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Sample records for hospital-based dialysis units

  1. Twenty-one year mortality in a dialysis unit: changing effect of withdrawal from dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bordenave, K; Tzamaloukas, A H; Conneen, S; Adler, K; Keller, L K; Murata, G H

    1998-01-01

    To characterize the factors affecting the decision to withdraw from dialysis, the authors compared patients withdrawing from dialysis (n=62) with patients dying from all other causes (n=242) over 21 years (1976-1996) in a single dialysis unit. Compared with those who died from other causes, patients who withdrew were older (67+/-11 vs 61+/-11 years); were more likely to have severe physical impairment (87% vs 62%) and severe restriction of activities of daily living (77% vs 46%); and had higher frequencies of congestive heart failure (81 % vs 62%), myocardial infarction (60% vs 42%), peripheral vascular disease (71 % vs 40%), and diabetes mellitus (66% vs 36%) (p < or = 0.014). Dialysis modality; duration of dialysis; the degree of family support; index of disease severity; the use of tobacco, alcohol, or illicit drugs; and the frequency of ischemic heart disease, dysrhythmia, pericarditis, cardiac arrest, cerebrovascular accident, hypertension, obstructive lung disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus did not differ between the two groups. Stepwise logistic regression showed that dialysis during 1990-1996, severe limitation of activities of daily living, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for withdrawal. During 1990-1996, 44% of the deaths were caused by withdrawal from treatment. In addition to other factors, dialysis in the 1990s is a strong predictor of withdrawal from dialysis. The reasons for the increased rate of withdrawal from dialysis in recent years, and the effect of this increased rate of withdrawal on mortality, need further evaluation.

  2. Pseudouremic pruritus: a scabies epidemic in a dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Lempert, K D; Baltz, P S; Welton, W A; Whittier, F C

    1985-02-01

    A scabies epidemic was studied in a university hospital dialysis unit. Itching in patients was initially attributed to uremic pruritus, and diagnosis of the epidemic was delayed until cases occurred among the staff. Sixteen cases (seven patients and nine staff) were identified by survey questionnaire and dermatologic examination. Application of 1% lindane lotion (Kwell, Reed and Carnrick, Piscataway, NJ) to all patients dialyzed in the unit and the entire staff eradicated the epidemic. A dialysis unit-associated nosocomial scabies epidemic has not been reported before and may mimic uremic pruritus in dialysis patients.

  3. Dialysis Facility and Network Factors Associated With Low Kidney Transplantation Rates Among United States Dialysis Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, R. E.; Plantinga, L.; Krisher, J.; Pastan, S. O.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in transplant rates between different dialysis units has been noted, yet little is known about facility-level factors associated with low standardized transplant ratios (STRs) across the United States End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Network regions. We analyzed Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Dialysis Facility Report data from 2007 to 2010 to examine facility-level factors associated with low STRs using multivariable mixed models. Among 4098 dialysis facilities treating 305 698 patients, there was wide variability in facility-level STRs across the 18 ESRD Networks. Four-year average STRs ranged from 0.69 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.64–0.73) in Network 6 (Southeastern Kidney Council) to 1.61 (95% CI: 1.47–1.76) in Network 1 (New England). Factors significantly associated with a lower STR (p <0.0001) included for-profit status, facilities with higher percentage black patients, patients with no health insurance and patients with diabetes. A greater number of facility staff, more transplant centers per 10 000 ESRD patients and a higher percentage of patients who were employed or utilized peritoneal dialysis were associated with higher STRs. The lowest performing dialysis facilities were in the Southeastern United States. Understanding the modifiable facility-level factors associated with low transplant rates may inform interventions to improve access to transplantation. PMID:24891272

  4. Dialysis for undocumented immigrants in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A

    2015-01-01

    The United States offers near-universal coverage for treatment of ESRD. Undocumented immigrants with ESRD are the only subset of patients not covered under a national strategy. There are 2 divergent dialysis treatment strategies offered to undocumented immigrants in the United States, emergent dialysis and chronic outpatient dialysis. Emergent dialysis, offering dialysis only when urgent indications exist, is the treatment strategy in certain states. Differing interpretations of Emergency Medicaid statute by the courts and state and federal government have resulted in the geographic disparity in treatment strategies for undocumented immigrants with ESRD. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 ignored the health care of undocumented immigrants and will not provide relief to undocumented patients with catastrophic illness like ESRD, cancer, or traumatic brain injuries. The difficult patient and provider decisions are explored in this review. The Renal Physicians Association Position Statement on uncompensated renal-related care for noncitizens is an excellent starting point for a framework to address this ethical dilemma. The practice of "emergent dialysis" will hopefully be found unacceptable in the future because of the fact that it is not cost effective, ethical, or humane.

  5. Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis. There are two main types of dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt, and water. Hemodialysis uses a machine. It is sometimes called ...

  6. Implementation and practical application of the nutrition care process in the dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Memmer, Debra

    2013-01-01

    The Nutrition Care Process (NCP) was introduced in 2003 (Lacey and Pritchett, J Am Diet Assoc. 2003;103:1061-1071). Since then, dietitians have been encouraged to incorporate the NCP into their daily practice, yet it has not been totally adopted in all dialysis units (Dent and McDuffie, J Ren Nutr. 2011;1:205-207). The renal dietitian has the benefit of being able to follow-up with the dialysis patient on a monthly basis. During these monthly visits, as information unfolds, a unique relationship culminates with the dialysis patient. The NCP allows the dietitian to make precise nutrition diagnoses, which reflect the complexity of the renal dietitian's involvement with the dialysis patient. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief description of the NCP as it relates to dialysis, offer a framework on how to begin using the NCP in the dialysis unit, and provide an example of a monthly nutrition note.

  7. The medical-legal responsibilities of a dialysis unit medical director.

    PubMed

    Vaqar, Sarosh; Murray, Brian; Panesar, Mandip

    2014-01-01

    The specialty of Nephrology, by virtue of its relationship with the dialysis procedure, is highly vulnerable to litigation. As is the case with all nephrologists, a dialysis unit medical director is not immune to medical malpractice suits, and can be held liable for any act of perceived or potential harm to any dialysis patient, regardless of the director's level of involvement. The medical director, per the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Conditions of Participation, accepts the responsibilities, accountability, and consequent legal liabilities of the quality of the medical care provided to every dialysis patient in the unit. This review is a synopsis of lawsuits filed against medical directors of dialysis units in the past forty years. Six categories of legal actions were noted; medical malpractice, fraudulent claims, self-referral and Stark Law, discrimination, negligence, and violation of patient autonomy and dignity.

  8. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. PMID:21159414

  9. Zora: a pilot virtual community in the pediatric dialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Bers, M U; Gonzalez-Heydrich, J; Raches, D; DeMaso, D R

    2001-01-01

    We describe a five-month pilot project conducted in the dialysis unit at Boston's Children's Hospital. Pediatric patients with renal disease used the Zora therapeutic community program while undergoing hemodialysis. Zora is a 3D multi-user computer environment designed at the MIT Media Laboratory to help young people explore issues of identity, while engaging in a virtual community. Users build "virtual rooms" and populate them with objects and characters, program them with storytelling behaviors, and converse with other young people in real-time through a virtual character representing themselves. It was specifically designed to help young people explore issues of identity, while engaging in a participatory virtual community. This paper presents the experience and evaluates the feasibility and safety of using Zora in a hospital setting. It describes how Zora facilitated explorations of identity and mutual patient support and interaction. Finally it also presents design recommendations for future interventions of this kind. More generally, this paper explores the potential of technology specifically designed with therapeutic purposes to help patients cope with their illness.

  10. Evaluating Infection Prevention Strategies in Out-Patient Dialysis Units Using Agent-Based Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wares, Joanna R; Lawson, Barry; Shemin, Douglas; D'Agata, Erika M C

    2016-01-01

    Patients receiving chronic hemodialysis (CHD) are among the most vulnerable to infections caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO), which are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current guidelines to reduce transmission of MDRO in the out-patient dialysis unit are targeted at patients considered to be high-risk for transmitting these organisms: those with infected skin wounds not contained by a dressing, or those with fecal incontinence or uncontrolled diarrhea. Here, we hypothesize that targeting patients receiving antimicrobial treatment would more effectively reduce transmission and acquisition of MDRO. We also hypothesize that environmental contamination plays a role in the dissemination of MDRO in the dialysis unit. To address our hypotheses, we built an agent-based model to simulate different treatment strategies in a dialysis unit. Our results suggest that reducing antimicrobial treatment, either by reducing the number of patients receiving treatment or by reducing the duration of the treatment, markedly reduces overall colonization rates and also the levels of environmental contamination in the dialysis unit. Our results also suggest that improving the environmental decontamination efficacy between patient dialysis treatments is an effective method for reducing colonization and contamination rates. These findings have important implications for the development and implementation of future infection prevention strategies. PMID:27195984

  11. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  12. Aspects of Fear of Personal Death, Levels of Awareness, and Professional Affiliation among Dialysis Unit Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Lea; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined expressions of fear of personal death among physicians, nurses, and social workers working in hospital dialysis units. Results indicated no differences in fear of personal death between 71 dialysis personnel and 68 other hospital personnel serving as controls. Physicians had lowest scores of fear of personal death followed by nurses and…

  13. Associations between CMS's Clinical Performance Measures project benchmarks, profit structure, and mortality in dialysis units.

    PubMed

    Szczech, L A; Klassen, P S; Chua, B; Hedayati, S S; Flanigan, M; McClellan, W M; Reddan, D N; Rettig, R A; Frankenfield, D L; Owen, W F

    2006-06-01

    Prior studies observing greater mortality in for-profit dialysis units have not captured information about benchmarks of care. This study was undertaken to examine the association between profit status and mortality while achieving benchmarks. Utilizing data from the US Renal Data System and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' end-stage renal disease (ESRD) Clinical Performance Measures project, hemodialysis units were categorized as for-profit or not-for-profit. Associations with mortality at 1 year were estimated using Cox regression. Two thousand six hundred and eighty-five dialysis units (31,515 patients) were designated as for-profit and 1018 (15,085 patients) as not-for-profit. Patients in for-profit facilities were more likely to be older, black, female, diabetic, and have higher urea reduction ratio (URR), hematocrit, serum albumin, and transferrin saturation. Patients (19.4 and 18.6%) in for-profit and not-for-profit units died, respectively. In unadjusted analyses, profit status was not associated with mortality (hazard ratio (HR)=1.04, P=0.09). When added to models with profit status, the following resulted in a significant association between profit status (for-profit vs not-for-profit) and increasing mortality risk: URR, hematocrit, albumin, and ESRD Network. In adjusted models, patients in for-profit facilities had a greater death risk (HR 1.09, P=0.004). More patients in for-profit units met clinical benchmarks. Survival among patients in for-profit units was similar to not-for-profit units. This suggests that in the contemporary era, interventions in for-profit dialysis units have not impaired their ability to deliver performance benchmarks and do not affect survival. PMID:16732194

  14. Hepatitis B and C in dialysis units in Kosova

    PubMed Central

    Telaku, Skender; Fejza, Hajrullah; Elezi, Ymer; Bicaj, Teuta

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are important causes of morbidity and mortality of hemodialysis (HD) patients. This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological and clinical features of HCV and HBV infections in six different HD units in Kosova. Five hundred and eighty-three end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) patients on maintenance HD from six HD centers in Kosova (358 female, 225 male, mean age 54,8 years (16–66) were included in this study. Data from databank of the National Blood Bank in Prishtina, as well as the data from the databank of the Transfusion Centers in Regional hospitals in Prizren, Peja, Gjilan, Mitrovica and Gjakova were taken in this study. Clinical data such as age, sex, HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody and primary causes of ESKD were examined. Serological markers for HBV and HCV were determined with immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). Results The T-test and x2 test were used to analyze the significance of the results. Among our HD patients HBsAg and anti-HCV antibody prevalence rate was 12%, respectively 43%. Chronic nephritis was a more frequent cause of ESKD among our HD patients. With unknown etiology were 23, 5% from them. Conclusion HBV and HCV prevalence in our HD patients is still high. These data emphasize the need for stricter adherence to infection control, barrier precaution and preventive behaviors with all patients. PMID:19497116

  15. Black yeasts-like fungi isolated from dialysis water in hemodialysis units.

    PubMed

    Figel, Izabel Cristina; Marangoni, Paulo Roberto Dantas; Tralamazza, Sabina Moser; Vicente, Vânia Aparecida; Dalzoto, Patrícia do Rocio; do Nascimento, Mariana Machado Fidelis; de Hoog, G Sybren; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval

    2013-06-01

    Hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal failure promotes the removal of toxic substances, water, and minerals from the body and often takes place in specialized clinics. Microbial contamination of dialysis fluid is a serious problem in therapy. One of the sources of contamination is the water used to prepare the dialysate. In Brazil, legislation regulating the microbiological quality of water for dialysis does not cover waterborne microbes such as Pseudomonas, mycobacteria, and fungi. The aim of the present study was to quantify, isolate, and identify fungi present in water systems in six hemodialysis units in Curitiba, Paraná state, Brazil. Fungi were analyzed by surface plating and membrane filtration. Isolates were identified by morphology, while the dematiaceous fungi were identified by sequencing the rDNA ITS region. It was found that 66 % of the samples presented fungi, while black fungi were present in 46 % of all samples. Twenty-eight isolates from treated water for dialysis and dialysate were identified by sequencing and were found to be Exophiala pisciphila, E. cancerae, E. equina, and Rhinocladiella similis. The presence of dematiaceous fungi may pose a risk for debilitated hospitalized patients.

  16. Rationing dialysis in the United States: possible implications of capitated systems.

    PubMed

    Glover, J J; Moss, A H

    1998-10-01

    The application of managed care to dialysis raises concerns that dialysis will be rationed in the United States. Rationing means the implicit or explicit denial of beneficial or marginally beneficial medical treatment as a result of insufficient resources to provide treatment to all. In this era of cost containment and budget cutting, rationing appears inevitable in the end-stage renal disease program because of its continued growth in numbers and cost and because many are questioning the benefit of dialysis to certain groups of patients. Rationing according to social worth, ability to pay, or age is not ethically justifiable, but it is justified to ration according to medical benefit. There is an important role for guidelines developed with broad input from patients, families, health care professionals, ethicists, health policy experts, and payers. Consensus statements exist in the literature, and the nephrology community is in the process of developing practice guidelines that will be available for future use. In the meantime, managed care companies should look to broader community input in the form of consensus statements and community dialogue. Managed care companies will need ethics committees to ensure that their policies and procedures for rationing are fair, principled, and subject to review and appeal.

  17. An instrumental variable approach finds no associated harm or benefit from early dialysis initiation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Scialla, Julia J.; Liu, Jiannong; Crews, Deidra C.; Guo, Haifeng; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Ephraim, Patti L.; Tangri, Navdeep; Sozio, Stephen M.; Shafi, Tariq; Miskulin, Dana C.; Michels, Wieneke M.; Jaar, Bernard G.; Wu, Albert W.; Powe, Neil R.; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at dialysis initiation has been rising. Observational studies suggest harm, but may be confounded by unmeasured factors. As instrumental variable methods may be less biased we performed a retrospective cohort study of 310,932 patients starting dialysis between 2006 to 2008 and registered in the United States Renal Data System in order to describe geographic variation in eGFR at dialysis initiation and determine its association with mortality. Patients were grouped into 804 health service areas by zip code. Individual eGFR at dialysis initiation averaged 10.8 ml/min/1.73m2 but varied geographically. Only 11% of the variation in mean health service areas-level eGFR at dialysis initiation was accounted for by patient characteristics. We calculated demographic-adjusted mean eGFR at dialysis initiation in the health service areas using the 2006 and 2007 incident cohort as our instrument and estimated the association between individual eGFR at dialysis initiation and mortality in the 2008 incident cohort using the 2 stage residual inclusion method. Among 89,547 patients starting dialysis in 2008 with eGFR 5 to 20 ml/min/1.73m2, eGFR at initiation was not associated with mortality over a median of 15.5 months [hazard ratio 1.025 per 1 ml/min/1.73m2 for eGFR 5 to 14 ml/min/1.73m2; and 0.973 per 1 ml/min/1.73m2 for eGFR 14 to 20 ml/min/1.73m2]. Thus, there was no associated harm or benefit from early dialysis initiation in the United States. PMID:24786707

  18. Dialysis vascular access management by interventional nephrology programs at University Medical Centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Vachharajani, Tushar J; Moossavi, Shahriar; Salman, Loay; Wu, Steven; Dwyer, Amy C; Ross, Jamie; Dukkipati, Ramanath; Maya, Ivan D; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Agarwal, Anil; Abreo, Kenneth D; Work, Jack; Asif, Arif

    2011-01-01

    The development of interventional nephrology has undoubtedly led to an improvement in patient care at many facilities across the United States. However, these services have traditionally been offered by interventional nephrologists in the private practice arena. While interventional nephrology was born in the private practice setting, several academic medical centers across the United States have now developed interventional nephrology programs. University Medical Centers (UMCs) that offer interventional nephrology face challenges, such as smaller dialysis populations, limited financial resources, and real or perceived political "turf" issues." Despite these hurdles, several UMCs have successfully established interventional nephrology as an intricate part of a larger nephrology program. This has largely been accomplished by consolidating available resources and collaborating with other specialties irrespective of the size of the dialysis population. The collaboration with other specialties also offers an opportunity to perform advanced procedures, such as application of excimer laser and endovascular ultrasound. As more UMCs establish interventional nephrology programs, opportunities for developing standardized training centers will improve, resulting in better quality and availability of nephrology-related procedures, and providing an impetus for research activities. PMID:21999740

  19. Association of increased travel distance to dialysis units with the risk of anemia in rural chronic hemodialysis elderly.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chia-Ter; Lai, Chun-Fu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Sheng-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Geographic remoteness has been found to influence health-related outcomes negatively. As reported in the literature, rural dialysis patients have a higher risk of mortality with increasing travel distance to dialysis units. However, few studies have focused on the impact of travel distances on the development of dialysis complications. We utilized a prospectively collected chronic hemodialysis patient cohort from a rural regional hospital for analysis. Data on demographics, comorbidities, and serum laboratory results were obtained. Correlation analyses between travel distance to dialysis units and dialysis complications were conducted, and significantly correlated parameters were entered into multivariate logistic regression models to determine their exact associations. A total of 46 rural chronic hemodialysis patients were enrolled, with an average age higher than others in the literature. Significant correlation was found between travel distance and serum hemoglobin levels (R(2) = -0.34, P value = 0.029). Multivariate logistic regression found that every 1 km increase in travel distance was associated with an increased risk of anemia (hemoglobin <9 g/dL) (odds ratio 1.46; P value = 0.01). Sensitivity analyses further showed that the associated risk was partially attenuated by serum albumin (odds ratio 1.83; P value = 0.07) and ferritin (odds ratio 1.39; P value = 0.08) levels. This is the first study to demonstrate the association between increased travel distance to dialysis units and the risk of anemia in chronic dialysis patients, especially elderly. Malnutrition, inflammation, and atherosclerosis syndrome could be partially responsible for the observed association. Further research is required to confirm our findings.

  20. Training patients for automated peritoneal dialysis: A survey of practices in six successful centers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Firanek, Catherine A; Sloand, James A; Todd, Lucy B

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, the majority of patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) use a cycler or automated peritoneal dialysis (APD). The aim of this study was the identification of common features in nurse-led APD training programs that were likely to contribute to successful home dialysis. This study collected data on nurse-led APD training programs in six high-performing PD centers. A 13-point survey, which focused on training tools, topics covered methods used, and level of support at home, was administered during group face-to-face interviews with the PD training nurses. Data were reviewed for trends between centers. Training programs in all six centers focused on essential information and skill sets to begin home dialysis using APD, with simple instructions and a hands-on approach. Every center initially trained patients on continuous ambulatory PD before APD. The clinics provided ongoing education, reinforcement, and retraining of concepts and skills through discussion, quizzes, and topic-specific monthly training sessions. All clinics provided 24-hour support for patients. Adopting the best practices identified in this study has the potential to improve APD training.

  1. Medicare program; end-stage renal disease program; prospective reimbursement for dialysis services and approval of special purpose renal dialysis facilities--HCFA. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1983-05-11

    These regulations change the reimbursement system by which Medicare pays for outpatient maintenance dialysis and related physician and laboratory services. These changes establish a prospective method of payment for maintenance dialysis, whether furnished at home or in a hospital-based or independent dialysis facility, and revise other aspects of the reimbursement system to encourage home dialysis and provide incentives for economy and efficiency in furnishing these services. These amendments implement section 2145 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981. We expect that these changes will improve our administration of the end-stage renal disease program and enable us to control the rapidly growing costs of furnishing dialysis. The controls on quality of care that have been in effect since the beginning of the program will continue to apply. These regulations will also ensure access to care by providing for adequate reimbursement to isolated, essential facilities, where patients have no alternative sources of dialysis care. These regulations also provide for time-limited approval for Medicare participation of special purpose renal dialysis facilities. As a general rule we have not approved facilities such as transient or mobile units set up for emergency purposes or to serve vacationing dialysis patients in State parks and children's camps. This change in regulations will remove this limitation.

  2. Systematic barriers to the effective delivery of home dialysis in the United States: a report from the Public Policy/Advocacy Committee of the North American Chapter of the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Golper, Thomas A; Saxena, Anjali B; Piraino, Beth; Teitelbaum, Isaac; Burkart, John; Finkelstein, Fredric O; Abu-Alfa, Ali

    2011-12-01

    Home dialysis, currently underused in the United States compared with other industrialized countries, likely will benefit from the newly implemented US prospective payment system. Not only is home dialysis less expensive from the standpoint of pure dialysis costs, but overall health system costs may be decreased by more subtle benefits, such as reduced transportation. However, many systematic barriers exist to the successful delivery of home dialysis. We organized these barriers into the categories of educational barriers (patient and providers), governmental/regulatory barriers (state and federal), and barriers specifically related to the philosophies and business practices of dialysis providers (eg, staffing, pharmacies, supplies, space, continuous quality improvement practices, and independence). All stakeholders share the goal of delivering home dialysis therapies in the most cost- and clinically effective and least problematic manner. Identification and recognition of such barriers is the first step. In addition, we have suggested action plans to stimulate the kidney community to find even better solutions so that collectively we may overcome these barriers. PMID:21903316

  3. Benzodiazepine use and mortality of incident dialysis patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Winkelmayer, W C; Mehta, J; Wang, P S

    2007-12-01

    Benzodiazepines and other omega-receptor agonists are frequently used for sleep and anxiety disorders. We studied the rates, correlates, and safety of individual benzodiazepines and zolpidem use from the records of 3690 patients in a national cohort of Dialysis Morbidity and Mortality Study Wave 2 data. We assessed drug utilization and an association between drug use and all-cause mortality. Overall, 14% of incident dialysis patients used a benzodiazepine or zolpidem. Women, Caucasians, current smokers, and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were more likely to use these drugs, whereas patients with cerebrovascular disease were less likely to use these drugs. In adjusted analyses, benzodiazepine or zolpidem use was associated with a 15% higher mortality rate. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease significantly modified this association, suggesting that these patients were at higher risk. No association was found between benzodiazepine use and greater risk for hip fracture. We conclude that benzodiazepine or zolpidem use is common in incident dialysis patients and may be associated with greater mortality. Further studies are needed to elucidate the safety of these drugs in the dialysis population, which may lead to cautious and restrictive utilization of omega-receptor agonists in dialysis patients. PMID:17851463

  4. Dialysis and sexuality.

    PubMed

    Beal-Lloyd, Donna; Groh, Carla J

    2012-01-01

    End stage renal disease is a major health issue in the United States. Dialysis, the major form of renal replacement therapy, has physical and psychological implications that can have a major impact on both men's and women's sexuality and sexual performance. Nurses are in a key position to assist men and women on dialysis to develop healthy and realistic approaches to their sexuality. This article reviews the literature on dialysis and sexuality, and recommends nursing interventions that can assist persons on dialysis achieve the level of sexual intimacy and satisfaction they desire. PMID:23061112

  5. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, D; Prakash, J

    2000-07-01

    Malnutrition is a common clinical problem in dialysis patients, which is multifactorial in origin. It is most often found in a patient of chronic renal failure (CRF) during the period when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 10 ml/min, but dialysis is yet to be started. The loss of proteins, aminoacids and other essential nutrients during the procedure of dialysis may further aggravate the malnutrition. Poor nutrition in dialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the form of delayed wound healing, malaise, fatigue, increased susceptibility to infection and poor rehabilitation. In view of the above consequences, all patients on dialysis must undergo nutritional assessment. It is very vital to maintain good nutritional status in-patients on dialysis by adequate protein and calories intake, appropriate supplementation of iron, calcium, minerals and water-soluble vitamins and, of course, the supplementation should be individualised. Nutritional needs are enhanced in presence of stresses like infection or surgery to limit excessive tissue catabolism and therefore, these are the situations, which demand intensive nutrition therapy. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients on dialysis in intensive care unit, using a central venous catheter. However, enteral route is always preferred to parenteral ones, whenever possible. Even after adequate dialysis has been given, dietary counselling is often required for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients to ensure that they ingest the recommended amount of protein, calories and essential micronutrients.

  6. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sen, D; Prakash, J

    2000-07-01

    Malnutrition is a common clinical problem in dialysis patients, which is multifactorial in origin. It is most often found in a patient of chronic renal failure (CRF) during the period when the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) falls below 10 ml/min, but dialysis is yet to be started. The loss of proteins, aminoacids and other essential nutrients during the procedure of dialysis may further aggravate the malnutrition. Poor nutrition in dialysis patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in the form of delayed wound healing, malaise, fatigue, increased susceptibility to infection and poor rehabilitation. In view of the above consequences, all patients on dialysis must undergo nutritional assessment. It is very vital to maintain good nutritional status in-patients on dialysis by adequate protein and calories intake, appropriate supplementation of iron, calcium, minerals and water-soluble vitamins and, of course, the supplementation should be individualised. Nutritional needs are enhanced in presence of stresses like infection or surgery to limit excessive tissue catabolism and therefore, these are the situations, which demand intensive nutrition therapy. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) may be required for patients on dialysis in intensive care unit, using a central venous catheter. However, enteral route is always preferred to parenteral ones, whenever possible. Even after adequate dialysis has been given, dietary counselling is often required for both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients to ensure that they ingest the recommended amount of protein, calories and essential micronutrients. PMID:11273510

  7. National surveillance of dialysis-associated diseases in the United States, 2002.

    PubMed

    Finelli, Lyn; Miller, Jeremy T; Tokars, Jerome I; Alter, Miriam J; Arduino, Matthew J

    2005-01-01

    In December 2002, all U.S. chronic hemodialysis centers were surveyed regarding selected patient care practices and dialysis-associated diseases. The results were compared with similar surveys conducted in previous years. In 2002, 85% of hemodialysis centers were free-standing and 81% operated for profit; the proportion of centers operating for profit has increased each year since 1985. During 1995-2002, the percentage of patients who received dialysis through central catheters increased from 13% to 26%; this trend is worrisome, as infections and antimicrobial use are higher among patients receiving dialysis through catheters. However, during the same period, the percentage of patients receiving dialysis through fistulas increased from 22% to 33%. The percentage of centers reporting one or more patients infected or colonized with vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) increased from 12% in 1995 to 30% in 2002. During 1997-2002, the percentage of patients vaccinated against hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection increased from 47% to 56% and the percentage of staff vaccinated increased from 87% to 90%. In 2002, routine testing for antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) was performed on patients at 64% of centers; anti-HCV was found in 7.8% of patients. In 2001, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) published Recommendations for Preventing Transmission of Infections among Chronic Hemodialysis Patients. Centers were surveyed regarding their awareness of the recommendations and about a variety of infection control practices. In general, the incidence of HBV and HCV was not substantially different for the infection control practices evaluated, including where staff obtain clean supplies for patient treatment, reuse of unused and unopened supplies, and practices for changing external transducer filters/protectors. However, in 2002, the incidence of HBV infection was higher among patients in centers where injectable medications were prepared on a medication cart or

  8. Practice patterns, case mix, Medicare payment policy, and dialysis facility costs.

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, R A; Held, P J; Orzol, S M; Dor, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of case mix, practice patterns, features of the payment system, and facility characteristics on the cost of dialysis. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The nationally representative sample of dialysis units in the 1991 U.S. Renal Data System's Case Mix Adequacy (CMA) Study. The CMA data were merged with data from Medicare Cost Reports, HCFA facility surveys, and HCFA's end-stage renal disease patient registry. STUDY DESIGN: We estimated a statistical cost function to examine the determinants of costs at the dialysis unit level. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The relationship between case mix and costs was generally weak. However, dialysis practices (type of dialysis membrane, membrane reuse policy, and treatment duration) did have a significant effect on costs. Further, facilities whose payment was constrained by HCFA's ceiling on the adjustment for area wage rates incurred higher costs than unconstrained facilities. The costs of hospital-based units were considerably higher than those of freestanding units. Among chain units, only members of one of the largest national chains exhibited significant cost savings relative to independent facilities. CONCLUSIONS: Little evidence showed that adjusting dialysis payment to account for differences in case mix across facilities would be necessary to ensure access to care for high-cost patients or to reimburse facilities equitably for their costs. However, current efforts to increase dose of dialysis may require higher payments. Longer treatments appear to be the most economical method of increasing the dose of dialysis. Switching to more expensive types of dialysis membranes was a more costly means of increasing dose and hence must be justified by benefits beyond those of higher dose. Reusing membranes saved money, but the savings were insufficient to offset the costs associated with using more expensive membranes. Most, but not all, of the higher costs observed in hospital-based units appear to reflect

  9. Conserving water in and applying solar power to haemodialysis: 'green dialysis' through wiser resource utilization.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2010-06-01

    Natural resources are under worldwide pressure, water and sustainable energy being the paramount issues. Haemodialysis, a water-voracious and energy-hungry healthcare procedure, thoughtlessly wastes water and leaves a heavy carbon footprint. In our service, 100 000 L/week of previously discarded reverse osmosis reject water--water which satisfies all World Health Organisation criteria for potable (drinking) water--no longer drains to waste but is captured for reuse. Reject water from the hospital-based dialysis unit provides autoclave steam for instrument sterilization, ward toilet flushing, janitor stations and garden maintenance. Satellite centre reject water is tanker-trucked to community sporting fields, schools and aged-care gardens. Home-based nocturnal dialysis patient reuse reject water for home domestic utilities, gardens and animal watering. Although these and other potential water reuse practices should be mandated through legislation for all dialysis services, this is yet to occur. In addition, we now are piloting the use of solar power for the reverse osmosis plant and the dialysis machines in our home dialysis training service. If previously attempted, these have yet to be reported. After measuring the power requirements of both dialytic processes and modelling the projected costs, a programme has begun to solar power all dialysis-related equipment in a three-station home haemodialysis training unit. Income-generation with the national electricity grid via a grid-share and reimbursement arrangement predicts a revenue stream back to the dialysis service. Dialysis services must no longer ignore the non-medical aspects of their programmes but plan, trial, implement and embrace 'green dialysis' resource management practices.

  10. Dialysis - hemodialysis

    MedlinePlus

    Artificial kidneys - hemodialysis; Dialysis; Renal replacement therapy - hemodialysis; End-stage renal disease - hemodialysis; Kidney failure - hemodialysis; Renal failure - hemodialysis; Chronic kidney disease - ...

  11. Dialysis cultures.

    PubMed

    Pörtner, R; Märkl, H

    1998-10-01

    Dialysis techniques are discussed as a means for effective removal of low-molecular-mass components from fermentation broth to reach high cell density. Reactor systems and process strategies, the relevant properties of membranes and examples for high-density fermentation with dialysis, and problems related to scale-up are addressed. The dialysis technique has turned out to be very efficient and reliable for obtaining high cell densities. As in dialysis processes the membranes are not perfused, membrane clogging is not a problem as it is for micro- and ultrafiltration. By applying a "nutrient-split" feeding strategy, the loss of nutrients can be avoided and the medium is used very efficiently. The potential of dialysis cultures is demonstrated on the laboratory scale in a membrane dialysis reactor with an integrated membrane and in reactor systems with an external dialysis loop. In dialysis cultures with different microorganisms (Staphylococci, Escherichia coli, extremophilic microorganisms, Lactobacilli) the cell densities achieved were up to 30 times higher than those of other fermentation methods. The technique enables high cell densities to be attained without time-consuming medium optimization. For animal cell cultures the concept of a fixed bed coupled with dialysis proved to be very effective.

  12. Quality of life in chronic haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients in Turkey and related factors.

    PubMed

    Oren, Besey; Enç, Nuray

    2013-12-01

    Turkey is the fifth country in Europe with regard to the number of patients receiving haemodialysis (HD). However, only a limited number of studies have comparatively investigated the factors that affect quality of life in haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients in Turkey. The purpose of the study was to investigate the factors that affect quality of life in haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients, as well as providing a comparison of quality of life between these groups. In this cross-sectional study, Quality of Life Scale and a data form was completed by 300 dialysis patients who received treatment at five hospital-based dialysis units in Istanbul, Turkey. The data were evaluated using arithmetic mean values, standard deviations, minimums, maximums, percentages, independent groups t-tests, Spearman correlation analyses and one-way variance analyses. The quality of life values in peritoneal dialysis patients were found to be higher than those of haemodialysis patients (P < 0.05). It was concluded that the quality of life in chronic dialysis patients was affected by various factors.

  13. Renal Dialysis and its Financing.

    PubMed

    Borelli, Marisa; Paul, David P; Skiba, Michaeline

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and its associated comorbidities such as diabetes and hypertension continue to increase as the population ages. As most ESRD patients qualify for Medicare coverage, the U.S. government initiated reforms of the payment system for dialysis facilities in an effort to decrease expenditures associated with ESRD reimbursement. The effects of reduced reimbursement rates, bundled payment options, and quality incentives on the current dialysis system, including kidney dialysis units, physicians, and patients, are examined.

