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Sample records for hospital service department

  1. Focus on: Good Samaritan Hospital Biomedical Services Department.

    PubMed

    Shreve, R B

    1987-01-01

    The Biomedical Services Department of the Good Samaritan Hospital, located in Central Pennsylvania, has responsibility for preventive maintenance, safety and regulation compliance (appropriate to a biomedical department) and repairs for the Hospital. These services have resulted in substantial cost savings. In addition, the Department's Shared Service activity has produced alternative revenue sources. The combined hospital and shared service inventory of approximately 1100 instruments is serviced by the Department Staff, which consists of one Director and two technicians.

  2. Evaluation of service quality of hospital outpatient department services.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2011-07-01

    It has become essential for hospital managers to understand and measure consumer perspectives and service quality gaps, so that any perceived gap in delivery of service is identified and suitably addressed. A study was conducted at a peripheral service hospital to ascertain any service gap between consumer expectations and perceptions in respect of the hospital outpatient department (OPD) services. A cross-sectional study was conducted using SERVQUAL as the survey instrument, the instrument being validated for use in the hospital environment. Consumer ratings across 22 items of the survey instrument were collected in paired expectation and perception scores and then service quality gaps were identified and statistically analysed. Service quality gaps were identified to exist across all the five dimensions of the survey instrument, with statistically significant gaps across the dimensions of 'tangibles' and 'responsiveness.' The quality gaps were further validated by a total unweighted SERVQUAL score of (-) 1.63. The study concludes that significant service quality gaps existed in the delivery of the hospital OPD services, which need to be addressed by focused improvement efforts by the hospital management.

  3. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  4. Service mix in the hospital outpatient department: implications for Medicare payment reform.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M E; Sulvetta, M B; Englert, E

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To determine if implementation of a PPS for Medicare hospital outpatient department (HOPD) services will have distributional consequences across hospital types and regions, this analysis assesses variation in service mix and the provision of high-technology services in the HOPD. DATA. HCFA's 1990 claims file for a 5 percent random sample of Medicare beneficiaries using the HOPD was merged, by hospital provider number, with various HCFA hospital characteristic files. STUDY DESIGN. Hospital characteristics examined are urban/rural location, teaching status, disproportionate-share status, and bed size. Two analyses of HOPD services are presented: mix of services provided and the provision of high-technology services. The mix of services is measured by the percentage of services in each of 14 type-of-service categories (e.g., medical visits, advanced imaging services, diagnostic testing services). Technology provision is measured by the percentage of hospitals providing selected high-technology services. FINDINGS/CONCLUSIONS. The findings suggest that the role hospital types play in providing HOPD services warrants consideration in establishing a PPS. HOPDs in major teaching hospitals and hospitals serving a disproportionate share of the poor play an important role in providing routine visits. HOPDs in both major and minor teaching hospitals are important providers of high-technology services. Other findings have implications for the structure of an HOPD PPS as well. First, over half of the services provided in the HOPD are laboratory tests and HOPDs may have limited control over these services since they are often for patients referred from local physician offices. Second, service mix and technology provision vary markedly among regions, suggesting the need for a transition to prospective payment. Third, the organization of service supply in a region may affect service provision in the HOPD suggesting that an HOPD PPS needs to be coordinated with payment

  5. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the...

  6. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the...

  7. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the...

  8. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the...

  9. 38 CFR 17.50 - Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to the Department of... AFFAIRS MEDICAL Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.50 Use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals with beds allocated to...

  10. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health...

  11. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health...

  12. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health...

  13. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health...

  14. 38 CFR 17.51 - Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital care under 38 U.S.C. 1710 or 38 CFR 17.46. Use of Public or Private Hospitals ... Department of Defense, Public Health Service or other Federal hospitals. 17.51 Section 17.51 Pensions... Health Service Or Other Federal Hospitals § 17.51 Emergency use of Department of Defense, Public Health...

  15. Computerization of Psychosocial Services in the General Hospital: Collaborative Information Management in the Human Services Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Describes process by which a multiple-level collaborative database system was designed. Notes that by clearly elaborating the various design goals, it was possible to build a system through which ongoing program evaluation efforts could be easily managed without disrupting the service delivery process. (Author)

  16. Department of Health and Human Services Changes: Implications for Hospital Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Aldredge, Patti A.

    2013-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama issued a directive to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) regarding patient visitation, advance directives, and other initiatives to improve the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families. The HHS response to this directive has implications for hospital social workers. The…

  17. Department of Health and Human Services Changes: Implications for Hospital Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Annemarie; Aldredge, Patti A.

    2013-01-01

    In April 2010, President Obama issued a directive to the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) regarding patient visitation, advance directives, and other initiatives to improve the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families. The HHS response to this directive has implications for hospital social workers. The…

  18. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1993-94. Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Cosmetology Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    A study was conducted to evaluate student and student employer satisfaction with the services provided by the South Seattle Community College (SSCC) Cosmetology Department. Specifically, the study gathered data related to four outcomes: that students receive an educational experience allowing them to meet their goals; that former and current…

  19. Investments for medical equipment in a mother and child health hospital: correlation with level of services/departments.

    PubMed

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Raggi, Roberto; Bavuusuren, Bayasgalantai; Tudevdorj, Erkhembaatar; Doglioni, Nicoletta; Zanardo, Vincenzo

    2011-02-01

    To assess whether investments for medical equipments assigned by a team of experts to a mother and child health hospital located in Mongolia were correlated with structural, organizational, and educational level of its services/departments. A score was used for evaluating the level of each service/department. It was based on a 'structural area' and an 'organizational and educational area'. Destination of funds was determined by a team of experts in collaboration with the head of the service/department. Thirty-three of 36 services/departments (91.6%) were evaluated. A total sum of 4,432,140 Euros to invest in medical equipment was estimated. Assigned investments were inversely correlated with the total (structural plus organizational and educational area) score (n = 33; r =  -0.59; p = 0.0002), and the specific scores for structural area (n = 33; r = -0.46; p = 0.005) and organizational and educational area (n = 33; r =  -0.56; p = 0.0006). A large part of the funds for medical equipment was destined to services/departments with low organizational and educational conditions, limiting the potential effect of the aid meanwhile supporting the most in need departments. Educational efforts and monitoring of specific long-term indicators are mandatory.

  20. Demand for public hospital emergency department services in Australia: 2000-2001 to 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Gerry; Toloo, Sam; Rego, Joanna; Ting, Joseph; Aitken, Peter; Tippett, Vivienne

    2012-02-01

    Hospital EDs are a significant and high-profile component of Australia's health-care system, which in recent years have experienced considerable crowding. This crowding is caused by the combination of increasing demand, throughput and output factors. The aim of the present article is to clarify trends in the use of public ED services across Australia with a view to providing an evidence basis for future policy analysis and discussion. The data for the present article have been extracted, compiled and analysed from publicly available sources for a 10 year period between 2000-2001 and 2009-2010. Demand for public ED care increased by 37% over the decade, an average annual increase of 1.8% in the utilization rate per 1000 persons. There were significant differences in utilization rates and in trends in growth among states and territories that do not easily relate to general population trends alone. This growth in demand exceeds general population growth, and the variability between states both in utilization rates and overall trends defies immediate explanation. The growth in demand for ED services is a partial contributor to the crowding being experienced in EDs across Australia. There is a need for more detailed study, including qualitative analysis of patient motivations in order to identify the factors driving this growth in demand. © 2011 The Authors. EMA © 2011 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  1. Efficacy of hospital in the home services providing care for patients admitted from emergency departments: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Varney, Jane; Weiland, Tracey J; Jelinek, George

    2014-06-01

    Increases in emergency department (ED) demand may compromise patient outcomes, leading not only to overcrowding in the ED, increased ED waiting times and increased ED length of stay, but also compromising patient safety; the risk of adverse events is known to rise in the presence of overcrowding. Hospital in the home (HiTH) services may offer one means of reducing ED demand. This integrative review sought to assess the efficacy of admission-avoidance HiTH services that admit patients directly from the ED. Papers published between 1995 and 2013 were identified through searches of Medline, CINAHL and Google. English-language studies that assessed the efficacy of a HiTH service and that recruited at least one-third of the participants directly from the ED were included in the review. A HiTH service was considered one that provided health professional support to patients at home for a time-limited period, thus avoiding the need for hospitalization. Twenty-two articles met the inclusion criteria for this review. The interventions were diverse in terms of the clinical interventions delivered, the range and intensity of health professional input and the conditions treated. The studies included in the review found no effect on clinical outcomes, rates of adverse events or complications, although patient satisfaction and costs were consistently and favourably affected by HiTH treatment. Given evidence suggesting that HiTH services which recruit patients directly from the ED contribute to cost-savings, greater patient satisfaction and safety and efficacy outcomes that are at least equivalent to those associated with hospital-based care, the expansion of such programmes might therefore be considered a priority for policy makers.

  2. The Association of Physical Access With the Interval Between Attending the Hospital and Receiving Service in Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, MohammadReza; Haji Nabi, Kamran; Ayoubian, Ali; Hashemi Dehaghi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: The relation between physical access in emergency department ‎(ED) and the time patients have to wait before being served is unknown. Objectives: Our objective was to discover the associations between the physical access in ED and the time patients had to wait before receiving services. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, statistical society comprised two portions, namely, public hospitals’ EDs and referred patients to the ward. Data on waiting time for 240 patients in six public and private hospitals were gathered. In addition, physical condition of EDs was inspected by visiting these hospitals. A designed checklist, based on the introduced physical space, was filled for each hospital. Results of the checklist were scored using Likert’s five-points scale and Spearman and Pearson's correlation coefficient were applied to determine the relationship between physical access and waiting time. Results: The correlation between the waiting time beginning from the very moment of stepping into the ward until first examination and physical condition at the triage wards in private (P < 0.001) and public hospitals (P > 0.05) was not significant. The waiting interval, beginning from the very moment of stepping into the ward until first examination and access to physical space of ED, was significant for private hospitals (P < 0.001) and insignificant for public hospitals (P > 0.05). Conclusions: According to the results, there was a direct correlation between access to physical space in ED and waiting time. In addition, improving the physical access did not necessarily result in shorter waiting time. Therefore, to improve triage process, improvement of waiting time indices, and modifying forms of work process in ED are recommended. PMID:25763222

  3. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1993-94. Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Floristry Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    A study was conducted to determine current and former students' and local employers' satisfaction with South Seattle Community College's (SSCC's) Floristry Department. Specifically, the study gathered data related to four outcomes: that students receive an education allowing them to meet goals; that students be satisfied with facilities,…

  4. 42 CFR 447.54 - Cost sharing for services furnished in a hospital emergency department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the agency exercises the option under paragraph (c) of this section. (b) At state option, cost sharing... individuals with family income at or below 150 percent of the FPL shall be increased each year, beginning...): Services Maximum allowable cost sharing Individuals with family income ≤150% of the FPL Individuals...

  5. [Patients in a state of agitation at the admission service of a Rouen hospital emergency department].

    PubMed

    Moritz, F; Bauer, F; Boyer, A; Lemarchand, P; Kerleau, J M; Moirot, E; Navarre, C; Muller, J M

    1999-10-09

    To determine the incidence and causes of agitation states in patients presenting at the Rouen University Hospital emergency room and to analyze the management scheme. A prospective study was conducted over a 9 month period in 100 consecutive patients presenting a state of agitation assessed using the Overt Aggression Scale. A pre-planned management protocol was applied. The incidence of states of agitation was 0.56%. There were 43 women and 57 men, mean age 33 years. Most of the agitated patients were admitted between 6 p.m. and 4 a.m. (69%). Over the 9 month period, 2 patients were admitted twice for agitation and 2 absconded. Low glucose level was the cause of agitation in 4 cases. Alcohol and/or drug use concerned 73% of the agitated patients and was the most frequently observed triggering factor (17%). Only 6% of the patients had a regular employment. Physical restraining measures and sedation were required in 86% and 84% of the cases respectively. Among 67 patients given loxapine for sedation, 2 developed acute dyskinesia and 9 low blood pressure. One out of 4 patients were referred to a psychiatric unit. Patients in a state of agitation are young, often female, and in a difficult socio-economic situation. Hypoglycemia is the main differential diagnosis. A triggering factor can often be identified. A state of agitation is not a repetitive condition but occurs as a short-lived episode in the patientís history. Such patients need rapid care to avoid further aggravation and disruption of the emergency room activity, and to prevent the patient from fleeing. Loxapine provides effective sedation but requires regular monitoring of blood pressure and can provoke acute dyskinesia in young subjects.

  6. Hospitals look to hospitality service firms to meet TQM goals.

    PubMed

    Hard, R

    1992-05-20

    Hospitals that hire contract service firms to manage one or all aspects of their hospitality service departments increasingly expect those firms to help meet total quality management goals as well as offer the more traditional cost reduction, quality improvement and specialized expertise, finds the 1992 Hospital Contract Services Survey conducted by Hospitals.

  7. Hospital service recovery.

    PubMed

    Gutbezahl, Cary; Haan, Perry

    2006-01-01

    An organization's ability to correct service errors is an important factor in achieving success in today's service economy. This paper examines service recovery in hospitals in the U.S. First is a general review of service recovery theories. Next is a discussion of specific service issues related to the hospital environment. The literature on service recovery is used to make specific recommendations to hospitals for ways to improve their ability to remedy service errors when they occur. Suggestions for future research in the field of service recovery are also made.

  8. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  9. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  10. Physicians in Hospital Emergency Departments. [Proceedings, New Jersey Training Program].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services and Mental Health Administration (DHEW), Rockville, MD. Div. of Emergency Health Services.

    This program was organized in response to the rapidly increasing demands placed upon the emergency departments of general hospitals, and in recognition of the fact that the crucial ingredient in emergency department services is physician capability. The training program was implemented for hospital department physicians and other interested…

  11. [Outpatient care in emergency departments and primary care services : A descriptive analysis of secondary data in a rural hospital].

    PubMed

    Seeger, I; Rupp, P; Naziyok, T; Rölker-Denker, L; Röhrig, R; Hein, A

    2016-11-11

    The use of emergency departments in German hospitals has been increasing in recent years. Emergency care provided by primary care services ("Bereitschaftsdienstpraxis") or a hospital emergency departments (EDs) is the subject of current discussions. The purpose of this study was to determine the reasons that outpatients with lower treatment urgency consult the ED. Further, the effects of the cooperation between primary care services and the ED will be examined. The study was an exploratory secondary data analysis of data from the hospital information system and a quality management survey of a basic and standard care clinic in a rural area. All patients classified as 4 and 5 according to the emergency severity index (ESI), both four weeks before and after the primary care services and ED visit, were included in the study. During the two survey periods, a total of 1565 outpatient cases were treated, of which 962 cases (61%) were triaged ESI 4 or 5. Of these patients, 324 were surveyed (34%). Overall, 276 cases (85%) visited the ED without contacting a physician beforehand, 161 of the cases (50%) reported an emergency as the reason. In 126 cases (39%) the symptoms lasted more than one day. One-third of all outpatient admissions (537 cases, 34%) visited the ED during the opening hours of the general practitioner. More than 80% of the surviving cases visited the ED without physician contact beforehand. The most common reason for attending the ED was, "It is an emergency." The targeted control of the patients by integrating the primary care service into the ED does not lead to an increased number of cases in the primary care service, but to a subjective relief of the ED staff.

  12. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  13. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  14. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider.

  15. 38 CFR 17.112 - Services or ceremonies on Department of Veterans Affairs hospital or center reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Organizations must provide assurance that their members will obey all rules in effect at the hospital or center... if it includes commentary in support of, or in opposition to, or attempts to influence, any current... appropriate time, and render assistance where appropriate. No organization will be given exclusive permission...

  16. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1993-94 Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    A study was conducted to determine current and former students' and local employers' satisfaction with South Seattle Community College's (SSCC's) Landscape and Environmental Horticulture Department. Specifically, the study gathered data on four outcomes: that students receive an education allowing them to meet goals; that students be satisfied…

  17. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of...

  18. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). 447.280 Section 447.280 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of...

  19. Focus on: Southern Baptist Hospital Biomedical Electronics Department.

    PubMed

    Newton, L M

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the Biomedical Electronics Department at Southern Baptist Hospital, New Orleans, LA. The department, organized in January 1986, was established to replace an existing department which was operated under contractual agreement with a clinical equipment management company. The Biomedical Electronics Department is responsible for the preventive maintenance and repair of over 3,500 pieces of equipment, in areas ranging from dialysis to radiology and from communications to computers. The management and approval of all service contracts are handled by the department. Additional responsibilities include equipment inventory control, radio paging and nurse call system maintenance, and control of all time-and-materials services provided by biomedical equipment vendors.

  20. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  1. Hospitality Services. Student Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This student activity book contains pencil-and-paper activities for use in a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The activities are organized into 29 chapters on the following topics: hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization/management structures in…

  2. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital...

  3. Hospital Readmission Through the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudi, Sadrollah; Taghipour, Hamid Reza; Javadzadeh, Hamid Reza; Ghane, Mohammad Reza; Goodarzi, Hassan; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hosein

    2016-01-01

    Background Hospital readmission places a high burden on both health care systems and patients. Most readmissions are thought to be related to the quality of the health care system. Objectives The aim of this study was to examine the causes and rates of early readmission in emergency department in a Tehran hospital. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional investigation was performed to study readmission of inpatients at a large academic hospital in Tehran, Iran. Patients admitted to hospital from July 1, 2014 to December 30, 2014 via the emergency department were enrolled. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the distribution demographics in the sample. Data was analyzed by chi2 test using SPSS 20 software. Results The main cause of readmission was complications related to surgical procedures (31.0%). Discharge from hospital based on patient request at the patient's own risk was a risk factor for emergency readmission in 8.5%, a very small number were readmitted after complete treatment (0.6%). The only direct complication of treatment was infection (17%). Conclusions Postoperative complications increase the probability of patients returning to hospital. Physicians, nurses, etc., should focus on these specific patient populations to minimize the risk of postoperative complications. Future studies should assess the relative connections of various types of patient information (e.g., social and psychosocial factors) to readmission risk prediction by comparing the performance of models with and without this information in a specific population. PMID:27626018

  4. Focus on: Washington Hospital Center, Biomedical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J D

    1995-01-01

    The Biomedical Engineering Department of the Washington Hospital Center provides clinical engineering services to an urban 907-bed, tertiary care teaching hospital and a variety of associated healthcare facilities. With an annual budget of over $3,000,000, the 24-person department provides cradle-to-grave support for a host of sophisticated medical devices and imaging systems such as lasers, CT scanners, and linear accelerators as well as traditional patient care instrumentation. Hallmarks of the department include its commitment to customer service and patient care, close collaboration with clinicians and quality assurance teams throughout the hospital system, proactive involvement in all phases of the technology management process, and shared leadership in safety standards with the hospital's risk management group. Through this interactive process, the department has assisted the Center not only in the acquisition of 11,000 active devices with a value of more than $64 million, but also in becoming one of the leading providers of high technology healthcare in the Washington, DC metropolitan area.

  5. Local health department perspectives on linkages among birthing hospitals.

    PubMed

    Strobino, Donna M; Silver, Gillian Beth; Allston, Adam A; Grason, Holly A

    2003-12-01

    To describe perinatal linkages among hospitals, changes in their numbers and their impact on relationships among high-risk providers in local communities. Data were obtained about the organization of perinatal services in 1996-1999 from a cross-sectional study evaluating fetal and infant mortality review (FIMR) programs nationwide. Geographic areas were sampled based on region, population density, and the presence of a FIMR. A local health department representative was interviewed in 76% (N=193) of eligible communities; 188 provided data about hospitals. Linkages among all hospitals were reported in 143 communities and with a subspecialty hospital in 122. All but 12 communities had a maternity hospital, and changes in the number of hospitals occurred in 49 communities. Decreases in the number of Level II hospitals were related to changes in relationships among providers of high-risk care for mothers and newborns; they were associated with changing relationships only for mothers in Level I hospitals. These relations were noted only where established provider relationships existed. Decreases in the number of maternity hospitals affect provider relationships in communities, but only where there are established linkages among hospitals.

  6. Department of Defense Food Service Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    information . 3. Centralized and consolidated food service facilities. 4. A viable research, development, testing, and engineerii’g program to provide...aZ Department of Defense - INSTRUCTION June 5, I~qq AD-A270 334 NUMBER 1338.1o ASD(P&L) SUBJECT: Department of Defense Food Service Program...34Manual for the Department of Defense Food Service Program," November 1978, authorized by this Directive (e) through (hi), see enclosure 1I~% A

  7. National study of emergency department observation services.

    PubMed

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Ross, Michael A; Ginde, Adit A

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to describe patient and facility characteristics of emergency department (ED) observation services in the United States. The authors analyzed the 2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Characteristics of EDs with observation units (OUs) were compared to those without, and patients with a disposition of ED observation were compared to those with a "short-stay" (<48 hour) hospital admission. Results are descriptive and without formal statistical comparisons for this observational analysis. An estimated 1,746 U.S. EDs (36%) reported having OUs, of which 56% are administratively managed by ED staff. Fifty-two percent of hospitals with ED-managed OUs are in an urban location, and 89% report ED boarding, compared to 29 and 65% of those that do not have an OU. The admission rate is 38% at those with ED-managed OUs and 15% at those without OUs. Of the 15.1% of all ED patients who are kept in the hospital following an ED visit, one-quarter are kept for either a short-stay admission (1.8%) or an ED observation admission (2.1%). Most (82%) ED observation patients were discharged from the ED. ED observation patients were similar to short-stay admission patients in terms of age (median = 52 years for both, interquartile range = 36 to 70 years), self-pay (12% vs. 10%), ambulance arrival (37% vs. 36%), urgent/emergent triage acuity (77% vs. 74%), use of ≥1 ED medication (64% vs.76%), and the most common primary chief complaints and primary diagnoses. Over one-third of U.S. EDs have an OU. Short-stay admission patients have similar characteristics as ED observation patients and may represent an opportunity for the growth of OUs. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. District nursing sister attached to hospital surgical department.

    PubMed

    Hockey, L

    1970-04-18

    An experiment of attaching a district nursing sister to the surgical department of a general hospital was designed to show the use of the district nursing service for the after-care of patients discharged from hospital after surgical treatment. In a 15-week period about 590 bed days were saved, and only six out of 126 patients discharged early had to be readmitted. Most of the patients and the general practitioners who replied to questionaries about the scheme were in favour of it.

  9. Department of Health and Human Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... content HHS .gov Search U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Search Close A-Z Index About HHS ... below. Email HHS Headquarters U.S. Department of Health & Human Services 200 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. ...

  10. 26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. 'CITY HOSPITAL, BLACKWELL'S ISLAND.' (Source: New York City Department of Public Finance, Real Estate Owned by the City of New York under Jurisdiction of the Department of Public Charities, 1909.) - Island Hospital, Roosevelt Island, New York County, NY

  11. 42 CFR 419.32 - Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospital outpatient services. 419.32 Section 419.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Rates for Hospital...

  12. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 1992 Emergency Department Summary.

    PubMed

    Schappert, S M

    1997-03-01

    This report presents data on the provision and utilization of ambulatory medical care services in hospital emergency departments during 1992. Ambulatory medical care services are described in terms of patient, visit, and facility characteristics. Among these are the patient's reason for the visit, diagnostic and screening services ordered or provided, diagnosis, and medications provided or prescribed. Cause of injury data are presented for injury-related visits. Data presented in this report are from the 1992 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS), a national survey of non-Federal, general and short-stay hospitals, conducted by the Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This report reflects the survey's first year of data collection. A four-stage probability sample design was used, resulting in a sample of 524 non-Federal, general and short-stay hospitals. Ninety-two percent of eligible facilities participated in the survey. Hospital staff were asked to complete Patient Record forms for a systematic random sample of patient visits occurring during a randomly assigned 4-week reporting period, and 36,271 forms were completed by participating emergency departments. Diagnosis and cause of injury were coded according to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM). Reason for visit and medications were coded according to systems developed by the National Center for Health Statistics. An estimated 89.8 million visits were made to the emergency departments of non-Federal, general and short-stay hospitals in the United States during 1992-357.1 visits per 1,000 persons. Persons 75 years of age and over had a higher visit rate than persons in five other age categories. White persons accounted for 78.5 percent of all visits. However, the visit rate for black persons was significantly higher than for white persons overall and for

  13. Human resources management for a hospital pharmacy department.

    PubMed

    Chase, P A

    1989-06-01

    The concepts of human resources management (HRM) are presented, and the application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department is described. Low salaries and poor working conditions had precipitated a mass exodus of pharmacists from a 650-bed, tertiary-care medical center. The newly hired director of pharmacy sought to rebuild the department by developing a three-stage HRM model consisting of needs forecasting, performance management, and advanced management systems. In the needs-forecasting stage, the strengths and weaknesses of departmental programs were determined through analysis of existing standards of practice, situational analysis, and financial analyses; the strengths and weaknesses of departmental employees were determined through the use of talent inventories, turnover analysis, analysis of time and leave records, reevaluation of the department's job classifications, performance and productivity evaluations, and productivity evaluations, and development of a philosophy of practice and mission statement. Needs and problems were addressed by examining each existing program and developing new policies and procedures, performance standards, quality assurance mechanisms, and productivity expectations. Personnel needs and problems were addressed by designing a system of differentiated career ladders, contracting with pharmacists for career moves, developing the skills of currently employed pharmacists, and implementing a succession planning model. The model has been in place for approximately three years and is beginning to yield the desired results. Application of HRM concepts to a hospital pharmacy department appears to have been successful in improving employee morale and in helping the department to meet goals of expanded and improved services.

  14. Variation in the rates of adverse events between hospitals and hospital departments.

    PubMed

    Zegers, Marieke; De Bruijne, Martine C; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Wagner, Cordula; Van Der Wal, Gerrit; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the variation in the rates of adverse events (AEs), and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments in order to investigate the room for improvement in reducing AEs at both levels. In addition, we explored the extent to which patient, department and hospital characteristics explain differences in the rates of AEs. Structured retrospective patient record review of hospital admissions. Twenty-one Dutch hospitals. Population A representative random sample of 7113 hospital admissions in 2004. Variation in AEs, and preventable AEs, between hospitals and hospital departments and the explanatory factors of the variation. The rates of AEs varied between hospitals (P = 0.05) and hospital departments (P < 0.05). The rates of preventable AEs only varied significantly between hospital departments. The clustering of preventable AEs in hospital departments was more than twice that found in hospitals (ICC 9.5 versus 3.5%). The type of hospital explained 35% of the inter-hospital variance in AEs. Patient and department characteristics explained 23% of the inter-department variance in preventable AEs. In addition to interventions to improve the overall patient safety within a hospital, interventions tailored for specific departments are necessary to reduce their patient safety risks. Monitoring and comparing the performance of hospitals should not be limited to the hospital level, but should be extended to the individual department since there can be significant differences in the rates of preventable AEs between different departments within the same hospital.

  15. Clinical Pharmacy Services in Canadian Emergency Departments: A National Survey.

    PubMed

    Wanbon, Richard; Lyder, Catherine; Villeneuve, Eric; Shalansky, Stephen; Manuel, Leslie; Harding, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Providing clinical pharmacy services in emergency departments (EDs) is important because adverse drug events commonly occur before, during, and after ED encounters. Survey studies in the United States have indicated a relatively low presence of clinical pharmacy services in the ED setting, but a descriptive survey specific to Canada has not yet been performed. To describe the current status of pharmacy services in Canadian EDs and potential barriers to implementing pharmacy services in this setting. All Canadian hospitals with an ED and at least 50 acute care beds were contacted to identify the presence of dedicated ED pharmacy services (defined as at least 0.5 full-time equivalent [FTE] position). Three different electronic surveys were then distributed by e-mail to ED pharmacy team members (if available), pharmacy managers (at hospitals without an ED pharmacy team), and ED managers (all hospitals). The surveys were completed between July and September 2013. Of the 243 hospitals identified, 95 (39%) had at least 0.5 FTE clinical pharmacy services in the ED (based on initial telephone screening). Of the 60 ED pharmacy teams that responded to the survey, 56 had pharmacists (27 of which also had ED pharmacy technicians) and 4 had pharmacy technicians (without pharmacists). Forty-four (79%) of the 56 ED pharmacist services had been established within the preceding 10 years. Order clarification, troubleshooting, medication reconciliation, and assessment of renal dosing were the services most commonly provided. The large majority of pharmacy managers and ED managers identified the need for ED pharmacy services where such services do not yet exist. Inadequate funding, competing priorities, and lack of training were the most commonly reported barriers to providing this service. Although the establishment of ward-based pharmacy services in Canadian EDs has increased over the past 10 years, lack of funding and a lack of ED training for pharmacists were reported as

  16. Clinical Pharmacy Services in Canadian Emergency Departments: A National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Wanbon, Richard; Lyder, Catherine; Villeneuve, Eric; Shalansky, Stephen; Manuel, Leslie; Harding, Melanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing clinical pharmacy services in emergency departments (EDs) is important because adverse drug events commonly occur before, during, and after ED encounters. Survey studies in the United States have indicated a relatively low presence of clinical pharmacy services in the ED setting, but a descriptive survey specific to Canada has not yet been performed. Objectives: To describe the current status of pharmacy services in Canadian EDs and potential barriers to implementing pharmacy services in this setting. Methods: All Canadian hospitals with an ED and at least 50 acute care beds were contacted to identify the presence of dedicated ED pharmacy services (defined as at least 0.5 full-time equivalent [FTE] position). Three different electronic surveys were then distributed by e-mail to ED pharmacy team members (if available), pharmacy managers (at hospitals without an ED pharmacy team), and ED managers (all hospitals). The surveys were completed between July and September 2013. Results: Of the 243 hospitals identified, 95 (39%) had at least 0.5 FTE clinical pharmacy services in the ED (based on initial telephone screening). Of the 60 ED pharmacy teams that responded to the survey, 56 had pharmacists (27 of which also had ED pharmacy technicians) and 4 had pharmacy technicians (without pharmacists). Forty-four (79%) of the 56 ED pharmacist services had been established within the preceding 10 years. Order clarification, troubleshooting, medication reconciliation, and assessment of renal dosing were the services most commonly provided. The large majority of pharmacy managers and ED managers identified the need for ED pharmacy services where such services do not yet exist. Inadequate funding, competing priorities, and lack of training were the most commonly reported barriers to providing this service. Conclusions: Although the establishment of ward-based pharmacy services in Canadian EDs has increased over the past 10 years, lack of funding and a lack of

  17. 42 CFR 419.32 - Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospital outpatient services. 419.32 Section 419.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Rates for Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.32 Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital...

  18. 42 CFR 419.32 - Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospital outpatient services. 419.32 Section 419.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Rates for Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.32 Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital...

  19. 42 CFR 419.32 - Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospital outpatient services. 419.32 Section 419.32 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... FOR HOSPITAL OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Rates for Hospital Outpatient Services § 419.32 Calculation of prospective payment rates for hospital...

  20. Medicare hospital outpatient services and costs: Implications for prospective payment

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark E.; Sulvetta, Margaret B.

    1992-01-01

    Medicare expenditures of hospital outpatient department (HOPD) services are growing rapidly, prompting congressional interest in a prospective payment system. In this article, the authors identify frequently provided services and examine service volume and charges in the HOPD. Relatively few services drive Medicare HOPD spending, and volume is dominated by visits, imaging and laboratory tests, whereas surgery accounts for a large proportion of charges. Hospital-level variations in charges, costs, case mix, and outliers are also explored. There is substantial variation in charges and costs across hospital types. However, after case-mix adjustment, all hospital types have average costs within 6 percent of the national average. PMID:10171489

  1. Hospital utilization pattern in a hepatogastroenterology department of a research institute hospital, from 2004 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Elayyat, Afaf H A; Sadek, Ahmed

    2016-06-01

    The Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (TBRI) Hospital is a research and referral center for gastroenterology and hepatology. The Hepatogastroenterology (HGE) Department in TBRI Hospital is a center for endoscopy and sonography. The department also has a hepatology ICU. As a part of hospital performance improvement, medical records that satisfy the needs and demands of the healthcare team, setting a practical framework to improve the quality of medical care in TBRI Hospital, were generated. The aim of the study was to assess the performance of the HGE Department in TBRI Hospital during the 10-year period from 2004 to 2013. This is a retrospective observational study. Data were sourced from the electronic database of patient records in the form of automated summary discharge forms and from annual reports from the year 2004 until the year 2013, which are available in the Medical Record Unit in TBRI Hospital. HGE Department data include utilization of outpatient and emergency services and inpatient and ICU services. Hospital admission rates and readmission rates (RARs) were also used. Other utilization indices such as ultrasonography and endoscopy and hospital bed utilization indices such as average length of hospital stay (ALOS), bed occupancy rate (BOR), bed turnover rate, and mortality rate (MR) were also included. Outpatient cases almost doubled from 2004 to 2013 (from 6209 to14241). Inpatient cases increased by 40.5% (from 2003 to 2829). On average, the emergency admissions and ICU admissions formed about one-fourth of total admissions. RAR decreased over the 10 years (from 14.2 to 0.6). ALOS also decreased (from 9.4 to 6.1). BOR increased from 2004 to 2012 only (from 54.3 to 86.3). Bed turnover rate ranged from 21.1 to 28.5, but in 2012 it increased to 47.7 as a result of the increased BOR that year. MR decreased from 8.9 in 2004 to 0.3 in 2013. Ultrasonography increased from 3384 to 3973. Over the 10 years, the number of endoscopies increased about two

  2. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  3. 77 FR 43369 - Lexisnexis, a Subsidiary of Reed Elsevier Customer Service Department and Fulfillment Department...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Lexisnexis, a Subsidiary of Reed Elsevier Customer Service Department...; Lexisnexis, a Subsidiary of Reed Elsevier Customer Service Department and Fulfillment Department, Including..., 2012, applicable to workers of Lexisnexis, a subsidiary of Reed Elsevier, Inc., Customer Service...

  4. Evaluating Service Quality in Universities: A Service Department Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gareth; Smith, Alison; Clarke, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to report on an in-depth exploration of service quality in an Information Technology service department in a Higher Education Institute (HEI) and to evaluate the instrument used. Design/methodology/approach: The study surveys customers using the SERVQUAL instrument, which is one of the most widely used and…

  5. Evaluating Service Quality in Universities: A Service Department Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gareth; Smith, Alison; Clarke, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to report on an in-depth exploration of service quality in an Information Technology service department in a Higher Education Institute (HEI) and to evaluate the instrument used. Design/methodology/approach: The study surveys customers using the SERVQUAL instrument, which is one of the most widely used and…

  6. Specialty and Full-Service Hospitals: A Comparative Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Kathleen; Burgess, James F; Young, Gary J

    2008-01-01

    Objective To compare the costs of physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical single specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospital competitors. Data Sources The primary data sources are the Medicare Cost Reports for 1998–2004 and hospital inpatient discharge data for three of the states where single specialty hospitals are most prevalent, Texas, California, and Arizona. The latter were obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. Additional data comes from the American Hospital Association Annual Survey Database. Study Design We identified all physician-owned cardiac, orthopedic, and surgical specialty hospitals in these three states as well as all full-service acute care hospitals serving the same market areas, defined using Dartmouth Hospital Referral Regions. We estimated a hospital cost function using stochastic frontier regression analysis, and generated hospital specific inefficiency measures. Application of t-tests of significance compared the inefficiency measures of specialty hospitals with those of full-service hospitals to make general comparisons between these classes of hospitals. Principal Findings Results do not provide evidence that specialty hospitals are more efficient than the full-service hospitals with whom they compete. In particular, orthopedic and surgical specialty hospitals appear to have significantly higher levels of cost inefficiency. Cardiac hospitals, however, do not appear to be different from competitors in this respect. Conclusions Policymakers should not embrace the assumption that physician-owned specialty hospitals produce patient care more efficiently than their full-service hospital competitors. PMID:18662170

  7. Focus on: Watsonville Community Hospital Biomedical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Shugart, B L

    1986-01-01

    The Journal of Clinical Engineering is pleased to present this FOCUS on the Biomedical Engineering Department of Watsonville Community Hospital (Watsonville, CA). Since the Department's inception in 1983, the growth of the hospital and the surrounding area has resulted in the expansion of the Department and its duties. This paper describes the responsibilities of the two-man Biomedical Engineering Department, which serves this 130-bed hospital and oversees the preventive maintenance and repair of approximately 800 pieces of equipment. In addition, the Department is involved with staff education, equipment inventory control, new equipment purchases, technical consultations, and special projects.

  8. Managing pediatric dental trauma in a hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jonathan; Sheller, Barbara; Velan, Elizabeth; Caglar, Derya; Scott, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) examine types of dental trauma presenting to a hospital emergency department (ED); (2) describe the medical services provided to these patients; and (3) quantify time spent during ED encounters for dental trauma emergencies. Records of 265 patients who presented to the ED with dental trauma over a three-year period were reviewed. Demographics, injury types, triage acuity, pain scores, and dental/medical treatment and times were analyzed. Patient demographics and injury types were similar to previous studies. Eighty-two percent of patients received mid-level triage scores; 41 percent of patients had moderate to severe pain. The most frequently provided medical services were administration of analgesics and/or prescriptions (78 percent). The mean times were: 51 minutes waiting for a physician; 55 minutes with dentists; and 176 minutes total time. Higher triage acuity and pain levels resulted in significantly longer wait times for physician assessment. Dental evaluation, including treatment, averaged 32 percent of time spent at the hospital. A dental clinic is the most efficient venue for treating routine dental trauma. Patients in this study spent the majority of time waiting for physicians and receiving nondental services. Most patients required no medical intervention beyond prescriptions commonly used in dental practice.

  9. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  10. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  11. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  12. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  13. 42 CFR 412.50 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.50 Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or...

  14. Patient satisfaction with services of the outpatient department

    PubMed Central

    Mohd, Athar; Chakravarty, Abhijit

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients' satisfaction is a useful measure to provide an indicator of quality in healthcare and thus needs to be measured frequently. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the level of satisfaction of patients attending the Outpatient Department of a Hospital. Methods Study was conducted by using a pre-structured questionnaire with 120 samples. Samples were further stratified into sub-populations of Officers, Junior Commissioned Officers (JCOs) and Other Ranks (ORs) including dependents as study population. Results JCOs predominantly expressed lower satisfaction judgement with several attributes. Overall satisfaction judgement with Outpatient Department services were rated lower by JCOs (2.56) when compared with Officers and ORs (3.10), the difference being statistically significant. Conclusion Statistically significant differences have been identified by this study against various study attributes as well as overall impression towards OPD services among the study groups, which need to be addressed by the hospital leadership to achieve consumer delight. PMID:25378776

  15. 42 CFR 412.509 - Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly or under arrangement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Furnishing of inpatient hospital services directly..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Prospective Payment System for Long-Term Care Hospitals § 412.509 Furnishing of inpatient hospital...

  16. 42 CFR 482.2 - Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.2 Section 482.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS General Provisions § 482.2 Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals. (a) The services...

  17. 42 CFR 482.2 - Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.2 Section 482.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS General Provisions § 482.2 Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals. (a) The services...

  18. 42 CFR 482.2 - Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.2 Section 482.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS General Provisions § 482.2 Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals. (a) The services...

  19. 42 CFR 482.2 - Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.2 Section 482.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS General Provisions § 482.2 Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals. (a) The services...

  20. 42 CFR 482.2 - Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospitals. 482.2 Section 482.2 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CONDITIONS OF PARTICIPATION FOR HOSPITALS General Provisions § 482.2 Provision of emergency services by nonparticipating hospitals. (a) The services...

  1. The Impact of Hospital Closures and Hospital and Population Characteristics on Increasing Emergency Department Volume: A Geographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brendan G.; Smith, Tony E.; Tran, Van C.; Polsky, Daniel; Branas, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Emergency visits are rising nationally, whereas the number of emergency departments is shrinking. However, volume has not increased uniformly at all emergency departments. It is unclear what factors account for this variability in emergency volume growth rates. The objective of this study was to test the association of hospital and population characteristics and the effect of hospital closures with increases in emergency department volume. The study team analyzed emergency department volume at New York State hospitals from 2004 to 2010 using data from cost reports and administrative databases. Multivariate regression was used to evaluate characteristics associated with emergency volume growth. Spatial analytics and distances between hospitals were used in calculating the predicted impact of hospital closures on emergency department use. Among the 192 New York hospitals open from 2004 to 2010, the mean annual increase in emergency department visits was 2.7%, but the range was wide (-5.5% to 11.3%). Emergency volume increased nearly twice as fast at tertiary referral centers (4.8%) and nonurban hospitals (3.7% versus urban at 2.1%) after adjusting for other characteristics. The effect of hospital closures also strongly predicted variation in growth. Emergency volume is increasing faster at specific hospitals: tertiary referral centers, nonurban hospitals, and those near hospital closures. This study provides an understanding of how emergency volume varies among hospitals and predicts the effect of hospital closures in a statewide region. Understanding the impact of these factors on emergency department use is essential to ensure that these populations have access to critical emergency services. (Population Health Management 2015;18:459–466) PMID:25658768

  2. Bone bank service in Odense, Denmark. Audit of the first ten years with bone banking at the Department of Orthopaedics, Odense University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, H T; Larsen, S; Andersen, M; Ovesen, O

    2001-01-01

    There has been an increase in the demand for allograft bone in recent years. The Odense University Hospital bone bank has been in function since 1990, and this paper outlines our results during the 10 year period 1990-1999. Potential donors were screened by contemporary banking techniques which include a social history, donor serum tests for HIV, hepatitis B and C, and graft microbiology. The bones were stored at -80 degrees C. No type of secondary sterilisation was made. 423 femoral heads were approved and donated to 300 patients,1-6 heads/operation. The allografts have been used mainly to reconstruct defects at revision hip arthroplasty (34%), and for fracture surgery (24%). 7 % of all transplanted patients were reoperated because of infection. In the hip revision group the infection rate was 4 %. There were no cases of disease transmission. During the 10 year period there was a change in the clinical use of the allografts. In the first years the allografts were mainly used for spinal fusion surgery, but today the majority are used in hip revision and fracture surgery. The clinical results correspond to those reported in larger international series.

  3. [Effectiveness of psychiatric departments at general hospitals].

    PubMed

    Weise, K

    1986-11-01

    A few statistics referring to the psychiatric hospital of the Karl Marx University in Leipzig, which has taken over the function of a local psychiatric unit providing ward and semi-clinical treatment for the inhabitants of an urban district with 110,000 residents, are presented as an index of the work performed and success achieved by this sort of medical facility. The fact that full ward treatment with 64 beds is available is an important aspects. Transfers to specialized psychiatric hospitals are rare exceptions caused almost exclusively by a lack of in-house complementary facilities.

  4. Strategic management of Public Hospitals' medical services.

    PubMed

    Hao, Aimin; Yi, Tao; Li, Xia; Wei, Lei; Huang, Pei; Xu, Xinzhou; Yi, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The quality of medical services provided by competing public hospitals is the primary consideration of the public in determining the selection of a specific hospital for treatment. The main objective of strategic planning is to improve the quality of public hospital medical services. This paper provides an introduction to the history, significance, principles and practices of public hospital medical service strategy, as well as advancing the opinion that public hospital service strategy must not merely aim to produce but actually result in the highest possible level of quality, convenience, efficiency and patient satisfaction.

  5. Institutional Effectiveness Assessment Process, 1992-93. Executive Summary. Hospitality and Service Occupations Division, Food Sciences Department, Food Production Program, Food Production Management Program, Pastry and Specialty Baking Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Seattle Community Coll., Washington.

    In the 1992-93 academic year, the Hospitality and Food Sciences Department at South Seattle Community College conducted surveys of current and former students and local foodservice employers to determine the level of satisfaction with Department programs. Specifically, the surveys focused on four key outcomes: determining the extent to which…

  6. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National Aeronautics and Space...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Part XVII Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration Federal Acquisition Regulation; Semiannual Regulatory Agenda ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE/GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION/ NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (FAR) DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL...

  7. Markets for hospital services in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Nakamba, Pamela; Hanson, Kara; McPake, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Hospital reforms involving the introduction of measures to increase competition in hospital markets are being implemented in a range of low and middle-income countries. However, little is understood about the operation of hospital markets outside the USA and the UK. This paper assesses the degree of competition for hospital services in two hospital markets in Zambia (Copperbelt and Midlands), and the implications for prices, quality and efficiency. We found substantial differences among different hospital types in prices, costs and quality, suggesting that the hospital service market is a segmented market. The two markets differ significantly in their degree of competition, with the high cost inpatient services market in Copperbelt relatively more competitive than that in the Midlands market. The implications of these differences are discussed in terms of the potential for competition to improve hospital performance, the impact of market structure on equity of access, and how the government should address the problem of the mine hospitals.

  8. Abortion services at hospitals in Istanbul.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Mary Lou

    2017-04-01

    Despite the existence of a liberal law on abortion in Turkey, there is growing evidence that actually securing an abortion in Istanbul may prove difficult. This study aimed to determine whether or not state hospitals and private hospitals that accept state health insurance in Istanbul are providing abortion services and for what indications. Between October and December 2015, a mystery patient telephone survey of 154 hospitals, 43 public and 111 private, in Istanbul was conducted. 14% of the state hospitals in Istanbul perform abortions without restriction as to reason provided in the current law while 60% provide the service if there is a medical necessity. A quarter of state hospitals in Istanbul do not provide abortion services at all. 48.6% of private hospitals that accept the state health insurance also provide for abortion without restriction while 10% do not provide abortion services under any circumstances. State and private hospitals in Istanbul are not providing abortion services to the full extent allowed under the law. The low numbers of state hospitals offering abortions without restriction indicates a de facto privatization of the service. This same trend is also visible in many private hospitals partnering with the state that do not provide abortion care. While many women may choose a private provider, the lack of provision of abortion care at state hospitals and those private hospitals working with the state leaves women little option but to purchase these services from private providers at some times subtantial costs.

  9. Measuring service line competitive position. A systematic methodology for hospitals.

    PubMed

    Studnicki, J

    1991-01-01

    To mount a broad effort aimed at improving their competitive position for some service or group of services, hospitals have begun to pursue product line management techniques. A few hospitals have even reorganized completely under the product line framework. The benefits include focusing accountability for operations and results, facilitating coordination between departments and functions, stimulating market segmentation, and promoting rigorous examination of new and existing programs. As part of its strategic planning process, a suburban Baltimore hospital developed a product line management methodology with six basic steps: (1) define the service lines (which they did by grouping all existing diagnosis-related groups into 35 service lines), (2) determine the contribution of each service line to total inpatient volume, (3) determine trends in service line volumes (by comparing data over time), (4) derive a useful comparison group (competing hospitals or groups of hospitals with comparable size, scope of services, payer mix, and financial status), (5) review multiple time frames, and (6) summarize the long- and short-term performance of the hospital's service lines to focus further analysis. This type of systematic and disciplined analysis can become part of a permanent strategic intelligence program. When hospitals have such a program in place, their market research, planning, budgeting, and operations will be tied together in a true management decision support system.

  10. North side. Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North side. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Physiotherapy & Electrocardiograph Department Building, North of Building No. 516, East of corridor connecting Building No. 511 to Building No. 515, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  11. 7 CFR 652.6 - Department delivery of technical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Department delivery of technical services. 652.6 Section 652.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SUPPORT ACTIVITIES TECHNICAL SERVICE PROVIDER ASSISTANCE General Provisions § 652.6 Department delivery...

  12. Estimating Uncompensated Care Charges at Rural Hospital Emergency Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Kevin J.; Moore, Charity G.; Probst, Janice C.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Rural hospitals face multiple financial burdens. Due to federal law, emergency departments (ED) provide a gateway for uninsured and self-pay patients to gain access to treatment. It is unknown how much uncompensated care in rural hospitals is due to ED visits. Purpose: To develop a national estimate of uncompensated care from patients…

  13. Child Care Services Provided by Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Women's Bureau (DOL), Washington, DC.

    In an attempt to determine the extent to which hospitals had established child care services for their personnel, a survey was conducted of 3,000 hospitals with 100 beds or more. Out of nearly 2,000 hospitals which responded, 98 were operating child care centers, with about 500 more planning or at least showing interest in such a program. The…

  14. [Hospitalization charges for patients in the Neurology Department of Lomé Teaching Hospital].

    PubMed

    Balogou, Agnon Ayélola Koffi; Tossa, Kokou Robert; Kowu, Akouavi; Belo, Mofou; Grunitzky, Kodjo Eric

    2004-01-01

    For many years the cost of health care in sub-Saharan Africa was largely covered by the State. But in September 1987, in view of the economical problems those countries had to face, the WHO regional committee adopted the "Bainako's Initiative" resolution. This meant that from then on everybody was to pay for their health expenses. The purpose of this prospective study which was conducted from March 1, 1996 to February 28, 1999 among 316 patients was to assess hospitalization charges incurred for patients in the Neurology Department of Lomé Teaching Hospital with a view to improve the quality of the services provided and the accessibility of care. A questionnaire was used and every expense relating to the hospitalization of each patient was recorded on a daily basis. The average cost is 389,586 (48,485 FCFA for an average stay of 19.7 (2.5 days. This average cost is 19 times the minimal monthly salary of a state employee. It can be broken down as follows: Accommodation costs represent 52%, medical acts and tests 20.3% while drug costs amount to 21.2% and accompanist expenses represent 6.5%. The average cost of HIV-infected patients is 635,017 (190,624 FCFA for an average stay of 57 (12.9 days. The average cost of HIV-negative patients is 257,354 (12,837 FCFA for an average stay of 24.4 (1.8 days. To improve the quality of the services and the accessibility of care, it is necessary to prescribe and make drugs available in their generic form. After a few days in hospital, some disabling diseases as strokes, myelopathy and myopathy should be treated at home to reduce the length of stay in hospital or in cheaper places such as prolonged accommodation centres. Copyright John Libbey Eurotext 2003.

