracy: A Modelling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wake, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    The starting point of this article is the question, "how might we inform an epistemology of numeracy from the point of view of better preparing young people for workplace competence?" To inform thinking illustrative data from two projects that researched into mathematics in workplace activity and the teaching and learning of modelling in…

  7. Building Workplace Vocabulary for Millwright: Compound Words.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Rhonda; And Others

    Developed as part of the ABCs of Construction National Workplace Literacy Project, this instructional module is designed to help persons preparing for the occupation of millwright develop strategies for finding the meanings of compound words used in technical writing and the workplace. Presented in the first section is a method for deducing the…

  8. Mobilizing Workplaces: Actors, Discipline and Governmentality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Richard; Nicoll, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Foucault, and to a lesser extent actor-network theory, this article examines some of their methodological and theoretical implications for conceptions of workplace learning. We suggest that workplaces need to be examined for the spatio-temporal ordering of practices and the actors drawn into them in order to move beyond the…

  9. Boston Workplace Education Collaborative. Final External Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Mark L.; Pansar, Eleanor

    An evaluation of the Boston Workplace Education Collaborative (BWEC) was conducted during 1989. The BWEC is a partnership among Roxbury Community College, the Boston Private Industry Council, and the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) of Massachusetts to provide workplace literacy educational opportunities…

  10. Workplace Education Initiative: Year Two Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperazi, Laura; Astrein, Bruce

    Site visits to 17 workplace education projects funded in the second year of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative are reported for year 1 and year 2 projects. The year one projects are as follows: EASCO Handtool Company (Springfield), T.J. Maxx Distribution Center (Worcester), laundry workers (Boston/Lynn), AT&T (Lawrence), and…

  11. Workplace Education Initiative: Case Studies and Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Astrein, Bruce; And Others

    Seven workplace education projects funded in the first year of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative are reported. This report includes both general observations and specific information in case studies of the projects. Overall information is provided on students served, the importance of partnerships, the emphasis on…

  12. Workplace Skills Enhancement Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Private Industry Council, Seattle, WA.

    The Seattle-King County Private Industry Council developed and delivered a workplace literacy program in partnership with the following agencies: Employment Opportunities Center, Refugee Federation Services Center, and Center for Career Alternatives. The program provided significant workplace literacy skills to 325 actual enrollees (266 Asian, 15…

  13. New Work: The Revolution in Today's Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Economics Trends, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. economy, workplace, and work are in the midst of historic change. New ways of organizing and managing the workplace and new ways of working are becoming increasingly common. Large companies are giving way to smaller and leaner organizations. Today, the typical business establishment employs 15 people. Across all industries, smaller…

  14. Workplace Education Initiative: Year Two Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperazi, Laura; Astrein, Bruce

    Site visits to 17 workplace education projects funded in the second year of the Massachusetts Workplace Education Initiative are reported for year 1 and year 2 projects. The year one projects are as follows: EASCO Handtool Company (Springfield), T.J. Maxx Distribution Center (Worcester), laundry workers (Boston/Lynn), AT&T (Lawrence), and…

  15. Workplace Literacy: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Martha

    Workplace literacy is literacy training provided in the workplace, incorporating basic skills training with job-related instructional materials. Early research efforts to define the literacy requirements of jobs began with two military projects, Operational REALISTIC and Project 100,000, in the late 1960s. Subsequent studies have focused on the…

  16. The Embedded Character of Workplace Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frenkel, Stephen J.

    2003-01-01

    The workplace is embedded in three force fields: the macro field of globalization/technology, the meso field of transnational production networks, and the micro field of local labor markets and organizations. Each field influences the way flexibility and cost reduction are prioritized and has consequences for workplace structures and relations.…

  17. Piecing Together the "Workplace Multilingualism" Jigsaw Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Multilingualism in the workplace is different from multilingualism at home or in other domains of social life. It has more direct, yet entangled, economic and social implications and serves interactional purposes which can be at any point on the continuum of goal-orientation and relationship-building. Multilingualism in the workplace is both a…