  14. Improvement in adequacy of delivered dialysis for adult in-center hemodialysis patients in the United States, 1993 to 1995.

    PubMed

    Helgerson, S D; McClellan, W M; Frederick, P R; Beaver, S K; Frankenfield, D L; McMullan, M

    1997-06-01

    The objective of this review is to describe the adequacy of delivered dialysis provided to in-center hemodialysis patients in the United States and to compare the findings with published guidelines. The medical records of random samples of 6,138, 6,919, and 6,861 patients in hemodialysis facilities were studied from all Medicare-eligible adult in-center hemodialysis patients alive on December 31, 1993, 1994, and 1995, respectively. The main clinical measure used was the urea reduction ratio (URR), the mean of which was 0.63 in 1993, 0.64 in 1994, and 0.66 in 1995. The proportion of patients with URR > or = 0.65, as recommended by the Renal Physicians Association and a National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Conference Statement, increased from 43% in 1993 to 49% in 1994 and 59% in 1995. In each of these 3 years, women were more likely than men to have a URR > or = 0.65 (1993: 54% v 31%, odds ratio 2.6; 1994: 61% v 38%, odds ratio 2.5; and 1995: 70% v 50%, odds ratio 24), as were older patients (65+ years) compared with younger patients (18 to 44 years) (1993: 47% v 37%, odds ratio 1.4; 1994: 54% v 45%, odds ratio 1.5; and 1995: 65% v 53%, odds ratio 1.6) and white patients compared with black patients (1993: 46% v 36%, odds ratio 1.5; 1994: 53% v 43%, odds ratio 1.5; and 1995: 63% v 54%, odds ratio 1.4). There was also substantial geographic variation in the proportion of patients receiving hemodialysis with a URR > or = 0.65. In conclusion, marked differences existed in 1993, 1994, and 1995 between observed practice and consensus guidelines for the delivery of adequate dialysis. Nevertheless, notable improvement occurred during this time period. A system to monitor further improvements in hemodialysis care in the United States is in place.

  15. International Comparisons to Assess Effects of Payment and Regulatory Changes in the United States on Anemia Practice in Patients on Hemodialysis: The Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Douglas S; Bieber, Brian A; Pisoni, Ronald L; Li, Yun; Morgenstern, Hal; Akizawa, Tadao; Jacobson, Stefan H; Locatelli, Francesco; Port, Friedrich K; Robinson, Bruce M

    2016-07-01

    For years, erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) use among patients on dialysis was much higher in the United States than in Europe or Japan. Sweeping changes to dialysis reimbursement and regulatory policies for ESA in the United States in 2011 were expected to reduce ESA use and hemoglobin levels. We used the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS) data from 7129 patients in 223 in-center hemodialysis facilities (average per month) to estimate and compare time trends in ESA dose and hemoglobin levels among patients on hemodialysis in the United States, Germany, Italy, Spain, the United Kingdom, and Japan. From 2010 to 2013, substantial declines in ESA use and hemoglobin levels occurred in the United States but not in other DOPPS countries. Between August of 2010 and April of 2013, mean weekly ESA dose in the United States decreased 40.4% for black patients and 38.0% for nonblack patients; mean hemoglobin decreased from 11.5 g/dl in black patients and 11.4 g/dl in nonblack patients to 10.6 g/dl in both groups. In 2010 and 2013, adjusted weekly ESA doses per kilogram were 41% and 11% lower, respectively, in patients in Europe and 60% and 18% lower, respectively, in patients in Japan than in nonblack patients in the United States. Adjusted hemoglobin levels in 2010 and 2013 were 0.07 g/dl lower and 0.56 g/dl higher, respectively, in patients in Europe and 0.93 and 0.01 g/dl lower, respectively, in patients in Japan than in nonblack patients in the United States. In conclusion, ESA dosing reductions in the United States likely reflect efforts in response to changes in reimbursement policy and regulatory guidance.

  16. Dialysis - peritoneal

    MedlinePlus

    ... The number of exchanges and amount of dwell time depends on the method of PD you use and other factors. Your ... PD: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) . For this ... routine until it is time to drain the fluid. You are not hooked ...

  17. Peritoneal dialysis in microencephaly.

    PubMed

    Peters, April

    2008-01-01

    J.T. was able to remain home in her familiar environment and receive safe and adequate treatment for her renal disease. J.T. had no infectious episodes or hospitalizations while under this unit's care for 35 months. She was also able to participate in her regular activities of daily living, interact with her family members, and travel on occasion, thus maintaining a good quality of life. Therefore, unit goals for her care were met. J.T.'s experience demonstrates that with proper teaching, preparation, and support from the dialysis care team working with a dedicated family, peritoneal dialysis can be an ideal modality for the treatment of ESRD in people with mental disabilities. PMID:19260611

  18. Acute Kidney Injury Treated with Dialysis outside the Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Observational Single-Center Study

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger-Mähr, Hannelore; Zitt, Emanuel; Lhotta, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of patients suffering from acute kidney injury requiring dialysis (AKI-D) is increasing. Whereas causes and outcome of AKI-D in the intensive care unit (ICU) are described extensively, few data exist about AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU. Aim of this study was to identify the causes of AKI-D, determine in-depth the comorbid conditions and outcome of this particular patient group and identify possibilities for its prevention. Methods We retrospectively studied all AKI-D patients treated outside the ICU in a single nephrology referral center between January 2010 and June 2015. Data on comorbid conditions, renal function and drug therapy prior to AKI-D, and possible causal events were collected. Patients were grouped into those with renal hypoperfusion as the predominant cause of AKI-D (hemodynamic group) and those with other causes (non-hemodynamic group). Results During 66 months 128 patients (57% male, mean age 69.3 years) were treated. AKI-D was community-acquired in 70.3%. The most frequent comorbidities were hypertension (62.5%), chronic kidney disease (CKD) (58.9%), coronary artery disease (CAD) (46.1%), diabetes (35.9%) and heart failure (34.1%). Most patients were prescribed diuretics (61.7%) and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RASI) (57.8%); 46.1% had a combination of both. In the 88 patients with hemodynamic AKI-D (68.8%) the most frequent initiating events were diarrhea (39.8%), infections (17.0%) and acute heart failure (13.6%). In the 40 patients with non-hemodynamic AKI-D (31.2%) interstitial nephritis (n = 15) was the prominent diagnosis. Patients with hemodynamic AKI-D were older (72.6 vs. 62.1 years, p = 0.001), suffered more often from CKD (68.2% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.003), CAD (54.5% vs. 27.5%, p = 0.004) and diabetes (42.0% vs. 22.5%, p = 0.033), and were more frequently on diuretics (75.0% vs. 32.5%, p<0.001), RASI (67.0% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.002) or their combination (58.0% vs. 20.0%, p<0

  19. [Integration of a psychologist into Nephrology-Dialysis-Hypertension Operative Unit: from needs evaluation to the definition of an intervention model].

    PubMed

    Monica, Ratti Maria; Delli Zotti, Giulia Bruna; Spotti, Donatella; Sarno, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and the dialytic treatment cause a significant psychological impact on patients, their families and on the medical-nursing staff too. The psychological aspects linked to the chronic condition of Kidney Disease generate the need to integrated a psychologist into the healthcare team of the Nephrology, Dialysis and Hypertension Operative Unit, in order to offer a specific and professional support to the patient during the different stages of the disease, to their caregivers and to the medical team. The aim of this collaboration project between Nephrology and Psychology is to create a global and integrated healthcare model. It does not give attention simply to the physical dimension of patients affected by CKD, but also to the emotional-affective, cognitive and social dimensions and to the health environment.

  20. 42 CFR 414.310 - Determination of reasonable charges for physician services furnished to renal dialysis patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Determination of Reasonable Charges Under the ESRD... maintenance dialysis patients who dialyze— (A) In an independent or hospital-based ESRD facility, or (B)...

  1. The DOPPS Practice Monitor: Rationale and Methods for an Initiative to Monitor the New U.S. Bundled Dialysis Payment System

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bruce; Fuller, Douglas; Zinsser, Dawn; Albert, Justin; Gillespie, Brenda; Tentori, Francesca; Turenne, Marc; Port, Friedrich; Pisoni, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    A new initiative of the United States (U.S.) Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study (DOPPS), the DOPPS Practice Monitor (DPM) provides up-to-date data and analyses to monitor trends in dialysis practice during implementation of the new Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Prospective Payment System (PPS; 2011–2014). We review DPM rationale, design, sampling approach, analytic methods, and facility sample characteristics. Using stratified random sampling, the sample of ~145 U.S. facilities provides results representative nationally and by facility type (dialysis organization size, rural/urban, free-standing/hospital-based), achieving coverage similar to the CMS sample frame at average values and tails of the distributions for key measures and patient characteristics. A publicly available Web report (www.dopps.org/DPM) provides detailed trends including demographic, comorbidity, and dialysis data, medications, vascular access, and quality of life. Findings are updated every 4 months and lagged only 3–4 months. Baseline data are from mid-2010, prior to the new PPS. In sum, the DPM provides timely, representative data to monitor the effects of the expanded PPS on dialysis practice. Findings can serve as an early warning system for possible adverse effects on clinical care and as a basis for community outreach, editorial comment, and informed advocacy. PMID:21530036

  2. Update on dialysis economics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Baboolal, Keshwar

    2011-03-01

    The burgeoning population of patients requiring renal replacement therapy contributes a disproportionate strain on National Health Service resources. Although renal transplantation is the preferred treatment modality for patients with established renal failure, achieving both clinical and financial advantages, limitations to organ donation and clinical comorbidities will leave a significant proportion of patients with established renal failure requiring expensive dialysis therapy in the form of either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. An understanding of dialysis economics is essential for both healthcare providers and clinical leaders to establish clinically efficient and cost-effective treatment modalities that maximize service provision. In light of changes to the provision of healthcare funds in the form of "Payment by Results," it is imperative for UK renal units to adopt clinically effective and financially accountable dialysis programs. This article explores the role of dialysis economics and implications for UK renal replacement therapy programs. PMID:21364210

  3. Update on dialysis economics in the UK.

    PubMed

    Sharif, Adnan; Baboolal, Keshwar

    2011-03-01

    The burgeoning population of patients requiring renal replacement therapy contributes a disproportionate strain on National Health Service resources. Although renal transplantation is the preferred treatment modality for patients with established renal failure, achieving both clinical and financial advantages, limitations to organ donation and clinical comorbidities will leave a significant proportion of patients with established renal failure requiring expensive dialysis therapy in the form of either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. An understanding of dialysis economics is essential for both healthcare providers and clinical leaders to establish clinically efficient and cost-effective treatment modalities that maximize service provision. In light of changes to the provision of healthcare funds in the form of "Payment by Results," it is imperative for UK renal units to adopt clinically effective and financially accountable dialysis programs. This article explores the role of dialysis economics and implications for UK renal replacement therapy programs.

  4. Critical Care Dialysis System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Organon Teknika Corporation's REDY 2000 dialysis machine employs technology originally developed under NASA contract by Marquardt Corporation. The chemical process developed during the project could be applied to removing toxic waste from used dialysis fluid. This discovery led to the development of a kidney dialysis machine using "sorbent" dialysis, a method of removing urea from human blood by treating a dialysate solution. The process saves electricity and, because the need for a continuous water supply is eliminated, the patient has greater freedom.

  5. Maintenance dialysis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Aditi; Bagga, Arvind

    2015-02-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease require renal replacement therapy with maintenance hemodialysis or chronic peritoneal dialysis while awaiting transplantation. In addition to economic issues and limited state funding for advanced health care, the lack of trained medical personnel contributes to scarce dialysis facilities for children in developing countries. The establishment and operation of a hemodialysis unit with multidisciplinary facilities is both cost- and labor-intensive. Hemodialysis is usually carried out three times a week in a hospital setting and affects the curricular and extracurricular activities of the patient. Chronic ambulatory or cyclic peritoneal dialysis is technically simpler and allows better nutrition and growth, but is expensive for the majority of patients who must pay out of their own pocket. Multiple initiatives to enhance the training of pediatricians and nurses in skills related to initiating and managing patients on maintenance dialysis have resulted in the improved survival of children with end-stage renal disease. Support from state governments and philanthropic institutions have helped in establishing pediatric nephrology units that are equipped to provide renal replacement therapy for children. PMID:24469439

  6. Cancers of the kidney and urinary tract in patients on dialysis for end-stage renal disease: analysis of data from the United States, Europe, and Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Stewart, John H; Buccianti, Gherardo; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gellert, Ryszard; McCredie, Margaret R E; Lowenfels, Albert B; Disney, Alex P S; Wolfe, Robert A; Boyle, Peter; Maisonneuve, Patrick

    2003-01-01

    Patients on maintenance dialysis have increased risk for cancer, especially in the kidney and urinary tract. In a retrospective cohort of 831,804 patients starting dialysis during 1980 to 1994 in the United States, Europe, or Australia and New Zealand, standardized incidence ratios (SIR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for kidney and bladder cancers. Risks for cancers of the kidney (SIR 3.6; CI 3.5 to 3.8) and bladder (SIR 1.5; CI 1.4 to 1.6) were increased, relatively more in younger than older patients and more in female patients (kidney: SIR 4.6, CI 4.3 to 4.9; bladder: SIR 2.7, CI 2.4 to 2.9) than male patients (kidney: SIR 3.2, CI 3.0 to 3.4; bladder: SIR 1.3, CI 1.2 to 1.3). SIR for kidney cancer were raised in all categories of primary renal disease, and for bladder cancer in all but diabetes and familial, hereditary diseases. Notably high SIR occurred in toxic nephropathies (chiefly analgesic nephropathy) and miscellaneous conditions (a category that includes Balkan nephropathy), the excess of kidney cancer in these conditions being urothelial in origin. SIR for kidney cancer rose significantly, and those for bladder cancer fell (not reaching significance) with time on dialysis. There was no association with type of dialysis. The pattern of increased risk for renal parenchymal cancer in dialysis patients is consistent with causation through acquired renal cystic disease and of urothelial cancers of the kidney and bladder with the carcinogenic effects of certain primary renal diseases.

  7. Tailoring dialysis and resuming low-protein diets may favor chronic dialysis discontinuation: report on three cases.

    PubMed

    Piccoli, Giorgina Barbara; Guzzo, Gabriella; Vigotti, Federica Neve; Capizzi, Irene; Clari, Roberta; Scognamiglio, Stefania; Consiglio, Valentina; Aroasio, Emiliano; Gonella, Silvana; Veltri, Andrea; Avagnina, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    Renal function recovery (RFR), defined as the discontinuation of dialysis after 3 months of replacement therapy, is reported in about 1% of chronic dialysis patients. The role of personalized, intensive dialysis schedules and of resuming low-protein diets has not been studied to date. This report describes three patients with RFR who were recently treated at a new dialysis unit set up to offer intensive hemodialysis. All three patients were females, aged 73, 75, and 78 years. Kidney disease included vascular-cholesterol emboli, diabetic nephropathy and vascular and dysmetabolic disease. At time of RFR, the patients had been dialysis-dependent from 3 months to 1 year. Dialysis was started with different schedules and was progressively discontinued with a "decremental" policy, progressively decreasing number and duration of the sessions. A moderately restricted low-protein diet (proteins 0.6 g/kg/day) was started immediately after dialysis discontinuation. The most recent update showed that two patients are well off dialysis for 5 and 6 months; the diabetic patient died (sudden death) 3 months after dialysis discontinuation. Within the limits of small numbers, our case series may suggest a role for personalized dialysis treatments and for including low-protein diets in the therapy, in enhancing long-term RFR in elderly dialysis patients.

  8. Shifts in dialysis patients from natural disasters in 2005.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2007-10-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita alerted the world to North America's Gulf Coast's vulnerability to natural disasters. This vulnerability was most evident in poor, minority and elderly populations, and patients with chronic diseases requiring treatment such as dialysis. These hurricanes resulted in massive devastation of the healthcare infrastructure, including dialysis units, across the Gulf Coast region, and often resulted in temporary or permanent closure of dialysis units, predominantly in the New Orleans metropolitan area; however, Hurricane Rita primarily affected Lake Charles. Most notable was the population shift of dialysis patients in Louisiana due to hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Before the 2005 hurricane season, there were 2011 and 362 dialysis patients residing in the parishes (the Louisiana equivalent to counties) most affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, respectively. Each of these parishes had experienced increases in dialysis patient populations over the past 5 years. However, following the storms, there were 1014 and 316 dialysis patients residing in the affected parishes. Reasons for the population shifts were multifactorial in nature and included individual, provider, and healthcare system factors. As patients and physicians return to these affected areas, dialysis services will need to be reallocated based on new demographics and distribution of services in Louisiana communities. In planning for future dialysis services, adaptations will need to occur to prevent future interruption of services and loss of patient access to dialysis services.

  9. What's the Deal with Dialysis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... White House Lunch Recipes What's the Deal With Dialysis? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's the Deal With Dialysis? ... in the blood is too low What Is Dialysis? When someone's kidneys can no longer do their ...

  10. Palliative peritoneal dialysis: Implementation of a home care programme for terminal patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD).

    PubMed

    Gorrin, Maite Rivera; Teruel-Briones, José Luis; Vion, Victor Burguera; Rexach, Lourdes; Quereda, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Terminal-stage patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD) are often transferred to haemodialysis as they are unable to perform the dialysis technique themselves since their functional capacities are reduced. We present our experience with five patients on PD with a shortterm life-threatening condition, whose treatment was shared by primary care units and who were treated with a PD modality adapted to their circumstances, which we call Palliative Peritoneal Dialysis.

  11. Cognitive Impairment in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kalirao, Paramjit; Pederson, Sarah; Foley, Robert N.; Kolste, Ali; Tupper, David; Zaun, David; Buot, Vanessa; Murray, Anne M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Prevalence of moderate to severe cognitive impairment among hemodialysis patients is more than double the prevalence in the general population. This study describes cognitive impairment occurrence in a peritoneal dialysis cohort compared with a cohort without chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study Design Cross-sectional study. Setting and Participants 51 English-speaking peritoneal dialysis patients from two urban dialysis units, compared with 338 hemodialysis patients from 16 urban dialysis units and 101voluntary controls without CKD from urban general medicine clinics. Predictor A 45-minute battery of nine validated neuropsychological tests (cognitive domains memory, executive function, language). Outcomes Mild, moderate, or severe cognitive impairment, classified according to a previously designed algorithm. Results Of the peritoneal dialysis cohort, 33.3% had no or mild, 35.3% moderate, and 31.4% severe cognitive impairment; corresponding values were 60.4%, 26.7%, and 12.9% of the non-CKD cohort, and 26.6%, 36.4%, and 37.0% of the hemodialysis cohort. A logistic regression model including age, sex, race, education, hemoglobin, diabetes, and stroke showed that only non-white race (P = 0.002) and education (P = 0.002) were associated with moderate to severe cognitive impairment in the peritoneal dialysis cohort. Compared with hemodialysis patients, more peritoneal dialysis patients had moderate to severe memory impairment (60% vs. 52%), but fewer had impaired executive function (one-third vs. one-half). Peritoneal dialysis was associated with a more than 2.5-fold increased risk of moderate to severe cognitive impairment compared with no CKD (OR, 2.58; 95% confidence interval 1.02-6.53), as was hemodialysis (OR, 3.16; 95% CI, 1.91-5.24), in an adjusted logistic regression model. Limitations Small sample size, participation rate somewhat low. Conclusions Similar to hemodialysis patients, two-thirds of peritoneal dialysis patients had moderate to severe

  12. Just the Facts: Traveling on Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... notice to fit in a traveler. Other units need a few months—or even a year. Ask your social worker for a list of the dialysis units ... who has time open on the dates you need. Have your home unit’s address, fax, ... be sent for your social worker or travel coordinator to fill out. Check ...

  13. Dialysis induced hypoxemia.

    PubMed

    Habte, B; Carter, R; Shamebo, M; Veicht, J; Boulton Jones, J M

    1982-09-01

    We investigated the mechanism by which hypoxemia is produced in patients on dialysis by studying changes in neutrophil count, blood gases and pulmonary function in a patient with only trace amounts of circulating C3 associated with Type II mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis and a control group of 6 patients with normal C3 levels during a 4 hour hemodialysis. Fifteen minutes after the start of dialysis the neutrophil count fell to 13% of pre-dialysis values in the control group while it only fell to 71% in the study patient. A further fall to 47% occurred in the patient at 30 minutes. A drop in PaO2 by 15% of initial values occurred at 15 and 30 minutes in the controls and the patient respectively matching the trend of fall in the neutrophil count. PaCO2 fell sharply across the dialysis membrane with reciprocol changes in the dialysis bath. Alveolar oxygen tension showed a significant reduction starting at 15 minutes correlating with the reduction in PaO2. The A-a O2 gradient was not altered significantly. These data strongly suggest that the principal mechanism leading to hypoxemia during dialysis is hypoventilation resulting from CO2 loss into the dialysis bath. Complement mediated pulmonary leucostasis may play a secondary role in inducing a quicker fall in PaO2 in the early part of dialysis. PMID:7140022

  14. DIALYSIS FLASK FOR CONCENTRATED CULTURE OF MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Gallup, D. M.

    1963-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), and D. M. Gallup. Dialysis flask for concentrated culture of microorganisms. J. Bacteriol 86:919–929. 1963.—A twin-chambered dialysis flask was designed with a supported membrane clamped between a reservoir of medium in the bottom and a small volume of culture above, the unit being mounted on a shaking machine to provide aeration and agitation. The performance of different dialysis membranes and membrane filters was compared in glucose-diffusion and bacterial-culture tests. Some of the variables in dialysis culture were assessed and the growth response was characterized, with Serratia marcescens as the test organism. The general usefulness and concentrating effect of dialysis culture were demonstrated in trials with 16 representative types of microorganisms. Dialysis culture was shown to be especially suitable for producing dense populations of cells or their macromolecular products in an environment free from complex medium constituents, for removing toxic products that limit growth or fermentation, and for supplying oxygen by diffusion without the damage from usual aeration procedures. Images PMID:14080802

  15. [Ethical problems in dialysis in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Alloatti, S; Gabrielli, D; Molino, A; Venturella, E; Mattioni, A

    2003-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of elderly patients are progressively increasing in most dialysis facilities with consequent medical assistance difficulties and the need to find a suitable care unit. Particularly in this age group, the clinical assessment is often difficult and the selection criteria vary widely, not only from country to country, but also from one dialysis unit to another unit in the same area. The authors discuss some of the more complex arguments for and against dialysis in elderly patients. For some of the more difficult cases, Kantian deontology and its three ethical principles of beneficence, non-maleficence and autonomy can facilitate the decision-making process regarding the acceptance or refusal of the therapy. The central role of the patients themselves, the involvement of the family, the discussion of the individual case within the dialysis team, and the good performance of the pre-dialysis program are particularly important. In certain cases it is possible to actually discontinue the treatment, or not initiate it, by using different arguments in competent or incompetent patients. In conclusion, the difficult choice of whether to treat or turn down an elderly patient must depend exclusively on the medical clinical assessment of each case, whereas economical considerations can incorrectly influence that choice. PMID:12647283

  16. Measures of blood pressure and cognition in dialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are few reports on the relationship of blood pressure with cognitive function in maintenance dialysis patients. The Cognition and Dialysis Study is an ongoing investigation of cognitive function and its risk factors in six Boston area hemodialysis units. In this analysis, we evaluated the rela...

  17. Nutrition in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Sahu, K M

    2001-04-01

    Adequate nutrition is very important for dialysis patients for a better overall outcome. Protein energy malnutrition is highly prevalent (25-50%) among dialysis patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Causes of malnutrition in dialysis patients include anorexia (inadequate calorie or protein intake), metabolic acidosis (stimulation of amino acid and protein degradation), and infection/inflammation (stimulation of protein degradation). Anorexia resulting into decreased intake is probably the most important factor. Nutritional assessment can be done by anthropometric measurements, laboratory parameters, subjective global assessment, dialysis malnutrition score, near infra-red interactance and other methods. Subjective global assessment is currently the most accepted one and classifies patients into three nutritional categories: Well nourished, moderately malnourished, and severely malnourished. Prevention of malnutrition by proper dietary counselling and adequate dietary intake starting from redialysis days is probably the most effective therapeutic approach. Other therapeutic approaches include adequate dialysis delivery, avoidance of acidaemia, aggressive treatment of catabolic illnesses and food supplements: Oral, enteral or parenteral, particulary intradialytic parenteral nutrition. Experimental approaches for treatment of malnutrition in dialysis patients include amino acids in peritoneal or haemodialysate, appetite stimulants and use of recombinant human growth hormone and insulin like growth factor I. There are few randomised controlled trials unequivocally proving the efficacy of any treatment modality. Large scale, randomised trials are urgently needed to establish effective therapy for malnutrition in dialysis patients. This applies more so for Indian patients.

  18. Dialysis Extraction for Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jahnsen, V. J.

    1985-01-01

    Chromatographic-sample pretreatment by dialysis detects traces of organic contaminants in water samples analyzed in field with minimal analysis equipment and minimal quantities of solvent. Technique also of value wherever aqueous sample and solvent must not make direct contact.

  19. Dialysis provision in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Zaki, M

    2000-06-01

    We determined the provision for dialysis treatment in Malaysia. There were 181 dialysis centres as at 1st June 1999 (161 Haemodialysis (HD) and 20 Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) centres), providing treatment for 5614 patients. This is equivalent to an estimated prevalence rate of 253 patients per million population (pmp) and new dialysis acceptance rate of 49 patients pmp. Dialysis facilities were widely distributed throughout the country though rather unevenly among states. Penang, Selangor/KL, Malacca led with number of dialysis patients pmp ranging from 417 to 480. Kelantan and Sabah had the lowest provision with 51 and 64 patients pmp respectively. There were more centres and HD capacity in the private sector while the Non-Government Organisation and public sectors had about the same capacity. However the public sector had more patients on account of availability of CAPD and home HD services, as well as low HD capacity to patient ratio. The number ofcentres, HD capacity and patients have increased rapidly especially since 1991; the estimated growth rates were 16.5 centres/year, 658 capacity/year, and 392 patients/year respectively. There was also a trend toward increasing over-capacity in the private and NGO sectors. In conclusion, the level of dialysis provision is increasing, indicating increasing accessibility of dialysis treatment in Malaysia. Over-capacity is a concern in the private and NGO sectors. Thus funding agencies should be encouraged to source provision from those sectors. The public sector still has the crucial role of providing for under-served areas in the country.

  20. Standardising haemodialysis care by restricting nutrition during dialysis: introducing a quality improvement initiative for renal outpatients.

    PubMed

    De, Diana; Xiang Ai, Anna Tian

    2015-01-01

    A number of relevant issues are considered which show that it is essential to address the issue of in-centre meals during dialysis. This discussion paper critically explores the potential complications posed to patients who consume a large calorific intake during their dialysis treatment. The mission is to appeal to more dialysis units and outpatient departments to gradually implement a 'no food' policy during regular scheduled dialysis treatment sessions. The authors aim to put forward the significances and challenges and offer some possible solutions when introducing a 'no eating policy' like this into dialysis units. Nutritional supplements could, however, be offered on an as required basis.

  1. Aseptic peritonitis in patients on maintenance peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, V C; Kamadana, M R; Ing, T S; Daugirdas, J T; Viol, G W; Robinson, J A; Geis, W P; Hano, J E

    1979-01-01

    An 'epidemic' of aseptic peritonitis occurred in our peritoneal dialysis unit, affecting 5 of 20 patients. Acute and convalescent viral titers were normal in all 5. The peritoneal fluid of the affected patients was not tested for endotoxin, but endotoxin was found in subsequent dialysis fluids from two machines in the unit. This endotoxin might have been the causative agent of this outbreak. Rapid recovery ensued in all patients following peritoneal lavage. PMID:503270

  2. Phosphate control in dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-01-01

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients. PMID:24133374

  3. Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Dose and Adequacy Page Content On this page: ... from the abdominal cavity. [ Top ] Types of Peritoneal Dialysis The two types of peritoneal dialysis differ mainly ...

  4. Peritoneal dialysis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K S; Prabhu, M V; Sinoj, K A; Subhramanyam, S V; Sridhar, G

    2009-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is acknowledged worldwide as a well-accepted form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Ideally, PD should be the preferred modality of RRT for ESRD in developing countries due to its many inherent advantages. Some of these are cost savings (especially if PD fluids are manufactured locally or in a neighboring country), superior rehabilitation and quality of life (QOL), home-based therapy even in rural settings, avoidance of hospital based treatment and the need for expensive machinery, and freedom from serious infections (hepatitis B and C). However, this is not the ground reality, due to certain preconceived notions of the health care givers and governmental agencies in these countries. With an inexplicable stagnation or decline of PD numbers in the developed world, the future of PD will depend on its popularization in Latin America and in Asia especially countries such as China and India, with a combined population of 2.5 billion and the two fastest growing economies worldwide. A holistic approach to tackle the issues in the developing countries, which may vary from region to region, is critical in popularizing PD and establishing PD as the first-choice RRT for ESRD. At our center, we have been pursuing a 'PD first' policy and promoting PD as the therapy of choice for various situations in the management of renal failure. We use certain novel strategies, which we hope can help PD centers in other developing countries working under similar constraints. The success of a PD program depends on a multitude of factors that are interlinked and inseparable. Each program needs to identify its strengths, special circumstances, and deficiencies, and then to strategize accordingly. Ultimately, teamwork is the 'mantra' for a successful outcome, the patient being central to all endeavors. A belief and a passion for PD are the fountainhead and cornerstone on which to build a quality PD program.

  5. Peritoneal dialysis in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Nayak, K S; Prabhu, M V; Sinoj, K A; Subhramanyam, S V; Sridhar, G

    2009-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is acknowledged worldwide as a well-accepted form of renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Ideally, PD should be the preferred modality of RRT for ESRD in developing countries due to its many inherent advantages. Some of these are cost savings (especially if PD fluids are manufactured locally or in a neighboring country), superior rehabilitation and quality of life (QOL), home-based therapy even in rural settings, avoidance of hospital based treatment and the need for expensive machinery, and freedom from serious infections (hepatitis B and C). However, this is not the ground reality, due to certain preconceived notions of the health care givers and governmental agencies in these countries. With an inexplicable stagnation or decline of PD numbers in the developed world, the future of PD will depend on its popularization in Latin America and in Asia especially countries such as China and India, with a combined population of 2.5 billion and the two fastest growing economies worldwide. A holistic approach to tackle the issues in the developing countries, which may vary from region to region, is critical in popularizing PD and establishing PD as the first-choice RRT for ESRD. At our center, we have been pursuing a 'PD first' policy and promoting PD as the therapy of choice for various situations in the management of renal failure. We use certain novel strategies, which we hope can help PD centers in other developing countries working under similar constraints. The success of a PD program depends on a multitude of factors that are interlinked and inseparable. Each program needs to identify its strengths, special circumstances, and deficiencies, and then to strategize accordingly. Ultimately, teamwork is the 'mantra' for a successful outcome, the patient being central to all endeavors. A belief and a passion for PD are the fountainhead and cornerstone on which to build a quality PD program. PMID:19494625

  6. Natural disasters and dialysis care in the Asia-Pacific.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicholas A; Wolley, Martin; Liew, Adrian; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The impact of natural disasters on the provision of dialysis services has received increased attention in the last decade following Hurricane Katrina devastating New Orleans in 2005. The Asia-Pacific is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes, tsunami, typhoons (also known as cyclones and hurricanes) or storms and flooding. These events can seriously interrupt provision of haemodialysis with adverse effects for patients including missed dialysis, increased hospitalization and post-traumatic stress disorder. Furthermore, haemodialysis patients may need to relocate and experience prolonged periods of displacement from family and social supports. In contrast to haemodialysis, most literature suggests peritoneal dialysis in a disaster situation is more easily managed and supported. It has become apparent that dialysis units and patients should be prepared for a disaster event and that appropriate planning will result in reduced confusion and adverse outcomes should a disaster occur. Numerous resources are now available to guide dialysis units, patients and staff in preparation for a possible disaster. This article will examine the disaster experiences of dialysis units in the Asia-Pacific, the impact on patients and staff, methods employed to manage during the disaster and suggested plans for reducing the impact of future disasters. PMID:26032113

  7. Natural disasters and dialysis care in the Asia-Pacific.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicholas A; Wolley, Martin; Liew, Adrian; Nakayama, Masaaki

    2015-12-01

    The impact of natural disasters on the provision of dialysis services has received increased attention in the last decade following Hurricane Katrina devastating New Orleans in 2005. The Asia-Pacific is particularly vulnerable to earthquakes, tsunami, typhoons (also known as cyclones and hurricanes) or storms and flooding. These events can seriously interrupt provision of haemodialysis with adverse effects for patients including missed dialysis, increased hospitalization and post-traumatic stress disorder. Furthermore, haemodialysis patients may need to relocate and experience prolonged periods of displacement from family and social supports. In contrast to haemodialysis, most literature suggests peritoneal dialysis in a disaster situation is more easily managed and supported. It has become apparent that dialysis units and patients should be prepared for a disaster event and that appropriate planning will result in reduced confusion and adverse outcomes should a disaster occur. Numerous resources are now available to guide dialysis units, patients and staff in preparation for a possible disaster. This article will examine the disaster experiences of dialysis units in the Asia-Pacific, the impact on patients and staff, methods employed to manage during the disaster and suggested plans for reducing the impact of future disasters.