  15. Assessing hospital performance for acute myocardial infarction: how should emergency department transfers be attributed.

    PubMed

    Samadashvili, Zaza; Hannan, Edward L; Cozzens, Kimberly; Walford, Gary; Jacobs, Alice K; Berger, Peter B; Holmes, David R; Venditti, Ferdinand J; Curtis, Jeptha

    2015-03-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services publicly reports risk-standardized mortality rates (RSMRs) to assess quality of care for hospitals that treat acute myocardial infarction patients, and the outcomes for inpatient transfers are attributed to transferring hospitals. However, emergency department (ED) transfers are currently ignored and therefore attributed to receiving hospitals. New York State administrative data were used to develop a statistical model similar to the one used by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to risk-adjust hospital 30-day mortality rates. RSMRs were calculated and outliers were identified when ED transfers were attributed to: (1) the transferring hospital and (2) the receiving hospital. Differences in hospital outlier status and RSMR tertile between the 2 attribution methods were noted for hospitals performing and not performing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs). Although both methods of attribution identified 3 high outlier non-PCI hospitals, only 2 of those hospitals were identified by both methods, and each method identified a different hospital as a third outlier. Also, when transfers were attributed to the referring hospital, 1 non-PCI hospital was identified as a low outlier, and no non-PCI hospitals were identified as a low outlier with the other attribution method. About one sixth of all hospitals changed their tertile status. Most PCI hospitals (89%) that changed status moved to a higher (worse RSMR) tertile, whereas the majority of non-PCI hospitals (68%) that changed status were moved to a lower (better) RSMR tertile when ED transfers were attributed to the referring hospital. Hospital quality assessments for acute myocardial infarction are affected by whether ED transfers are assigned to the transferring or receiving hospital. The pros and cons of this choice should be considered.

  16. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Organ Procurement Organization Reporting and Communication; Transplant Outcome Measures and Documentation Requirements; Electronic Health Record (EHR) Incentive Programs; Payment to Nonexcepted Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital; Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program; Establishment of Payment Rates Under the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule for Nonexcepted Items and Services Furnished by an Off-Campus Provider-Based Department of a Hospital. Final rule with comment period and interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2016-11-14

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2017 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, in this final rule with comment period, we are making changes to tolerance thresholds for clinical outcomes for solid organ transplant programs; to Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs) definitions, outcome measures, and organ transport documentation; and to the Medicare and Medicaid Electronic Health Record Incentive Programs. We also are removing the HCAHPS Pain Management dimension from the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing (VBP) Program. In addition, we are implementing section 603 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 relating to payment for certain items and services furnished by certain off-campus provider-based departments of a provider. In this document, we also are issuing an interim final rule with comment period to establish the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule payment rates for the nonexcepted items and services billed by a nonexcepted off-campus provider-based department of a hospital in accordance with the provisions of section 603.

  17. Cost allocation patterns between hospital inpatient and outpatient departments.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, K

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study examines changes in hospitals' cost allocation patterns between inpatient and outpatient departments in response to the implementation of the prospective payment system. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTINGS. The analysis was carried out using data for 3,961 hospitals obtained from the Medicare Cost Reports and from the American Hospital Association for the years 1984 through 1988. STUDY DESIGN. A total operating cost function was estimated on the two outputs of discharges and outpatient visits. The estimation results were instrumental in disaggregating costs into inpatient and outpatient components. This was done cross-sectionally for each of the five years. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Comparison of this cost breakdown with that of hospital revenue provides evidence of distinct patterns in which nonteaching, rural, and small hospitals increasingly allocated greater costs to outpatient departments than did large, urban, and teaching hospitals. CONCLUSIONS. The results suggest that small rural hospitals turned to the outpatient side in the face of tough economic challenges over the period of study. Because differences in cost allocation patterns occur by particular hospital category, analyses that rely on accounting cost or revenue data in order to identify cost differences among those same categories may come to erroneous conclusions. In particular, because teaching hospitals apportion costs more heavily on the inpatient side, cost allocation differences cause upward bias in the PPS medical education adjustment. PMID:8063566

  18. Planned Parenthood services in teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    1973-06-01

    As a contribution to the continuing discussion stimulated by the WHO Study Group on education and training for family planning in health services (December 1971, Geneva), the Regional Medical Executive Committee of IPPF commissioned articles on planned parenthood services and training in the university hospital context in both Austria and Belgium. In Vienna, Graz, and Innsbruck medical students receive regular instruction in the physiology and pathology of reproduction and contraceptive methods. Training in methods of fertility regulation is integrated into the gynecology curriculum in both lectures and group discussion. Planned parenthood and social medicine are at present not essential examination subjects. In obligatory practical work in gynecology clinics there are only 2 periods of 6 days in which the student can obtain only a very superficial picture of gynecology and obstetrics. If a qualified physician remains in a university clinic to specialize in these fields, instruction includes complete training in family planning with the possibility of comprehensive practical experience. In Belgium the introduction of planned parenthood into departmental policy and the attainment of national uniformity in thinking and application are recent, due mainly to the coincidence the present chairmen of most departments of obstetrics and gynecology regard planned parenthood as socially indispensable. It is imperative that the education and training of both providers and users be not limited to technical knowledge but expanded to include the all- important psychological, socioeconomic, and health aspects and implications of sexuality. The theory and practice of family planning must be transmitted to the mediical profession, the paramedical professions, and such nonmedical professions as pharmacy. It is noted that the most important new accomplishments of the teaching hospitals lie in the provision of planned parenthood service.

  19. Marketing hospital wellness products to service companies.

    PubMed

    Andrus, D M; Paul, R; Michaud, J

    1995-01-01

    The authors examine service firm employee attitudes towards wellness programs among twenty-three service companies in three states. Program components that were considered to be most desirable by service industry workers are identified in a regression model. The results indicate that hospital administrators need to adopt a marketing approach during the design phase of employee wellness programs.

  20. 7 CFR 652.6 - Department delivery of technical services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Department delivery of technical services. 652.6... General Provisions § 652.6 Department delivery of technical services. (a) The Department may enter into a... technical assistance services that accelerate conservation program delivery. Related technical...

  1. 77 FR 17052 - Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... AGENCY Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of... between the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of..., Information Technology and Resources Management Division (7502P), Office of Pesticide Programs, Environmental...

  2. [Concept of an interdisciplinary emergency department at the Schwarzwald-Baar Hospital].

    PubMed

    Kumle, B; Merz, S; Geiger, M; Kugel, K; Fink, U

    2014-10-01

    Numerous hospitals were combined years ago into a new Central Hospital for cost reasons in the Schwarzwald-Baar region. This also suggested the idea of a large central emergency department. The concept of a central emergency department is an organizational challenge, since they are directly engaged in the organizational structure of all medical departments that are involved in emergency treatment. Such a concept can only be enforced if it is supported by hospital management and all parties are willing to accept interdisciplinary and interprofessional work. In this paper, the concept of a central emergency department in a tertiary care hospital which was rebuilt as an organizationally independent unit is described. Collaborations with various departments, emergency services, and local physicians are highlighted. The processes of a central emergency department with an integrated admission department and personnel structures are described. The analysis of the concept after almost a year has shown that the integration into the clinic has been successful, the central emergency department has proven itself as a central hub and has been accepted as a unit within the hospital.

  3. Hospital pharmacists' evaluation of drug wholesaler services.

    PubMed

    Allen, W O; Ryan, M R; Roberts, K B

    1983-10-01

    Services provided by drug wholesalers were evaluated by hospital pharmacists. A survey was mailed to 1500 randomly selected pharmacy directors. Respondents indicated availability and use of 26 customer services. Pharmacists rated the services that they used on the basis of importance of the service and satisfaction with the service. The 644 returned questionnaires indicated that most services were available to a large majority of respondents. Most services used were rated as important or essential. Most respondents were satisfied with wholesaler services; the service with which the most respondents were dissatisfied was stocking of pharmaceuticals in single-unit packaging. Of other services that were widely used and rated important, prompt crediting for delivery errors, few out-of-stock items, frequent pickup of return merchandise, and stocking of injectable pharmaceuticals received low satisfaction ratings. Same-day delivery service and emergency delivery of prescription items were unavailable to more than 40% of respondents. Hospital pharmacists were generally satisfied with services provided by drug wholesalers. Wholesalers should be aware of the particular service needs of hospital pharmacists, and further studies of these needs should be conducted.

  4. Food production and service in UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Jones, Eleri; Redmond, Elizabeth; Hewedi, Mahmoud; Wingert, Andreas; Gad El Rab, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to apply value stream mapping holistically to hospital food production/service systems focused on high-quality food. Multiple embedded case study of three (two private-sector and one public-sector) hospitals in the UK. The results indicated various issues affecting hospital food production including: the menu and nutritional considerations; food procurement; food production; foodservice; patient perceptions/expectations. Value stream mapping is a new approach for food production systems in UK hospitals whether private or public hospitals. The paper identifies opportunities for enhancing hospital food production systems. The paper provides a theoretical basis for process enhancement of hospital food production and the provision of high-quality hospital food.

  5. Hospital Department Cost and Employment Increases: 1980-92

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, Jerry; Butrica, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Hospital costs have continued to rise at rates well in excess of inflation generally, even after the introduction of Medicare's per case prospective payment system (PPS). This article uses a hospital subscriber microcost reporting system to show trends in costs, wages, labor hours, and outputs for more than 50 individual departments from 1980-92. Descriptive results show dramatic growth in the operating room, catheter lab, and other technologically driven cost centers. Administrative costs also increased rapidly through 1988, but slowed thereafter. The paperwork billing and collection burden of hospitals is estimated to be $6 billion in 1992, or approximately 4 percent of total expenses. PMID:10153468

  6. Workplace violence prevention programs in hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Casteel, Carri; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Nocera, MaryAlice; Goldmacher, Suzi; OHagan, Emily; Blando, James; Valiante, David; Gillen, Marion; Harrison, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Hospital violence is a growing concern, yet little is known about existing programs. This study compared workplace violence programs in high-risk emergency departments among a representative sample of 116 hospitals in California and 50 hospitals in New Jersey. Information was collected through interviews, a facility walk-through, and review of written policies, procedures, and training material. Programs were scored on the components of training, policies and procedures, security, and environmental approaches. California had significantly higher scores for training and policies and procedures, but there was no difference for security and environmental approaches. Program component scores were not highly correlated. For example, hospitals with a strong training program were not more likely to have strong policies and procedures. Most hospitals in California and New Jersey had implemented a workplace violence prevention program, but important gaps were found.

  7. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  8. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  9. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  10. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  11. 48 CFR 831.7001-4 - Medical services and hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospital care. 831.7001-4 Section 831.7001-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... and Procedures 831.7001-4 Medical services and hospital care. (a) VA may pay the customary student... Government. (b) When the customary student's health fee does not cover medical services or hospital care, but...

  12. [Relevance of traditional hospitalizations in an ophthalmology department].

    PubMed

    Gaujoux, T; Offret, O; Renard, G; Santini, Y; Chauvaud, D; Bourges, J-L

    2008-05-01

    Ophthalmological indications for traditional hospitalizations are not clearly established and should be updated with respect to both healthcare quality and economic considerations. We therefore analyzed the data of patients hospitalized in an ophthalmology department. We prospectively analyzed the medical and socioeconomic charts of all patients hospitalized during a 2-month period (December 2006 and January 2007) in a single ophthalmology department. Over the 2 months, 349 patients were admitted (mean stay, 3 days), 324 of whom were operated. The main causes of admission were retinal detachments (n=103), injuries (n=33), endothelial cell failure (n=27), cataract (n=27), high ocular pressure (n=23), and corneal abscess (n=17). Admission was mainly guided by the surgeon's habits (n=135, 39%) and was not medically relevant but was generally motivated by financial considerations. Other hospital admissions were medically justified (intravenous injections, head positioning) but the hospitalization of patients living far from the hospital (n=46; 13%) could be limited by the development of housing made available to patients. Ophthalmological hospitalization is not always medically relevant and often is based on financial or housing constraints. More than half of the classical admissions should be switched to ambulatory patient care by adapting financial compensations to surgical costs or providing outpatient housing.

  13. A New Model for the Organizational Structure of Medical Record Departments in Hospitals in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddasi, Hamid; Hosseini, Azamossadat; Sheikhtaheri, Abbas

    2006-01-01

    The organizational structure of medical record departments in Iran is not appropriate for the efficient management of healthcare information. In addition, there is no strong information management division to provide comprehensive information management services in hospitals in Iran. Therefore, a suggested model was designed based on four main axes: 1) specifications of a Health Information Management Division, 2) specifications of a Healthcare Information Management Department, 3) the functions of the Healthcare Information Management Department, and 4) the units of the Healthcare Information Management Department. The validity of the model was determined through use of the Delphi technique. The results of the validation process show that the majority of experts agree with the model and consider it to be appropriate and applicable for hospitals in Iran. The model is therefore recommended for hospitals in Iran. PMID:18066362

  14. Emergency department transfers and transfer relationships in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Dana R; Mutter, Ryan L; Houchens, Robert L; Barrett, Marguerite L; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-02-01

    The objective was to describe transfers out of hospital-based emergency departments (EDs) in the United States and to identify different characteristics of sending and receiving hospitals, travel distance during transfer, disposition on arrival to the second hospital, and median number of transfer partners among sending hospitals. Emergency department records were linked at transferring hospitals to ED and inpatient records at receiving hospitals in nine U.S. states using the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) State Emergency Department Databases and State Inpatient Databases, the American Hospital Association Annual Survey, and the Trauma Information Exchange Program. Using the Clinical Classification Software (CCS) to categorize conditions, the 50 disease categories with the highest transfer rates were studied, and these were then placed into nine clinical groups. Records were included where both sending and receiving records were available; these data were tabulated to describe ED transfer patterns, hospital-to-hospital distances, final patient disposition, and number of transfer partners. A total of 97,021 ED transfer encounters were included in the analysis from the 50 highest transfer rate disease categories. Among these, transfer rates ranged from 1% to 13%. Circulatory conditions made up about half of all transfers. Receiving hospitals were more likely to be nonprofit, teaching, trauma, and urban and have more beds with greater specialty coverage and more advanced diagnostic and therapeutic resources. The median transfer distance was 23 miles, with 25% traveling more than 40 to 50 miles. About 8% of transferred encounters were discharged from the second ED, but that varied from 0.6% to 53% across the 50 conditions. Sending hospitals had a median of seven transfer partners across all conditions and between one and four per clinical group. Among high-transfer conditions in U.S. EDs, patients are often transferred great distances, more

  15. Hospitalization and emergency department visits among seniors receiving homecare: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew A; Carusone, Soo B Chan; Willison, Kathleen; Babineau, Tamara J; Smith, Stephanie D; Abernathy, Tom; Marrie, Tom; Loeb, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Background Despite the recent growth in home health services, data on clinical outcomes and acute health care utilization among older adults receiving homecare services are sparse. Obtaining such data is particularly relevant in Ontario where an increasing number of frail seniors receiving homecare are awaiting placement in long-term care facilities. In order to determine the feasibility of a large-scale study, we conducted a pilot study to assess utilization of acute health care services among seniors receiving homecare to determine associated clinical outcomes. Methods This prospective cohort study followed forty-seven seniors admitted to homecare by two homecare agencies in Hamilton, Ontario over a 12-month period. Demographic information and medical history were collected at baseline, and patients were followed until either termination of homecare services, death, or end of study. The primary outcome was hospitalization. Secondary outcomes included emergency department visits that did not result in hospitalization and death. Rates of hospitalization and emergency department visits without admission were calculated, and univariate analyses were performed to test for potential risk factors. Survival curves for accumulative rates of hospitalization and emergency department visits were created. Results 312 seniors were eligible for the study, of which 123 (39%) agreed to participate initially. After communicating with the research nurse, of the 123 who agreed to participate initially, 47 (38%) were enrolled in the study. Eleven seniors were hospitalized during 3,660 days of follow-up for a rate of 3.0 incident hospitalizations per 1,000 homecare-days. Eleven seniors had emergency department visits that did not result in hospitalization, for a rate of 3.3 incident emergency department visits per 1,000 homecare-days. There were no factors significantly associated with hospitalization or emergency department visits when adjustment was made for multiple comparisons

  16. Reorganizing departments of psychiatry, hospitals, and medical centers for the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Schreter, R K

    1998-11-01

    Market forces are reshaping health care, transforming it from a public service into a product that is sold in a highly competitive marketplace. This transformation has been particularly disruptive for hospital departments of psychiatry and medical centers that were the early targets for managed care efforts at cost containment. To survive, health care institutions have embarked on a clinical and administrative re-engineering process. The author describes a series of steps for reconfiguring departments, hospitals, and medical centers as they enter the 21st century. The steps include identifying the leadership team, formulating a mission statement and strategic plan, creating a legal entity capable of achieving the organization's goals, drawing up an organizational chart, and developing the provider network. Other steps in the process include enhancing the continuum of services offered, developing administrative capability, dealing with managed care, paying attention to fundamental business practices, integrating psychiatric services into the health care system, and marketing psychiatric services.

  17. Modelling coordination in hospital emergency departments through social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Liaquat; Kit Guan, Danny Chun

    2012-04-01

    Coordination theory provides a theoretical framework for analysing complex processes of project groups working towards a common goal. In this study, we explore the relationship between coordination and social networks for the development of a network-based coordination model. This model is applied to measure the performance and quality of complex and dynamic project coordination such as in hospital emergency departments. The dataset used for the study was collected by the 2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey--a national probability sample survey of visits to emergency and outpatient departments of non-Federal, short-stay and general hospitals in the United States. Using social network analysis, this study allows us to understand the possible causes of inefficient coordination performance and coordination quality resulting in access blocks. © 2012 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2012.

  18. 42 CFR 403.321 - State systems for hospital outpatient services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State systems for hospital outpatient services. 403.321 Section 403.321 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... Control Systems § 403.321 State systems for hospital outpatient services. CMS may approve a...

  19. A new design for the department of information services.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, M

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and function of the department of Information Services at Sacred Heart Health System in Eugene, Oregon. This department has gone through a process of reorganization. The new department design features self-directed work teams with a strong customer service orientation; a mentor role stressing staff development; and a skill-based compensation system.

  20. Do hospital service areas and hospital referral regions define discrete health care populations?

    PubMed

    Kilaru, Austin S; Wiebe, Douglas J; Karp, David N; Love, Jennifer; Kallan, Michael J; Carr, Brendan G

    2015-06-01

    Effective measurement of health care quality, access, and cost for populations requires an accountable geographic unit. Although Hospital Service Areas (HSAs) and Hospital Referral Regions (HRRs) have been extensively used in health services research, it is unknown whether these units accurately describe patterns of hospital use for patients living within them. To evaluate the ability of HSAs, HRRs, and counties to define discrete health care populations. Cross-sectional geographic analysis of hospital admissions. All hospital admissions during the year 2011 in Washington, Arizona, and Florida. The main outcomes of interest were 3 metrics that describe patient movement across HSA, HRR, and county boundaries: localization index, market share index, and net patient flow. Regression models tested the association of these metrics with different HSA characteristics. For 45% of HSAs, fewer than half of the patients were admitted to hospitals located in their HSA of residence. For 16% of HSAs, more than half of the treated patients lived elsewhere. There was an equivalent degree of movement across county boundaries but less movement across HRR boundaries. Patients living in populous, urban HSAs with multiple, large, and teaching hospitals tended to remain for inpatient care. Patients admitted through the emergency department tended to receive care at local hospitals relative to other patients. HSAs and HRRs are geographic units commonly used in health services research yet vary in their ability to describe where patients receive hospital care. Geographic models may need to account for differences between emergent and nonemergent care.

  1. Availability of pediatric services and equipment in emergency departments: United States, 2006.

    PubMed

    Schappert, Susan M; Bhuiya, Farida

    2012-03-01

    This report presents data on the availability of pediatric services, expertise, and supplies for treating pediatric emergencies in U.S. hospitals. Data in this report are from the Emergency Pediatric Services and Equipment Supplement (EPSES), a self-administered questionnaire added to the 2006 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). NHAMCS samples nonfederal short-stay and general hospitals in the United States. Sample data were weighted to produce annual estimates of pediatric services, expertise, and equipment availability in hospital emergency departments (EDs). In 2006, only 7.2 percent of hospital EDs had all recommended pediatric emergency supplies, and 45.6 percent had at least 85.0 percent of recommended supplies. EDs in children's hospitals and hospitals with pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) were more likely to meet guidelines for pediatric emergency department services, expertise, and supplies. About 74.0 percent of these facilities had at least 85.0 percent of recommended supplies, compared with 42.4 percent of other facilities. Among children's hospitals and hospitals with PICUs, 66.0 percent had 24 hours a day, 7 days a week access to a board-certified pediatric emergency medicine attending physician; such access was uncommon in other types of hospitals. In general, little change was noted in the availability of emergency pediatric supplies between 2002-2003, when the initial EPSES was conducted, and 2006.

  2. 42 CFR 410.66 - Emergency outpatient services furnished by a nonparticipating hospital and services furnished in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency outpatient services furnished by a nonparticipating hospital and services furnished in a foreign country. 410.66 Section 410.66 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...

  3. Security aspects of electronic data interchange between a state health department and a hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, J A; Klockner, Rocke; Ladd-Wilson, Stephen; Zechnich, Andrew; Bangs, Christopher; Kohn, Melvin A

    2004-01-01

    Electronic emergency department reporting provides the potential for enhancing local and state surveillance capabilities for a wide variety of syndromes and reportable conditions. The task of protecting data confidentiality and integrity while developing electronic data interchange between a hospital emergency department and a state public health department proved more complex than expected. This case study reports on the significant challenges that had to be resolved to accomplish this goal; these included application restrictions and incompatibilities, technical malfunctions, changing standards, and insufficient dedicated resources. One of the key administrative challenges was that of coordinating project security with enterprise security. The original project has evolved into an ongoing pilot, with the health department currently receiving secure data from the emergency department at four-hour intervals. Currently, planning is underway to add more emergency departments to the project.

  4. UHS development and hospital services rationing.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José Mendes

    2009-01-01

    We analyze Brazilian health system in comparative perspective. Middle income beneficiaries migration to pre-paid private insurance makes Brazilian case similar to United States. Public hospital services delivery shows an important retrenchment enhanced by demographic growth and new expectations due to constitutional definitions. Retrenchment is selective and concentrates on obstetric and clinic services and private for-profit services. To ensure equal access it is necessary to improve public spending; diminish out-of-pocket spending; develop organizational reforms; improve government capacity.

  5. Analysis of in-hospital consultations with the department of internal medicine.

    PubMed

    Montero Ruiz, E; Rebollar Merino, A; García Sánchez, M; Culebras López, A; Barbero Allende, J M; López Álvarez, J

    2014-05-01

    An important but understudied activity of the departments of internal medicine (IM) is the in-hospital consultations. We analyzed the requests for in-hospital consultation with IM and the potential differences between the consultations of medical and surgical departments. This was an 8-month observational prospective study that analyzed demographic variables related to the origin of the interconsultation, comorbidity, length of stay and hospital mortality, emergency, admission-consultation request delay, appropriateness (not appropriate if another department was consulted for the same reason or if the pathology behind the consultation was that of the requesting service) and, for patients who underwent surgery, whether it was requested before or after the surgery. During the study, 215 in-hospital consultations were conducted (27 consultations/month). The mean age of the patients was 69.8 years (women, 50%). Some 30.7% were requested by medical departments and 69.3% by surgical departments. Thirteen percent of the in-hospital consultations were duplicated. The department of IM was not the appropriate department consulted in 23.3% of cases (13.0% of the cases requested consultations for the same reason with another department; in 14.3% of the cases, the pathology was that of requesting department). More in-hospital consultations were conducted on Mondays and Fridays than on Thursdays (25.1% and 23.7% versus 15.3%, respectively; p=.03). The delay between admission and the request for interconsultation was of 12.6 days. Some 90.7% of the in-hospital consultations for patients undergoing surgery were requested after the intervention. There were no differences in the characteristics of the in-hospital consultations between the medical and surgical departments. In-hospital consultations directed at IM are frequently duplicate, are not well directed at the appropriate department and their urgency is incorrectly assessed. These characteristics are similar for the

  6. Emergency Department of a Rural Hospital in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tara; Gaus, David; Herrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is a paucity of data studying patients and complaints presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in low- and middle-income countries. The town of Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM) is located in the northwestern highlands of Ecuador. Hospital PVM (HPVM) is a rural teaching hospital providing family medicine residency training. These physicians provide around-the-clock acute medical care in HPVM’s ED. This study provides a first look at a functioning ED in rural Latin America by reviewing one year of ED visits to HPVM. Methods All ED visits between April 14, 2013, and April 13, 2014, were included and analyzed, totaling 1,239 patient visits. Data were collected from their electronic medical record and exported into a de-identified Excel® database where it was sorted and categorized. Variables included age, gender, mode of arrival, insurance type, month and day of the week of the service, chief complaint, laboratory and imaging requests, and disposition. We performed descriptive statistics, and where possible, comparisons using Student’s T or chi-square, as appropriate. Results Of the 1239 total ED visits, 48% were males and 52% females; 93% of the visits were ambulatory, and 7% came by ambulance. Sixty-three percent of the patients had social security insurance. The top three chief complaints were abdominal pain (25.5%), fever (15.1%) and trauma (10.8%). Healthcare providers requested labs on 71.3% of patients and imaging on 43.2%. The most frequently requested imaging studies were chest radiograph (14.9%), upper extremity radiograph (9.4%), and electrocardiogram (9.0%). There was no seasonal or day-of-week variability to number of ED patients. The chief complaint of human or animal bite made it more likely the patient would be admitted, and the chief complaint of traumatic injury made it more likely the patient would be transferred. Conclusion Analysis of patients presenting to a rural ED in Ecuador contributes to the global study of acute care in

  7. Emergency Department of a Rural Hospital in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tara; Gaus, David; Herrera, Diego

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of data studying patients and complaints presenting to emergency departments (EDs) in low- and middle-income countries. The town of Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM) is located in the northwestern highlands of Ecuador. Hospital PVM (HPVM) is a rural teaching hospital providing family medicine residency training. These physicians provide around-the-clock acute medical care in HPVM's ED. This study provides a first look at a functioning ED in rural Latin America by reviewing one year of ED visits to HPVM. All ED visits between April 14, 2013, and April 13, 2014, were included and analyzed, totaling 1,239 patient visits. Data were collected from their electronic medical record and exported into a de-identified Excel® database where it was sorted and categorized. Variables included age, gender, mode of arrival, insurance type, month and day of the week of the service, chief complaint, laboratory and imaging requests, and disposition. We performed descriptive statistics, and where possible, comparisons using Student's T or chi-square, as appropriate. Of the 1239 total ED visits, 48% were males and 52% females; 93% of the visits were ambulatory, and 7% came by ambulance. Sixty-three percent of the patients had social security insurance. The top three chief complaints were abdominal pain (25.5%), fever (15.1%) and trauma (10.8%). Healthcare providers requested labs on 71.3% of patients and imaging on 43.2%. The most frequently requested imaging studies were chest radiograph (14.9%), upper extremity radiograph (9.4%), and electrocardiogram (9.0%). There was no seasonal or day-of-week variability to number of ED patients. The chief complaint of human or animal bite made it more likely the patient would be admitted, and the chief complaint of traumatic injury made it more likely the patient would be transferred. Analysis of patients presenting to a rural ED in Ecuador contributes to the global study of acute care in the developing world and also provides a

  8. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Civil Rights Search U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Search Close HHS A-Z Index About ... opportunities to participate in certain health care and human services programs without unlawful discrimination. HIPAA - Health Information ...

  9. [Competence of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Segura, Estrella; Lleixà-Fortuño, Mar; Salvadó-Usach, Teresa; Solà-Miravete, Elena; Adell-Lleixà, Mireia; Chanovas-Borrás, Manel R; March-Pallarés, Gemma; Mora-López, Gerard

    2017-06-01

    To identify associations between sociodemographic characteristics variables and competence levels of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments. Descriptive, cross-sectional, multicenter study of triage nurses in hospital emergency departments in the southwestern area of Catalonia (Ebre River territory). We used an instrument for evaluating competencies (the COM_VA questionnaire) and recording sociodemographic variables (age, sex, total work experience, emergency department experience, training in critical patient care and triage) and perceived confidence when performing triage. We then analyzed the association between these variables and competency scores. Competency scores on the COM_VA questionnaire were significantly higher in nurses with training in critical patient care (P=.001) and triage (P=0.002) and in those with longer emergency department experience (P<.0001). Perceived confidence when performing triage increased with competency score (P<.0001) and training in critical patient care (P<.0001) and triage (P=.045). The competence of triage nurses and their perception of confidence when performing triage increases with emergency department experience and training.

  10. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  11. The role of microbiology and pharmacy departments in the stewardship of antibiotic prescribing in European hospitals.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Fiona M; Gould, Ian M; Bruce, Julie; Mollison, Jill; Monnet, Dominique L; Krcmery, Vladimir; Cookson, Barry; van der Meer, Jos W M

    2007-06-01

    working hours had significantly higher antibiotic use compared with institutions that did not provide this service (p = 0.01). A wide range of antibiotic stewardship measures was practised in the participating hospitals in 2001, although there remains great scope for expansion of those overseen by pharmacy departments. Most hospitals had active antibiotic stewardship programmes led by specialists in infection, although there is no evidence that these were associated with reduced antibiotic consumption. There was also no evidence that pharmacy services reduced the amount of antibiotics prescribed.

  12. Hospital Determinants of Emergency Department Left Without Being Seen Rates

    PubMed Central

    Hsia, Renee Y.; Asch, Steven M.; Weiss, Robert E.; Zingmond, David; Liang, Li-Jung; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather; Sun, Benjamin C.

    2011-01-01

    Study objective The proportion of patients who leave without being seen in the emergency department (ED) is an outcome-oriented measure of impaired access to emergency care and represents the failure of an emergency care delivery system to meet its goals of providing care to those most in need. Little is known about variation in the amount of left without being seen or about hospital-level determinants. Such knowledge is necessary to target hospital-level interventions to improve access to emergency care. We seek to determine whether hospital-level socioeconomic status case mix or hospital structural characteristics are predictive of ED left without being seen rates. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of all acute-care, nonfederal hospitals in California that operated an ED in 2007, using data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database and the US census. Our outcome of interest was whether a visit to a given hospital ED resulted in left without being seen. The proportion of left without being seen was measured by the number of left without being seen cases out of the total number of visits. Results We studied 9.2 million ED visits to 262 hospitals in California. The percentage of left without being seen varied greatly over hospitals, ranging from 0% to 20.3%, with a median percentage of 2.6%. In multivariable analyses adjusting for hospital-level socioeconomic status case mix, visitors to EDs with a higher proportion of low-income and poorly insured patients experienced a higher risk of left without being seen. We found that the odds of an ED visit resulting in left without being seen increased by a factor of 1.15 for each 10-percentage-point increase in poorly insured patients, and odds of left without being seen decreased by a factor of 0.86 for each $10,000 increase in household income. When hospital structural characteristics were added to the model, county ownership, trauma center designation, and teaching

  13. [Inappropiate visits to emergency department of a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Gómez, J O; Ramalle-Gómar, E; Arias, A V; Azpiazu, J I; Blas, L B; Villa, C G

    2000-09-30

    The proportion of inadequate attendances at emergency department (ED) is 20-80%. The suitability of attendances at ED was evaluated using an Hospital Emergency Suitability Protocol, which was validated. 37.9% of attendances were inappropriate and they are more frequent in children. Patients who were referred by a doctor, with trauma or surgical consulted more adequately. The suitability of attendances at ED are related with illness.

  14. Oxyuriasis at the Department of Pediatrics, Dr. Pirngadi Hospital, Medan.

    PubMed

    Hasibuan, B; Naim, M; Lubis, A H; Pasaribu, S; Lubis, C P

    1989-01-01

    During the period of 3 months (February-April 1987), a prospective study on oxyuariasis among children had been conducted at Child Health Department of Dr. Pirngadi Hospital Medan. All children over 8 months of age were included in this study. The diagnosis was based on the modified Scoth's technique. Oxyuriasis ova were found in 21 out 119 children (17.65%). The peak incidence was found in the school age.

  15. Implementation of product-line management in a hospital pharmacy department.

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio-Feinberg, G J; Sheinman, C H

    1990-09-01

    The development and implementation of product-line management (PLM) in a pharmacy department is reviewed. The PLM system of hospital organization shifts the emphasis from function to product. The pharmacy department at a 737-bed nonprofit hospital adopted PLM in an effort to reach more directly the physician and patient markets, enhance the image of pharmacy, and help meet requirements of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. The department surveyed physicians and administrators to identify their product and service needs and surveyed pharmacy staff members to identify the perceived benefits and risks of a PLM system. A strategic-planning session was held to decide how best to match the pharmacy department's product lines with market needs. The team leaders were renamed clinical supervisors and were no longer responsible for defined physical areas but rather for clinical matters relating to patients in the product line assigned. Pharmacy's chosen product lines were oncology services, neuropsychiatry, maternal and child care, cardiovascular, operating room-anesthesia-pain clinic, and general medical. The transition is being accomplished one product line at a time; interested team leaders transfer into clinical supervisor positions by achieving clinical expertise within the relevant product lines. Despite some initial confusion, PLM contributed to job satisfaction and morale and allowed the pharmacy department to provide increased clinical consultation and intervention services. PLM enhanced the clinical pharmacy program and focused clinical services on the physician and ultimately the patient.

  16. Comparing Utilization and Costs of Care in Freestanding Emergency Departments, Hospital Emergency Departments, and Urgent Care Centers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vivian; Metcalfe, Leanne; Dark, Cedric; Vu, Lan; Weber, Ellerie; Shelton, George; Underwood, Howard R

    2017-02-15

    We compare utilization, price per visit, and the types of care delivered across freestanding emergency departments (EDs), hospital-based EDs, and urgent care centers in Texas. We analyzed insurance claims processed by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas from 2012 to 2015 for patient visits to freestanding EDs, hospital-based EDs, or urgent care centers in 16 Texas metropolitan statistical areas containing 84.1% of the state's population. We calculated the aggregate number of visits, average price per visit, proportion of price attributable to facility and physician services, and proportion of price billed to Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas versus out of pocket, by facility type. Prices for the top 20 diagnoses and procedures by facility type are compared. Texans use hospital-based EDs and urgent care centers much more than freestanding EDs, but freestanding ED utilization increased 236% between 2012 and 2015. The average price per visit was lower for freestanding EDs versus hospital-based EDs in 2012 ($1,431 versus $1,842), but prices in 2015 were comparable ($2,199 versus $2,259). Prices for urgent care centers were only $164 and $168 in 2012 and 2015. Out-of-pocket liability for consumers for all these facilities increased slightly from 2012 to 2015. There was 75% overlap in the 20 most common diagnoses at freestanding EDs versus urgent care centers and 60% overlap for hospital-based EDs and urgent care centers. However, prices for patients with the same diagnosis were on average almost 10 times higher at freestanding and hospital-based EDs relative to urgent care centers. Utilization of freestanding EDs is rapidly expanding in Texas. Higher prices at freestanding and hospital-based EDs relative to urgent care centers, despite substantial overlap in services delivered, imply potential inefficient use of emergency facilities. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. State of the art in marketing hospital foodservice departments.

    PubMed

    Pickens, C W; Shanklin, C W

    1985-11-01

    The purposes of this study were to identify the state of the art relative to the utilization of marketing techniques within hospital foodservice departments throughout the United States and to determine whether any relationships existed between the degree of utilization of marketing techniques and selected demographic characteristics of the foodservice administrators and/or operations. A validated questionnaire was mailed to 600 randomly selected hospital foodservice administrators requesting information related to marketing in their facilities. Forty-five percent of the questionnaires were returned and analyzed for frequency of response and significant relationship between variables. Chi-square was used for nominal data and Spearman rho for ranked data. Approximately 73% of the foodservice administrators stated that marketing was extremely important in the success of a hospital foodservice department. Respondents (79%) further indicated that marketing had become more important in their departments in the past 2 years. Departmental records, professional journals, foodservice suppliers, observation, and surveys were the sources most often used to obtain marketing data, a responsibility generally assumed by the foodservice director (86.2%). Merchandising, public relations, and word-of-mouth reputation were regarded as the most important aspects of marketing. Increased sales, participation, good will, departmental recognition, and employee satisfaction were used most frequently to evaluate the success of implemented marketing techniques. Marketing audits as a means of evaluating the success of marketing were used to a limited extent by the respondents.

  18. The relationship of hospital ownership and service composition to hospital charges

    PubMed Central

    Eskoz, Robin; Peddecord, K. Michael

    1985-01-01

    The relationship of hospital ownership and service composition to hospital charges was examined for 456 general acute hospitals in California. Ancillary services had higher profit margins, both gross and net profits, than daily hospital services. Ancillary services accounted for 55.3 percent of total patient revenue. Charges per day were 23 percent higher for ancillary services than for daily hospital services. Net profits for daily and ancillary services were lowest at county hospitals. Proprietary hospitals had the highest net profits for total ancillary services and the highest mean charges. Not-for-profit hospitals had the highest profit margins for daily hospital services. Neither direct nor total costs for ancillary services were significantly different among ownership groups, although direct costs for daily hospital services were significantly higher at proprietary hospitals. PMID:10311161

  19. Pharmaceutical services in rural hospitals in Illinois--2001.

    PubMed

    Schumock, Glen; Walton, Surrey; Sarawate, Chaitanya; Crawford, Stephanie Y

    2003-04-01

    The results of a survey characterizing pharmaceutical services in rural hospitals in Illinois are reported and compared with results of a similar survey conducted in 1991. A questionnaire was developed and mailed to pharmacy directors at rural hospitals in Illinois to obtain information about product-related services, the use of technology, clinical pharmacy services, and human resources data (including vacancies) for 2001. Of the 71 surveys that were mailed, 47 pharmacy directors (66%) responded. Respondent hospitals were smaller compared with those responding in 1991 (mean average daily census, 41.0 versus 51.2, respectively). As in 1991, nearly all respondents reported the provision of unit dose services and complete and comprehensive i.v. admixture programs (100% and 83%, respectively, for 2001). Three respondents (6%) reported having a cleanroom facility. The most commonly used technology reported was nursing-unit-based automated drug dispensing cabinets (35%). Nearly all hospitals reported providing drug therapy monitoring, patient education and counseling, pharmacokinetic consultations, and nutritional support. Consistent with national reports, staffing levels and vacancies increased between 1991 and 2001. In 2001, the mean number of full-time equivalents was 7.1, with a pharmacist to technician ratio of 1.0:1.08 and a ratio of pharmacists to occupied beds of 1.0:22.6. The overall vacancy rate was 8%, with a vacancy rate of 14% and 5% for pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, respectively. A 2001 survey of pharmacy departments in rural hospitals in Illinois showed progression in the provision of distributive and clinical pharmacy services since 1991. Employee vacancy rates in pharmacy departments were high in 2001, especially among pharmacist positions, but were lower than those reported for the general population of hospitals.

  20. [Cost of hospitalization by the Activity Based Costing method in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar].

    PubMed

    Tchamdja, T; Balaka, A; Tchandana, M; Agbétra, A

    2015-01-01

    To determine the cost of hospitalization per day in the neonatal department of Principal Hospital of Dakar. This prospective study took place during the month of July 2011 in the newborn unit. The activity-based costing method was used to analyze costs. During the study period, 52 newborns were hospitalized for a total of 590 days. The cost of the human resources during that month was 9,907,832 FCFA (US $ 19,815.66), the cost of depreciation of fixed assets was estimated at 571,952 FCFA (US $ 1143.90), and supplies at 112,084 FCFA (US $ 224.17). External services cost 386,753 FCFA (US $ 773.51) and support services 6,917,380.65 FCFA (US $ 13,834.7613). The monthly expenses incurred for the hospitalization of newborns totaled 17,896,002 FCFA (US $ 35,792), for a cost per patient per day of 30,332.20 FCFA (US $ 60.66) and an average cost of hospitalization 334,153.88 FCFA (US $ 668,31). This study is the first of its kind in Senegal and neighboring countries. By applying the ABC approach, we can obtain a more detailed and precise estimate of the cost of activities and services. Process improvements and corrective actions should make it possible to identify cost drivers, such as time.

  1. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility services...

  2. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility services...

  3. Perspective: Hospital support for anesthesiology departments: aligning incentives and improving productivity.

    PubMed

    Hill, Laureen L; Evers, Alex S

    2012-03-01

    Anesthesiology groups, particularly academic departments, are increasingly dependent on hospital support for financial viability. Economic stresses are driven by higher patient acuity, by multiple subspecialty service and call demands, by high-risk obstetric services, and by long case durations attributable to both case complexity and time for teaching. An unfavorable payer mix, university taxation, and other costs associated with academic education and research missions further compound these stresses. In addition, the current economic climate and the uncertainty surrounding health care reform measures will continue to increase performance pressures on hospitals and anesthesiology departments.Although many researchers have published on the mechanics of operating room (OR) productivity, their investigations do not usually address the motivational forces that drive individual and group behaviors. Institutional tradition, surgical convenience, and parochial interests continue to play predominant roles in OR governance and scheduling practices. Efforts to redefine traditional relationships, to coordinate operational decision-making processes, and to craft incentives that align individual performance goals with those of the institution are all essential for creating greater economic stability. Using the principles of shared costs, department autonomy, hospital flexibility and control over institutional issues, and alignment between individual and institutional goals, the authors developed a template to redefine the hospital-anesthesiology department relationship. Here, they describe both this contractual template and the results that followed implementation (2007-2009) at one institution.

  4. 42 CFR 410.42 - Limitations on coverage of certain services furnished to hospital outpatients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... furnished to hospital outpatients. 410.42 Section 410.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.42 Limitations on coverage of certain services...

  5. 42 CFR 410.42 - Limitations on coverage of certain services furnished to hospital outpatients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... furnished to hospital outpatients. 410.42 Section 410.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.42 Limitations on coverage of certain services...

  6. 42 CFR 410.42 - Limitations on coverage of certain services furnished to hospital outpatients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... furnished to hospital outpatients. 410.42 Section 410.42 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.42 Limitations on coverage of certain services...

  7. Impact of a new senior emergency department on emergency department recidivism, rate of hospital admission, and hospital length of stay.

    PubMed

    Keyes, Daniel C; Singal, Bonita; Kropf, Charles W; Fisk, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Senior (geriatric) emergency departments (EDs) are an emerging phenomenon across the United States, designed to provide greater comfort for elders, screening for common morbidities, and selective contact with social workers. We hypothesize that the senior ED will reduce recidivism, rate of admission, and hospital length of stay. This was a pre/postintervention observational study of seniors (≥65 years) before and after opening of a new senior ED in a large community hospital. Older nonseniors treated during the same periods were included to detect temporal trend bias. Outcomes included admission to the hospital, hospital length of stay, and ED return visits. Cox proportional hazards models, controlling for patient age, sex, triage level, insurance type, admission on the index visit, and hospital length of stay, were used to test association with time to return within 30 and 180 days. Multivariable regression modeling was used to determine whether the intervention was associated with admission on the index visit, and hospital length of stay. There was no significant difference in time to return within 30 days (HR=1.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.95 to 1.23), 180 days (HR=0.99; 95% CI 0.91 to 1.08), or average hospital length of stay. Risk of being admitted on the index visit was lower for seniors treated in the senior ED compared with the regular ED (Relative Risk=0.93; 95% CI 0.89 to 0.98). A new senior ED was not associated with reduced ED recidivism or hospital length of stay, but was associated with decreased rate of admission. Copyright © 2013 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Department of Defense / General Services Administration / National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... (DoD), General Services Administration (GSA), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA...., Washington, DC 20405, (202) 501-4755. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: DoD, GSA, and NASA, under their several... Acquisition Policy. DOD/GSA/NASA (FAR)--Final Rule Stage Regulation Sequence Title Identifier Number...

  9. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  10. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed... Inpatient Hospital and Long-Term Care Facility Services Swing-Bed Hospitals § 447.280 Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals). (a) General rule. If the State plan provides for NF...

  11. Customer service and today's hospital security professional.

    PubMed

    Knox, Thomas J

    2004-01-01

    Customer service, benchmarking, and budget control have supplanted enforcement as the essential parts of hospital security operations, according to the author. In the article he emphasizes and illustrates the need for security satisfaction surveys and benchmarking to enable the budget process to go smoothly.

  12. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  13. Embedding research culture and productivity in hospital physiotherapy departments: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Elizabeth H; Williams, Cylie M; Haines, Terry P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have investigated research culture in the Australian hospital system. Although physiotherapists working in tertiary hospital departments conduct and publish research, a conflict between service delivery and research productivity remains. Few departments record research achievements, which limits the accuracy of investigating factors associated with research productivity within allied health. The conduct and translation of research within acute physiotherapy and allied health departments is imperative to improve patient health outcomes, optimise health service efficiency and cost-effectiveness and to improve staff and patient satisfaction and staff retention. Allied health departments should institute a research register and consider implementing other strategies to improve research culture and productivity, such as dedicating equivalent full-time staff to research, supporting staff with joint clinical and academic appointments, ensuring a research register is available and used and having events available for the dissemination of research. Future research should focus on improving research productivity within acute allied health departments to provide Level 1 and 2 evidence of service effectiveness and cost-effectiveness to optimise health care delivery and to maximise the benefit of allied health staff to Australia's healthcare system.

  14. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. 17.35 Section 17.35 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35...

  15. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. 17.35 Section 17.35 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35...

  16. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. 17.35 Section 17.35 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35...

  17. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. 17.35 Section 17.35 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35...

  18. 38 CFR 17.35 - Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hospital care and medical services in foreign countries. 17.35 Section 17.35 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital Or Nursing Home Care and Medical Services in Foreign Countries § 17.35...

  19. 38 CFR 4.29 - Ratings for service-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation. 4.29 Section 4.29 Pensions, Bonuses, and... § 4.29 Ratings for service-connected disabilities requiring hospital treatment or observation. A total... observation at Department of Veterans Affairs expense for a service-connected disability for a period in...

  20. Current State of Antimicrobial Stewardship in Children's Hospital Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Rakesh D; Newland, Jason G; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Hersh, Adam L; May, Larissa; Perman, Sarah M; Kuppermann, Nathan; Dayan, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND Antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) effectively optimize antibiotic use for inpatients; however, the extent of emergency department (ED) involvement in ASPs has not been described. OBJECTIVE To determine current ED involvement in children's hospital ASPs and to assess beliefs and preferred methods of implementation for ED-based ASPs. METHODS A cross-sectional survey of 37 children's hospitals participating in the Sharing Antimicrobial Resistance Practices collaboration was conducted. Surveys were distributed to ASP leaders and ED medical directors at each institution. Items assessed included beliefs regarding ED antibiotic prescribing, ED prescribing resources, ASP methods used in the ED such as clinical decision support and clinical care guidelines, ED participation in ASP activities, and preferred methods for ED-based ASP implementation. RESULTS A total of 36 ASP leaders (97.3%) and 32 ED directors (86.5%) responded; the overall response rate was 91.9%. Most ASP leaders (97.8%) and ED directors (93.7%) agreed that creation of ED-based ASPs was necessary. ED resources for antibiotic prescribing were obtained via the Internet or electronic health records (EHRs) for 29 hospitals (81.3%). The main ASP activities for the ED included production of antibiograms (77.8%) and creation of clinical care guidelines for pneumonia (83.3%). The ED was represented on 3 hospital ASP committees (8.3%). No hospital ASPs actively monitored outpatient ED prescribing. Most ASP leaders (77.8%) and ED directors (81.3%) preferred implementation of ED-based ASPs using clinical decision support integrated into the EHR. CONCLUSIONS Although ED involvement in ASPs is limited, both ASP and ED leaders believe that ED-based ASPs are necessary. Many children's hospitals have the capability to implement ED-based ASPs via the preferred method: EHR clinical decision support. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:469-475.

  1. [Children with injuries treated in hospital emergency departments].

    PubMed

    Mestrović, Julije; Milunović, Pjer; Skelin, Ana; Carija, Robert; Catipović, Tatjana; Mestrović, Marija; Mujkić, Aida

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine characteristics of injuries of children admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) of University Hospital Split, and also to define the mechanisms of injuries, as well as the type and severity of injuries. We evaluated 3,221 children with injuries treated in the ED of the University Hospital of Split in the period from January to July 2009. The following indicators were analyzed: age, gender, anatomic distribution of injuries, mechanism, Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the need for hospital and intensive care admission. Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests were used in order to determine statistical relevance of the results. Boys were more often injured than girls (65.6%), and most of the injured children were older than 13 years (41.7%). The majority of patients (96%) had minor injuries (ISS < 10), and only 3.7% of patients were hospitalized. The majority of injuries were caused by falls (71.3%), and limbs were the most frequently injured body region (67.1%). However, road traffic accidents (RTA) required hospitalization more often than any other mechanism (25% of patients), and the leading injury in RTA victims was head injury (38% of patients). Older children were more susceptible to RTAs (64.5%), and the majority of children were injured as passengers in cars (36.4%). Children with head injuries, and those injured in RTAs, were more often hospitalized and more often admitted to intensive care unit than other patients. The most frequently injured body region in children treated in ED are limbs, and the most frequent mechanism of injury is fall. However, the most severe are head injuries, and the majority of severe injuries are caused by RTAs. These data are important for programs of injury prevention.