  18. Distributed Learning: Understanding the Emerging Workplace Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pillay, Hitendra; Elliott, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Explores cognitive attributes that allow individuals to function effectively in the changing nature of society and the workplace. Describes emerging models for learning and suggests that changing workplaces require a distributed cognitive model of human competence which promotes critical thinking and lifelong learning. (Author/LRW)

  19. Piecing Together the "Workplace Multilingualism" Jigsaw Puzzle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Multilingualism in the workplace is different from multilingualism at home or in other domains of social life. It has more direct, yet entangled, economic and social implications and serves interactional purposes which can be at any point on the continuum of goal-orientation and relationship-building. Multilingualism in the workplace is both a…

  20. Educating Managers to Create Healthy Workplaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbreath, Brad

    2012-01-01

    This article provides management educators with a comprehensive, research-based set of concepts they can use to enrich students' understanding of how to create healthy workplaces. To assist with that endeavor, learning objectives related to creating healthy workplaces are provided. Work environment stressors are discussed along with human and…

  1. Northeast Texas Workplace Partnership Implementation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northeast Texas Community Coll., Mount Pleasant.

    The Northeast Texas Workplace Partnership Program developed curriculum and training materials based on the literacy requirements of the workplace for two different industries in northeast Texas--Lone Star Steel Company and Pilgrim's Pride Industries. Three advisory committees were established to involve the community, education, and business and…

  2. A Developmental Perspective on College & Workplace Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lippman, Laura; Atienza, Astrid; Rivers, Andrew; Keith, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a developmental perspective on what competencies young people need to be ready for college, the workplace, and the transition to adulthood. National hand-wringing about the lack of preparedness of high school graduates for college and the workplace has catalyzed researchers, educators, and policymakers to define the skills and…

  3. Evaluating Workplace ESL Instructional Programs. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Miriam; Saccomano, Mark

    With the increase in workplace English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) literacy education programs, there is a need to assess whether the attention given to improving basic skills and English language proficiency has made a change in the participant and in the workplace. Such evaluations often use both qualitative and quantitative measures of program…

  4. Exposure to workplace bullying and post-traumatic stress disorder symptomology: the role of protective psychological resources.

    PubMed

    Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Nosko, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    To examine the relationship between nurses' exposure to workplace bullying and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptomology and the protective role of psychological capital (PsyCap). Workplace bullying has serious organisational and health effects in nursing. Few studies have examined the relation of workplace bullying to serious mental health outcomes, such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Even fewer have examined the effect of intrapersonal strengths on the health impact of workplace bullying. A survey of 1205 hospital nurses was conducted to test the hypothesized model. Nurses completed standardized measures of bullying, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and PsyCap. A moderated regression analysis revealed that more frequent exposure to workplace bullying was significantly related to Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptomology regardless of the PsyCap level. That is, PsyCap did not moderate the bullying/PTSD relationship in either group. Bullying exposure and PsyCap were significant independent predictors of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptoms in both groups. Efficacy, a subdimension of PsyCap, moderated the bullying/Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder relationship only among experienced nurses. Workplace bullying appears to be predictive of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder symptomology, a serious mental health outcome. Workplace bullying is a serious threat to nurses' health and calls for programmes that eliminate bullying and encourage greater levels of positive resources among nurses. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Simulating the Black Saturday 2009 smoke plume with an interactive composition-climate model: Sensitivity to emissions amount, timing, and injection height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Robert D.; Luo, Ming; Fromm, Mike; Voulgarakis, Apostolos; Mangeon, Stéphane; Worden, John