  8. Temporal changes in incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Raymond K; McCulloch, Charles E; Dudley, R Adams; Lo, Lowell J; Hsu, Chi-yuan

    2013-01-01

    The population epidemiology of AKI is not well described. Here, we analyzed data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, a nationally representative dataset, to identify cases of dialysis-requiring AKI using validated International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes. From 2000 to 2009, the incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI increased from 222 to 533 cases per million person-years, averaging a 10% increase per year (incidence rate ratio=1.10, 95% CI=1.10-1.11 per year). Older age, male sex, and black race associated with higher incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI. The rapid increase in incidence was evident in all age, sex, and race subgroups examined. Temporal changes in the population distribution of age, race, and sex as well as trends of sepsis, acute heart failure, and receipt of cardiac catheterization and mechanical ventilation accounted for about one third of the observed increase in dialysis-requiring AKI among hospitalized patients. The total number of deaths associated with dialysis-requiring AKI rose from 18,000 in 2000 to nearly 39,000 in 2009. In conclusion, the incidence of dialysis-requiring AKI increased rapidly in all patient subgroups in the past decade in the United States, and the number of deaths associated with dialysis-requiring AKI more than doubled.

  9. Peritoneal dialysis in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2003-02-01

    While Mexico has the thirteenth largest economy, a large portion of the population is impoverished. About 90% of the population is Mestizo, the result of the admixture of Mexican Indians and Spaniards, with the Indigenous peoples concentrated in the southeastern region. Treatment for end-stage renal disease (estimated 268 patients per million population) is largely determined by the limited healthcare system and the individual's access to resources such as private insurance ( approximately 15%) and governmental sources ( approximately 85%). With only 5% of the gross national product spent on healthcare and most treatment providers being public health institutions that are often under severe economic restrictions, it is not surprising that many Mexican patients do not receive renal replacement therapy. Mexico uses proportionately more peritoneal dialysis than other countries; 1% of the patients are on automated peritoneal dialysis, 19% on hemodialysis and 80% on CAPD. Malnutrition and diabetes, important risk factors for poor outcome, are prevalent among the patients in CAPD programs.

  10. [Assisted peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Klarić, Dragan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-04-01

    According to the National Registry of Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT), the incidence of chronic kidney disease (end-stage renal disease) and the need of RRT have declined in the last decade renal. One of the reasons for this tendency certainly is transplantation as the best choice. However, transplant procedure has limitations in elderly patients due to the number of comorbidities. This study was designed as retrospective analysis of outcomes in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis for a period of eleven years. Patients were divided into those who had been assisted or unassisted. Out of 100 patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD), 77 completed the treatment, including 26 assisted and 51 unassisted patients. Peritonitis was recorded in 20 assisted and 26 unassisted patients. Peritonitis was more common in unassisted patients, who were more frequently lost from PD. Assisted PD could be a good and safe choice of RRT in this special group of patients.

  11. Provision of Home Dialysis by Freestanding Renal Dialysis Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kendix, Michael

    1995-01-01

    This article explores home dialysis provision among freestanding renal facilities by examining whether they provide continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD), and home hemodialysis. These modalities require fewer visits to a dialysis center, which may be beneficial for patients living long distances from facilities. A negative association was found between the number of facilities per square mile and the probability of provision of the home modalities. Secondly, facilities with a higher percent of black patients were less likely to provide the home modalities. Thirdly, facilities with larger numbers of patients were more likely to provide the home modalities. PMID:10157371

  12. Efficiency of U.S. Dialysis Centers: An Updated Examination of Facility Characteristics That Influence Production of Dialysis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Shreay, Sanatan; Ma, Martin; McCluskey, Jill; Mittelhammer, Ron C; Gitlin, Matthew; Stephens, J Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relative efficiency of dialysis facilities in the United States and identify factors that are associated with efficiency in the production of dialysis treatments. Data Sources/Study Setting Medicare cost report data from 4,343 free-standing dialysis facilities in the United States that offered in-center hemodialysis in 2010. Study Design A cross-sectional, facility-level retrospective database analysis, utilizing data envelopment analysis (DEA) to estimate facility efficiency. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Treatment data and cost and labor inputs of dialysis treatments were obtained from 2010 Medicare Renal Cost Reports. Demographic data were obtained from the 2010 U.S. Census. Principal Findings Only 26.6 percent of facilities were technically efficient. Neither the intensity of market competition nor the profit status of the facility had a significant effect on efficiency. Facilities that were members of large chains were less likely to be efficient. Cost and labor savings due to changes in drug protocols had little effect on overall dialysis center efficiency. Conclusions The majority of free-standing dialysis facilities in the United States were functioning in a technically inefficient manner. As payment systems increasingly employ capitation and bundling provisions, these institutions will need to evaluate their efficiency to remain competitive. PMID:24237043

  13. Prescription and practice of dialysis in Australia, 1988.

    PubMed

    Disney, A P

    1990-05-01

    Facilities for provision of treatment of end-stage renal failure with hemodialysis (HD) or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) are available in many centers, most of which are government-funded. Medicare provides free treatment for all patients. There are no specific criteria for determining a patient's acceptance for dialysis treatment: age, quality of life, and capacity for independent living are important factors. The usual HD prescription is three dialysis periods weekly, hollow-fiber dialyzer, 1.0-1.2 m2 surface area, for 4 to 5 hours, with blood flow rate 250 mL/min and acetate-based dialysate flow rate 500 mL/min. Reuse of the dialyzer is common, but many units practice single use to reduce the expense and time necessary for processing the dialyzer and the risks of formalin exposure. There is only limited use of hemofiltration, or highly efficient dialyzers for shortened hours at higher blood flow rates. The choice of dialysis prescription is influenced by the physician's preference for the patient to be treated at home or in a self-care center with limited assistance. CAPD is preferred for home dialysis, especially for elderly or diabetic patients. There is no personal financial incentive to the physician to favor any particular form of dialysis. The costs of dialysis do influence the provision and prescription of treatment, causing the reuse of dialyzers and the limited use of bicarbonate-based HD and highly permeable dialyzers. Nevertheless, adequate dialysis should be available to all patients, and noncompliance with prescribed dialysis is infrequent. Quality-assurance programs have been developed both for nursing and medical care.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Effects and repercussions of local/hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA): a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly performed at the local or hospital level where the costs, impacts, and benefits of health technologies can be directly assessed. Although local/hospital-based HTA has been implemented for more than two decades in some jurisdictions, little is known about its effects and impact on hospital budget, clinical practices, and patient outcomes. We conducted a mixed-methods systematic review that aimed to synthesize current evidence regarding the effects and impact of local/hospital-based HTA. Methods We identified articles through PubMed and Embase and by citation tracking of included studies. We selected qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods studies with empirical data about the effects or impact of local/hospital-based HTA on decision-making, budget, or perceptions of stakeholders. We extracted the following information from included studies: country, methodological approach, and use of conceptual framework; local/hospital HTA approach and activities described; reported effects and impacts of local/hospital-based HTA; factors facilitating/hampering the use of hospital-based HTA recommendations; and perceptions of stakeholders concerning local/hospital HTA. Due to the great heterogeneity among studies, we conducted a narrative synthesis of their results. Results A total of 18 studies met the inclusion criteria. We reported the results according to the four approaches for performing HTA proposed by the Hospital Based HTA Interest Sub-Group: ambassador model, mini-HTA, internal committee, and HTA unit. Results showed that each of these approaches for performing HTA corresponds to specific needs and structures and has its strengths and limitations. Overall, studies showed positive impacts related to local/hospital-based HTA on hospital decisions and budgets, as well as positive perceptions from managers and clinicians. Conclusions Local/hospital-based HTA could influence decision-making on several aspects

  15. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Peritoneal Dialysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... 3.70 MB) MedlinePlus Alternate Language URL Peritoneal Dialysis Page Content On this page: What is peritoneal ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is peritoneal dialysis and how does it work? Peritoneal dialysis is ...

  16. An evidence-based approach to earlier initiation of dialysis.

    PubMed

    Churchill, D N

    1997-12-01

    The objective was to review evidence addressing the optimal time to initiate dialysis treatment. The database was derived from an evidence-based review of the medical literature and from the Canada-United States peritoneal dialysis study. The publications were divided into (1) those addressing the clinical impact of early versus late referral to a dialysis program; (2) those evaluating the association between residual renal function at initiation of dialysis and the concurrent nutritional status; (3) those evaluating the association between residual renal function at initiation of dialysis and subsequent clinical outcomes, including patient survival. There were five studies evaluating early versus late referral, three cohort design and two case-control design. Late referrals had worse outcomes than early referrals. The former had more serious comorbidity and many had been noncompliant with follow-up. The latter were more likely to have hereditary renal disease. Renal function was slightly worse at initiation among those referred late. Three studies addressed the association between renal function at initiation of dialysis and concurrent nutritional status. Two showed decreased protein intake with diminished glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Poor nutritional status is associated with decreased patient survival among both incident and prevalent dialysis patients. The third study reported excellent patient survival among patients with late initiation of dialysis. These patients had received a supplemented low-protein diet and were not malnourished at initiation of dialysis. Three groups have studied the association between GFR at initiation of dialysis and clinical outcomes. Decreased GFR at initiation of dialysis is associated with a increased probability of hospitalization and death. None of these studies has used the rigorous randomized clinical trial design, and they are therefore subject to bias. Referral time bias, comorbidity, patient compliance, and starting

  17. Dialysis Culture of T-Strain Mycoplasmas

    PubMed Central

    Masover, Gerald K.; Hayflick, Leonard

    1974-01-01

    Using dialyzing cultures of T-strain mycoplasmas, it was possible to make some observations relevant to the growth and metabolism of these organisms which would not be possible in nondialyzing cultures due to growth inhibition of the organisms by elevated pH and increased ammonium ion concentration in media containing urea. The rate of ammonia accumulation was found to be related to the initial urea concentration in the medium and could not be accounted for by any change in the multiplication rate of the organisms. More ammonia was generated than could be accounted for by the added urea alone, suggesting that an ammonia-producing activity other than urease may be present in T-strain mycoplasmas. Titers above 107 color change units per ml were achieved in dialysis cultures of a T-strain mycoplasma in the presence of urea, and such titers were maintained for approximately 60 h during dialysis culture in the absence of added urea. PMID:4595203

  18. Dialysis access thrombosis in a family cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Bornak, Arash; Kirksey, Lee

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, 464,952 individuals were newly diagnosed with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI); 102,356 of those newly diagnosed patients required initiation of dialysis for end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Among the ESRD population, about one third is African American despite the fact that this population represent only about 12% of the total population in the United States (U.S. Renal Data System 2006). Familial aggregation of kidney disease disproportionately affects minorities. This paper describes the detection and management of dialysis access failure due to hypercoagulable states in a genetically related group. We also discuss the implications that associated familial disorders may have on the diagnoses, treatment and survival for this devastating illness. PMID:17722673

  19. DIALYSIS WITH STIRRING.

    PubMed

    Kunitz, M; Simms, H S

    1928-05-20

    Substances to be purified by dialysis are placed in collodion bags together with a toy "marble" or a bubble of air. The bags are stoppered and placed in glass tubes of a rocking machine. Distilled water of the desired temperature is circulated through the tubes (around the bags) at a rate of about 8 cc. per minute per bag while the machine is in motion. The rolling of the marbles or bubbles causes stirring which makes it possible to remove the salts from a protein solution in 24 to 48 hours.

  20. How to deal with dialysis catheters in the ICU setting

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney insufficiency (AKI) occurs frequently in intensive care units (ICU). In the management of vascular access for renal replacement therapy (RRT), several factors need to be taken into consideration to achieve an optimal RRT dose and to limit complications. In the medium and long term, some individuals may become chronic dialysis patients and so preserving the vascular network is of major importance. Few studies have focused on the use of dialysis catheters (DC) in ICUs, and clinical practice is driven by the knowledge and management of long-term dialysis catheter in chronic dialysis patients and of central venous catheter in ICU patients. This review describes the appropriate use and management of DCs required to obtain an accurate RRT dose and to reduce mechanical and infectious complications in the ICU setting. To deliver the best RRT dose, the length and diameter of the catheter need to be sufficient. In patients on intermittent hemodialysis, the right internal jugular insertion is associated with a higher delivered dialysis dose if the prescribed extracorporeal blood flow is higher than 200 ml/min. To prevent DC colonization, the physician has to be vigilant for the jugular position when BMI < 24 and the femoral position when BMI > 28. Subclavian sites should be excluded. Ultrasound guidance should be used especially in jugular sites. Antibiotic-impregnated dialysis catheters and antibiotic locks are not recommended in routine practice. The efficacy of ethanol and citrate locks has yet to be demonstrated. Hygiene procedures must be respected during DC insertion and manipulation. PMID:23174157

  1. Dialysis Complications in AKI Patients Treated with Extended Daily Dialysis: Is the Duration of Therapy Important?

    PubMed Central

    Balbi, André Luis

    2014-01-01

    This trial aimed to compare the dialysis complications occurring during different durations of extended daily dialysis (EDD) sessions in critically ill AKI patients. We included patients older than 18 years with AKI associated with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit and using noradrenaline dose ranging from 0.3 to 0.7 μg/kg/min. Patients were divided into two groups randomly: in G1, 6 h sessions were performed and, in G2, 10 h sessions were performed. Seventy-five patients were treated with 195 EDD sessions for 18 consecutive months. The prevalence of hypotension, filter clotting, hypokalaemia, and hypophosphataemia was 82.6, 25.3, 20, and 10.6%, respectively. G1 and G2 were similar in male predominance and SOFA. There was no significant difference between the two groups in hypotension, filter clotting, hypokalaemia, and hypophosphataemia. However, the group treated with sessions of 10 hours showed higher refractory to clinical measures for hypotension and dialysis sessions were interrupted more often. Metabolic control and fluid balance were similar between G1 and G2. In conclusion, intradialysis hypotension was common in AKI patients treated with EDD. There was no difference in the prevalence of dialysis complications in patients undergoing different durations of EDD. PMID:25177682

  2. Initiation of dialysis should be timely: neither early nor late.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Rivara, Matthew; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States are starting maintenance dialysis therapy at progressively higher estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Moreover, several observational studies have demonstrated an association of a higher risk of death with higher serum creatinine-based estimates of GFR at the time of initiation of dialysis. In contrast, studies in which renal function has been measured by timed urinary collection show either a lower risk of death or no significant association with higher GFR at the time of initiation of dialysis. There are numerous potential sources of bias in such observational studies, particularly in those that use serum creatinine-based eGFR. The only randomized controlled clinical trial to have examined this question did not demonstrate either benefit or harm with initiation of dialysis at higher level of renal function. Thus, the data to date suggest that eGFR should not be the sole consideration when assessing the need for initiating maintenance dialysis in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. Given the high societal costs of starting renal replacement therapy earlier in the course of the disease, these considerations also suggest that dialysis can be safely be postponed in otherwise asymptomatic individuals with advanced chronic kidney disease. By the same token, dialysis should not be denied to individuals who could clearly benefit from renal replacement therapy simply because the GFR is too high (viz., volume overload, refractory hyperkalemia). Finally, there is a compelling need to reexamine the symptoms that could be attributed to uremia and clearly improve upon initiation of dialysis to better guide clinical decision-making. PMID:24004413

  3. Patient-Staff Interactions and Mental Health in Chronic Dialysis Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Richard D.; Perry, Erica; Brown, Stephanie; Swartz, June; Vinokur, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    Chronic dialysis imposes ongoing stress on patients and staff and engenders recurring contact and long-term relationships. Thus, chronic dialysis units are opportune settings in which to investigate the impact of patients' relationships with staff on patient well-being. The authors designed the present study to examine the degree to which…

  4. Rationale for hospital-based rehabilitation in obesity with comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Capodaglio, P; Lafortuna, C; Petroni, M L; Salvadori, A; Gondoni, L; Castelnuovo, G; Brunani, A

    2013-06-01

    Severely obese patients affected by two or more chronic conditions which could mutually influence their outcome and disability can be defined as "complex" patients. The presence of multiple comorbidities often represents an obstacle for being admitted to clinical settings for the treatment of metabolic diseases. On the other hand, clinical Units with optimal standards for the treatment of pathological conditions in normal-weight patients are often structurally and technologically inadequate for the care of patients with extreme obesity. The aims of this review paper were to review the intrinsic (anthropometrics, body composition) and extrinsic (comorbidities) determinants of disability in obese patients and to provide an up-to-date definition of hospital-based multidisciplinary rehabilitation programs for severely obese patients with comorbidities. Rehabilitation of such patients require a here-and-now multidimensional, comprehensive approach, where the intensity of rehabilitative treatments depends on the disability level and severity of comorbidities and consists of the simultaneous provision of physiotherapy, diet and nutritional support, psychological counselling, adapted physical activity, specific nursing in hospitals with appropriate organizational and structural competences.

  5. Nephrologists' professional ethics in dialysis practices.

    PubMed

    Ozar, David T; Kristensen, Cynthia; Fadem, Stephen Z; Blaser, Robert; Singer, Dale; Moss, Alvin H

    2013-05-01

    Although the number of incidents is unknown, professional quality-oriented renal organizations have become aware of an increased number of complaints regarding nephrologists who approach patients with the purpose of influencing patients to change nephrologists or dialysis facilities (hereinafter referred to as patient solicitation). This development prompted the Forum of ESRD Networks and the Renal Physicians Association to publish a policy statement on professionalism and ethics in medical practice as these concepts relate to patient solicitation. Also common but not new is the practice of nephrologists trying to recruit their own patients to a new dialysis unit in which they have a financial interest. This paper presents two illustrative cases and provides an ethical framework for analyzing patient solicitation and physician conflict of interest. This work concludes that, in the absence of objective data that medical treatment is better elsewhere, nephrologists who attempt to influence patients to change nephrologists or dialysis facilities fall short of accepted ethical standards pertaining to professional conduct, particularly with regard to the physician-patient relationship, informed consent, continuity of care, and conflict of interest.

  6. Just the Facts: The Dialysis Machine

    MedlinePlus

    Just the Facts: The Dialysis Machine What is a dialysis machine? During dialysis, your blood is cleaned using a fluid called dialysate, or “bath.” Wastes ... into the bath and are drained away. The dialysis machine controls the flow of the blood and ...

  7. Green dialysis: the environmental challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2015-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation website begins: "Natural resource and energy conservation is achieved by managing materials more efficiently--reduce, reuse, recycle," yet healthcare agencies have been slow to heed and practice this simple message. In dialysis practice, notable for a recurrent, per capita resource consumption and waste generation profile second to none in healthcare, efforts to: (1) minimize water use and wastage; (2) consider strategies to reduce power consumption and/or use alternative power options; (3) develop optimal waste management and reusable material recycling programs; (4) design smart buildings that work with and for their environment; (5) establish research programs that explore environmental practice; all have been largely ignored by mainstream nephrology. Some countries are doing far better than others. In the United Kingdom and some European jurisdictions, exceptional recent progress has been made to develop, adopt, and coordinate eco-practice within dialysis programs. These programs set an example for others to follow. Elsewhere, progress has been piecemeal, at best. This review explores the current extent of "green" or eco-dialysis practices. While noting where progress has been made, it also suggests potential new research avenues to develop and follow. One thing seems certain: as global efforts to combat climate change and carbon generation accelerate, the environmental impact of dialysis practice will come under increasing regulatory focus. It is far preferable for the sector to take proactive steps, rather than to await the heavy hand of government or administration to force reluctant and costly compliance on the un-prepared. PMID:25440109

  8. Green dialysis: the environmental challenges ahead.

    PubMed

    Agar, John W M

    2015-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation website begins: "Natural resource and energy conservation is achieved by managing materials more efficiently--reduce, reuse, recycle," yet healthcare agencies have been slow to heed and practice this simple message. In dialysis practice, notable for a recurrent, per capita resource consumption and waste generation profile second to none in healthcare, efforts to: (1) minimize water use and wastage; (2) consider strategies to reduce power consumption and/or use alternative power options; (3) develop optimal waste management and reusable material recycling programs; (4) design smart buildings that work with and for their environment; (5) establish research programs that explore environmental practice; all have been largely ignored by mainstream nephrology. Some countries are doing far better than others. In the United Kingdom and some European jurisdictions, exceptional recent progress has been made to develop, adopt, and coordinate eco-practice within dialysis programs. These programs set an example for others to follow. Elsewhere, progress has been piecemeal, at best. This review explores the current extent of "green" or eco-dialysis practices. While noting where progress has been made, it also suggests potential new research avenues to develop and follow. One thing seems certain: as global efforts to combat climate change and carbon generation accelerate, the environmental impact of dialysis practice will come under increasing regulatory focus. It is far preferable for the sector to take proactive steps, rather than to await the heavy hand of government or administration to force reluctant and costly compliance on the un-prepared.

  9. Managing diabetes in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Sam M; Fan, Stanley L; Yaqoob, M Magdi; Chowdhury, Tahseen A

    2012-03-01

    Burgeoning levels of diabetes are a major concern for dialysis services, as diabetes is now the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in most developed nations. With the rapid rise in diabetes prevalence in developing countries, the burden of end stage renal failure due to diabetes is also expected to rise in such countries. Diabetic patients on dialysis have a high burden of morbidity and mortality, particularly from cardiovascular disease, and a higher societal and economic cost compared to non-diabetic subjects on dialysis. Tight glycaemic and blood pressure control in diabetic patients has an important impact in reducing risk of progression to end stage renal disease. The evidence for improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis having an impact on mortality or morbidity is sparse. Indeed, many factors make improving glycaemic control in patients on dialysis very challenging, including therapeutic difficulties with hypoglycaemic agents, monitoring difficulties, dialysis strategies that exacerbate hyperglycaemia or hypoglycaemia, and possibly a degree of therapeutic nihilism or inertia on the part of clinical diabetologists and nephrologists. Standard drug therapy for hyperglycaemia (eg, metformin) is clearly not possible in patients on dialysis. Thus, sulphonylureas and insulin have been the mainstay of treatment. Newer therapies for hyperglycaemia, such as gliptins and glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues have become available, but until recently, renal failure has precluded their use. Newer gliptins, however, are now licensed for use in 'severe renal failure', although they have yet to be trialled in dialysis patients. Diabetic patients on dialysis have special needs, as they have a much greater burden of complications (cardiac, retinal and foot). They may be best managed in a multidisciplinary diabetic-renal clinic setting, using the skills of diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical nurse specialists in nephrology and diabetes, along with

  10. Critical factors for successful hospital-based case management.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Warrick, L H; Christianson, J B; Netting, F E

    1993-01-01

    Six hospitals were funded to develop programs for long-term case management. Factors that should be considered when developing hospital-based case management are discussed within three areas: organizational placement, program management, and financial viability.

  11. Peritoneal dialysis in Asia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I K

    1996-01-01

    The socioeconomic status of Asian countries is diverse, and government reimbursement policies for treatment of patients suffering from end-stage renal disease (ESRD) vary greatly from one country to another. Both of these factors have a major impact not only on the choice of treatment for ESRD but also on the utilization of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in this region. Based on the data collected from 11 representative Asian countries, several observations can be made. First, the treatment rates for ESRD in these countries correlated closely with their gross domestic product (GDP) per capita income. Second, the PD utilization rate appeared to have a biphasic relationship with the GDP per capita income and treatment rate, in that countries with the highest and the lowest treatment rates tended to have lower PD utilization rates, whereas countries with modest treatment rates tended to have higher PD utilization rates. The reason for low PD utilization in countries with the highest treatment rates differs from that in countries with low treatment rates. In the former, because of full government reimbursement, there is little physician incentive to introduce PD as an alternative form of ESRD treatment to in-center hemodialysis (HD), whereas in the latter, the complete lack of government reimbursement prevents the introduction of PD as a form of treatment. This pattern is likely to change in the future because, of the 11 countries surveyed, all except Thailand have recorded a growth rate which is higher for PD than HD over the last three years. The rate of utilization of different PD systems varies greatly among different Asian countries. Automated PD has yet to gain popularity in Asia. Conventional straight-line systems remain the dominant PD systems in use in Hong Kong, Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines, while in Malaysia and Singapore UV germicidal connection devices are most popular. However, in all these countries there has been a progressive shift over the last

  12. Herbs, menopause, and dialysis.

    PubMed

    Roemheld-Hamm, Beatrix; Dahl, Naomi V

    2002-01-01

    Women with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at increased risk for menstrual disorders, early menopause, and osteoporosis, and rarely discuss gynecologic and reproductive issues with their nephrologist. Various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) products are of interest to women with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who have these disorders. However, very little is known about the specifics of using herbal medicines in patients on chronic dialysis, resulting in numerous problems when patients and providers try to ascertain the safety and efficacy of these products. This article reviews evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of black cohosh, ginseng, chastetree, dong quai, evening primrose oil, soy products, and the so-called natural hormones. Pharmacologic parameters important to evaluating the quality of botanical products are discussed, along with recommendations and information resources. PMID:11874595

  13. Revenue risk and price transparency in hospital-based laboratories.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeffrey H

    2015-11-01

    Two developments with important revenue implications for hospital laboratories demand the attention of hospital finance leaders: > Significant differences in pricing between higher-priced hospital-based laboratory services and lower-priced services delivered by commercial laboratories give patients a disincentive to use the hospital-based services. > Hospital operating revenue will be substantially affected beginning in 2017 by deep, statutory cuts in payment for the highest-volume tests on the Part B Clinical Laboratory Fee Schedule. PMID:26685443

  14. Implementing computer information systems for hospital-based case management.

    PubMed

    Williams, F G; Netting, F E; Engstrom, K M

    1991-01-01

    Like all health care services, case management is a process that relies on information. Based on the experiences in implementing computer information systems in six hospital-based case management programs, several financial, technical, and management issues are reviewed. These issues, which are also relevant for other specialized hospital-based programs, include information priorities, user acceptance, quantifying data, data entry methods, data security, and systems integration. The lessons learned regarding these issues are discussed, and categories of software alternatives are presented.

  15. Disaster preparedness of dialysis patients for Hurricanes Gustav and Ike 2008.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A

    2009-01-01

    Hurricanes Katrina and Rita resulted in massive devastation of the Gulf Coast at Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas during 2005. Because of those disasters, dialysis providers, nephrologists, and dialysis patients used disaster planning activities to work to mitigate the morbidity and mortality associated with the 2005 hurricane season for future events affecting dialysis patients. As Hurricane Gustav approached, anniversary events for Hurricane Katrina were postponed because of evacuation orders for nearly the entire Louisiana Gulf Coast. As part of the hurricane preparation, dialysis units reviewed the disaster plans of patients, and patients made preparation for evacuation. Upon evacuation, many patients returned to the dialysis units that had provided services during their exile from Hurricane Katrina; other patients went to other locations as part of their evacuation plan. Patients uniformly reported positive experiences with dialysis providers in their temporary evacuation communities, provided that those communities did not experience the effects of Hurricane Gustav. With the exception of evacuees to Baton Rouge, patients continued to receive their treatments uninterrupted. Because of extensive damage in the Baton Rouge area, resulting in widespread power losses and delayed restoration of power to hospitals and other health care facilities, some patients missed one treatment. However, as a result of compliance with disaster fluid and dietary recommendations, no adverse outcomes occurred. In most instances, patients were able to return to their home dialysis unit or a nearby unit to continue dialysis treatments within 4 - 5 days of Hurricane Gustav. Hurricane Ike struck the Texas Gulf Coast near Galveston, resulting in devastation of that area similar to the devastation seen in New Orleans after Katrina. The storm surge along the Louisiana Gulf Coast resulted in flooding that temporarily closed coastal dialysis units. Patients were prepared and experienced

  16. Metal speciation by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.A.; Slonawska, K.; Gatchell, D.K.; Hiebert, A.G.

    1984-04-01

    In Donnan dialysis aqueous samples are separated from receiver electrolytes by an ion exchange membrane. The present work demonstrates that the dialysis of metals into salt solutions occurs in proportion to the sum of the concentrations of the free metal and the metal held in the form of labile complexes; however, with strongly acidic or chelating receivers, the dialysis occurs in proportion to the total soluble metal. Hence, Donnan dialysis provides the basis for a rapid estimation of the total soluble (i.e., free plus labile complexed) metal and nonlabile-complexed metal. The method is demonstrated with Pb, Zn, Cu, and Cd complexes of glycine, humic acid, and nitrilotriacetic acid and is applied to a lake water sample. The results are compared to values obtained from an established approach that utilizes stripping voltammetry and separations with a chelating ion exchange resin.

  17. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a treatment center. This article focuses on hemodialysis at a treatment center. ... JT, Blake PG, Ing TS, eds. Handbook of Dialysis . 5th ed. ... TA. Hemodialysis. In: Skorecki K, Chertow GM, Marsden PA, Taal ...

  18. Prescribing for patients on dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Brendan; Jones, Ceridwen; Saunders, John

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The pharmacokinetics of a drug may be altered in patients with renal impairment who require dialysis. Some drugs are contraindicated. The drug’s clearance and therapeutic index determine if a dose adjustment is needed. A lower dose or less frequent dosing may be required. Consult a reference source or the patient’s nephrologist before prescribing. Start at a low dose and increase gradually. If possible give once-daily drugs after dialysis. PMID:27041803

  19. Home Dialysis Modalities: Educational Barriers to Utilization.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, an increasing number of individuals are being diagnosed with end stage renal disease requiring renal replacement therapy. Home dialysis modalities are an available option in lieu of in-center hemodialysis therapy for these individuals, but are vastly underutilized in the U.S. for multiple reasons. Both healthcare providers and individuals requiring renal replacement therapy are frequently unaware these modalities are an available alternative to in-center hemodialysis and of the potential benefits related to home modality use. Lack of healthcare provider and patient education regarding home modalities is a primary factor related to underutilization. PMID:27501632

  20. Age and Racial Disparities in Dialysis Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kucirka, Lauren M.; Grams, Morgan E.; Lessler, Justin; Hall, Erin Carlyle; James, Nathan; Massie, Allan B; Montgomery, Robert A.; Segev, Dorry L.

    2013-01-01

    Context Many studies have reported that blacks survive longer on dialysis than whites. This observation is paradoxical given racial disparities in access to and quality of care, and is inconsistent with observed lower survival among blacks with chronic kidney disease. We hypothesized that age and the competing risk of transplantation modify survival differences by race. Objectives To estimate death on dialysis by race, accounting for age as an effect modifier and kidney transplantation as a competing risk. Design, Setting, and Participants An observational cohort study of 1,330,007 incident end-stage renal disease patients as captured in the United States Renal Data System between January 1, 1995 and September 28, 2009 (median potential follow-up time = 6.7 years, range 1 day-14.8 years). Multivariate age-stratified Cox proportional hazards and competing risk models were constructed to examine death on dialysis. Main Outcome Measures Death on dialysis in blacks versus whites Results Similar to previous studies, blacks had a lower death rate on dialysis compared with whites (232,361 deaths (57.1% mortality) for blacks versus 585,792 deaths (63.5% mortality) for whites, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 0.84, 95% CI: 0.83-0.84, p<0.001). However, stratifying by age and treating kidney transplantation as a competing risk, blacks had significantly higher mortality than their white counterparts at ages 18-30 (27.6% mortality versus 14.2%, aHR 1.93, 95% CI: 1.84-2.03), 31-40 (37.5% versus 26.8%, aHR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.41-1.50), and 41-50 (44.8% versus 38.0%, aHR 1.12, 95% CI: 1.10-1.14, p <0.001 for interaction terms between race and each prior age category), as opposed to those 51-60 (51.5% versus 50.9%, aHR 0.93, 95% CI: 0.92-0.94), 61-70 (64.9% versus 67.2%, aHR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.86-0.88), 71-80 (76.1% versus 79.7%, aHR 0.85, 95% CI: 0.84-0.86), and > 80 (82.4% versus 83.6%, aHR 0.87, 95% CI: 0.85-0.88). Conclusions Overall, among dialysis patients in the United States, there

  1. [Guidelines on water and solutions for dialysis. Italian Society of Nephrology].

    PubMed

    Alloatti, S; Bolasco, P; Canavese, C; Cappelli, G; Pedrini, L; Pizzarelli, F; Pontoriero, G; Santoro, A; Anastasio, P; Teatini, U; Fuiano, G

    2005-01-01

    The National Society of Nephrology has promoted the development of specific Italian Guidelines for dialysis fluids. Two previous national inquiries showed a wide variety in the type and frequency of both microbiological and chemical controls concerning dialysis water, reinforcing the need for specific standards and recommendations. An optimal water treatment system should include tap water pre-treatment and a double reverse osmosis process. Every component of the system, including the delivery of the treated water to the dialysis machines, should prevent microbiological contamination of the fluid. Regular chemical and microbiological tests and regular disinfection of the system are necessary. 1. Chemical quality (Table: see text). Treated tap water used to prepare dialysis fluid should be within European Pharmacopoeia limits at the water treatment system inlet and at the reverse osmosis outlet. In addition dialysate, concentrate and infusion fluids must comply with specific Pharmacopoeia limits. The physician in charge of the dialysis unit is advised to institute a multidisciplinary team to evaluate the requirement for added chemical controls in the presence of local hazards. 2. Microbiological quality (Table: see text). High microbiological purity of dialysis fluid--regularly verified--is a fundamental prerequisite for dialysis quality and every dialysis unit should aim as a matter of course to obtain "ultra-pure" dialysate (microbial count <0.1 UFC/mL, endotoxins <0.03 U/mL). On-line dialysate ultrafiltration and regular disinfection of dialysis machines greatly enhance microbiological purity. On-line dialysate reinfusion requires specific devices used according to corresponding instructions and to more frequent microbiological tests. Dialysis fluids for home dialysis should comply with the same chemical and bacteriological quality. The appendix reports the water treatment system's technical characteristics, sampling and analytical methods, monitoring time

  2. Personal Disaster Preparedness of Dialysis Patients in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Mark; Shofer, Frances; Principe, Stephanie; DeWalt, Darren; Falk, Ronald; Ferris, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Dialysis patients are among the most vulnerable patients during a disaster because they are sensitive to a lapse in treatment. Although thorough preparation could mitigate disaster effects, we hypothesized that dialysis patients' personal and medical disaster preparedness was inadequate. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This prevalence study surveyed mentally competent adults requiring care at six regional dialysis centers. We asked questions regarding demographics, general disaster preparedness utilizing Homeland Security recommended item lists, dialysis-specific preparation for an individual to shelter in place, and preparatory steps for a forced evacuation. To determine if preparedness differed by demographic variables (gender, race, age, and education) chi-squared tests were used. Results Four hundred forty-two patients were approached, and 311 (70%) completed the survey. Participants were 54% male, 60% black, average age was 58 (± 15) years, and although 79% completed high school, 50% of our sample had marginal or low health literacy. Although all units had a disaster preparedness program in place, the general disaster preparedness of most participants was poor. Age, gender, race, education, literacy, and socioeconomic status did not affect general disaster preparedness. However, home peritoneal dialysis patients were significantly more likely to be prepared for a disaster compared with hemodialysis patients. No other significant associations were noted. Conclusions Irrespective of sociodemographic characteristics, most subjects were unprepared for a disaster. Dialysis patients were poorly prepared to shelter in place or to evacuate in the face of a disaster. Education regarding personal and dialysis-specific disaster preparedness is warranted. PMID:21852660

  3. Psychosocial adjustment and adherence to dialysis treatment regimes.

    PubMed

    Brownbridge, G; Fielding, D M

    1994-12-01

    Sixty children and adolescents in end-stage renal failure who were undergoing either haemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at one of five United Kingdom dialysis centres were assessed on psychosocial adjustment and adherence to their fluid intake, diet and medication regimes. Parental adjustment was also measured and data on sociodemographic and treatment history variables collected. A structured family interview and standardised questionnaire measures of anxiety, depression and behavioural disturbance were used. Multiple measures of treatment adherence were obtained, utilising children's and parents' self-reports, weight gain between dialysis, blood pressure, serum potassium level, blood urea level, dietitians' surveys and consultants' ratings. Correlational analyses showed that low treatment adherence was associated with poor adjustment to diagnosis and dialysis by children and parents (P < 0.01), self-ratings of anxiety and depression in children and parents (P < 0.001), age (adolescents tended to show poorer adherence than younger children, P < 0.001), duration of dialysis (P < 0.05), low family socioeconomic status (P < 0.05) and family structure (P < 0.01). These findings demonstrate the importance of psychosocial care in the treatment of this group of children. Future research should develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions aimed at improving treatment adherence.