  2. Hospital service quality: a managerial challenge.

    PubMed

    Rose, Raduan Che; Uli, Jegak; Abdul, Mohani; Ng, Kim Looi

    2004-01-01

    While much is known generally about predictions of customer-perceived service quality, their application to health services is rarer. No attempt has been made to examine the impact of social support and patient education on overall service quality perception. Together with six quality dimensions identified from the literature, this study seeks to provide a more holistic comprehension of hospital service quality prediction. Although 79 percent of variation is explained, other than technical quality the impact of the remaining factors on quality perception is far from constant, and socio-economic variables further complicate unpredictability. Contrary to established beliefs, the cost factor was found to be insignificant. Hence, to manage service quality effectively, the test lies in how well healthcare providers know the customers they serve. It is not only crucial in a globalized environment, where trans-national patient mobility is increasingly the norm, but also within homogeneous societies that appear to converge culturally.

  3. Establishing a pharmacy department for a large pediatric hospital: managerial problems, opportunities, and lessons.

    PubMed

    Summerfield, M R; Gurwitch, K D; Scholz, R L; Bagby, L M

    1991-07-01

    The process of planning and establishing a pharmacy department in a pediatric hospital is described, and lessons learned from the experience are summarized. Since its founding in 1954, Texas Children's Hospital (TCH) had shared pharmacy services with St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital. The decision to terminate the shared-services agreement in the mid-1980s made it necessary for TCH to establish an independent pharmacy department. A director of pharmacy was hired in March 1988, and November 30 of that year was set as the target for implementation of the TCH pharmacy. It was decided that six services--a decentralized unit dose distribution system, an i.v. admixture service, delivery services, ambulatory-care services, a formulatory system, and a drug information service--would be offered initially. Decisions concerning department organizational structure and staffing, space allocations, and a computer system were made. A multidisciplinary advisory committee was appointed; one of its responsibilities was to oversee inservice staff training. The pharmacy areas were to be opened on a staggered basis, beginning with the hematology-oncology clinic pharmacy. A number of problems arose immediately following the opening of the central pharmacy, including inaccurate computer profiles, lower-than-estimated productivity resulting from staff members' unfamiliarity with the new system, higher-than-estimated patient census, and orders for nonformulary drugs. Delays in drug delivery times were unacceptably high. A crisis-management plan was implemented to cover both short- and long-term problems, and within a few months operations had stabilized. The opening of the intensive-care and sixth-floor satellite pharmacies enhanced decentralized operations and had an important role in improving response times.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Analyzing patient's waiting time in emergency & trauma department in public hospital - A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Shazwa; Tahir, Herniza Md; Nordin, Noraimi Azlin Mohd; Zaharudin, Zati Aqmar

    2014-09-01

    Emergency and Trauma Department (ETD) is an important element for a hospital. It provides medical service, which operates 24 hours a day in most hospitals. However overcrowding is not exclusion for ETD. Overflowing occurs due to affordable services provided by public hospitals, since it is funded by the government. It is reported that a patient attending ETD must be treated within 90 minutes, in accordance to achieve the Key Performance Indicator (KPI). However, due to overcrowd situations, most patients have to wait longer than the KPI standard. In this paper, patient's average waiting time is analyzed. Using Chi-Square Test of Goodness, patient's inter arrival per hour is also investigated. As conclusion, Monday until Wednesday was identified as the days that exceed the KPI standard while Chi-Square Test of Goodness showed that the patient's inter arrival is independent and random.

  5. The interface of quality management and the hospital information department.

    PubMed

    Spath, P L

    1993-02-01

    Hospital leadership, the Joint Commission, third-party payors, health care researchers, and others are repeatedly recognizing the essential role of information management in their quality improvement objectives. The health information department must become more proactive in its acknowledgment of these responsibilities by instituting the continuous quality improvement model. This model will prevent proactiveness from turning into mere reactiveness. As suggested by Peter Senge in The Fifth Discipline, "all too often, 'proactiveness' is reactiveness in disguise. If we simply become more aggressive fighting the 'enemy out there,' we are reacting--regardless of what we call it. True proactiveness comes from seeing how we contribute to our own problems."

  6. Decentralization and Hospital Pharmacy Services: The Case of Iranian University Affilliated Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ashna Delkhosh, Reza; Ardama, Ali; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the satisfaction rate of hospital managerial/clinical teams (HMCTs) including principles (chief executives), managers, supervisor pharmacists and head nurses from services presented by private sectors directing 10 pharmacy departments in hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences. This study is an observational and descriptive study in which a questionnaire containing 16 questions evaluating the satisfaction of the HMCTs from private sectors, and questions about demography of the responders was used for data collection. Collected data was applied to assign a satisfaction score (maximum 64) for each respondent. SPSS 17.0 and Microsoft Office Excel 2007 were used for statistical description and analysis of these information (where applicable). Overall, 97 people in charge of the hospitals (HMCTs) entered the study. The average satisfaction score was 26.38 ± 6.81 with the lowest satisfaction rate observed in Mofid children specialty hospital (19.5%) and the highest rate obtained for Imam Hussein (p.b.u.h) general hospital (65.3%). Generally, 59% of the HMCTs believed that the function of the private sector in the pharmacy of hospitals is satisfactory. Assuming that the satisfaction scores under 75% of the total obtainable score (i.e. 48 out of 64) could not be considered as an indicator of desired pharmacy services, our results revealed that the status of the services offered by private sectors are far behind the desired satisfactory level. PMID:24250687

  7. Assessing the physical service setting: a look at emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Steinke, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the attributes of the physical setting that are important for developing a positive service climate within emergency departments and to validate a measure for assessing physical service design. The design of the physical setting is an important and contributing factor for creating a service climate in organizations. Service climate is defined as employee perceptions of the practices, procedures, and behaviors that get rewarded, supported, and expected with regard to customer service and customer service quality. There has been research conducted which identifies antecedents within organization that promotes a positive service climate which in turn creates service-oriented behaviors by employees toward clients. The antecedent of the physical setting and its impact on perceptions of service climate has been less commonly explored. Using the concept of the physical service setting (which may be defined as aspects of the physical, built environment that facilitate the delivery of quality service), attributes of the physical setting and their relationship with service climate were explored by means of a quantitative paper survey distributed to emergency nurses (n = 180) throughout a province in Canada. The results highlight the validity and reliability of six scales measuring the physical setting and its relation to service. Respondents gave low ratings to the physical setting of their departments, in addition to low ratings of service climate. Respondents feel that the design of the physical setting in the emergency departments where they work is not conducive to providing quality service to clients. Certain attributes of the physical setting were found to be significant in influencing perceptions of service climate, hence service quality, within the emergency department setting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. The tuberculosis hospital in Hohenkrug, Stettin. Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zajaczkowski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    Towards the end of the 19th century, Europe turned particular attention to the problem of tuberculosis, at that time the most serious social disease. In the majority of cases, pulmonary tuberculosis had a fatal outcome owing to the lack of effective drugs and methods of treatment. Due to poor sanitary conditions, particularly as regards dwellings, pulmonary tuberculosis was able to spread rapidly. Hospital departments were reluctant to admit patients suffering from tuberculosis. It was only after the discoveries of Robert Koch (bacillus tubercle in 1882) that the cause of the disease became understood and methods of treatment began to be developed. A modern sanatorium and hospital with 270 beds was erected in Hohenkrug (today Szczecin-Zdunowo) between 1915 and 1930. Patients could now be treated with modern methods, surgically in most cases. After the Second World War, pulmonary tuberculosis was still an enormous epidemiologic problem. In 1949, the Polish authorities opened a 400-bed sanatoriumin Zdunowo. The methods of treatment were not much different from pre-war practice and it was only the routine introduction of antituberculotic drugs during the fifties of the past century that brought about a radical change in the fight against tuberculosis. The growing numbers of patients with tuberculosis of the genitourinary system led to the opening in 1958 of a 40-bed specialist ward at the Tuberculosis Sanatorium in Zdunowo. It should be emphasized that the Department of Genitourinary Tuberculosis in Szczecin-Zdunowo was a historical necessity and a salvation for thousands of patients from Northern Poland. The Department totally fulfilled its social duties thanks to the commitment of many outstanding persons dedicated to helping the patients. This unit was finally closed in 1987 because the demand for surgical treatment of tuberculosis was declining concurrently with the advent of new and potent antituberculotics and falling number of new cases of genitourinary

  9. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... under section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility...

  10. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... under section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility...

  11. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... under section 1903(i)(4) of the Act and subpart H of part 456 of this chapter. (b) Nursing facility...

  12. Hospital determinants of emergency department left without being seen rates.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Renee Y; Asch, Steven M; Weiss, Robert E; Zingmond, David; Liang, Li-Jung; Han, Weijuan; McCreath, Heather; Sun, Benjamin C

    2011-07-01

    The proportion of patients who leave without being seen in the emergency department (ED) is an outcome-oriented measure of impaired access to emergency care and represents the failure of an emergency care delivery system to meet its goals of providing care to those most in need. Little is known about variation in the amount of left without being seen or about hospital-level determinants. Such knowledge is necessary to target hospital-level interventions to improve access to emergency care. We seek to determine whether hospital-level socioeconomic status case mix or hospital structural characteristics are predictive of ED left without being seen rates. We performed a cross-sectional study of all acute-care, nonfederal hospitals in California that operated an ED in 2007, using data from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development database and the US census. Our outcome of interest was whether a visit to a given hospital ED resulted in left without being seen. The proportion of left without being seen was measured by the number of left without being seen cases out of the total number of visits. We studied 9.2 million ED visits to 262 hospitals in California. The percentage of left without being seen varied greatly over hospitals, ranging from 0% to 20.3%, with a median percentage of 2.6%. In multivariable analyses adjusting for hospital-level socioeconomic status case mix, visitors to EDs with a higher proportion of low-income and poorly insured patients experienced a higher risk of left without being seen. We found that the odds of an ED visit resulting in left without being seen increased by a factor of 1.15 for each 10-percentage-point increase in poorly insured patients, and odds of left without being seen decreased by a factor of 0.86 for each $10,000 increase in household income. When hospital structural characteristics were added to the model, county ownership, trauma center designation, and teaching program affiliation were positively

  13. 42 CFR 409.26 - Transfer agreement hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transfer agreement hospital services. 409.26... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.26 Transfer agreement hospital services. (a) Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medicare pays for medical...

  14. 42 CFR 409.26 - Transfer agreement hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transfer agreement hospital services. 409.26... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.26 Transfer agreement hospital services. (a) Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medicare pays for medical...

  15. 42 CFR 409.26 - Transfer agreement hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transfer agreement hospital services. 409.26... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.26 Transfer agreement hospital services. (a) Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medicare pays for medical...

  16. 42 CFR 409.26 - Transfer agreement hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transfer agreement hospital services. 409.26... SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPITAL INSURANCE BENEFITS Posthospital SNF Care § 409.26 Transfer agreement hospital services. (a) Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medicare pays for medical...

  17. Hospital Emergency Services for Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Geoffrey C.; Klonoff, Harry

    1967-01-01

    The records of visits of children and adolescents to the emergency department of the Vancouver General Hospital were reviewed during the period July 1, 1965, to June 30, 1966, and the diagnostic and disposal data recorded. One-quarter of all visits were made by children and adolescents. Three-quarters of the visits were made for surgical conditions. There were more males than females in both surgical and medical groups, and the peaks in attendance were of those in the early preschool and late adolescent age groups. Three-quarters of the patients were referred to the family doctor and approximately one-sixth were admitted to the hospital. These findings suggested that while prompt medical attention was usually indicated, the majority of problems were not urgent and that the emergency department was becoming a substitute for the office of the family physician. PMID:6023997

  18. Independent component analysis decomposition of hospital emergency department throughput measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Qiang; Chu, Henry

    2016-05-01

    We present a method adapted from medical sensor data analysis, viz. independent component analysis of electroencephalography data, to health system analysis. Timely and effective care in a hospital emergency department is measured by throughput measures such as median times patients spent before they were admitted as an inpatient, before they were sent home, before they were seen by a healthcare professional. We consider a set of five such measures collected at 3,086 hospitals distributed across the U.S. One model of the performance of an emergency department is that these correlated throughput measures are linear combinations of some underlying sources. The independent component analysis decomposition of the data set can thus be viewed as transforming a set of performance measures collected at a site to a collection of outputs of spatial filters applied to the whole multi-measure data. We compare the independent component sources with the output of the conventional principal component analysis to show that the independent components are more suitable for understanding the data sets through visualizations.

  19. Design and implementation of GRID-based PACS in a hospital with multiple imaging departments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanyuan; Jin, Jin; Sun, Jianyong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2008-03-01

    Usually, there were multiple clinical departments providing imaging-enabled healthcare services in enterprise healthcare environment, such as radiology, oncology, pathology, and cardiology, the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) is now required to support not only radiology-based image display, workflow and data flow management, but also to have more specific expertise imaging processing and management tools for other departments providing imaging-guided diagnosis and therapy, and there were urgent demand to integrate the multiple PACSs together to provide patient-oriented imaging services for enterprise collaborative healthcare. In this paper, we give the design method and implementation strategy of developing grid-based PACS (Grid-PACS) for a hospital with multiple imaging departments or centers. The Grid-PACS functions as a middleware between the traditional PACS archiving servers and workstations or image viewing clients and provide DICOM image communication and WADO services to the end users. The images can be stored in distributed multiple archiving servers, but can be managed with central mode. The grid-based PACS has auto image backup and disaster recovery services and can provide best image retrieval path to the image requesters based on the optimal algorithms. The designed grid-based PACS has been implemented in Shanghai Huadong Hospital and been running for two years smoothly.

  20. Sleep problems, psychiatric hospitalization, and emergency department use among psychiatric patients with Medicaid.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Christopher N; Spira, Adam P; Rae, Donald S; West, Joyce C; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2011-09-01

    This study examined the prevalence of sleep problems and their association with the use of inpatient and emergency department services by Medicaid recipients with serious mental illness. The sample consisted of 1,560 psychiatric patients with Medicaid coverage who were identified in a ten-state random survey of psychiatrists. Sleep problems were assessed by clinician ratings. Over 75% of the patients experienced a sleep problem, and approximately 50% of these patients had problems that were moderate to severe. Greater sleep problem severity was associated with an increased risk of psychiatric hospitalization and emergency department visits for mental health reasons. Sleep problems were highly prevalent among Medicaid patients with serious mental illness and were associated with greater inpatient and emergency mental health service use. More careful monitoring and management of sleep problems in this patient population could address a common clinical need and might help to reduce costly service use.

  1. Sleep Problems, Psychiatric Hospitalization, and Emergency Department Use Among Medicaid Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Christopher N.; Spira, Adam P.; Rae, Donald; West, Joyce C.; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study examined the prevalence of sleep problems, and their relationship with the use of inpatient and emergency department services among Medicaid psychiatric patients. METHODS Participants were 1,560 Medicaid psychiatric patients identified in a ten-state random survey of psychiatrists. Sleep problems were assessed by clinician ratings. RESULTS Over 75% of Medicaid psychiatric patients experienced a sleep problem, and in approximately 50% of patients these problems were moderate to severe. Greater sleep problem severity was associated with an increased risk of psychiatric hospitalization and emergency department visits for mental health reasons. CONCLUSIONS Sleep problems are highly prevalent among Medicaid patients, and are associated with greater inpatient and emergency mental health service use. More careful monitoring and management of sleep problems in this patient population would address a common clinical need and might also help to reduce costly service use. PMID:21885593

  2. Violence-related injuries treated in hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Rand, M R; Strom, K

    1997-08-01

    The Study of Injured Victims of Violence included a survey to estimate the number of persons treated in US hospital emergency departments (EDs) for nonfatal injuries from violence. This study serves as a supplement to the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, in a nationally representative, one-third sample of 31 hospitals having EDs. Six of the main key findings were: 1) in 1994, about 1.4 million people were treated for nonfatal injuries sustained in intentional or possibly intentional acts of violence; 2) about 94% of the patients were injured during an assault, 2% during robbery, and 5% during rape or sexual assault; 3) three-fifths of all persons treated were males; 4) Blacks, who constitute about 13% of the population, comprised 24% of those treated for violence-related injuries; 5) a higher percentage of women were treated for injuries inflicted by persons they are intimate with, such as a spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend, while men were more likely to be injured by acquaintances or strangers; and 6) about 92% of violence victims treated in EDs were immediately released after treatment, whereas 8% were hospitalized for further treatment.

  3. Costs and hospital procedures in an urology department of a tertiary hospital. Analysis of groups related by their diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Boronat, F; Barrachina, I; Budia, A; Vivas Consuelo, D; Criado, M C

    The health care system has management tools available in hospitals that facilitate the assessment of efficiency through the study of costs and management control in order to make a better use of the resources. The aim of the study was the calculation and analysis of the total cost of a urology department, including ambulatory, hospitalization and surgery activity and the drafting of an income statement where service costs are compared with income earned from the Government fees during 2014. From the information recorded by the Economic Information System of the Department of Health, ABC and top-down method of cost calculation was applied by process care activity. The cost results obtained were compared with the rates established for ambulatory and hospital production in the Tax Law of the Generalitat Valenciana. The production was structured into outpatient (external and technical consultations) and hospital stays and surgeries (inpatient). A total of 32,510 outpatient consultations, 7,527 techniques, 2,860 interventions and 4,855 hospital stays were made during 2014. The total cost was 7,579,327€; the cost for outpatient consultations was 1,748,145€, 1,229,836 Euros for technical consultations, 2,621,036€ for surgery procedures and 1,980,310€ for hospital admissions. Considered as income the current rates applied in 2014 (a total of 15,035,843€), the difference between income and expenditure was 7,456,516€. The economic balance was positive with savings over 50% and a mean adjusted hospitalization stay rate (IEMAC) rate of 0.67 (33% better than the standard). CMA had a favorable impact on cost control. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Hospital funding and services in Queensland.

    PubMed

    Surrao, Suzanne; Taylor, Geri; Turner, Anne; Donald, Ken

    2002-01-01

    The Queensland health sector has been characterised as unique. The population has traditionally relied on the public sector to provide necessary hospital and other health services across the vast distances that make up the state, although there is a strong non-government sector also. More recently, and over the last 5-6 years stability and drive at the management level in the public sector has supported reform and progress, consistent with the national agenda. The Queensland reputation of cost efficiency and effectiveness in service delivery and outputs to meet national standards continues as this Chapter demonstrates.

  5. Treatment profiles in a Danish psychiatric university hospital department.

    PubMed

    Okkels, Niels; Mogensen, Rasmus Beyer; Crean, Lea Catherine; Vestergaard, Claus Høstrup; Skadhede, Søren; Rasmussen, Camilla; Shanmuganathan, Jan Walter Dhillon; Hansen, Kenneth Brandt; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2017-05-01

    Despite concerns about rising treatment of psychiatric patients with psychotropic medications and declining treatment with psychotherapy, actual treatment profiles of psychiatric patients are largely unknown. To describe patterns in the treatment of patients in a large psychiatric university hospital department. A descriptive mapping of treatment of in- and outpatients in a psychiatric department at Aarhus University Hospital Risskov, Denmark. Information was collected by healthcare staff using a 25-item survey form. The p-value was calculated with a chi-squared test and p < 0.05 was considered significant. The study was preceded by a pilot study on 41 patients. Over a 1 month period, a total of 343 consecutive patients were assessed and hereof 200 were included in the age range 18-90 years (mean 53.76); 86 men and 114 women. One-hundred and eighty-eight patients (94%) used psychotropic medication, 37 (19%) as monotherapy, and 148 (74%) in combination with non-pharmacological therapy. Ninety-seven (49%) had psychotherapy and 104 (52%) social support. Among inpatients, 21 (64%) had physical therapy, and 10 (30%) electroconvulsive therapy. In total, 163 (82%) had non-pharmacological therapy. Fifty-two (26%) patients had monotherapy, and 148 (74%) polytherapy. Mean number of treatment modalities used per patient was 2.07 for all patients and 3.23 for inpatients. In this department, polytherapy including non-pharmacological modalities is applied widely across all settings and patient categories. However, psychotropic medication clearly dominates as the most frequently applied treatment.

  6. Department Reengineering Improves Service at Miami-Dade Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menendez, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    Details the process of reengineering Miami-Dade Community College's maintenance department to lower costs while increasing services. Changes included work flow, communications, purchasing, staffing, and technology methods. (EV)

  7. 20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of National Park Service photograph, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 8005.B, 4 July 1963. CASCADE FROM ABOVE - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Photocopy of photograph, National Park Service, US Department of Interior, Washington, DC. Photograph No. 9525-A, 15 December 1965 ARMILLARY SPHERE AT EXEDRA - Meridian Hill Park, Bounded by Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Euclid & W Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  9. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resize A A A Print Share Office for Civil Rights (OCR) I would like info on. . . Contact ... enter your contact information below. Email Office for Civil Rights Headquarters U.S. Department of Health & Human Services ...

  10. 75 FR 68799 - Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and Extended Care Services...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Services [CMS-8040-N] RIN 0938-AP86 Medicare Program; Inpatient Hospital Deductible and Hospital and... (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces the inpatient hospital deductible and the hospital and extended care services coinsurance amounts for services furnished in calendar year (CY) 2011...

  11. Student-Led Services in a Hospital Aged Care Temporary Stay Unit: Sustaining Student Placement Capacity and Physiotherapy Service Provisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicole, Madelyn; Fairbrother, Michele; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; Blackford, Julia; Sheepway, Lyndal; Penman, Merrolee; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Through a collaborative university-hospital partnership, a student-led service model (SLS-model) was implemented to increase student placement capacity within a physiotherapy department of a 150 bed Sydney hospital. This study investigates the perceived barriers and enablers to increasing student placement capacity through student-led services…

  12. Dallas Police Department Youth Services Program: Police Diversion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dallas Police Dept., TX.

    The Youth Section of the Dallas Police Department has instituted an innovative police diversion project entitled the Youth Services Program as an operational unit of the police department. Fourteen civilian counselors supervised by a police lieutenant function as a diversion unit for arrested juveniles between the ages of 10 and 16. Juveniles that…

  13. The Ohio Department of Youth Services Juvenile Prison Library System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Deidra N.

    2009-01-01

    The article is an introduction to The Ohio Department of Youth Services librarians and the services they provide. Information about each juvenile prison facility is revealed and provides an explanation of guidelines and standards for prison libraries. Sixty-eight questions were asked in four in-person interviews to present a profile of the…

  14. Who provides nursing services in Cambodian hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai-Doi, Yukie; Mochizuki, Noriko; Phuong, Keat; Sung, Chao; Visoth, Pheng; Sriv, Bun; Amara, Sar Rath; Murakami, Hitoshi; Komagata, Tomoko; Fujita, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    In Cambodia, the number of nurses is insufficient and details of nursing services are unknown and undocumented. This research explored who provides nursing service activities in Cambodia. The study was conducted at nine hospitals in Cambodia. Findings indicate that non-invasive medical care such as vital signs taking was designated to nurses. In performing more complex medical interventions, nurses shared the tasks with medical doctors. Conversely, simpler nursing tasks, including maintaining bedside environment/hygiene and supporting patient activities, tasks were shared by nurses with patients' family. This study elucidated an optimal personnel mix and task shared between nurses, doctors and patients' families. There are important implications for nursing legislation related to streamlining the production of nurses to provide an adequate and qualified nursing service in Cambodia. PMID:24661282

  15. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  16. Evaluation of hospital service level agreements.

    PubMed

    Berbée, Rieneke G; Gemmel, Paul; Droesbeke, Brenda; Casteleyn, Hugo; Vandaele, Darline

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to evaluate the development and use of service level agreements (SLAs) in a Belgian hospital from a client's point of view. The paper is based on a theoretical framework indicating the variables that influence the relationship between the use of a specific governance mechanisms and performance, a new instrument was developed and applied on a convenience sample of 107 SLA clients from a Belgian hospital. SLAs are useful for hospitals, as they improve people's insight into processes, stimulate people to think about performance measurement and, in some cases, also lead to improved services. The main advantages of SLAs do not really lie in improved relationships and better fits with clients' needs, but in improved process mapping and improved performance measurement. The questionnaire from this research study proves to be a useful and reliable instrument for evaluating internal SLAs from a client's point of view. The results of this study are limited, as they are only based on one Belgian institution. Other limitations include the posttest-only research design and the unequal distribution of the respondents over the different SLAs. Recommendations for future research include applying the questionnaire in other Belgian hospitals and in settings where both a pretest and posttest can be conducted. As far as known, no other studies have yet evaluated the effectiveness of SLAs in the healthcare sector. While a fairly-substantial amount of scientific literature deals with SLAs in the world of ICT, this literature is often very specific and cannot always be applied to other service sectors.

  17. The hospital emergency department as a social welfare institution.

    PubMed

    Gordon, J A

    1999-03-01

    In an era of social welfare reform marked by the erosion of a societal safety net, few institutions remain that can guarantee assistance to those most in need. The hospital emergency department is perhaps the only local institution where professional help is mandated by law, with guaranteed availability for all persons, all the time, regardless of the problem. Although the ED serves as a true social safety net, its potential as a social welfare institution generally goes underestimated, hampering its full development as an effective societal resource. More of the disadvantaged may pass through the ED than through any other community institution, making it a logical site not only for the treatment of acute illness, but also for the identification of basic social needs and the extension of existing community resources. By helping more fully incorporate the ED into the total care of its community, emergency physicians can become leaders in the design and implementation of integrated sociomedical systems of care.

  18. Ambulatory Surgery Centers and Prices in Hospital Outpatient Departments.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen

    2016-03-06

    Specialty providers claim to offer a new competitive benchmark for efficient delivery of health care. This article explores this view by examining evidence for price competition between ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and hospital outpatient departments (HOPDs). I studied the impact of ASC market presence on actual prices paid to HOPDs during 2007-2010 for four common surgical procedures that were performed in both provider types. For the procedures examined, HOPDs received payments from commercial insurers in the range of 3.25% to 5.15% lower for each additional ASC per 100,000 persons in a market. HOPDs may have less negotiating leverage with commercial insurers on price in markets with high ASC market penetration, resulting in relatively lower prices. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. [Febrile neutropenia at the emergency department of a cancer hospital].

    PubMed

    Debey, C; Meert, A-P; Berghmans, T; Thomas, J M; Sculier, J P

    2011-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of fever in the cancer patient. When he/she is undergoing chemotherapy, the priority is to exclude that complication because it requires rapid administration of empiric broad-spectrum antibiotics. We have studied the rate and characteristics of febrile neutropenia in cancer patients consulting in a emergency department. We have conducted a retrospective study in the emergency department of a cancer hospital over the year 2008. Every patient with cancer and fever > or = 38 degrees C was included. Over 2.130 consultations, 408 were selected (313 patients) including 21.6% (88) for febrile neutropenia. A focal symptom or physical sign was present in the majority of the cases. 88% were assessed as low risk for severe complications and about half of them received oral antibiotics. There were only a few patients with a nude fever for which it was difficult to make a hypothetical diagnosis in order to administer a probabilistic treatment. The majority of the consultations lead to hospital admission. Over the 80 hospitalisations, 6 deaths occurred. There was no death among the patients who remained ambulatory. In conclusion, our study shows that febrile neutropenia is frequent in ambulatory cancer patients presenting with fever and that in the majority of the cases, it is associated with a low risk. In such a situation, ambulatory management is more and more often considered or, at least, a rapid discharge after a short admission in case of low risk febrile neutropenia. In that context, the role of the general practioner has to be emphasised and to facilitate the outpatient management, we propose an algorithm that requires validation.

  20. Critical pediatric equipment availability in Canadian hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    McGillivray, D; Nijssen-Jordan, C; Kramer, M S; Yang, H; Platt, R

    2001-04-01

    Of all child visits to emergency departments, 1% to 5% involve critically ill children who require cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Numerous versions of pediatric equipment lists for EDs have been published. Despite these efforts, many EDs remain unprepared for pediatric emergencies. The objectives of this study were to assess the availability of pediatric resuscitation equipment items in Canadian hospital EDs and to identify risk factors for the unavailability of these items. Using the updated database of the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP), a questionnaire survey was sent to 737 Canadian hospital EDs with a maximum of 3 mailings to nonresponders. On-site visits to a selected subset of hospital EDs were completed to validate the results obtained by the mailed questionnaire. The response rate was 88.3% (650/737). Results showed the following overall equipment unavailability: intraosseous needle, 15.9%; pediatric drug dose guidelines, 6.6%; infant blood pressure cuff, 14.8%; pediatric defibrillator paddles, 10.5%; infant warming device, 59.4%; infant bag-valve-mask device, 3.5%; infant laryngoscope blade, 3.5%; 3-mm endotracheal tube, 2.5%; and pediatric pulse oximeter, 18.0%. Low percentage of pediatric visits, lack of an on-call pediatrician for the ED, and lack of a pediatric advanced life support-trained physician on staff were independently associated with equipment unavailability. This study demonstrated that essential pediatric resuscitation equipment is unavailable in a disturbingly high number of EDs across Canada and has identified several determinants of this unavailability.

  1. Population access to hospital emergency departments and the impacts of health reform in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Brabyn, Lars; Beere, Paul

    2006-09-01

    In the current political climate of evidence-based research, GIS has emerged as a powerful research tool as it allows spatial and social health inequality to be explored efficiently. This article explores the impact health reforms had on geographical accessibility to hospital emergency department (ED) services in New Zealand from 1991 to 2001. Travel time was calculated using least-cost path analysis, which identified the shortest travel time from each census enumeration district through a road network to the nearest ED. This research found that the population further than 60 minutes from an ED has increased with some areas being affected more than others. Some of this increase is attributed to increases in population rather than the closing of hospitals. The findings will be discussed within the context of the health policy reform era and changes to health service provision.

  2. The preparedness of hospital Health Information Services for system failures due to internal disasters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheens; Robinson, Kerin M; Wendt, Kate; Williamson, Dianne

    2009-01-01

    The unimpeded functioning of hospital Health Information Services (HIS) is essential for patient care, clinical governance, organisational performance measurement, funding and research. In an investigation of hospital Health Information Services' preparedness for internal disasters, all hospitals in the state of Victoria with the following characteristics were surveyed: they have a Health Information Service/ Department; there is a Manager of the Health Information Service/Department; and their inpatient capacity is greater than 80 beds. Fifty percent of the respondents have experienced an internal disaster within the past decade, the majority affecting the Health Information Service. The most commonly occurring internal disasters were computer system failure and floods. Two-thirds of the hospitals have internal disaster plans; the most frequently occurring scenarios provided for are computer system failure, power failure and fire. More large hospitals have established back-up systems than medium- and small-size hospitals. Fifty-three percent of hospitals have a recovery plan for internal disasters. Hospitals typically self-rate as having a 'medium' level of internal disaster preparedness. Overall, large hospitals are better prepared for internal disasters than medium and small hospitals, and preparation for disruption of computer systems and medical record services is relatively high on their agendas.

  3. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2009-01-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  4. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2008-01-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  5. Hospitality and service: leading real change.

    PubMed

    Kerfoot, Karlene M

    2008-10-01

    A patient's decision to recommend a health care organization and the patient's loyalty scores are largely determined by the interaction patients and their families have with the nurses. Hospitality is how the delivery of that product makes the person feel and is a dialogue that requires the server to be "on the guest's side" throughout the experience. The challenge for health care is to help our patients and their families transcend the usual routine care of our health care world and to experience an emotional connection that provides that sense of affiliation and emotional kinship with the organization and the staff. Moving from the service mindset in health care to the hospitality mindset that engages people positively and emotionally is what healing is all about.

  6. Customer awareness and preferences toward competing hospital services.

    PubMed

    Woodside, A; Shinn, R

    1988-03-01

    Does unaided awareness of a hospital affect former patients' preferences for and intention to use the medical services of that hospital? Do customer preferences toward hospitals influence their intentions to use the medical services of those hospitals? To what extent does satisfaction with previous hospital stays affect former patients' intentions to return to the same hospital? The authors provide some tentative answers to these questions. The results of an exploratory field study of former inpatients of one hospital are reported. Several recommendations for research and hospital marketing strategies are provided.

  7. 42 CFR 440.20 - Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.20 Outpatient hospital services and rural health clinic services. (a) Outpatient hospital... agency may exclude from the definition of “outpatient hospital services” those types of items and... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient hospital services and rural...

  8. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for...

  9. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for...

  10. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for...

  11. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for...

  12. 38 CFR 17.49 - Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Priorities for outpatient medical services and inpatient hospital care. 17.49 Section 17.49 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.49 Priorities for...

  13. Public expectations for nonemergency hospital resources and services during disasters.

    PubMed

    Charney, Rachel L; Rebmann, Terri; Esguerra, Cybill R; Lai, Charlene W; Dalawari, Preeti

    2013-04-01

    The public's expectations of hospital services during disasters may not reflect current hospital disaster plans. The objective of this study was to determine the public's expected hospital service utilization during a pandemic, earthquake, and terrorist bombing. A survey was distributed to adult patients or family members at 3 emergency departments (EDs). Participants identified resources and services they expect to need during 3 disaster scenarios. Linear regression was used to describe factors associated with higher expected utilization scores for each scenario. Of the 961 people who participated in the study, 66.9% were women, 47.5% were white, and 44.6% were black. Determinants of higher pandemic resource utilization included persons who were younger (P < .01); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED visits (P < .01), hospitalization (P = .001), or fewer primary care provider visits (P = .001) in the past year; and did not have a reunification plan (P < .001). Determinants of higher earthquake resource utilization included persons who were non-white (P < .001); who were a patient or spouse (vs parent) participating in the study (P < .05 and P = .001); and had higher ED visits in the past year (P = .001). Determinants of higher bombing resource utilization included persons who were female (P = .001); non-white (P < .001); had higher ED (P = .001) or primary care provider (P < .01) visits in past year; and experienced the loss of home or property during a past disaster (P < .05). Public expectations of hospitals during disasters are high, and some expectations are inappropriate. Better community disaster planning and public risk communication are needed.

  14. Genetic counseling, a health department service to physicians.

    PubMed

    Jolly, E; Blum, H L

    1965-11-01

    Questions about inheritance in all kinds of diseases and defects are commonly asked of nearly all physicians. In attempting to answer these questions, however, the physician is often hampered by lack of formal instruction in clinical genetics. Since the health department, if it is to carry out its epidemiologic function, must be as concerned over the increasing identification of genetic agents in disease as it is and has been over environmental disease agents, it should come to represent a source of assistance not now generally available to the physician. In short, as it carries out those activities by which its store of general genetic information is increased, and until other sources of genetic consultation become reasonably available, the health department can be of real service to physicians as a resource to which they may turn for help when dealing with families wanting genetic information. Such a service has been provided experimentally for the last two years by the Contra Costa County Health Department. This program calls for the taking of family pedigrees by public health nurses on families with questions of a genetic nature who are health department clients and on families who are referred by their private physicians for this service. An interpretation of each pedigree is made by the department's physician in charge of the program and submitted to the family's physician for his use in counseling the family. Evidence to date suggests the process can be a highly useful service to the practitioner and his patient.

  15. Comparison of pharmacy services at critical access hospitals and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Ursan, Julia D; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    The results of a survey evaluating pharmacy services and technology use at critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other small and rural hospitals in Illinois are reported. A mail survey was sent to pharmacy directors at 86 CAHs and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois not designated as CAHs. Independent sample t tests and chi-square statistics were used to compare CAHs and non-CAHs in areas such as pharmacy services, staffing, use of technology, and sterile compounding practices. The survey response rate was 46.5%, with usable data received from 40 hospitals. Analysis of the survey data indicated that hospitals designated as CAHs were significantly less likely than non-CAHs to have automatic therapeutic interchange policies (p = 0.012) and more likely to conduct pharmacist-provided educational programs on medication costs for physicians and other health care personnel (p = 0.037). Relative to non-CAHs, CAHs were significantly less likely to have automated dispensing cabinets (p = 0.016) and to out-source the preparation of sterile products to offsite vendors (p = 0.012); pharmacy directors at CAHs were less likely to report the use of technology for remote medication order entry or review (p = 0.038). At both types of facilities, pharmacists typically have both distributive and clinical responsibilities, and patient-specific clinical pharmacy services (e.g., patient education or counseling, other drug therapy monitoring, medication reconciliation, pharmacokinetic consultations) are offered at similar frequencies. A survey of pharmacy departments at small and rural hospitals in Illinois determined that there were more similarities than differences between CAHs and non-CAHs. The survey indicated significant differences in dispensing processes, the use of technology and drug policy tools, and outsourcing of sterile product preparation.

  16. [Comparison analysis on remedy condition of acute chemical intoxication in emergency departments and occupational departments of general hospitals].

    PubMed

    Li, An; Wang, Xiao-hong; Hao, Feng-tong

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the current situation of treatment for acute chemical poisoning in the emergency departments and occupational disease departments of some general hospitals and to provide a basis for improving the ability of general hospital to deal with acute chemical poisoning. Four hospitals from Shandong Province, Beijing City, and Shanxi Province, China were selected in the study. They included two first-class hospitals located in the downtown, where the patients with acute chemical poisoning from urban and suburban areas were admitted to the occupational disease departments, and two second-class hospitals located in the suburban area or county, where the patients with acute chemical poisoning from the suburban area were admitted to the emergency departments. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 141 medical workers (51 persons in the emergence department group and 90 persons in the occupational disease department group) that were engaged in the treatment of acute chemical poisoning in the four hospitals; 1999 medical records were analyzed. Individual in-depth interviews, questionnaire investigation, and field observation were used to compare the emergency department group and occupational disease department group in terms of the ability to deal with acute chemical poisoning and the training on treatment for acute chemical poisoning. The emergency department group had significantly higher proportion of pesticide poisoning cases than the occupational disease department group (P<0.01). Thirty-seven of the patients in occupational disease department group died, with a fatality rate of 2.7%, and 14 of the patients in emergence department group died,with a fatality rate of 2.2%, so there was no significant difference between the two groups in this regard (P>0.05). There were significantly more cases treated without emergency plan in the emergency department group than in the occupational disease department group ( 37.3% vs. 10.0%, P <0.0 1). The occupational

  17. In California, Primary Care Continuity Was Associated With Reduced Emergency Department Use And Fewer Hospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Pourat, Nadereh; Davis, Anna C.; Chen, Xiao; Vrungos, Shelley; Kominski, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The expansion of health insurance coverage to millions of Americans through the Affordable Care Act has given rise to concerns over increased use of emergency department (ED) and hospital services by previously uninsured populations. Prior research has also demonstrated that continuity with a regular source of primary care is associated with lower utilization of ED and inpatient services and with better patient satisfaction. We assessed the impact of a policy to increase patient adherence with an individual primary care provider or clinic and subsequent use of ED and hospital services in a California coverage program for previously uninsured adults called the Health Care Coverage Initiative. We found that the policy was associated with increased probability of primary care provider adherence (change in probability = 42%). Furthermore, patients who were always adherent had a higher probability of having no ED visits (change in probability = 2.0%) and no hospitalizations (change in probability = 1.7%) compared to those who were never adherent. Primary care provider adherence can reduce utilization of costly care because it allows patients’ health care needs to be managed within the less-expensive primary care setting. PMID:26153305

  18. Understanding non-emergency patients admitted to hospitals through the emergency department for efficient ED functions.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jee-In; Chang, Hyejung

    2010-05-01

    ED overcrowding and inefficient flow are closely related to the presence of non-emergency patients. This study aims to examine the characteristics of the non-emergency patients admitted to hospitals through the emergency department by comparison with emergency ED patients and inpatients admitted through outpatient departments, in terms of patient demographics and health care utilization and outcomes. This study used an exploratory descriptive design. The retrospective data of 280,104 patients from 38 hospitals were analyzed. chi(2) Tests and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine significant differences among the 3 patient groups. Among the patients admitted through the emergency department, 13.1% were non-emergency patients. These non-emergency ED patients showed different health care utilization characteristics: 42.8% had 4 or more diagnoses, 90.3% had 5 or more laboratory tests, and 89.4% had radiology tests. After we controlled for patient characteristics and health care utilization variables, mortality risk of emergency ED patients was 2-fold higher than that of non-emergency ED patients and standard inpatients (odds ratio, 2.1), but the referral rate to other facilities on discharge was the highest in non-emergency ED patients compared with standard inpatients (odds ratio, 3.3). Non-emergency patients admitted to hospitals through the emergency department showed special needs for health care services: care continuity, improved access, and fast tracking for acute care hospital-level treatment. Health care policies and strategies are suggested for efficient ED functions. Copyright 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  19. Computerized system for hospital engineering service management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centeno, C. A.; Gonzalez, E. A.; Cagnolo, F. J.; Olmos, C. E.

    2007-11-01

    When a Hospital Engineering Service (HES) is implemented within a health care environment, the idea is to improve service conditions and costs as well as to provide timely responses to equipment preventive maintenance and infrastructure requirements. An HES must, within the shortest possible period of time, meet the above requirements at the cost necessary to provide the service quality sought. In many cases there is a lack of minimal materials and staff who are qualified to attain the objectives that have been set. Therefore, external assistance becomes necessary. In this context, actions are often taken which, because they are not recorded, cannot be assessed in order to evaluate the HES. Since all action taken is appraised from the purely economic point of view, in the final analysis the contributions from staff remain invisible. This situation works against the possibility of quantifying the convenience of possessing an internal HES. The software support system we have developed here is oriented toward providing all the necessary data to address this issue.

  20. ABC estimation of unit costs for emergency department services.

    PubMed

    Holmes, R L; Schroeder, R E

    1996-04-01

    Rapid evolution of the health care industry forces managers to make cost-effective decisions. Typical hospital cost accounting systems do not provide emergency department managers with the information needed, but emergency department settings are so complex and dynamic as to make the more accurate activity-based costing (ABC) system prohibitively expensive. Through judicious use of the available traditional cost accounting information and simple computer spreadsheets. managers may approximate the decision-guiding information that would result from the much more costly and time-consuming implementation of ABC.

  1. MICRO-CARES: An Information Management System for Psychosocial Services in Hospital Settings

    PubMed Central

    Hammer, Jeffrey S.; Lyons, John S.; Strain, James J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a flexible software system that is adaptable to a variety of information management uses across different psychosocial service departments in hospital settings. Initially developed for Consultation Liaison Psychiatry, the present system has now been adapted for a Social Work department and is being adapted to Hospice, Home Care, Patient Representative, and Pastoral Care departmental uses.

  2. Price Increases Were Much Lower In Ambulatory Surgery Centers Than Hospital Outpatient Departments In 2007-12.

    PubMed

    Carey, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    Ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are freestanding facilities that provide services to patients who do not require an overnight stay. The number of ASCs has grown rapidly over the past fifteen years, as have the number of surgical procedures performed at them. ASCs now compete with hospital outpatient departments. This study examined the revenue side of ASC growth by using a large national claims database that contains information on actual prices paid. For six common outpatient surgical procedures, prices paid to ASCs on the whole grew in line with general medical care prices, while overall prices paid to hospital outpatient departments for the same procedures climbed sharply. This provides no evidence that ASCs are successfully pressuring hospital outpatient departments to lower their prices. Not unexpectedly, private insurers paid ASCs considerably more than Medicare paid ASCs for the same procedures. Medicare currently pays ASCs a legislated percentage of what it pays hospital outpatient departments for the same services, but there is a considerable discrepancy between this ratio and the ratio of payments by private insurers across provider types and procedures. This finding questions the wisdom of using a single ratio for ASC payments to hospital outpatient department payments. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Process mapping of PTA and stent placement in a university hospital interventional radiology department.

    PubMed

    de Bucourt, Maximilian; Busse, Reinhard; Güttler, Felix; Reinhold, Thomas; Vollnberg, Bernd; Kentenich, Max; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgräber, Ulf K

    2012-08-01

    To apply the process mapping technique in an interdisciplinary approach in order to visualize, better understand, and efficiently organize percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stent placement procedures in a university hospital's interventional radiology department. After providing an overview of seven established mapping techniques for medical professionals, the process mapping technique was chosen and applied in an interdisciplinary approach including referrers (physicians, nurses, and other staff in referring departments, e.g., vascular surgery), providers (interventional radiologists, nurses, technicians, and staff of the angiography suite), and specialists of the hospital's controlling department. A generally binding and standardized process map was created, describing the entire procedure for a patient in whom the radiological intervention of PTA or stent treatment is contemplated from admission to the department of vascular surgery until discharge after successful treatment. This visualization tool assists in better understanding (especially given natural staff fluctuation over time) and efficiently organizing PTA and stent procedures. Process mapping can be applied for streamlining workflow in healthcare, especially in interdisciplinary settings. By defining exactly what a business entity does, who is responsible, to what standard a process should be completed, and how the success can be assessed, this technique can be used to eliminate waste and inefficiencies from the workplace while providing high-quality goods and services easily, quickly, and inexpensively. Process mapping can be used in a university hospital's interventional radiology department. • Process mapping can describe the patient's entire process from admission to PTA/stent placement until discharge. • Process mapping can be used in interdisciplinary teams (e.g., referrers, providers, and controlling specialists). • Process mapping can be used in order to more efficiently

  4. Provision of Personal Healthcare Services by Local Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huabin; Sotnikov, Sergey; Winterbauer, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The scope of local health department (LHD) involvement in providing personal healthcare services versus population-based services has been debated for decades. A 2012 IOM report suggests that LHDs should gradually withdraw from providing personal healthcare services. The purpose of this study is to assess the level of LHD involvement in provision of personal healthcare services during 2008–2013 and examine the association between provision of personal healthcare services and per capita public health expenditures. Methods Data are from the 2013 survey of LHDs and Area Health Resource Files. The number, ratio, and share of revenue from personal healthcare services were estimated. Both linear and panel fixed effects models were used to examine the association between provision of personal healthcare services and per capita public health expenditures. Data were analyzed in 2014. Results The mean number of personal healthcare services provided by LHDs did not change significantly in 2008–2013. Overall, personal services constituted 28% of total service items. The share of revenue from personal services increased from 16.8% in 2008 to 20.3% in 2013. Results from the fixed effect panel models show a positive association between personal healthcare services’ share of revenue and per capita expenditures (b=0.57, p<0.001). Conclusions A lower share of revenue from personal healthcare services is associated with lower per capita expenditures. LHDs, especially those serving <25,000 people, are highly dependent on personal healthcare revenue to sustain per capita expenditures. LHDs may need to consider strategies to replace lost revenue from discontinuing provision of personal healthcare services. PMID:25997902

  5. 26 CFR 1.513-6 - Certain hospital services not unrelated trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certain hospital services not unrelated trade or business. 1.513-6 Section 1.513-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain...

  6. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  7. 26 CFR 1.513-6 - Certain hospital services not unrelated trade or business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Certain hospital services not unrelated trade or business. 1.513-6 Section 1.513-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Taxation of Business Income of Certain Exempt...

  8. Hippi Care Hospital: Towards Proactive Business Processes in Emergency Room Services. Teaching Case

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Kar Way; Shankararaman, Venky

    2014-01-01

    It was 2:35 am on a Saturday morning. Wiki Lim, process specialist from the Process Innovation Centre (PIC) of Hippi Care Hospital (HCH), desperately doodling on her notepad for ideas to improve service delivery at HCH's Emergency Department (ED). HCH has committed to the public that its ED would meet the service quality criterion of serving 90%…

  9. 42 CFR 409.26 - Transfer agreement hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital services. (a) Services furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training. Medicare pays for medical services that are furnished by an intern or a resident-in-training (under a hospital teaching program approved in accordance with the provisions of § 409.15) as posthospital SNF care, if the intern or resident...

  10. Modelling a radiology department service using a VDL integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Guglielmino, Maria Gabriella; Celano, Giovanni; Costa, Antonio; Fichera, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    The healthcare industry is facing several challenges such as the reduction of costs and quality improvement of the provided services. Engineering studies could be very useful in supporting organizational and management processes. Healthcare service efficiency depends on a strong collaboration between clinical and engineering experts, especially when it comes to analyzing the system and its constraints in detail and subsequently, when it comes to deciding on the reengineering of some key activities. The purpose of this paper is to propose a case study showing how a mix of representation tools allow a manager of a radiology department to solve some human and technological resource re-organizational issues, which have to be faced due to the introduction of a new technology and a new portfolio of services. In order to simulate the activities within the radiology department and examine the relationship between human and technological resources, different visual diagrammatic language (VDL) techniques have been implemented to get knowledge about the heterogeneous factors related to the healthcare service delivery. In particular, flow charts, IDEFO diagrams and Petri nets have been integrated each other with success as a modelisation tools. The simulation study performed through the application of the aforementioned VDL techniques suggests the opportunity of re-organizing the nurse activities within the radiology department. The re-organization of a healthcare service and in particular of a radiology department by means of joint flow charts, IDEF0 diagrams and Petri nets is a poorly investigated topic in literature. This paper demonstrates how flow charts and IDEF0 can help people working within the department to understand the weak points of their organization and constitute an efficient base of knowledge for the implementation of a Petri net aimed at improving the departmental performance.