    2016-04-01

    We simulated the high-altitude smoke plume from the early February 2009 Black Saturday bushfires in southeastern Australia using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first single-plume analysis of biomass burning emissions injected directly into the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UTLS) using a full-complexity composition-climate model. We compared simulated carbon monoxide (CO) to a new Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer/Microwave Limb Sounder joint CO retrieval, focusing on the plume's initial transport eastward, anticyclonic circulation to the north of New Zealand, westward transport in the lower stratospheric easterlies, and arrival over Africa at the end of February. Our goal was to determine the sensitivity of the simulated plume to prescribed injection height, emissions amount, and emissions timing from different sources for a full-complexity model when compared to Aura. The most realistic plumes were obtained using injection heights in the UTLS, including one drawn from ground-based radar data. A 6 h emissions pulse or emissions tied to independent estimates of hourly fire behavior produced a more realistic plume in the lower stratosphere compared to the same emissions amount being released evenly over 12 or 24 h. Simulated CO in the plume was highly sensitive to the differences between emissions amounts estimated from the Global Fire Emissions Database and from detailed, ground-based estimates of fire growth. The emissions amount determined not only the CO concentration of the plume but also the proportion of the plume that entered the stratosphere. We speculate that this is due to either or both nonlinear CO loss with a weakened OH sink or plume self-lofting driven by shortwave absorption of the coemitted aerosols.

  6. The American Organization of Nurse Executives and Emergency Nurses Association Guiding Principles on Mitigating Violence in the Workplace.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Violence in the workplace, including violence toward staff from patients and families as well as lateral violence, has become a serious safety issue for hospitals in the United States. Concerned about this issue, the Emergency Nurses Association and the American Organization of Nurse Executives convened a Day of Dialogue to discuss ways to mitigate violence in the workplace. The result of the discussion was the development of guiding principles and a toolkit to assist nurse leaders in systemically reducing lateral violence and patient and family violence in hospitals.

  7. Workplace etiquette for the medical practice employee.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Medical practice workplace etiquette is slowly being modified and fine-tuned. New workplace etiquette rules have become necessary because of advances in communications technology, shifting norms, and expectations of what constitutes good manners. Today's medical practice employees must concern themselves with traditional workplace manners but also the manners that come into play when they make or receive cell phone calls, text messages, and e-mails, and when they use social networking media outside of work. This article offers 25 rules for good manners in the medical practice that relate to the ways employees interact with people today, whether face-to-face or when using electronic communications technologies. It offers practical guidelines for making introductions both inside and outside the medical practice. This article also provides a self-quiz to help medical practice employees assess their workplace etiquette intelligence and 12 tips for good workplace table manners.

  8. Workplace violence: managing a culture of acceptance.

    PubMed

    Fredrick, Marie

    2014-01-01

    The cultural acceptance of workplace violence is changing. Management has become more educated on regulatory issues around its tolerance of workplace violence. Events around the country in a variety of settings have aided in raising awareness of this issue. Healthcare professionals are not immune to workplace violence, including those working in the imaging profession. Healthcare workers, historically, have given care despite the demeanor of patients, often putting up with aggressive behavior including sexual harassment and physical assault. Management needs to take all possible measures to ensure employees feel safe at work. It is essential to have well thought out policies and procedures to mitigate workplace violence; keeping in mind that a goal of eliminating workplace violence is unrealistic.

  9. Fatigue management in the workplace

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers’ fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management. PMID:26257477

  10. Fatigue management in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Yazdi, Zohreh

    2015-01-01

    Workers' fatigue is a significant problem in modern industry, largely because of high demand jobs, long duty periods, disruption of circadian rhythms, and accumulative sleep debt that are common in many industries. Fatigue is the end result of integration of multiple factors such as time awake, time of day, and workload. Then, the full understanding of circadian biologic clock, dynamics of transient and cumulative sleep loss, and recovery is required for effective management of workplace fatigue. It can be more investigated in a new field of sleep medicine called occupational sleep medicine. Occupational sleep medicine is concerned with maintaining best productivity and safety in the industrial settings. The fatigue risk management system (FRMS) is a comprehensive approach that is based on applying scientific evidence of sleep knowledge to manage workers fatigue. It is developing rapidly in the highly safety demand jobs; especially truck drivers, pilots, and power plant workers. The objective of this review is to explain about fatigue in the workplace with emphasis on its association work performance and errors/accidents. Also, we discussed about different methods of fatigue measurement and management.