  4. Cardiac rehabilitation and survival of dialysis patients after coronary bypass.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca; Huang, Yijian; Herzog, Charles A

    2006-04-01

    Patients who are on renal dialysis are at high risk for cardiac death and have a large burden of cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation can promote improved survival of nondialysis patients after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery and is covered by Medicare, but no previous studies have investigated whether dialysis patients' survival after CABG may be improved as a function of cardiac rehabilitation. A prospective cohort study was conducted using Medicare claims (1998 to 2002) for CABG and cardiac rehabilitation and patient information from the United States Renal Data System database for 6215 renal patients who initiated hemodialysis and underwent CABG between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2002, with mortality follow-up to December 31, 2003. Cardiac rehabilitation was defined by Current Procedural Terminology codes for monitored and nonmonitored exercise in Medicare claims data. Dialysis patients who received cardiac rehabilitation after CABG had a 35% reduced risk for all-cause mortality and a 36% reduced risk for cardiac death compared with dialysis patients who did not receive cardiac rehabilitation, independent of sociodemographic and clinical risk factors, including recent hospitalization. Only 10% of patients received cardiac rehabilitation after CABG, compared with an estimated 23.4% of patients in the general population, and lower income patients of all ages as well as women and black patients who were aged 65+ were significantly less likely to receive cardiac rehabilitation services. This observational study suggests a survival benefit of cardiac rehabilitation for dialysis patients after CABG.

  5. Volunteers in hospital-based case management programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G; Jones-McClintic, S; Warrick, L

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the use of volunteers within hospital-based long-term care case management programs. As hospitals diversify into long-term care, the roles played by volunteers are also diversifying. A brief description of the involvement of volunteers with the frail elderly is followed by a comparison of the roles and relationships of volunteers within existing hospital auxiliaries and long-term care case management programs. Three models for structuring hospital-based volunteer programs that address the needs of the frail elderly within diverse communities are presented. Implications surrounding the involvement of volunteers beyond hospital walls are discussed.

  6. Hospital-based case management: results from a demonstration.

    PubMed

    Warrick, L H; Netting, F E; Christianson, J B; Williams, F G

    1992-12-01

    The Flinn Foundation Hospital-based Coordinated Care case management demonstration was designed to help patients discharged from six participating hospitals be linked to community services by a case manager. One unexpected result was that about half of the clients served were referred from the community, not from the hospital. We examine the characteristics of hospital-based case management clients, the predictors of their continuation in case management, and their health status over 1 year, focusing on the differences between hospital- and community-referred clients.

  7. Outpatient Dialysis for Patients with AKI: A Policy Approach to Improving Care

    PubMed Central

    Heung, Michael; Watnick, Suzanne; Cruz, Dinna N.; Koyner, Jay L.; Mour, Girish; Liu, Kathleen D.; Cerda, Jorge; Okusa, Mark D.; Lukaszewski, Mark; Vijayan, Anitha

    2015-01-01

    The rate of AKI requiring dialysis has increased significantly over the past decade in the United States. At the same time, survival from AKI seems to be improving, and thus, more patients with AKI are surviving to discharge while still requiring dialysis. Currently, the options for providing outpatient dialysis in patients with AKI are limited, particularly after a 2012 revised interpretation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services guidelines, which prohibited Medicare reimbursement for acute dialysis at ESRD facilities. This article provides a historical perspective on outpatient dialysis management of patients with AKI, reviews the current clinical landscape of care for these patients, and highlights key areas of knowledge deficit. Lastly, policy changes that have the opportunity to significantly improve the care of this at-risk population are suggested. PMID:26220818

  8. Adequacy of dialysis: trace elements in dialysis fluids.

    PubMed

    D'Haese, P C; De Broe, M E

    1996-01-01

    A number of considerations suggest that trace element disturbances might occur in dialysed patients. These must at least in part be ascribed to the dialysis treatment itself during which these constituents may either be transferred to or removed from the patient. Tap water must be considered as the main source of dialysate trace metal contamination. These can adequately be removed during water treatment provided that, in addition to softening and deionization, reverse osmosis is available. However, even in the presence of the latter devices the possibility of serious contamination of the dialysis fluids leading to either chronic or acute intoxications still exists. The addition of chemical concentrates may also contribute to the increased concentrations of a number of trace metals. The toxic effects of aluminium in dialysis patients are well known and at the present time the element is still responsible for the greater part of trace metal-related problems in dialysis patients. Hence, the need for regular monitoring of aluminium cannot be ruled out at present. Strategies for diagnosis and treatment of aluminium overload have been updated. Recent studies demonstrated the efficacy of low desferrioxamine doses in diagnosis and treatment of aluminium overload, and optimal schedules for administration of the chelator and duration of treatment have been presented. Recently, in an epidemiological survey serum silicon concentrations in dialysis patients were found to be increased up to 100-fold compared to subjects with normal renal function. Moreover, it was noted that silicon concentrations in the dialysis population differ from one centre to another and that increased levels are due to either the use of silicon-contaminated dialysis fluids or an increased oral intake of the element originating from a high silicon content in the drinking water. Besides aluminium and silicon, a transfer towards the patients during dialysis has also been reported for a number of other

  9. Factors Related to Healthy Diet and Physical Activity in Hospital-Based Clinical Nurses.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M; Butler, Robert; Sorrell, Jeanne

    2014-09-30

    Hospitals often promote healthy lifestyles, but little is known about nurses' actual diet and physical activity. Greater understanding about these lifestyle choices for clinical nurses may improve existing hospital-based programs and/or create desirable services. This article discusses a study that considered diet and physical activity of clinical nurses, using elements of Pender's self-care theory as a conceptual framework. Study methods included a cross-sectional, correlational design and a convenience sample of 278 nurses who worked on units with 24 hours/day and seven days-per-week responsibilities. Participants completed diet and exercise questionnaires about perceptions of attitudes and opinions, barriers, diet benefits/exercise motivators, self-efficacy, and locus of control, and personal and work characteristics. Diet and activity categories were created. Study results demonstrated that over 50% of nurses had moderately healthy diets but were insufficiently active. Healthy diet and physical activity levels were associated with higher self-efficacy, more diet benefits and physical activity motivators, fewer perceived barriers, and confidence in body image. The article discussion and conclusion sections note areas for future research and suggest that focused interventions that address benefits, motivators, and self-efficacy may increase participation in hospital-based programs and enhance healthy lifestyle for hospital-based clinical nurses.

  10. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each... for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (b) CMS determines the amount on the basis of program...

  11. [Quality guide in nephrology and dialysis].

    PubMed

    Manno, C; Palmieri, V; Virgilio, M; Palasciano, G; Schena, F P

    2004-01-01

    The Quality Guide, a strategic tool for any nephrologist wishing to initiate a quality policy in his own renal unit, describes to the organisation of total quality management. This article gives a short description of a Quality Guide in Nephrology and Dialysis. According to ISO 9004:2000 Norms, the Quality Guide can be subdivided into four sections: Managerial Accountability, Resource Management; Implementation of Services; Analysis, Evaluation and Continuous Quality Improvement. The quality cycle begins by identifying the customers, who added to the resources constitute the input that will be transformed by the service into output (results). By measuring customer satisfaction the results will be evaluated and analyzed to allow continuous improvement of the service. In conclusion, the drafting of the Guide by all staff members involved has a twofold value: it organizes the quality management within the renal unit and certifies the quality level guaranteed to the customer. PMID:15285006

  12. [Quality guide in nephrology and dialysis].

    PubMed

    Manno, C; Palmieri, V; Virgilio, M; Palasciano, G; Schena, F P

    2004-01-01

    The Quality Guide, a strategic tool for any nephrologist wishing to initiate a quality policy in his own renal unit, describes to the organisation of total quality management. This article gives a short description of a Quality Guide in Nephrology and Dialysis. According to ISO 9004:2000 Norms, the Quality Guide can be subdivided into four sections: Managerial Accountability, Resource Management; Implementation of Services; Analysis, Evaluation and Continuous Quality Improvement. The quality cycle begins by identifying the customers, who added to the resources constitute the input that will be transformed by the service into output (results). By measuring customer satisfaction the results will be evaluated and analyzed to allow continuous improvement of the service. In conclusion, the drafting of the Guide by all staff members involved has a twofold value: it organizes the quality management within the renal unit and certifies the quality level guaranteed to the customer.

  13. Hospital-based, acute care following ambulatory surgery center discharge

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Justin P.; Vashi, Anita A.; Ross, Joseph S.; Gross, Cary P.

    2014-01-01

    Background As a measure of quality, ambulatory surgery centers have begun reporting rates of hospital transfer at discharge. However, this may underestimate patient’s acute care needs after care. We conducted this study to determine rates and evaluate variation in hospital transfer and hospital-based, acute care within 7 days among patients discharged from ambulatory surgery centers. Methods Using data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, we identified adult patients who underwent a medical or surgical procedure between July 2008 and September 2009 at ambulatory surgery centers in California, Florida, and Nebraska. The primary outcomes were hospital transfer at the time of discharge and hospital-based, acute care (emergency department visits or hospital admissions) within 7-days expressed as the rate per 1,000 discharges. At the ambulatory surgery center level, rates were adjusted for age, sex, and procedure-mix. Results We studied 3,821,670 patients treated at 1,295 ambulatory surgery centers. At discharge, the hospital transfer rate was 1.1/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 1.1–1.1). Among patients discharged home, the hospital-based, acute care rate was 31.8/1,000 discharges (95% CI, 31.6–32.0). Across ambulatory surgery centers, there was little variation in adjusted hospital transfer rates (median=1.0/1,000 discharges [25th–75th percentile=1.0–2.0]), while substantial variation existed in adjusted hospital-based, acute care rates (28.0/1,000 [21.0–39.0]). Conclusions Among adult patients undergoing ambulatory surgery center care, hospital transfer at discharge is a rare event. In contrast, the hospital-based, acute care rate is nearly 30-fold higher, varies across centers, and may be a more meaningful measure for discriminating quality. PMID:24787100

  14. Perspectives of Patients, Families, and Health Care Professionals on Decision-Making About Dialysis Modality—The Good, the Bad, and the Misunderstandings!

    PubMed Central

    Griva, Konstadina; Li, Zhi Hui; Lai, Alden Yuanhong; Choong, Meng Chan; Foo, Marjorie Wai Yin

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Objectives: This study explored the factors influencing decision-making about dialysis modality, integrating the perspectives of patients, their families, and health care professionals within an Asian population. The study further sought to understand the low penetration rate of peritoneal dialysis (PD) in Singapore. ♦ Methods: A sample of 59 participants comprising pre-dialysis patients, dialysis patients, caregivers, and health care professionals (HCPs) participated in semi-structured interviews to explore the decision-making process and their views about various dialysis modalities. Data were thematically analyzed using NVivo9 (QSR International, Doncaster, Australia) to explore barriers to and facilitators of various dialysis modalities and decisional support needs. ♦ Results: Fear of infection, daily commitment to PD, and misperceptions of PD emerged as barriers to PD. Side effects, distance to dialysis centers, and fear of needling and pain were barriers to hemodialysis (HD). The experiences of other patients, communicated informally or opportunistically, influenced the preferences and choices of patients and family members for a dialysis modality. Patients and families value input from HCPs and yet express strong needs to discuss subjective experiences of life on dialysis (PD or HD) with other patients before making a decision about dialysis modality. ♦ Conclusions: Pre-dialysis education should expand its focus on the family as the unit of care and should provide opportunities for interaction with dialysis patients and for peer-led learning. Barriers to PD, especially misperceptions and misunderstandings, can be targeted to improve PD uptake. PMID:23123668

  15. Dialysis fistula or graft: the role for randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Allon, Michael; Lok, Charmaine E

    2010-12-01

    The Fistula First Initiative has strongly encouraged nephrologists, vascular access surgeons, and dialysis units in the United States to make valiant efforts to increase fistula use in the hemodialysis population. Unfortunately, the rigid "fistula first" recommendations are not based on solid, current, evidence-based data and may be harmful to some hemodialysis patients by subjecting them to prolonged catheter dependence with its attendant risks of bacteremia and central vein stenosis. Once they are successfully cannulated for dialysis, fistulas last longer than grafts and require fewer interventions to maintain long-term patency for dialysis. However, fistulas have a much higher primary failure rate than grafts, require more interventions to achieve maturation, and entail longer catheter dependence, thereby leading to more catheter-related complications. Given the tradeoffs between fistulas and grafts, there is equipoise about their relative merits in patients with moderate to high risk of fistula nonmaturation. The time is right for definitive, large, multicenter randomized clinical trials to compare fistulas and grafts in various subsets of chronic kidney disease patients. Until the results of such clinical trials are known, the optimal vascular access for a given patients should be determined by the nephrologist and access surgeon by taking into account (1) whether dialysis has been initiated, (2) the patient's life expectancy, (3) whether the patient has had a previous failed vascular access, and (4) the likelihood of fistula nonmaturation. Careful clinical judgment should optimize vascular access outcomes and minimize prolonged catheter dependence among hemodialysis patients. PMID:21030576

  16. Disaster planning for peritoneal dialysis programs.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A; Norman, Lisa D; Krane, N Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Because of increased intensity of hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region of the United States, peritoneal dialysis (PD) programs have been disrupted and patients relocated temporarily following these catastrophic events. We describe the disaster planning, implementation, and follow-up that occurred in one such PD program in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Each year at the beginning of the North American hurricane season, the PD program's disaster plan is reviewed by clinic staff and copies are distributed to patients. Patients are instructed to assemble a disaster kit and are provided with contact numbers for dialysis suppliers and for a PD program in their planned evacuation city. In July 2005, this disaster plan was tested when an early tropical storm and hurricane entered the Gulf and several patients briefly relocated or evacuated because of power loss and then returned without incident. However, when Hurricane Katrina, a category 5 storm, was predicted to strike the metropolitan area, patients were notified by telephone to evacuate, and contact information, including their evacuation city and telephone and cellular phone numbers, was obtained. Patients were also reminded to take all medications, bottled water, antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer, and 4-5 days of PD supplies. Following the storm, telephone and cellular phone services were severely disrupted. However, text messaging was available to contact patients to confirm safety and to provide further instructions. Arrangements with the major dialysis suppliers to ship emergency supplies to new locations were made by the PD nurse and the patients. Only 2 of 22 patients required hospitalization because of complications resulting from evacuation failure, contamination, and inability to perform dialysis for a prolonged period of time. Both of these patients were quickly released and have continued PD. Following the event, all patients remained on PD, and most have planned to return to their home PD

  17. Disaster planning for peritoneal dialysis programs.

    PubMed

    Kleinpeter, Myra A; Norman, Lisa D; Krane, N Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Because of increased intensity of hurricanes in the Gulf Coast region of the United States, peritoneal dialysis (PD) programs have been disrupted and patients relocated temporarily following these catastrophic events. We describe the disaster planning, implementation, and follow-up that occurred in one such PD program in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. Each year at the beginning of the North American hurricane season, the PD program's disaster plan is reviewed by clinic staff and copies are distributed to patients. Patients are instructed to assemble a disaster kit and are provided with contact numbers for dialysis suppliers and for a PD program in their planned evacuation city. In July 2005, this disaster plan was tested when an early tropical storm and hurricane entered the Gulf and several patients briefly relocated or evacuated because of power loss and then returned without incident. However, when Hurricane Katrina, a category 5 storm, was predicted to strike the metropolitan area, patients were notified by telephone to evacuate, and contact information, including their evacuation city and telephone and cellular phone numbers, was obtained. Patients were also reminded to take all medications, bottled water, antibacterial soap, hand sanitizer, and 4-5 days of PD supplies. Following the storm, telephone and cellular phone services were severely disrupted. However, text messaging was available to contact patients to confirm safety and to provide further instructions. Arrangements with the major dialysis suppliers to ship emergency supplies to new locations were made by the PD nurse and the patients. Only 2 of 22 patients required hospitalization because of complications resulting from evacuation failure, contamination, and inability to perform dialysis for a prolonged period of time. Both of these patients were quickly released and have continued PD. Following the event, all patients remained on PD, and most have planned to return to their home PD

  18. Impact of facility size and profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, D L; Sugarman, J R; Presley, R J; Helgerson, S D; Rocco, M V

    2000-08-01

    Little information is available regarding the influence of dialysis facility size or profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients. We have combined data from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Core Indicators Project; the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) facility survey; and the HCFA On-Line Survey, Certification, and Reporting System to analyze trends in this area. For hemodialysis patients, larger facilities were more likely than smaller facilities to perform dialysis on patients who were younger than 65 years of age, black, or undergoing dialysis 2 years or more (P < 0.001). Nonprofit facilities were more likely to perform dialysis on patients with diabetes mellitus as a cause of ESRD and less likely to perform dialysis on patients with hypertension as a cause of ESRD compared with for-profit units (P < 0.05). By multivariate analysis, larger facility size was modestly associated with a greater Kt/V value and urea reduction ratio, but not with hematocrit or serum albumin values. Facility profit status was not associated with these intermediate outcomes. For peritoneal dialysis patients, there were no significant differences in patient demographics based on facility size. More patients in nonprofit units had been undergoing dialysis 2 or more years than patients in for-profit units (P < 0.05). By univariate analysis, patients in larger facilities were more likely to have an adequacy measure performed than patients from smaller facilities (P < 0.05). There were few substantial differences in intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients based on facility size or profit status. PMID:10922310

  19. Impact of facility size and profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, D L; Sugarman, J R; Presley, R J; Helgerson, S D; Rocco, M V

    2000-08-01

    Little information is available regarding the influence of dialysis facility size or profit status on intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients. We have combined data from the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Core Indicators Project; the end-stage renal disease (ESRD) facility survey; and the HCFA On-Line Survey, Certification, and Reporting System to analyze trends in this area. For hemodialysis patients, larger facilities were more likely than smaller facilities to perform dialysis on patients who were younger than 65 years of age, black, or undergoing dialysis 2 years or more (P < 0.001). Nonprofit facilities were more likely to perform dialysis on patients with diabetes mellitus as a cause of ESRD and less likely to perform dialysis on patients with hypertension as a cause of ESRD compared with for-profit units (P < 0.05). By multivariate analysis, larger facility size was modestly associated with a greater Kt/V value and urea reduction ratio, but not with hematocrit or serum albumin values. Facility profit status was not associated with these intermediate outcomes. For peritoneal dialysis patients, there were no significant differences in patient demographics based on facility size. More patients in nonprofit units had been undergoing dialysis 2 or more years than patients in for-profit units (P < 0.05). By univariate analysis, patients in larger facilities were more likely to have an adequacy measure performed than patients from smaller facilities (P < 0.05). There were few substantial differences in intermediate outcomes in chronic dialysis patients based on facility size or profit status.

  20. Experience of using heat citric acid disinfection method in central dialysis fluid delivery system.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Koji; Uchiumi, Nobuko; Sato, Sumihiko; Aida, Nobuhiko; Ishimatsu, Taketo; Igoshi, Tadaaki; Kodama, Yoshihiro; Hotta, Hiroyuki

    2010-09-01

    We applied the heat citric acid disinfection method in the main part of the central dialysis fluid delivery system (MPCDDS), which consists of a multiple-patient dialysis fluid supply unit, dialysis console units, and dialysis fluid piping. This disinfection method has been used for single-patient dialysis machines, but this is the first trial in the MPCDDS. We examined, by points of safety and disinfection effect, whether this disinfection method is comparable to conventional disinfection methods in Japan. The conventional disinfection method is a combination of two disinfectants, sodium hypochlorite and acetic acid, used separately for protein removal and decalcification. Consequently, total microbial counts and endotoxin concentrations fully satisfied the microbiological requirements for standard dialysis fluid of ISO 11663. From our results and discussion, this heat citric acid disinfection method is proved to be safe and reliable for MPCDDS. However, to satisfy the microbiological requirements for ultrapure dialysis fluid, further consideration for this method in MPCDDS including the reverse osmosis device composition and piping is necessary.

  1. Administration of chemotherapy in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, James C; Craft, Paul S

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of patients on dialysis has increased and these patients present a challenge for chemotherapy administration when diagnosed with cancer. A consensus on the dosage and timing of different chemotherapeutic agents in relation to dialysis has not been established. We describe the pattern of care and treatment outcome for cancer patients on dialysis in our institution. The dataset from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry of patients on dialysis who had a diagnosis of cancer was obtained and matched to the pharmacy records in our institution to identify patients who had received chemotherapy while on dialysis. Relevant clinical information including details of the dialysis regimen, chemotherapy administration and adverse events was extracted for analysis. Between July 1999 and July 2014, 21 patients on dialysis were included for analysis. Five (23.8%) received chemotherapy, most of which was administered before dialysis sessions. As a result of adverse events, one patient discontinued treatment; two other patients required dose reduction or treatment delay. Chemotherapy administration was feasible in cancer patients on dialysis, but chemotherapy usage was low. Better understanding of the altered pharmacokinetics in patients on dialysis may improve chemotherapy access and practice.

  2. Hospital-Based Physicians: Current Issues and Descriptive Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Steinwald, Bruce

    1980-01-01

    Hospital-based physicians (HBPs) have been the recipients of considerable attention in health policy debates in recent years. This paper discusses issues and trends concerning HBPs and presents evidence on practice characteristics, compensation methods, and incomes of anesthesiologists, pathologists, and radiologists. Some comparisons with office-based MDs are included. The primary data source is composed of physician surveys sponsored by the Health Care Financing Administration and conducted by the National Opinion Research Center in 1977 and 1978. Findings generated from these surveys support past research showing that radiology is the most lucrative HBP specialty, followed by pathology and anesthesiology; hospital-based practice tends to be considerably more lucrative than office-based practice, taken as a whole. Survey findings are discussed in light of current policy developments in the health services sector. PMID:10309258

  3. Target marketing for the hospital-based wellness center.

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, J D

    1997-01-01

    The American population is aging, medical technology is advancing, and life expectancies are on the rise. At the same time hospitals are looking for additional sources of income due to the pressures of government regulations and managed care. One of the options for hospitals looking for additional sources of income is the hospital-based but free-standing comprehensive wellness and fitness center. Such centers go beyond the facilities, programs and services offered by traditional health and fitness centers. In addition to physical fitness programs, hospital-based wellness centers offer programs in CPR, nutrition, weight control and many other programs of interest to an aging but active American populace. This research documents the hospital industry, wellness industry and the prospects of success or failure for he hospital attempting such a venture. The focus of the research is the experience of a particular hospital with regard to the programs, facilities and services deemed most important by its target market. PMID:10163917

  4. Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Type and Outcomes in Maintenance Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shilane, D.; Hlatky, M.A.; Winkelmayer, W.C.; Chang, T.I.

    2014-01-01

    Aim Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on maintenance dialysis have a high burden of coronary disease. Prior studies in non-dialysis patients show better outcomes in coronary artery bypass surgery using the internal mammary artery (IMA) compared with the saphenous vein graft (SVG), but less is known about outcomes in ESRD. We sought to compare the effectiveness of multivessel bypass grafting using IMA versus SVG in patients on maintenance dialysis in the United States. Methods Cohort study using data from the United States Renal Data System to examine IMA versus SVG in patients on maintenance dialysis undergoing multivessel coronary revascularization. We used Cox proportional hazards regression with multivariable adjustment in the full cohort and in a propensity-score matched cohort. The primary outcome was death from any cause; the secondary outcome was a composite of non-fatal myocardial infarction or death. Results Overall survival rates were low in this patient population (5-year survival in the matched cohort 25.3%). Use of the IMA compared to SVG was associated with lower risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84-0.92) and lower risk of the composite outcome (adjusted HR 0.89; CI 0.85-0.93). Results did not materially change in analyses using the propensity-score matched cohort. We found similar results irrespective of patient sex, age, race, or the presence of diabetes, peripheral vascular disease or heart failure. Conclusion Although overall survival rates were low, IMA was associated with lower risk of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity compared to SVG in patients on dialysis. PMID:24343371

  5. Maintenance Dialysis throughout the World in Years 1990 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Bernadette; Wulf, Sarah; Bikbov, Boris; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Courville de Vaccaro, Karen; Flaxman, Abraham; Peterson, Hannah; Delossantos, Allyne; Haring, Diana; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Murray, Christopher; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Rapidly rising global rates of chronic diseases portend a consequent rise in ESRD. Despite this, kidney disease is not included in the list of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted by the United Nations for 25% reduction by year 2025. In an effort to accurately report the trajectory and pattern of global growth of maintenance dialysis, we present the change in prevalence and incidence from 1990 to 2010. Data were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 epidemiologic database. The results are on the basis of an analysis of data from worldwide national and regional renal disease registries and detailed systematic literature review for years 1980-2010. Incidence and prevalence estimates of provision of maintenance dialysis from this database were updated using a negative binomial Bayesian meta-regression tool for 187 countries. Results indicate substantial growth in utilization of maintenance dialysis in almost all world regions. Changes in population structure, changes in aging, and the worldwide increase in diabetes mellitus and hypertension explain a significant portion, but not all, of the increase because increased dialysis provision also accounts for a portion of the rise. These findings argue for the importance of inclusion of kidney disease among NCD targets for reducing premature death throughout the world.

  6. Maintenance Dialysis throughout the World in Years 1990 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Bernadette; Wulf, Sarah; Bikbov, Boris; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Courville de Vaccaro, Karen; Flaxman, Abraham; Peterson, Hannah; Delossantos, Allyne; Haring, Diana; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Murray, Christopher; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Rapidly rising global rates of chronic diseases portend a consequent rise in ESRD. Despite this, kidney disease is not included in the list of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted by the United Nations for 25% reduction by year 2025. In an effort to accurately report the trajectory and pattern of global growth of maintenance dialysis, we present the change in prevalence and incidence from 1990 to 2010. Data were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 epidemiologic database. The results are on the basis of an analysis of data from worldwide national and regional renal disease registries and detailed systematic literature review for years 1980-2010. Incidence and prevalence estimates of provision of maintenance dialysis from this database were updated using a negative binomial Bayesian meta-regression tool for 187 countries. Results indicate substantial growth in utilization of maintenance dialysis in almost all world regions. Changes in population structure, changes in aging, and the worldwide increase in diabetes mellitus and hypertension explain a significant portion, but not all, of the increase because increased dialysis provision also accounts for a portion of the rise. These findings argue for the importance of inclusion of kidney disease among NCD targets for reducing premature death throughout the world. PMID:26209712

  7. Maintenance Dialysis throughout the World in Years 1990 and 2010

    PubMed Central

    Wulf, Sarah; Bikbov, Boris; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Courville de Vaccaro, Karen; Flaxman, Abraham; Peterson, Hannah; Delossantos, Allyne; Haring, Diana; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Murray, Christopher; Naghavi, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly rising global rates of chronic diseases portend a consequent rise in ESRD. Despite this, kidney disease is not included in the list of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) targeted by the United Nations for 25% reduction by year 2025. In an effort to accurately report the trajectory and pattern of global growth of maintenance dialysis, we present the change in prevalence and incidence from 1990 to 2010. Data were extracted from the Global Burden of Disease 2010 epidemiologic database. The results are on the basis of an analysis of data from worldwide national and regional renal disease registries and detailed systematic literature review for years 1980–2010. Incidence and prevalence estimates of provision of maintenance dialysis from this database were updated using a negative binomial Bayesian meta-regression tool for 187 countries. Results indicate substantial growth in utilization of maintenance dialysis in almost all world regions. Changes in population structure, changes in aging, and the worldwide increase in diabetes mellitus and hypertension explain a significant portion, but not all, of the increase because increased dialysis provision also accounts for a portion of the rise. These findings argue for the importance of inclusion of kidney disease among NCD targets for reducing premature death throughout the world. PMID:26209712

  8. Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status, Race, and Mortality in Young Adult Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Estrella, Michelle M.; Crews, Deidra C.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.; Ephraim, Patti L.; Cook, Courtney; Boulware, L. Ebony

    2014-01-01

    Young blacks receiving dialysis have an increased risk of death compared with whites in the United States. Factors influencing this disparity among the young adult dialysis population have not been well explored. Our study examined the relation of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and racial differences in mortality in United States young adults receiving dialysis. We merged US Renal Data System patient-level data from 11,027 black and white patients ages 18–30 years old initiating dialysis between 2006 and 2009 with US Census data to obtain neighborhood poverty information for each patient. We defined low SES neighborhoods as those neighborhoods in US Census zip codes with ≥20% of residents living below the federal poverty level and quantified race differences in mortality risk by level of neighborhood SES. Among patients residing in low SES neighborhoods, blacks had greater mortality than whites after adjusting for baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, rurality, and access to care factors. This difference in mortality between blacks and whites was significantly attenuated in higher SES neighborhoods. In the United States, survival between young adult blacks and whites receiving dialysis differs by neighborhood SES. Additional studies are needed to identify modifiable factors contributing to the greater mortality among young adult black dialysis patients residing in low SES neighborhoods. PMID:24925723

  9. Neighborhood socioeconomic status, race, and mortality in young adult dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Johns, Tanya S; Estrella, Michelle M; Crews, Deidra C; Appel, Lawrence J; Anderson, Cheryl A M; Ephraim, Patti L; Cook, Courtney; Boulware, L Ebony

    2014-11-01

    Young blacks receiving dialysis have an increased risk of death compared with whites in the United States. Factors influencing this disparity among the young adult dialysis population have not been well explored. Our study examined the relation of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) and racial differences in mortality in United States young adults receiving dialysis. We merged US Renal Data System patient-level data from 11,027 black and white patients ages 18-30 years old initiating dialysis between 2006 and 2009 with US Census data to obtain neighborhood poverty information for each patient. We defined low SES neighborhoods as those neighborhoods in U.S. Census zip codes with ≥20% of residents living below the federal poverty level and quantified race differences in mortality risk by level of neighborhood SES. Among patients residing in low SES neighborhoods, blacks had greater mortality than whites after adjusting for baseline demographics, clinical characteristics, rurality, and access to care factors. This difference in mortality between blacks and whites was significantly attenuated in higher SES neighborhoods. In the United States, survival between young adult blacks and whites receiving dialysis differs by neighborhood SES. Additional studies are needed to identify modifiable factors contributing to the greater mortality among young adult black dialysis patients residing in low SES neighborhoods.

  10. Impact of Hemodialysis Catheter Dysfunction on Dialysis and Other Medical Services: An Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Newsome, Britt B.; Leung, Grace; Block, Geoffrey A.; Herbert, Robert J.; Danese, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Practice guidelines define hemodialysis catheter dysfunction as blood flow rate (BFR) <300 mL/min. We conducted a study using data from DaVita and the United States Renal Data System to evaluate the impact of catheter dysfunction on dialysis and other medical services. Patients were included if they had ≥8 consecutive weeks of catheter dialysis between 8/2004 and 12/2006. Actual BFR <300 mL/min despite planned BFR ≥300 mL/min was used to define catheter dysfunction during each dialysis session. Among 9,707 patients, the average age was 62,53% were female, and 40% were black. The median duration of catheter dialysis was 190 days, and the cohort accounted for 1,075,701 catheter dialysis sessions. There were 70,361 sessions with catheter dysfunction, and 6,33 1 (65.2%) patients had at least one session with catheter dysfunction. In multivariate repeated measures analysis, catheter dysfunction was associated with increased odds of missing a dialysis session due to access problems (Odds ratio [OR] 2.50; P < 0.001), having an access-related procedure (OR 2.10; P < 0.001), and being hospitalized (OR 1.10; P = 0.001). Catheter dysfunction defined according to NKF vascular access guidelines results in disruptions of dialysis treatment and increased use of other medical services. PMID:22518313

  11. Missed dialysis sessions and hospitalization in hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Amanda H; Cohen, Andrew J; Kutner, Nancy G; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Kimmel, Paul L; Muntner, Paul

    2009-06-01

    In order to evaluate the factors that contributed to missed dialysis sessions and increased hospitalizations of hemodialysis patients after Hurricane Katrina, we contacted 386 patients from 9 New Orleans hemodialysis units. Data were collected through structured telephone interviews on socio-demographics, dialysis factors, and evacuation characteristics. Overall, 44% of patients reported missing at least one and almost 17% reported missing 3 or more dialysis sessions. The likelihood of missing 3 or more sessions was greater for those whose dialysis vintage was less than 2 years compared to those for whom it was 5 or more years, who had 38 or fewer billed dialysis sessions compared to those who had 39 or more in the 3 months before the storm, who lived alone before the storm, who were unaware of their dialysis facility's emergency plans, who did not evacuate prior to hurricane landfall, and who were placed in a shelter. The adjusted odds ratio of hospitalization among patients who missed 3 or more compared to those who did not miss any dialysis sessions was 2.16 (95% CI: 1.05-4.43). These findings suggest that when preparing for future disasters more emphasis needs to be placed on patient awareness and early execution of emergency plans.