  11. Disaster preparation and the functioning of a hospital social work department during the Gulf War.

    PubMed

    Ben Shahar, I

    1993-01-01

    The nature of the Gulf War and its consequences for the public at the personal and community levels, called for considerable alterations in organization and management at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, the largest government general hospital in Israel, with constant adaptation to the changing situation. The preparations and exercises preceding the state of emergency, combined with the knowledge and experience gained in similar situations in the past, equipped the staff of the Social Work Department to function adequately and to make appropriate decisions and changes in the face of moral and ethical dilemmas, as well as immediate physical threat. This article presents the rationale for the model of intervention that guided the hospital during the Gulf War in offering services to casualty victims and their families. Also discussed are the process of developing an organizational framework and its content that meets wartime demands, and the implications for social work practice in dealing with a war crisis.

  12. A descriptive study of access to services in a random sample of Canadian rural emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Fleet, Richard; Poitras, Julien; Maltais-Giguère, Julie; Villa, Julie; Archambault, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine 24/7 access to services and consultants in a sample of Canadian rural emergency departments (EDs). Design Cross-sectional study—mixed methods (structured interview, survey and government data bases) with random sampling of hospitals. Setting Canadian rural EDs (rural small town (RST) definition—Statistics Canada). Participants 28% (95/336) of Canadian rural EDs providing 24/7 physician coverage located in hospitals with acute care hospitalisation beds. Main outcome measures General characteristics of the rural EDs, information about 24/7 access to consultants, equipment and services, and the proportion of rural hospitals more than 300 km from levels 1 and 2 trauma centres. Results Of the 336 rural EDs identified, 122 (36%) were randomly selected and contacted. Overall, 95 EDs participated in the study (participation rate, 78%). Hospitals had, on an average, 23 acute care beds, 7 ED stretchers and 13 500 annual ED visits. The proportion of rural hospitals with local access to the following 24/7 services was paediatrician, 5%; obstetrician, 10%; psychiatrist, 11%; internist, 12%; intensive care unit, 17%; CT scanner, 20%; surgeon, 26%; ultrasound, 28%; basic X-ray, 97% and laboratory services, 99%. Forty-four per cent and 54% of the RST EDs were more than 300 km from a level 1 and level 2 trauma centre, respectively. Conclusions This is the first study describing the services available in Canadian rural EDs. Apart from basic laboratory and X-ray services, most rural EDs have limited access to consultants, advanced imaging and critical care services. A detailed study is needed to evaluate the impact of these limited services on patient outcomes, costs and interfacility transport demands. PMID:24285633

  13. [Development of bioethics. Analysis of practices in 20 hospital departments].

    PubMed

    de Montgolfier, S; Moutel, G; Hervé, C

    2000-10-28

    In order to analyze the constitution and management of DNA banks and the limitations on procedures currently used in France, we conducted a study in a sample of French hospital units. A DNA bank was defined as any facility where individual samples of DNA, irrespective of the form, are stored for ongoing or future gene studies. The aim of this work was to focus attention on the need for in-depth thought on the ethical issues involved in storing and using DNA as part of everyday clinical practice and research and to provide elements for a debate on the interest and limitations of the French bioethics laws whose revision is currently being considered. A questionnaire was sent to the heads of departments in two university hospitals. Five areas were retained for evaluation: the nature and degree of DNA storage activities, procedures followed for reporting the DNA bank, procedures used to protect confidentiality, information given to patients and procedures used for informed consent, and finally, internal rules governing the bank's operation. The answers to the questionnaires were analyzed anonymously. Among 20 hospital units collecting DNA samples, 70% also stored other samples (DNA, blood, tissue, cell lines) including a large proportion of tissue samples. These samples were collected for purposes of fundamental research and clinical practice. The number of samples stored was quite variable, ranging from a few dozen samples to more than 40,000. Only 55% of the units had reported the facility to a control body, in compliance with current law. Seventy percent maintained computerized data bases but only 50% used an anonymous code. Seventy-five percent obtained written consent but patients were not always informed of the site of the storage or the transfer of their DNA. In addition, the validity of the consent over time, the duration of storage and the types of studies that could be conducted on the DNA were poorly detailed. Internal rules governing the bank's activities

  14. [Development and application of hospital customer service center platform].

    PubMed

    Chen, Minya; Zheng, Konglin; Xia, Yong

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the construction and application of the platform of client service center in the general hospital and discusses how to provide patients with an entire service including service before clinic, on clinic and after clinic. It can also provide references for a new service mode for clinic service.

  15. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  16. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  17. 75 FR 67998 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Chattahoochee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests.... Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests, Gainesville, GA. The...

  18. [Mental Health in the General Hospital: Results of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) in Four Hospital Services].

    PubMed

    Castro-Camacho, Leonidas; Escobar, Juan Manuel; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Delgado-Barrera, Lucía; Aparicio-Turbay, Soraya; Molano, Juan Carlos; Noguera, Efraín

    2012-03-01

    Few individuals have access to mental health services due in part to underdetection. As it is more likely to consult for medical conditions, primary care may be a useful gateway for early detection of mental health problems. Detection of the frequency of mental health problems in four hospital services at the Fundación Santa Fe de Bogotá: Outpatient unit, hospitalization, emergency department, and primary care through a brief detection questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Cross-sectional study of patients seen at the four services who answered a Demographic Data Questionnaire and the PHQ together with information gathered about current medical diagnosis, history of visits, and hospitalizations during the last year. 1094 patients seen at the four hospital services between September 2010 and May 2011 were selected at random. A mental health problem was detected in 36.7% of the total sample. Major depressive disorder (7.3%), alcohol abuse (14.4%), and any anxiety disorder (7.7%) showed the highest prevalence with the emergency department showing the highest frequency of detection. The usefulness of a brief detection questionnaire such as the PHQ in hospital settings is demonstrated and implications in the design of mental health programs in the general hospital are discussed. The need to replicate this study in other settings and to undertake further research is outlined. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Forecasting Hospitalization and Emergency Department Visit Rates for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. A Time-Series Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gershon, Andrea; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Moineddin, Rahim; Zhao, Xiu Yan; Hwee, Jeremiah; To, Teresa

    2017-06-01

    Knowing trends in and forecasting hospitalization and emergency department visit rates for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can enable health care providers, hospitals, and health care decision makers to plan for the future. We conducted a time-series analysis using health care administrative data from the Province of Ontario, Canada, to determine previous trends in acute care hospitalization and emergency department visit rates for COPD and then to forecast future rates. Individuals aged 35 years and older with physician-diagnosed COPD were identified using four universal government health administrative databases and a validated case definition. Monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD were determined from 2003 to 2014 and then forecasted to 2024 using autoregressive integrated moving average models. Between 2003 and 2014, COPD prevalence increased from 8.9 to 11.1%. During that time, there were 274,951 hospitalizations and 290,482 emergency department visits for COPD. After accounting for seasonality, we found that monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 individuals with COPD remained stable. COPD prevalence was forecasted to increase to 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 11.4-14.1) by 2024, whereas monthly COPD hospitalization and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD were forecasted to remain stable at 2.7 (95% CI, 1.6-4.4) and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.3-5.6), respectively. Forecasted age- and sex-stratified rates were also stable. COPD hospital and emergency department visit rates per 1,000 people with COPD have been stable for more than a decade and are projected to remain stable in the near future. Given increasing COPD prevalence, this means notably more COPD health service use in the future.

  20. Psychiatric Patient Length of Stay in the Emergency Department Following Closure of a Public Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Misek, Ryan K; Magda, Ashley D; Margaritis, Samantha; Long, Robert; Frost, Erik

    2017-07-01

    Psychiatric patient boarding in the emergency department (ED) is a ubiquitous problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluate the effect of closing a public psychiatric facility in a major metropolitan area on the ED length of stay (LOS) of psychiatric patients. This was a retrospective chart review at two metropolitan EDs of all patients assessed to require inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. The time of arrival, time of disposition, time of transfer, insurance status, and accepting facility type were collected prior to and following the closure of a local inpatient psychiatric facility. We analyzed a total of 1107 patients requiring inpatient psychiatric hospitalization, with 671 patients who presented prior to the closure of the closest public psychiatric facility and 436 patients that presented following the facility closure. Following hospital closure, patients with private insurance (620 min before, 771 min after) and Medicare/Medicaid (642 min before, 718 min after) had statistically significantly longer ED LOS, as well as patients transferred to a private psychiatric hospital (664 min prior, 745 min after). However, overall ED length of stay following hospital closure for transfer of all psychiatric patients requiring inpatient hospitalization was not found to be statistically significant (1017 min prior, 967 min after). There was a statistically significant increase in ED LOS for patients with private insurance, Medicare/Medicaid, and for those patients transferred to a private psychiatric facility following closure of a public mental health hospital; however, overall, ED LOS was not increased for patients transferred to an inpatient psychiatric facility. This study highlights the significant impact that the closure of a single inpatient psychiatric facility can have on nearby EDs. We hope to bring attention to the need for increased psychiatric services during a time when there is a nationwide trend toward the reduction

  1. [Quality in the anesthesia department of San Cecilio Hospital from the professionals' perspective].

    PubMed

    Danet-Danet, A; Palacios-Córdoba, A; March-Cerdá, J C

    To evaluate the quality of the services provided by the anaesthesia department of the San Cecilio Clinical University Hospital, from the health professionals' point of view. Location: Andalusia. 134 health professionals in contact with the hospital anaesthesia department. Tool: self-administered questionnaire, measuring: accessibility, personal treatment, comfort, scientific and technical quality (scale 1 to 5), overall satisfaction (scale 0 to 10), and suggestions for improvement. A descriptive statistical and correlation analysis were performed, including mean differences (by sex, frequency of contact with the anaesthesia department, and unit), as well as a regression model. The quality of personal treatment received a mean of 4.2 points (SD 0.651), the scientific and technical quality 4.00 points (SD 0.532), accessibility 3.3 (SD 0.795), professional comfort 3.30 (SD 0.988), and patient comfort 2.62 points (SD 1.051). Overall satisfaction obtained a mean of 7.1 points (0 to 10 scale). Women and professionals working in units with less than 10 people had a better general evaluation of the anaesthesia department. The worse perspective was that of staff with daily contact with the anaesthesia department. Among the suggestions for improvement there were: Reducing waiting lists, creating special rooms to give information to families, improving working conditions, training and work satisfaction for staff, and achieving better communication and collaboration between health professionals. The internal evaluation shows the need for training strategies and organisational interventions in the anaesthesia department, in order to achieve a better quality and satisfaction for both professionals and patients. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals. 424.13 Section 424.13 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... PAYMENT Certification and Plan Requirements § 424.13 Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals...

  3. A proposed simulation optimization model framework for emergency department problems in public hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Ireen Munira; Liong, Choong-Yeun; Bakar, Sakhinah Abu; Ahmad, Norazura; Najmuddin, Ahmad Farid

    2015-12-01

    The Emergency Department (ED) is a very complex system with limited resources to support increase in demand. ED services are considered as good quality if they can meet the patient's expectation. Long waiting times and length of stay is always the main problem faced by the management. The management of ED should give greater emphasis on their capacity of resources in order to increase the quality of services, which conforms to patient satisfaction. This paper is a review of work in progress of a study being conducted in a government hospital in Selangor, Malaysia. This paper proposed a simulation optimization model framework which is used to study ED operations and problems as well as to find an optimal solution to the problems. The integration of simulation and optimization is hoped can assist management in decision making process regarding their resource capacity planning in order to improve current and future ED operations.

  4. The Experiences and Perceptions of Street-Involved Youth Regarding Emergency Department Services.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, David B; Newton, Amanda S; Calhoun, Avery; Dong, Kathryn; deJong-Berg, Margaret A; Hamilton, Faye; Kilmer, Christopher; McLaughlin, Anne Marie; Shankar, Janki

    2016-05-01

    Street-involved (SI) youth comprise a substantial component of the urban homeless population. Despite being significant users of hospital emergency department (ED) services for acute and ongoing health needs, little is known about their experiences of ED care and the factors affecting their ED use. This study used a grounded theory and community-based approach to examine these issues. Focus groups and individual interviews were facilitated with 48 SI youth between ages 15 and 26 years, recruited in hospital or through community agencies serving SI youth in a major Western Canadian city. Results demonstrate that SI youth often perceived suboptimal care and experienced long waiting periods that led to many avoiding or prematurely exiting the ED. Service gaps appeared to have a negative bearing on their care and health outcomes. Findings invite a critical review of ED care processes, structures, and staff interactions in the aim of enhancing ED services to SI youth. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. An Empirical Analysis of the Current Need for Teleneuromedical Care in German Hospitals without Neurology Departments

    PubMed Central

    Ickenstein, G. W.; Groß, S.; Tenckhoff, D.; Hausn, P.; Becker, U.; Klisch, J.; Isenmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    Indroduction. At present, modern telemedicine methods are being introduced, that may contribute to reducing lack of qualified stroke patient care, particularly in less populated regions. With the help of video conferencing systems, a so-called neuromedical teleconsultation is carried out. Methods. The study included a multicentered, completely standardized survey of physicians in hospitals by means of a computerized on-line questionnaire. Descriptive statistical methods were used for data analysis. Results. 119 acute hospitals without neurology departments were included in the study. The most important reasons for participating in a teleneuromedical network is seen as the improvement in the quality of treatment (82%), the ability to avoid unnecessary patient transport (76%), easier and faster access to stroke expertise (72%) as well as better competitiveness among medical services (67%). The most significant problem areas are the financing system of teleneuromedicine with regard to the acquisition costs of the technical equipment (43%) and the compensation for the stroke-unit center with the specialists' consultation service (31%) as well as legal aspects of teleneuromedicine (27%). Conclusions. This investigation showed that there is a high acceptance for teleneuromedicine among co-operating hospitals. However these facilities have goals in addition to improved quality in stroke treatment. Therefore the use of teleneuromedicine must be also associated with long term incentives for the overall health care system, particularly since the implementation of a teleneuromedicine network system is time consuming and associated with high implementation costs. PMID:20671991

  6. Assessing the impact of the presence of pharmacists in a clinical department of a Lebanese hospital.

    PubMed

    Rabbaa-Khabbaz, L; Karam, L; Farhat, C; Azzi, R; Karam Sarkis, D

    2012-11-01

    Clinical pharmacy services are still in their very early implementation stages in Lebanon. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the impact of clinical pharmacist's presence at the infectious diseases department of Hôtel-Dieu de France University Hospital of Beirut (HDF) and to evaluate the acceptance of pharmacist's interventions by healthcare providers. A 21-month prospective analysis was conducted, including 240 hospitalized patients in the infectious diseases department of HDF and 475 interventions performed by the pharmacist. A clinical pharmacist and pharmacy residents were present for 1 to 2hours/day in the ward. A pharmaceutical care plan was established and used to document patients' problems and pharmacist's interventions. Main criteria analyzed were: types and frequencies of pharmaceutical problems detected, types of pharmaceutical interventions performed, their acceptance by the prescribers and/or nurses, and factors affecting the interventions and their acceptance. The most frequent pharmaceutical problem detected was incorrect dosage and the three most frequent interventions performed by the pharmacist were stop/start/substitute a drug, change drug dosage/or daily distribution, and change administration time. The acceptance was the highest for I.TIM (change drug administration time) and the lowest for I.FOL (request a lab test/exam/clinical follow-up). Even a short daily pharmacist's presence is an added value in inpatient care at the infectious diseases department of Hôtel-Dieu de France University Hospital. Areas of improvement are a better communication between the pharmacist and the prescribers, a direct contact between pharmacist and patient and a longer presence of the clinical pharmacist in the clinical department. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  7. Admission of nursing home residents to a hospital internal medicine department.

    PubMed

    Barba, Raquel; Zapatero, Antonio; Marco, Javier; Perez, Alejandro; Canora, Jesús; Plaza, Susana; Losa, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Hospitalization of nursing home residents is costly and potentially exposes residents to iatrogenic disease and psychological harm. In this study, we analyzed the data from the Basic Minimum Data Set of patients hospitalized from the nursing home who were discharged from all the internal medicine departments at the National Health Service hospitals in Spain between 2005 and 2008, according to the data provided by the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs. Between January 2005 and December 2008, 2,134,363 patients were admitted to internal medicine departments in Spain, of whom 45,757 (2.1%) were nursing home residents. Overall, 7898 (17.3%) patients died during hospitalization, 2442 (30.91%) of them in the first 48 hours. The following variables were the significant predictors of in-hospital mortality in multivariate analysis: age (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.02-1.03), female gender (OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.13-1.17), dementia (OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.03-1.16), previous feeding tube (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.09-1.79), malignant disease (OR 2.03, 95% CI 1.86-2.23), acute infectious disease (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25), pressure sores (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.62-1.95), acute respiratory failure (OR 2.00, 95% CI 1.90-2.10), and nosocomial pneumonia (OR 2.5, 95% CI 2.23-2.72). Two of every 100 patients admitted to internal medicine departments came from nursing homes. The rate of mortality is very high in these patients, with almost one third of patients dying in the first 48 hours, which suggests that many of these transfers were unnecessary. The cost of these admissions for 1 year was equivalent to the annual budget of a 300- to 400-bed public hospital in Spain. The mechanism of coordination between nursing homes and public hospitals must be reviewed with the aim of containing costs and facilitating the care of patients in the last days of life. Copyright © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Medicaid program; clarification of outpatient hospital facility (including outpatient hospital clinic) services definition. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-11-07

    Outpatient hospital services are a mandatory part of the standard Medicaid benefit package. This final rule aligns the Medicaid definition of outpatient hospital services more closely to the Medicare definition in order to: Improve the functionality of the applicable upper payment limits (which are based on a comparison to Medicare payments for the same services), provide more transparency in determining available hospital coverage in any State, and generally clarify the scope of services for which Federal financial participation (FFP) is available under the outpatient hospital services benefit category.

  9. Risk Factors for Psychiatric Hospital Admission for Participants in California's Full-Service Partnership Program.

    PubMed

    Penkunas, Michael J; Hahn-Smith, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the demographic and clinical predictors of psychiatric hospitalization during the first 2 years of treatment for adults participating in the full-service partnership (FSP) program, based on Assertive Community Treatment, in a large county in northern California. Clinical and demographic characteristics, data on prior hospitalizations, length of enrollment, and living situation for 328 FSP participants were collected from the county's internal billing system and the California Department of Health Care Services. In univariate models, the probability of hospitalization varied by diagnosis, age, and hospitalization history. In the multivariate model, younger age and frequent hospitalization prior to enrollment predicted hospitalization during enrollment. Findings support prior research on hospital recidivism and may be beneficial in refining future strategies for meeting the needs of adults with serious mental illness.

  10. Performance improvement indicators of the Medical Records Department and Information Technology (IT) in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ketabi, Saedeh; Torabiyan, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Medical Record Department (MRD) has a vital role in making short and long term plans to improve health system services. The aim of this study was to describe performance improvement indicators of hospital MRD and information technology (IT). Collection of Data: A search was conducted in various databases, through related keywords in articles, books, and abstracts of conferences from 2001 to 2009. About 58 articles and books were available which were evaluated and finally 15 of them were selected based on their relevance to the study. MRD must be capable of supporting tasks such as patient care and continuity, institute management processes, medical education programs, medical research, communication between different wards of a hospital and administrative and medical staff. The use of IT in MRD can facilitate access to department, expedite communication within and outside department, reduce space with electronic medical records, reduce costs, accelerate activities such as coding by use of coding guide software and facilitate retrieval of records that will ultimately improve the performance of MRD. PMID:26150874

  11. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  12. Hospital emergency department utilisation rates among the immigrant population in Barcelona, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Buron, Andrea; Cots, Francesc; Garcia, Oscar; Vall, Oriol; Castells, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent increase in the number of immigrants of Barcelona represents a challenge for the public healthcare system, the emergency department being the most used healthcare service by this group. However, utilisation rates in our environment have not yet been studied. We aimed to compare emergency department utilisation rates between Spanish-born and foreign-born residents in a public hospital of Barcelona. Methods The study population included all adults residing in the area of study and visiting the emergency department of Hospital del Mar in 2004. The emergency care episodes were selected from the Emergency Department register, and the population figures from the Statistics Department of Barcelona. Emergency care episodes were classified into five large clinical categories. Adjusted rate ratios (RR) of utilisation among foreign-born vs. Spanish-born residents were assessed through negative binomial regression. Results The overall utilisation rate was 382 emergency contacts per 1,000 persons-years. The RR for foreign-born versus Spanish-born residents was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.52; 0.74%). The RR was also significantly below one in surgery (0.51, 95% CI: 0.42; 0.63), traumatology (0.47, 95% CI: 0.38; 0.59), medicine (0.48, 95% CI: 0.38; 0.59) and psychiatry (0.42, 95% CI: 0.18; 0.97). No differences were found in utilisation of gynaecology and minor emergency services. Conclusion The overall lower utilisation rates obtained for foreign-born residents is consistent with previous studies and is probably due to the "healthy immigrant effect". Thus, the population increase due to immigration does not translate directly into a corresponding increase in the number of emergency contacts. The lack of differences in minor and gynaecological emergency care supports the hypothesis that immigrants overcome certain barriers by using the emergency department to access to health services. The issue of healthcare barriers should therefore be addressed, especially among

  13. Population aging and emergency departments: visits will not increase, lengths-of-stay and hospitalizations will.

    PubMed

    Pallin, Daniel J; Allen, Matthew B; Espinola, Janice A; Camargo, Carlos A; Bohan, J Stephen

    2013-07-01

    With US emergency care characterized as "at the breaking point," we studied how the aging of the US population would affect demand for emergency department (ED) services and hospitalizations in the coming decades. We applied current age-specific ED visit rates to the population structure anticipated by the Census Bureau to exist through 2050. Our results indicate that the aging of the population will not cause the number of ED visits to increase any more than would be expected from population growth. However, the data do predict increases in visit lengths and the likelihood of hospitalization. As a result, the aggregate amount of time patients spend in EDs nationwide will increase 10 percent faster than population growth. This means that ED capacity will have to increase by 10 percent, even without an increase in the number of visits. Hospital admissions from the ED will increase 23 percent faster than population growth, which will require hospitals to expand capacity faster than required by raw population growth alone.

  14. Analysis of blood tests in the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Rehmani, R.; Amanullah, S.

    1999-01-01

    There is ample evidence that many investigations sent from the accident and emergency department are inappropriate, thus affecting the quality of patient care. A study was designed to address this issue in the emergency department of a tertiary care hospital of a large city. A prospective cross-sectional study was carried out during the 3-month period 1 December 1996 to 28 February 1997. A set of guidelines was used to assess the appropriateness of different blood tests for the initial assessment of the patients presenting with common clinical conditions, although any investigation could be done if considered important for patient management. All other blood tests were considered inappropriate. A total of 6401 patients were seen in the emergency department and 14 300 blood tests were done on 3529 patients with diagnoses covered by the guidelines. Of these 62.2% were found to be inappropriate. Of the total 22 655 investigations done on all the 6401 patients seen, only 3.8% influenced the diagnosis, 3.0% influenced patient care in the emergency department, and 4.0% influenced the decision to admit or not. Amylase and arterial blood gases were found to be the most appropriate investigations. Analysis of reasons for unnecessary use of emergency tests suggested that improving supervision, decreasing the utilization of the emergency department as a phlebotomy service for the hospital, and abolition of routine blood tests would help to improve patient care.


Keywords: blood tests; accident and emergency medicine PMID:10621876

  15. The 500-bed hospital that isn't there: the Victorian Department of Health review of the Hospital in the Home program.

    PubMed

    Montalto, Michael

    2010-11-15

    The Victorian Department of Health reviewed its Hospital in the Home (HIH) program in 2009, for the first time in a decade. Annual reimbursements to all Victorian hospitals for HIH care had reached $110 million. Nearly all Victorian hospitals have an HIH program. Collectively, these units recorded 32,462 inpatient admissions in 2008-09, representing 2.5% of all inpatient admissions, 5.3% of multiday admissions and 5% of all bed-days in Victoria. If HIH were a single entity, it would be a 500-bed hospital. Treatment of many patients with acute community- and hospital-acquired infections or venous thromboembolism has moved into HIH. There is still capacity for growth in clinical conditions that can be appropriately managed at home. The review found evidence of gaming by hospitals through deliberate blurring of boundaries between acute HIH care and postacute care. The Victorian HIH program is a remarkable success that has significantly expanded the overall capacity of the hospital system, with lower capital resources. It suggests HIH with access to equivalent hospital remuneration is necessary for a successful HIH policy. Hospitals should invest in HIH medical leadership and supervision to expand their HIH services, including teaching. HIH is a challenge to the traditional vision of a hospital. Greater community awareness of HIH could assist in its continued growth.

  16. Unambiguous identification of hospital patients: case study at the university departments of the General Hospital, Vienna.

    PubMed

    Sachs, P; Gall, W; Marksteiner, A; Dorda, W

    2000-07-01

    This article considers the problem of identifying patients in one or more heterogeneous personal databases. The unambiguous identification of patients is an essential prerequisite for an efficient patient care system. We discuss the problems involved in this task and suggest how they can be dealt with. The solution of automatic consolidation of patient records sequires programming, organisational and work psychology measures. Following a survey of conventional identification methods, the method developed at the Department of Medical Computer Sciences, which is based on the current clinical situation at the General Hospital in Vienna (AKH--Allgemeines KrankenHaus), is described in detail. The basic principle is to identify patients unambiguously by means of an ID (IZAHL) derived directly from the personal data. Thereby a deterministic technique without probability weighting is used-all compared information must correspond completely. The article closes with a critical survey of experience gathered to date.

  17. Comparing public and private hospital care service quality.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, D; O'Callaghan, M

    1998-01-01

    The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian's framework to compare and contrast Malta's public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert-type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre-admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the "hotel services", but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients' expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified.

  18. The reflection of the Syrian civil war on the emergency department and assessment of hospital costs.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Ali; Yengil, Erhan; Akkücük, Seçkin; Cevik, Cengiz; Zeren, Cem; Uruc, Vedat

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to assess the demographics, clinical features, and treatment costs of cases referred to our hospital after the Syrian civil war. Of 1355 Syrian civil war victims referred to our hospital during the 14-month period between June 2011 and July 2012, 482 cases presenting to the emergency department were included in the study. The electronic data of these patients were retrospectively analyzed. Of 482 cases, 428 were male (88.8%) and 54 (11.2%) were female, with a mean age of 30.4±14.9 years (1-79 years). The mean age was 30.8±17.2 years (1-79 years) in males and 27.3±16.9 years (1.5-66 years) in females. There was a significant difference in terms of sex (p=0.007). It was found that the majority of the cases (41.1%) were aged 21-30 years. The highest number of admissions was recorded in June 2011 (159 patients, 33%), whereas the lowest number of admissions was in September 2011 (5 patients, 1%). All cases were transported to our hospital from nearby district hospitals and camps by emergency medical services. The most frequent presenting complaint was gunshot injury (338 cases, 70.1%). The most common diagnosis was extremity injury (153 cases, 31.7%). The number of forensic cases was found as 364 (75.5%). Of all the cases, 136 cases (28.2%) were managed in the emergency service, and the remaining cases were admitted to other services. They were most frequently admitted to the orthopedics ward (146 cases, 30.3%). The mean length of the hospital stay was 9.9 days (1-141).Overall, 456 cases (94.6%) were discharged, 22 cases died, and 4 cases were transferred to other facilities. The mean cost per case was estimated as 3723Turkish lira (TL) (15-69556). A positive correlation was found between cost and length of hospital stay. Among all Syrian cases, the majorities of young males and gunshot injuries was striking. Most of the cases were discharged after appropriate management. Preventive measures can avoid these negative outcomes and so

  19. Establishing a successful pre-hospital emergency service in a developing country: experience from Rescue 1122 service in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Hunniya; Naseer, Rizwan; Razzak, Junaid Abdul

    2011-06-01

    As in many other developing countries, emergency medical services, especially pre-hospital emergency care, has long been neglected in Pakistan. Consequently, patients are brought to the emergency departments by relatives or bystanders in private cars, taxis or any other readily available mode of transportation. Ambulances, where they exist, have barely a stretcher and arrangements for oxygen supply. Modern emergency services are considered too costly for many countries. A model of pre-hospital emergency services, called Rescue 1122 and established in Punjab province of Pakistan, is presented. The system is supported by government funding and provides a quality service. The article describes the process of establishment of the service, the organisational structure, the scope of services and the role it is currently playing in the healthcare of the region it serves.

  20. Strategic planning for clinical services: St. Joseph Hospital and Health Care Center.

    PubMed

    Linggi, A; Pelham, L D

    1986-09-01

    A pharmacy department at a 340-bed community hospital based its strategic plan for developing patient-oriented services on a sound drug distribution system, a credible work-measurement program, and fiscal responsibility. In 1982 the department of pharmacy and i.v. therapy implemented a strategic plan for improving pharmaceutical services. The plan involved developing goals and objectives for the department; marketing the department's services and fiscal management to hospital administrators, medical staff, and nursing staff; building teamwork among the pharmacy staff; and improving the drug distribution system before instituting clinical services. Hiring of additional pharmacy staff was justified on the basis of work-measurement data. By adjusting staffing levels every two weeks based on work-measurement data, the department increased the efficiency of drug distribution activities; the pharmacy also implemented cost-saving programs like selection of therapeutic alternates and formulary restrictions. The savings were then reinvested in labor-intensive patient-oriented pharmaceutical services. A staff development program using staff pharmacists as preceptors expanded the breadth and depth of pharmacists' clinical skills. The planning efforts were successful because the needs of hospital administrators, the pharmacy department, and staff members were addressed.

  1. Evaluation of paediatric radiology services in hospitals in the UK.

    PubMed

    Halliday, K; Drinkwater, K; Howlett, D C

    2016-12-01

    To compare paediatric radiology provision across the UK with national standards published by the Department of Health and the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR). Audit standards and indicators for paediatric imaging were derived from "Delivering quality imaging services for children",(1) "Standards for imaging in cases of suspected non-accidental injury"(2) and "Improving paediatric interventional radiology services"(3) and agreed jointly by the Clinical Radiology Audit Committee and the British Society of Paediatric Radiology. A questionnaire was sent to all hospitals and NHS trusts imaging children aged 16 or younger in the UK in October 2013. The target for all indicators was 100%. Eighty-seven of 196 (44%) eligible institutions submitted data, the size distribution of the institutions was representative when compared to data from "Facing the future: a review of paediatric services"(4) published by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child health. Only 65% of paediatric images were obtained by staff who had had specific training and only 60% were reported by radiographers or radiologists with appropriate training. Sixty-two percent of centres did not have access to a paediatric opinion 24 hours a day, 7 days a week all year; only 34% of radiographers who regularly imaged children had had any access to continuing professional development (CPD) in the 12 months of the audit. Although all hospitals had facilities for image transfer, only 57% had any formal funding arrangements in place for external reporting of images. The standards set for a network approach to paediatric radiology provision in "Delivering quality imaging services for children" are largely unmet. This failure to make the most of the workforce and resources puts vulnerable children at risk. The authors urge NHS England to work with the RCR to organise and administer a national network for paediatric imaging. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. [Pharmaceutical Service after the Fukushima Disaster: A Case Report of Soma General Hospital].

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Hisanori; Momonoi, Toshiyuki; Kumakawa, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

      Despite being damaged by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster, Soma General Hospital, located approximately 40 km north of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, was able to fulfill its role as a key regional hospital in northeast Fukushima. To elucidate the pharmaceutical service in response to the disaster, we investigated the hospital's operations in 2011 according to the medical records and prescriptions. One of the difficulties that the department of pharmaceutical service faced at that time was the increase in emergency healthcare requests by evacuated patients from other hospitals and clinics. Herein, we propose the following countermeasures to be considered in future disaster preparations: (1) establishing a medical and pharmaceutical service coordinator for disaster relief; (2) sharing all local patients' medical information in emergencies (at least contraindicated drugs or allergy history); and (3) reviewing disaster stockpiles, especially pharmaceuticals (both at the hospital and in nearby locations).

  3. Assessing the extent of provision of comprehensive medical care management for female sexual assault patients in US hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashlesha; Roston, Alicia; Tilmon, Sandra; Stern, Lisa; Roston, Arden; Patel, Daksha; Keith, Louis

    2013-10-01

    To describe medical services provided to sexual assault patients in US emergency departments and to identify the percentage of hospitals always providing the 10 elements of comprehensive medical care management (CMCM). A cross-sectional study was conducted in a national sample of US hospitals. A 26-item telephone survey assessed provision of services to sexual assault survivors in accordance with CMCM. Management included acute medical care comprising history and physical examination; acute and long-term rape crisis counseling; STI testing and prophylaxis; emergency contraception counseling and provision; and HIV testing and prophylaxis. The primary outcome was extent of provision of these elements. Overall, 582 emergency departments responded to the survey. The following components of CMCM were provided: acute medical care (582 [100.0%]); rape crisis counseling (234 [40.2%]); STI management (448 [77.0%]); emergency contraception (351 [60.3%]); and HIV management (380 [65.3%]). Only 101 (17.4%) hospitals provided all 10 elements of CMCM. Less than one-fifth of US hospitals provide comprehensive services to sexual assault patients. A national program incorporating clinical guidelines, checklists, and funding for sexual assault forensic/nurse examiner programs could improve the standard of care provided in emergency departments-the primary point of contact for acute care of sexual assault survivors. © 2013.

  4. The value-added services of hospital-based radiology groups.

    PubMed

    Rao, Vijay M; Levin, David C

    2011-09-01

    The authors discuss the ways in which a single, cohesive, on-site radiology group adds value to both the processes of patient care and the success of the hospital. The value-added services fall into 6 categories: (1) patient safety, (2) quality of the images, (3) quality of the interpretations, (4) service to patients and referring physicians, (5) cost containment, and (6) helping build the hospital's business. If the hospital allows its radiology department to become fragmented by the intrusion of other specialists or teleradiology companies in remote locations, most of these added values would be lost, and chaos could ensue.

  5. Private hospital emergency departments in Australia: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, Gerry; Toloo, Ghasem; He, Jun; Doig, Gavin; Rosengren, David; Rothwell, Sean; Sultana, Ron; Costello, Steve; Hou, Xiang-Yu

    2013-06-01

    Public hospital EDs in Australia have become increasingly congested because of increasing demand and access block. Six per cent of ED patients attend private hospital EDs whereas 45% of the population hold private health insurance. This study describes the patients attending a small selection of four private hospital EDs in Queensland and Victoria, and tests the feasibility of a private ED database. De-identified routinely collected patient data were provided by the four participating private hospital and amalgamated into a single data set. The mean age of private ED patients was 52 years. Males outnumbered females in all age groups except > 80 years. Attendance was higher on weekends and Mondays, and between 08.00 and 20.00 h. There were 6.6% of the patients triaged as categories 1 and 2, and 60% were categories 4 or 5. There were 36.4% that required hospital admission. Also, 96% of the patients had some kind of insurance. Furthermore, 72% were self-referred and 12% were referred by private medical practitioners. Approximately 25% arrived by ambulance. There were 69% that completed their ED treatment within 4 h. This study is the first public description of patients attending private EDs in Australia. Private EDs have a significant role to play in acute medical care and in providing access to private hospitals which could alleviate pressure on public EDs. This study demonstrates the need for consolidated data based on a consistent data set and data dictionary to enable system-wide analysis, benchmarking and evaluation. © 2013 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  6. Hospital competition and inpatient services efficiency in Taiwan: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiao-Lee; Chiang, Tung-Liang; Chang, Ray-E

    2011-10-01

    There is no consistent evidence of the relationship between market competition and hospital efficiency. Some studies indicated that more competition led to a faster patient turnover rate, higher hospital costs, and lower hospital efficiency. Since the 1980s some studies found market competition could increase the efficiency of inpatient services. However, there were few studies testing the market competition during a hospital's earlier stages on its efficiency during later stages, or the dynamic of efficiency. In this study, we examined the effect of early-stage market competition on later-stage hospital efficiency in Taiwan, and we determine the efficiency change using longitudinal study design. The data for the analysis came from the annual national hospital survey of 1996 and 2001 provided by the Department of Health. There were 102 teaching hospital be analysed. The results show that no evidence supports the proposition that higher market competition would improve the efficiency of hospitals in delivering inpatient services in Taiwan. Importantly, neither was the inefficiency score nor the Malmquist productivity index of inpatient services associated with the level of hospital market competition, regardless of the adjustment for hospital characteristics. However, the results may be related with the hospital increasing beds investment behavior. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. 77 FR 12273 - Public Availability of Department of Energy FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ....gov/management/downloads/service-contract-inventory . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Questions... Availability of Department of Energy FY 2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of FY 2011 Service Contract Inventories. SUMMARY: In accordance...

  8. Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction With Emergency Department Care: An Italian Rural Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Gabriele; Vencia, Francesco; Mecheroni, Silvana; Dionisi, Susanna; Baragatti, Lorenzo; Nante, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the emergency department satisfaction is strictly linked to the role of the nurses, namely the first interface between patients and hospital services. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to identify areas of emergency nursing activity associated with minor or major patient satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2010 - May 2011, in the rural hospital of Orbetello, Tuscany (Italy). Convenience sampling was used to select patients, namely patients presenting at the emergency unit in the study period. The Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale was used to collect information on two structured subscale (Caring and Teaching). Results: 259 questionnaire were collected. Analysis indicated that only two characteristics significantly influenced overall satisfaction: “receiving continuous information from personnel about delay” positively effect (OR=7.98; p=0.022) while “waiting time for examination” had a negative effect (OR 0.42; p=0.026) Conclusions: The study was the first conduced in Italy using this instrument that enabled to obtain much important information about patient satisfaction with nursing care received in the emergency department. The results showing improvements must be related to educational aspects, such as explaining patients the colour waiting list, and communication towards patients, such as informing about emergences that cause queue. PMID:25946915

  9. [A structural model to measure effectiveness of hospital services].

    PubMed

    Riveros S, Jorge; Berné M, Carmen; García-Uceda, Esperanza

    2012-05-01

    One of the main determinants of quality in the public health care services is the perceived user satisfaction. To analyze the relationship between supply (User Orientation of Management) (UO), demand (User Satisfaction with service components) (US) and subjective indicators of effectiveness, such as Perceived Global Quality (PGQ) and Global Satisfaction (GS) among hospital service users. A survey was applied to users of hospital services, asking about management and quality of hospital services and satisfaction with the service provided. Data was analyzed with exploratory and confirmatory factorial analyses. Structural Equation Models were used to test the hypotheses implied in the theoretical model of effectiveness. The cause-effect relationship between UO and US was confirmed. There was also a direct relationship between PGQ and GS. Efficient nursing and administrative personnel are of highest importance to improve user satisfaction. The hospital management must pay extreme attention to this kind of staff in order to be effective from the point of view of their patients.

  10. Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey.

    PubMed

    Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Cawich, Shamir O; Williams, Eric W; Williams-Johnson, Jean

    2008-10-12

    Emergency Department (ED) medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23-57). These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0-15; Median 2.5) and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years).Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV), 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population.

  11. Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey

    PubMed Central

    Crandon, Ivor W; Harding, Hyacinth E; Cawich, Shamir O; Williams, Eric W; Williams-Johnson, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Background Emergency Department (ED) medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57). These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5) and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years). Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV), 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population. PMID:18847504

  12. Medicare program; prospective payment system for hospital outpatient services--HCFA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-08

    As required by sections 4521, 4522, and 4523 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997, this proposed rule would eliminate the formula-driven overpayment for certain outpatient hospital services, extend reductions in payment for costs of hospital outpatient services, and establish in regulations a prospective payment system for hospital outpatient services (and for Medicare Part B services furnished to inpatients who have no Part A coverage). The prospective payment system would simplify our current payment system and apply to all hospitals, including those that are excluded from the inpatient prospective payment system. The Balanced Budget Act provides for implementation of the prospective payment system effective January 1, 1999, but delays application of the system to cancer hospitals until January 1, 2000. The hospital outpatient prospective payment system would also apply to partial hospitalization services furnished by community mental health centers. Although the statutory effective date for the outpatient prospective payment system is January 1, 1999, implementation of the new system will have to be delayed because of year 2000 systems concerns. The demands on intermediary bill processing systems and HCFA internal systems to become compliant for the year 2000 preclude making the major systems changes that are required to implement the prospective payment system. The outpatient prospective payment system will be implemented for all hospitals and community mental health centers as soon as possible after January 1, 2000, and a notice of the anticipated implementation date will be published in the Federal Register at least 90 days in advance. This document also proposes new requirements for provider departments and provider-based entities. These proposed changes, as revised based on our consideration of public comments, will be effective 30 days after publication of a final rule. This proposed rule would also implement section 9343(c) of the Omnibus Budget

  13. The effects of cognitive impairment on nursing home residents' emergency department visits and hospitalizations.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Caroline E; Newcomer, Robert; Blegen, Mary; Miller, Bruce; Harrington, Charlene

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about the relationship of cognitive impairment (CI) in nursing home (NH) residents and their use of emergency department (ED) and subsequent hospital services. We analyzed 2006 Medicare claims and resident assessment data for 112,412 Medicare beneficiaries aged >65 years residing in US nursing facilities. We estimated the effect of resident characteristics and severity of CI on rates of total ED visits per year, then estimated the odds of hospitalization after ED evaluation. Mild CI predicted higher rates of ED visits relative to no CI, and ED visit rates decreased as severity of CI increased. In unadjusted models, mild CI and very severe CI predicted higher odds of hospitalization after ED evaluation; however, after adjusting for other factors, severity of CI was not significant. Higher rates of ED visits among those with mild CI may represent a unique marker in the presentation of acute illness and warrant further investigation. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hospital dental service: a clinical evaluation to determine its justification.

    PubMed

    Emery, A C

    1975-05-01

    A research study was undertaken to determine the importance of a hospital dental service in civilian hospitals. Two hundred hospitalized patients were evaluated to determine their oral health status and possible effects of poor oral health on related physical situations. Both cental caries and periodontal disease were prelavlent in the hospital patient population, and 83.5% of the patients suffered from some type of oral pathosis that required treatment. Hospital dental care is important, not only for the health and improvement of the total patient but also for the hospital to provide complete patient care.

  15. Epidemiology of hospital-based emergency department visits due to sports injuries.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Anderson, Ingrid M; Lee, Min Kyeong; Rampa, Sankeerth; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush; Allareddy, Veerajalandhar

    2014-08-01

    Sports-related injuries in adolescents incur a significant amount of hospital resources. Sports-related injuries are not an uncommon cause of ED visit; however, national estimates of such injuries in teenagers are unknown. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize emergency department (ED) visits that result from sports-related injuries among teenagers across the United States. This study describes the outcomes associated with sports-related injuries necessitating ED visits among teenagers at a national level. This is a descriptive epidemiology study. The 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample data set, the largest all-payer health care database in the United States, was used to identify ED visits with external cause of injury related to sports occurring in patients aged 13 through 19 years. Outcomes examined included discharge status after the ED visit and presence of concomitant injuries. Descriptive statistics was used to summarize the estimates. Nationwide representative estimates were computed using the discharge weight variable. There were 432,609 ED visits by those between the ages of 13 and 19 years who experienced sports-related injuries, with total charges close to $447.4 million, with a mean total per-visit charge of $1205. The male patients accounted for 76.8% of the total ED visits. The most frequently occurring injuries were superficial injury or contusion (n = 118,250 ED visits); sprains and strains (n = 105,476); fracture of the upper limb (n = 63,151); open wounds of the head, the neck, and the trunk (n = 46,176); as well as intracranial injury (n = 30,726). Close to 29% of all ED visits occurred among those residing in geographical areas with median household income levels of greater than $64,000. After the ED visit, 1.6% were admitted to the same hospital, with a mean length of stay of 2.4 days and a mean hospital charge for ED visit and inpatient services of $22,703. The male patients composed 87.5% of the hospitalizations. The

  16. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General report on audit of Department of Energy support service contracting

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-30

    The purpose of this audit was to review the Department`s acquisition and use of support service contractors and subcontractors. The audit objectives were to determine if the Department (1) paid fees to both support service contractors and subcontractors for services exclusively performed by subcontractors, (2) used support service contractors to perform inherent government functions, and (3) rolled over unearned award fees to subsequent evaluation periods and had adequate management controls to ensure that contractor performance would be evaluated. The Department did not always obtain support services in the most economical and effective manner. The Department negotiated and paid four of six support service contractors an estimated $5.1 million in fees for services exclusively provided by subcontractors because the Department did not have a policy which addressed the inclusion, at the pre-award phase, of subcontract labor in the support service contractors` fee determinations. Furthermore, while the authors found no instances where support service contractors performed inherent government functions, they did note that the Department maintained minimal administration over major portions of contracted-for services on three of six support service contracts. This occurred because contractors subcontracted extensively for support services. Consequently, the Department may have decreased their ability to control cost growth on these three contracts. As discussed in Part 4, the Department`s process was sufficient in five of six cases to evaluate support service contractor performance. However, one of six cost-plus-award-fee contractors received award fees that exceeded its performance ratings by $89,000 because one Departmental office elected to rollover unearned portions of fees from prior evaluation periods and make them available in the next evaluation period.

  17. [Services portfolio of a department of endocrinology and clinical nutrition].

    PubMed

    Vicente Delgado, Almudena; Gómez Enterría, Pilar; Tinahones Madueño, Francisco

    2011-03-01

    Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition are branches of Medicine that deal with the study of physiology of body glands and hormones and their disorders, intermediate metabolism of nutrients, enteral and parenteral nutrition, promotion of health by prevention of diet-related diseases, and appropriate use of the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive tools related to these disciplines. Development of Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition support services requires accurate definition and management of a number of complex resources, both human and material, as well as adequate planning of the care provided. It is therefore essential to know the services portfolio of an ideal Department of Endocrinology and Clinical Nutrition because this is a useful, valid and necessary tool to optimize the available resources, to increase efficiency, and to improve the quality of care. Copyright © 2010 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Palliative care services in California hospitals: program prevalence and hospital characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pantilat, Steven Z; Kerr, Kathleen M; Billings, J Andrew; Bruno, Kelly A; O'Riordan, David L

    2012-01-01

    In 2000, 17% of California hospitals offered palliative care (PC) services. Since then, hospital-based PC programs have become increasingly common, and preferred practices for these services have been proposed by expert consensus. We sought to examine the prevalence of PC programs in California, their structure, and the hospital characteristics associated with having a program. A total of 351 acute care hospitals in California completed a survey that determined the presence of and described the structure of PC services. Logistic regression identified hospital characteristics associated with having a PC program. A total of 324 hospitals (92%) responded, of which 44% (n=141) reported having a PC program. Hospitals most likely to have PC programs were large nonprofit facilities that belonged to a health system, had teaching programs, and had participated in a training program designed to promote development of PC services. Investor-owned sites (odds ratio [OR]=0.08; 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.03, 0.2) and city/county facilities (OR=0.06; 95% CI=0.01, 0.3) were less likely to have a PC program. The most common type of PC service was an inpatient consultation service (88%), staffed by a physician (87%), social worker (81%), chaplain (76%), and registered nurse (74%). Most programs (71%, n=86) received funding from the hospital and were expected to meet goals set by the hospital or health system. Although the number of hospital-based PC services in California has doubled since 2000, more than half of the acute care hospitals still do not provide PC services. Developing initiatives that target small, public, and investor-owned hospitals may lead to wider availability of PC services. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Trends in hospital librarianship and hospital library services: 1989 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Thibodeau, Patricia L.; Funk, Carla J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The research studied the status of hospital librarians and library services to better inform the Medical Library Association's advocacy activities. Methods: The Vital Pathways Survey Subcommittee of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians distributed a web-based survey to hospital librarians and academic health sciences library directors. The survey results were compared to data collected in a 1989 survey of hospital libraries by the American Hospital Association in order to identify any trends in hospital libraries, roles of librarians, and library services. A web-based hospital library report form based on the survey questions was also developed to more quickly identify changes in the status of hospital libraries on an ongoing basis. Results: The greatest change in library services between 1989 and 2005/06 was in the area of access to information, with 40% more of the respondents providing access to commercial online services, 100% more providing access to Internet resources, and 28% more providing training in database searching and use of information resources. Twenty-nine percent (n = 587) of the 2005/06 respondents reported a decrease in staff over the last 5 years. Conclusions: Survey data support reported trends of consolidation of hospitals and hospital libraries and additions of new services. These services have likely required librarians to acquire new skills. It is hoped that future surveys will be undertaken to continue to study these trends. PMID:19851491

  20. Trends in hospital librarianship and hospital library services: 1989 to 2006.

    PubMed

    Thibodeau, Patricia L; Funk, Carla J

    2009-10-01

    The research studied the status of hospital librarians and library services to better inform the Medical Library Association's advocacy activities. The Vital Pathways Survey Subcommittee of the Task Force on Vital Pathways for Hospital Librarians distributed a web-based survey to hospital librarians and academic health sciences library directors. The survey results were compared to data collected in a 1989 survey of hospital libraries by the American Hospital Association in order to identify any trends in hospital libraries, roles of librarians, and library services. A web-based hospital library report form based on the survey questions was also developed to more quickly identify changes in the status of hospital libraries on an ongoing basis. The greatest change in library services between 1989 and 2005/06 was in the area of access to information, with 40% more of the respondents providing access to commercial online services, 100% more providing access to Internet resources, and 28% more providing training in database searching and use of information resources. Twenty-nine percent (n = 587) of the 2005/06 respondents reported a decrease in staff over the last 5 years. Survey data support reported trends of consolidation of hospitals and hospital libraries and additions of new services. These services have likely required librarians to acquire new skills. It is hoped that future surveys will be undertaken to continue to study these trends.