  11. Workplace smoking ban policy and smoking behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beomsoo

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate the impact of the workplace smoking ban in South Korea, where the male smoking rate is high (57%), on smoking behavior and secondhand smoke exposure. A workplace smoking ban legislation implemented in April 2003 requires offices, meeting rooms, and lobbies located in larger than 3,000 square meter buildings (or 2,000 square meter multipurpose buildings) should be smoke free. A representative cross-sectional survey, the third wave (2005) of health supplements in the National Health Nutrition Survey of South Korea, was used to measure the impact of the 2003 workplace smoking ban implementation on smoking behavior. It contained 3,122 observations of adults 20 to 65 years old (excluding self-employed and non-working populations). A multivariate statistical model was used. The self-reported workplace smoking ban policy (full workplace ban, partial workplace ban, and no workplace ban) was used as the key measure. A full workplace smoking ban reduced the current smoking rate by 6.4 percentage points among all workers and also decreased the average daily consumption among smokers by 3.7 cigarettes relative to no smoking ban. Secondhand smoke showed a dramatic decrease of 86 percent (= -1.74/2.03)from the sample mean for full workplace ban. However, public anti-smoking campaign did not show any significant impact on smoking behavior. The full workplace ban policy is effective in South Korea. Male group showed bigger impact of smoking ban policy than female group. The public antismoking campaign did not show any effectiveness.

  12. Barriers and facilitators to healthy eating for nurses in the workplace: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Rachel; Perry, Lin; Duffield, Christine; Gallagher, Robyn; Pierce, Heather

    2017-05-01

    The aim was to conduct an integrative systematic review to identify barriers and facilitators to healthy eating for working nurses. There is growing recognition of the influence of the workplace environment on the eating habits of the workforce, which in turn may contribute to increased overweight and obesity. Overweight and obesity exact enormous costs in terms of reduced well-being, worker productivity and increased risk of non-communicable diseases. The workplace is an ideal place to intervene and support healthy behaviours. This review aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to nurses' healthy eating in the workplace. Integrative mixed method review. Five electronic databases were searched: CINAHL, MEDLINE, PROQUEST Health and Medicine, ScienceDirect and PsycINFO. Reference lists were searched. Included papers were published in English between 2000-2016. Of 26 included papers, 21 were qualitative and five quantitative. An integrative literature review was undertaken. Quality appraisal of included studies used standardized checklists. A social-ecological framework was used to examine workplace facilitators and constraints to healthy eating, derived from the literature. Emergent themes were identified by thematic analysis. Review participants were Registered, Enrolled and/or Nurse Assistants primarily working in hospitals in middle or high income countries. The majority of studies reported barriers to healthy eating related to adverse work schedules, individual barriers, aspects of the physical workplace environment and social eating practices at work. Few facilitators were reported. Overall, studies found the workplace exerts a considerable negative influence on nurses' dietary intake. Reorientation of the workplace to promote healthy eating among nurses is required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Physiotherapy services provided outside of business hours in Australian hospitals: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Kathryn D; Taylor, Nicholas F; Brusco, Natasha K