  12. Return to dialysis after renal transplantation. Which would be the best way?

    PubMed

    Arias, Manuel; Escallada, Rafael; de Francisco, Angel L Martín; Rodrigo, Emilio; Fernández-Fresnedo, Gema; Setién, Ma Angeles; Piñera, Celestino; Ruiz, Juan Carlos; Herráez, Isabel; Cotorruelo, Julio

    2002-05-01

    The exact moment to return to dialysis when a graft fails has not clearly been established. Furthermore, there is no agreement with respect to whether the guidelines accepted for patients entering dialysis for the first time are adequate for this subgroup of patients with advanced renal failure, due to the special characteristics of these patients, derived from the immunosuppressive medications they are taking among other accompanying factors. We reviewed a group of renal transplant patients who returned to dialysis and compared them with a group of patients entering dialysis for the first time. Patients with chronic renal failure due to graft failure had a poorer renal function at the time entering dialysis and a more profound anemia. Additionally, complications considered such as the number of hospital admissions during the first year after initiation of dialysis were considerably higher in the group of transplanted patients. We advocate for an earlier referral to the dialysis unit, a more aggressive erythropoietin therapy in the phase of advanced renal failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy, and in selected cases retransplantation before definitive graft loss.

  13. Using (green) bricks and mortar for dialysis clinic construction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Bob

    2011-03-01

    The completed dialysis unit demonstrates that building green means creating and using processes that are environmentally responsible and resource efficient throughout a building's life cycle. The common objective is that green buildings are designed to reduce the overall impact of the environment on human health and the natural environment by: using energy, water and other resources more efficiently; protecting patient health while improving staff productivity; reducing waste.

  14. Conflict in the dialysis clinic.

    PubMed

    Payton, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Conflict is common in healthcare settings and can affect the functioning of a dialysis clinic. Unresolved conflict can decrease staff productivity and teamwork, and potentially decrease the quality of patient care. This article discusses the causes and effects of conflict, describes the five basic conflict-handling styles that can be useful when dealing with conflict (avoidance, accommodation, competing, compromise, and collaboration), and provides resources for resolving patient-provider conflict.

  15. Quality decision making in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, L G; Anderberg, C; Ipsen, R; Persson, E; Andersson, G

    1998-01-01

    A patient approaching the final stage of his renal disease is faced with many difficult questions. Should he opt for a transplant or start on dialysis? In the case of dialysis, can he manage his treatment at home or will he need to be cared for in a clinic? Should be choose peritoneal dialysis or haemodialysis? Is the freedom of being independent from a machine, given by CAPD, as valuable as the freedom of having days without treatment, given by HD? The issues are complex and do not have a given answer. To make the proper decisions about his treatment the patient needs extensive information and support from the caregivers. Likewise, the caregivers need to know the patient well in order to give appropriate advice. In this exchange of information, the renal nurse has a very important role. Some patients may need to be dialysed in a hospital but most can get an equally good or even better dialysis treatment in a less stressful environment. A high degree of self-care is preferred by people who value independence and freedom of movement. Self-care also improves the self-confidence and increases the chances of maintaining employment and a rich social life. Self-care could mean both PD and HD, sometimes with the assistance of a spouse or a nurse. But a certain degree of self-care can also be maintained in limited-care centres and satellites, where the presence of nursing staff gives the feeling of security. For everybody involved, not least the purchasers of health care, it is desirable to keep the patients out of the costly hospital environment for as long as possible. PMID:10222906

  16. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure. PMID:23709544

  17. Chryseobacterium indologenes peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Afshar, Mehdi; Nobakht, Ehsan; Lew, Susie Q

    2013-05-24

    Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis remains a major complication of peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Chryseobacterium indologenes is a rare organism that has been reported to cause infections mostly in hospitalised patients with severe underlying diseases. We report the first case of C indologenes peritonitis in a patient on peritoneal dialysis outside of Asia. Our patient with end-stage renal disease on peritoneal dialysis grew C indologenes from peritoneal fluid when he presented with abdominal pain and cloudy effluent. The patient responded well to intraperitoneal antibiotic therapy. Tenckhoff catheter did not require removal. This case demonstrates the importance of considering rare causes of peritonitis, such as C indologenes, in patients on peritoneal dialysis. Given the resistance of such organisms to commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotics, antimicrobial susceptibility testing must be assessed as early as possible to assure appropriate antibiotic coverage to avoid untreated peritonitis leading to peritoneal dialysis failure.

  18. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    SciTech Connect

    Honore, B.

    1987-04-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting in erroneously low estimates of the binding affinity and in inconsistent results at varying albumin concentrations. Dialysis rate determination is less sensitive to impurities.

  19. Peritoneal dialysis in hypernatraemic, ketoacidotic diabetic coma.

    PubMed

    Køolendorf, K; Møoller, B B

    1976-01-01

    Hypertonic dehydration in a 13-year-old boy with ketoacidotic diabetic coma has been treated successfully with peritoneal dialysis and isotonic fluids. Modes of treatment with either hypotonic or isotonic fluids are discussed, as is the feasibility of peritoneal dialysis. We recommend isotonic solutions composed of equal parts of 5.5% glucose and 0.9% sodium chloride combined with peritoneal dialysis in order to secure a relatively slow correction of the hypertonic state.

  20. Development of a Hospital-based Massage Therapy Course at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Dion, Liza J.; Cutshall, Susanne M.; Rodgers, Nancy J.; Hauschulz, Jennifer L.; Dreyer, Nikol E.; Thomley, Barbara S.; Bauer, Brent

    2015-01-01

    Background: Massage therapy is offered increasingly in US medical facilities. Although the United States has many massage schools, their education differs, along with licensure and standards. As massage therapy in hospitals expands and proves its value, massage therapists need increased training and skills in working with patients who have various complex medical concerns, to provide safe and effective treatment. These services for hospitalized patients can impact patient experience substantially and provide additional treatment options for pain and anxiety, among other symptoms. The present article summarizes the initial development and description of a hospital-based massage therapy course at a Midwest medical center. Methods: A hospital-based massage therapy course was developed on the basis of clinical experience and knowledge from massage therapists working in the complex medical environment. This massage therapy course had three components in its educational experience: online learning, classroom study, and a 25-hr shadowing experience. The in-classroom study portion included an entire day in the simulation center. Results: The hospital-based massage therapy course addressed the educational needs of therapists transitioning to work with interdisciplinary medical teams and with patients who have complicated medical conditions. Feedback from students in the course indicated key learning opportunities and additional content that are needed to address the knowledge and skills necessary when providing massage therapy in a complex medical environment. Conclusions: The complexity of care in medical settings is increasing while the length of hospital stay is decreasing. For this reason, massage provided in the hospital requires more specialized training to work in these environments. This course provides an example initial step in how to address some of the educational needs of therapists who are transitioning to working in the complex medical environment. PMID

  1. [The specific nutritionnal care in peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Castrale, Cindy; Azar, Raymond; Piquet, Marie-Astrid; Lobbedez, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Protein energy wasting is a major complication in peritoneal dialysis. It is leading to a poor quality of life and increasing mortality. Diagnosis must be early, according to criteria defined by the International society of renal nutrition and metabolism. It is necessary to appropriate the diagnostic tools with dialysis method. The nutritional care is difficult in peritoneal dialysis. Indeed, studies are limited and practical nutrition is complex. In this point of view, we propose to treat guidelines for protein energy wasting, in peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:27320370

  2. [Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: how to proceed to evaluate innovative medical devices?].

    PubMed

    Martelli, N; van den Brink, H; Denies, F; Dervaux, B; Germe, A F; Prognon, P; Pineau, J

    2014-01-01

    Innovative medical devices offer solutions to medical problems and greatly improve patients' outcomes. Like National Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies, hospitals face numerous requests for innovative and costly medical devices. To help local decision-makers, different approaches of hospital-based HTA (HB-HTA) have been adopted worldwide. The objective of the present paper is to explore HB-HTA models for adopting innovative medical devices in France and elsewhere. Four different models have been conceptualized: "ambassador" model, "mini-HTA" model, "HTA unit" model and "internal committee". Apparently, "HTA unit" and "internal committee" (or a mixture of both models) are the prevailing HB-HTA models in France. Nevertheless, some weaknesses of these models have been pointed out in previous works. Only few examples involving hospital pharmacists have been found abroad, except in France and in Italy. Finally, the harmonization of the assessment of innovative medical devices in France needs a better understanding of HB-HTA practices.

  3. Hospital Based Customization of a Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Marilyn A.; Ferguson, Julie C.

    1983-01-01

    A Medical Information System must be current if it is to be a viable adjunct to patient care within a hospital setting. Hospital-based customization provides a means of achieving this timeliness with maximum user satisfaction. It, however, requires a major commitment in personnel time as well as additional software and training expenses. The enhanced control of system modifications and overall flexibility in planning the change process result in enthusiastic support of this approach by many hospitals. The key factors for success include careful selection of local personnel with adequate vendor support, extensive QA control, thorough auditing/validation and direct user involvement.

  4. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospective rates for hospital-based and....174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. Link to an amendment... January 1, 2009, the methodology differentiates between hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities;...

  5. Developing and understanding a hospital-based proton facility: bringing physics into medicine.

    PubMed

    Slater, James M

    2007-08-01

    From October 18 to 20, 2006, a symposium, Developing and Understanding a Hospital-based Proton Facility: Bringing Physics Into Medicine, was held at the Renaissance Esmeralda Resort and Spa, Indian Wells, California. The event was offered by the Department of Radiation Medicine at Loma Linda University (LLU), supported by the Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) and the United States Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). The meeting was intended to discuss factors involved in planning, developing, and operating a hospital-based proton treatment center. It brought together some of the most distinguished physicists, radiation biologists, and radiation oncologists in the world, and more than 100 individuals participated in the three-day educational offering. This overview reports on the event and introduces several papers written by many of the speakers from their presentations, for publication in this issue of Technology in Cancer Research and Treatment. Both the symposium and the papers are appropriate for this journal: exploitation of technology was one of the underlying themes of the symposium.

  6. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: nurses' experiences of teaching patients.

    PubMed

    Shubayra, Amnah

    2015-03-01

    Nine nurses were interviewed to determine nurses' experiences of teaching patients to use continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). The material was analyzed using content analysis. Data were sorted into four themes and ten subthemes. The themes were presented as follows: Importance of language, individualized teaching, teaching needs and structure of care in teaching. The findings highlighted important insights into how nurses experience teaching patients to perform CAPD. The study revealed some barriers for the nurses during teaching. The major barrier was shortage of Arabic speaking nursing staff. Incidental findings involved two factors that played an important role in teaching, retraining and a special team to perform pre-assessments, including home visits. In conclusion, the findings of this study showed several factors that are considered as barriers for the nurses during teaching the CAPD patients and the need to improve the communication and teaching in the peritoneal dialysis units, including the importance of individualized teaching.

  7. Severe valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy successfully managed with peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amandeep; Suri, Ashish; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2014-07-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is a commonly used drug for epilepsy, psychiatric disorders and migraine and is frequently used in neurosurgical intensive care units. Though most of its side-effects are mild and transient, certain idiosyncratic side-effects have been attributed to VPA. Valproate induced hyperammonemia (VIH) is one such side-effect. VIH can produce symptoms of encephalopathy known as valproate induced hyperammonemic encephalopathy (VHE). VIH and VHE usually respond to withdrawal of VPA. However, in some cases VHE can be unresponsive to supportive measures and severe enough to be life-threatening. In such cases, dialysis can be used to rapidly reverse hyperammonemia and VHE and can prove to be a lifesaving measure. We report such a case of VIH and life-threatening VHE in a postoperative neurosurgical patient that was managed successfully with peritoneal dialysis.

  8. Regulation of Synthesis and Roles of Hyaluronan in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Timothy; Meran, Soma; Williams, Aled P.; Newbury, Lucy J.; Sauter, Matthias; Sitter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan composed of repeated disaccharide units of alternating D-glucuronic acid and D-N-acetylglucosamine residues linked via alternating β-1,4 and β-1,3 glycosidic bonds. HA is synthesized in humans by HA synthase (HAS) enzymes 1, 2, and 3, which are encoded by the corresponding HAS genes. Previous in vitro studies have shown characteristic changes in HAS expression and increased HA synthesis in response to wounding and proinflammatory cytokines in human peritoneal mesothelial cells. In addition, in vivo models and human peritoneal biopsy samples have provided evidence of changes in HA metabolism in the fibrosis that at present accompanies peritoneal dialysis treatment. This review discusses these published observations and how they might contribute to improvement in peritoneal dialysis. PMID:26550568

  9. Chronic peritoneal dialysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Nia; Hussain, Farida K; Connell, Roy; Shenoy, Manoj U

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of end-stage renal disease in children is increasing. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the modality of choice in many European countries and is increasingly applied worldwide. PD enables children of all ages to be successfully treated while awaiting the ultimate goal of renal transplantation. The advantages of PD over other forms of renal replacement therapy are numerous, in particular the potential for the child to lead a relatively normal life. Indications for commencing PD, the rationale, preparation of family, technical aspects, and management of complications are discussed. PMID:26504404

  10. [Immigrants and dialysis: a survey in Piedmont].

    PubMed

    Forneris, Giacomo; Boero, Roberto; Massara, Carlo; Quarello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    The number of immigrants has been rapidly increasing in Italy in the last decade, with potentially profound effects on the national health care system. Yet, few data are available on the clinical and demographic features of these subjects, or on their need for nephrological care and dialysis treatment. A survey was conducted in 19 dialysis facilities of Piedmont (a northwestern Italian region) about immigrants on chronic dialysis treatment. Data on native country, administrative position, clinical and dialysis aspects were anonymously collected. Overall, 93 immigrant dialysis patients coming from 24 foreign countries were registered. Most of them were young (mean age 46∓14 years) and on extracorporeal treatment (87%); late referral (38%) or starting dialysis in emergency (17%) were common modalities of presentation. Glomerular (33%) or unknown (31%) nephropathies were the most representative causes of end stage renal disease. No difference in incidence of HCV, HBV and HIV compared with native Italian patients was observed. Notably, more than 50% of the immigrant patients had low-level knowledge of Italian. As regards administrative position, 69% were regular foreign citizens, 19% were temporary foreign workers, and 9% had a residence permit. Our survey confirms the existence of a young immigrant population on dialysis in Piedmont, whose social and relational problems are more challenging than clinical aspects and call for new organizational models to manage this growing population on dialysis.

  11. [The past and present of peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Polner, Kálmán

    2008-01-01

    The author reviews briefly the history of peritoneal dialysis, and highlights the significance of the work of two Hungarian nephrologists, Stephen I. Vas and István Taraba . By now, peritoneal dialysis has been considered as equal renal replacement modality compared to haemodialysis. It is even more advantageous in the protection of the patients' residual renal function, morbidity-mortality indices, and quality of life peritoneal dialysis in the first two years. From economical point of view peritoneal dialysis is less expensive than hemodialysis, therefore in the future its greater role can be expected in the treatment of more and more renal patients. The recently achieved technical development, and also the more widespread use of the automated peritoneal dialysis machines contribute to quality improvement. The peritoneal dialysis therapy, by the patients' self-treatment, establishes a new kind of relationship between the patients and the medical personnel; there is a growing requirement for patient education, the patients' self-esteem and cooperation increase, which altogether provides better results in rehabilitation and higher quality of life. Our national peritoneal dialysis utilization falls behind the European achievements, but has been growing dynamically, and we can expect an increase of the number of renal patients on peritoneal dialysis. PMID:18089476

  12. Magnesium and Dialysis: The Neglected Cation.

    PubMed

    Alhosaini, Mohamad; Leehey, David J

    2015-09-01

    Disorders of magnesium homeostasis are very common in dialysis patients but have received scant attention. In this review, we address measurement of plasma magnesium, magnesium balance and the factors that affect magnesium flux during dialysis, the prevalence of hypo- and hypermagnesemia in dialysis patients, and the potential clinical significance of hypo- and hypermagnesemia in dialysis patients. Many factors can affect plasma magnesium concentration, including diet, nutritional status (including plasma albumin level), medications (such as proton pump inhibitors), and dialysis prescription. Further interventional studies to determine the effect of normalization of plasma magnesium concentration on clinical outcomes are needed. At the present time, we recommend that predialysis plasma magnesium be measured on a regular basis, with the dialysate magnesium concentration adjusted to maintain plasma magnesium concentration within the normal range.

  13. Risky business for dialysis services.

    PubMed

    Schohl, Joseph

    2010-05-01

    When self-insured health plans and their third-party administrators pay an artificially low out-of-network rate for dialysis services, they could be liable for the difference between that rate and the reimbursement level provided for by their health plan. Paying a rate that the repricers advised them to pay does not relieve self-insured health plans and third-party administrators of that obligation; only where the repricer has legitimately secured a negotiated contract rate is a lower payment justified. [Editor's note: The term "repricer" has no universally-accepted or formal definition, but it will be used here to describe those companies formed to act as middlemen between health care payers-like self-insured employer plans and TPAs working on behalf of such plans-and health care providers.] Failing to adhere to this will result in lawsuits against self-insured health plans and third-party administrators where they will be forced to defend the repricers' recommended payment amounts, while the repricers try to get themselves dismissed. A better option for plan holders and third-party administrators would be to negotiate directly with the dialysis providers and agree upon a mutually acceptable rate.

  14. Microbiological Surveillance and State of the Art Technological Strategies for the Prevention of Dialysis Water Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Bolasco, Piergiorgio; Contu, Antonio; Meloni, Patrizia; Vacca, Dorio; Galfrè, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Methods: The present report attempts to illustrate the positive impact on the microbiological quality of dialysis patients over a 15-year period through the progressive implementation of state-of-the-art technological strategies and the optimization of microbiological surveillance procedures in five dialysis units in Sardinia. Results: Following on better microbiological, quality controls of dialysis water and improvement of procedures and equipment, a drastic improvement of microbiological water quality was observed in a total of 945 samples. The main aim was to introduce the use of microbiological culture methods as recommended by the most important guidelines. The microbiological results obtained have led to a progressive refining of controls and introduction of new materials and equipment, including two-stage osmosis and piping distribution rings featuring a greater capacity to prevent biofilm adhesion. The actions undertaken have resulted in unexpected quality improvements. Conclusions: Dialysis water should be viewed by the nephrologist as a medicinal product exerting a demonstrable positive impact on microinflammation in dialysis patients. A synergic effort between nephrologists and microbiologists undoubtedly constitutes the most effective means of preventing dialysis infections. PMID:23066395

  15. Transcending Competency Testing in Hospital-Based Simulation.

    PubMed

    Lassche, Madeline; Wilson, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Simulation is a frequently used method for training students in health care professions and has recently gained acceptance in acute care hospital settings for use in educational programs and competency testing. Although hospital-based simulation is currently limited primarily to use in skills acquisition, expansion of the use of simulation via a modified Quality Health Outcomes Model to address systems factors such as the physical environment and human factors such as fatigue, reliance on memory, and reliance on vigilance could drive system-wide changes. Simulation is an expensive resource and should not be limited to use for education and competency testing. Well-developed, peer-reviewed simulations can be used for environmental factors, human factors, and interprofessional education to improve patients' outcomes and drive system-wide change for quality improvement initiatives. PMID:26909459

  16. RISK OF DEMENTIA IN PERITONEAL DIALYSIS PATIENTS COMPARED WITH HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgram, Dawn F.; Szabo, Aniko; Murray, Anne M.; Whittle, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Compared with similarly aged controls, patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have a higher prevalence of cognitive impairment and more rapid cognitive decline, which is not explained by traditional risk factors alone. Since previous small studies suggest an association of cognitive impairment with dialysis modality, we compared incident dementia among patients initiating hemodialysis (HD) versus peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a large national cohort. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of incident dialysis patients in the United States from 2006 to 2008 with no diagnosis of dementia prior to beginning dialysis. We evaluated the effect of initial dialysis modality on incidence of dementia, diagnosed by Medicare claims data, adjusted for baseline demographic and clinical data from USRDS registry. Results Our analysis included 121,623 patients, of whom 8,663 initiated dialysis on PD. The mean age of our cohort was 69.2 years. Patients who initiated on PD had a lower cumulative incidence of dementia than those who initiated HD (1.0% versus 2.7%, 2.5% versus 5.3%, and 3.9% versus 7.3% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively). The risk of dementia for patients who started on PD was lower compared with those who started on HD, with a hazard ratio (HR) = 0.46 [0.41, 0.53], in an unadjusted model and HR 0.74 [0.64, 0.86] in a matched model. Conclusions Dialysis modality is associated with incident dementia in a cohort of older ESRD patients. This finding warrants further investigation of the effect of dialysis modality on cognitive function and evaluation for possible mechanisms. PMID:25742686

  17. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities.

  18. Exploring the phenomenon of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital based healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Janie J; Hodgson, Jennifer L; Kolobova, Irina; Lamson, Angela L; Sira, Natalia; Musick, David

    2015-01-01

    Hospital chaplaincy and spiritual care services are important to patients' medical care and well-being; however, little is known about healthcare providers' experiences receiving spiritual support. A phenomenological study examined the shared experience of spiritual care between hospital chaplains and hospital-based healthcare providers (HBHPs). Six distinct themes emerged from the in-depth interviews: Awareness of chaplain availability, chaplains focus on building relationships with providers and staff, chaplains are integrated in varying degrees on certain hospital units, chaplains meet providers' personal and professional needs, providers appreciate chaplains, and barriers to expanding hospital chaplains' services. While HBHPs appreciated the care received and were able to provide better patient care as a result, participants reported that administrators may not recognize the true value of the care provided. Implications from this study are applied to hospital chaplaincy clinical, research, and training opportunities. PMID:26207904

  19. The nature of dilemmas in dialysis nurse practice.

    PubMed

    Wellard, S

    1992-08-01

    Dilemmas are a part of nurse practice. In situations where a problem potentially has two or more unsatisfactory resolutions, the nurse chooses which course of action to take. The decision to choose constitutes a dilemma. This study focuses on the dilemmas faced by nurses in dialysis units and the context in which they occur. A qualitative design was employed, using open interviews with eight nurses currently employed in dialysis nursing. This approach was taken in order to explore and gain in-depth understanding of the dilemmas in practice. Analysis reveals that dilemmas encountered in dialysis nursing emerge from conflicts in relationships with other people in the work environment. The dilemmas relate to the nurses' perception of the limited power they have in the determination of their practice. This powerlessness is reinforced by their perceived and real isolation from nurses working outside their area of practice. Traditionally, literature on dilemmas in nursing has focused on the development of ethical frameworks to guide practice and the resolution of dilemmas. However, the findings of this study suggest that if nurses are to deal with dilemmas effectively, both for the nurse and the patient, there must be an examination of the structural constraints affecting their practice. Models that are employed by nurses to guide practice must account for the structural elements in the work environment. PMID:1506546

  20. Defining Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Children on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Bakkaloglu, Sevcan A.; Zaritsky, Joshua; Suarez, Angela; Wong, William; Ranchin, Bruno; Qi, Cao; Szabo, Attila J.; Coccia, Paula A.; Harambat, Jérôme; Mitu, Florin; Warady, Bradley A.; Schaefer, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an important end point of dialysis-associated cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different pediatric reference systems on the estimated prevalence of LVH in children on chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD). Design, setting, participants, & measurements Echocardiographic studies in 507 pediatric CPD patients from neonatal age to 19 years were collected in 55 pediatric dialysis units around the globe. We compared the prevalence of LVH on the basis of the traditional cutoff of left ventricular mass (LVM) index (>38.5 g/m2.7) with three novel definitions of LVH that were recently established in healthy pediatric cohorts. Results Application of the new reference systems eliminated the apparently increased prevalence of LVH in young children obtained by the traditional fixed LVM index cutoff currently still recommended by consensus guidelines. However, substantial differences of LVM distribution between the new reference charts resulted in a marked discrepancy in estimated LVH prevalence ranging between 27.4% and 51.7%. Conclusions Although our understanding of the anthropometric determinants of heart size during childhood is improving, more consistent normative echocardiographic data from large populations of healthy children are required for cardiovascular diagnostics and research. PMID:21737857

  1. [The management of dialysis patients seropositive for HBsAg, anti-HCV, or anti-HIV antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2012-01-01

    Infections by hepatitis B or hepatitis C virus are still common among patients on maintenance dialysis in Western countries. The natural history of HBV and HCV in the dialysis population remains unclear; however, there is good evidence showing an adverse impact of an anti-HCV seropositive status on survival in dialysis patients. A recent meta-analysis of observational studies (n=7, 11,589 unique patients) reported that anti-HCV-positive patients on dialysis had a higher mortality rate than those who were anti-HCV negative (adjusted hazard ratio=1.35, 95% confidence interval, 1.13; 1.59, p<0.001). This was in part attributed to a higher frequency of chronic hepatitis C and its attending complications (cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma). In addition, HCV appeared to have a negative influence on quality of life. Recent clinical guidelines by the KDIGO Study Group have not suggested the isolation of anti-HCV-positive patients on maintenance dialysis. Standard precautions and specific procedures against the transmission of blood-borne agents have been recommended to control HCV infection within dialysis units. Isolation by dialysis machines, staff and rooms has been strongly recommended to control HBV. Vaccination is an important tool against transmission of HBV infection among patients on maintenance dialysis; however, the immune response towards the hepatitis B vaccine in uremic patients remains unsatisfactory. Monotherapy with lamivudine is currently used for dialysis patients with hepatitis B whereas combination antiviral therapy (pegylated interferon plus ribavirin) is the standard of care for hepatitis C in the dialysis population, even if various side effects have been observed.

  2. The atrial fibrillation conundrum in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    De Vriese, An S; Caluwé, Rogier; Raggi, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    The burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the risk of stroke are high in dialysis patients. The decision to use anticoagulation rests heavily on effective risk stratification. Because both the pathophysiology of the disease and the response to therapy differ in dialysis, data from the general population cannot be extrapolated. The effect of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) on the risk of stroke in dialysis patients with AF has not been studied in randomized trials. The available observational data provide contradictory results, reflecting differences in the degree of residual confounding, quality of international normalized ratio control, and stroke characterization. Dialysis patients have a high baseline bleeding risk. It remains unclear to what extent VKAs affect the overall bleeding propensity, but they may significantly increase the risk of intracerebral hemorrhage. Vascular calcifications are extremely prevalent in dialysis patients and independently associated with an adverse outcome. Vitamin K antagonists inhibit the activity of key anticalcifying proteins and may thus compound the risk of vascular calcification progression in dialysis. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines for anticoagulation in dialysis patients with AF, we provide recommendations to assist clinicians in individualized risk stratification. We further propose that new oral anticoagulants may have a better benefit-risk profile in dialysis patients than VKA, provided appropriate dose reductions are made. New oral anticoagulant may yield more on-target anticoagulation, reduce the risk of intracerebral bleeding, and not interfere with vascular calcification biology. Clinical trials with new oral anticoagulant in dialysis patients are eagerly awaited, to reveal whether these assumptions can be confirmed. PMID:26995377

  3. Dialysis technicians' perception of certification.

    PubMed

    Williams, Helen F; Garbin, Margery

    2015-03-01

    The Nephrology Nursing Certification Commission initiated this research project to study the viewpoint of dialysis technicians regarding the value of certification. A national convenience sample was obtained using both paper-and-pencil and online forms of the survey instrument. Demographic characteristics were obtained concerning age, race, ethnicity, education, and future employment planning. Technicians' primary work settings, the roles they fill, and the types of certification they hold are described. Incentives offered by employers are considered to explore how they contribute to job satisfaction. Understanding the perceptions of technicians regarding the benefits of certification and the limitations of workplace incentives should enable employers to improve their recruitment and retention programs. Information obtained may offer a baseline for future observations of the characteristics of these significant and essential contributors to the nephrology workforce. PMID:26480642

  4. Update on Ethical Issues in Pediatric Dialysis: Has Pediatric Dialysis Become Morally Obligatory?

    PubMed

    Wightman, Aaron G; Freeman, Michael A

    2016-08-01

    Improvements in pediatric dialysis over the past 50 years have made the decision to proceed with dialysis straightforward for the majority of pediatric patients. For certain groups, however, such as children with multiple comorbid conditions, children and families with few social and economic resources, and neonates and infants, the decision of whether to proceed with dialysis remains much more controversial. In this review, we will examine the best available data regarding the outcomes of dialysis in these populations and analyze the important ethical considerations that should guide decisions regarding dialysis for these patients. We conclude that providers must continue to follow a nuanced and individualized approach in decision making for each child and to recognize that, regardless of the decision reached about dialysis, there is a continued duty to care for patients and families to maximize the remaining quality of their lives. PMID:27037272

  5. Establishing a successful home dialysis program.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Buxo, Jose A; Crawford-Bonadio, Terri L; St Pierre, Donna; Ingram, Katherine M

    2006-01-01

    The renewed interest in home dialysis therapies makes it pertinent to address the essentials of establishing and running a successful home dialysis program. The success of a home program depends on a clear understanding of the structure of the home program team, the physical plant, educational tool requirements, reimbursement sources and a business plan. A good command of the technical and economic aspects is important, but the primary drivers for the creation and growth of a home dialysis program are the confidence and commitment of the nephrological team. PMID:16361836

  6. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  7. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  8. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Program § 414.316 Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services...

  9. Substitute treatment and replacement in chronic kidney disease: peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis and transplant.

    PubMed

    Treviño-Becerra, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    Chronic dialysis replacement treatments or renal transplants are instituted when the patient's glomerular filtration rate, measured by 24-h urine endogenous creatinine clearance, is <10-15 ml/mm and, as the The National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI), European and Canadian guidelines point out, when one or two of the following complications occur: "uremic toxicity" symptoms, significant fluid retention that does not respond to loop diuretics, hyperkalemia, chronic anemia (hemoglobin <8 g), metabolic acidosis or acute pulmonary edema. In all patients for whom transplant is indicated, a selected live donor must be sought or, in the absence of contraindications, the patient should be registered with the national cadaver donation waiting list. While waiting for the transplant, patients will be on a chronic dialysis program. There is no national registry of patients undergoing chronic dialysis; only indirect data from the Mexican Kidney Foundation and the dialysis industry are available. However, it is estimated that 40,000-50,000 people are under this treatment and the numbers grow by 11% every year. Overall, it is thought that for every patient receiving chronic dialysis, there is one more patient who dies without access to therapy. Hemodialysis units must comply with the Official Hemodialysis Standard and the General Health Council Hemodialysis Unit Quality Assessment Form.

  10. [Dialysis dose quantification in critically ill patients].

    PubMed

    Casino, Francesco Gaetano

    2010-01-01

    Acute kidney injury affects about 35% of intensive care unit patients. Renal replacement therapy is required in about 5% of such patients and is associated with a mortality rate as high as 50% to 80%. The latter is likely more related to the failure of extrarenal organs than to an insufficient dialysis dose. This could explain, at least in part, the findings of 2 recent trials (VA/ NIH and RENAL) where the expected dose-outcome relationship was not confirmed. These results cannot be taken to infer that assessing the dialysis dose is no longer required. The contrary is true, in that the common finding of large differences between prescribed and delivered doses calls for accurate dose assessment, at least to avoid underdialysis. The minimum adequate levels are now a Kt/V urea of 1.2 to 1.4 three times a week (3x/wk) on intermittent hemodialysis (IHD), and an effluent of 20 mL/kg/h for 85% of the time on continuous renal replacement therapy (CRTT). Both these parameters can be easily measured but are far from ideal indices because they account neither for residual renal function nor for irregular dose delivery. The equivalent renal urea clearance (EKRjc), by expressing the averaged renal+dialytic urea clearance over the whole treatment period, is able to account for the above factors. Although assessing EKRjc is quite complex, for regular 3x/wk IHD one could use the formula EKRjc=10 Kt/V+1 to compute that a Kt/V of 1.2 and 1.4 corresponds to an EKRjc of 13 and 15 mL/min, respectively. On the other hand, the hourly effluent per kg is numerically similar to EKRjc. On this basis it can be calculated that in non-prediluted really continuous treatment, the recommended CRRT dose (EKRjc=20 mL/min) is 33% higher than the EKRjc of 15 mL/min, corresponding to the recommended Kt/V of 1.4 on 3x/wk IHD.

  11. The practical problem of improving quality in multicenter dialysis facilities.

    PubMed

    Balter, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Multifacility dialysis groups are frequently interested in improving overall quality and find that there are major differences between individual units. Upper management must consider what strategy is needed for the whole company and what strategy must be formulated by individual facilities. To make substantive changes, management must decide to adopt a new culture of true teamwork, drive out fear, and emphasize leadership and education both at the management level and in the individual unit. Both at the corporate and unit levels, leaders must be chosen who are able to recognize people who have the ability, the educational background, the enthusiasm, and the time to direct change. Empowering the individual units and individual employees to make changes and be enthusiastic about improvement is the key to success. PMID:14629606

  12. Laughter and humor therapy in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul N; Parsons, Trisha; Ben-Moshe, Ros; Weinberg, Melissa; Neal, Merv; Gilbert, Karen; Rawson, Helen; Ockerby, Cherene; Finlay, Paul; Hutchinson, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Laughter and humor therapy have been used in health care to achieve physiological and psychological health-related benefits. The application of these therapies to the dialysis context remains unclear. This paper reviews the evidence related to laughter and humor therapy as a medical therapy relevant to the dialysis patient population. Studies from other groups such as children, the elderly, and persons with mental health, cancer, and other chronic conditions are included to inform potential applications of laughter therapy to the dialysis population. Therapeutic interventions could range from humorous videos, stories, laughter clowns through to raucous simulated laughter and Laughter Yoga. The effect of laughter and humor on depression, anxiety, pain, immunity, fatigue, sleep quality, respiratory function and blood glucose may have applications to the dialysis context and require further research.