  1. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    PubMed

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  2. Improving door-to-physician times in 2 community hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Welch, Shari; Dalto, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Door-to-physician time in the emergency department (ED) correlates with patient satisfaction and clinical quality and outcomes. Delays in seeing a provider result in a 3% nationwide rate of patients leaving without being seen (LWBS) after presenting for ED care. Two community hospitals had door-to-physician times of 51 and 47 minutes. The LWBS rates were 3% and 2%. A quality improvement project was initiated with a change package, including prompts, training, and feedback. Door-to-physician times decreased to 31 and 27 minutes. The change occurred in less than a month and was sustained for 6 months after the study. In addition, the LWBS rates at each facility fell by one third. Basic process improvement strategies borrowed from service industries were used in 2 EDs to improve the door-to-physician process.

  3. Postdeployment Hospitalizations among Service Members Deployed in Support of the Operations in Iraq and Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    10 ICD-9-CM diagnoses. For these analyses, only the first hospitalization for the targeted diagnosis or group of diagnoses was included.Outcomes To...injuries or illnesses that may be found after deploy- ment. Other categories such as neoplasms, found the most frequent diagnosis of uterine leiomyoma...phic lateral sclerosis, or fibromyalgia associated with Persian Gulf War service? An examination of Department of Defense hospitalization data. Am J

  4. 76 FR 9399 - Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-17

    ... Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of the release of the Department of State FY10 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: The Department of State has publically released its Service Contract Inventory for FY10. Section 743 of Division C of the FY...

  5. 77 FR 5614 - Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Notice of the release of the Department of State FY11 Service Contract Inventory. SUMMARY: The Department of State has publically released its Service Contract Inventory for FY11 and its analysis of the FY10 inventory. They are...

  6. Distribution and predictors of emergency department charges: the case of a tertiary hospital in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Shadi; Mourad, Yara; Dimassi, Hani; Hitti, Eveline

    2016-03-18

    As health care costs continue to increase worldwide, health care systems, and more specifically hospitals are facing continuous pressure to operate more efficiently. One service within the hospital sector whose cost structure has been modestly investigated is the Emergency Department (ED). The study aims to report on the distribution of ED resource use, as expressed in charges, and to determine predictors of/contributors to total ED charges at a major tertiary hospital in Lebanon. The study used data extracted from the ED discharge database for visits between July 31, 2012 and July 31, 2014. Patient visit bills were reported under six major categories: solutions, pharmacy, laboratory, physicians, facility, and radiology. Characteristics of ED visits were summarized according to patient gender, age, acuity score, and disposition. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted with total charges as the dependent variable. Findings revealed that the professional fee (40.9 %) followed by facility fee (26.1 %) accounted for the majority of the ED charges. While greater than 80 % of visit charges went to physician and facility fee for low acuity cases, these contributed to only 52 and 54 % of the high acuity presentations where ancillary services and solutions' contribution to the total charges increased. The total charges for males were $14 higher than females; age was a predictor of higher charges with total charges of patients greater than 60 years of age being around $113 higher than ages 0-18 after controlling for all other variables. Understanding the components and determinants of ED charges is essential to developing cost-containment interventions. Institutional modeling of charging patterns can be used to offer price estimates to ED patients who request this information and ultimately help create market competition to drive down costs.

  7. 42 CFR 412.540 - Method of payment for preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Method of payment for preadmission services under the long-term care hospital prospective payment system. 412.540 Section 412.540 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT...

  8. Reforming the hospital service structure to improve efficiency: urban hospital specialization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-soo; Chun, Ki-Hong; Lee, Jung-Soo

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this study is to explain the relationship between the case-mix specialization index and efficiency of inpatient hospital care services. Hospital specialization was measured using the information theory index constructed from diagnosis-related group numbers of hospitals in Seoul, Korea, in 2004. Hospital performance was measured by technical efficiency scores computed by data envelopment analysis for 2004. Multiple regression analysis models were applied to identify the internal and external factors that affected the extent of hospital specialization status as well as the efficiency of hospitals. The data envelopment analysis showed that input variables such as the number of beds, doctors and nurses were related to hospital efficiency. Hospitals had different levels of specialization in patient services, and more specialized hospitals were more likely to be efficient (odds ratio=25.95). Internal characteristics of providers had more significant effects on the extent of specialization than market conditions. These findings help to explain the relationship among hospitals, specialization, market conditions and provider performance. The study results related to the rearrangement of hospital services in a city. Further study including hospitals from other regions will increase the generalizability of results, and policy makers can use the information in making policy for the specialized hospital industry in Korea.

  9. Innovative Home Visit Models Associated With Reductions In Costs, Hospitalizations, And Emergency Department Use.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sarah; Snyder, Lynne Page; Rotondo, Christina; Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Colligan, Erin Murphy; Giuriceo, Katherine

    2017-03-01

    While studies of home-based care delivered by teams led by primary care providers have shown cost savings, little is known about outcomes when practice-extender teams-that is, teams led by registered nurses or lay health workers-provide home visits with similar components (for example, care coordination and education). We evaluated findings from five models funded by Health Care Innovation Awards of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Each model used a mix of different components to strengthen connections to primary care among fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries with multiple chronic conditions; these connections included practice-extender home visits. Two models achieved significant reductions in Medicare expenditures, and three models reduced utilization in the form of emergency department visits, hospitalizations, or both for beneficiaries relative to comparators. These findings present a strong case for the potential value of home visits by practice-extender teams to reduce Medicare expenditures and service use in a particularly vulnerable and costly segment of the Medicare population.

  10. Older adolescent presentations to a children's hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Batra, Shweta; Ng, Elaine Yu Ching; Foo, Feng; Noori, Omar; McCaskill, Mary; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2016-08-01

    To describe the characteristics, diagnoses and outcomes of older adolescents, aged 16-19 years, presenting to a paediatric ED. A retrospective review of total ED presentations by older adolescents to a tertiary paediatric hospital between 2010 and 2012, inclusive, was undertaken to determine if behavioural or mental health problems were common. A total of 1184 ED presentations by 730 older adolescents were identified. Injury and abdominal pain were the most common complaints for presentations by older adolescents to the ED. The median length of stay in ED was 241 (range: 0-3873) min. More than 60% of the older adolescent ED presentations were triaged urgent or semi-urgent, and 39% of all these presentations resulted in hospital admission. Two-thirds of these older adolescents had a chronic illness, which accounted for 77% of all ED presentations by older adolescents. The history of chronic illness was considered related or relevant in the evaluation and management of over 80% of older adolescents. Of all the ED presentations by older adolescents with chronic illness, only one quarter had transition planning documentation. A high prevalence of chronic illness was found in older adolescents attending the paediatric ED. There was no evidence that behavioural and mental health issues dominated. These findings reflect admission policy. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  11. Integration of a psychoanalytic liaison department at a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Neuburger, R P

    2000-08-01

    A general overview of liaison-psychoanalysis in a general hospital is presented. The team's trajectory is revisited, as generating a presence in the inpatient units: a demand which changes from a purely psychiatric, scarcely operative level to an acknowledgment of subjectivity. Generally, this appears disruptively in medical proceedings. Two case histories are presented: (i) 'the tenant' and (ii) 'the nail-polishing file'. With regard to the first case history, the transference in its double aspect, with the patient as well as with the unit's staff, is examined. The analyst's intervention seeks to untangle the impasse, which prevents the physicians from helping the patient. With regard to the second case history, in which the de-mystification aspects of liaison work are shown, the horror that the so-called 'mental illness' can produce in the medical institution is explored. The aim of narrating this experience is to preserve a psy-space in the hospital where the overwhelming technological developments menace with its disappearance.

  12. Promoting hospital-based smoking cessation services at major Swiss hospitals: a before and after study.

    PubMed

    Bolliger, Chris T; van Biljon, Xandra; Humair, Jean-Paul; El Fehri, Verena; Cornuz, Jauques

    2008-07-26

    Whether a 1-year nationwide, government supported programme is effective in significantly increasing the number of smoking cessation clinics at major Swiss hospitals as well as providing basic training for the staff running them. We conducted a baseline evaluation of hospital services for smoking cessation, hypertension, and obesity by web search and telephone contact followed by personal visits between October 2005 and January 2006 of 44 major public hospitals in the 26 cantons of Switzerland; we compared the number of active smoking cessation services and trained personnel between baseline to 1 year after starting the programme including a training workshop for doctors and nurses from all hospitals as well as two further follow-up visits. At base line 9 (21%) hospitals had active smoking cessation services, whereas 43 (98%) and 42 (96%) offered medical services for hypertension and obesity respectively. Hospital directors and heads of Internal Medicine of 43 hospitals were interested in offering some form of help to smokers provided they received outside support, primarily funding to get started or to continue. At two identical workshops, 100 health professionals (27 in Lausanne, 73 in Zurich) were trained for one day. After the programme, 22 (50%) hospitals had an active smoking cessation service staffed with at least 1 trained doctor and 1 nurse. A one-year, government-supported national intervention resulted in a substantial increase in the number of hospitals allocating trained staff and offering smoking cessation services to smokers. Compared to the offer for hypertension and obesity this offer is still insufficient.

  13. Mortality patterns in the accident and emergency department of an urban hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ekere, A U; Yellowe, B E; Umune, S

    2005-06-01

    The accident and emergency (A & E) department of any hospital provides an insight to the quality of care available in the institution. The University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital (UPTH) is a foremost institution in the South-South geopolitical region of Nigeria, servicing a core population of about 5 million people. The aim of this review was to highlight the demographic patterns of mortality, time spent before death in the emergency room. A 3 year retrospective review, covering April 2000 - March 2003, of patients attended to in the Accident & Emergency department of University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital was carried out. Casualty records including attendance registers, Nurses' report books and death certificates were used to extract demographic indices, causes of death and time from arrival to death in the Accident and Emergency Unit. Multiway frequency tables were used for analysis. Of the 22,791 patients seen during the study period, 446 died, giving a crude mortality rate of 2 percent. The male to female ratio was 1.5:1; the trauma subset and the non-traumatic subset being 4.6:1 and 1.2:1 respectively. Most of the cases were of non-traumatic origin (79.8%), with the 20-49 age group being the most affected when all the cases were taken into consideration. However, the overall mean age was 33+/-9.4 years. The peak age in trauma deaths was 20-29 year, while that in non-traumatic deaths was 40-49 years. Some of the deaths (3.4%) could not be traced to any cause. Probably due to incomplete records or ignorance to the cause of death. Road traffic accidents and assaults were the commonest causes of traumatic death, accounting for 57.8% and 11.1% respectively. Bulk of the non traumatic deaths (25.2%) was from cardiovascular diseases. Most of the patients (70.9%) died within six hours of arrival in the accident and emergency, while 3.6% (16) were dead on arrival. The average time in the casualty before death was about 22.0 hours. Contributing factors to

  14. One Year Audit of In Patient Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ariful; Haider, Ismat Ara; Uzzaman, Md Helal; Tymur, Fazla Rubby; Ali, Md Shahjahan

    2016-06-01

    The world wide pattern of oral and maxillofacial surgical conditions has rarely been reported despite its significance in ensuring quality of care. A large number of patients are managed surgically in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department of Dhaka Dental College Hospital but there has been no surgical audit to identify the potential problems in patient care. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of oral and maxillofacial conditions in patients of maxillofacial surgery of Dhaka Dental College Hospital, which would provide valuable information to build up the focus of attention, to develop a future strategy plan, to improve its clinical care and extend the academic and research field. A retrospective survey of oral and maxillofacial surgical cases managed at the inpatient Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College Hospital. All admitted patients from 1st January, 2012 to 31st December, 2012 were included in this study. The patients' data were retrieved from the wards registers and patient records. The data were recorded as age, sex, occupation, geographic distribution, diagnosis, treatment done and operation name. These were studied to assess the prevalence of age, sex, diseases and the name of the treatment offered. Analysis of major groups of diagnosis on the basis of age and sex was also studied. Mortality was also recorded. Between 1st January, 2012 and 31st December, 2012 a total of 768 patients were treated. Among them 494 patients were male while 274 were female, male female ratio was 1.80:1. The majority of the patients were from Dhaka division. The mean age of the patients was 33.20 years; peak age group was 15-30 years. The most common diagnosis was maxillofacial injuries (35 %), followed by oral squamous cell carcinoma (22 %) and odontogenic tumours and hamartomas (11 %). Maxillo-mandibular fixation or wiring was the main modality of treatment. The mortality rate was 0.26 % of total patients. The department of

  15. APNA Member Survey Results: Role of Psychiatric Nurses in Hospital Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Allen, Diane E

    2016-05-01

    A group of hospital emergency department nurses formed a virtual community within the American Psychiatric Nurses Association (APNA) to explore who and what skills are best suited to provide care for patients with psychiatric disorders in hospital emergency departments. The Emergency Department Nurse work group, under the auspices of APNA's Institute for Safe Environments, developed a survey to help describe the role and function of the psychiatric nurse in hospital emergency departments and to determine needs for training and competencies. The 25-item survey was sent via an email link to all APNA members. Responses from 520 nurses show consensus for the title of "psychiatric emergency department nurse," whose primary role is to provide "crisis management." A need for education in advanced medical assessment was identified. It is critical that we provide a professional practice context to assist nurses working in emergency departments. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. [Current status and needs of the department of neurology as a specialized department of a general hospital].

    PubMed

    Yamane, K

    2000-12-01

    In this report, I have summarized the current situation surrounding diagnosis, treatment and related needs in the department of neurology in relation to postgraduate neurology training considered from the standpoint of a specialized department within a general hospital. This summary is based on the responses to a questionnaire that was sent to the persons in charge of education and training at 180 institutions affiliated with the Japanese Society of Neurology and 478 education and training institutions among Japanese city hospitals, excluding university hospitals and special research institutions. Replies were received from 305 hospitals, amounting to a response rate of 63.8%. The number of doctors working in the department of neurology was found to be low at 2 in 84 hospitals and 3 in 65 hospitals. The majority of neurologists at general hospitals are fully engaged in examining outpatients as well as inpatients, and they do not have adequate time for research, education and training and participation in the activities of academic associations. Of the 10 items cited in the questionnaire relating to the types of postgraduate neurology training desired by neurologists employed in general hospitals, the most common selections in order of decreasing frequency were improvement in the capacity to manage common disorders (such as headache, dizziness, numbness, etc.) diagnosed in the outpatient clinic, improvement in the capacity to diagnose the acute phase of cerebral apoplexy, further education about EEG (electroencephalogram) and EMG (electromyogram), and medical ethical issues such as informed consent. The views about postgraduate neurological education and training described in detail in writing by the respondents were as follows. 1) Neurologists required by a city general hospital Numerous respondents commented that the capacity to diagnose medical neurological diseases associated with internal (systemic) medical disorders is needed since there are remarkably few

  17. Attitudes to euthanasia in ICUs and other hospital departments.

    PubMed

    Tepehan, Selma; Ozkara, Erdem; Yavuz, M Fatih

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal doctors' and nurses' attitudes to euthanasia in intensive care units and surgical, internal medicine and paediatric units in Turkey. A total of 205 doctors and 206 nurses working in several hospitals in Istanbul participated. Data were collected by questionnaire and analysed using SPSS v. 12.0. Significantly higher percentages of doctors (35.3%) and nurses (26.6%) working in intensive care units encountered euthanasia requests than those working in other units. Doctors and nurses caring for terminally ill patients in intensive care units differed considerably in their attitudes to euthanasia and patient rights from other health care staff. Euthanasia should be investigated and put on the agenda for discussion in Turkey.

  18. Adolescent presentations to an adult hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Noori, Omar; Batra, Shweta; Shetty, Amith; Steinbeck, Katharine

    2017-10-01

    Age-related policies allow adolescents to access paediatric and adult EDs. Anecdotally, paediatric and adult EDs report challenges when caring for older and younger adolescents, respectively. Our aim was to describe the characteristics of an adolescent population attending an adult ED, co-located with a tertiary paediatric ED. The Westmead Hospital ED database was accessed for 14.5-17.9 years old presentations between January 2010 and December 2012. Patient diagnosis coding (SNOMED) was converted to ICD-10. De-identified data were transferred into Microsoft Excel with analysis performed using spss V22. There were 5718 presentations made to the Westmead Hospital, Sydney, Australia ED by 4450 patients, representing 3.3% (95% CI 3.2-3.4) of total visits from all patients 14.5 years and above. The mean age of the sample was 16.6 years (male 51.8%). Presentations triaged as level 4 or 5 represented 61.0% (95% CI 58.7-61.3) of visits. The proportion of patients who did not wait to receive care was 13.8% (95% CI 12.9-14.7), which was significantly higher than adult rates (P < 0.01). There were 279 unscheduled return visits (visits made <72 h of discharge) representing 4.9% (95% CI 4.4-5.8) of all presentations. Injury was the most common diagnosis (30.2%, 95% CI 28.8-31.6). Chronic physical illness and alcohol-related visits comprised 2.1% (95% CI 1.7-2.5) and 0.8% (95% CI 0.6-1.0) of adolescent presentations, respectively. Contrary to reported staff perceptions, adolescent chronic physical illness presentations were not a major burden. Alcohol was likely under-recorded as a contributing factor to presentations. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Comparing policies for children of parents attending hospital emergency departments after intimate partner violence, substance abuse or suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, Eva M M; Diderich, Hester M; Teeuw, Arianne H; Klein Velderman, Mariska; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; van der Lee, Johanna H

    2016-03-01

    To improve identification of child maltreatment, a new policy ('Hague protocol') was implemented in hospitals in The Netherlands, stating that adults attending the hospital emergency department after intimate partner violence, substance abuse or a suicide attempt should be asked whether they care for children. If so, these children are referred to the Reporting Center for Child Abuse and Neglect (RCCAN), for assessment and referrals to support services. An adapted, hospital-based version of this protocol ('Amsterdam protocol') was implemented in another region. Children are identified in the same manner, but, instead of a RCCAN referral, they are referred to the pediatric outpatient department for an assessment, including a physical examination, and referrals to services. We compared results of both protocols to assess how differences between the protocols affect the outcomes on implementation, detection of child maltreatment and referrals to services. Furthermore, we assessed social validity and results of a screening physical examination. We included 212 families from the Amsterdam protocol (cohort study with reports by pediatric staff and parents) and 565 families from the Hague protocol (study of RCCAN records and telephone interviews with parents). We found that the RCCAN identified more maltreatment than pediatric staff (98% versus at least 51%), but referrals to services were similar (82% versus 80% of the total sample) and parents were positive about both interventions. Physical examination revealed signs of maltreatment in 5%. We conclude that, despite the differences, both procedures can serve as suitable methods to identify and refer children at risk for maltreatment.

  20. Evaluation of emergency department nursing services and patient satisfaction of services.

    PubMed

    Mollaoğlu, Mukadder; Çelik, Pelin

    2016-10-01

    To identify nursing services and assess patient satisfaction in patients who present to the emergency department. Emergency nursing care is a significant determinant of patient satisfaction. Patient satisfaction is often regarded as a reliable indicator of the quality of services provided in the emergency department. This is a descriptive study. Eighty-four patients who presented to the university emergency department were included in the study. The study data were collected by the Patient Information Form and the Satisfaction Level Form. Emergency nursing services, including history taking, assessing vital signs, preparing the patient for an emergency intervention, oxygen therapy, drug delivery and blood-serum infusion were shown to be more commonly provided compared with other services such as counselling the patients and the relatives about their care or delivering educational and psychosocial services. However, 78·6% of the patients were satisfied with their nursing services. The highest satisfaction rates were observed in the following sub-dimensions of the Satisfaction Level Form: availability of the nurse (82·1%), behaviour of the nurse towards the patient (78·6%) and the frequency of nursing rounds (77·4%). The most common practices performed by nurses in the emergency department were physical nursing services. Patient satisfaction was mostly associated with the availability of nurses when they were needed. Our results suggest that in addition to the physical care, patients should also receive education and psychosocial care in the emergency department. We believe that this study will contribute to the awareness and understanding of principles and concepts of emergency nursing, extend the limits of nursing knowledge and abilities, and improve and maintain the quality of clinical nursing education and practice to train specialist nurses with high levels of understanding in ethical, intellectual, administrative, investigative and professional issues.

  1. Antibiotics in respiratory tract infections in hospital pediatric emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Guzmán Molina, Claudia; Rodríguez-Belvís, Marta Velasco; Coroleu Bonet, Albert; Vall Combelles, Oriol; García-Algar, Oscar

    2014-09-01

    Respiratory tract infections are one of the most frequent problems in pediatric clinics and generate an elevated prescription of antibiotics. The aim of this study was to find out the standard of care practice about antibiotic use in these infections in a pediatric emergency department and to evaluate compliance with clinical guidelines. A pediatric emergency department database was reviewed from July 2005 to October 2007 under the category "respiratory infection", including variables such as age, antibiotic prescription and compliance with current clinical recommendations. Out of the 23,114 reviewed reports, 32.7% (7,567) were upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) (cold, acute otitis media [AOM], sinusitis and tonsillopharyngitis) or lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) (laryngitis, bronchitis, bronchiolitis and pneumonia). Children under the age of 2 were the most represented age group. Amongst URTI, rhinopharyngitis was the most frequent infection, while bronchitis was the most frequent among LRTI. Antibiotic therapy (mainly amoxicillin) was prescribed in 30.8% of URTI (5.7% rhinopharyngitis, 96.5% AOM, and 36.7% tonsillopharyngitis) and in 12.4% of LRTI. The percentage of respiratory tract infections was similar to previous studies and the antibiotic prescriptions followed current guidelines, except for cases diagnosed with AOM. Prescription compliance and clinical course of the cases should be monitored. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. [A university department as a psychiatric service centre for children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Remschmidt, Helmut; Walter, Reinhard; Theisen, Frank; Ulbrich, Rainer; Martin, Matthias

    2006-11-01

    The article reports on a system of care for psychiatrically ill children and adolescents that has been designed, established and expanded since 1980 by a university department in a rural region. The department is responsible for the mental health care of three counties with altogether 807 000 inhabitants. The development of this system of care was due in great part to the model program of the German Federal Government for the reform of mental health care that comprised 14 model regions, out of which the region of Marburg and its surrounding counties was the only one with a focus on the situation of psychiatrically ill children and adolescents. With the aid of this model program, a comprehensive evaluation of existing psychiatric services was carried out and at the same time, new services for this clientele were established such as a mobile child and adolescent psychiatric service and a day hospital. A particular focus was laid on the development of a complete network of psychiatric services with manifold, and over the years well proven, cooperation measures. Finally, the quality of mental health care was significantly increased by a continuous evaluation of services and the implementation of two institutes for psychotherapeutic training. Several research initiatives in the field of social psychiatry have contributed to this amelioration and at the same time, to a successful integration of mental health care and research.

  3. Applying Activity Based Costing (ABC) Method to Calculate Cost Price in Hospital and Remedy Services.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, A; Dabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is one of the new methods began appearing as a costing methodology in the 1990's. It calculates cost price by determining the usage of resources. In this study, ABC method was used for calculating cost price of remedial services in hospitals. To apply ABC method, Shahid Faghihi Hospital was selected. First, hospital units were divided into three main departments: administrative, diagnostic, and hospitalized. Second, activity centers were defined by the activity analysis method. Third, costs of administrative activity centers were allocated into diagnostic and operational departments based on the cost driver. Finally, with regard to the usage of cost objectives from services of activity centers, the cost price of medical services was calculated. The cost price from ABC method significantly differs from tariff method. In addition, high amount of indirect costs in the hospital indicates that capacities of resources are not used properly. Cost price of remedial services with tariff method is not properly calculated when compared with ABC method. ABC calculates cost price by applying suitable mechanisms but tariff method is based on the fixed price. In addition, ABC represents useful information about the amount and combination of cost price services.

  4. Applying Activity Based Costing (ABC) Method to Calculate Cost Price in Hospital and Remedy Services

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, A; Dabiri, A

    2012-01-01

    Background Activity Based Costing (ABC) is one of the new methods began appearing as a costing methodology in the 1990’s. It calculates cost price by determining the usage of resources. In this study, ABC method was used for calculating cost price of remedial services in hospitals. Methods: To apply ABC method, Shahid Faghihi Hospital was selected. First, hospital units were divided into three main departments: administrative, diagnostic, and hospitalized. Second, activity centers were defined by the activity analysis method. Third, costs of administrative activity centers were allocated into diagnostic and operational departments based on the cost driver. Finally, with regard to the usage of cost objectives from services of activity centers, the cost price of medical services was calculated. Results: The cost price from ABC method significantly differs from tariff method. In addition, high amount of indirect costs in the hospital indicates that capacities of resources are not used properly. Conclusion: Cost price of remedial services with tariff method is not properly calculated when compared with ABC method. ABC calculates cost price by applying suitable mechanisms but tariff method is based on the fixed price. In addition, ABC represents useful information about the amount and combination of cost price services. PMID:23113171

  5. Rising pressure: hospital emergency departments as barometers of the health care system.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Gerland, Anneliese M; Pham, Hoangmai H; Berenson, Robert A

    2005-11-01

    Pressures--ranging from persuading specialists to provide on-call coverage to dealing with growing numbers of patients with serious mental illness--are building in already-crowded hospital emergency departments (EDs) across the country, according to findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change's (HSC) 2005 site visits to 12 nationally representative communities. As the number of ED visits rises significantly faster than population growth, many hospitals are expanding emergency department capacity. At the same time, hospitals face an ongoing nursing shortage, contributing to tight inpatient capacity that in turn hinders admitting ED patients. In their role as hospitals' "front door" for attracting insured inpatient admissions, emergency departments also increasingly are expected to help hospitals compete for insured patients while still meeting obligations to provide emergency care to all-comers under federal law. Failure to address these growing pressures may compromise access to emergency care for patients and spur already rapidly rising health care costs.

  6. Disparities in asthma hospitalizations among children seen in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Lakota K; Deshpande, Sandy; Vezina, Melissa

    2007-12-01

    We examined the race/ethnicity variation in the risk of hospitalization among children seen in the emergency department (ED) for asthma. ED and hospitalization records for children 1 to 19 years of age in New Jersey for 2004 and 2005 were linked. The dataset identified 47,548 ED and hospitalizations among 37,216 children. ED and hospitalization rates indicated persistent disparities in pediatric asthma. ED admission rates were similar across race/ethnic groups, suggesting similar management of pediatric asthma patients once they are seen in the ED. Integrating existing ED and hospitalization records will enhance asthma surveillance and the targeting of interventions to reduce race/ethnicity disparities.

  7. Factors associated with the hospital admission of consumer product-related injuries treated in U.S. hospital emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Thomas J; Rodgers, Gregory B

    2013-10-01

    While unintentional injuries and hazard patterns involving consumer products have been studied extensively in recent years, little attention has focused on the characteristics of those who are hospitalized after treatment in emergency departments, as opposed to those treated and released. This study quantifies the impact of the age and sex of the injury victims, and other factors, on the likelihood of hospitalization. The analysis focuses on consumer product injuries, and was based on approximately 400,000 injury cases reported through the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, a national probability sample of U.S. hospital emergency departments. Logistic regression was used to quantify the factors associated with the likelihood of hospitalization. The analysis suggests a smooth U-shaped relationship between the age of the victim and the likelihood of hospitalization, declining from about 3.4% for children under age 5 years to 1.9% for 15-24 year-olds, but then rising to more than 25% for those ages 75 years and older. The likelihood of hospitalization was also significantly affected by the victim's sex, as well as by the types of products involved, fire involvement, and the size and type of hospital at which the injury was treated. This study shows that the probability of hospitalization is strongly correlated with the characteristics of those who are injured, as well as other factors.

  8. 42 CFR 447.280 - Hospital providers of NF services (swing-bed hospitals).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and standards used to determine payment rates for routine NF services must— (1) Provide for payment at the average rate per patient day paid to NFs, as applicable, for routine services furnished during the... routine NF services must apply to all swing-bed hospitals in the State. ...

  9. 7 CFR 1951.136 - Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service (Community Facility Program only) and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service. 1951.136 Section 1951.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,...

  10. 7 CFR 1951.136 - Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service (Community Facility Program only) and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service. 1951.136 Section 1951.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,...

  11. 7 CFR 1951.136 - Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service (Community Facility Program only) and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service. 1951.136 Section 1951.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,...

  12. 7 CFR 1951.136 - Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service (Community Facility Program only) and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service. 1951.136 Section 1951.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,...

  13. 7 CFR 1951.136 - Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for Department of Treasury offset and cross-servicing for the Rural Housing Service (Community Facility Program only) and the Rural Business-Cooperative Service. 1951.136 Section 1951.136 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE,...

  14. Books for the Hospital Emergency Service

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Donald E.; Morgan, Virginia W.

    1966-01-01

    This is a list of books that should be available in either the hospital emergency room or the medical library. The forty-nine books listed are divided into the following categories: General, Surgery and Trauma, Burns, Cardiology, Dentistry, Disaster Medicine, First Aid, Geriatrics, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Toxicology, and Transportation. An asterisk has been placed before twelve books that are particularly recommended for the hospital emergency room as well as the medical library. The latest edition is given for each book, and, unless otherwise noted, each has been annotated by one of the authors. PMID:5945569

  15. Impact of Hurricane Sandy on the Staten Island University Hospital Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Greenstein, Josh; Chacko, Jerel; Ardolic, Brahim; Berwald, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Introduction On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy touched down in New York City (NYC; New York USA) causing massive destruction, paralyzing the city, and destroying lives. Research has shown that considerable damage and loss of life can be averted in at-risk areas from advanced preparation in communication procedures, evacuation planning, and resource allocation. However, research is limited in describing how natural disasters of this magnitude affect emergency departments (EDs). Hypothesis/Problem The aim of this study was to identify and describe trends in patient volume and demographics, and types of conditions treated, as a result of Hurricane Sandy at Staten Island University Hospital North (SIUH-N; Staten Island, New York USA) site ED. A retrospective chart review of patients presenting to SIUH-N in the days surrounding the storm, October 26, 2012 through November 2, 2012, was completed. Data were compared to the same week of the year prior, October 28, 2011 through November 4, 2011. Daily census, patient age, gender, admission rates, mode of arrival, and diagnoses in the days surrounding the storm were observed. A significant decline in patient volume was found in all age ranges on the day of landfall (Day 0) with a census of 114; -55% compared to 2011. The daily volume exhibited a precipitous drop on the days preceding the storm followed by a return to usual volumes shortly after. A notably larger percentage of patients were seen for medication refills in 2012; 5.8% versus 0.4% (P<.05). Lacerations and cold exposure also were increased substantially in 2012 at 7.6% versus 2.8% (P<.05) and 3.8% versus 0.0% (P<.05) of patient visits, respectively. A large decline in admissions was observed in the days prior to the storm, with a nadir on Day +1 at five percent (-22%). Review of admitted patients revealed atypical admissions for home care service such as need for supplemental oxygen or ventilator. In addition, a drop in Emergency Medical Services (EMS

  16. The quality of nursing service management in South African hospitals.

    PubMed

    Muller, M

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine--explore and describe--the quality of nursing service management in South African hospitals. A combined qualitative and quantitative pre- and post-test research strategy, in accordance with the COHSASA programme, was utilised. The hospitals implement the national standards during the preparatory phase, after having entered into an agreement with COHSASA. They determine their baseline status by means of an assisted self-evaluation. This is followed by an external survey phase where the hospital's compliance with the standards is evaluated. The nursing service is one of the professional services included in the accreditation programme. Their performance is compared with selected other professional services and their compliance with the core elements is also evaluated. The nursing services in South Africa are compliant with the national standards. The deficiencies are mainly within the quality improvement programmes that require further development and refinement.

  17. [SWOT analysis: the analytical method in the process of planning and its application in the development of orthopaedic hospital department].

    PubMed

    Terzić, Zorica; Vukasinović, Zoran; Bjegović-Mikanović, Vesna; Jovanović, Vesna; Janicić, Radmila

    2010-01-01

    SWOT analysis is a managerial tool used to evaluate internal and external environment through strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats. The aim was to demonstrate the application of the SWOT analysis on the example of the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. Qualitative research was conducted during December 2008 at the Department for Paediatric Orthopaedics and Traumatology of the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" by applying the focus group technique. Participants were members of the medical staff and patients. In the first phase of the focus group brainstorming was applied to collect the factors of internal and external environment, and to identify strengths and weaknesses, opportunities and threats, respectively. In the second phase the nominal group technique was applied in order to reduce the list of factors. The factors were assessed according to their influence on the Department. Factors ranked by the three point Likert scale from 3 (highest impact) to 1 (lowest impact). The most important strengths of the Department are competent and skilled staff, high quality of services, average hospital bed utilization, the Department providing the educational basis of the School of Medicine, satisfied patients, pleasant setting, and additional working hours. The weaknesses are: poor spatial organization, personnel unmotivated to refresh knowledge, lack of specifically trained personnel, inadequate sanitary facilities, and uncovered services by the Insurance Fund, long average hospital stay, and low economic status of patients. The opportunities are: legislative regulations, formed paediatric traumatology service at the City level, good regional position of the Institute, and extension of referral areas. The threats are: absent Department autonomy in the personnel policy of the Institute, competitions within the Institute, impossibility to increase the Department

  18. Motorcycle crash-related emergency department visits and hospitalizations for traumatic brain injury in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Katherine J; Marshall, Stephen W; Proescholdbell, Scott K; Naumann, Rebecca B; Waller, Anna E

    2015-01-01

    To examine statewide emergency department (ED) visit data for motorcycle crash morbidity and healthcare utilization due to traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) and non-TBIs. North Carolina ED data (2010-2012) and hospital discharge data (2009-2011). Statewide ED visits and hospitalizations due to injuries from traffic-related motorcycle crashes stratified by TBI status. Descriptive study. Descriptive statistics include age, sex, mode of transport, disposition, expected source of payment, hospital length of stay, and hospital charges. Over the study period, there were 18 780 ED visits and 3737 hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes. Twelve percent of ED visits for motorcycle crashes and 26% of hospitalizations for motorcycle crashes had a diagnosis of TBI. Motorcycle crash-related hospitalizations with a TBI diagnosis had median hospital charges that were nearly $9000 greater than hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Emergency department visits and hospitalizations due to motorcycle crashes with a TBI diagnosis consumed more healthcare resources than motorcycle crash-related ED visits and hospitalizations without a TBI diagnosis. Increased awareness of motorcyclists by other road users and increased use of motorcycle helmets are 2 strategies to mitigate the incidence and severity of motorcycle crash injuries, including TBIs.

  19. The organisation of the Department of Veterinary Services in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mohd Nor, M N; Abu Mustapa, A J; Abu Hassan, M A; Chang, K W

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Veterinary Services (DVS) in Malaysia was established in 1888 as an agency to control exotic and domestic animal diseases. Over the years, the structure and functions of the organisation have evolved to meet the growing demand for veterinary services. The responsibilities of the Veterinary Services are enshrined in the Constitution of Malaysia. The current organisation of the DVS is structured to achieve the following objectives:---to prevent, control and eradicate animal and zoonotic diseases--to facilitate the growth and development of a strong animal industry--to ensure that animal products for human consumption are wholesome, clean, safe and suitable to be consumed--to facilitate the growth and development of the animal feed industry--to ensure the welfare and well-being of all animals. To meet these objectives the DVS has nine different divisions, as follows: Planning and Evaluation, Epidemiology and Veterinary Medicine, Veterinary Public Health, Research and Development, Industry Development, Production and Development of Genetic Resources, Human Resource Development (HRD), Enforcement, and Administration. The development of the animal industry is managed through national development policies, including the Third National Agriculture Policy. The basis for current programmes for disease control and animal industry development is the Eighth Development Plan (2001-2005). Over the period of this Plan, Malaysia will address the need for sanitary and phytosanitary measures by developing specific programmes covering all fields of the animal industry. This is just one way in which Malaysia is meeting the challenges of the increased liberalisation of trade created by the World Trade Organization and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Free Trade Area. The development of the industry is focused on the major commodities, namely, beef, mutton, poultry meat, eggs, pork and milk. Other commodities receive support if it is considered economically

  20. Patients of internists in hospital outpatient departments and in private practice.

    PubMed Central

    Rudd, P.; Carrier, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    To test the contention that patients in outpatient departments and private practices differ, variables were assessed that might affect both the process and the outcome of medical care. Two groups of 60 patients consulting nine Montreal internists who worked in both private practice and in an outpatient department of a university teaching hospital were surveyed. The internists served as their own controls. The two groups of patients were compared for 57 demographic, socioeconomic, access, utilization, attitudinal and current medical status variables. Financial factors were minimized by the existence of universal health insurance. The outpatient group was found to be older, less fluent in English, less likely to be employed, less educated, less wealthy, more dependent on public transportation, more disabled, more likely to use ambulatory services, more anxious about health, and more sceptical about physicians, yet more dependent on them than the private practice group. The outpatient group tended to have more active, significant medical conditions and to receive more prescriptions for medication than the private practice group, in contrast to the national patterns in the practice of internal medicine in the United States. Medical educators, researchers, administrators and providers of health care who have assumed that these two groups of patients are comparable must re-evaluate their practices. PMID:737639

  1. Key facilitators and best practices of hotel-style room service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sheehan-Smith, Lisa

    2006-04-01

    This qualitative study sought to identify the features, advantages, and disadvantages of hotel-style room service; the barriers to, and facilitators for, implementing the process; and "best practices." The study took place in four heterogeneous hospitals. Participants included hospital administrators, managers, and room-service employees. Data-collection methods included semi-structured interviews, observations, and document analysis. Common features of hotel-style room service were meal delivery within 30 to 45 minutes, a restaurant-style menu, procedures to feed ineligible patients, tray assembly on demand, scripting, and waitstaff uniforms for room-service employees. The major barrier to implementing room service was obtaining nursing support. The key facilitators were the hospital's service-oriented culture, using a multidisciplinary planning team, engaging nursing departments early in the planning stages, and intense customer-service training of room-service employees. The overwhelming advantage was patients' control over their food choices. The main disadvantage was cost. Initial best practices in hotel-style room service include: (a) taking a multidisciplinary team approach for developing and implementing the process, (b) customer-service training, (c) using a customer-driven menu, (d) wearing waitstaff uniforms, and (e) using carts with airpots for dispensing hot beverages.

  2. Who decides which pharmacy services are provided in UK National Health Service hospitals?

    PubMed

    Cotter, S M; McKee, M; Strong, P M

    1997-02-01

    An interview survey of 129 UK National Health Service doctors, nurses, pharmacists and managers at eight acute care hospitals was conducted in 1994. The survey examined several topics including whether the introduction of the internal market had affected hospital pharmacy services and what those effects had been. An internal market has been introduced and it has had significant effects on the nature and structure of hospital pharmacy services. Directorate pharmacy services were available at six sites. Contracts for specific, usually novel, services had been implemented at one site and contracts had been introduced widely at another hospital. However, all the features of a market were not present at any site. Market orientation also has implications for the equity of service provision, primarily because decision-making regarding service provision is increasingly in the hands of the clinical directors, rather than pharmacy managers. The effects of this change are not yet clear.

  3. The contribution of hospital library services to continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Gluck, Jeannine Cyr

    2004-01-01

    Much of the literature relating to continuing medical education programs laments the lack of effectiveness of traditional lecture-based format, the most often used method of presentation in hospitals. A gap exists between the content taught in lectures and the application of that knowledge in actual patient care. The services of the medical librarian, already employed in most hospitals, can help ameliorate this problem. Further, libraries help to support quality improvement efforts. These three functions (library services, continuing medical education, and quality improvement) are interdependent. Each lends strength to the other, and, ideally, all are coordinated within the hospital structure.

  4. Process Mining-Based Method of Designing and Optimizing the Layouts of Emergency Departments in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rismanchian, Farhood; Lee, Young Hoon

    2017-07-01

    This article proposes an approach to help designers analyze complex care processes and identify the optimal layout of an emergency department (ED) considering several objectives simultaneously. These objectives include minimizing the distances traveled by patients, maximizing design preferences, and minimizing the relocation costs. Rising demand for healthcare services leads to increasing demand for new hospital buildings as well as renovating existing ones. Operations management techniques have been successfully applied in both manufacturing and service industries to design more efficient layouts. However, high complexity of healthcare processes makes it challenging to apply these techniques in healthcare environments. Process mining techniques were applied to address the problem of complexity and to enhance healthcare process analysis. Process-related information, such as information about the clinical pathways, was extracted from the information system of an ED. A goal programming approach was then employed to find a single layout that would simultaneously satisfy several objectives. The layout identified using the proposed method improved the distances traveled by noncritical and critical patients by 42.2% and 47.6%, respectively, and minimized the relocation costs. This study has shown that an efficient placement of the clinical units yields remarkable improvements in the distances traveled by patients.

  5. Does type of hospital ownership influence physicians' daily work schedules? An observational real-time study in German hospital departments

    PubMed Central

    Mache, Stefanie; Scutaru, Cristian; Vitzthum, Karin; Quarcoo, David; Schöffel, Norman; Welte, Tobias; Klapp, Burghard F; Groneberg, David A

    2009-01-01

    Background During the last two decades the German hospital sector has been engaged in a constant process of transformation. One obvious sign of this is the growing amount of hospital privatization. To date, most research studies have focused on the effects of privatization regarding financial outcomes and quality of care, leaving important organizational issues unexplored. Yet little attention has been devoted to the effects of privatization on physicians' working routines. The aim of this observational real-time study is to deliver exact data about physicians' work at hospitals of different ownership. By analysing working hours, further impacts of hospital privatization can be assessed and areas of improvement identified. Methods Observations were made by shadowing 100 physicians working in private, for-profit or non-profit as well as public hospital departments individually during whole weekday shifts in urban German settings. A total of 300 days of observations were conducted. All working activities were recorded, accurate to the second, by using a mobile personal computer. Results Results have shown significant differences in physicians' working activities, depending on hospital ownership, concerning working hours and time spent on direct and indirect patient care. Conclusion This is the first real-time analysis on differences in work activities depending on hospital ownership. The study provides an objective insight into physicians' daily work routines at hospitals of different ownership, with additional information on effects of hospital privatization. PMID:19473487

  6. Status of radiological services in Addis Ababa public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shimelis, Dagmawit; Tsige, Mesfin; Atnafu, Asfaw

    2011-07-01

    The availability and quality of radiological service in the developing countries are generally poor. Ethiopia is one of the countries where overall health service has been compromised by inadequate & poorly maintained infrastructure and scarcity of health professionals. Radiological service is a resource intensive unit in a hospital and most developing countries radiological service is expected to be poor or may not be available at all. However, there is no study conducted to assess the radiological service in Ethiopia. The aim of the study is to assess the status of radiological service in all public hospitals in Addis Ababa, capital of Ethiopia, and to render insight to the overall national service status. A cross sectional survey was conducted from Aug 2008 to Oct 2009 G C in all twelve public hospitals in Addis Ababa, including specialized and military hospitals. Self administered pre-tested questioners were used to collect data from key informants, chief radiographers and radiologist. In addition, departmental daily work record book was used to extract the type of radiological examination performed Data analysis was done manually. All hospitals in the study provide a basic level of radiological services. Plain x-ray and ultrasound is the type of service (100%) available, whereas services like mammography (9%), CT scan (18%) and MRI (0%) were found to be the least available. There are a total of 78 radiographers and 20 radiologists in Addis Ababa public hospitals with no radiologist in three. The average number of examinations performed in a year amounts to 113,204 and US and routine x-ray examinations account for nearly 98% of the service offered The study showed 25% of the radiological equipments are non-functional and no appropriately trained dark room technicians & no maintenance staffpresent in all hospitals This study verifies the poor radiological infrastructure, poor level of support and the basic nature of the radiological service in the capital. We

  7. Validation of an Algorithm for Categorizing the Severity of Hospital Emergency Department Visits

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Dustin W.; Price, Mary; Fung, Vicki; Brand, Richard; Reed, Mary E.; Fireman, Bruce; Newhouse, Joseph P.; Selby, Joseph V.; Hsu, John

    2013-01-01

    Background Differentiating between appropriate and inappropriate resource use represents a critical challenge in health services research. The New York University Emergency Department (NYU ED) visit severity algorithm attempts to classify visits to the ED based on diagnosis, but it has not been formally validated. Objective To assess the validity of the NYU algorithm. Research Design: A longitudinal study in a single integrated delivery system (IDS) from January 1999 to December 2001. Subjects 2,257,445 commercial and 261,091 Medicare members of an IDS. Measures ED visits were classified as emergent, non-emergent, or intermediate severity, using the NYU ED algorithm. We examined the relationship between visit-severity and the probability of future hospitalizations and death using a logistic model with a general estimating equation (GEE) approach. Results Among commercially insured subjects, ED visits categorized as emergent were significantly more likely to result in a hospitalization within one-day (OR=3.37, 95% CI: 3.31–3.44) or death within 30-days (OR=2.81, 95% CI: 2.62–3.00) than visits categorized as non-emergent. We found similar results in Medicare patients and in sensitivity analyses using different probability thresholds. ED overuse for non-emergent conditions was not related to socio-economic status or insurance type. Conclusions The evidence presented supports the validity of the NYU ED visit severity algorithm for differentiating ED visits based on need for hospitalization and/or mortality risk; therefore, it can contribute to evidence-based policies aimed at reducing the use of the ED for non-emergencies. PMID:19952803

  8. Emergency department length of stay is an independent predictor of hospital mortality in trauma activation patients.

    PubMed

    Mowery, Nathan T; Dougherty, Stacy D; Hildreth, Amy N; Holmes, James H; Chang, Michael C; Martin, R Shayn; Hoth, J Jason; Meredith, J Wayne; Miller, Preston R

    2011-06-01

    The early resuscitation occurs in the emergency department (ED) where intensive care unit protocols do not always extend and monitoring capabilities vary. Our hypothesis is that increased ED length of stay (LOS) leads to increased hospital mortality in patients not undergoing immediate surgical intervention. We examined all trauma activation admissions from January 2002 to July 2009 admitted to the Trauma Service (n = 3,973). Exclusion criteria were as follows: patients taken to the operating room within the first 2 hours of ED arrival, nonsurvivable brain injury, and ED deaths. Patients spending >5 hours in the ED were not included in the analysis because of significantly lower acuity and mortality. Patients spent a mean of 3.2 hours ± 1 hour in the ED during their initial evaluation. Hospital mortality increases for each additional hour a patient spends in the ED, with 8.3% of the patients staying in the ED between 4 hours and 5 hours ultimately dying (p = 0.028). ED LOS measured in minutes is an independent predictor of mortality (odds ratio, 1.003; 95% confidence interval, 1.010-1.006; p = 0.014) when accounting for Injury Severity Score, Revised Trauma Score, and age. Linear regression showed that a longer ED LOS was associated with anatomic injury pattern rather than physiologic derangement. In this patient population, a longer ED LOS is associated with an increased hospital mortality even when controlling for physiologic, demographic, and anatomic factors. This highlights the importance of rapid progression of patients through the initial evaluation process to facilitate placement in a location that allows implementation of early goal directed trauma resuscitation.

  9. Factors contributing to frequent attendance to the emergency department of a remote Northern Territory hospital.

    PubMed

    Quilty, Simon; Shannon, Geordan; Yao, Anthony; Sargent, William; McVeigh, Michael F

    2016-02-15

    To determine the clinical and environmental variables associated with frequent presentations by adult patients to a remote Australian hospital emergency department (ED) for reasons other than chronic health conditions. Unmatched case-control study of all adult patients attending Katherine Hospital ED between 1 January and 31 December 2012. Cases were defined as frequent attenders (FAs) without a chronic health condition who presented to the ED six or more times during the 12-month period. A single presentation was randomly selected for data collection. Controls were patients who presented on only one occasion. Basic demographic data were collected, including clinical outcomes, Indigenous status, living arrangements, and whether alcohol and violence contributed to the presentation. Environmental variables were extracted from the Bureau of Meteorology database and mapped to each presentation. FAs were much more likely to be homeless (odds ratio [OR], 16.4; P < 0.001) and to be Aboriginal (OR, 2.16; P < 0.001); alcohol as a contributing factor was also more likely (OR, 2.77; P = 0.001). FAs were more likely to present in hotter, wetter weather, although the association was statistically weak. Clinical presentations by cases and controls were similar; the annual death rates for both groups were high (3.6% and 1.5%, respectively). There was a strong association between FA and Aboriginal status, homelessness and the involvement of alcohol, but alcohol was more likely to contribute to presentation by non-Aboriginal FAs who had stable living conditions. FAs and non-FAs had similar needs for emergency medical care, with strikingly higher death rates than the national average in both groups. As a result of this study, Katherine Hospital has initiated a Frequent Attender Pathway that automatically triggers a dedicated ED service for those at greatest clinical risk. Homelessness is a serious problem in the Northern Territory, and is associated with poor health outcomes.