    2013-06-01

    Physiotherapy services provided outside of business hours may improve patient and hospital outcomes, but there is limited understanding of what services are provided. This study described current services provided outside of business hours across Australian hospitals. Design Descriptive, cross-sectional, Web-based survey. Participants A random sample of Australian hospitals from the public or private sector located in either metropolitan or rural/regional areas. A total of 112 completed surveys were submitted. The most common service outside of business hours was a Saturday service, provided by 61% of participating hospitals with a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 1.0 hour (0.0 and 3.4) of physiotherapy per 30 beds. Sunday services were provided by 43% of hospitals, and services provided outside of business hours from Monday to Friday were provided by 14% of hospitals. More private hospitals provided some form of physiotherapy service outside of business hours (91%) than public hospitals (48%). More metropolitan hospitals provided some form of physiotherapy service outside of business hours (90%) than rural/regional hospitals (28%). Few of the hospitals providing sub-acute services had weekend physiotherapy (30%), but the majority of highly acute wards provided weekend physiotherapy (81%). Highly acute wards also provided more hours of service on a Saturday (median 8.1 hours per 30 beds, IQR 0.6-22.5) compared with acute wards (median 0.8 hours per 30 beds, IQR 0.0-2.8). There is limited availability of physiotherapy services in Australian hospitals outside of business hours. There are inequalities in physiotherapy services provided outside of business hours, with public, rural/regional and sub-acute facilities receiving fewer services outside of business hours than private, metropolitan and highly acute facilities. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Workplace phobia, workplace problems, and work ability among primary care patients with chronic mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, Beate; Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Work-related anxieties are frequent and have a negative effect on the occupational performance of patients and absence due to sickness. Most important is workplace phobia, that is, panic when approaching or even thinking of the workplace. This study is the first to estimate the prevalence of workplace phobia among primary care patients suffering from chronic mental disorders and to describe which illness-related or workplace-specific context factors are associated with workplace phobia. A convenience sample of 288 primary care patients with chronic mental disorders (70% women) seen by 40 primary care clinicians in Germany were assessed using a standardized diagnostic interview about mental disorders and workplace problems. Workplace phobia was assessed by the Workplace Phobia Scale and a structured Diagnostic and Statical Manual of Mental Disorders-based diagnostic interview. In addition, capacity and participation restrictions, illness severity, and sick leave were assessed. Workplace phobia was found in 10% of patients with chronic mental disorders, that is, approximately about 3% of all general practice patients. Patients with workplace phobia had longer durations of sick leave than patients without workplace phobia and were impaired to a higher degree in work-relevant capacities. They also had a higher degree of restrictions in participation in other areas of life. Workplace phobia seems to be a frequent problem in primary care. It may behoove primary care clinicians to consider workplace-related anxiety, including phobia, particularly when patients ask for a work excuse for nonspecific somatic complaints. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  15. Effects of workplace incivility and empowerment on newly-graduated nurses' organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lesley Marie; Andrusyszyn, Mary Anne; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test an expanded model of Kanter's theory by examining the influence of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the organizational commitment of newly-graduated nurses. The first years of practise represent an important confidence-building phase for newly-graduated nurses, yet many new nurses are exposed to disempowering experiences and incivility in the workplace. A predictive non-experimental design was used to examine the impact of structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility on the affective commitment of newly-graduated nurses (n=117) working in acute care hospitals. Controlling for age, 23.1% of the variance in affective commitment was explained by structural empowerment, psychological empowerment and workplace incivility [R²=0.231, F(5,107) =6.43, P=0.000]. Access to opportunity was the most empowering factor, with access to support and formal power perceived as least empowering. Perceived co-worker incivility was greater than perceived supervisor incivility. Results offer significant support for the use of Kanter's theory in the newly-graduated nurse population. Without specific strategies in place to combat incivility and disempowerment in the workplace, attempts to prevent further organizational attrition of new members may be futile. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders, quality of life, and workplace stress in physical therapists

    PubMed Central

    BAE, Young-Hyeon; MIN, Kyoung Sam

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed to determine the associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), quality of life (QoL), and workplace stress among physical therapists (PTs) in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were given to 855 PTs. Variables examined included general characteristics, WMSDs, QoL, and workplace stress. Of the 788 PTs who responded, 745 (94.5%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the shoulder (23.3%), and the most reported number of body sites affected by WMSDs was one (50.9%). QoL was significantly improved (p<0.05) among PTs over 39 years old, who had 10–15 years of professional experience, worked in general/university hospitals, and had only one site affected by WMSDs. Factors influencing QoL included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, presence/absence of WMSDs, working venues, workplace stress, and age. Factors affecting workplace stress included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, QoL, work hours, and gender. The results showed a high prevalence of WMSDs among PTs in South Korea, and this negatively affected both QoL and workplace stress. PMID:26860785