  13. Are Diuretics Underutilized in Dialysis Patients?

    PubMed

    Trinh, Emilie; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-09-01

    While oral diuretics are commonly used in patients with chronic kidney disease for the management of volume and blood pressure, they are often discontinued upon initiation of dialysis. We suggest that diuretics are considerably underutilized in peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis patients despite numerous potential benefits and few side effects. Moreover, when diuretics are used, optimal doses are not always prescribed. In peritoneal dialysis, the use of diuretics can improve volume status and minimize the need for higher glucose-containing solutions. In patients on haemodialysis, diuretics can help lessen interdialytic weight gain, resulting in decreased ultrafiltration rates and fewer episodes of intradialytic hypotension. This paper will review the mechanism of action of diuretics in patients with renal insufficiency, quantify the risk of side effects and elaborate on the potential advantages of diuretic use in peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis patients with residual kidney function.

  14. Laughter and humor therapy in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Paul N; Parsons, Trisha; Ben-Moshe, Ros; Weinberg, Melissa; Neal, Merv; Gilbert, Karen; Rawson, Helen; Ockerby, Cherene; Finlay, Paul; Hutchinson, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Laughter and humor therapy have been used in health care to achieve physiological and psychological health-related benefits. The application of these therapies to the dialysis context remains unclear. This paper reviews the evidence related to laughter and humor therapy as a medical therapy relevant to the dialysis patient population. Studies from other groups such as children, the elderly, and persons with mental health, cancer, and other chronic conditions are included to inform potential applications of laughter therapy to the dialysis population. Therapeutic interventions could range from humorous videos, stories, laughter clowns through to raucous simulated laughter and Laughter Yoga. The effect of laughter and humor on depression, anxiety, pain, immunity, fatigue, sleep quality, respiratory function and blood glucose may have applications to the dialysis context and require further research. PMID:24467450

  15. [Hypoxia and oxygen content during dialysis].

    PubMed

    Tulli, G; Vignali, G; Guadagnucci, A; Mondello, V; Pacciani, S; Pappagallo, S

    1992-03-01

    In a study of 72 patients treated with acetate and bicarbonate dialysis, the Authors verified if hypoxic hypoxia caused by dialysis depends on a deficit in oxygen content with an inherent risk of tissue hypoxia. PO2uv (uncompensated venous oxygen partial pressure) and CQ (cardiac compensation factor) derived from the oxygen absorption curve were studied by a new Ole Siggard-Andersen algorithm. The results do not show a risk of tissue hypoxia in the postdialytic period. PMID:1589077

  16. Nutrition in Older Adults on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Lina

    2015-11-01

    Nutrition in older adults on peritoneal dialysis is an important aspect of a patient's clinical management as well as being influenced by their overall well-being, both mental and physical. This is especially pertinent as individuals age, since the potential impact of life changes and physical changes contribute to the development of protein-energy wasting and potentially exacerbating sarcopenia and wasting. This article provides an outline of the nutritional issues to consider in older adults on peritoneal dialysis (PD).

  17. Transmission of HIV in dialysis centre.

    PubMed

    Velandia, M; Fridkin, S K; Cárdenas, V; Boshell, J; Ramirez, G; Bland, L; Iglesias, A; Jarvis, W

    1995-06-01

    In August, 1993, 13 dialysis patients at one dialysis centre in Colombia, South America, were found to be HIV positive, and this prompted an epidemiological investigation. We carried out a cohort study of all dialysis centre patients during January, 1992 to December, 1993 (epidemic period) to determine risk factors for HIV seroconversion. Haemodialysis and medical records were reviewed, dialysis centre staff and surviving patients were interviewed, and dialysis practices were observed. Stored sera from all dialysis centre patients were tested for HIV antibody. 12 (52%) of 23 patients tested positive for HIV antibody by enzyme immunoassay and western blot during the epidemic period. Of the 23 tested, 9 (39%) converted from HIV antibody negative to positive (seroconverters) and 10 (44%) remained HIV negative (seronegatives). The HIV seroconversion rate was higher among patients dialysed at the centre while a new patient, who was HIV seropositive, was dialysed there (90% vs 0%; p < 0.01), or when the dialysis centre reprocessed access needles, dialysers, and bloodlines (60% vs 0%). While 2 of 9 HIV seroconverters had had sex with prostitutes, none had received unscreened blood products or had other HIV risk factors. No surgical or dental procedures were associated with HIV seroconversion. Dialysers were reprocessed separately with 5% formaldehyde and were labelled for use on the same patient. Access needles were reprocessed by soaking them in a common container with a low-level disinfectant, benzalkonium chloride; 4 pairs of needles were placed in one pan creating the potential for cross-contamination or use of one patient's needles on another patient. HIV transmission at the dialysis centre was confirmed. Improperly reprocessed patient-care equipment, most probably access needles, is the likely mechanism of transmission. This outbreak was discovered by accident and similar transmission may be occurring in many other countries where low-level disinfectants are used to

  18. Dialysis treatment in Australia, 1982 to 1988.

    PubMed

    Disney, A P

    1990-05-01

    The incidence of new dialysis-dependent patients in Australia increased rapidly from 1982, due mainly to acceptance for treatment of more elderly patients. In 1988, 21% of patients beginning dialysis were 65 to 74 years old, and a further 26% were 55 to 64 years. Consequently, the prevalence of dialysis-dependent patients increased considerably during the same period, particularly in the age range 55 to 74 years. Diabetes-induced renal failure accounted for a constant low proportion of new patients, approximately 10%, which contrasted with the experience in some other countries. Hemodialysis (HD) was the more common method of treatment compared with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in 1988 (70% v 30%, respectively). Home dialysis treatment, HD or CAPD, supported 50% of all dialysis-dependent patients. Patient survival at 1, 2, and 5 years after initiating treatment was 89%, 78%, and 48%, respectively. Age and method of dialysis significantly influenced survival; the elderly and diabetic had a lower expectation of survival. The difference in survival of HD compared with CAPD increased with the duration of treatment, reaching 20% at 5 years (5-year survival, 59% HD; 39% CAPD). There was no evidence of increasing mortality among patients beginning treatment recently. Withdrawal from treatment represented 16% of deaths during 1988; 19% of the deaths were in the age group 65 to 74 years. The influence of the morbidity and mortality of dialysis on provision of such treatment for end-stage renal failure in the elderly population warrants an objective review of both the benefits to the individual and the availability of health care to the whole society.

  19. The elderly patient on dialysis: geriatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Germain, Michael J; Cohen, Lewis; Unruh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The burgeoning population of older dialysis patients presents opportunities to provide personalized care. The older dialysis population has a high burden of chronic health conditions, decrements in quality of life and a high risk of death. In order to address these challenges, this review will recommend routinely establishing prognosis through the use of prediction instruments and communicating these findings to older patients. The challenges to prognosis in adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) include the subjective nature of clinical judgment, application of appropriate prognostic tools and communication of findings to patients and caregivers. There are three reasons why we believe these conversations occur infrequently with the dialysis population. First, there have previously been no clinically practical instruments to identify individuals undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD) who are at highest risk for death. Second, nephrologists have not been trained to have conversations about prognosis and end-of-life care. Third, other than hospitalizations and accrual of new diagnoses, there are no natural milestone guidelines in place for patients supported by dialysis. The prognosis can be used in shared decision-making to establish goals of care, limits on dialysis support or parameters for withdrawal from dialysis. As older adults with ESRD benefit from kidney transplantation, prognosis can also be used to determine who should be referred for evaluation by a kidney transplant team. The use of prognosis in older adults may determine approaches to optimize well-being and personalize care among older adults ranging from hospice to kidney transplantation.

  20. The elderly patient on dialysis: geriatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pooja; Germain, Michael J; Cohen, Lewis; Unruh, Mark

    2014-05-01

    The burgeoning population of older dialysis patients presents opportunities to provide personalized care. The older dialysis population has a high burden of chronic health conditions, decrements in quality of life and a high risk of death. In order to address these challenges, this review will recommend routinely establishing prognosis through the use of prediction instruments and communicating these findings to older patients. The challenges to prognosis in adults with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) include the subjective nature of clinical judgment, application of appropriate prognostic tools and communication of findings to patients and caregivers. There are three reasons why we believe these conversations occur infrequently with the dialysis population. First, there have previously been no clinically practical instruments to identify individuals undergoing maintenance hemodialysis (HD) who are at highest risk for death. Second, nephrologists have not been trained to have conversations about prognosis and end-of-life care. Third, other than hospitalizations and accrual of new diagnoses, there are no natural milestone guidelines in place for patients supported by dialysis. The prognosis can be used in shared decision-making to establish goals of care, limits on dialysis support or parameters for withdrawal from dialysis. As older adults with ESRD benefit from kidney transplantation, prognosis can also be used to determine who should be referred for evaluation by a kidney transplant team. The use of prognosis in older adults may determine approaches to optimize well-being and personalize care among older adults ranging from hospice to kidney transplantation. PMID:23787545

  1. Profile of incident chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorders in chronic kidney disease Stage 4 and 5: A hospital based cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Valson, A. T.; Sundaram, M.; David, V. G.; Deborah, M. N.; Varughese, S.; Basu, G.; Mohapatra, A.; Alexander, S.; Jose, J.; Roshan, J.; Simon, B.; Rebekah, G.; Tamilarasi, V.; Jacob, C. K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease related-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) has been poorly studied in pre-dialysis Indian CKD patients. We aimed to study the clinical, biochemical and extra skeletal manifestations of untreated CKD-MBD in pre-dialysis Stage 4 and 5 CKD patients attending nephrology out-patient clinic at a tertiary care hospital in South India. A hospital based cross-sectional survey including, demographic profile, history of CKD-MBD symptoms, measurement of serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, 25 hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH) D) and alkaline phosphatase; lateral abdominal X-rays for abdominal aortic calcification (AAC) and echocardiography for valvular calcification (VC) was carried out. Of the 710 patients surveyed, 45% had no CKD-MBD related symptom. Prevalence of hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperparathyroidism (>150 pg/mL) and 25(OH) D levels <30 ng/mL was 66.3%, 59%, 89.3% and 74.7% respectively. Echocardiography was carried out in 471 patients; 96% of whom had VC (calcification score ≥1). Patients with VC were older and had lower 25(OH) D levels than those without. Lateral abdominal X-rays were obtained in 558 patients, 6.8% of whom were found to have AAC, which was associated with older age. Indian patients with incident CKD-MBD have a high prevalence of hypocalcemia, 25(OH) D deficiency and VC even prior to initiating dialysis while AAC does not appear to be common. The association between 25(OH) D deficiency and VC needs further exploration. PMID:24701042

  2. Intraperitoneal meropenem for peritoneal dialysis peritonitis with Serratia marcescens immediately on commencing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bhave, P; Tregaskis, P; Walker, R; Wilson, S

    2016-03-01

    A 67-year-old man developed Serratia marcescens peritonitis within a week of commencing peritoneal dialysis. Dialysate cultures isolated multidrug-resistant S. marcescens, which was treated with intraperitoneal meropenem. This unusual case highlights the problem of multidrug-resistant peritoneal dialysis infections and the potential viability of intraperitoneal meropenem as ambulatory peritonitis therapy.

  3. Central venous catheter malposition due to dialysis catheter: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Neha; Samson, Sumanth

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man on maintenance hemodialysis was admitted to the intensive care unit with septic shock and coagulopathy. As there was a dialysis catheter in the right internal jugular vein, the left internal jugular vein was cannulated with a central venous catheter to initiate vasopressor therapy. A chest X-ray showed formation of a catheter loop inside the left brachiocephalic vein, probably due to hindrance by the dialysis catheter. This report describes the hurdles encountered, repeated cannulation attempts, and serial chest X-ray findings required to obtain acceptable placement of the catheter tip. PMID:27703638

  4. Water channels in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Devuyst, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis involves diffusive and convective transports and osmosis through the highly vascularized peritoneal membrane. Several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) corresponds to the ultrasmall pore predicted by the modelization of peritoneal transport. Proof-of-principle studies have shown that up-regulation of the expression of AQP1 in peritoneal capillaries is reflected by increased water permeability and ultrafiltration, without affecting the osmotic gradient and the permeability for small solutes. Inversely, studies in Aqp1 mice have shown that haploinsufficiency in AQP1 is reflected by significant attenuation of water transport. Recent studies have identified lead compounds that could act as agonists of aquaporins, as well as putative binding sites and potential mechanisms of gating the water channel. By modulating water transport, these pharmacological agents could have clinically relevant effects in targeting specific tissues or disease states. These studies on the peritoneal membrane also provide an experimental framework to investigate the role of water channels in the endothelium and various cell types.

  5. [Focusing on peritoneal dialysis adequacy].

    PubMed

    Issad, Belkacem; Durand, Pierre-Yves; Siohan, Pascale; Goffin, Eric; Cridlig, Joëlle; Jean, Guillaume; Ryckelynck, Jean-Philippe; Arkouche, W; Bourdenx, J-P; Cridlig, J; Dallaporta, B; Fessy, H; Fischbach, M; Giaime, P; Goffin, E; Issad, B; Jean, G; Joly, D; Mercadal, L; Poux, J-M; Ryckelynck, J-P; Siohan, P; Souid, M; Toledano, D; Verger, C; Vigeral, P; Uzan, M

    2013-11-01

    The optimal method to assess the adequacy of peritoneal dialysis therapies is controversial. Today, the adequacy must not be considered as a number or a concept assessed only by two parameters (total KT/V urea and total solute clearance) but defined by many more items. In the absence of data, based on theoretical considerations, the reanalysis of the CANUSA study showed that renal kidney function, rather than peritoneal clearance, was associated with improved survival. Residual renal function is considered as a major predictor factor of cardiovascular mortality. Results of this reanalysis were supported by the adequacy data in ADEMEX, EAPOS and ANZDATA studies. Therefore, clinical assessment plays a major role in PD adequacy. The management of fluid balance, the regular monitoring of malnutrition, the control of mineral metabolism and particularly the glucose load, considered as the "corner-stone" of the system, are the main points to be considered in the adequacy of PD patients. The essential goal is to minimize glucose load by glucose-sparing strategies in order to reduce the neoangiogenesis of the peritoneal membrane. PMID:23850000

  6. Nosocomial infections in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Alexander; Trevino, Sergio; Marschall, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections in patients requiring renal replacement therapy have a high impact on morbidity and mortality. The most dangerous complication is bloodstream infection (BSI) associated with the vascular access, with a low BSI risk in arteriovenous fistulas or grafts and a comparatively high risk in central venous catheters. The single most important measure for preventing BSI is therefore the reduction of catheter use by means of early fistula formation. As this is not always feasible, prevention should focus on educational efforts, hand hygiene, surveillance of dialysis-associated events, and specific measures at and after the insertion of catheters. Core measures at the time of insertion include choosing the optimal site of insertion, the use of maximum sterile barrier precautions, adequate skin antisepsis, and the choice of catheter type; after insertion, access care needs to ensure hub disinfection and regular dressing changes. The application of antimicrobial locks is reserved for special situations. Evidence suggests that bundling a selection of the aforementioned measures can significantly reduce infection rates. The diagnosis of central line-associated BSI (CLABSI) is based on clinical signs and microbiological findings in blood cultures ideally drawn both peripherally and from the catheter. The prompt installation of empiric antibiotic treatment covering the most commonly encountered organisms is key regarding CLABSI treatment. Catheter removal is recommended in complicated cases or if cultures yield Staphylococcus aureus, enterococci, Pseudomonas or fungi. In other cases, guide wire exchange or catheter salvage strategies with antibiotic lock solutions may be acceptable alternatives. PMID:25676304

  7. Physical, emotional and social adjustments to home dialysis.

    PubMed

    Brown, D J; Craick, C C; Davies, S E; Johnson, M L; Dawborn, J K; Heale, W F

    1978-03-11

    Forty home dialysis patients and their families were interviewed by means of a standard questionnaire to determine their physical, emotional, and social adjustment to treatment. The results indicated a reasonable level of health, particularly in patients under the age of 50 years. However, home dialysis produced considerable strain in the family, particularly in the dialysis partners. Home training programmes should provide appropriate learning and technical experience for the dialysis partners and continued support, including integrated medical and paramedical services, domiciliary visiting, and regular holidays. Limited-care dialysis facilities should be provided where home dialysis is impractical or becomes intolerable.

  8. “Is There Life on Dialysis?”: Time and Aging in a Clinically Sustained Existence

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Ann J.; Shim, Janet K.; Kaufman, Sharon R.

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, in the United States, lives are being extended at ever-older ages through the implementation of routine medical procedures such as renal dialysis. This paper discusses the lives and experiences of a number of individuals 70 years of age and older at two dialysis units in California. It considers what kind of life it is that is being sustained and prolonged in these units, the meanings of the time gained through (and lost to) dialysis for older people, and the relationship of “normal” life outside the units to an exceptional state on the inside that some patients see as not-quite-life. Highlighting the unique dimensions of gerontological time on chronic life support, the article PMID:16249136

  9. Best Practices Consensus Protocol for Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement by Interventional Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aal, Ahmed K.; Dybbro, Paul; Hathaway, Peter; Guest, Steven; Neuwirth, Michael; Krishnamurthy, Venkat

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters can be placed by interventional radiologists, an approach that might offer scheduling efficiencies, cost-effectiveness, and a minimally invasive procedure. In the United States, changes in the dialysis reimbursement structure by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are expected to result in the increased use of PD, a less costly dialysis modality that offers patients the opportunity to receive dialysis in the home setting and to have more independence for travel and work schedules, and that preserves vascular access for future dialysis options. Placement of PD catheters by interventional radiologists might therefore be increasingly requested by nephrology practices, given that recent publications have demonstrated the favorable impact on PD practices of an interventional radiology PD placement capability. Earlier reports of interventional radiology PD catheter placement came from single-center practices with smaller reported experiences. The need for a larger consensus document that attempts to establish best demonstrated practices for radiologists is evident. The radiologists submitting this consensus document represent a combined experience of more than 1000 PD catheter placements. The authors submit these consensus-proposed best demonstrated practices for placement of PD catheters by interventional radiologists under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. This technique might allow for expeditious placement of permanent PD catheters in late-referred patients with end-stage renal disease, thus facilitating urgent-start PD and avoiding the need for temporary vascular access catheters. PMID:24584622

  10. Patency and complications of translumbar dialysis catheters

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fanna; Bennett, Stacy; Arrigain, Susana; Schold, Jesse; Heyka, Robert; McLennan, Gordon; Navaneethan, Sankar D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Translumbar tunneled dialysis catheter (TLDC) is a temporary dialysis access for patients exhausted traditional access for dialysis. While few small studies reported successes with TLDC, additional studies are warranted to understand the short and long-term patency and safety of TLDC. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of adult patients who received TLDC for hemodialysis access from June 2006 to June 2013. Patient demographics, comorbid conditions, dialysis details, catheter insertion procedures and associated complications, catheter patency, and patient survival data were collected. Catheter patency was studied using Kaplan-Meier curve; catheter functionality was assessed with catheter intervals and catheter related complications were used to estimate catheter safety. Results There were 84 TLDCs inserted in 28 patients with 28 primary insertions and 56 exchanges. All TLDC insertions were technically successful with good blood flow during dialysis (>300 ml/min) and no immediate complications (major bleeding or clotting) were noted. The median number of days in place for initial catheter, secondary catheter and total catheter were 65, 84 and 244 respectively. The catheter patency rate at 3, 6 and 12 months were 43%, 25% and 7% respectively. The main complications were poor blood flow (40%) and catheter related infection (36%), which led to 30.8% and 35.9% catheter removal respectively. After translumbar catheter, 42.8% of the patients were successfully converted to another vascular access or peritoneal dialysis. Conclusion This study data suggests that TLDC might serve as a safe, alternate access for dialysis patients in short-term who have exhausted conventional vascular access. PMID:25800550

  11. Retinal Detachment in Southwest Ethiopia: A Hospital Based Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Asaminew, Tsedeke; Gelaw, Yeshigeta; Bekele, Sisay; Solomon, Berhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The incidence of retinal detachment in Blacks is generally considered to be low though there are few supporting studies in Africa. This study, thus, aimed at describing the clinical profile of patients with retinal detachment in Southwest Ethiopia. Methods A hospital-based study was done on all consecutive retinal detachment patients who presented to Jimma University Hospital over six months period. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect patients’ sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history. Comprehensive anterior and posterior segment eye examinations were done and risk factors were sought for. Statistical tests were considered significant if P < 0.05. Results A total of 94 eyes of 80 patients (1.5%) had retinal detachment (RD) and about 69% of patients were symptomatic for over a month before presentation. The mean age was 41.4 years (SD ±16.5). Fourteen patients (17.5%) had bilateral RD. At presentation, 61 eyes (64.9%) were blind from RD and 11 (13.8%) patients were bilaterally blind from RD. Rhegmatogenous RD was seen in 55 eyes (58.5%) and tractional RD in 22 eyes (23.4%). The most common risk factors were ocular trauma (32 eyes, 34.0%), myopia (23 eyes, 24.5%), posterior uveitis (13 eyes, 13.8%) and diabetic retinopathy (9 eyes, 9.6%). Most retinal breaks (25 eyes, 43.1%) were superotemporal and horse-shoe tear was the most common (19 eyes, 20.2%). Macula was off in 77 eyes (81.9%) and 38 eyes (69.1% of RRD eyes) had grade C proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Macular status was significantly associated with PVR (P=0.011), and duration of symptoms (RR=1.25, 95%CI: 1.059-1.475, P=0.040). Conclusions A significant numbers of patients with ocular problem had retinal detachment, and nearly two third of the patients presented late. Trauma and myopia were the most important risk factors. People should be educated to improve their health seeking behavior and use eye safety precautions to prevent ocular trauma. PMID:24086614

  12. Increasing sodium removal on peritoneal dialysis: applying dialysis mechanics to the peritoneal dialysis prescription.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michel; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Shroff, Rukshana; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-04-01

    Optimal fluid removal on peritoneal dialysis (PD) requires removal of water coupled with sodium, which is predominantly achieved via the small pores in the peritoneal membrane. On the other hand, free-water transport takes place through aquaporin-1 channels, but leads to sodium retention and over hydration. PD prescription can be adapted to promote small pore transport to achieve improved sodium and fluid management. Both adequate dwell volume and dwell time are required for small pore transport. The dwell volume determines the amount of "wetted" peritoneal membrane being increased in the supine position and optimized at dwell volumes of approximately 1400 ml/m(2). Diffusion across the recruited small pores is time-dependent, favored by a long dwell time, and driven by the transmembrane solute gradient. According to the 3-pore model of conventional PD, sodium removal primarily occurs via convection. The clinical application of these principles is essential for optimal performance of PD and has resulted in a new approach to the automated PD prescription: adapted automated PD. In adapted automated PD, sequential short- and longer-dwell exchanges, with small and large dwell volumes, respectively, are used. A crossover trial in adults and a pilot study in children suggests that sodium and fluid removal are increased by adapted automated PD, leading to improved blood pressure control when compared with conventional PD. These findings are not explained by the current 3-pore model of peritoneal permeability and require further prospective crossover studies in adults and children for validation.

  13. Increasing sodium removal on peritoneal dialysis: applying dialysis mechanics to the peritoneal dialysis prescription.

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michel; Schmitt, Claus Peter; Shroff, Rukshana; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Warady, Bradley A

    2016-04-01

    Optimal fluid removal on peritoneal dialysis (PD) requires removal of water coupled with sodium, which is predominantly achieved via the small pores in the peritoneal membrane. On the other hand, free-water transport takes place through aquaporin-1 channels, but leads to sodium retention and over hydration. PD prescription can be adapted to promote small pore transport to achieve improved sodium and fluid management. Both adequate dwell volume and dwell time are required for small pore transport. The dwell volume determines the amount of "wetted" peritoneal membrane being increased in the supine position and optimized at dwell volumes of approximately 1400 ml/m(2). Diffusion across the recruited small pores is time-dependent, favored by a long dwell time, and driven by the transmembrane solute gradient. According to the 3-pore model of conventional PD, sodium removal primarily occurs via convection. The clinical application of these principles is essential for optimal performance of PD and has resulted in a new approach to the automated PD prescription: adapted automated PD. In adapted automated PD, sequential short- and longer-dwell exchanges, with small and large dwell volumes, respectively, are used. A crossover trial in adults and a pilot study in children suggests that sodium and fluid removal are increased by adapted automated PD, leading to improved blood pressure control when compared with conventional PD. These findings are not explained by the current 3-pore model of peritoneal permeability and require further prospective crossover studies in adults and children for validation. PMID:26924063

  14. Sexual function in women receiving maintenance dialysis.

    PubMed

    Seethala, Srikanth; Hess, Rachel; Bossola, Maurizio; Unruh, Mark L; Weisbord, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    While substantial attention has been paid to the issue of sexual dysfunction in men on chronic dialysis, less is known about this problem in women with end-stage renal disease. We sought to assess sexual dysfunction in women on chronic dialysis and determine whether patients discuss this problem with their providers and receive treatment. We prospectively enrolled women receiving chronic hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis in Pittsburgh, PA. We asked patients to complete the 19-item Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) to assess sexual function and a 5-item survey that assessed whether patients had discussed sexual dysfunction with their providers and/or received treatment for this problem in the past. We enrolled 66 patients; 59 (89%) on hemodialysis and 7 (11%) on peritoneal dialysis. All patients completed the FSFI, of whom 53 (80%) had FSFI scores <26.55, consistent with the presence of sexual dysfunction. Of 37 patients who were married or residing with a significant other, 27 (73%) had sexual dysfunction. Among 24 participants who reported having been sexually active over the previous 4 weeks, 11 (46%) had sexual dysfunction. Only 21% of patients with sexual dysfunction had discussed this problem with their gynecologist, renal or primary provider, and 3 (6%) reported having received treatment. Sexual dysfunction is common in women on dialysis, even among patients who are married or residing with a significant other and those who are sexually active. However, few women discuss this issue with their providers or receive treatment.

  15. The poetics of professionalism among dialysis technicians.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Laura L

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of care for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients is provided by skilled (but not formally educated) paraprofessional technicians. Using Goffman's (1959) framing of the performance of self in everyday discourse, this study examines discourse from dialysis technicians and technical aides to explore these paraprofessionals' construction and performance of professional identity and professional communication within the context of an outpatient dialysis clinic. Themes of professionalism--individualized care, vigilance, teamwork, and emotion management--are illustrated via poetic transcription of interviews with technicians. I contend that such representation offers validity equal to that of traditional research accounts while embodying alternative representational strengths. PMID:21181599

  16. The Gambro system for home daily dialysis.

    PubMed

    Ledebo, Ingrid; Fredin, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Safety and reliability have been the main emphasis when developing our system for home daily dialysis. The AK 95 is part of a comprehensive system of appropriate products consisting additionally of a silent water treatment module, an ultrafilter, and a range of dry disposables for dialysis fluid preparation and disinfection. The dialyzer can be selected from a family of synthetic, biocompatible filters, both low and high flux. To complete the system, a modern data management tool for online or off-line surveillance and multilingual training manuals in both conventional format as well as animated software are available.

  17. Berardinelli-Seip syndrome in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Bande-Fernández, José Joaquín; García-Castro, Raúl; Sánchez-Alvarez, José Emilio; Rodríguez-Suárez, Carmen; Coronel-Aguilar, Diego; Hidalgo, Carlos; Istanbuli, Beatriz; Merino-Bueno, Carmen; Del Rio-García, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A case of Berardinelli-Seip syndrome, a congenital generalised lipodystrophy, is reported. Symptoms first appeared when the patient was 20 years old. She showed severe insulin resistance as well as micro- and macro-angiopathic complications, including chronic kidney disease, which required renal replacement therapy with peritoneal dialysis. The patient's clinical course was reviewed since paediatric age (when initial signs of the disease being already evident) to present time. Berardinelli-Seip syndrome is very uncommon, and the present case is particularly rare because it is the only case (at least as reported in the literature) in a patient receiving dialysis.

  18. Maintaining Safety in the Dialysis Facility

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Errors in dialysis care can cause harm and death. While dialysis machines are rarely a major cause of morbidity, human factors at the machine interface and suboptimal communication among caregivers are common sources of error. Major causes of potentially reversible adverse outcomes include medication errors, infections, hyperkalemia, access-related errors, and patient falls. Root cause analysis of adverse events and "near misses" can illuminate care processes and show system changes to improve safety. Human factors engineering and simulation exercises have strong potential to define common clinical team purpose, and improve processes of care. Patient observations and their participation in error reduction increase the effectiveness of patient safety efforts. PMID:25376767

  19. Maintaining safety in the dialysis facility.

    PubMed

    Kliger, Alan S

    2015-04-01

    Errors in dialysis care can cause harm and death. While dialysis machines are rarely a major cause of morbidity, human factors at the machine interface and suboptimal communication among caregivers are common sources of error. Major causes of potentially reversible adverse outcomes include medication errors, infections, hyperkalemia, access-related errors, and patient falls. Root cause analysis of adverse events and "near misses" can illuminate care processes and show system changes to improve safety. Human factors engineering and simulation exercises have strong potential to define common clinical team purpose, and improve processes of care. Patient observations and their participation in error reduction increase the effectiveness of patient safety efforts. PMID:25376767

  20. [Should dialysis be for all? Yes indeed!].

    PubMed

    Panzetta, G; Grignetti, M; Toigo, G

    2008-01-01

    Clinically compromised patients who must undergo chronic dialysis are, in general, at risk because the procedure can be difficult to perform and give poor results in terms of survival and of rehabilitation. However, it is dialysis of the very elderly which is routinely characterized by misgivings about the indication for and limits of the technique. Patients older than 75 years of age currently represent more than 35% of the population that begin dialysis in most European registries. In our center at least 30 very old patients begin dialysis every year, which represents 45% of the total incident patients. About 30% of these patients, because of severe physical and/or mental disability, often associated with a situation of social deprivation, rarely achieve true clinical stability and depend upon outside caregivers in order to survive. The treatment of these patients strains the resources of the health and social structure, as well as the Nephrology Division, whose organization can be disrupted by their urgent needs, such as hospitalization, transportation, convalescent care, etc. Despite these difficulties and a mean survival of only 28 months, the global clinical conditions of patients older than 75 years of age are not much different than patients in the age bracket of 65 to 75 years. In fact, excluding patients older than 85 years of age (a category which geriatricians consider separately), the survival and rehabilitation of the very elderly appear similar to those of patients 65 to 75 years of age. Many of the clinical problems of the dialyzed elderly, such as sensory, mental and functional impairment, are the result of advanced age per se rather than of uremia or of dialysis. Therefore, ethical considerations of dialysis and of health maintenance in the very elderly are similar to those presented by patients who are afflicted by other serious diseases such as cancer, heart failure, or extensive stroke. As a result of modern technology and the advancement of

  1. An Alternative Approach to Delivering Intensive Dialysis in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ross, Louise E; Swift, Pauline A; Newbold, Sandra M; Bramham, Kate; Hurley, Anne; Gallagher, Hugh

    Pregnancy outcomes in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis are improving. Recent literature supports intensive hemodialysis (HD) as the modality of choice during pregnancy in ESRD. We report the successful delivery of a healthy infant at full term in a patient with ESRD by supplementing peritoneal dialysis (PD) with intermittent HD to achieve adequate dialysis intensity. PMID:27659934

  2. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  3. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  4. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not paid under...

  5. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  6. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not paid under...