  10. Trends in dental-related use of hospital emergency departments in Florida.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Scott L; Carden, Donna L; Dodd, Virginia J; Catalanotto, Frank A; Herndon, Jill Boylston

    2016-06-01

    The inability to access regular dental care may lead to care seeking at hospital emergency departments (EDs). However, EDs generally are not equipped or staffed to provide definitive dental services. This study examined trends and patterns of hospital ED use for dental-related reasons in Florida, a large, diverse state with serious barriers to accessing dental care. Data for this study were drawn from ambulatory ED discharge records compiled by Florida's Agency for Health Care Administration for 2005-2014. Visits for dental-related reasons in Florida were defined by the patient's reported reason for seeking care or the ED physician's primary diagnosis using ICD-9-CM codes. We calculated frequencies, age-specific and age-adjusted rates per 100,000 population, and secular trends in dental-related ED visits and their associated charges. The number of dental-related visits to Florida EDs increased each year, from 104,642 in 2005 to 163,900 in 2014; the age-adjusted rate increased by 43.6 percent. Total charges for dental-related ED visits in Florida increased more than threefold during this time period, from $47.7 million in 2005 to $193.4 million in 2014 (adjusted for inflation). The primary payers for dental-related ED visits in 2014 were Medicaid (38 percent), self-pay (38 percent), commercial insurance (11 percent), Medicare (8 percent), and other (5 percent). Dental-related visits to hospital EDs in Florida have increased substantially during the past decade, as have their associated charges. Most patients did not receive definitive oral health care in EDs, and this trend represents an increasingly inefficient use of health care system resources. © 2016 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  11. Trends in Dental-Related Use of Hospital Emergency Departments in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, Scott L.; Carden, Donna L.; Dodd, Virginia J.; Catalanotto, Frank A.; Herndon, Jill Boylston

    2016-01-01

    Study objective The inability to access regular dental care may lead to care seeking at hospital emergency departments (EDs). However, EDs generally are not equipped or staffed to provide definitive dental services. This study examined trends and patterns of hospital ED use for dental-related reasons in Florida, a large, diverse state with serious barriers to accessing dental care. Methods Data for this study were drawn from ambulatory ED discharge records compiled by Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration for 2005–2014. Visits for dental-related reasons in Florida were defined by the patient’s reported reason for seeking care or the ED physician’s primary diagnosis using ICD-9-CM codes. We calculated frequencies, age-specific and age-adjusted rates per 100,000 population, and secular trends in dental-related ED visits and their associated charges. Results The number of dental-related visits to Florida EDs increased each year, from 104,642 in 2005 to 163,900 in 2014; the age-adjusted rate increased by 43.6%. Total charges for dental-related ED visits in Florida increased more than three-fold during this time period, from $47.7 million in 2005 to $193.4 million in 2014 (adjusted for inflation). The primary payers for dental-related ED visits in 2014 were Medicaid (38%), self-pay (38%), commercial insurance (11%), Medicare (8%), and other (5%). Conclusions Dental-related visits to hospital EDs in Florida have increased substantially during the past decade, as have their associated charges. Most patients did not receive definitive oral health care in EDs, and this trend represents an increasingly inefficient use of health care system resources. PMID:27103213

  12. Quantitative optimization of emergency department's nurses of an educational hospital: a case study.

    PubMed

    Mehrolhasani, Mohammad Hosein; Mouseli, Ali; Vali, Leila; Mastaneh, Zahra

    2017-02-01

    Nurses account for the majority of human resources in hospitals, as such that 62% of the workforce and 36% of hospital expenditures are related to nurses. Considering its vital role in offering round-the-clock emergency healthcare services, an Emergency Department (ED) requires adequate nurses. Therefore, this study was conducted to optimize the number of nurses in ED. This was an applied study conducted using a Linear Programming (LP) model in 2015. The study population were selected by census who were all ED nurses (n=84) and patients referred to ED (n=3342). To obtain the statistics related to the number of patients and nurses, the hospital information system and human resources database were employed respectively. To determine the optimum number of nurses per shift, LP model was created via literature review and expert advice, and it was executed in WinQSB software. Before implementing the model, the number of nurses required for ED morning shift, evening shift, and night shift (2 shifts) was 26, 24 and 34 respectively. The optimum number of nurses who worked in ED after running the model was 62 nurses, 17 in the morning shift, 17 in the evening shift and 28 in the night shift (2 shifts). This reduced to 60 nurses after conducting sensitivity analysis. The estimated number of nurses using LP was less than the number of nurses working in ED. This discrepancy can be reduced by scientific understanding of factors affecting allocation and distribution of nurses in ED and flexible organization, to reach the optimal point.

  13. 38 CFR 17.242 - Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... with Department of Health and Human Services. 17.242 Section 17.242 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... § 17.242 Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services. Programs for sharing... jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. Grants for Exchange of Information...

  14. 38 CFR 17.242 - Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... with Department of Health and Human Services. 17.242 Section 17.242 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... § 17.242 Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services. Programs for sharing... jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. Grants for Exchange of Information...

  15. 38 CFR 17.242 - Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... with Department of Health and Human Services. 17.242 Section 17.242 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... § 17.242 Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services. Programs for sharing... jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. Grants for Exchange of Information ...

  16. 38 CFR 17.242 - Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... with Department of Health and Human Services. 17.242 Section 17.242 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans... § 17.242 Coordination of programs with Department of Health and Human Services. Programs for sharing... jurisdiction of the Department of Health and Human Services. Grants for Exchange of Information ...

  17. Performance indicators for information technology services at four community hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Pegi; Dimnik, Gerry; Burns, Rodney; Bowie, Jamie

    2006-01-01

    During the 2004/05 fiscal year, the Directors of Information Technology Services (ITS) at four Toronto-area hospitals agreed to participate in a detailed benchmarking exercise looking at ITS costs and services in their organizations. The indicators presented in this article highlight some of the findings from this data analysis.

  18. Cluster analysis of medical service resources at district hospitals in Taiwan, 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shu-Fang; Lee, Tian-Shyug; Deng, Chung-Yeh

    2015-12-01

    A vast amount of the annual/national budget has been spent on the National Health Insurance program in Taiwan. However, the market for district hospitals has become increasingly competitive, and district hospitals are under pressure to optimize the use of health service resources. Therefore, we employed a clustering method to explore variations in input and output service volumes, and investigate resource allocation and health care service efficiency in district hospitals. Descriptive and cluster analyses were conducted to examine the district hospitals included in the Ministry of Health and Welfare database during 2007-2011. The results, according to the types of hospital ownership, suggested that the number of public hospitals has decreased and that of private hospitals increased; the largest increase in the number of district hospitals occurred when Taichung City was merged into Taichung County. The descriptive statistics from 2007 to 2011 indicated that 43% and 36.4% of the hospitals had 501-800 occupied beds and 101-200 physicians, respectively, and > 401 medical staff members. However, the number of outpatients and discharged patients exceeded 6001 and 90,001, respectively. In addition, the highest percentage of hospitals (43.9%) had 30,001-60,000 emergency department patients. In 2010, the number of patients varied widely, and the analysis of variance cluster results were nonsignificant (p > 0.05). District hospitals belonging to low-throughput and low-performance groups were encouraged to improve resource utilization for enhancing health care service efficiency. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  19. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Based on the students' perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered.

  20. Does outsourcing paramedical departments of teaching hospitals affect educational status of the students?

    PubMed Central

    Moslehi, Shandiz; Atefimanesh, Pezhman; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ahmadzadeh, Nahal; Kafaeimehr, Mohamadhosein; Emamgholizadeh, Saeid

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an increasing trend of outsourcing public departments. Teaching hospitals also outsourced some of their departments to private sectors. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of teaching hospitals affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This study was conducted in six teaching hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences, which had public and outsourced teaching departments in 2015. One hundred fifty students from the departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory participated in this study and their perceptions about their educational status were assessed. A valid and reliable questionnaire was used; participation in the study was voluntary. Descriptive statistics such as mean (SD), t-test and Kolmogorov-Smirnov were used. Results: No difference was detected between the educational status of students in public and outsourced departments of radiology, physiotherapy and laboratory (p>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the students’ perception, the private sectors could maintain the educational level of the teaching departments similar to the public departments. It is recommended to involve all the stakeholders such as hospital administrators, academic staff and students in the decision- making process when changes in teaching environments are being considered. PMID:27683645

  1. An evaluation of pre-hospital communication between ambulances and an accident and emergency department.

    PubMed

    Rowlands, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We studied pre-hospital notification and the quality of data received from ambulance crews transporting seriously ill or injured patients to an accident and emergency department. During a two-month study period, pre-hospital notification was received for 54 patients. However, the department was notified about only 25 of 62 patients (40%) who, on arrival by ambulance, were triaged as emergencies. Despite developing a data protocol for emergency pre-hospital communication and being equipped to receive emergency ambulance calls directly, many such patients still arrived either unannounced or described in insufficient detail to allow appropriate preparations to be made for them.

  2. Embedded ubiquitous services on hospital information systems.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Takatoshi; Masuda, Yasushi; Yasumuro, Yoshihiro; Hori, Kenta; Ohboshi, Naoki; Takemura, Tadamasa; Chihara, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2012-11-01

    A Hospital Information Systems (HIS) have turned a hospital into a gigantic computer with huge computational power, huge storage and wired/wireless local area network. On the other hand, a modern medical device, such as echograph, is a computer system with several functional units connected by an internal network named a bus. Therefore, we can embed such a medical device into the HIS by simply replacing the bus with the local area network. This paper designed and developed two embedded systems, a ubiquitous echograph system and a networked digital camera. Evaluations of the developed systems clearly show that the proposed approach, embedding existing clinical systems into HIS, drastically changes productivity in the clinical field. Once a clinical system becomes a pluggable unit for a gigantic computer system, HIS, the combination of multiple embedded systems with application software designed under deep consideration about clinical processes may lead to the emergence of disruptive innovation in the clinical field.

  3. 76 FR 5559 - Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of FY 2010 Service Contract... 2010 (Pub. L. 111-117), Department of Commerce is publishing this notice to advise the public of...

  4. Application of Analytical Hierarchy Process Approach for Service Quality Evaluation in Radiology Departments: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Hassani, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Radiology department as a service provider organization requires realization of quality concept concerning service provisioning knowledge, satisfaction and all issues relating to the customer as well as quality assurance and improvement issues. At present, radiology departments in hospitals are regarded as income generating units and they should continuously seek performance improvement so that they can survive in the changing and competitive environment of the health care sector. The aim of this study was to propose a method for ranking of radiology departments in selected hospitals of Tehran city using analytical hierarchical process (AHP) and quality evaluation of their service in 2015. This study was an applied and cross-sectional study, carried out in radiology departments of 6 Tehran educational hospitals in 2015. The hospitals were selected using non-probability and purposeful method. Data gathering was performed using customized joint commission international (JCI) standards. Expert Choice 10.0 software was used for data analysis. AHP method was used for prioritization. "Management and empowerment of human resources'' (weight = 0.465) and "requirements and facilities" (weight = 0.139) were of highest and lowest significance respectively in the overall ranking of the hospitals. MS (weight = 0.316), MD (weight = 0.259), AT (weight = 0.14), TS (weight = 0.108), MO (weight = 0.095), and LH (0.082) achieved the first to sixth rankings respectively. The use of AHP method can be promising for fostering the evaluation method and subsequently promotion of the efficiency and effectiveness of the radiology departments. The present model can fill in the gap in the accreditation system of the country's hospitals in respect with ranking and comparing them considering the significance and value of each individual criteria and standard. Accordingly, it can predict an integration of qualitative and quantitative criteria involved and thereby take a decisive step towards

  5. A multi agent system model for evaluating quality service of Clinical Engineering Department.

    PubMed

    Gaetano, Laura; Balestra, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical technology is strategically important to the operational effectiveness of healthcare facilities. As a consequence, clinical engineers have become an essential figure in hospital environment: their role in maintenance, support, evaluation, integration, assessment of new, advanced and complex technologies in point of view of patient safety and cost reduction is become inalienable. For this reason, nations have begun to establish Clinical Engineering Department, but, unfortunately, in a very diversified and fragmented way. So, a tool able to evaluate and improve the quality of current services is needed. Hence, this work builds a model that acts as a reference tool in order to assess the quality of an existing Clinical Engineering Department, underlining its defaulting aspects and suggesting improvements.

  6. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed Central

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-01-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified. PMID:1737708

  7. Adapting the SERVQUAL scale to hospital services: an empirical investigation.

    PubMed

    Babakus, E; Mangold, W G

    1992-02-01

    Defining and measuring the quality of service has been a major challenge for health care marketers. A comprehensive service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL) is empirically evaluated for its potential usefulness in a hospital service environment. Active participation by hospital management helped to address practical and user-related aspects of the assessment. The completed expectations and perceptions scales met various criteria for reliability and validity. Suggestions are provided for the managerial use of the scale, and a number of future research issues are identified.

  8. Hospital and corporate information services: introducing a new column.

    PubMed

    Jajko, P

    1992-01-01

    Successful hospital and corporate libraries offer customized resources and services to meet the needs of their dynamic organizations. Concepts such as customer-driven, service-oriented and value-added are central to these libraries. Serving decision makers and integrating the library into the decision-making process of the organization is critical. Future articles in this new column will further explore the underlying philosophies and the specialized resources and services that characterize these libraries.

  9. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN.

    PubMed

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-02-01

    The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction.

  10. THE EFFECT OF OUTPATIENT SERVICE QUALITY ON PATIENT SATISFACTION IN TEACHING HOSPITALS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Pouragha, Behrouz; Zarei, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The quality of services plays a primary role in achieving patient satisfaction. The main purpose of this study was to explore the effect of outpatient service quality on patient satisfaction in teaching hospitals in Iran. Methods: this cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014. The study sample included 500 patients were selected with systematic random method from the outpatient departments (clinics) of four teaching hospitals in Tehran. The survey instrument was a questionnaire consisted of 44 items, which were confirmed its reliability and validity. The data were analyzed by using descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation, and multivariate regression methods with the SPSS.18 software. Results: According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience in the outpatient departments of the teaching hospitals and thus evaluated the services as good. Perceived service costs, physician consultation, physical environment, and information to patient were found to be the most important determinants of outpatient satisfaction. Conclusion: The results suggest that improving the quality of consultation, providing information to the patients during examination and consultation, creating value for patients by reducing costs or improving service quality, and enhancing the physical environment quality of the clinic can be regarded as effective strategies for the management of teaching hospitals toward increasing outpatient satisfaction. PMID:27047262

  11. 42 CFR 419.22 - Hospital outpatient services excluded from payment under the hospital outpatient prospective...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM... services that meet the requirements of § 415.102(a) of this chapter for payment on a fee schedule basis. (b... in section 1861(v)(1)(U) of the Act, or, if applicable, the fee schedule established under...

  12. An audit of health education services within UK hospitals.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Charlotte L; Cook, Gary A

    2009-08-01

    UK public health policy requires hospitals to deliver health promotion services to patients for healthy lifestyles (i.e. health education), but there are currently few data on the health education delivered within hospitals. This audit aimed to collect data on the routine health education activities delivered to hospitalized patients to assess whether the following standards were met: 100% of hospitalized patients screened for smoking, alcohol use and obesity, 70% of smokers offered health education for smoking cessation and 50% of patients identified as misusing alcohol, obese, consuming an unhealthy diet and/or physically inactive delivered the appropriate health education. An audit of data contained in hospitalized patients' written medical case notes for evidence that the above standards were met. Nine hospitals in Greater Manchester in England participated. Four hospitals screened all patients for smoking. None of the hospitals met the standards for screening alcohol or obesity. For health education delivery, all hospitals met the standard for diet, four for alcohol misuse and four for physical activity. None of the hospitals met the standards for smoking or obesity. Improvements in practice for screening of alcohol and obesity are required. While some hospitals appeared to meet standards for health education delivery for alcohol, diet and physical activity, given the poor screening procedures for these risk factors, we can not conclude that health education delivery was adequate.

  13. Implementing "lean" principles to improve the efficiency of the endoscopy department of a community hospital: a case study.

    PubMed

    Laing, Karen; Baumgartner, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    Many endoscopy units are looking for ways to improve their efficiency without increasing the number of staff, purchasing additional equipment, or making the patients feel as if they have been rushed through the care process. To accomplish this, a few hospitals have looked to other industries for help. Recently, "lean" methods and tools from the manufacturing industry, have been applied successfully in health care systems, and have proven to be an effective way to eliminate waste and redundancy in workplace processes. The "lean" method and tools in service organizations focuses on providing the most efficient and effective flow of service and products. This article will describe the journey of one endoscopy department within a community hospital to illustrate application of "lean" methods and tools and results.

  14. Comparison of access to services in rural emergency departments in Quebec and British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Fleet, Richard; Audette, Louis-David; Marcoux, Jérémie; Villa, Julie; Archambault, Patrick; Poitras, Julien

    2014-11-01

    Although emergency departments (EDs) in Canada's rural areas serve approximately 20% of the population, a serious problem in access to health care services has emerged. The objective of this project was to compare access to support services in rural EDs between British Columbia and Quebec. Rural EDs were identified through the Canadian Healthcare Association's Guide to Canadian Healthcare Facilities. We selected hospitals with 24/7 ED physician coverage and hospitalization beds that were located in rural communities (using the rural and small town definition from Statistics Canada). Data were collected from ministries of health, local health authorities, and ED statistics. A telephone interview was administered to collect denominative user data statistics and determine the status of services. British Columbia has more rural EDs (n  =  34) than Quebec (n  =  26). EDs in Quebec have higher volumes (19,310 versus 7,793 annual visits). With respect to support services, 81% of Quebec rural EDs have a 24/7 on-call general surgeon compared to 12% for British Columbia. Nearly 75% of Quebec rural EDs have 24/7 access to computed tomography versus only 3% for British Columbia. Rural EDs in Quebec are also supported by a greater proportion of intensive care units (88% versus 15%); however, British Columbia appears to have more medevac aircraft/helicopters than Quebec. The results suggest that major differences exist in access to support services in rural EDs in British Columbia and Quebec. A nationwide study is justified to address this issue of variability in rural and remote health service delivery and its impact on interfacility transfers and patient outcomes.

  15. Evaluation of performance quality of an advanced scope physiotherapy role in a hospital emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J; Vine, K; Grimmer, K

    2015-01-01

    Background Physiotherapists working in advanced and extended scope roles internationally make a difference to workflow, performance targets, and patient satisfaction in areas traditionally served by medicine and nursing. Aim To assess the impact of an advanced scope of practice physiotherapist (ASoP-PT) service in a large Australian hospital emergency department (ED) by measuring national service and triage category indicators, patient and staff satisfaction. Methods Consecutive patients consulting the ASoP-PT were recruited over 53 weeks following service inception. Descriptions of ASoP-PT activities and patients were collected. Performance was assessed against national ED indicators for length of stay and wait. Patient and staff perspectives were assessed independently by semi-structured interviews. The physiotherapist was formally trained to extended scope of practice including competency in medicines, prescription and application. The legislation prevented him from applying these skills, therefore he worked in an ASoP-PT role in ED. Results The ASoP-PT treated on average, 72 patients per month in ten shifts per fortnight, consulting patients aged from 1 to 88 years. Patients largely presented with musculoskeletal problems in triage Categories 4 and 5. There were shorter length of wait and length of stay, when the ASoP-PT was on shift. However overall compliance with national performance targets was similar with and without the ASoP-PT. Staff and patient satisfaction was high, particularly valuing the ASoP-PT’s expertise in musculoskeletal injuries. Conclusion The ASoP-PT performed at least as well as other ED health care providers in meeting national triage targets. Had the legislation permitted his independent prescription of medicines, the ASoP-PT could have worked in an extended scope role, and his performance in meeting targets may have been better. PMID:26229515

  16. Benefits of Early Roflumilast Treatment After Hospital or Emergency Department Discharge for a COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Qing; Mocarski, Michelle; Sun, Shawn X.

    2016-01-01

    treatment had moderate (P = .013) or severe (P = .002) exacerbations. Early roflumilast treatment also was associated with reduced annualized COPD-related (P = .012) and all-cause (P = .009) rehospitalizations, outpatient visits per patient (P <.001 for COPD-related and all-cause), and procedures or therapies (COPD-related, P = .016; all-cause, P = .009). The early treatment group had fewer COPD-related emergency department visits per patient than the delayed roflumilast treatment group (P = .035), and the total mean annualized COPD-related and all-cause costs were reduced by $7273 (P = .014) and $14,111 (P = .002), respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that early treatment was associated with lower COPD-related and all-cause annualized health services costs per patient annually (P <.001 for both). Conclusion In this real-world study, the patients with COPD who initiated roflumilast treatment ≤30 days after a hospital or emergency department discharge for a COPD-related exacerbation experienced fewer subsequent exacerbations and rehospitalizations, reduced healthcare utilizations, and lower healthcare costs than the patients who delayed their roflumilast treatment. PMID:27606039

  17. Service quality of private hospitals: The Iranian Patients' perspective

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. Results The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. Conclusion The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients. PMID:22299830

  18. Service quality of private hospitals: the Iranian patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Asghar; Arab, Mohammad; Froushani, Abbas Rahimi; Rashidian, Arash; Ghazi Tabatabaei, S Mahmoud

    2012-02-02

    Highly competitive market in the private hospital industry has caused increasing pressure on them to provide services with higher quality. The aim of this study was to determine the different dimensions of the service quality in the private hospitals of Iran and evaluating the service quality from the patients' perspective. A cross-sectional study was conducted between October and November 2010 in Tehran, Iran. The study sample was composed of 983 patients randomly selected from 8 private general hospitals. The study questionnaire was the SERVQUAL questionnaire, consisting of 21 items in service quality dimensions. The result of factor analysis revealed 3 factors, explaining 69% of the total variance. The total mean score of patients' expectation and perception was 4.91(SD = 0.2) and 4.02(SD = 0.6), respectively. The highest expectation and perception related to the tangibles dimension and the lowest expectation and perception related to the empathy dimension. The differences between perception and expectation were significant (p < 0.001). There was a significant difference between the expectations scores based on gender, education level, and previous hospitalization in that same hospital. Also, there was a significant difference between the perception scores based on insurance coverage, average length of stay, and patients' health conditions on discharge. The results showed that SERVQUAL is a valid, reliable, and flexible instrument to monitor and measure the quality of the services in private hospitals of Iran. Our findings clarified the importance of creating a strong relationship between patients and the hospital practitioners/personnel and the need for hospital staff to be responsive, credible, and empathetic when dealing with patients.

  19. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  20. Costing hospital surgery services: the method matters.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Gregoire; Naro, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Accurate hospital costs are required for policy-makers, hospital managers and clinicians to improve efficiency and transparency. However, different methods are used to allocate direct costs, and their agreement is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between bottom-up and top-down unit costs of a large sample of surgical operations in a French tertiary centre. Two thousand one hundred and thirty consecutive procedures performed between January and October 2010 were analysed. Top-down costs were based on pre-determined weights, while bottom-up costs were calculated through an activity-based costing (ABC) model. The agreement was assessed using correlation coefficients and the Bland and Altman method. Variables associated with the difference between methods were identified with bivariate and multivariate linear regressions. The correlation coefficient amounted to 0.73 (95%CI: 0.72; 0.76). The overall agreement between methods was poor. In a multivariate analysis, the cost difference was independently associated with age (Beta = -2.4; p = 0.02), ASA score (Beta = 76.3; p<0.001), RCI (Beta = 5.5; p<0.001), staffing level (Beta = 437.0; p<0.001) and intervention duration (Beta = -10.5; p<0.001). The ability of the current method to provide relevant information to managers, clinicians and payers is questionable. As in other European countries, a shift towards time-driven activity-based costing should be advocated.

  1. Costing Hospital Surgery Services: The Method Matters

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Gregoire; Naro, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate hospital costs are required for policy-makers, hospital managers and clinicians to improve efficiency and transparency. However, different methods are used to allocate direct costs, and their agreement is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the agreement between bottom-up and top-down unit costs of a large sample of surgical operations in a French tertiary centre. Methods Two thousand one hundred and thirty consecutive procedures performed between January and October 2010 were analysed. Top-down costs were based on pre-determined weights, while bottom-up costs were calculated through an activity-based costing (ABC) model. The agreement was assessed using correlation coefficients and the Bland and Altman method. Variables associated with the difference between methods were identified with bivariate and multivariate linear regressions. Results The correlation coefficient amounted to 0.73 (95%CI: 0.72; 0.76). The overall agreement between methods was poor. In a multivariate analysis, the cost difference was independently associated with age (Beta = −2.4; p = 0.02), ASA score (Beta = 76.3; p<0.001), RCI (Beta = 5.5; p<0.001), staffing level (Beta = 437.0; p<0.001) and intervention duration (Beta = −10.5; p<0.001). Conclusions The ability of the current method to provide relevant information to managers, clinicians and payers is questionable. As in other European countries, a shift towards time-driven activity-based costing should be advocated. PMID:24817167

  2. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient's trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  3. Nurses' Emotional Intelligence Impact on the Quality of Hospital Services

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbar Ezzatabadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Mohammad Amin; Hadizadeh, Farzaneh; Arab, Masoomeh; Nasiri, Soheyla; Amiresmaili, Mohammadreza; Ahmadi Tehrani, Gholamreza

    2012-01-01

    Background Emotional intelligence is the potential to feel, use, communicate, recognize, remember, describe, identify, learn from, manage, understand and explain emotions. Service quality also can be defined as the post-consumption assessment of the services by consumers that are determined by many variables. Objectives This study was aimed to determine the nurses’ emotional intelligence impact on the delivered services quality. Materials and Methods This descriptive - applied study was carried out through a cross-sectional method in 2010. The research had 2 populations comprising of patients admitted to three academic hospitals of Yazd and the hospital nurses. Sample size was calculated by sample size formula for unlimited (patients) and limited (nursing staff) populations and obtained with stratified- random method. The data was collected by 4 valid questionnaires. Results The results of study indicated that nurses' emotional intelligence has a direct effect on the hospital services quality. The study also revealed that nurse's job satisfaction and communication skills have an intermediate role in the emotional intelligence and service quality relation. Conclusions This paper reports a new determinant of hospital services quality. PMID:23482866

  4. Identifying key hospital service quality factors in online health communities.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain; Kim, Minki

    2015-04-07

    The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. We defined social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea's two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media-based key quality factors for hospitals. To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is 78% on average. Extraction and

  5. Identifying Key Hospital Service Quality Factors in Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yuchul; Hur, Cinyoung; Jung, Dain

    2015-01-01

    Background The volume of health-related user-created content, especially hospital-related questions and answers in online health communities, has rapidly increased. Patients and caregivers participate in online community activities to share their experiences, exchange information, and ask about recommended or discredited hospitals. However, there is little research on how to identify hospital service quality automatically from the online communities. In the past, in-depth analysis of hospitals has used random sampling surveys. However, such surveys are becoming impractical owing to the rapidly increasing volume of online data and the diverse analysis requirements of related stakeholders. Objective As a solution for utilizing large-scale health-related information, we propose a novel approach to identify hospital service quality factors and overtime trends automatically from online health communities, especially hospital-related questions and answers. Methods We defined social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. In addition, we developed text mining techniques to detect such factors that frequently occur in online health communities. After detecting these factors that represent qualitative aspects of hospitals, we applied a sentiment analysis to recognize the types of recommendations in messages posted within online health communities. Korea’s two biggest online portals were used to test the effectiveness of detection of social media–based key quality factors for hospitals. Results To evaluate the proposed text mining techniques, we performed manual evaluations on the extraction and classification results, such as hospital name, service quality factors, and recommendation types using a random sample of messages (ie, 5.44% (9450/173,748) of the total messages). Service quality factor detection and hospital name extraction achieved average F1 scores of 91% and 78%, respectively. In terms of recommendation classification, performance (ie, precision) is

  6. [ The hospitalization of Jews in mental hospitals under Vichy in the department of the Seine].

    PubMed

    Caire, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The author presents the state of his research about a question not very studied till now in a French départment whose specificities have to be considered. The studying of some fifty medical records and some unpublished documents allows to point out how people persecuted by racial laws have been set in psychiatric hospitals and protected. As for their goods it seems that the system intending to protect psychiatric in-patients during their stay at the hospital has been turned away and used to despoil the patents "claimed or alleged Jews".

  7. Building areas of hospitals in Japan and distribution of areas by department--1980's.

    PubMed

    Itoh, M; Nakayama, S; Liu, Y Y; Kawaguchi, Y

    1993-07-01

    (1) Areas of entire hospitals which have been continuously increasing in the past 30 years are finally showing signs for slowing down. The areas of the hospitals completed in the 1980's were generally 50 to 80 m2 per bed. (2) The distribution of the nursing department to the entire hospitals in area ratio ranges from 30 to slightly more than 40%, or higher than 35% in most cases. The actual areas of the nursing department has surpassed 20 m2 per bed in a considerably large number of hospitals. (3) The area ratio of the outpatient department tends to concentrate to about 12%. Of this percentage, in almost all hospitals, the proportion of the emergency division was less than 2%. (4) As in the 1970's, the diagnostic and treatment facilities were within the range of 18 to 22% in the majority of the hospitals. The distribution shifted to ratios higher than the previous survey. The distributions for the various sections are as follows: 1) Specimen test rooms 3 to 5% 2) Physiological examination rooms slightly below 1% to slightly above 2% 3) X-ray diagnosis rooms about 4% 4) Radiation therapy rooms about 1% 5) Nuclear medicine rooms about 1% 6) Operating department 3 to 5%, 2 to 3 m2/bed 7) Delivery suite less than 1% 8) Rehabilitation department 1 to 4% 9) Hemodialysis suite about 1% (5) The area ratios of the supply department dispersed substantially between 12 and 25%. About 70% of the hospitals remained in the range of 15 to 20%. The ratios of the various sections in the department are as follows: 1) Pharmacy: slightly less than 2% to slightly less than 3% 2) Central sterile and supply department: about 2% 3) Blood bank: installed in hospitals with more than 500 beds 4) Kitchen: slightly more than 2% to slightly more than 3%, 1.5 to 2.5 m2/bed 5) Laundry: less than 1% 6) Central storage and material hundling unit: about 1% 7) Mechanical plant: 5 to 13% (6) The administration department allocates 7 to 14% of its area to the management division and 2 to 6% to the

  8. 42 CFR 424.122 - Conditions for payment for emergency inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... hospital services. 424.122 Section 424.122 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... emergency inpatient hospital services. Medicare Part A pays for emergency inpatient hospital services furnished by a foreign hospital if the following conditions are met: (a) At the time of the emergency that...

  9. 42 CFR 424.122 - Conditions for payment for emergency inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... hospital services. 424.122 Section 424.122 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... hospital services. Medicare Part A pays for emergency inpatient hospital services furnished by a foreign hospital if the following conditions are met: (a) At the time of the emergency that required the inpatient...

  10. [Acute diabetic complications attended in a hospital emergency department: a descriptive analysis].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Almazán, María; Montero-Carretero, Teresa; Sánchez-Ramón, Susana; Jorge-Bravo, M Teresa; Crespo-Soto, Cristina

    2017-07-01

    To analyze the characteristics of acute diabetic complications attended in a hospital emergency department. Cross-sectional, descriptive, retrospective study of patients with hyper- and hypoglycemic emergencies attended in a tertiary-care university hospital emergency department. We included 237 patients with a mean (SD) age of 61 (26) years. Diabetes had been diagnosed previously in 86.5% (type 2 in 74% and type 1 in 26%). Hyperglycemic emergencies were treated in 72%. The most frequent reasons for decompensation were poor control of type 1 diabetes (41.2%) and infections in type 2 diabetes (51.5%). Twenty-eight percent had low blood sugar levels caused by poor control of disease (50%). Patients with hypoglycemia had shorter mean stays. More admissions were made in type 2 diabetes than in type 1. Type 2 diabetes leads to more visits to the emergency department, more admissions, and a longer hospital stay than type 1 diabetes.

  11. Evaluation of preventable trauma death in emergency department of Imam Reza hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour, Changiz; Rad, Bahram Samadi; Vahdati, Samad Shams; Ghaffarzad, Amir; Masoud, Armita

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trauma is considered as a worldwide problem despite socio-economic development. Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are the most important cause of trauma. Trauma related deaths are mostly preventable. This study aimed to investigate the causes and prevention of death in trauma patients. METHODS: This retrospective, descriptive-analytic study assessed 100 trauma patients referred to our emergency department (ED) from January 2013 to Januanry 2015. The included patients were those with trauma died after arrival at our ED. Age, sex, cause of trauma, clinical causes of death, causes of death defined by autopsy, way of transfer to the ED, time of ambulance arrival at the scene of trauma, and time elapsed to enter the ED from the scene of trauma were studied. RESULTS: In the 100 patients, 21 (21%) patients were female and 79 (79%) male. Forty-three patients were older than 60 years. Trauma was largely due to pedestrian accidents in 31% of the patients, and 33% had a hypo-volemic shock. About 80% of deaths were due to intra-cranial hemorrhage (ICH) or intra-ventricular hemorrhage (IVH), and spinal injuries were not preventable. Autopsy revealed that 28% of the patients suffered from internal injuries. Autopsy revealed that 19% of the deaths were not preventable and 81% were considered preventable. In our patients, 76 were transferred to the hospital by emergency medicine services (EMS). Analysis of time for ambulance arrival to the scene and frequency of death revealed that 52.2% of the deaths occurred between 11 and 15 minutes. Analysis of time for admission to the ED from the scene of trauma showed that 74.6% deaths occurred between 6 and 10 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of hospital preventable deaths is about 80%, a high mortality rate, which denotes a lack of proper diagnosis and treatment. The time for arrival of EMS at the scene of trauma is longer than that in other countries. PMID:27313809

  12. Psychosocial care in the Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology of public hospitals in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Farberman, Débora; Méndez, Teresa; García, Leticia; Salvia, Lucía; Otarolac, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    Blood diseases and cancer are part of a group of rare conditions in pediatrics. In general, cancer treatments are prolonged (months or years), so psychosocial support has been introduced to provide comprehensive care to these patients. To explore psychosocial care provided at the public hospitals of Argentina to children and adolescents with cancer. Population and Methods. An electronic questionnaire was sent to the heads of the Departments of Hematology and Oncology, Mental Health, and Social Services of 27 public hospitals providing care to pediatric patients with cancer. The survey included questions related to psychosocial care provided to this group of patients. Answers were collected and processed in the 2013-2014 period. Of the total number of health care providers contacted, 62.6% (47/75) completed the questionnaire. As per hematologist-oncologists, the three specialties complied with the recommendations made by the International Society of Pediatric Oncology to a greater extent than that reported by the psychosocial area. Such difference was repeatedly observed in all answers. The standards that were observed more consistently were continuation of education and care of healthy siblings. The health care providers from the three specialties indicated that they lacked formal mechanisms to detect failures in treatment adherence in an early manner, although treatment withdrawal interventions were systematized. Providers from the psychosocial area indicated that human resources were lacking and perceived little interdisciplinary work. This study reported partial adherence to the standards recommended by the International Society of Pediatric Oncology. The assessment made by hematologists-oncologists was different from that made by health care providers from the psychosocial area.

  13. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  14. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  15. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  16. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  17. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  18. Using the critical incident survey to assess hospital service quality.

    PubMed

    Longo, B; Connor, G; Barnhart, T

    1993-01-01

    This survey was designed to determine "standards of excellence" in hospital services as defined by (a) former patients, (b) physicians, (c) hospital employees, and (d) corporate insurance subscribers. One hundred forty-seven (147) patients, 188 employees, and 20 corporate subscribers were interviewed by telephone, and 52 physicians were interviewed in their offices. The interview consisted of a single question: "Can you think of a time when, as a patient/employee/employer/physician, you had a particularly satisfying or dissatisfying experience with a local hospital?" Reported incidents were reviewed, and 239 "critical incidents" were identified. These incidents were classified into 12 descriptive categories relating to the underlying factors in the incident reports. Six focus groups were later held with participants segregated by the population pool they represented. These groups were asked to develop definitions of "excellence" in hospital service quality and standards for service which would "exceed expectations." The focus groups created 122 standards of excellence, which were classified into 43 categories. Overall, the largest percentages of corporate, physician, and employee critical incidents were classified as "Administrative Policy" issues. Patients most often reported "Nurturing" incidents as critical to their perceptions of hospital service quality.

  19. Strategies for cutting hospital beds: the impact on patient service.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L V; Nguyen, V

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop insights on the impact of size, average length of stay, variability, and organization of clinical services on the relationship between occupancy rates and delays for beds. DATA SOURCES: The primary data source was Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Secondary data were obtained from the United Hospital Fund of New York reflecting data from about 150 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: Data from Beth Israel Deaconess on discharges and length of stay were analyzed and fit into appropriate queueing models to generate tables and graphs illustrating the relationship between the variables mentioned above and the relationship between occupancy levels and delays. In addition, specific issues of current concern to hospital administrators were analyzed, including the impact of consolidation of clinical services and utilizing hospital beds uniformly across seven days a week rather than five. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using target occupancy levels as the primary determinant of bed capacity is inadequate and may lead to excessive delays for beds. Also, attempts to reduce hospital beds by consolidation of different clinical services into single nursing units may be counterproductive. CONCLUSIONS: More sophisticated methodologies are needed to support decisions that involve bed capacity and organization in order to understand the impact on patient service. Images Figure 2 PMID:11409821

  20. LIFENET hospitals (India): developing new services' case study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Zillur; Qureshi, M N

    2008-01-01

    Indian healthcare is in the process of offering a plethora of services to customers hailing largely from India and from neighboring countries. The Indian hospital sector consists of private "nursing homes" and government and charitable missionary hospitals. Government and missionary hospitals determine their charges according to patients' income levels and treat poor patients freely. Nursing homes charged higher, market-determined rates. They offer services in just a few medical specialties, owned and operated by physicians who worked with them. Nursing homes cannot afford the latest medical technology, but they provide more intimate settings than government hospitals. This case study aims to demonstrate the various strategic options available to a for-profit hospital, in an emerging economy with a burgeoning middle-class population and how it can choose which services that it can best offer to its target population. Diagnosing and treating complex ailments in nursing homes could be a time-consuming and expensive proposition as visits to several nursing homes with different specialties may be necessary. This paper demonstrates how an hospital can develop new customer-oriented services and eliminate the hassle for patients needing to run around different healthcare outlets even for minor ailments. The paper finds that large government hospitals generally have better facilities than nursing homes, but they were widely believed to provide poor-quality care. They failed to keep up with advanced equipment, train their technicians adequately and did not publicize their capabilities to doctors who might refer patients. Many missionary and charitable hospitals were undercapitalized and did not offer all services. These conditions left an unsatisfied demand for high-quality medical care. In 1983, LIFENET opened in Madras, becoming the first comprehensive, for-profit hospital in India. LIFENET, invested in a cardiology laboratory and clinics with capacity to diagnose heart

  1. Preventable Hospitalizations and Emergency Department Visits for Angina, United States, 1995–2010

    PubMed Central

    Valderrama, Amy L.; Yoon, Paula W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Preventable hospitalizations for angina have been decreasing since the late 1980s — most likely because of changes in guidance, physician coding practices, and reimbursement. We asked whether this national decline has continued and whether preventable emergency department visits for angina show a similar decline. Methods We used National Hospital Discharge Survey data from 1995 through 2010 and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 1995 through 2009 to study preventable hospitalizations and emergency department visits, respectively. We calculated both crude and standardized rates for these visits according to technical specifications published by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, which uses population estimates from the US Census Bureau as the denominator for the rates. Results Crude hospitalization rates for angina declined from 1995–1998 to 2007–2010 for men and women in all 3 age groups (18–44, 45–64, and ≥65) and age- and sex-standardized rates declined in a linear fashion (P = .02). Crude rates for preventable emergency department visits for angina declined for men and women aged 65 or older from 1995–1998 to 2007–2009. Age- and sex-standardized rates for these visits showed a linear decline (P = .05). Conclusion We extend previous research by showing that preventable hospitalization rates for angina have continued to decline beyond the time studied previously. We also show that emergency department visits for the same condition have also declined during the past 15 years. Although these declines are probably due to changes in diagnostic practices in the hospitals and emergency departments, more studies are needed to fully understand the reasons behind this phenomenon. PMID:23886045

  2. Systematic review of frequent users of emergency departments in non-US hospitals: state of the art.

    PubMed

    van Tiel, Sofie; Rood, Pleunie P M; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M; Erasmus, Vicky; Haagsma, Juanita; van Beeck, Ed; Patka, Peter; Polinder, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    This review focuses on frequent users (FUs) of the emergency department (ED). Elucidation of the characteristics of frequent ED users will help to improve healthcare services. A systematic review of the literature (from 1999 onwards) on frequent ED users in non-US hospitals was performed. Twenty-two studies were included. FUs are responsible for a wide variety of 1-31% of ED visits depending on the FU definition used. They have a mean age between 40 and 50 years and are older than nonfrequent users. Chronic physical and mental diseases seem to be the main reasons for frequent ED visits. In terms of social characteristics, lacking a partner is more frequently reported among FUs in some studies. The absence of a universal definition for FUs complicates the determination of the burden on emergency healthcare services. FUs are a heterogeneous group of patients with genuine medical needs and high consumption of other healthcare services.

  3. Using Simulation to Examine the Effect of Physician Heterogeneity on the Operational Efficiency of an Overcrowded Hospital Emergency Department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Y.-H.; Leung, J. M. Y.; Graham, C. A.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of modelling and analyzing the patient flow of a hospital emergency department in Hong Kong. The emergency department is facing the challenge of overcrowding and the patients there usually experience a long waiting time. Our project team was requested by a senior consultant of the emergency department to analyze the patient flow and provide a decision support tool to help improve their operations. We adopt a simulation approach to mimic their daily operations. With the simulation model, we conduct a computational study to examine the effect of physician heterogeneity on the emergency department performance. We found that physician heterogeneity has a great impact on the operational efficiency and thus should be considered when developing simulation models. Our computational results show that, with the same average of service rates among the physicians, variation in the rates can improve overcrowding situation. This suggests that emergency departments may consider having some efficient physicians to speed up the overall service rate in return for more time for patients who need extra medical care.

  4. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  5. Modeling hospitals' adaptive capacity during a loss of infrastructure services.

    PubMed

    Vugrin, Eric D; Verzi, Stephen J; Finley, Patrick D; Turnquist, Mark A; Griffin, Anne R; Ricci, Karen A; Wyte-Lake, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Resilience in hospitals - their ability to withstand, adapt to, and rapidly recover from disruptive events - is vital to their role as part of national critical infrastructure. This paper presents a model to provide planning guidance to decision makers about how to make hospitals more resilient against possible disruption scenarios. This model represents a hospital's adaptive capacities that are leveraged to care for patients during loss of infrastructure services (power, water, etc.). The model is an optimization that reallocates and substitutes resources to keep patients in a high care state or allocates resources to allow evacuation if necessary. An illustrative example demonstrates how the model might be used in practice.

  6. Availability of software services for a hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, N

    1998-03-01

    Hospital information systems (HISs) are becoming more important and covering more parts in daily hospital operations as order-entry systems become popular and electronic charts are introduced. Thus, HISs today need to be able to provide necessary services for hospital operations for a 24-h day, 365 days a year. The provision of services discussed here does not simply mean the availability of computers, in which all that matters is that the computer is functioning. It means the provision of necessary information for hospital operations by the computer software, and we will call it the availability of software services. HISs these days are mostly client-server systems. To increase availability of software services in these systems, it is not enough to just use system structures that are highly reliable in existing host-centred systems. Four main components which support availability of software services are network systems, client computers, server computers, and application software. In this paper, we suggest how to structure these four components to provide the minimum requested software services even if a part of the system stops to function. The network system should be double-protected in stratus using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) as its base network. Client computers should be fat clients with as much application logic as possible, and reference information which do not require frequent updates (master files, for example) should be replicated in clients. It would be best if all server computers could be double-protected. However, if that is physically impossible, one database file should be made accessible by several server computers. Still, at least the basic patients' information and the latest clinical records should be double-protected physically. Application software should be tested carefully before introduction. Different versions of the application software should always be kept and managed in case the new version has problems. If a hospital

  7. [Public hospital emergency department visits due to burns in Brazil, 2009].

    PubMed

    Gawryszewski, Vilma Pinheiro; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Silva, Nilza Nunes da; Morais Neto, Otaliba Libânio de; Silva, Marta Maria Alves da; Mascarenhas, Márcio Dênis Medeiros; Sá, Naíza Nayla Bandeira de; Monteiro, Rosane Aparecida; Malta, Deborah Carvalho

    2012-04-01

    The objective was to analyze the characteristics of burn injuries treated in emergency departments (ED) and associated factors. This was a cross-sectional study of 761 ED visits collected through the National Injury Surveillance System in 2009. The majority of patients were males (58.6%), and the most prevalent age brackets were 30-49 years (23.1%) and 0-4 years (23%). Most burns occurred at home (62.1%), especially among females and children, and in commerce/services/industry/construction (19.1%), mainly among males 20-49 years. Work-related burns comprised 29.1% of the overall sample. Alcohol use prior to the injury was reported in 5.1% of cases. Causal agents across all age brackets were: contact with hot substances (43.6%) and exposure to fire and flames (24.2%); among the economically productive age groups, association with chemicals substances was common. Burns in children 0-14 years were associated with injuries at home, contact with heat and hot substances, and subsequent hospitalization; burns in the 15-49-year bracket were associated with exposure to fire/flames and electrical current, injuries occurring in public places, and outpatient treatment and discharge. The study highlights the importance of burn prevention strategies targeting children and workers.

  8. Quality of the clinical laboratory department in a specialized hospital in Alexandria, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Elhoseeny, T A; Mohammad, E K

    2013-01-01

    Assessment and improvement of turnaround times (TAT) as well as customer satisfaction is essential for laboratory quality management. This study in a specialized hospital in Alexandria, Egypt measured the current TAT for outpatient department bilirubin samples and evaluated the satisfaction of physicians with aspects of clinical laboratory services. While the mean TAT for 110 bilirubin tests [58.1 (SD 31.8) min] was within the College of American Pathologists' benchmark, the 90th percentile was long (96.7 min); 62.7% of tests were reported within 60 min. The mean overall satisfaction score of physicians (range 1-5) was 3.46 (SD 0.49). The highest satisfaction rating was for staff courtesy while the lowest ratings were for laboratory management responsiveness, outpatient stat TAT and critical value notification. Quality or reliability of results was judged by physicians as the most important factor (32.3%), followed by routine test TAT (18.5%). Further analysis of the different steps of the TAT would be helpful and follow-up through examining outliers is recommended

  9. Effects of hospital closures and hospital characteristics on emergency department ambulance diversion, Los Angeles County, 1998 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Sun, Benjamin C; Mohanty, Sarita A; Weiss, Robert; Tadeo, Richard; Hasbrouck, Maureen; Koenig, William; Meyer, Carol; Asch, Steven

    2006-04-01

    We assess the effects of nearby hospital closures and other hospital characteristics on emergency department (ED) ambulance diversion. The study design was a retrospective, multiple interrupted time series with control group. We studied all ambulance-receiving hospitals with EDs in Los Angeles County from 1998 to 2004. The main outcome measure was monthly ambulance diversion hours because of ED saturation. Our sample included 80 hospitals, of which 9 closed during the study period. There were increasing monthly diversion hours over time, from an average of 57 hours (95% confidence interval [CI] 51 to 63 hours) in 1998 to 190 hours (95% CI 180 to 200 hours) in 2004. In multivariate modeling, hospital closure increased ambulance monthly diversion hours by an average of 56 hours (95% CI 28 to 84 hours) for 4 months at the nearest ED. County-operated hospitals had 150 hours (95% CI 90 to 200 hours) and trauma centers had 48 hours (95% CI 9 to 87 hours) more diversion than other hospitals. Diversion hours for a given facility were positively correlated with diversion hours of the nearest ED (0.3; 95% CI 0.28 to 0.32). There was a significant and positive interaction between diversion hours of the nearest ED and time, suggesting that the effects of an adjacent facility's diversion hours increased during the study period. Hospital closure was associated with a significant but transient increase in ambulance diversion for the nearest ED. The temporal trend toward more diversion hours, as well as increasing effects of the nearest facility's diversion hours over time, implies that the capacity to absorb future hospital closures is declining.

  10. Exploring patterns of health service use in older emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Hastings, S Nicole; Horney, Carolyn; Landerman, Lawrence R; Sanders, Linda L; Hocker, Michael B; Schmader, Kenneth E

    2010-10-01

    Study objectives were to identify groups of older patients with similar patterns of health care use in the 12 months preceding an index outpatient emergency department (ED) visit and to identify patient-level predictors of group membership.   Subjects were adults ≥ 65 years of age treated and released from an academic medical center ED. Latent cluster analysis (LCA) models were estimated to identify groups with similar numbers of primary care (PC), specialist, and outpatient ED visits and hospital days within 12 months preceding the index ED visit.   In this sample (n = 308), five groups with distinct patterns of health service use emerged. Low Users (35%) had fewer visits of all types and fewer hospital days compared to sample means. Low Users were more likely to be female and had fewer chronic health conditions relative to the overall sample (p < 0.05). The ED to Supplement Primary Care Provider (PCP) (23%) group had more PCP visits, but also significantly more ED visits. Specialist Heavy (22%) group members had twice as many specialist visits, but no difference in PCP visits. Members of this class were more likely to be white and male (p < 0.05). High Users (15%) received more care in all categories and had more chronic baseline health conditions (p < 0.05) but no differences in demographic characteristics relative to the whole sample. The ED and Hospital as Substitution Care (6%) group had fewer PC and specialist visits, but more ED visits and hospital days.   In this sample of older ED patients, five groups with distinct patterns of health service use were identified. Further study is needed to determine whether identification of these patient groups can add important information to existing risk-assessment methods. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  11. A survey of pandemic influenza preparedness and response capabilities in Chicago area hospital security departments.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, David P

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary based on a December 2007 paper prepared by the author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree in business and organizational security management at Webster University. The project described was intended to assess Chicago-area healthcare organization security departments' preparedness and response capabilities for a potential influenza pandemic. While the author says healthcare organizations are learning from the pandemics of the past, little research has been conducted on the requirements necessary within hospital security departments. The article explores staffing, planning, preparation and response capabilities within a healthcare security context to determine existing resources available to the healthcare security community. Eleven completed surveys were received from hospital security managers throughout the geographical Chicago area. They reveal that hospital security managers are conscious of the risks of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Yet, it was found that several gaps existed within hospital security department staffing and response capabilities, as hospital security departments may not have the available resources necessary to adequately maintain their operations during a pandemic incident.