  17. What difficulties do faculty members face when conducting workplace-based assessments in undergraduate clerkships?

    PubMed Central

    Mak-van der Vossen, Marianne C.; Croiset, Gerda; Kusurkar, Rashmi A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Workplace-based assessments are based on the principle of providing feedback to medical students on clinical performance in authentic settings. In practice, however, the assessment often overshadows the feedback. The aim of this study was to determine what problems faculty perceived when performing workplace-based assessments and what solutions they suggested to overcome these difficulties. Methods Discussion meetings were conducted with education coordinators and faculty (n=55) from 11 peripheral hospitals concerning the difficulties encountered when conducting workplace-based assessments. We analysed the reports from these discussion meetings using an integrated approach guided by our research questions to code the data. Two researchers analysed the data independently and resolved differences of opinion through consensus. Results The problems perceived by faculty in workplace-based assessments (difficulties) and suggestions for improvement formed the overarching themes. Problems included the short duration of clerkships, students choosing the assessment moments, the use of grades for the mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise, the difficulty in combining teacher and assessor roles and the difficulty in giving fail judgements. Suggestions for improvement included longer clerkship duration, faculty choosing the assessment moments, using a pass/fail system for the mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise and forward feeding of performance from earlier clerkships following a fail judgement. Conclusions Our study indicates that faculty perceive difficulties when conducting workplace-based assessments. These assessments need periodical review to understand the difficulties faculty experience using them; they also require periodical feedback to ensure their proper and effective use. PMID:26803256

  18. Associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders, quality of life, and workplace stress in physical therapists.

    PubMed

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Min, Kyoung Sam

    2016-08-05

    This study was performed to determine the associations between work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs), quality of life (QoL), and workplace stress among physical therapists (PTs) in South Korea. Self-reporting questionnaires were given to 855 PTs. Variables examined included general characteristics, WMSDs, QoL, and workplace stress. Of the 788 PTs who responded, 745 (94.5%) reported WMSDs affecting at least one body site. The most affected WMSDs site was the shoulder (23.3%), and the most reported number of body sites affected by WMSDs was one (50.9%). QoL was significantly improved (p<0.05) among PTs over 39 years old, who had 10-15 years of professional experience, worked in general/university hospitals, and had only one site affected by WMSDs. Factors influencing QoL included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, presence/absence of WMSDs, working venues, workplace stress, and age. Factors affecting workplace stress included number of body sites affected by WMSDs, QoL, work hours, and gender. The results showed a high prevalence of WMSDs among PTs in South Korea, and this negatively affected both QoL and workplace stress.

  19. Do gender differences matter to workplace bullying?

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei-Ling; Hsieh, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying has become an omnipresent problem in most organizations. Gender differences have recently received increasing attention in the workplace bullying domain. Integrating social dominance theory with gender role theory, this study explores whether male minority and supervisor gender are related to the incidence of workplace bullying. Data from 501 public servants employed in the tax administration institute of Taiwan was collected via a questionnaire and analyzed using hierarchical regression. Male minority reported more workplace bullying than did the female majority. Subordinates working with male supervisors had more exposure to bullying than those working with female supervisors. However, male supervisors did not exacerbate the relationship between male minority and workplace bullying, while females exposure to workplace bullying was attenuated when working with male supervisors. These findings confirm the important role of gender differences when predicting bullying at work and support the view that gender is not merely an individual antecedent of bullying, but rather acts as a social factor to influence the incidence of workplace bullying.