  7. Hamster bite peritonitis: Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Campos, A; Taylor, J H; Campbell, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the first case of Pasteurella pneumotropica peritonitis in a peritoneal dialysis patient. This rare infection was the result of contamination of the dialysis tubing by a pet hamster. We stress the importance of household pets as a source of infection in the peritoneal dialysis population. PMID:11095007

  8. Regrets Associated with Providing Healthcare: Qualitative Study of Experiences of Hospital-Based Physicians and Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Agoritsas, Thomas; Perneger, Thomas V.; Schmidt, Ralph E.; Cullati, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Background Regret is an unavoidable corollary of clinical practice. Physicians and nurses perform countless clinical decisions and actions, in a context characterised by time pressure, information overload, complexity and uncertainty. Objective To explore feelings associated with regretted clinical decisions or interventions of hospital-based physicians and nurses and to examine how these regrets are coped with. Method Qualitative study of a volunteer sample of 12 physicians and 13 nurses from Swiss University Hospitals using semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis Results All interviewees reported at least one intense regret, which sometimes led to sleep problems, or taking sickness leave. Respondents also reported an accumulation effect of small and large regrets, which sometimes led to quitting one's unit or choosing another specialty. Respondents used diverse ways of coping with regrets, including changing their practices and seeking support from peers and family but also suppression of thoughts related to the situation and ruminations on the situation. Another coping strategy was acceptance of one's limits and of medicine's limits. Physicians reported that they avoided sharing with close colleagues because they felt they could lose their credibility. Conclusions Since regret seems related to both positive and negative consequences, it is important to learn more about regret coping among healthcare providers and to determine whether training in coping strategies could help reduce negative consequences such as sleep problems, absenteeism, or turnover. PMID:21829706

  9. Hospital-Based Acute Care Use in Survivors of Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ortego, Alexandra; Gaieski, David F.; Fuchs, Barry D.; Jones, Tiffanie; Halpern, Scott D.; Small, Dylan S.; Sante, S. Cham; Drumheller, Byron; Christie, Jason D.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Septic shock is associated with increased long-term morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the use of hospital-based acute care in survivors after hospital discharge. The objectives of the study were to examine the frequency, timing, causes, and risk factors associated with Emergency Department (ED) visits and hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Tertiary, academic hospital in the United States. Patients Patients admitted with septic shock (serum lactate ≥ 4 mmol/L or refractory hypotension) and discharged alive to a non-hospice setting between 2007 and 2010. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results The co-primary outcomes were all-cause hospital readmission and ED visits (treat-and-release encounters) within 30 days to any of the three health system hospitals. Of 269 at-risk survivors, 63 (23.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 18.2, 28.5) were readmitted within 30 days of discharge and another 12 (4.5%, 95% CI: 2.3, 7.7) returned to the ED for a treat-and-release visit. Readmissions occurred within 15 days of discharge in 75% of cases and were more likely in oncology patients (p=0.001) and patients with a longer hospital length of stay (p=0.04). Readmissions were frequently due to another life-threatening condition and resulted in death or discharge to hospice in 16% of cases. The reasons for readmission were deemed potentially related to the index septic shock hospitalization in 78% (49/63) of cases. The most common cause was infection-related, accounting for 46% of all 30-day readmissions, followed by cardiovascular or thromboembolic events (18%). Conclusions The use of hospital-based acute care appeared to be common in septic shock survivors. Encounters often led to readmission within 15 days of discharge, were frequently due to another acute condition, and appeared to result in substantial morbidity and mortality. Given the potential public health implications of

  10. The economic impact of epoetin alfa therapy on delaying time to dialysis in elderly patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Patrick; Duh, Mei Sheng; Mody, Samir H; Bookhart, Brahim; Piech, Catherine Tak

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of epoetin alfa (EPO) therapy on delaying progression to renal dialysis and quantify the associated medical cost savings in elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Elderly (>/=65 years) dialysis patients who had >/=1 hemoglobin (Hb) value and >/=1 glomerular filtration rate (GFR) value of <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) were identified using health claims and laboratory data from the period January 1999 to February 2005. Exclusion criteria included: organ transplantation, blood transfusion, use of darbepoetin alfa, and dialysis for reasons other than CKD. Each EPO patient was matched by Hb and GFR to one control patient. The time from when matched patients had the same GFR value to dialysis was compared. The economic impact of EPO on delaying dialysis was monetized using standardized health plan payments, and adjusted to 2005 United States dollars. Sixty-eight patients (34 EPO and 34 matched controls) formed the study population. The average time to dialysis was 156 days longer for the EPO group compared to the matched control group (p = 0.003). Analysis by CKD severity revealed that EPO therapy in less severe CKD patients offered a greater delay in time to dialysis (Stage 4: 213 days difference, p = 0.003; Stage 5: 104 days difference, p = 0.160). EPO treatment resulted in cost savings of $43,374-$59,222 per patient compared to non-EPO matched controls. This retrospective matched cohort study suggests that EPO therapy has a beneficial impact on delaying progression to dialysis in elderly CKD patients, especially in those with less severe CKD.

  11. The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry: annual report 2005.

    PubMed

    Nesrallah, Gihad; Garg, Amit X; Moist, Louise M; Suri, Rita S; Lindsay, Robert M

    2005-07-01

    The International Quotidian Dialysis Registry was designed to collect data describing treatments, characteristics, and outcomes of patients treated with quotidian hemodialysis (HD) worldwide. In July 2004, North American centers were first invited to enroll patients. By March 1, 2005, a total of 70 nocturnal and 8 short-daily HD patients from three Canadian and two US centers were enrolled. As recruitment continues, projected enrollment for 2005 may exceed 200 patients from North America alone. Preliminary analyses indicate that the current registry cohort is younger (mean age, 49.5 +/- 1.6 years) and carries a lower burden of comorbidity than the overall North American HD population. The low event rate expected in this cohort underlines the need for a large sample size if an appropriately powered survival study is to be undertaken. Increasing recruitment in the United States by including HD centers owned or managed by large dialysis organizations, and beginning overseas collaborations to include Australia, New Zealand, Europe, and South America will be the primary areas of focus for 2005.

  12. Improving retention and motivation in non-clinical dialysis employees.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Anne

    2004-02-01

    For no additional expense, little intrusion into the schedule or duties of the day, and no additional personnel to hire, dialysis facilities can make a dramatic impact on the training, motivation, and retention of employees through the use of classes designed specifically for the needs of newly employed non-clinical personnel. In today's world where many are expected to do a task with little or no orientation to the overall values and goals of the organization and how their tasks matter, what other action can accomplish so much for employee motivation and retention for so little time and expense? At DCI Mid-Missouri this program has been successful in retaining many excellent employees over many years and has been part of an ongoing effort to increase employees' interest and commitment to their work and the organization. It has also made them much more aware of treatments, other personnel and most of all, of our patients and their needs. It fulfills the needs of humans to be valued and have meaningful work. It contains costs and helps efficiency and productivity. Most of all, it keeps excellent people on the job and enjoying their work more than they would have. Participants' words when evaluating the most recent series of classes speak for themselves in demonstrating these important benefits that can be achieved easily in dialysis facilities throughout the United States and the world. PMID:14748247

  13. [Dialysis and ecology: can we do better in the future?].

    PubMed

    Vuignier, Y; Pruijm, M; Jarrayah, F; Burnier, M

    2013-02-27

    Development of dialysis has saved the lives of many patients. However, haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are very demanding in resources such as water and electricity, and generate a large amount of waste. In this article, we will review the environmental aspects of dialysis. Different solutions will be discussed, such as recycling of water discharged during reverse osmosis, the integration of solar energy, recycling of waste plastics, and the use of other techniques such as sorbent dialysis. In a world where natural resources are precious and where global warming is a major problem, it is important that not only dialysis, but all branches of medicine become more attentive to ecology.

  14. Removal of phosphorus by peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Delmez, J A

    1993-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists that peritoneal dialysis, as currently practiced, cannot alone remove adequate amounts of phosphorus in well-nourished patients. Current efforts should address the possibility of developing improved nontoxic oral phosphorus binders and/or different compositions of dialysate fluid. PMID:8399639

  15. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study.

  16. Dose adjustment of carboplatin in patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Guddati, Achuta K; Joy, Parijat S; Marak, Creticus P

    2014-05-01

    The Calvert equation has been extensively used to determine the dosage of carboplatin. However, in patients on dialysis, it predicts the same dosage regardless of the frequency of dialysis. Clearance of carboplatin during hemodialysis has been studied to a lesser extent, but there have been very few studies which have investigated the clearance of carboplatin in patients on peritoneal dialysis. A mathematical formula is proposed here to predict the dose of carboplatin for a given AUC in patients on peritoneal dialysis. This formula takes into account the frequency of dialysis sessions and the time delay between carboplatin infusion and the initiation of dialysis. The formula predicts an approximately similar dosage of carboplatin as that of the Calvert formula in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis four times per day if dialysis is initiated 12 h after infusion. The formula may help in guiding the adjustment of carboplatin dose in patients who receive a lesser number of dialysis sessions per day and in those patients whose dialysis is initiated at different times (0-24 h) after carboplatin infusion. It is suggested that usage of this formula will result in a better dosage of carboplatin to suit specific dialysis frequencies in specific patients and eventually may result in a better efficacy and toxicity profile.

  17. Peritoneal dialysis: from bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Krediet, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis was first employed in patients with acute renal failure in the 1940s and since the 1960s for those with end-stage renal disease. Its popularity increased enormously after the introduction of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in the end of 1970s. This stimulated both clinical and basic research. In an ideal situation, this should lead to cross-fertilization between the two. The present review describes two examples of interactions: one where it worked out very well and another where basic science missed the link with clinical findings. Those on fluid transport are examples of how old physiological findings on absorption of saline and glucose solutions were adopted in peritoneal dialysis by the use of glucose as an osmotic agent. The mechanism behind this in patients was first solved mathematically by the assumption of ultrasmall intracellular pores allowing water transport only. At the same time, basic science discovered the water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP-1), and a few years later, studies in transgenic mice confirmed that AQP-1 was the ultrasmall pore. In clinical medicine, this led to its assessment in patients and the notion of its impairment. Drugs for treatment have been developed. Research on biocompatibility is not a success story. Basic science has focussed on dialysis solutions with a low pH and lactate, and effects of glucose degradation products, although the first is irrelevant in patients and effects of continuous exposure to high glucose concentrations were largely neglected. Industry believed the bench more than the bedside, resulting in ‘biocompatible’ dialysis solutions. These solutions have some beneficial effects, but are evidently not the final answer. PMID:26120456

  18. Risk of Tuberculosis Among Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Chin-Chung; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Wei, Yu-Feng; Lee, Chih-Yuan; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Wu, Vin-Cent; Yang, Feng-Jung; Lin, Hsien-Ho; Wang, Jann-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Shing; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients on long-term dialysis are at high risk for tuberculosis (TB). Although latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is good target for TB eradication, interferon-gamma release assay-defined LTBI has a high proportion of negative conversion and lacks active TB correlation among patients on dialysis. Patients on long-term dialysis were screened in multiple centers in Taiwan. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-tube (QFT-GIT) was used to define LTBI and was performed thrice at 6-month intervals. The primary outcome was active TB diagnosed after LTBI screening. The incidence and predictive value of QFT-GIT were analyzed. The 940 dialysis patients enrolled had an average age of 59.3 years. The initial QFT-GIT results were positive in 193, including 49.6% with persistent positive results on second check. In an average follow-up period of 3 years, 7 patients had TB. Three (319.1 per 100,000 person-yrs) and 4 (141.8 per 100,000 person-yrs) of them were prevalent and incident TB cases, respectively. Persistent positive QFT-GIT for 2 and 3 times correlated with increased hazard ratio for TB (14.44 and 20.29, respectively) compared with a single positive result (hazard ratio 10.38). Among those with 3 positive QFT-GIT results, TB development rate was 4.5% and incidence rate was 1352.3 per 100,000 person-years. In contrast, none of the incident TB occurred in those with initial positive and then negative conversion of QFT-GIT. In an area of intermediate TB incidence, dialysis patients have high TB risk. LTBI status is a good predictor of TB development, especially for those with more than 1 positive result. After excluding prevalent TB cases, serial follow-up of LTBI may narrow the target population to reduce treatment costs. PMID:27258523

  19. Financial Implications to Medicare from Changing the Dialysis Modality Mix under the Bundled Prospective Payment System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Frank X.; Walton, Surrey M.; Leipold, Robert; Isbell, Deborah; Golper, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background: The economic burden of treating end-stage renal disease (ESRD) continues to grow. As one response, effective January 1, 2011, Medicare implemented a bundled prospective payment system (PPS, including injectable drugs) for dialysis patients. This study investigated the 5-year budget impact on Medicare under the new PPS of changes in the distribution of patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD), in-center hemodialysis (ICHD), and home hemodialysis (HHD). ♦ Methods: An Excel-based budget impact model was created to assess dialysis-associated Medicare costs. The model accounted for dialysis access establishment, the current monthly capitation physician payment for ESRD, Medicare dialysis payments (including start-up costs), training, oral drug costs, and the costs and probabilities of adverse events including access failure, hospitalization for access infection, pneumonia, septicemia, and cardiovascular events. United States Renal Data System (USRDS) data were used to project the US Medicare dialysis patient population across time. The baseline scenario assumed a stable distribution of PD (7.7%), HHD (1.3%) and ICHD (91.0%) over 5 years. Three comparison scenarios raised the proportions of PD and HHD by (1) 1% and 0.5%, (2) 2% and 0.75%, and (3) 3% and 1% each year; a fourth scenario held HHD constant and lowered PD by 1% per year. ♦ Results: Under the bundled PPS, scenarios that increased PD and HHD from 7.7% and 1.3% over 5 years resulted in cumulative savings to Medicare of $114.8M (Scenario 1, 11.7% PD and 3.3% HHD at year 5), $232.9M (Scenario 2, 15.7% PD and 4.3% HHD at year 5), and $350.9M (Scenario 3, 19.7% PD and 5.3% HHD at year 5). When the PD population was decreased from 7.7% in 2013 to 3.7% by 2017 with a constant HHD population, the total Medicare payment for dialysis patients increased by over $121.2M. ♦ Conclusions: Under Medicare bundled PPS, increasing the proportion of patients on PD and HHD vs ICHD could generate

  20. Systemic anticoagulation related to heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Bong, Y C; Walsham, J

    2016-07-01

    Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters is routinely performed in intensive care to maintain catheter patency when the catheters are not being used. Leakage of heparin into the circulation can potentially cause systemic anticoagulation and may present a risk to intensive care patients. To assess the effect of 5000 units per millilitre heparin locking of non-tunnelled dialysis catheters on systemic anticoagulation, we performed a prospective observational study of ten intensive care patients receiving heparin locking of dialysis catheters in an adult tertiary intensive care unit between July and September 2015. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was measured prior to, and three minutes after, heparin locking of catheter lumens with the manufacturer's recommended locking volume to assess the effect on systemic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters resulted in a significant rise in APTT (P=0.002). The median rise was by 56 seconds (interquartile range 30-166.5). Following heparin locking, 80% of patients had APTT values within or above the range associated with therapeutic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters can cause systemic anticoagulation in intensive care patients and therefore poses a potential risk to patient safety. PMID:27456177

  1. Systemic anticoagulation related to heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters in intensive care patients.

    PubMed

    Bong, Y C; Walsham, J

    2016-07-01

    Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters is routinely performed in intensive care to maintain catheter patency when the catheters are not being used. Leakage of heparin into the circulation can potentially cause systemic anticoagulation and may present a risk to intensive care patients. To assess the effect of 5000 units per millilitre heparin locking of non-tunnelled dialysis catheters on systemic anticoagulation, we performed a prospective observational study of ten intensive care patients receiving heparin locking of dialysis catheters in an adult tertiary intensive care unit between July and September 2015. Activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was measured prior to, and three minutes after, heparin locking of catheter lumens with the manufacturer's recommended locking volume to assess the effect on systemic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of venous dialysis catheters resulted in a significant rise in APTT (P=0.002). The median rise was by 56 seconds (interquartile range 30-166.5). Following heparin locking, 80% of patients had APTT values within or above the range associated with therapeutic anticoagulation. Heparin locking of non-tunnelled venous dialysis catheters can cause systemic anticoagulation in intensive care patients and therefore poses a potential risk to patient safety.

  2. Peritoneal dialysis in China: meeting the challenge of chronic kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xueqing; Yang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Due to limited medical and economic resources, particularly in the countryside and remote areas, the proportion of individuals with end-stage kidney disease who are treated with dialysis in China is only about 20%. For the rest, renal replacement therapy currently is not available. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been developed and used for more than 30 years in China to treat patients with end-stage kidney disease. Several national PD centers of first-rate scale and quality have sprung up, but the development of PD varies widely among geographic regions across China. The Chinese government has dedicated itself to continually increasing the coverage and level of medical service for patients with end-stage kidney disease. Under the guidance of the government and because of promotion by kidney care professionals, presently there are more than 40,000 prevalent PD patients in China, representing approximately 20% of the total dialysis population. Recently, a National Dialysis Unit Training Program for countywide hospitals has been initiated. Through the efforts of programs like this, we believe that awareness of PD and advances in the underlying technology will benefit more patients with end-stage kidney disease in China.

  3. Low level of self-reported physical activity in ambulatory patients new to dialysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Kirsten L; Chertow, Glenn M; Kutner, Nancy G; Dalrymple, Lorien S; Grimes, Barbara A; Kaysen, George A

    2010-12-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to the frailty and the decline in function that develops over time among patients with end-stage renal disease. We assessed physical activity among 1547 ambulatory patients new to dialysis in the United States Renal Data System Comprehensive Dialysis Study. We used a self-reporting Human Activity Profile that included Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores and compared results to established norms by age and gender. Physical activity was found to be extremely low with scores for all age and gender categories below the 5th percentile of healthy individuals and 95% of patients had scores consonant with low fitness. Older age, female gender, diabetes, atherosclerotic disease, and a low level of education were associated with lower activity scores assessed by univariate and multivariable linear regression analysis. Higher serum albumin, creatinine, and lower body mass index, but not hemoglobin levels, were associated with greater physical activity. By multivariable analysis, patients on hemodialysis using a catheter reported lower levels of physical activity compared to those on peritoneal dialysis, hemodialysis using an arteriovenous fistula, or with a graft. Lower Maximal and Adjusted Activity Scores were associated with poor physical function and mental health. Hence, physical activity is distressingly low among patients new to dialysis. Thus, strategies to enhance activity in these patients should be explored.

  4. Acute peritoneal dialysis in a Jehovah's Witness post laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Appalsawmy, Usha Devi; Akbani, Habib

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man who was a Jehovah's Witness with an advanced directive against autologous procedures developed acute kidney injury needing renal replacement therapy while he was intubated and ventilated on the intensive care unit. He was being treated for hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. He also had a healing laparotomy wound, having undergone a splenectomy less than a month ago following a road traffic accident. His hyperkalaemia and metabolic acidosis were refractory to medical treatment. As he became oligoanuric, decision was taken to carry out acute peritoneal dialysis (PD) by inserting a Tenckhoff catheter in his abdomen using peritoneoscopic technique. The patient was started on automated PD without any complications. His urine output gradually improved, and his renal function eventually recovered. On discharge from hospital, his renal function was within normal range, and he had no abdominal complications from the acute PD. PMID:27581233

  5. The role of peritoneal dialysis in modern renal replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Goodlad, Catriona; Brown, Edwina

    2013-10-01

    Most patients starting dialysis can choose between peritoneal dialysis and haemodialysis. There is little evidence proving that one form of dialysis is better than the other; although there may be an early advantage to peritoneal dialysis (PD) in young patients with residual function this effect is short-lived. Technique failure develops after years on PD so dialysis modality will often change during a long dialysis career. Quality of life studies, which must be interpreted carefully, indicate that patients require information about the impact of dialysis on their lifestyle as well as health-related outcomes so that they can choose the most suitable dialysis modality. Increasing numbers of frail elderly patients are starting dialysis; support in the home by nursing staff may facilitate the use of PD in this group. In the UK guidelines prioritise the patient's choice of dialysis modality (where feasible) based on good quality predialysis education. Cost of treatment is generally lower on PD, which is particularly recommended for patients with residual renal function and few comorbidities. PMID:23908406

  6. Skin disorders in peritoneal dialysis patients: An underdiagnosed subject

    PubMed Central

    Gursu, Meltem; Uzun, Sami; Topcuoğlu, Derya; Koc, Leyli Kadriye; Yucel, Lamiye; Sumnu, Abdullah; Cebeci, Egemen; Ozkan, Oktay; Behlul, Ahmet; Koc, Leyla; Ozturk, Savas; Kazancioglu, Rumeyza

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine all skin changes in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients followed up in our unit. METHODS: Patients on PD program for at least three months without any known chronic skin disease were included in the study. Patients with already diagnosed skin disease, those who have systemic diseases that may cause skin lesions, patients with malignancies and those who did not give informed consent were excluded from the study. All patients were examined by the same predetermined dermatologist with all findings recorded. The demographic, clinical and laboratory data including measures of dialysis adequacy of patients were recorded also. Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) for Windows 16.0 standard version was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Among the patients followed up in our PD unit, those without exclusion criteria who gave informed consent, 38 patients were included in the study with male/female ratio and mean age of 26/12 and 50.3 ± 13.7 years, respectively. The duration of CKD was 7.86 ± 4.16 years and the mean PD duration was 47.1 ± 29.6 mo. Primary kidney disease was diabetic nephropathy in 11, nephrosclerosis in six, uropathologies in four, chronic glomerulonephritis in three, chronic pyelonephritis in three, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in three patients while cause was unknown in eight patients. All patients except for one patient had at least one skin lesion. Loss of lunula, onychomycosis and tinea pedis are the most frequent skin disorders recorded in the study group. Diabetic patients had tinea pedis more frequently (P = 0.045). No relationship of skin findings was detected with primary renal diseases, comorbidities and medications that the patients were using. CONCLUSION: Skin abnormalities are common in in PD patients. The most frequent skin pathologies are onychomycosis and tinea pedis which must not be overlooked. PMID:27458566

  7. Thyroid dysfunction in major psychiatric disorders in a hospital based sample

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Rajiv; Calvin, Sam; Singh, Jyotin Kshitiz; Thomas, Binston; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Abnormalities in thyroid hormonal status is common in major psychiatric disorders. Although the relevance of thyroid dysfunction to bipolar disorder is well-recognized, yet the association between thyroid dysfunction and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is under-emphasized. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the rates of abnormal thyroid hormonal status in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and mood disorders in an inpatient tertiary care general hospital psychiatry unit. Methods: This was a retrospective hospital-based study on 468 inpatient samples. Data on serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), T3 (triiodothyroxine), T4 (L-thyroxine), free unbound fractions of T3 and T4 (FT3 and FT4) were obtained from records of 343 patients, 18 patients were anti-TPO (anti thyroid peroxidase antibody) positive. The rates of abnormal thyroid hormonal status were compared using the chi square test. Results: Abnormal thyroid hormonal status in general, and presence of hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, in particular were seen in 29.3, 25.17 and 4.08 per cent patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, respectively. These were comparable to the rates in patients with mood disorders (23.24, 21.62 and 1.62%, respectively). Eleven of the 18 patients with antiTPO positivity had a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder. There were no gender differences. Interpretation & conclusions: Thyroid dysfunction was present in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorder as well as mood disorders. Autoimmune thyroid disease was more commonly seen in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders compared to mood disorders. The findings reiterate the relevance of screening patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders for abnormal thyroid hormonal status. PMID:24521631

  8. A national, cross-sectional survey of children's hospital-based safety resource centres

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Sadiqa; Zonfrillo, Mark R; Seaver Hill, Karen; Arbogast, Kristy B; Gittelman, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the location, staffing, clientele, safety product disbursement patterns, education provided and sustainability of safety resource centres (SRCs) in US children's hospitals. Methods A cross-sectional survey was distributed to children's hospital-based SRC directors. Survey categories included: funding sources, customer base, items sold, items given free of charge, education provided and directors’ needs. Results 32/38 (84.2%) SRC sites (affiliated with 30 hospitals) completed the survey. SRCs were in many hospital locations including lobby (28.1%), family resource centres (12.5%), gift shop/retail space (18.8%), mobile units (18.8%) and patient clinics (12.5%). 19% of respondents reported that their SRC was financially self-sustainable. Sales to patients predominated (mean of 44%); however, hospital employees made up a mean of 20% (range 0–60%) of sales. 78.1% of SRCs had products for children with special healthcare needs. Documentation kept at SRC sites included items purchased (96.9%), items given free of charge (65.6%) and customer demographics (50%). 56.3% of SRCs provided formal injury prevention education classes. The SRCs’ directors’ most important needs were finances (46.9%), staffing (50%) and space (46.9%). All of the directors were ‘somewhat interested’ or ‘very interested’ in each of the following: creation of a common SRC listserv, national SRC data bank and multisite SRC research platform. Conclusions SRCs are located in many US children's hospitals, and can be characterised as heterogeneous in location, products sold, data kept and ability to be financially sustained. Further research is needed to determine best practices for SRCs to maximise their impact on injury prevention. PMID:24667383

  9. Hospital based superconducting cyclotron for neutron therapy: Medical physics perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudelev, M.; Burmeister, J.; Blosser, E.; Maughan, R. L.; Kota, C.

    2001-12-01

    The neutron therapy facility at the Gershenson Radiation Oncology Center, Harper University Hospital in Detroit has been operational since September 1991. The d(48.5)+Be beam is produced in a gantry mounted superconducting cyclotron designed and built at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). Measurements were performed in order to obtain the physical characteristics of the neutron beam and to collect the data necessary for treatment planning. This included profiles of the dose distribution in a water phantom, relative output factors and the design of various beam modifiers, i.e., wedges and tissue compensators. The beam was calibrated in accordance with international protocol for fast neutron dosimetry. Dosimetry and radiobiology intercomparions with three neutron therapy facilities were performed prior to clinical use. The radiation safety program was established in order to monitor and reduce the exposure levels of the personnel. The activation products were identified and the exposure in the treatment room was mapped. A comprehensive quality assurance (QA) program was developed to sustain safe and reliable operation of the unit at treatment standards comparable to those for conventional photon radiation. The program can be divided into three major parts: maintenance of the cyclotron and related hardware; QA of the neutron beam dosimetry and treatment delivery; safety and radiation protection. In addition the neutron beam is used in various non-clinical applications. Among these are the microdosimetric characterization of the beam, the effects of tissue heterogeneity on dose distribution, the development of boron neutron capture enhanced fast neutron therapy and variety of radiobiology experiments.

  10. Proposed educational objectives for hospital-based dentists during catastrophic events and disaster response.

    PubMed

    Psoter, Walter J; Herman, Neal G; More, Frederick G; Park, Patricia; Robbins, Miriam; Rekow, E Dianne; Ryan, James M; Triola, Marc M; Glotzer, David

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to define education and training requirements for hospital-based dentists to efficiently and meaningfully participate in a hospital disaster response. Eight dental faculty with hospital-based training and/or military command and CBRNE (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosive) expertise were recruited as an expert panel. A consensus set of recommended educational objectives for hospital-based dentists was established using the following process: 1) identify assumptions supported by all expert panelists, 2) determine current advanced dental educational training requirements, and 3) conduct additional training and literature review by various panelists and discussions with other content and systems experts. Using this three-step process, educational objectives that the development group believed necessary for hospital-based dentists to be effective in treatment or management roles in times of a catastrophic event were established. These educational objectives are categorized into five thematic areas: 1) disaster systems, 2) triage/medical assessment, 3) blast and burn injuries, 4) chemical agents, and 5) biological agents. Creation of training programs to help dentists acquire these educational objectives would benefit hospital-based dental training programs and strengthen hospital surge manpower needs. The proposed educational objectives are designed to stimulate discussion and debate among dental, medical, and public health professionals about the roles of dentists in meeting hospital surge manpower needs.

  11. Cost-effectiveness analysis of therapies for chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis: a case for excluding dialysis costs.

    PubMed

    Grima, Daniel T; Bernard, Lisa M; Dunn, Elizabeth S; McFarlane, Philip A; Mendelssohn, David C

    2012-11-01

    In many jurisdictions, cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) plays an important role in determining drug coverage and reimbursement and, therefore, has the potential to impact patient access. Health economic guidelines recommend the inclusion of future costs related to the intervention of interest within CEAs but provide little guidance regarding the definition of 'related'. In the case of CEAs of therapies that extend the lives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis but do not impact the need for or the intensity of dialysis, the determination of the relatedness of future dialysis costs to the therapy of interest is particularly ambiguous. The uncertainty as to whether dialysis costs are related or unrelated in these circumstances has led to inconsistencies in the conduct of CEAs for such products, with dialysis costs included in some analyses while excluded in others. Due to the magnitude of the cost of dialysis, whether or not dialysis costs are included in CEAs of such therapies has substantial implications for the results of such analyses, often meaning the difference between a therapy being deemed cost effective (in instances where dialysis costs are excluded) or not cost effective (in instances where dialysis costs are included). This paper explores the issues and implications surrounding the inclusion of dialysis costs in CEAs of therapies that extend the lives of dialysis patients but do not impact the need for dialysis. Relevant case studies clearly demonstrate that, regardless of the clinical benefits of a life-extending intervention for dialysis patients, and due to the high cost of dialysis, the inclusion of dialysis costs in the analysis essentially eliminates the possibility of obtaining a favourable cost-effectiveness ratio. This raises the significant risk that dialysis patients may be denied access to interventions that are cost effective in other populations due solely to the high background cost of dialysis itself. Finally, the

  12. Training and certification in dialysis access.

    PubMed

    Ross, John; Dolmatch, Bart; Gallichio, Michael; Gallieni, Maurizio; Slakey, Douglas; Vesely, Tom; Davidson, Ingemar

    2014-10-01

    Decreasing and eliminating the gaps in knowledge, skills, and effective communication are the mainstays for a successful dialysis access training program curriculum and at the core of the human factors training philosophy. Many of these skills can be learned in the simulation environment. Education and training will reduce gaps in knowledge and technical skills, before exposing patients to procedure-related risk. For dialysis access, a reliable workplace environment depends upon a culture where safety and accountability are balanced to recognize the human contribution to success or failure in the complex care of patients with end-stage renal disease. Rigorous testing and certification adds value to the participants and validates the training program. PMID:25362979

  13. Reducing Peritoneal Dialysis-Related Peritonitis Rate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Anupkumar

    2014-01-01

    Background Peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis is an important negative risk of peritoneal dialysis. Peritonitis results when organisms enter the normally sterile peritoneal space, and the peritoneal immune system is unable to prevent the proliferation of the organisms. Methods The process of reducing the rate of peritonitis includes identification of the need for reducing peritonitis, identification of the cause of the high peritonitis rate through root cause analysis, and intervention. Results Interventions vary depending upon the type of organism causing peritonitis. Nonenterococcal gram-positive peritonitis and Pseudomonas peritonitis are related to contamination and are potentially preventable; enteric peritonitis is difficult to prevent. Conclusion The rate of peritonitis can be reduced through a strong continuous quality improvement team because the majority of peritonitis episodes can be prevented. PMID:25249805

  14. Dual-wavelength method and optoelectronic sensor for online monitoring of the efficiency of dialysis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevsky, A. M.; Konoplev, G. A.; Stepanova, O. S.; Zemchenkov, A. Yu; Gerasimchuk, R. P.; Frorip, A.

    2015-11-01

    The absorption spectra of effluent dialysate in the ultraviolet region were investigated. A novel dual-wavelength spectrophotometric method for uric acid determination in effluent dialysate and an optoelectronic sensor based on UV LED were developed. Clinical trials of the proposed sensor were carried out in the dialysis unit of St. Petersburg Mariinsky Hospital. The relative error of measurement for the concentration of uric acid does not exceed 10%.

  15. Waste acid recycling via diffusion dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steffani, C.

    1995-05-26

    Inorganic acids are commonly used for surface cleaning and finishing of metals. The acids become unuseable due to contamination with metals or diluted and weakened. Diffusion dialysis has become a way to recover the useable acid and allow separation of the metals for recovery and sale to refineries. This technique is made possible by the use of membranes that are strong enough to withstand low ph and have long service life.

  16. Internal dialysis of Limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J H; Lisman, J E

    1982-01-01

    The internal dialysis technique has been applied to Limulus ventral photoreceptors. This method potentially allows quantitative control of the concentration of diffusible molecules within living cells. During dialysis, Limulus photoreceptors retained their ability to respond to light. Under conditions of dim illumination, responses were normal for close to an hour. In bright light, abnormalities developed more rapidly. The reversible effects of raising the dialysate Mg2+ concentration and the entrance of rhodamine-labeled albumin into cells shows that the dialysis method is useful for assaying the effects of small or large molecules on visual transduction. This method has been used to examine the effects of nucleotide triphosphates and cyclic nucleotides. The results show that nucleotide triphosphates (5-10 mM) are required to maintain a low rate of spontaneous quantum bumps. The importance of cyclic nucleotides in transduction is less clear; the light response was reduced by either cGMP or cAMP but only at very high concentrations (10 mM). Images PMID:6961434

  17. Dialysis Modalities and HDL Composition and Function

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Michael; Schilcher, Gernot; Curcic, Sanja; Trieb, Markus; Ljubojevic, Senka; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Scharnagl, Hubert; Kopecky, Chantal M.; Rosenkranz, Alexander R.; Heinemann, Akos

    2015-01-01

    Lipid abnormalities may have an effect on clinical outcomes of patients on dialysis. Recent studies have indicated that HDL dysfunction is a hallmark of ESRD. In this study, we compared HDL composition and metrics of HDL functionality in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) or peritoneal dialysis (PD) with those in healthy controls. We detected a marked suppression of several metrics of HDL functionality in patients on HD or PD. Compositional analysis revealed that HDL from both dialysis groups shifted toward a more proinflammatory phenotype with profound alterations in the lipid moiety and protein composition. With regard to function, cholesterol efflux and anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic functions seemed to be more severely suppressed in patients on HD, whereas HDL-associated paraoxonase activity was lowest in patients on PD. Quantification of enzyme activities involved in HDL metabolism suggested that HDL particle maturation and remodeling are altered in patients on HD or PD. In summary, our study provides mechanistic insights into the formation of dysfunctional HDL in patients with ESRD who are on HD or PD. PMID:25745027

  18. Peritonitis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J; Rogers, W A; Taylor, H M; Everett, E D; Prowant, B F; Fruto, L V; Nolph, K D

    1980-01-01

    We initiated a therapeutic program of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for patients with chronic renal failure. Our program resulted in many episodes of peritonitis arising from contamination due to the technical aspects of the procedure. Microbiologic evaluation showed that 73% of 97 episodes were culture positive, with gram-positive organisms causing most of the cases, especially early in dialysis. Gram-negative rods tended to occur later. Gram stains of dialysate effluent resulted in a disappointingly low yield of only 9% positivity. Cell counts were a dependable indicator of the presence of peritoneal inflammation and also of therapeutic success. Most patients responded well to intraperitoneal cephalothin, 125 mg/L for 10 to 14 d. The occurrence of peritonitis resulted in 0.93 years of hospitalization during the total of 15.45 patient-years on dialysis, which essentially negated the financial advantages of this method of treatment of chronic renal failure. For this to be a successful mode of therapy, advances in the prevention of peritonitis must be made. PMID:6985785

  19. Pro: Higher serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients is protective.

    PubMed

    Misra, Madhukar

    2016-08-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is common in dialysis patients. Bicarbonate administration via the dialysate helps maintain the acid-base balance in these patients. Serum bicarbonate level in dialysis patients is determined by several factors that include dietary protein intake, nutritional status and dialysis prescription, etc. Additionally, a meaningful interpretation of serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients requires an understanding of complexities involving its measurement. Both very low as well very high levels of serum bicarbonate have been associated with adverse outcomes in observational studies. However, recent observational data, when adjusted for the confounding effects of nutritional status, do not associate higher predialysis serum bicarbonate with adverse consequences. At this time, there are no prospective studies available that have examined the association of serum bicarbonate with hard outcomes in dialysis patients. The ideal level of serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients is therefore unknown. This article examines the available data with regard to the benefits of higher predialysis serum bicarbonate. PMID:27411723

  20. Using vision to become viable: how rural hospital-based home health can thrive.

    PubMed

    2010-02-01

    It's been the trend for some years that, with their own particular set of challenges and constraints, hospital-based home health agencies have struggled to maintain profitability and efficiency in their operations. That can especially be true for hospital-based agencies operating in more rural areas, even as such agencies have been shown to play an important--or even critical--role in ensuring individuals in the communities they serve have access to needed treatment and health care services. Two executives who've successfully led a rural hospital-based agency discuss how to engage employees, referral sources, and communities and instill the right core philosophy to help your business succeed and grow. PMID:20391656

  1. The hazards of the changing hazard of dialysis modalities.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos P; Unruh, Mark L

    2014-11-01

    The impact of the dialysis modality on patient survival has received considerable epidemiological attention, with most studies suggesting an early benefit favoring peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis. Kumar et al. report the relative outcomes of the two modalities in incident patients followed by an accountable care organization. Using advanced statistical techniques for non-proportional hazards survival models, the authors corroborate the early benefit of peritoneal dialysis for the first 3 years and equivalent outcomes thereafter.