  12. 77 FR 5012 - Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services and Department of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... office of Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service/Biotechnology Regulatory Services (APHIS/BRS) and... private entities pursuant to its biotechnology regulations under 7 CFR part 340 only as described below...

  13. Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blog Home Our Focus Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Business Services Civil Rights Emergency Response Imports & Exports ... Landing Page Popular Topics Animal Health Animal Welfare Biotechnology Emergency Response Imports & Exports International Services Plant Health ...

  14. The Association of Longitudinal and Interpersonal Continuity of Care with Emergency Department Use, Hospitalization, and Mortality among Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    Bentler, Suzanne E.; Morgan, Robert O.; Virnig, Beth A.; Wolinsky, Fredric D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuity of medical care is widely believed to lead to better health outcomes and service utilization patterns for patients. Most continuity studies, however, have only used administrative claims to assess longitudinal continuity with a provider. As a result, little is known about how interpersonal continuity (the patient's experience at the visit) relates to improved health outcomes and service use. Methods We linked claims-based longitudinal continuity and survey-based self-reported interpersonal continuity indicators for 1,219 Medicare beneficiaries who completed the National Health and Health Services Use Questionnaire. With these linked data, we prospectively evaluated the effect of both types of continuity of care indicators on emergency department use, hospitalization, and mortality over a five-year period. Results Patient-reported continuity was associated with reduced emergency department use, preventable hospitalization, and mortality. Most of the claims-based measures, including those most frequently used to assess continuity, were not associated with reduced utilization or mortality. Conclusion Our results indicate that the patient- and claims-based indicators of continuity have very different effects on these important health outcomes, suggesting that reform efforts must include the patient-provider experience when evaluating health care quality. PMID:25531108

  15. Initiation of a medical toxicology consult service at a tertiary care children’s hospital

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GEORGE SAM; MONTE, ANDREW; HATTEN, BENJAMIN; BRENT, JEFFREY; BUCHANAN, JENNIE; HEARD, KENNON J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, only 10% of board-certified medical toxicologists are pediatricians. Yet over half of poison center calls involve children < 6 years, poisoning continues to be a common pediatric diagnosis and bedside toxicology consultation is not common at children’s hospitals. In collaboration with executive staff from Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, regional poison center, and our toxicology fellowship, we established a toxicology consulting service at our tertiary-care children’s hospital. There were 139 consultations, and the service generated 13 consultations in the first month; median of 11 consultations per month thereafter (range 8–16). The service increased pediatric cases seen by the fellowship program from 30 to 94. The transition to a consult service required a culture change. Historically, call center advice was the mainstay of consulting practice and the medical staff was not accustomed to the availability of bedside medical toxicology consultations. However, after promotion of the service and full attending and fellowship coverage, consultations increased. In collaboration with toxicologists from different departments, a consultation service can be rapidly established. The service filled a clinical need that was disproportionately utilized for high acuity patients, immediately utilized by the medical staff and provided a robust pediatric population for the toxicology fellowship. PMID:25686099

  16. 39 CFR 760.1 - Treasury Department regulations; applicability to Postal Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treasury Department regulations; applicability to... OBLIGATIONS; DISBURSEMENT POSTAL MONEY ORDERS APPLICABILITY OF TREASURY DEPARTMENT REGULATIONS § 760.1 Treasury Department regulations; applicability to Postal Service. The provisions of Treasury...

  17. Consultation-liaison service in a regional hospital in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, M M C; Yiu, M G C

    2014-06-01

    To examine consultation-liaison psychiatric services in a general hospital in Hong Kong. All records of Tseung Kwan O Hospital psychiatric consultations from 1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013 were extracted from the database. Patients' demographic data, sources and reasons of referral, psychiatric and suicidal histories, current suicidal attempt, psychiatric diagnoses, psychiatric outcomes, as well as waiting times were analysed accordingly. A total of 1392 psychiatric consultations were received, of which 82% were attended to within the same working day when the referral was received, and 99% were attended to by the end of the next working day. The commonest reasons of consultation were unstable emotion followed by suicidal / deliberate self-harm and aggression. There were 246 consultations with actual suicidal attempt. Overall, 270 (19%) patients who received consultation-liaison psychiatric services were admitted to the psychiatric wards. Follow-up in the psychiatric outpatient department was arranged for 691 (50%) patients while 57 (4%) required referral to the community psychiatric nursing service in addition to outpatient department arrangement. Management of suicidal attempters and provision of risk assessment continue to be the major tasks of consultation-liaison psychiatrists and nurses. A readily available on-site consultation-liaison psychiatric service is an essential component of services provided in acute general hospitals.

  18. Trauma in elderly patients evaluated in a hospital emergency department in Konya, Turkey: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Hasan; Bayir, Aysegul; Ak, Ahmet; Akinci, Murat; Tufekci, Necmettin; Degirmenci, Selim; Azap, Melih

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Trauma is a common cause of admission to the hospital emergency department. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cause of admission, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of patients aged ≥65 years admitted to an emergency department in Turkey because of blunt trauma. Materials and methods Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for 568 patients (314 women and 254 men) aged ≥65 years who were admitted to an emergency department of a tertiary care hospital. Results Trauma was caused by low-energy fall in 379 patients (67%), traffic accident in 79 patients (14%), high-energy fall in 69 patients (12%), and other causes in 41 patients (7%). The most frequent sites of injury were the lower extremity, thorax, upper extremity, and head. The femur was the most frequent fracture site. After evaluation in the emergency department, 377 patients (66%) were hospitalized. There were 31 patients (5%) who died. Risk of hospitalization after trauma was significantly associated with trauma to the lower extremity, thorax, and spine; fractures of the femur and rib; and intracranial injury. Conclusion Emergency department admission after trauma in patients aged ≥65 years is common after low-energy falls, and most injuries occur to the extremities. It is important to focus on prevention of falls to decrease the frequency of trauma in the elderly. PMID:24376346

  19. [Geriatric profile according to the Identification of Seniors At Risk (ISAR) tool in the emergency department in a teaching hospital].

    PubMed

    El-Hayeck, Rita; Baddoura, Rafic; Fadel, Patricia; Wehbé, Amine; Zoghby, Antoine; Berthel, Marc

    2015-01-01

    With the anticipated increase in the number of elderly people in Lebanon, it is important to develop services tailored to their specific needs. The Identification of Seniors At Risk (ISAR) tool identifies, in emergency setting, frail elderly people at risk of adverse outcomes, who are more likely to benefit from a geriatric approach. i) Assess the geriatric profile according to ISAR score ii) correlate the score to outcomes two months after Emergency Department (ED) visit. A two-month prospective study: at the ED of Hôtel-Dieu de France Hospital, we interviewed 273 people aged 70 years and older (or their caregiver) using the ISAR tool. Telephone follow-up was done two months later. The prevalence of subjects with ISAR score ≥ 2 and thus likely to benefit from the establishment of a geriatric service is 70.7% (95% CI: 64.9-76.0). Elderly patients admitted to ED with ISAR score ≥ 2 are more likely to be hospitalized (51.6%) than subjects of the same age and sex with ISAR score < 2 (36.9%) (p = 0.034). After two months of follow-up, the risk of hospital readmission and the risk of death was significantly associated with the ISAR score (p = 0.0005) CONCLUSION: The percentage of elderly people likely to benefit from specialized geriatric care network upon admission to the ED of a university hospital is significantly high [70.7% (95% Cl: 64.9-76 .0)].

  20. Benchmarking as a tool for the improvement of health services' supply departments.

    PubMed

    Dacosta-Claro, Ivan; Lapierre, Sophie D

    2003-11-01

    This paper presents a benchmarking study carried out on the supply departments of Quebec's health services. The paper begins with the definition of a methodology to collect the information needed, both environmental (to enable institutions to be sorted into homogenous groups) and performance related. The analysis of indicators and the data envelopment analysis (DEA) models allowed classification of each hospital's performance and explained the operational approaches used, either at a general level or for each subprocess of the supply chain. It was observed that important economies of scale may be achieved with better co-ordination and with the regrouping of the supplying activities, both for purchasing management and central store management. The study showed that the best performance of central store services comes with flexible administrative structures, by receiving packages as small as possible and by using employees from the lowest range of the hierarchy. Purchasing services should employ highly qualified and well-paid staff. Although such services are relatively small with respect to their purchase volume, they show a higher activity rate. As a result of the discovered performing strategies, the possible economies range from 20% to 30% of the actual supply-chain management cost.

  1. Emergency Department Visits and Hospitalizations in Children With Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pant, Chaitanya; Sferra, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    We analyzed 2 national databases to assess the use of health care resources by children with chronic pancreatitis (CP). In 2012, the hospital discharge rate for pediatric CP was 2.73/100,000 children. Patients with CP were sicker with a greater burden of illness than age- and sex-matched counterparts. Acute pancreatitis occurred frequently in hospitalized children with CP. Abdominal pain and nausea, and vomiting were the most common gastrointestinal symptoms associated with emergency department visits in children with CP. A significant proportion of these visits resulted in a hospitalization. These findings add to our understanding of the epidemiology of CP in the United States.

  2. Evaluation of Purchased Day Care: Texas Department of Human Services Day Care Service Control Pilot Study, 1985 through 1989.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Marian

    This pilot study of facilities from which the Texas Department of Human Services (TDHS) purchased day care services gathered and analyzed data for use in developing day care service control standards by means of which the quality of purchased day care services could be systematically assessed. Random samples were selected from contract centers,…

  3. 76 FR 79221 - Penske Logistics, LLC, Customer Service Department General Motors and Tier Finished Goods...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration Penske Logistics, LLC, Customer Service Department General Motors and... workers of Penske Logistics, LLC, Customer Service Department, a subsidiary of General Electric/Penske... engaged in the supply of customer service. The notice was published in the Federal Register on March 10...

  4. 31 CFR 223.22 - Fees for services of the Treasury Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... running to the United States) of surety companies doing business with the United States (see § 223.12(a... (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE SURETY COMPANIES DOING BUSINESS WITH THE UNITED STATES § 223.22 Fees for services of the Treasury Department. (a) Fees shall...

  5. Spending on Hospital Care and Pediatric Psychology Service Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer.

    PubMed

    McGrady, Meghan E; Peugh, James L; Brown, Gabriella A; Pai, Ahna L H

    2017-02-26

    To examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending on hospital care among adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer. Billing data were obtained from 48 AYAs with cancer receiving need-based pediatric psychology services and a comparison cohort of 48 AYAs with cancer not receiving services. A factorial analysis of covariance examined group differences in spending for hospital care. Pending significant findings, a multivariate analysis of covariance was planned to examine the relationship between need-based pediatric psychology service use and spending for inpatient admissions, emergency department (ED) visits, and outpatient visits. Spending for hospital care was higher among AYAs receiving need-based pediatric psychology services than in the comparison cohort ( p < .001, ωPartial2 = .11 ). Group differences were driven by significantly higher spending for inpatient admissions and ED visits among AYAs receiving need-based pediatric psychology services. The behavioral and psychosocial difficulties warranting need-based pediatric psychology services may predict higher health care spending.

  6. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  7. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  8. 42 CFR 447.321 - Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient hospital and clinic services... SERVICES Payment Methods for Other Institutional and Noninstitutional Services Outpatient Hospital and Clinic Services § 447.321 Outpatient hospital and clinic services: Application of upper payment limits...

  9. Primary care professionals providing non-urgent care in hospital emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Khangura, Jaspreet K; Flodgren, Gerd; Perera, Rafael; Rowe, Brian H; Shepperd, Sasha

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries emergency departments (EDs) are facing an increase in demand for services, long-waits and severe crowding. One response to mitigate overcrowding has been to provide primary care services alongside or within hospital EDs for patients with non-urgent problems. It is not known, however, how this impacts the quality of patient care, the utilisation of hospital resources, or if it is cost-effective. Objectives To assess the effects of locating primary care professionals in the hospital ED to provide care for patients with non-urgent health problems, compared with care provided by regular Emergency Physicians (EPs), Search methods We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialized register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane library, 2011, Issue 4), MEDLINE (1950 to March 21 2012); EMBASE (1980 to April 28 2011); CINAHL (1980 to April 28 2011); PsychINFO (1967 to April 28 2011); Sociological Abstracts (1952 to April 28 2011); ASSIA (1987 to April 28 2011); SSSCI (1945 to April 28 2011); HMIC (1979 to April 28 2011), sources of unpublished literature, reference lists of included papers and relevant systematic reviews. We contacted experts in the field for any published or unpublished studies, and hand searched ED conference abstracts from the last three years. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials, non-randomised studies, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies that evaluated the effectiveness of introducing primary care professionals to hospital EDs to attend to non-urgent patients, as compared to the care provided by regular EPs. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for each included study. We contacted authors of included studies to obtain additional data. Dichotomous outcomes are presented as risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and continuous

  10. State Regulation Of Freestanding Emergency Departments Varies Widely, Affecting Location, Growth, And Services Provided.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Catherine; Lindor, Rachel A; Baker, Olesya; Cutler, David; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-10-01

    Freestanding emergency departments (EDs), which offer emergency medical care at sites separate from hospitals, are a rapidly growing alternative to traditional hospital-based EDs. We evaluated state regulations of freestanding EDs and describe their effect on the EDs' location, staffing, and services. As of December 2015, thirty-two states collectively had 400 freestanding EDs. Twenty-one states had regulations that allowed freestanding EDs, and twenty-nine states did not have regulations that applied specifically to such EDs (one state had hospital regulations that precluded them). State policies regarding freestanding EDs varied widely, with no standard requirements for location, staffing patterns, or clinical capabilities. States requiring freestanding EDs to have a certificate of need had fewer of such EDs per capita than states without such a requirement. For patients to better understand the capabilities and costs of freestanding EDs and to be able to choose the most appropriate site of emergency care, consistent state regulation of freestanding EDs is needed.

  11. Differences in Access to Services in Rural Emergency Departments of Quebec and Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Archambault, Patrick; Audette, Louis David; Plant, Jeff; Bégin, François; Poitras, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rural emergency departments (EDs) are important safety nets for the 20% of Canadians who live there. A serious problem in access to health care services in these regions has emerged. However, there are considerable geographic disparities in access to trauma center in Canada. The main objective of this project was to compare access to local 24/7 support services in rural EDs in Quebec and Ontario as well as distances to Levels 1 and 2 trauma centers. Materials and Methods Rural EDs were identified through the Canadian Healthcare Association's Guide to Canadian Healthcare Facilities. We selected hospitals with 24/7 ED physician coverage and hospitalization beds that were located in rural communities. There were 26 rural EDs in Quebec and 62 in Ontario meeting these criteria. Data were collected from ministries of health, local health authorities, and ED statistics. Fisher’s exact test, the t-test or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, were performed to compare rural EDs of Quebec and Ontario. Results All selected EDs of Quebec and Ontario agreed to participate in the study. The number of EDs visits was higher in Quebec than in Ontario (19 322 ± 6 275 vs 13 446 ± 8 056, p = 0.0013). There were no significant differences between Quebec and Ontario’s local population and small town population density. Quebec’s EDs have better access to advance imaging services such as CT scanner (77% vs 15%, p < .0001) and most the consultant support and ICU (92% vs 31%, p < .0001). Finally, more than 40% of rural EDs in Quebec and Ontario are more than 300 km away from Levels 1 and 2 trauma centers. Conclusions Considering that Canada has a Universal health care system, the discrepancies between Quebec and Ontario in access to support services are intriguing. A nationwide study is justified to address this issue. PMID:25874948

  12. Military hospitalizations among deployed US service members following anthrax vaccination, 1998-2001.

    PubMed

    Wells, Timothy Steven; Sato, Paul A; Smith, Tyler Clain; Wang, Linda Zhenling; Reed, Robert John; Ryan, Margaret Angela Kappel

    2006-01-01

    Safety concerns have confronted the Department of Defense Anthrax Vaccine Immunization Program since inception in 1998. To determine if anthrax vaccination was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization, a historical cohort study utilizing pre- and post-anthrax-vaccination hospitalizations was undertaken and analyzed with Cox proportional hazards models. The study population consisted of 170,723 active duty US service members who were anthrax-vaccinated and deployed during the time period January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2001. Study outcomes included hospitalizations due to any-cause, 14 broad International Classification of Diseases diagnostic categories, autoimmune organ specific and organ non-specific hospitalizations, and asthma. After adjustment, anthrax vaccination was associated with significantly fewer hospitalizations for any-cause, diseases of the blood and blood forming organs, and diseases of the respiratory system. Comparing anthrax post-vaccination hospitalization experience with the pre-vaccination period resulted in no significant increased hazard for any of the hospitalization outcomes studied. Although there was no apparent increase in risk of morbidity in this study population, the relationship between anthrax vaccine and deployment on health outcomes among US service members needs further study.

  13. Describing the continuum of collaboration among local health departments with hospitals around the community health assessments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kristin D; Mohr, Lisa Buettner; Beatty, Kate E; Ciecior, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals and local health departments (LHDs) are under policy requirements from the Affordable Care Act and accreditation standards through the Public Health Accreditation Board. Tax exempt hospitals must perform a community health needs assessment (CHNA), similar to the community health assessment (CHA) required for LHDs. These efforts have led to a renewed interest in hospitals and LHDs working together to achieve common goals. The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of levels of joint action leading toward collaboration between LHDs and hospitals and describe collaboration around CHAs. Local health departments were selected on the basis of reporting collaboration (n = 26) or unsure about collaboration (n = 29) with local hospitals. Local health departments were surveyed regarding their relationship with local hospitals. For LHDs currently collaborating with a hospital, a collaboration continuum scale was calculated. Appropriate nonparametric tests, chi-squares, and Spearman's rank correlations were conducted to determine differences between groups. A total of 44 LHDs responded to the survey (80.0%). Currently collaborating LHDs were more likely to be interested in accreditation and to refer to their CHA 5 or more times a year compared to the unsure LHDs. In the analysis, a collaboration continuum was created and is positively correlated with aspects of the CHA and CHA process. This study is the first attempt to quantify the level of collaboration between LHDs and hospitals around CHAs. Better understanding of the levels of joint action required may assist LHDs in making informed decisions regarding deployment of resources on the path to accreditation.

  14. Characteristics of hospital observation services: a society of cardiovascular patient care survey.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Anwar; Weston, John; Wheatley, Matthew; O'Malley, Rachel; Leach, George; Pitts, Stephen; Schrager, Justin; Holmes, Kay; Ross, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the setting in which observation services are provided, or how observation patients are managed in settings such as accredited cardiovascular patient care centers. To describe the characteristics of observation services in accredited Cardiovascular Patient Care hospitals, or those seeking accreditation. This is a cross-sectional survey of hospitals either accredited by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care, or considering accreditation in 2010. The survey was a web-based free service linked to an e-mail sent to Cardiovascular Patient Care coordinators at the respective institutions. The survey included 17 questions which focused on hospital characteristics and observation services, specifically management, settings, staffing, utilization, and performance data. Of the 789 accredited hospitals, 91 hospitals (11.5%) responded to the survey. Responding hospitals had a median of 250 inpatient beds (interquartile range [IQR] 277), 32.5 emergency department (ED) beds or hall spots, with an average annual ED census of 41,660 (IQR 30,149). These hospitals had an average of 8 (IQR 9) observation unit beds whose median length of stay (LOS) was 19 hours (IQR 8.1), with a discharge rate of 89.1% (IQR 15). There was an average of 1 observation bed to 3.8 ED beds. Observation units were most commonly administered by emergency medicine (48.5%), but staffed by a broad spectrum of specialties. Nonemergency medicine units had longer LOSs, which were not significant. Most common conditions were chest pain and abdominal pain. Accredited chest pain centers have observation units whose LOSs and discharge rates are comparable to prior studies with utilization patterns that may serve as benchmarks for similar hospitals.

  15. Medicare costs and surgeon supply in hospital service areas.

    PubMed

    Ricketts, Thomas C; Belsky, Daniel W

    2012-03-01

    To quantify the correlates of variations of Medicare per beneficiary costs at the hospital service area level and determine whether physician supply and the specialty of physicians has a significant relationship with cost variation. The American Medical Association Masterfile data on physician and surgeon location, characteristics and specialty; Census derived sociodemographic data from 2006 ZIP code level Claritas PopFacts database; and Medicare per beneficiary costs from the Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care project. A correlational analysis using bivariate plots and fixed effects linear regression models controlling for hospital service area sociodemographics and the number and characteristics of the physician supply. Data were aggregated to the Dartmouth hospital service area level from ZIP code level files. We found that costs are strongly related to the sociodemographic character of the hospital service areas and the overall supply of physicians but a mixed correlation to the specialist supply depending on the interaction of the proportion of the physician supply who are international medical graduates. The ratio of general surgeons and surgical subspecialists to population are associated with lower costs in the models, again with difference depending on the influence of international medical graduates. There is a strong association between higher costs and the local proportion of physician supply made up of graduates of non-US or Canadian medical schools and female graduates. These results suggest that strategies to reduce overall costs by changing physician supply must consider more than just overall numbers.

  16. Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations: Grade 8. Cluster V.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Olivia H.

    A curriculum guide for grade 8, the document is devoted to the occupational cluster "Hospitality, Recreation, and Personal Service Occupations." It is divided into four units: recreational resources for education, employment, and professional opportunities; barbering and cosmetology; mortuary science; hotel-motel management. Each unit is…

  17. Regionalization of Health Care Services within the Department of Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    systems that were linked by formal and informal sharing, coordination, and cooperation. Shared services , cross utilization of personnel, and other limited...wasappearing in the private sector. This effort was in the form of multihospital systems and shared services organizations. These arrangements were...these are considered to be of greatest Importance when looking at the 8 reasons for success of multihospital systems and shared services arrangements

  18. Acute pain management services: a comparison between Air Force and U.S. hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rayos, C L; McDonough, J P

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the prevalence of acute pain management services (APMS) in Air Force medical facilities. There are no published reports on the current status of Air Force pain programs. This study used a telephone survey to all facilities worldwide that house an anesthesia department. Anesthesia providers in charge of pain services or department chiefs were interviewed from December 1996 to May 1997. Respondents were asked questions related to the initiation of a formal APMS, components, and familiarity with the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines on pain management. Data analysis described current practices and used chi 2 analysis to compare results with a national study of U.S. hospitals. Air Force anesthesia departments (45%) had established as many acute pain services as U.S. hospitals (42%). Formal pain programs are becoming more prevalent in Air Force hospitals. These findings suggest an increased awareness of the need for pain management and future establishment of pain programs.

  19. Patient Safety in Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments of two Teaching Hospitals in Delhi

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Guleria, Kiran; Arora, Renu

    2016-01-01

    Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error. PMID:27385879

  20. Implementation of an Acute Care Surgery Service in a Community Hospital: Impact on Hospital Efficiency and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalina, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A service led by acute care surgeons managing trauma, critically ill surgical, and emergency general surgery patients via an acute care surgery model of patient care improves hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at university-affiliated hospitals and American College of Surgeons-verified trauma centers. Our goal was to determine whether an acute care surgeon led service, entitled the Surgical Trauma and Acute Resuscitative Service (STARS) that implemented an acute care surgery model of patient care, could improve hospital efficiency and patient outcomes at a community hospital. A total of 492 patient charts were reviewed, which included 230 before the implementation of the STARS [pre-STARS (control)] and 262 after the implementation of the STARS [post-STARS (study)]. Demographics included age, gender, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score, and medical comorbidities. Efficiency data included length of stay in emergency department (ED-LOS), length of stay in surgical intensive care unit (SICU-LOS), and length of stay in hospital (H-LOS), and total in hospital charges. Average age was 64.1 + 16.4 years, 255 males (51.83%) and 237 females (48.17%). Average Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation 2 score was 11.9 + 5.8. No significant differences in demographics were observed. Average decreases in ED-LOS (9.7 + 9.6 hours, pre-STARS versus 6.6 + 4.5 hours, post-STARS), SICU-LOS (5.3 + 9.6 days, pre-STARS versus 3.5 + 4.8 days, post-STARS), H-LOS (12.4 + 12.7 days, pre-STARS versus 11.4 + 11.3 days, post-STARS), and total in hospital charges ($419,602.6 + $519,523.0 pre-STARS to $374,816.7 + $411,935.8 post-STARS) post-STARS. Regression analysis revealed decreased ED-LOS-2.9 hours [P = 0.17; 95% confidence interval (CI): -7.0, 1.2], SICU-LOS-6.3 days (P < 0.001; 95% CI: -9.3, -3.2), H-LOS-7.6 days (P = 0.001; 95% CI: -12.1, -3.1), and 3.4 times greater odds of survival (P = 0.04; 95% CI: 1.1, 10.7) post-STARS. In conclusion, implementation of

  1. The Impact of Hospital Characteristics on the Availability of Radiology Services at Critical Access Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Khaliq, Amir A; Deyo, Darwyyn; Duszak, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Although all critical access hospitals (CAHs) provide basic medical and radiographic imaging services, it remains unclear how CAHs provide additional imaging services given relatively low patient volumes and high resource costs. The aim of this study was to examine whether CAHs with more resources or access to resources through affiliation with larger systems are more likely to offer other imaging services in their communities. Linking data from the American Hospital Association's annual hospital surveys and the American Hospital Directory's annual surveys from 2009 to 2011, multivariate logistic regressions were performed to estimate the likelihood of individual CAHs with greater financial resources or network affiliations providing specific imaging services (MRI, CT, ultrasound, mammography, and PET/CT), while adjusting for the number of beds, personnel, inpatient revenue share, case mix, rural status, year, and geographic location. Hospital total expenditures were positively associated with the provision of MRI (odds ratio [OR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.07-1.19), mammography (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16), and PET/CT (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.06). Network affiliation was positively associated with the availability of MRI (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.27-2.39), CT (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.15-4.09), ultrasound (OR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.17-3.52), and mammography (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.47-2.71). Rural location was negatively associated with the availability of PET/CT (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.49-0.88). Total hospital expenditures and network participation are important determinants of whether CAHs provide certain imaging services. Encouraging CAHs' participation in larger systems or networks may facilitate access to highly specialized services in rural and underserved areas. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of computerized maintenance management system for the chilean naval hospital biomedical engineering department.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Francisco; Fuentes, Jose; Enderle, John

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design and implement a computerized maintenance management system (CMMS) to be used at the Chilean Naval Hospital Biomedical Engineering Department. It is designed to meet the specific needs of this military facility and follows the generic clinical engineering maintenance management system suggested by Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI).

  3. [Central interdisciplinary emergency department. Organization of emergency medicine from the perspective of hospital management].

    PubMed

    Mayer, U; Debatin, J F

    2011-04-01

    The treatment of emergencies in a hospital should be organized in a central interdisciplinary emergency department (ER). It is the main entrance for all patients with acute illness or injuries. There are multiple advantages of such a central unit. Quality of treatment and economic efficiency is improved. The interdisciplinary diagnostics and treatment at one place prevents time-consuming and unnecessary transport. The fact that more complex diseases and injuries need specialized doctors in specific disciplines should be considered in personnel planning of the ER. To reinsure that the entire medical staff of the hospital is familiar with the daily routine and clinical pathways of the ER, doctors from other departments of the hospital should always be part of the ER team.

  4. Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.

    PubMed

    Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

    2011-12-01

    The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Training and competency in rapid sequence intubation: the perspective from a Scottish teaching hospital emergency department.

    PubMed

    Donald, C B

    2011-09-01

    Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is an established core competency for emergency medicine trainees. The training and experience required to achieve competency is unclear. To illustrate the RSI training and experience attained as a specialist registrar in a Scottish teaching hospital emergency department (ED) and establish whether it is sufficient to progress to independent practice. Single centre observational study in the ED of Ninewells Hospital, Dundee. RSI data were collected over a 51-month period (April 2005-July 2009) specifically for: patient population; case-mix; operator; and pre-hospital RSI. Competency was assessed by a postal survey questionnaire. 329 RSIs were performed. Trauma was the most common reason for RSI, in 134 (41%) patients. Emergency physicians were the primary operator in 288 (88%) cases. ED registrars were the predominant operator in 206 (63%) RSI. ED registrars perform approximately 6.5 RSI/year. Pre-hospital RSI occurred in 45 (14%) patients. An ED registrar was the operator in 15 (33%) vs an ED consultant in 30 (66%). 12 (71%) of the 17 questionnaires were completed. All trainees (100%) were confident to perform RSI independently at the end of registrar training. 7 (60%) were confident to practice RSI in the pre-hospital environment. ED trainees in this department achieve a relatively broad experience and exposure to RSI. Trainees appear to be satisfied with the training they have obtained in order to continue with ED RSI as a new consultant. Additional training is likely to be necessary to confidently perform pre-hospital RSI.

  6. [Nursing care in pre-hospital services and airmedical removal].

    PubMed

    Rocha, Patricia Kuerten; do Prado, Marta Lenise; Radünz, Vera; Wosny, Antônio de Miranda

    2003-01-01

    The present article is a description of an experience developed during the Conclusive Monography of the Nursing Course from Santa Catarina's Federal University, in the second semester year 2000. It discusses the importance of the Pre-hospital Attendiment Service and Airmedical Removal, and the need of nurses preparation to attend the increasing requests of those services. It presents a historical review on these kind of attention method in health, in Brazil and in the world. It discusses some aspects related to management of human and material resources, concerning its specificity in those kind of services. It also points out the importance of the Nurse roll, and the necessity of widening their skills to act in the field of pre-hospital attendiment and airmedical removal.

  7. Nations first federal combined solar power purchase launched by EPA, Forest Service, Energy Department and GSA

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Forest Service, Department of Energy and General Services Administration announced the first ever federal partnership to purchase solar power. This action follows President Obama's order

  8. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  9. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  10. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  11. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  12. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  13. 42 CFR 456.101 - UR plan required for inpatient hospital services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false UR plan required for inpatient hospital services...: Hospitals Utilization Review (ur) Plan: General Requirement § 456.101 UR plan required for inpatient hospital services. (a) A State plan must provide that each hospital furnishing inpatient services under the...

  14. Patients' choice between public and private hospital emergency departments: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    He, Jun; Hou, Xiang-Yu; Toloo, Ghasem Sam; FitzGerald, Gerry

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this study was to understand what factors influence patients' choice between public and private hospital ED and the relative weight of those factors among adult patients with private health insurance in Australia. A survey of 280 patients was conducted in four public and private hospitals' EDs in Brisbane between May and August 2015. The survey included information about respondent's demographics, nature of illness, decision-making, attitudes and choice. Independent t-test and Pearson's χ²-test were used to identify binary associations, and logistic regression was used to determine what factors influence patients' choice. Patients who agreed that 'long waiting time is a barrier to access public hospital ED' were twice as likely to choose private hospitals (odds ratio [OR] 2.172, P = 0.001). Alternatively patients who did not consider that 'there were long waiting times in public hospital ED' were less likely to access private hospitals (OR 0.200, P = 0.003). More public hospital patients (70.7%) than private hospital patients (56.4%) (P = 0.015) agreed that 'out-of-pocket payment is a barrier to accessing private hospital ED'. Patients attending private hospitals rated the quality of service higher than those attending public hospitals (OR 1.26, P = 0.001). Longer waiting times in public EDs is the principal issue considered by patients choosing private EDs and the out-of-pocket payment for accessing private EDs is the principal issue considered by public ED patients. The study suggests that addressing the out-of-pocket payments will attract more patients with private health insurance to access private EDs. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  15. Predictors of regional variations in hospitalizations following emergency department visits for atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Tyler W; Self, Wesley H; Jenkins, Cathy A; Storrow, Alan B; Heavrin, Benjamin S; McNaughton, Candace D; Collins, Sean P; Goldberger, Jeffrey J

    2013-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is often where atrial fibrillation (AF) is first detected and acutely treated and affected patients dispositioned. We used the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample to estimate the percentage of visits resulting in hospitalization and investigate associations between patient and hospital characteristics with hospitalization at the national and regional levels. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults with AF listed as the primary ED diagnosis in the 2007 to 2009 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample. We performed multivariate logistic regression analyses investigating the associations between prespecified patient and hospital characteristics with hospitalization. From 2007 to 2009, there were 1,320,123 weighted ED visits for AF, with 69% hospitalized nationally. Mean regional hospitalization proportions were: Northeast (74%), Midwest (68%), South (74%), and West (57%). The highest odds ratios for predicting hospitalization were heart failure (3.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.66 to 4.02), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (2.47, 95% CI 2.34 to 2.61), and coronary artery disease (1.65, 95% CI 1.58 to 1.73). After adjusting for age, privately insured (0.77, 95% CI 0.73 to 0.81) and self-pay (0.77 95% CI 0.66 to 0.90) patients had lower odds compared with Medicare recipients, whereas Medicaid (1.21, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.32) patients tended to have higher odds. Patients living in low-income zip codes (1.18, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.25) and patients treated at large metropolitan hospitals (1.75, 95% CI 1.59 to 1.93) had higher odds. In conclusion, our analysis showed considerable regional variation in the management of patients with AF in the ED and in associations between patient socioeconomic and hospital characteristics with ED disposition; adapting best practices from among these variations in management could reduce hospitalizations and health-care expenses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 39 CFR 602.2 - Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail... OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.2 Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department. In accordance with the foregoing policy, the Postal Service Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services...

  17. 39 CFR 602.2 - Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail... OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.2 Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department. In accordance with the foregoing policy, the Postal Service Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services...

  18. 39 CFR 602.2 - Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail... OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.2 Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department. In accordance with the foregoing policy, the Postal Service Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services...

  19. 39 CFR 602.2 - Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail... OTHER THAN PATENTS § 602.2 Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services Department. In accordance with the foregoing policy, the Postal Service Office of Licensing, Philatelic and Retail Services...

  20. Pure tone audiometry: comparison of general practice and hospital services

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael C.F.; Cable, Hugh R.; Wilmot, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Pure tone audiometry was obtained for both ears of 32 children by a general practitioner using a simple audiometer in his surgery, and by audiometricians in a hospital department on the same day. Comparing the worst hearing threshold at any of the three tested frequencies, the general practitioner did not find any ears to hear more than 10 dB better than the hospital (no false negatives). However, there were six false positives (9%) where the general practitioner identified an apparent hearing loss of greater than 15 dB. It is concluded that pure tone audiometry could be carried out accurately in the practice. PMID:3267745

  1. Acinetobacter sp. isolates from emergency departments in two hospitals of South Korea.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji-Young; Ko, Eun Ah; Kwon, Ki Tae; Lee, Shinwon; Kang, Choel In; Chung, Doo-Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2014-10-01

    A total of 114 Acinetobacter sp. isolates were collected from patients in the emergency departments (EDs) of two Korean hospitals. Most isolates belonged to the Acinetobacter baumannii complex (105 isolates, 92.1 %). Imipenem resistance was found in 39 isolates (34.2 %) of the Acinetobacter sp. isolates, and 6 colistin-resistant isolates were also identified. Species distribution and antimicrobial-resistance rates were different between the two hospitals. In addition, two main clones were identified in the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii isolates from hospital B, but very diverse and novel genotypes were found in those from hospital A. Many Acinetobacter sp. isolates, including the imipenem-resistant A. baumannii, are considered to be associated with the community. The evidence of high antimicrobial resistance and different features in these Acinetobacter sp. isolates between the two EDs suggests the need for continuous testing to monitor changes in epidemiology.

  2. [Optimal sequence algorithm of divided period appointment consultation service sequence for re-visiting patients in the department of stomatology].

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Jin, Wen-zhong; Lu, Yao; Hu, Xiao-feng; Wu, Zheng-yi

    2015-12-01

    An optimal sequence algorithm model of divided period appointment consultation service was built through optimal sequence algorithm. Re-visiting patients in the department of stomatology in a tertiary hospital were enrolled as the research objects in this study. Information about the diagnose term of common diseases, tooth positions treated, doctor's consultation hours were collected. After calculating the mean consultation hours of each disease based on the statistical analysis, the appointment consultation service sequence of re-visiting patients in the department of stomatology was optimized in accordance with the rule of "providing priority service to those requiring short consultation hours" by referencing to the theoretical model of parallel machine. The total waiting hours of patients after optimizing the appointment consultation sequence was decreased by 35.1%. Optimal sequence algorithm can optimize divided period consultation sequence, effectively shorten waiting hours and improve patients' medical experience.

  3. Construction of a questionnaire measuring outpatients' opinion of quality of hospital consultation departments

    PubMed Central

    Gasquet, Isabelle; Villeminot, Sylvie; Estaquio, Carla; Durieux, Pierre; Ravaud, Philippe; Falissard, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Background Few questionnaires on outpatients' satisfaction with hospital exist. All have been constructed without giving enough room for the patient's point of view in the validation procedure. The main objective was to develop, according to psychometric standards, a self-administered generic outpatient questionnaire exploring opinion on quality of hospital care. Method First, a qualitative phase was conducted to generate items and identify domains using critical analysis incident technique and literature review. A list of easily comprehensible non-redundant items was defined using Delphi technique and a pilot study on outpatients. This phase involved outpatients, patient association representatives and experts. The second step was a quantitative validation phase comprised a multicenter study in 3 hospitals, 10 departments and 1007 outpatients. It was designed to select items, identify dimensions, measure reliability, internal and concurrent validity. Patients were randomized according to the place of questionnaire completion (hospital v. home) (participation rate = 65%). Third, a mail-back study on 2 departments and 248 outpatients was conducted to replicate the validation (participation rate = 57%). Results A 27-item questionnaire comprising 4 subscales (appointment making, reception facilities, waiting time and consultation with the doctor). The factorial structure was satisfactory (loading >0.50 on each subscale for all items, except one item). Interscale correlations ranged from 0.42 to 0.59, Cronbach α coefficients ranged from 0.79 to 0.94. All Item-scale correlations were higher than 0.40. Test-retest intraclass coefficients ranged from 0.69 to 0.85. A unidimensional 9-item version was produced by selection of one third of the items within each subscale with the strongest loading on the principal component and the best item-scale correlation corrected for overlap. Factors related to satisfaction level independent from departments were age, previous

  4. The emergency to home project: impact of an emergency department care coordinator on hospital admission and emergency department utilization among seniors.

    PubMed

    Bond, Christopher Matthew; Freiheit, Elizabeth A; Podruzny, Lesley; Kingsly, Alianu Akawakun; Wang, Dongmei; Davenport, Jamie; Gutscher, Abram; Askin, Cathy; Taylor, Allison; Lee, Vivian; Choo, Queenie; Lang, Eddy Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Seniors comprise 14% to 21% of all emergency department (ED) visits, yet are disproportionately larger users of ED and inpatient resources. ED care coordinators (EDCCs) target seniors at risk for functional decline and connect them to home care and other community services in hopes of avoiding hospitalization. The goal of this study was to measure the association between the presence of EDCCs and admission rates for seniors aged ≥ 65. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, recidivism at 30 days, and revisit resulting in admission at 30 days. This was a matched pairs study using administrative data from eight EDs in six Alberta cities. Four of these hospitals were intervention sites, in which patients were seen by an EDCC, while the other four sites had no EDCC presence. All seniors aged ≥ 65 with a discharge diagnosis of fall or musculoskeletal pathology were included. Cases were matched by CTAS category, age, gender, mode of arrival, and home living environment. McNemar's test for matched pairs was used to compare admission and recidivism rates at EDCC and non-EDCC hospitals. A paired t-test was used to compare length of stay between groups. There were no statistically significant differences for baseline admission rate, revisit rate at 30 days, and readmission rate at 30 days between EDCC and non-EDCC patients. This study showed no reduction in senior patients' admission rates, recidivism at 30 days, or hospital length of stay when comparing seniors seen by an EDCC with those not seen by an EDCC.

  5. The effect of hospital occupancy on emergency department length of stay and patient disposition.

    PubMed

    Forster, Alan J; Stiell, Ian; Wells, George; Lee, Alexander J; van Walraven, Carl

    2003-02-01

    Emergency department (ED) overcrowding is a common problem. Despite a widespread belief that low hospital bed availability contributes to ED overcrowding, there are few data demonstrating this effect. To identify the effect of hospital occupancy on ED length of stay for admitted patients and patient disposition. This was an observational study design using administrative data at a 500-bed acute care teaching hospital. All patients presenting to the ED between April 1993 and June 1999 were included in the study. The predictor variable was daily hospital occupancy. Outcome measures included daily ED length of stay for admitted patients, daily consultation rate, and daily admission rate. The models controlled for the average daily age of ED patients and the average daily "arrival density" index, which adjusts for patient volume and clustering of patient arrivals. The average hospital occupancy was 89.7%. On average 155 patients visited the ED daily; 21% were referred to hospital physicians and 19% were admitted. The median ED length of stay for admitted patients was 5 hours 54 minutes (interquartile range 5 hr 12 min to 6 hr 42 min). Daily ED length of stay for admitted patients increased 18 minutes (95% CI = 12 to 24) when there was an absolute increase in occupancy of 10%. The ED length of stay appeared to increase extensively when hospital occupancy exceeded a threshold of 90%. Consultation and admission rates were not influenced by hospital occupancy. Increased hospital occupancy is strongly associated with ED length of stay for admitted patients. Increasing hospital bed availability might reduce ED overcrowding.

  6. A community outbreak of rotavirus diarrhea associated with exposures in a hospital outpatient department in South China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Guo, Hongxiong; Xu, Wenti; Wu, Taishun; Ma, Huilai; Fontaine, Robert E

    2011-09-01

    Between October 1 and December 10, 2006, Bao'an, China had a 5-fold increase in acute rotavirus gastroenteritis (ARGE) cases compared with the same time in 2005. To identify the risk factors for ARGE during this outbreak, we conducted a case-control study among children ≤ 24 months old from the most heavily affected area. We defined an ARGE case as diarrhea, with group A rotavirus antigen detected from fecal samples by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test. In the case-control study, 86 confirmed ARGE cases were identified. We enrolled 98 healthy control children matched by age. We administered questionnaires about exposures through telephone interviews. Of 8 general exposure types, we identified the following as being associated with ARGE: visiting outpatient services of hospital X, odds ratio (OR) = 7.1 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.2-26); contact with other children with diarrhea, OR = 2.1 (95% CI, 1.1-3.7); and hand-washing before eating, OR = 0.48 (95% CI, 0.27-0.82). After improvements in the outpatient department of hospital X, ARGE incidence in the community during the ARGE transmission season (October through December) decreased from 4.3/10000 in 2006 to 1.4/10000 in 2009. Outpatient services in hospital X may have contributed to the transmission of ARGE and improvements in infection control practices in this setting were associated a marked decrease incidence of ARGE in this community.

  7. Tight budgetary control: a study of clinical department managers' perceptions in Swedish hospitals.

    PubMed

    Nylinder, Pia

    2009-04-01

    The composition of clinical department managers in Swedish hospitals is changing; more non-doctors and women are entering managerial positions. In parallel, most hospitals face increased pressure to contain costs. This article presents a study of managers' perceptions of tightness of budgetary control and how their views vary systematically with personal characteristics and organizational conditions. Data were collected through a postal survey in 2005 to 173 clinical department managers (response rate of 70%). Statistical analysis was performed by factor analysis and logistic regression. The data suggest that clinical department managers' perceptions of tight budgetary control were related to how long they had been in their current position, their profession (whether they were doctors or non-doctors) and their sex. Further, their perceptions could be explained by how close the managers' departments were to their budget targets. Perception of tight budgetary control by managers depends on both their personal characteristics and the financial situation of their departments. Differences between men and women, and doctors and non-doctors call for additional research about the possible impact of changes in the composition of clinical department managers on how budgetary responsibility is exercised.

  8. Managers' perceptions of customers' satisfactions with their hospital cafeteria services.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C M; Upton, E M

    1991-01-01

    It is important that hospital cafeterias deliver products that create customer satisfaction so that financial objectives are met. An exploratory descriptive survey of 12 selected hospital cafeterias used a self-administered questionnaire to determine how satisfied customers were with services provided. It also asked cafeteria managers to give their perceptions of their customers' relative satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the service. Principal components analysis, followed by varimax rotation, identified four underlying constructs of the 15 pre-selected foodservice characteristics used to measure relative satisfaction. A multiple regression model, controlling for country, hospital size and customer demographics, in which the dependent variable was overall rating, found that the independent variables, the underlying rating constructs--food and service--made a much greater impact on overall rating than environment and accessibility. Most cafeteria managers' predictions about their customers' satisfaction were within two standard deviations of their customers' mean scores of satisfaction. While the managers' close association with their service may have accounted for this, it does not necessarily follow that they have the power to implement policy and product improvements.

  9. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S

    2015-05-20

    Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA strategies in practice, and the application of

  10. Application of Quality Assurance Strategies in Diagnostics and Clinical Support Services in Iranian Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Aghaei Hashjin, Asgar; Kringos, Dionne; Ravaghi, Hamid; Manoochehri, Jila; Gorji, Hassan Abolghasem; Klazinga, Niek S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Iran has a widespread diagnostics and clinical support services (DCSS) network that plays a crucial role in providing diagnostic and clinical support services to both inpatient and outpatient care. However, very little is known on the application of quality assurance (QA) policies in DCSS units. This study explores the extent of application of eleven QA strategies in DCSS units within Iranian hospitals and its association with hospital characteristics. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009/2010. Data were collected from 554 DCSS units among 84 hospitals. Results: The average reported application rate for the QA strategies ranged from 57%-94% in the DCSS units. Most frequently reported were checking drugs expiration dates (94%), pharmacopoeia availability (92%), equipment calibration (87%) and identifying responsibilities (86%). Least reported was external auditing of the DCSS (57%). The clinical chemistry and microbiology laboratories (84%), pharmacies, blood bank services (83%) reported highest average application rates across all questioned QA strategies. Lowest application rates were reported in human tissue banks (50%). There was no significant difference between the reported application rates in DCSS in the general/specialized, teaching/research, nonteaching/research hospitals with the exception of pharmacies and radiology departments. They reported availability of a written QA plan significantly more often in research hospitals. Nearly all QA strategies were reported to be applied significantly more often in the DCSS of Social Security Organization (SSO) and private-for-profit hospitals than in governmental hospitals. Conclusion: There is still room for strengthening the managerial cycle of QA systems and accountability in the DCSS in Iranian hospitals. Getting feedback, change and learning through application of specific QA strategies (eg, external/internal audits) can be improved. Both the effectiveness of QA

  11. 42 CFR 410.28 - Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.28 Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients...

  12. 42 CFR 410.28 - Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.28 Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients...

  13. 42 CFR 410.28 - Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to... Medical and Other Health Services § 410.28 Hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients: Conditions. (a) Medicare Part B pays for hospital or CAH diagnostic services furnished to outpatients...

  14. University Gynaecology and Obstetrics, quo vadis? A Department of Women's Health-University Women's Hospital of the future?

    PubMed

    Simoes, Elisabeth; Brucker, Sara Y; Krämer, Bernhard; Wallwiener, Diethelm

    2015-02-01

    Numerous changes in society, science and health care challenge gynaecology and obstetrics. These challenges include the maintenance of excellence in research, commercial potential and clinical innovation, as well as the maintenance of adequate human resources, new standards for patient orientation and individualised medicine. Based on a SWOT analysis of the status quo, of local and national quality data, a search regarding national conceptions and of international best practice for women's health centres, the model of a Department of Women's Health was developed. The Department, consisting of a University Hospital and a Research Institute, should interlink clinical care and science. With the establishment of the department, a pool of expertise is achieved which encompasses gynaecology and obstetrics from basic care to the high-technology segments, as well as all the scientific areas relevant to the medical discipline and women's health, including health services research. Preservation and attraction of personnel resources are based on the department's excellence, on reliable perspectives and the flexibility of job profiles, which also result from the close connection between care and research and the expansion of perspectives on women's health. Methodological diversity and inter-professionalism build the appropriate base for the further development of research fields. At the same time, the Department creates space for the consolidation of the core areas and the integration of sub-disciplines (clinical and scientific) to maintain the unity of this discipline. Via the scientific monitoring of the implementation, suitable elements can be highlighted for transfer to other facilities.

  15. 'The hospital was just like a home': self, service and the 'McCord Hospital Family'.