  20. Workplace Bullying in Radiology and Radiation Oncology.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Jay R; Harolds, Jay A; Bluth, Edward I

    2017-08-01

    Workplace bullying is common in health care and has recently been reported in both radiology and radiation oncology. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness of bullying and its potential consequences in radiology and radiation oncology. Bullying behavior may involve abuse, humiliation, intimidation, or insults; is usually repetitive; and causes distress in victims. Workplace bullying is more common in health care than in other industries. Surveys of radiation therapists in the United States, student radiographers in England, and physicians-in-training showed that substantial proportions of respondents had been subjected to workplace bullying. No studies were found that addressed workplace bullying specifically in diagnostic radiology or radiation oncology residents. Potential consequences of workplace bullying in health care include anxiety, depression, and health problems in victims; harm to patients as a result of victims' reduced ability to concentrate; and reduced morale and high turnover in the workplace. The Joint Commission has established leadership standards addressing inappropriate behavior, including bullying, in the workplace. The ACR Commission on Human Resources recommends that organizations take steps to prevent bullying. Those steps include education, including education to ensure that the line between the Socratic method and bullying is not crossed, and the establishment of policies to facilitate reporting of bullying and support victims of bullying. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Health care workplace discrimination and physician turnover.

    PubMed

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Pilgrim, Nanlesta; Wynia, Matthew; Desai, Mayur M; Bright, Cedric; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H

    2009-12-01

    To examine the association between physician race/ ethnicity, workplace discrimination, and physician job turnover. Cross-sectional, national survey conducted in 2006-2007 of practicing physicians (n = 529) randomly identified via the American Medical Association Masterfile and the National Medical Association membership roster. We assessed the relationships between career racial/ethnic discrimination at work and several career-related dependent variables, including 2 measures of physician turnover, career satisfaction, and contemplation of career change. We used standard frequency analyses, odds ratios and chi2 statistics, and multivariate logistic regression modeling to evaluate these associations. Physicians who self-identified as nonmajority were significantly more likely to have left at least 1 job because of workplace discrimination (black, 29%; Asian, 24%; other race, 21%; Hispanic/Latino, 20%; white, 9%). In multivariate models, having experienced racial/ethnic discrimination at work was associated with high job turnover (adjusted odds ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.4-4.9). Among physicians who experienced workplace discrimination, only 45% of physicians were satisfied with their careers (vs 88% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .01), and 40% were contemplating a career change (vs 10% among those who had not experienced workplace discrimination, p value < .001). Workplace discrimination is associated with physician job turnover, career dissatisfaction, and contemplation of career change. These findings underscore the importance of monitoring for workplace discrimination and responding when opportunities for intervention and retention still exist.

  2. Modeling workplace bullying using catastrophe theory.

    PubMed

    Escartin, J; Ceja, L; Navarro, J; Zapf, D

    2013-10-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as negative behaviors directed at organizational members or their work context that occur regularly and repeatedly over a period of time. Employees' perceptions of psychosocial safety climate, workplace bullying victimization, and workplace bullying perpetration were assessed within a sample of nearly 5,000 workers. Linear and nonlinear approaches were applied in order to model both continuous and sudden changes in workplace bullying. More specifically, the present study examines whether a nonlinear dynamical systems model (i.e., a cusp catastrophe model) is superior to the linear combination of variables for predicting the effect of psychosocial safety climate and workplace bullying victimization on workplace bullying perpetration. According to the AICc, and BIC indices, the linear regression model fits the data better than the cusp catastrophe model. The study concludes that some phenomena, especially unhealthy behaviors at work (like workplace bullying), may be better studied using linear approaches as opposed to nonlinear dynamical systems models. This can be explained through the healthy variability hypothesis, which argues that positive organizational behavior is likely to present nonlinear behavior, while a decrease in such variability may indicate the occurrence of negative behaviors at work.