    PubMed

    Noble, Vanessa; Parle, Julie

    2014-04-01

    For more than a century, McCord Hospital, a partly private and partly state-subsidised mission hospital has provided affordable health-care services, as well as work and professional training opportunities for thousands of people in Durban, a city on the east coast of South Africa. This article focuses on one important aspect of the hospital's longevity and particular character, or 'organisational culture': the ethos of a 'McCord Family', integral to which were faith and a commitment to service. While recognising that families - including 'hospital families' like that at McCord - are contentious social constructs, with deeply embedded hierarchies and inequalities based on race, class and gender, we also consider however how the notion of 'a McCord family' was experienced and shared in complex ways. Indeed, during the twentieth century, this ethos was avidly promoted by the hospital's founders and managers and by a wide variety of employees and trainees. It also extended to people at a far geographical remove from Durban. Moreover, this ethos became so powerful that many patients felt that it shaped their convalescence experience positively. This article considers how this 'family ethos' was constructed and what made it so attractive to this hospital's staff, trainees and patients. Furthermore, we consider what 'work' it did for this mission hospital, especially in promoting bonds of multi-racial unity in the contexts of segregation and apartheid society. More broadly, it suggests that critical histories of the ways in which individuals, hospitals, faith and 'families' intersect may be of value for the future of hospitals as well as of interest in their past.

  16. Hospital based emergency department visits attributed to child physical abuse in United States: predictors of in-hospital mortality.

    PubMed

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G; Rotta, Alexandre T; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008-2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of "Child physical abuse" (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child's parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81-0.96, p < 0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07-5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57-154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24-11.07, p<0.0001) had higher odds of mortality compared to their male counterparts. In this

  17. Hospital Based Emergency Department Visits Attributed to Child Physical Abuse in United States: Predictors of In-Hospital Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Allareddy, Veerajalandhar; Asad, Rahimullah; Lee, Min Kyeong; Nalliah, Romesh P.; Rampa, Sankeerth; Speicher, David G.; Rotta, Alexandre T.; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe nationally representative outcomes of physical abuse injuries in children necessitating Emergency Department (ED) visits in United States. The impact of various injuries on mortality is examined. We hypothesize that physical abuse resulting in intracranial injuries are associated with worse outcome. Materials and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of the Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS), the largest all payer hospital based ED database, for the years 2008–2010. All ED visits and subsequent hospitalizations with a diagnosis of “Child physical abuse” (Battered baby or child syndrome) due to various injuries were identified using ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification) codes. In addition, we also examined the prevalence of sexual abuse in this cohort. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to examine the association between mortality and types of injuries after adjusting for a multitude of patient and hospital level factors. Results Of the 16897 ED visits that were attributed to child physical abuse, 5182 (30.7%) required hospitalization. Hospitalized children were younger than those released treated and released from the ED (1.9 years vs. 6.4 years). Male or female partner of the child’s parent/guardian accounted for >45% of perpetrators. Common injuries in hospitalized children include- any fractures (63.5%), intracranial injuries (32.3%) and crushing/internal injuries (9.1%). Death occurred in 246 patients (13 in ED and 233 following hospitalization). Amongst the 16897 ED visits, 1.3% also had sexual abuse. Multivariable analyses revealed each 1 year increase in age was associated with a lower odds of mortality (OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.81–0.96, p<0.0001). Females (OR = 2.39, 1.07–5.34, p = 0.03), those with intracranial injuries (OR = 65.24, 27.57–154.41, p<0.0001), or crushing/internal injury (OR = 4.98, 2.24–11.07, p<0

  18. [Implementation of quality management in medical departments of a teaching hospital: accelerators and inhibitors].

    PubMed

    François, P; Boyer, L; Weil, G

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to assess the level of implementation of continuous quality management program and to identify the factors associated with its failure in the medical departments of a teaching hospital. Semi-directive interviews were conducted with 52 hospitalists, including 16 department heads and 36 staff members in charge of quality management, in 30 medical departments that implemented a continuous quality management program from 1998 to 2002. The interviews were analyzed using a manual thematic method and a computerized semantic method. At the study endpoint (i.e., 2003), the continuous quality management program was still working in six departments and was stopped in 24 departments. The professionals complied with the model of intervention based on the identification and the resolution of department problems by multiprofessional working groups. The main external factors associated with the failure of the continuous quality management program included shortage in staff and the lack of time to devote to this activity. In addition, professionals cited the defect of commitment by the top management, the lack of acknowledgment of their efforts, and the hospital accreditation as factors with negative impact on staff motivation. The main internal factors associated with the failure of the continuous quality management program were related to the leadership in quality management. The personal involvement of the department head played a key role in the continuation of the quality management program. Most of the staff regretted the lack of involvement of the physicians and stated that methodological support was needed. The implementation of quality management in the medical departments remains difficult in the absence of institutional support. The leadership within the department plays a major role in the continuation of the process.

  19. Impact of Hospital "Best Practice" Mandates on Prescription Opioid Dispensing After an Emergency Department Visit.

    PubMed

    Sun, Benjamin C; Lupulescu-Mann, Nicoleta; Charlesworth, Christina J; Kim, Hyunjee; Hartung, Daniel M; Deyo, Richard A; John McConnell, K

    2017-08-01

    Washington State mandated seven hospital "best practices" in July 2012, several of which may affect emergency department (ED) opioid prescribing and provide a policy template for addressing the opioid prescription epidemic. We tested the hypothesis that the mandates would reduce opioid dispensing after an ED visit. We further assessed for a selective effect in patients with prior risky or chronic opioid use. We performed a retrospective, observational analysis of ED visits by Medicaid fee-for-service beneficiaries in Washington State, between July 1, 2011, and June 30, 2013. We used an interrupted time-series design to control for temporal trends and patient characteristics. The primary outcome was any opioid dispensing within 3 days after an ED visit. The secondary outcome was total morphine milligram equivalents (MMEs) dispensed within 3 days. We analyzed 266,614 ED visits. Mandates were associated with a small reduction in opioid dispensing after an ED visit (-1.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.8% to -0.15%). The mandates were associated with decreased opioid dispensing in 42,496 ED visits by patients with prior risky opioid use behavior (-4.7%, 95% CI = -7.1% to -2.3%) and in 20,238 visits by patients with chronic opioid use (-3.6%, 95% CI = -5.6% to -1.7%). Mandates were not associated with reductions in MMEs per dispense in the overall cohort or in either subgroup. Washington State best practice mandates were associated with small but nonselective reductions in opioid prescribing rates. States should focus on alternative policies to further reduce opioid dispensing in subgroups of high-risk and chronic users. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  20. "Hotel-style services" evolve in hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Schirg, G

    1995-10-01

    Glenn Schirg has been the director of nutrition services at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee for the past 11 years. Besides taking full responsibility for his department, he now acts as a team leader responsible for facilitating one of the medical center's 10 major initiatives.

  1. 42 CFR 424.13 - Requirements for inpatient services of hospitals other than psychiatric hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the patient for medical treatment or medically required inpatient diagnostic study; or (ii) Special or unusual services for cost outlier cases (under the prospective payment system set forth in... hospitalization if the physician finds that the patient could receive proper treatment in a SNF but no bed...

  2. Networked electronic information services at the Austin Hospital, Melbourne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Graeme J.; Egan, Gary F.; O'Callaghan, Daniel; McKay, W.; Hennessy, Oliver; Morrison, Iain

    1994-05-01

    A wide area computer network has been installed at the Austin Hospital, Melbourne. The network consists of optic fiber segments between buildings, an ethernet spine through the main buildings and ethernet segments throughout each department. The network is connected to Internet via an ISDN link to the University of Melbourne computer network. The Austin hospital network is used for intra-hospital image distribution, external image distribution, internal and external electronic mail via Internet, electronic information access, file transfer via Internet, and remote login to Internet networked computers. Present and future developments include secure patient record access for internal users, confidential information transmission using public key encryption techniques, external dial-up connectivity for teleradiology, and research and development into medical image processing and analysis.

  3. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Guanrong; Zou, Dongdong; Wang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Background Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care. Objective To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China’s public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Research design Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals. Subjects 7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014. Measures Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week) and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014. Results Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only. Conclusions Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience. PMID:28207783

  4. Patient experience with outpatient encounters at public hospitals in Shanghai: Examining different aspects of physician services and implications of overcrowding.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yuhua; Fan, Guanrong; Zou, Dongdong; Wang, Tong; Xue, Di

    2017-01-01

    Over 90% of outpatient care in China was delivered at public hospitals, making outpatient experience in this setting an important aspect of quality of care. To assess outpatient experience with different aspects of physician services at China's public hospitals and its association with overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Retrospective analysis of a large survey of outpatient experience in Shanghai, China. We tested the hypotheses that patient experience was poorer with physician-patient communication, education, and shared decision-making and where and when there was greater overcrowding of the hospital outpatient departments. Ordered logistic models were estimated separately for general and specialty hospitals. 7,147 outpatients at 40 public hospitals in Shanghai, China, in 2014. Patient experience with physician services were self-reported based on 12 questions as part of a validated instrument. Indicators of overcrowding included time of visit (morning vs. afternoon, Monday vs. rest of the week) and hospital outpatient volume in the first half of 2014. Overall, patients reported very favorable experience with physician services. Two out of the 12 questions pertaining to both communication and shared decision-making consistently received lower ratings. Hospitals whose outpatient volumes were in the top two quartiles received lower patient ratings, but the relationship achieved statistical significance among specialty hospitals only. Inadequate physician-patient communication and shared decision-making and hospital overcrowding compromise outpatient experience with physician services at Chinese public hospitals. Effective diversion of patients with chronic and less complex conditions to community health centers will be critical to alleviate the extreme workloads at hospitals with high patient volumes and, in turn, improve patient experience.

  5. Historical perspective on the Department of Neurosurgery at the Henry Ford Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kole, M K; O'Leary, S T; Malik, G M; Rosenblum, M L

    2001-02-01

    The Henry Ford Hospital (HFH) was founded in 1915 as a philanthropic gift from Henry Ford, the automobile magnate and inventor of the Model T. The hospital and its organizational structure represented a nonsectarian facility that would provide care for all members of society. The system was patterned after the newest and most modern medical centers at the time in Europe, Canada, and the United States, including the German Krankenhauser, the Johns Hopkins Hospital, the Mayo Clinic, and the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston. The HFH grew into the Henry Ford Health System in the 1970s to 1990s, with the acquisition of other hospitals, the development of a multiple-region-based clinic system through southeastern Michigan, and the development of comprehensive, vertically integrated health care systems. The Division of Neurosurgery at HFH was established by Albert Crawford in 1926. The tradition of training residents in neurosurgery began in 1946, and the residency training program was accredited by the American Board of Neurosurgery in 1954. In 1970, the Division of Neurosurgery of the Department of Surgery was combined with the Division of Neurology to create the joint Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery. A separate Department of Neurosurgery was established in 1981. Four individuals have served as chairmen of the Department of Neurosurgery at HFH, i.e., Albert Crawford (1926-1952), Robert Knighton (1952-1978), James Ausman (1978-1991), and Mark Rosenblum (1992 to the present). During the 1980s and 1990s, HFH evolved into the vertically integrated, regionally distributed Henry Ford Health System. Under the current direction of Dr. Rosenblum, the Department of Neurosurgery at HFH has grown to include 11 full-time neurosurgeons, 2 neuro-oncologists, and 3 investigators with Ph.D. degrees and has recently expanded into three additional hospitals in southeastern Michigan, paralleling the growth of the system. The faculty annually treats more than 2,000 cases in

  6. Mass-casualty, terrorist bombings: implications for emergency department and hospital emergency response (Part II).

    PubMed

    Halpern, Pinchas; Tsai, Ming-Che; Arnold, Jeffrey L; Stok, Edita; Ersoy, Gurkan

    2003-01-01

    This article reviews the implications of mass-casualty, terrorist bombings for emergency department (ED) and hospital emergency responses. Several practical issues are considered, including the performance of a preliminary needs assessment, the mobilization of human and material resources, the use of personal protective equipment, the organization and performance of triage, the management of explosion-specific injuries, the organization of patient flow through the ED, and the efficient determination of patient disposition. As long as terrorists use explosions to achieve their goals, mass-casualty, terrorist bombings remain a required focus for hospital emergency planning and preparedness.

  7. 78 FR 70584 - ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ... Doc No: 2013-28332] DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-82,999] ATOS IT... Insurance (UI) Wages are Reported Through Siemens IT Solutions and Services, Mason, Ohio; Amended... workers of ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Mason, Ohio. The...

  8. 76 FR 5364 - Public Availability of Department of Energy FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... the inventory at the following link: http://www.management.energy.gov/policy_guidance/competitive... Availability of Department of Energy FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY 2010 Service Contract Inventories. SUMMARY: In accordance...

  9. Variation in US hospital emergency department admission rates by clinical condition.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Arjun K; Dai, Ying; Ross, Joseph S; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Capp, Roberta; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-03-01

    Variation in hospitalization rates have been described for decades, yet little is known about variation in emergency department (ED) admission rates across clinical conditions. We sought to describe variation in ED risk-standardized admission rates (RSAR) and the consistency between condition-specific ED admission rates within hospitals. Cross-sectional analysis of the 2009 National Emergency Department Sample, an all-payer administrative, claims dataset. We identify the 15 most frequently admitted conditions using Clinical Classification Software. To identify conditions with the highest ED RSAR variation, we compared both the ratio of the 75th percentile to the 25th percentile hospital and coefficient of variation between conditions. We calculate Spearman correlation coefficients to assess within-hospital correlation of condition-specific ED RSARs. Of 21,885,845 adult ED visits, 4,470,105 (20%) resulted in admission. Among the 15 most frequently admitted conditions, the 5 with the highest magnitude of variation were: mood disorders (ratio of 75th:25th percentile, 6.97; coefficient of variation, 0.81), nonspecific chest pain (2.68; 0.66), skin and soft tissue infections (1.82; 0.51), urinary tract infections (1.58; 0.43), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.57; 0.33). For these 5 conditions, the within-hospital RSAR correlations between each pair of conditions were >0.4, except for mood disorders, which was poorly correlated with all other conditions (r<0.3). There is significant condition-specific variation in ED admission rates across US hospitals. This variation appears to be consistent between conditions with high variation within hospitals.

  10. Variation in U.S. Hospital Emergency Department Admission Rates by Clinical Condition

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Arjun K.; Dai, Ying; Ross, Joseph S.; Schuur, Jeremiah D.; Capp, Roberta; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Variation in hospitalization rates have been described for decades, yet little is known about variation in emergency department (ED) admission rates across clinical conditions. We sought to describe variation in ED risk-standardized admission rates (RSAR) and the consistency between condition-specific ED admission rates within hospitals. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of the 2009 National Emergency Department Sample, an all-payer administrative claims dataset. We identify the 15 most frequently admitted conditions using Clinical Classification Software. To identify conditions with the highest ED RSAR variation we compared both the ratio of the 75th percentile to the 25th percentile hospital and coefficient of variation between conditions. We calculate Spearman correlation coefficients to assess within-hospital correlation of condition-specific ED RSARs. Results Of 21,885,845 adult ED visits, 4,470,105 (20%) resulted in admission. Among the 15 most frequently admitted conditions, the five with the highest magnitude of variation were: mood disorders (ratio of 75th:25th percentile, 6.97; coefficient of variation, 0.81), nonspecific chest pain (2.68; 0.66), skin and soft tissue infections (1.82; 0.51), urinary tract infections (1.58; 0.43) and COPD (1.57; 0.33). For these five conditions, the within-hospital RSAR correlations between each pair of conditions were greater than 0.4, except for mood disorders, which was poorly correlated with all other conditions (r<0.3). Conclusions There is significant condition-specific variation in ED admission rates across US hospitals. This variation appears to be consistent between conditions with high variation within hospitals. PMID:25397965

  11. Severity of illness index for surgical departments in a Cuban hospital: a revalidation study.

    PubMed

    Armas-Bencomo, Amadys; Tamargo-Barbeito, Teddy Osmin; Fuentes-Valdés, Edelberto; Jiménez-Paneque, Rosa Eugenia

    2017-03-08

    In the context of the evaluation of hospital services, the incorporation of severity indices allows an essential control variable for performance comparisons in time and space through risk adjustment. The severity index for surgical services was developed in 1999 and validated as a general index for surgical services. Sixteen years later the hospital context is different in many ways and a revalidation was considered necessary to guarantee its current usefulness. To evaluate the validity and reliability of the surgical services severity index to warrant its reasonable use under current conditions. A descriptive study was carried out in the General Surgery service of the "Hermanos Ameijeiras" Clinical Surgical Hospital of Havana, Cuba during the second half of 2010. We reviewed the medical records of 511 patients discharged from this service. Items were the same as the original index as were their weighted values. Conceptual or construct validity, criterion validity and inter-rater reliability as well as internal consistency of the proposed index were evaluated. Construct validity was expressed as a significant association between the value of the severity index for surgical services and discharge status. A significant association was also found, although weak, with length of hospital stay. Criterion validity was demonstrated through the correlations between the severity index for surgical services and other similar indices. Regarding criterion validity, the Horn index showed a correlation of 0.722 (95% CI: 0.677-0.761) with our index. With the POSSUM score, correlation was 0.454 (95% CI: 0.388-0.514) with mortality risk and 0.539 (95% CI: 0.462-0.607) with morbidity risk. Internal consistency yielded a standardized Cronbach's alpha of 0.8; inter-rater reliability resulted in a reliability coefficient of 0.98 for the quantitative index and a weighted global Kappa coefficient of 0.87 for the ordinal surgical index of severity for surgical services (IGQ). The validity

  12. Differences in Statin Usage and Target-Goal Achievement between Departments at the Same Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Wang, Xin; Ding, Zhen; Fan, Peiying; Ma, Genshan

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare use of statins and target-goal achievement in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with or without stable coronary artery disease (CAD), between cardiology and endocrinology departments at a tertiary hospital. Methods A total of 966 patients with T2DM were enrolled, including 553 with stable CAD, from the departments of endocrinology and cardiology. Baseline characteristics, prescription of statins, and target-goal achievement of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) during a 6-month follow-up period were analyzed. Results There was lower ratio of statin use in patients with T2DM, with or without CAD, in the department of endocrinology than in the department of cardiology (all P<0.05). At the 6-month follow-up, compared to patients with T2DM in the endocrinology department, target-goal achievement among patients with T2DM in the department of cardiology was higher (52.90% vs. 41.46%, P<0.01), indicating a significant improvement among patients in the department of cardiology but not for those in the department of endocrinology when compared to baseline. According to the new Chinese guidelines, the goal attainment rate was higher among patients with T2DM combined with CAD in the department of cardiology than in the department of endocrinology (27.62% vs. 19.05%, P<0.05). However, with regard to ATP III 2004, the goal attainment rate was similar for patients with T2DM combined with CAD in both departments during the 6-month follow-up (9.21% vs. 8.84%, P>0.05), with no apparent improvement compared to baseline. Conclusions There was differential and sub-optimal use of statins as well as low target-goal achievement among patients with T2DM, with or without CAD, in the departments of cardiology and endocrinology at the same tertiary hospital, with a lower rate of statin prescription and target-goal achievement of LDL-C in the department of endocrinology. PMID:23251371

  13. The emergency bed service — a barometer of London's hospital service

    PubMed Central

    Evans, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    The emergency bed service in London exists to facilitate admissions to hospital in cases referred to them by general practitioners and deputizing doctors. The data collected by the emergency bed service provides a unique London-wide perspective of the hospital service and the recent changes observed are examined in this paper. When the emergency bed service fails to arrange for the admission of a patient after trying at least four hospitals the case is medically refereed. The number of cases reviewed by the medical referee has increased over the period 1976-86 as has the necessity for hospitals to stop or slow nonemergency admissions (red and yellow alerts). External factors, such as severe weather and influenza epidemics, were examined to see whether they could account for these changes. However, it was concluded that bed closures accounted for the changes and were making it more difficult to obtain hospital admission for emergency cases via the emergency bed service in Greater London. PMID:3505639

  14. Going beyond information management: using the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals to promote knowledge-based information services.

    PubMed

    Schardt, C M

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) initiated the Agenda for Change, a major revision in the evaluation process for hospitals. An essential component of that change was to shift the emphasis away from standards for individual departments to standards for hospital-wide functions. In recent years, hospital librarians have focused their energy and attention on complying with the standards for the "Management of Information" chapter, specifically the IM.9 section on knowledge-based information. However, the JCAHO has listed the health sciences librarian and library services as having responsibilities in six other chapters within the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals. These chapters can have a major impact on the services of the hospital library for two reasons: (1) they are being read by hospital leaders and other professionals in the organization, and (2) they articulate specific ways to apply knowledge-based information services to the major functions within the hospital. These chapters are "Education"; "Improving Organizational Performance"; "Leadership"; "Management of Human Resources"; "Management of the Environment of Care"; and "Surveillance, Prevention, and Control of Infection." The standards that these chapters promote present specific opportunities for hospital librarians to apply knowledge-based information resources and service to hospital-wide functions. This article reviews these chapters and discusses the standards that relate to knowledge-based information.

  15. Health services use of older veterans treated and released from veterans affairs medical center emergency departments.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Susan Nicole; Smith, Valerie A; Weinberger, Morris; Oddone, Eugene Z; Olsen, Maren K; Schmader, Kenneth E

    2013-09-01

    To determine predictors of repeat health service use in older veterans treated and released from the emergency department (ED). Retrospective cohort study. Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) EDs. Nationally representative sample of veterans aged 65 and older treated and released from one of 102 VAMC EDs between October 1, 2007, and June 30, 2008. Logistic regression models were used to examine the association between independent variables and primary outcomes (30-day repeat ED visits and hospital admissions). In 31,206 older veterans, ED diagnoses were commonly related to chronic conditions (22.5%), injuries and acute musculoskeletal conditions (19%), and infections (13.5%). Within 30 days, 22% of older veterans had returned to the ED (n = 4,779) or been hospitalized (n = 2,005). In adjusted models, factors associated with greater odds of repeat ED visits than injury were homelessness (odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-2.1), previous ED visits (OR = 1.7, 95% CI = 1.6-1.8), previous hospitalization (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.4), and index ED visit related to infection (1.2, 95% CI = 1.1-1.3). Odds of subsequent hospital admission were higher in veterans with previous hospitalization (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 2.2-2.8), who were homeless (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.0), who had aid and attendance benefits (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.2-1.8), who were unmarried (OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.1-1.3), and who had an ED visit related to a chronic condition (OR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.2-1.6) than in those with injury. A substantial proportion of older veterans treated and released from a VAMC ED returned to the ED or were hospitalized within 30 days. Intervening with high-risk older veterans after an ED visit may reduce unscheduled healthcare use. © 2013, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2013, The American Geriatrics Society.

  16. [Care management: nurses' actions in a hospital emergency service].

    PubMed

    dos Santos, José Luís Guedes; Lima, Maria Alice Dias da Silva

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to analyze care management actions performed by nurses in a hospital emergency service. This is a qualiative research of the case study type, carried out with nurses from the Emergency Service of a University Hospital in southern Brazil. The data were collected through participant observation and semi-structured interviews, and analyzed using thematic analysis. The results show nurses' actions in care planning, forecasting and provisioning of resources, supervision, leadership and training of the nursing team. In care planning, there is the execution of the nursing process and the control of the realization of laboratory and radiological tests. The actions of forecasting and provisioning of resources were: elaboration of the monthly schedule of employees, daily distribution of the staff and the management of material resources. Leadership encourages the planning of care, the coordination of the nursing staff and the delegation of activities.

  17. Antibiotic prescribing in various clinical departments in a tertiary care teaching hospital in northern India.

    PubMed

    Abhijit, Kumar; Jain, Pushpawati; Upadhyaya, Prerna; Jain, Shipra

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is not only a problem for the individual patient; it also reduces the effectiveness of established treatment and has become a major threat to public health by increasing the complexity and cost of treatment and reducing the probability of a successful outcome. A prospective cross sectional study was carried out with the aim of identifying prescription pattern of antibiotics in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Northern India. A total of 300 prescriptions were collected, collated and analysed from the indoor patients of MG hospital, Jaipur, India from the department of Medicine, Surgery and Orthopaedics. The prescribing and dispensing details of antibiotics from each prescription were recorded in the tabular form as mentioned in Data Acquisition form. Comparison of antibiotic prescribing practices among all the three departments was made by using Percentage method. Majority of prescriptions (51%) with single drug was prescribed in Medicine department, followed by 16% in surgery and only 2% in Orthopaedics. Prescriptions with 3 drugs were prescribed mostly in Orthopaedics (66%) followed by 46% in Surgery and 10% in Medicine. 51% prescriptions in Orthopaedics department were of Ceftriaxone+ Sulbactam+ Amikacin. Thirty four percent prescriptions in Medicine department were of Ceftriaxone. 18% prescriptions in Surgery department were of Ceftriaxone+ Sulbactam+ Tobramycin. This study clearly highlights the practice of Poly-Pharmacy and injudicious usage of antibiotics in hospital settings. The Government of India is planning to revise the antibiotic policy issued in 2011 and put a ban on over the counter availability of third generation antibiotics. General public awareness and sensitization of doctors and revision of clinical drug policy is the need of the hour to bring the changes at all possible level for the longterm and better clinical outcome in medical practice.

  18. Hospitality: transformative service to children, families, and communities.

    PubMed

    Melton, Gary B

    2014-11-01

    Hospitality is an ancient moral practice that was deeply embedded in early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Hospitality requires acceptance of, service to, and respect for people who lack a place in the community. The contemporary importance of this practice reflects the social disconnection and economic disadvantage of many young parents and the high frequency of separation of young people, including many young parents, from their communities. Such social deterioration substantially increases the risk of child maltreatment. Building on the proposals of the U.S. Advisory Board on Child Abuse and Neglect, Strong Communities for Children demonstrated the effectiveness of community building in reducing such risk. It further suggested the importance of both relying on and learning from hospitable people in strengthening support for children and their parents.

  19. Implementation of a general practitioner cooperative adjacent to the emergency department of a hospital increases the caseload for the GPC but not for the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Colliers, Annelies; Remmen, Roy; Streffer, Marie-Luise; Michiels, Barbara; Bartholomeeusen, Stefaan; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Goris, Jef; Coenen, Samuel; Verhoeven, Veronique; Philips, Hilde

    2017-02-01

    The implementation of general practitioner cooperatives (GPC) for out-of-hours (OOH) primary care, raises the question if the location of a GPC adjacent to a hospital reduces the OOH caseload of the emergency department (ED). Two natural experiments were used in this before-after study, the effect of the implementation of two GPCs in two different regions on the out-of-hours caseload of the local EDs was compared. One GPC was located adjacent to the ED of a general hospital, the other was not. GPCs (or rota systems) and EDs in comparable regions were selected as control groups during the same study period. The study was performed in Flanders (Belgium) with no gatekeeping function for general practitioners (GPs). After implementation of the GPC there was a significantly increase in caseload at the GPC in the two regions, mainly due to an increase of consultations with small children. There were no significant changes in caseload at the ED services. Self-referrals' to the ED did not change significantly. For the GPs the number of home visits decreased during out-of-hours in one region. In a country with no gatekeeping role for GPs, implementing a GPC increased the out-of-hours caseload of the GPCs. The caseload of the EDs stabilised during the study period.

  20. Military Base Closures and Affected Defense Department Civil Service Employees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-07

    employees adversely affected by BRAC. Outplacement subsidies could also be offered to other federal agencies to hire displaced DOD employees through...for its civilians, such as outplacement services, priority placement and separation incentives, will be available to employees under NSPS

  1. Increased Computed Tomography Utilization in the Emergency Department and Its Association with Hospital Admission

    PubMed Central

    Bellolio, M. Fernanda; Heien, Herbert C.; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R.; Jeffery, Molly M.; Campbell, Ronna L.; Cabrera, Daniel; Shah, Nilay D.; Hess, Erik P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to investigate trends in computed tomography (CT) utilization in emergency departments (EDs) and its association with hospitalization. Methods We conducted an analysis of an administrative claims database of U.S. privately insured and Medicare Advantage enrollees. We identified ED visits from 2005 through 2013 and assessed for CT use, associated factors, and hospitalization after CT, along with patient demographics. We used both descriptive methods and regression models adjusted for year, age, sex, race, geographic region, and Hwang comorbidity score to explore associations among CT use, year, demographic characteristics, and hospitalization. Results We identified 33,144,233 ED visits; 5,901,603 (17.8%) involved CT. Over time, CT use during ED visits increased 59.9%. CT use increased in all age groups but decreased in children since 2010. In propensity-matching analysis, odds of hospitalization increased with age, comorbidities, male sex, and CT use (odds ratio, 2.38). Odds of hospitalization over time decreased more quickly for patients with CT. Conclusion CT utilization in the ED has increased significantly from 2005 through 2013. For children, CT use after 2010 decreased, indicating caution about CT use. Male sex, older age, and higher number of comorbidities were predictors of CT in the ED. Over time, odds of hospitalization decreased more quickly for patients with CT. PMID:28874935

  2. Increased Computed Tomography Utilization in the Emergency Department and Its Association with Hospital Admission.

    PubMed

    Bellolio, M Fernanda; Heien, Herbert C; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Jeffery, Molly M; Campbell, Ronna L; Cabrera, Daniel; Shah, Nilay D; Hess, Erik P

    2017-08-01

    Our goal was to investigate trends in computed tomography (CT) utilization in emergency departments (EDs) and its association with hospitalization. We conducted an analysis of an administrative claims database of U.S. privately insured and Medicare Advantage enrollees. We identified ED visits from 2005 through 2013 and assessed for CT use, associated factors, and hospitalization after CT, along with patient demographics. We used both descriptive methods and regression models adjusted for year, age, sex, race, geographic region, and Hwang comorbidity score to explore associations among CT use, year, demographic characteristics, and hospitalization. We identified 33,144,233 ED visits; 5,901,603 (17.8%) involved CT. Over time, CT use during ED visits increased 59.9%. CT use increased in all age groups but decreased in children since 2010. In propensity-matching analysis, odds of hospitalization increased with age, comorbidities, male sex, and CT use (odds ratio, 2.38). Odds of hospitalization over time decreased more quickly for patients with CT. CT utilization in the ED has increased significantly from 2005 through 2013. For children, CT use after 2010 decreased, indicating caution about CT use. Male sex, older age, and higher number of comorbidities were predictors of CT in the ED. Over time, odds of hospitalization decreased more quickly for patients with CT.

  3. Availability of gynecologic services in the department of veterans affairs.

    PubMed

    Seelig, Michelle D; Yano, Elizabeth M; Bean-Mayberry, Bevanne; Lanto, Andy B; Washington, Donna L

    2008-01-01

    The optimum approach to providing the Congressionally mandated gender-specific services for which women veterans are eligible is unknown. We evaluated onsite availability of gynecologic services, clinic type and staffing arrangements, and the impact of having a gynecology clinic (GYN) and/or an obstetrician gynecologist (OBGYN) routinely available. We analyzed data from the 2001 national VHA Survey of Women Veterans Health Programs and Practices (n = 136 sites; response rate, 83%). We assessed availability of gynecologic services, and evaluated differences in availability by clinic type (designated women's health provider in primary care [PC], separate women's health clinic for primary care [WHC], and/or separate GYN) and staffing arrangements (OBGYN routinely involved versus not). Out of 133 sites, 77 sites (58%) offered services through a GYN and 56 sites (42%) did not have GYN. Seventy-two (54%) sites had a WHC. More sites with an OBGYN provided endometrial biopsies (91% vs. 20%), IUD insertion (85% vs. 14%), infertility evaluation (56% vs. 23%), infertility treatment (25% vs. none), gynecologic surgery (65 vs. 28%), p < .01. In comparison to sites without WHC, those with WHC were more likely to offer services onsite: endometrial biopsy odds ratio (OR) 6.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-18.1); IUD insertion 4.4 (1.6-12.2); infertility evaluation 2.8 (1.2-6.3); and gynecologic surgery 2.3 (1.0-5.4). As the VA develops strategic plans for accommodating the growing number of women veterans, leaders should consider focusing on establishing WHC for primary care and routine availability of OBGYN or other qualified clinicians, rather than establishing separate GYN.

  4. Application of Analytical Hierarchy Process Approach for Service Quality Evaluation in Radiology Departments: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Hassani, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Radiology department as a service provider organization requires realization of quality concept concerning service provisioning knowledge, satisfaction and all issues relating to the customer as well as quality assurance and improvement issues. At present, radiology departments in hospitals are regarded as income generating units and they should continuously seek performance improvement so that they can survive in the changing and competitive environment of the health care sector. Objectives: The aim of this study was to propose a method for ranking of radiology departments in selected hospitals of Tehran city using analytical hierarchical process (AHP) and quality evaluation of their service in 2015. Materials and Methods: This study was an applied and cross-sectional study, carried out in radiology departments of 6 Tehran educational hospitals in 2015. The hospitals were selected using non-probability and purposeful method. Data gathering was performed using customized joint commission international (JCI) standards. Expert Choice 10.0 software was used for data analysis. AHP method was used for prioritization. Results: “Management and empowerment of human resources’’ (weight = 0.465) and “requirements and facilities” (weight = 0.139) were of highest and lowest significance respectively in the overall ranking of the hospitals. MS (weight = 0.316), MD (weight = 0.259), AT (weight = 0.14), TS (weight = 0.108), MO (weight = 0.095), and LH (0.082) achieved the first to sixth rankings respectively. Conclusion: The use of AHP method can be promising for fostering the evaluation method and subsequently promotion of the efficiency and effectiveness of the radiology departments. The present model can fill in the gap in the accreditation system of the country’s hospitals in respect with ranking and comparing them considering the significance and value of each individual criteria and standard. Accordingly, it can predict an integration of qualitative

  5. Role of out of hours primary care service in limiting inappropriate access to emergency department.

    PubMed

    Posocco, Andrea; Scapinello, Maria Paola; De Ronch, Irene; Castrogiovanni, Francesco; Lollo, Gianluca; Sergi, Guglielmo; Tomaselli, Iginio; Tonon, Loris; Solmi, Marco; Pescador, Daniele; Battistuz, Elena; Traversa, Stefano; Zambianco, Vincenzo; Veronese, Nicola

    2017-05-25

    Out of hours (OOH) doctors can have an important gate-keeping role over the access to the emergency department (ED), but the outcome and the quality of their ED referrals have been poorly studied. We aimed to investigate the outcome of patients referred to ED from OOH service and the determinants of admission or short-stay dispositions. We collected retrospectively data about referrals to ED from a local OOH service in the north-east of Italy using the OOH paper register and the ED electronic database, over the period of 01/10/2012 to 31/03/2013. Out of 5217 patients accessing the OOH service, 408 referrals were included in our analysis. 45.3% (185) of the referrals were admitted to hospital or the short-stay unit, 26 patients (=6.4%) were discharged as non-urgent outgoing codes after no specialist consultation or test, suggesting inappropriate referrals, and, of the remaining 197 (=48%), only 10 did not undergo any investigation or consultation. Significant determinants of admission were: age ≥65 years (OR = 2.619; 95% CI 1.528-4.491, p < 0.0001), domiciliary examination (OR = 2.168; 95% CI 1.353-3.476, p = 0.001), nursing home/palliative care setting (OR = 2.563; 95% CI 1.228-5.351, p = 0.012) and OOH triage code, ranging from an OR of 7.47 (95% CI 3.028-18.433) for minor urgencies to an OR of 26.835 (95% CI 6.761-106.508, p < 0.0001) for emergencies, in comparison to no urgent codes. OOH service seems to play an effective gate-keeping role limiting ED access. Determinants of admission to hospital suggest some simple interventions that could improve the adequacy of ED referral from OOH service.

  6. Hospital image and the positioning of service centers: an application in market analysis and strategy development.

    PubMed

    Smith, S M; Clark, M

    1990-09-01

    The research confirms the coexistence of different images for hospitals, service centers within the same hospitals, and service programs offered by each of the service centers. The images of individual service centers are found not to be tied to the image of the host facility. Further, service centers and host facilities have differential rankings on the same service decision attributes. Managerial recommendations are offered for "image differentiation" between a hospital and its care centers.

  7. 76 FR 5778 - Public Availability of the Department of Agriculture FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Public Availability of the Department of Agriculture FY 2010 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Office of... 2010 (Pub. L. 111-117), Department of Agriculture is publishing this notice to advise the public of...

  8. 77 FR 12798 - Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY2011 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of the Secretary Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY2011 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Public Availability of FY...

  9. 78 FR 17349 - Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY2012 Service Contract Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Office of the Secretary Public Availability of Department of Commerce FY2012 Service Contract Inventory AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public availability of FY...

  10. Creation of a career enhancement program for a hospital-based education and development department.

    PubMed

    Storey, Susan; Crist, Lynn; Nelis, Deborah A; Murphy, Lynn; Fisher, Mary L

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the development of a career enhancement program for hospital-based staff development consultants in a complex, centralized department consisting of diverse educator roles. Just as incentives for career enhancement are essential for retaining bedside nurses, it is equally vital for master's-prepared educators to have a growth and recognition plan. This theory-based model can provide the needed link to achieve individual and organizational goals related to educator development and recognition.

  11. The contribution of hospital library information services to clinical care: a study in eight hospitals.

    PubMed Central

    King, D N

    1987-01-01

    Hospital health sciences libraries represent, for the vast majority of health professionals, the most accessible source for library information and services. Most health professionals do not have available the specialized services of a clinical medical librarian, and rely instead upon general information services for their case-related information needs. The ability of the hospital library to meet these needs and the impact of the information on quality patient care have not been previously examined. A study was conducted in eight hospitals in the Chicago area as a quality assurance project. A total of 176 physicians, nurses, and other health professionals requested information from their hospital libraries related to a current case or clinical situation. They then assessed the quality of information received, its cognitive value, its contribution to patient care, and its impact on case management. Nearly two-thirds of the respondents asserted that they would definitely or probably handle their cases differently as a result of the information provided by the library. Almost all rated the libraries' performance and response highly. An overview of the context and purpose of the study, its methods, selected results, limitations, and conclusions are presented here, as is a review of selected earlier research. PMID:3450340

  12. Urinary catheter-related visits to the emergency department and implications for community services.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Tiziana; Harari, Danielle

    2017-05-11

    Thousands of patients live with urinary catheters and the potential complications deriving from long-term use. Disjointed community services may result in patients attending the emergency department (ED) to manage catheter complications. to conduct a service review of catheterised patients attending the ED of a large London hospital; to describe incidence, reasons for attendance and cost to inform future planning for out-of-hospital care. a catheter collaborative, consisting of multidisciplinary health professionals and patients, formulated survey questions. Patients were identified from the electronic patient record by searching for the code 'urological complaint'. One month of clinical records were retrospectively reviewed and analysed using descriptive statistics. 287 patients attended the department with urological complaints: 41 (14%) had urinary catheter problems, of these 24 (59%) patients were discharged and 17 (41%) were admitted for further treatment. Stays in ED varied from 1 hour 13 minutes to 17 hours (mean = 4.8 hours). A total of 9 patients (38%) were sent home during antisocial hours (9 pm to 7 am), 4 patients were discharged between midnight and 2 am. Patients admitted had mean stays of 4.11 days. Most admissions were short term for intravenous (IV) treatments; 3 patients were hospitalised for 20 days. A total of 14 patients (34%) were diagnosed with catheter-related infections: 11 (79%) had bladder infections and 3 (21%) had septicaemia. All 14 patients (100%) had urine-culture-confirmed infections, mainly from coliform, proteus and pseudomonas species. A total of 20 patients (49%) received antibiotic treatment. The majority of patients received an initial IV dose followed, where required, by oral treatment on discharge. many catheterised patients had complex needs with high rates of urinary infections and admissions for urosepsis. High attendance related less to old age but more to complexity of history, such as neurological conditions and

  13. Rotavirus-associated hospitalization and emergency department costs and rotavirus vaccine program impact.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, April; Donauer, Stephanie; Edwards, Kathryn M; Weinberg, Geoffrey A; Payne, Daniel C; Szilagyi, Peter G; Rice, Marilyn; Cassedy, Amy; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael R; Parashar, Umesh D; Staat, Mary Allen

    2013-08-28

    To determine the medical costs of laboratory-confirmed rotavirus hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits and estimate the economic impact of the rotavirus vaccine program. During 4 rotavirus seasons (2006-2009), children <3 years of age hospitalized or seen in the ED with laboratory-confirmed rotavirus were identified through active population-based rotavirus surveillance in three US counties. Medical costs were obtained from hospital and physician billing data, and factors associated with increased costs were examined. Annual national costs were estimated using rotavirus hospitalization and ED visit rates and medical costs for rotavirus hospitalizations and ED visits from our surveillance program for pre- (2006-2007) and post-vaccine (2008-2009) time periods. Pre-vaccine, for hospitalizations, the median medical cost per child was $3581, the rotavirus hospitalization rate was 22.1/10,000, with an estimated annual national cost of $91 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $4304, the hospitalization rate was 6.3/10,000 and the estimated annual national cost was $31 million. Increased costs were associated with study site, age <3 months, underlying medical conditions and an atypical acute gastroenteritis presentation. For ED visits, the pre-vaccine median medical cost per child was $574, the ED visit rate was 291/10,000 resulting in an estimated annual national cost of $192 million. Post-vaccine, the median medical cost was $794, the ED visit rate was 71/10,000 with an estimated annual national cost of $65 million. After implementation of rotavirus immunization, the total annual medical costs decreased from $283 million to $96 million, an annual reduction of $187 million. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Association of Hospital Resources and Imaging Choice for Appendicitis in Pediatric Emergency Departments.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Katherine; Depinet, Holly; Iyer, Sujit; Hall, Matt; Herr, Sandra; Morton, Inge; Lee, Timothy; Melzer-Lange, Marlene

    2017-04-01

    Abdominal pain and concern for appendicitis are common chief complaints in patients presenting to the pediatric emergency department (PED). Although many professional organizations recommend decreasing use of computed tomography (CT) and choosing ultrasound as first-line imaging for pediatric appendicitis, significant variability persists in imaging utilization. This study investigated practice variation across children's hospitals in the diagnostic imaging evaluation of appendicitis and determined hospital-level characteristics associated with the likelihood of ultrasound as the first imaging modality. This was a multicenter (seven children's hospitals) retrospective investigation. Data from chart review of 160 consecutive patients aged 3-18 years diagnosed with appendicitis from each site were compared with a survey of site medical directors regarding hospital resource availability, usual practices, and departmental-level demographics. In the diagnostic evaluation of 1,090 children with appendicitis, CT scan was performed first for 22.4% of patients, with a range across PEDs of 3.1% to 83.8%. Ultrasound was performed for 54.0% of patients with a range of 2.5% to 96.9%. The only hospital-level factor significantly associated with ultrasound as the first imaging modality was 24-hour availability of in-house ultrasound (odds ratio = 29.2, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-691.8). Across children's hospitals, significant practice variation exists regarding diagnostic imaging in the evaluation of patients with appendicitis. Variation in hospital-level resources may impact the diagnostic evaluation of patients with appendicitis. Availability of 24-hour in-house ultrasound significantly increases the likelihood of ultrasound as first imaging and decreases CT scans. Hospitals aiming to increase the use of ultrasound should consider adding 24-hour in-house coverage. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  15. Defense Department Advisory Committee on Women in the Services (DACOWITS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-09

    who were aware of sexual assault occurring in the military, probably due to the smaller amount of time these personnel have spent on Active or...differences in rates found across the Service branches. Rates of sexual assault against female Active duty personnel varied by pay grade, with junior... Active duty.63 DoD Central Registry uses common report forms (DD 2486) to report incidents of sexual assault. However, reporting practices lack

  16. Defense Health Care: Availability and Quality Measurement of Women’s Health Care Services in U.S. Military Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    at military hospitals and clinics located on military bases. Women represent a significant percentage of the population eligible for MHS services...represent a significant percentage of the population served by the Department of Defense’s (DOD) Military Health System (MHS); as of the end of fiscal year...selection, and how information is shared among different levels within the MHS. In addition, we conducted site visits to six military hospitals

  17. Emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments: a United Kingdom postal survey.

    PubMed Central

    Tye, C C; Ross, F; Kerry, S M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the current and predicted distribution of formal emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom; to determine organisational variations in service provision, with specific reference to funding, role configuration, training, and scope of clinical activity. METHODS: Postal survey of senior nurses of all major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom (n = 293) in May/June 1996. RESULTS: There were 274 replies (94% response rate): 98 departments (36%) provided a formal service; a further 91 departments (33%) reported definite plans to introduce a service by the end of 1996; smaller departments, under 40000 new patient attendances annually, were less likely to provide a service than busier units (p < 0.001, chi2 for trend). Three different methods of making the role operational were identified: dedicated, integrated, and rotational. Only 16 (18%) were able to provide a 24 hour service; 91 departments (93%) employed emergency nurse practitioners who had received specific training, but wide variations in length, content, and academic level were noted; 82 departments (84%) authorised nurse practitioners to order x rays independently, but only 35 (36%) allowed them to interpret radiographs; 67 (68%) permitted "over the counter" drug supplying under local protocol, and 52 (54%), "prescription only" drug supplying from an agreed list. CONCLUSIONS: Formal emergency nurse practitioner services are provided in all parts of the United Kingdom, with predicted figures suggesting a rapidly accelerating upward trend. Wide variations in service organisation, training, and scope of activity are evident. PMID:9475220

  18. [Variability in Spanish National Health System hospital emergency services utilization].

    PubMed

    Peiró, Salvador; Librero, Julián; Ridao, Manuel; Bernal-Delgado, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to estimate the rate of hospital emergency services (HES) visits per health area, the associated percentage of admissions and the standardized HES utilization ratio, and to analyze their relationship with hospital resources. We performed an ecological study that combined information from distinct sources (Survey of Health Care Hospitalization Establishments 2006 and Minimum Data Set 2006) to estimate the rate of HES visits and the percentage of associated emergency admissions in 164 health areas in 14 autonomous communities (AC). Among 35.3 million inhabitants in the 164 areas examined, there were 16.2 million visits to the HES (45.75 per 100 inhabitants); more than 2 million (12.6%) were hospitalized. Excluding 5% of extreme areas, rates oscillated between 31.60 and 78.69 HES visits/100 inhabitants, and the percentage of admissions was between 7.6% and 27.9%. These differences were not attenuated after standardization. The AC factor explained 29% of variance in HES visits and 82% of variance in admissions. The rate of visits was not associated with the number of beds or staff physicians but did correlate with the number HES doctors, and smaller and non-teaching hospitals. There is wide variability in the rates of HES visits and emergency admissions in the different areas of the Spanish National Health System. This variability seems to be associated with a differential use for minor problems. Copyright 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Workplace violence in a tertiary care Israeli hospital - a systematic analysis of the types of violence, the perpetrators and hospital departments.

    PubMed

    Shafran-Tikva, Sigal; Zelker, Revital; Stern, Zvi; Chinitz, David

    2017-08-23

    Worldwide, there is a widespread and disturbing pattern of violence towards healthcare workers. However, violent occurrences in Israeli hospitals have often been unrecognized and underreported. Moreover, most studies have not sufficiently differentiated among the different types of violence. To examine the different types of violence experienced by nurses and physicians, the types of perpetrators and the specialty fields involved. A quantitative questionnaire was used to assess the incidence of a "basket" of violent behaviors, divided into eight types of violent manifestations. The study population consisted of 729 physicians and nurses in a variety of hospital divisions and departments (surgery, oncology, intensive care, ambulatory services including day care, and emergency room) in a large general hospital. Six hundred seventy-eight of them responded to the survey for a response rate of 93%; about two thirds of respondents (446) were nurses and about one third (232) were physicians. The questionnaires were completed during staff meetings and through subsequent follow-up efforts. In the 6 months preceding the survey, the respondents experienced about 700 incidents of passive aggressive behavior, 680 of verbal violence and 81 of sexual harassment. Types of violence differed between patients and companions; for example, the latter exhibited more verbal, threatening and passive aggressive behaviors. Violence was reported in all departments (ranging from 52-96%), with the departments most exposed to violence being the emergency room and outpatient clinics. Nurses in the emergency room were 5.5 times at a higher risk of being exposed to violence than nurses in the internal medicine department. Nurses were exposed to violence almost twice as much as physicians. There was a positive association between the physician's rank and his/her exposure to violence. A multiple regression model found that being older reduced the risk of being exposed to violence, for both

  20. Pediatric poisonings and risk markers for hospital admission in a major emergency department in Romania.

    PubMed

    Oprescu, Florin; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Wallis, Anne; Young, Tracy; Nour, Daniel; Cherecheş, Razvan M

    2012-02-01

    To identify the prevalence, characteristics, and risk markers for childhood poisonings treated in the emergency department of a large Romanian hospital. Trauma registry data using ICD-10 codes and case summaries were studied to identify poisonings among children aged 0-18. Multivariate logistic regression identified factors associated with hospital admission. Between 1999 and 2003, 1,173 pediatric trauma cases were seen in the emergency department; 437 (37.3%) were treated for poisoning, including medication (35%), alcohol (26%), chemical products (19%), and carbon monoxide (14%). Half of all poisonings were unintentional, primarily affecting children < 10 years. Half were intentional, mainly affecting children 10-18. Females were three times more likely than males to have documented suicidal intent (P < .0001). Over 30% of suicide attempts were among children ages 10-14 (P < .0001). We report significantly increased adjusted odds ratios (P < .05) of hospital admission for children 10-18, and for chemical substance poisoning, and suicidal intent. Pediatric poisoning is a serious public health issue in Romania, and we suggest these findings are relevant across other eastern European countries with limited resources. Poisonings result in morbidity and hospital admissions, yet there are few prevention resources available. Health education programs and consumer product safety policies are needed in Romania and eastern Europe.