  3. Antecedents, consequences and interventions for workplace bullying.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Vivien

    2014-09-01

    The issue of workplace bullying has become an area of research interest in the last 3 decades. Much of the extant literature is published in the business management journals. This is problematic as the targets of workplace bullying may need psychiatric treatment; as a discipline, therefore psychiatrists may benefit from a deeper understanding of the nature of workplace bullying and its sequelae. There is still no agreed upon definition, although most definitions include similar criteria. Managers and human resources personnel frequently have difficulty identifying and effectively managing workplace bullying. The consequences for the targets of bullying can be severe; they may need psychiatric treatment and it can have a lifelong impact. There is a paucity of research into effective prevention and intervention programs. Preventive measures that focus on the whole workplace culture or on targets alone have mixed results. Workplace policies and procedures may lessen the prevalence and incidence of bullying, but often competing interests of senior management, human resources personnel, supervisors and workers may mitigate any antibullying interventions. Although psychiatrists are likely to treat the targets of bullying, bullying has yet to attract much attention as a research topic in psychiatry. Although the consequences of bullying can be severe for both targets and workplaces, prevention strategies are hampered by competing interests.

  4. Workplace Bullying: A Tale of Adverse Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Workplace bullying is defined as the repetitive and systematic engagement of interpersonally abusive behaviors that negatively affect both the targeted individual and the work organization. According to the findings of 12 studies, being bullied in the workplace affects approximately 11 percent of workers. Victims are frequently blue-collar and unskilled workers. However, there also appear to be gender and milieu/management factors. Emotional/psychological consequences of workplace bullying may include increased mental distress, sleep disturbances, fatigue in women and lack of vigor in men, depression and anxiety, adjustment disorders, and even work-related suicide. Medical consequences of workplace bullying may include an increase in health complaints such as neck pain, musculoskeletal complaints, acute pain, fibromyalgia, and cardiovascular symptoms. Finally, socioeconomic consequences of workplace bullying may include absenteeism due to sick days and unemployment. Clinicians in both mental health and primary care settings need to be alert to the associations between bullying in the workplace and these potential negative consequences, as patients may not disclose workplace maltreatment due to embarrassment or fears of retribution. PMID:25852978

  5. Toward a Workplace Pedagogy: Guidance, Participation, and Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Constructs a workplace pedagogy of practices on three planes: participation in workplace activities, learning guided by more-experienced workers, and guided learning for transfer. Discusses how workplace pedagogy must account for ways in which workplaces provide access to guided learning and how individuals choose to participate. (Contains 49…

  6. 7 CFR 3021.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 3021.635 Section 3021.635..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  7. 22 CFR 1509.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1509.635 Section 1509.635 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  8. 29 CFR 94.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 94.635 Section 94.635 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 94.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done in...

  9. 29 CFR 94.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Drug-free workplace. 94.635 Section 94.635 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 94.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done in...

  10. 45 CFR 1173.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1173.635 Section 1173.635... HUMANITIES NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1173.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  11. 7 CFR 3021.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 3021.635 Section 3021.635..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  12. 21 CFR 1405.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 1405.635 Section 1405.635 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a...

  13. 22 CFR 312.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2013-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drug-free workplace. 312.635 Section 312.635 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  14. 2 CFR 182.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 182.635 Section 182.635 Grants and Agreements Office of Management and Budget Guidance for Grants and Agreements OFFICE OF...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace...

  15. 22 CFR 133.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 133.635 Section 133.635 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE MISCELLANEOUS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  16. 7 CFR 3021.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Drug-free workplace. 3021.635 Section 3021.635..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 3021.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  17. 22 CFR 1509.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2012-04-01 2009-04-01 true Drug-free workplace. 1509.635 Section 1509.635 Foreign Relations AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  18. 22 CFR 312.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Drug-free workplace. 312.635 Section 312.635 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 312.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the performance of work done...

  19. 49 CFR 32.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug-free workplace. 32.635 Section 32.635 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...

  20. 34 CFR 84.635 - Drug-free workplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug-free workplace. 84.635 Section 84.635 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 84.635 Drug-free workplace. Drug-free workplace means a site for the...