  2. Peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Gosmanova, Elvira O; Garrett, Tiffani R; Wall, Barry M

    2013-12-01

    Peritonitis is an important cause of morbidity in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. Rothia mucilaginosa has been reported as an unusual cause of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis. Difficulty in the management of this microorganism lies in the absence of uniform recommendations for anti-microbial therapy directed against this pathogen. The current report describes the clinical course of an episode of peritoneal dialysis associated peritonitis caused by Rothia mucilaginosa. Treatment options for this organism are summarized. PMID:24263080

  3. Practical guidelines for automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sritippayawan, Suchai; Nilwarangkur, Sukij; Aiyasanon, Nipa; Jattanawanich, Parnthip; Vasuvattakul, Somkiat

    2011-09-01

    The development of APD technologies enables physician to customize PD treatment for optimal dialysis. Dialysis dose can be increased with APD alone or in conjunction with daytime dwells. Although there is no strong evidence of the advantage over CAPD, APD is generally recommended for patients having a high peritoneal transport, outflow problems or high intraperitoneal pressure (IPP) and those who depend on caregivers for their dialysis. The benefits of APD over CAPD depends on the problems and treatment results among dialysis centers. Before starting the APD, medical, psychosocial and financial aspects, catheter function, residual renal function (RRF), body surface area and peritoneal transport characteristic must be evaluated. The recommended starting prescription for APD is the dwell volume of 1,500 ml/m2, 2 hours/cycle, and 5 cycles/session, which will provides 10-15 L of total volume and 10 hours per session. The IPP should be monitored and kept below 18 cmH2O. NIPD is accepted for patients with significant RRF. Anuric patients usually require 15-20 L of total fill volume and may need 1-2 day-dwells of 2L icodextrin or hypertonic glucose solutions. Small solute clearances and ultrafiltration depend on the peritoneal catheter function and dialysis schedule. The clinical outcomes and small solute clearances must be monitored and adjusted accordingly to meet the weekly total Kt/V urea > or = 1.7 and in low peritoneal transporters, the weekly total CCr should be > or = 45 L/1.73 m2. The volume status must be normal. To diagnose the peritonitis in NIPD patients, 1 L of PDF should be infused and permitted to dwell for 2 hours before sending for analysis. The differential of white cell count may be more useful than the total cell counts. In Siriraj Hospital, APD patients had 1.5-3 times less peritonitis than CAPD patients and most of our anuric patients can achieve the weekly total Kt/V urea target with 10 L of NIPD.

  4. The design and implementation of hospital-based coordinated care programs.

    PubMed

    Warrick, L H; Christianson, J B; Williams, F G; Netting, F E

    1990-01-01

    This article contains the initial findings of an ongoing evaluation of a hospital-based coordinated care demonstration. The goal of the demonstration is to investigate the appropriateness and feasibility of providing hospital-based case management services for extended periods to elderly individuals living in the community. The rationale for the demonstration is reviewed, and the structure of each participating hospital's coordinated care program is described. Data are presented on the characteristics of clients served by the programs during the first six months of the demonstration. The factors that influenced implementation and early operations of these programs are analyzed, and their implications for hospital managers are discussed.

  5. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies.

  6. Calciphylaxis in peritoneal dialysis patients: a single center cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanchen; Corapi, Kristin M; Luongo, Maria; Thadhani, Ravi; Nigwekar, Sagar U

    2016-01-01

    Background Calciphylaxis is a rare but devastating condition in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. Most research in the field of calciphylaxis is focused on hemodialysis (HD) patients; however, data on calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients are limited. Methods In this cohort study, we examined data from adult patients who initiated PD for ESRD management at our institute’s PD unit from January 2001 to December 2015. Associations with the development of calciphylaxis were examined for clinical, laboratory, and medication exposures. Incidence of calciphylaxis and mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis were analyzed. Treatments administered to treat calciphylaxis in PD patients were summarized. Results In this cohort of 63 patients, 7 patients developed calciphylaxis (incidence rate: 9.0 per 1,000 patient-years). Median age of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 50 years, 57% were white, 71% females, and 71% were previously on HD. Female sex, obesity, HD as a prior dialysis modality, recurrent hypotension, elevated time-averaged serum phosphorous levels, reduced time-averaged serum albumin levels, and warfarin therapy were associated with increased calciphylaxis risk in univariate logistic regression analyses. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate was administered in 57% of PD patients who developed calciphylaxis. One-year mortality in PD patients who developed calciphylaxis was 71% despite multimodal treatment including sodium thiosulfate, hyperbaric oxygen, cinacalcet, and wound debridement. Conclusion Calciphylaxis is a rare but frequently fatal condition in PD patients. Our study provides critical early insights into calciphylaxis incidence, risk factors, and prognosis in PD patients. Sample size and characteristics of patients included in our study limit generalizability to overall PD population and warrant examination in larger independent studies. PMID:27698566

  7. Implementation and Analysis of Hemodialysis in the Unit Operations Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madihally, Sundararajan V.; Lewis, Randy S.

    2007-01-01

    To enhance bioengineering in the chemical engineering curriculum, a Unit Operations experiment simulating the hemodialysis of creatinine was implemented. The blood toxin creatinine was used for developing a more realistic dialysis experiment. A dialysis model is presented that allows students to assess the validity of model assumptions. This work…

  8. Characteristics of Hospital-Based Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Kasahara, Mari; Nakamura, Ayako

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article explores characteristics of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in Japan, a country which provides an egalitarian, low cost, and easy-access health care system. Methods: We sent a questionnaire survey to 11 leading doctors in the child abuse field in Japan, each located in different hospital-based sites. Child abuse doctors…

  9. Caring for Young Adolescent Sexual Abuse Victims in a Hospital-Based Children's Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edinburgh, Laurel; Saewyc, Elizabeth; Levitt, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study compared health care assessments, referrals, treatment, and outcomes for young adolescent sexual assault/sexual abuse victims seen at a hospital-based Child Advocacy Center (CAC), to that provided to similar victims evaluated by other community providers. A second purpose was to document how common DNA evidence is found…

  10. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... independent ESRD facilities. 413.174 Section 413.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. (a) Establishment of...

  11. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... independent ESRD facilities. 413.174 Section 413.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. Link to an...

  12. 42 CFR 413.174 - Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... independent ESRD facilities. 413.174 Section 413.174 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... NURSING FACILITIES Payment for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.174 Prospective rates for hospital-based and independent ESRD facilities. (a) Establishment of...

  13. DriveWise: An Interdisciplinary Hospital-Based Driving Assessment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Margaret G.; Kapust, Lissa R.; Hollis, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    Health care professionals working with the elderly have opportunities through research and clinical practice to shape public policy affecting the older driver. This article describes DriveWise, an interdisciplinary hospital-based driving assessment program developed in response to clinical concerns about the driving safety of individuals with…

  14. Dialysis: low-glucose-containing peritoneal dialysis solutions: good or bad?

    PubMed

    Jha, Vivekanand; Rathi, Manish

    2013-11-01

    Two trials of low-glucose-containing peritoneal dialysis regimen in patients with diabetes mellitus show that although this strategy improved glycaemic control, it was associated with increased risk of serious adverse events and mortality. These studies suggest caution is needed when evaluating effectiveness using surrogate measures and awareness of confounding factors is important. PMID:24080795

  15. Comorbidities in Chronic Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Patients: A Report of the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network

    PubMed Central

    Neu, Alicia M.; Sander, Anja; Borzych-Dużałka, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Vallés, Patricia G.; Ha, Il Soo; Patel, Hiren; Askenazi, David; Balasz-Chmielewska, Irena; Lauronen, Jouni; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Feber, Janusz; Schaefer, Franz; Warady, Bradley A.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background, Objectives, and Methods: Hospitalization and mortality rates in pediatric dialysis patients remain unacceptably high. Although studies have associated the presence of comorbidities with an increased risk for death in a relatively small number of pediatric dialysis patients, no large-scale study had set out to describe the comorbidities seen in pediatric dialysis patients or to evaluate the impact of those comorbidities on outcomes beyond the newborn period. In the present study, we evaluated the prevalence of comorbidities in a large international cohort of pediatric chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) patients from the International Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Network registry and began to assess potential associations between those comorbidities and hospitalization rates and mortality. ♦ Results: Information on comorbidities was available for 1830 patients 0 - 19 years of age at dialysis initiation. Median age at dialysis initiation was 9.1 years [interquartile range (IQR): 10.9], median follow-up for calculation of hospitalization rates was 15.2 months (range: 0.2 - 80.9 months), and total follow-up time in the registry was 2095 patient-years. At least 1 comorbidity had been reported for 602 of the patients (32.9%), with 283 (15.5%) having cognitive impairment; 230 (12.6%), motor impairment; 167 (9.1%), cardiac abnormality; 76 (4.2%), pulmonary abnormality; 212 (11.6%), ocular abnormality; and 101 (5.5%), hearing impairment. Of the 150 patients (8.2%) that had a defined syndrome, 85% had at least 1 nonrenal comorbidity, and 64% had multiple comorbidities. The presence of at least 1 comorbidity was associated with a higher hospitalization rate [hospital days per 100 observation days: 1.7 (IQR: 5.8) vs 1.2 (IQR: 3.9), p = 0.001] and decreased patient survival (4-year survival rate: 73% vs 90%, p < 0.0001). ♦ Conclusions: Nearly one third of pediatric CPD patients in a large international cohort had at least 1 comorbidity, and multiple

  16. Cost Analysis of Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Access in Incident Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Coentrão, Luis A.; Araújo, Carla S.; Ribeiro, Carlos A.; Dias, Claúdia C.; Pestana, Manuel J.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Although several studies have demonstrated the economic advantages of peritoneal dialysis (PD) over hemodialysis (HD), few reports in the literature have compared the costs of HD and PD access. The aim of the present study was to compare the resources required to establish and maintain the dialysis access in patients who initiated HD with a tunneled cuffed catheter (TCC) or an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and in patients who initiated PD. ♦ Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the 152 chronic kidney disease patients who consecutively initiated dialysis treatment at our institution in 2008 (HD-AVF, n = 65; HD-CVC, n = 45; PD, n = 42). Detailed clinical and demographic information and data on access type were collected for all patients. A comprehensive measure of total dialysis access costs, including surgery, radiology, hospitalization for access complications, physician costs, and transportation costs was obtained at year 1 using an intention-to-treat approach. All resources used were valued using 2010 prices, and costs are reported in 2010 euros. ♦ Results: Compared with the HD-AVF and HD-TCC modalities, PD was associated with a significantly lower risk of access-related interventions (adjusted rate ratios: 1.572 and 1.433 respectively; 95% confidence intervals: 1.253 to 1.891 and 1.069 to 1.797). The mean dialysis access-related costs per patient-year at risk were €1171.6 [median: €608.8; interquartile range (IQR): €563.1 - €936.7] for PD, €1555.2 (median: €783.9; IQR: €371.4 - €1571.7) for HD-AVF, and €4208.2 (median: €1252.4; IQR: €947.9 - €2983.5) for HD-TCC (p < 0.001). In multivariate analysis, total dialysis access costs were significantly higher for the HD-TCC modality than for either PD or HD-AVF (β = -0.53; 95% CI: -1.03 to -0.02; and β = -0.50; 95% CI: -0.96 to -0.04). ♦ Conclusions: Compared with patients initiating HD, those initiating PD required fewer resources to establish and maintain a dialysis

  17. Advances in tunneled central venous catheters for dialysis: design and performance.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R

    2008-01-01

    Over 70% of patients initiating chronic hemodialysis in the United States have a tunneled central venous catheter (CVC) for dialysis as their first blood access device. Tunneled CVC have requirements that are unparalleled by other access devices: high blood flow rates at moderate pressure drops without obstruction, minimal trauma to the vein, resistance to occlusion by fibrous sheathing, prevention of infection, avoidance of clotting, biocompatibility, avoidance of lumen collapse and kinking and breaks, resistance to antiseptic agents, placement with minimal trauma, and radiopaque appearance on X-ray. This publication reviews the numerous designs for tunneled CVC and evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of each design. A catheter that self-centers in the superior vena cava (Centros) is described, along with early clinical results. Current challenges and future directions for tunneled CVC for dialysis are discussed, included means to diminish catheter-related infections, catheter tip clotting, fibrous sheathing, central venous stenosis, and external component bulk. PMID:19000125

  18. Entropy of uremia and dialysis technology.

    PubMed

    Ronco, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    The second law of thermodynamics applies with local exceptions to patient history and therapy interventions. Living things preserve their low level of entropy throughout time because they receive energy from their surroundings in the form of food. They gain their order at the expense of disordering the nutrients they consume. Death is the thermodynamically favored state: it represents a large increase in entropy as molecular structure yields to chaos. The kidney is an organ dissipating large amounts of energy to maintain the level of entropy of the organism as low as possible. Diseases, and in particular uremia, represent conditions of rapid increase in entropy. Therapeutic strategies are oriented towards a reduction in entropy or at least a decrease in the speed of entropy increase. Uremia is a process accelerating the trend towards randomness and disorder (increase in entropy). Dialysis is a factor external to the patient that tends to reduce the level of entropy caused by kidney disease. Since entropy can only increase in closed systems, energy and work must be spent to limit the entropy of uremia. This energy should be adapted to the system (patient) and be specifically oriented and personalized. This includes a multidimensional effort to achieve an adequate dialysis that goes beyond small molecular weight solute clearance. It includes a biological plan for recovery of homeostasis and a strategy towards long-term rehabilitation of the patient. Such objectives can be achieved with a combination of technology and innovation to answer specific questions that are still present after 60 years of dialysis history. This change in the individual bioentropy may represent a local exception to natural trends as the patient could be considered an isolated universe responding to the classic laws of thermodynamics.

  19. Development of a Comprehensive Hospital-Based Elder Abuse Intervention: An Initial Systematic Scoping Review

    PubMed Central

    Du Mont, Janice; Macdonald, Sheila; Kosa, Daisy; Elliot, Shannon; Spencer, Charmaine; Yaffe, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Elder abuse, a universal human rights problem, is associated with many negative consequences. In most jurisdictions, however, there are no comprehensive hospital-based interventions for elder abuse that address the totality of needs of abused older adults: psychological, physical, legal, and social. As the first step towards the development of such an intervention, we undertook a systematic scoping review. Objectives Our primary objective was to systematically extract and synthesize actionable and applicable recommendations for components of a multidisciplinary intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention. A secondary objective was to summarize the characteristics of the responses reviewed, including methods of development and validation. Methods The grey and scholarly literatures were systematically searched, with two independent reviewers conducting the title, abstract and full text screening. Documents were considered eligible for inclusion if they: 1) addressed a response (e.g., an intervention) to elder abuse, 2) contained recommendations for responding to abused older adults with potential relevance to a multidisciplinary and intersectoral hospital-based elder abuse intervention; and 3) were available in English. Analysis The extracted recommendations for care were collated, coded, categorized into themes, and further reviewed for relevancy to a comprehensive hospital-based response. Characteristics of the responses were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results 649 recommendations were extracted from 68 distinct elder abuse responses, 149 of which were deemed relevant and were categorized into 5 themes: Initial contact; Capacity and consent; Interview with older adult, caregiver, collateral contacts, and/or suspected abuser; Assessment: physical/forensic, mental, psychosocial, and environmental/functional; and care plan. Only 6 responses had been evaluated, suggesting a significant gap between development and implementation of

  20. Dialysis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Диализ - Русский (Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hemodialysis Гемодиализ - Русский (Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Peritoneal Dialysis Перитонеальный диализ - Русский (Russian) Bilingual PDF Health Information ...

  1. [A new view on pathochemical mechanisms of prolonged peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Petrovich, Iu A; Iarema, I V; Terekhina, N A; Kichenko, S M

    2010-01-01

    New data on etiology, pathogenesis, clinics, quantity estimation, treatment and complications of peritoneal dialysis are observed. The role of aquaporine, nitric oxide, NO-synthase, inflammation and sepsis markers (procalcitonine, C-reactive protein) in pathochemical mechanism of peritoneal dialysis is discussed. PMID:20734476

  2. Predictors of Chain Acquisition among Independent Dialysis Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Pozniak, Alyssa S; Hirth, Richard A; Banaszak-Holl, Jane; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the predictors of chain acquisition among independent dialysis providers. Data Sources Retrospective facility-level data combined from CMS Cost Reports, Medical Evidence Forms, Annual Facility Surveys, and claims for 1996–2003. Study Design Independent dialysis facilities' probability of acquisition by a dialysis chain (overall and by chain size) was estimated using a discrete time hazard rate model, controlling for financial and clinical performance, practice patterns, market factors, and other facility characteristics. Data Collection The sample includes all U.S. freestanding dialysis facilities that report not being chain affiliated for at least 1 year between 1997 and 2003. Principal Findings Above-average costs and better quality outcomes are significant determinants of dialysis chain acquisition. Facilities in larger markets were more likely to be acquired by a chain. Furthermore, small dialysis chains have different acquisition strategies than large chains. Conclusions Dialysis chains appear to employ a mix of turn-around and cream-skimming strategies. Poor financial health is a predictor of chain acquisition as in other health care sectors, but the increased likelihood of chain acquisition among higher quality facilities is unique to the dialysis industry. Significant differences among predictors of acquisition by small and large chains reinforce the importance of using a richer classification for chain status. PMID:20148985

  3. Vitamin K Status of Canadian Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin K –dependent proteins have been implicated in the regulation of vascular calcification, a condition that is prevalent among peritoneal dialysis patients. Vitamin K status in this patient population is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 22 peritoneal dialysis patients selected from a Can...

  4. Kidney Dialysis Patients Discover New Hope through ABE Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amonette, Linda; And Others

    A program was developed to provide adult basic education (ABE) to kidney patients while they are receiving dialysis treatment. The program, which relies on an individualized learning approach, involved the coordinated efforts of the following parties: West Virginia Dialysis Facilities, Inc.; the Charleston Renal Group; and the Kanawha County Adult…

  5. Microcystin exposure and biochemical outcomes among dialysis patients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background and aims Dialysis patients appear to be at special risk for exposure to cyanobacteria toxins; episodes of microcystin (MCYST) exposure via dialysate during 1996 and 2001 have been previously reported. During 2001, as many as 44 dialysis patients were exposed to contam...

  6. Torque teno virus among dialysis and renal-transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Watanabe, Maria Angélica Ehara; Veríssimo da Silva Junior, Waldir; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Bedendo, João

    2015-03-01

    Patients who undergo dialysis treatment or a renal transplant have a high risk of blood-borne viral infections, including the Torque teno virus (TTV). This study identified the presence of TTV and its genome groups in blood samples from 118 patients in dialysis and 50 renal-transplant recipients. The research was conducted in a hospital in the city of Maringá, state of Paraná. The viral DNA, obtained from whole blood, was identified by using two nested Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). The frequencies of TTV were 17% and 36% in dialysis patients using the methodology proposed by Nishizawa et al . (1997) and Devalle and Niel (2004) , respectively, and 10% and 54% among renal-transplant patients. There was no statistically significant association between the frequency of the pathogen and the variables: gender, time in dialysis, time since transplant, blood transfusions, and the concomitant presence of hepatitis B, for either the dialysis patients or the renal-transplant recipients. Among dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients, genogroup 5 was predominant (48% and 66% respectively), followed by genogroup 4 (37% and 48%) and genogroup 1 (23% and 25%). Genogroup 2 was present in both groups of patients. Some patients had several genogroups, but 46% of the dialysis patients and 51% of the renal-transplant recipients had only a single genogroup. This study showed a high prevalence of TTV in dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients.

  7. Torque teno virus among dialysis and renal-transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Saito, Patricia Keiko; Yamakawa, Roger Haruki; Watanabe, Maria Angélica Ehara; Veríssimo da Silva, Waldir; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Bedendo, João

    2015-01-01

    Patients who undergo dialysis treatment or a renal transplant have a high risk of blood-borne viral infections, including the Torque teno virus (TTV). This study identified the presence of TTV and its genome groups in blood samples from 118 patients in dialysis and 50 renal-transplant recipients. The research was conducted in a hospital in the city of Maringá, state of Paraná. The viral DNA, obtained from whole blood, was identified by using two nested Polymerase Chain Reactions (PCR). The frequencies of TTV were 17% and 36% in dialysis patients using the methodology proposed by Nishizawa et al . (1997) and Devalle and Niel (2004) , respectively, and 10% and 54% among renal-transplant patients. There was no statistically significant association between the frequency of the pathogen and the variables: gender, time in dialysis, time since transplant, blood transfusions, and the concomitant presence of hepatitis B, for either the dialysis patients or the renal-transplant recipients. Among dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients, genogroup 5 was predominant (48% and 66% respectively), followed by genogroup 4 (37% and 48%) and genogroup 1 (23% and 25%). Genogroup 2 was present in both groups of patients. Some patients had several genogroups, but 46% of the dialysis patients and 51% of the renal-transplant recipients had only a single genogroup. This study showed a high prevalence of TTV in dialysis patients and renal-transplant recipients. PMID:26221122

  8. Bacterial growth and killing in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Verbrugh, H A; Keane, W F; Conroy, W E; Peterson, P K

    1984-01-01

    We determined the ability of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli to survive and grow in peritoneal dialysis fluids from patients undergoing chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Staphylococci did not survive in commercially available dialysis solutions but grew readily in peritoneal effluents obtained from patients after the dialysis dwell time. The number of CFU doubled 6 and 13 times in 24 h for S. epidermidis and S. aureus, respectively. E. coli grew well in both the pre- and postdialysis peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal macrophages as well as peripheral blood leukocytes inhibited bacterial growth in peritoneal dialysis fluid. However, 10(6) phagocytes per ml were minimally required to obtain a bacteriostatic effect. The addition of serum to peritoneal dialysis fluid increased the antibacterial activity of macrophages and blood leukocytes. The capacity of the aminoglycoside antibiotic tobramycin to reduce bacterial CFU in peritoneal dialysis fluid was only 10% of its bactericidal capacity in standard Mueller-Hinton brush. Peritoneal dialysis fluid had no effect on the antibacterial activity of imipenem. PMID:6386844

  9. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agent resistance and mortality in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Responsiveness to erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) varies widely among dialysis patients. ESA resistance has been associated with mortality in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients data is limited. Therefore we assessed the relation between ESA resistance in both HD and PD patients. Methods NECOSAD is a Dutch multi-center prospective cohort study of incident dialysis patients who started dialysis between January 1997 and January 2007. ESA resistance was defined as hemoglobin level < 11 g/dL with an above median ESA dose (i.e. 8,000 units/week in HD and 4,000 units/week in PD patients). Unadjusted and adjusted Cox regression analysis for all-cause 5-year mortality was performed for HD and PD patients separately. Results 1013 HD and 461 PD patients were included in the analysis. ESA resistant HD patients had an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.37 (95% CI 1.04-1.80) and ESA resistant PD patients had an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.41 (1.27-4.57) as compared to patients with a good response. Conclusions ESA resistance, as defined by categories of ESA and Hb, is associated with increased mortality in both HD and PD patients. The effect of ESA resistance, ESA dose and hemoglobin are closely related and the exact mechanism remains unclear. Our results strengthen the need to investigate and treat causes of ESA resistance not only in HD, but also in PD patients. PMID:24066978

  10. Chronic peritoneal dialysis catheters: challenges and design solutions.

    PubMed

    Ash, S R

    2006-01-01

    Although highly successful as transcutaneous access devices, today's peritoneal dialysis catheters still have imperfect hydraulic function, biocompatibility and resistance to infection. Success of Tenckhoff catheters is greatly improved by the proper positioning of deep and subcutaneous cuffs and intraperitoneal segment. Newer peritoneal catheter designs are intended to improve hydraulic function, avoid outflow failure, and diminish exit site infection. These catheter designs serve as excellent alternatives for patients with various types of failure of Tenckhoff catheters. Catheters have been designed for Continuous Flow Peritoneal Dialysis, and have generally been successful in providing high peritoneal dialysis flow rate, but not always successful in optimally distributing flow of peritoneal fluid. Improvements in catheter design may expand the use of peritoneal dialysis as a successful home dialysis therapy. PMID:16485243

  11. Peritoneal dialysis. An adjunct to pediatric postcardiotomy fluid management.

    PubMed Central

    Stromberg, D; Fraser, C D; Sorof, J M; Drescher, K; Feltes, T F

    1997-01-01

    Patients requiring cardiopulmonary bypass for congenital heart surgery commonly exhibit impaired renal function and extravascular fluid retention. These conditions contribute to early postoperative fluid overload, which may result in significant morbidity and mortality. We examined the safety and efficacy of peritoneal dialysis in removing extravascular fluid from critically ill postcardiotomy patients. A retrospective case review from July of 1995 through April of 1996 was conducted. All patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis achieved a net negative fluid balance. Average urine output increased from 2.1 cc/kg/hr to 3.9 cc/kg/hr (P < 0.01) during the pre-peritoneal dialysis to post-peritoneal dialysis period, and the mean number of inotropic agents decreased from 2.2 to 1.7 (P < 0.05). Controlled comparison revealed that the peritoneal dialysis cohort more rapidly achieved a negative weight-adjusted fluid balance throughout the early postoperative course. The peritoneal dialysis group's illness severity decreased more rapidly within the 24-hour period after initiation of peritoneal dialysis than did that of the control cohort over the same period of time. No difference in postoperative morbidity or mortality existed between the study groups. Complications from the catheter placement were minimal, and no patient experienced peritonitis or metabolic or hemodynamic instability during peritoneal dialysis catheter placement, usage, or removal. Peritoneal dialysis is a safe and effective form of renal replacement therapy, even among critically ill pediatric postcardiotomy patients. Early postsurgical institution of peritoneal dialysis may hasten early postoperative recovery. We speculate that intraoperative catheter placement reduces the complication rate associated with this treatment modality. PMID:9456479

  12. Survival by Dialysis Modality-Who Cares?

    PubMed

    Lee, Martin B; Bargman, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    In light of the recent emphasis on patient-centered outcomes and quality of life for patients with kidney disease, we contend that the nephrology community should no longer fund, perform, or publish studies that compare survival by dialysis modality. These studies have become redundant; they are methodologically limited, unhelpful in practice, and therefore a waste of resources. More than two decades of these publications show similar survival between patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis and those receiving thrice-weekly conventional hemodialysis, with differences only for specific subgroups. In clinical practice, modality choice should be individualized with the aim of maximizing quality of life, patient-reported outcomes, and achieving patient-centered goals. Expected survival is often irrelevant to modality choice. Even for the younger and fitter home hemodialysis population, quality of life, not just duration of survival, is a major priority. On the other hand, increasing evidence suggests that patients with ESRD continue to experience poor quality of life because of high symptom burden, unsolved clinical problems, and unmet needs. Patients care more about how they will live instead of how long. It is our responsibility to align our research with their needs. Only by doing so can we meet the challenges of ESRD patient care in the coming decades.

  13. Effects of disinfectants in renal dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, E.

    1986-11-01

    Patients receiving hemodialysis therapy risk exposure to both disinfectants and sterilants. Dialysis equipment is disinfected periodically with strong solutions of hypochlorite or formaldehyde. Gross hemolysis resulting from accidental hypochlorite infusion has led to cardiac arrest, probably as a result of hyperkalemia. Formaldehyde is commonly used in 4% solutions to sterilize the fluid paths of dialysis controllers and to sterilize dialyzers before reuse. It can react with red cell antigenic surfaces leading to the formation of anti-N antibodies. The major exposure risk is the low concentration of disinfectant found in municipal water used to prepare 450 L dialysate weekly. With thrice-weekly treatment schedules, the quality requirements for water used to make this solution must be met rigorously. Standards for water used in the preparation of dialysate have recently been proposed but not all patients are treated with dialysate meeting such standards. The introduction of sterilants via tap water is insidious and has let to more pervasive consequences. Both chlorine and chloramines, at concentrations found in potable water, are strong oxidants that cause extensive protein denaturation and hemolysis. Oxidation of the Fe/sup 2 +/ in hemoglobin to Fe/sup 3 +/ forms methemoglobin, which is incapable of carrying either O/sub 2/ or CO/sub 2/. Chloramine can form not only methemoglobin, but can also denature proteins within the red cell, thus forming aggregates (Heinz bodies). Chloramines also inhibit hexose monophosphate shunt activity, a mechanism that makes the red cell even more susceptible to oxidant damage.

  14. ELECTROLYTIC MEMBRANE DIALYSIS FOR TREATING WASTEWATER STREAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald C. Timpe

    2000-04-01

    This project will determine whether electrolytic dialysis has promise in the separation of charged particles in an aqueous solution. The ability to selectively move ions from one aqueous solution to another through a semipermeable membrane will be studied as a function of emf, amperage, and particle electrical charge. The ions selected for the study are Cl{sup -} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. These ions are of particular interest because of their electrical conduction properties in aqueous solution resulting with their association with the corrosive action of metals. The studies will be performed with commercial membranes on solutions prepared in the laboratory from reagent salts. pH adjustments will be made with dilute reagent acid and base. Specific objectives of the project include testing a selected membrane currently available for electrolytic dialysis, membrane resistance to extreme pH conditions, the effectiveness of separating a mixture of two ions selected on the basis of size, the efficiency of the membranes in separating chloride (Cl{sup 1-}) from sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), and separation efficiency as a function of electromotive force (emf).

  15. Hypertension in dialysis and kidney transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, GV Ramesh; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Tobe, Sheldon W; Lebel, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, the Canadian Hypertension Education Program has studied the evidence supporting blood pressure control in people requiring renal replacement therapy for end-stage kidney disease, including those on dialysis and with renal transplants. According to the Canadian Organ Replacement Registry’s 2008 annual report, there were an estimated 33,832 people with end-stage renal disease in Canada at the end of 2006, an increase of 69.7% since 1997. Of these, 20,465 were on dialysis and 13,367 were living with a functioning kidney transplant. Thus, it is becoming more likely that primary care practitioners will be helping to care for these complex patients. With the lack of large controlled clinical trials, the consensus recommendation based on interpretation of the existing literature is that blood pressure should be lowered to below 140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients on renal replacement therapy and to below 130/80 mmHg for renal transplant patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease. PMID:19417862

  16. Type of peritoneal dialysis catheter and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Pinerolo, Cristina; Cariati, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    In peritoneal dialysis (PD), a well-functioning catheter is of great importance, because a dysfunctional catheter may be associated with incidence of peritonitis, efficiency of dialysis, and to the overall quality of treatment, representing one of the main barriers to optimal use of PD. When considering the relationship between PD catheter type and outcomes, we should keep in mind the different types of available PD catheters, those that are most commonly used in clinical practice, and the available head-to-head comparisons in the literature. The main differences in PD catheter design include the number of cuffs, the shape of subcutaneous tract (straight vs. swan neck), and the shape of intraperitoneal tract (straight vs. coiled). The availability of the best catheter design and materials, along with a skillful management of PD access, may have the greatest impact on long-term patient outcome on PD. It is now established that the use of straight catheters may improve outcomes and technique survival, but further advances in PD catheter technology can potentially improve technique survival. The self-locating PD catheter is a well established device that has not been fully studied and it may represent, based on the available observational evidence and on the clinical experience, an already existing technological advance deserving further studies. PMID:25751555

  17. [Guidelines for quality management of dialysis solutions].

    PubMed

    Pérez García, R; González Parra, E; Ceballos, F; Escallada Cotero, R; Gómez-Reino, Ma I; Martín-Rabadán, P; Pérez García, A; Ramírez Chamond, R; Sobrino, P E; Solozábal, C

    2004-01-01

    A Best Practice Guideline about Dialysis fluid purity has been developed under the leadership of the Spanish Society of Nephrology. The Guideline has established recommendations for standards for preparing dialysate: water, concentrates and hemodialysis proportioning systems. The Guideline was based on the European pharmacopoeia, the Real Farmacopea Española, the AAMI Standards and Recommended Practices, European Best Practice Guidelines for Haemodialysis (Section IV), literature reviews, according to their level of evidence, and the opinion of the expert spanish group. Two levels of quality of water were defined: purified water and high purified water (Ultra pure) and for dialysate: standard dialysate and ultra pure dialysate. Regular use of ultra pure dialysate is necessary for hemofiltration and hemodiafiltration on-line and desirable for high-flux hemodialysis to prevent and delay the occurrence of complications: inflammation, malnutrition, anemia and amyloidosis. Water, concentrates and dialysate quality requirements are defined as maximum allowable contaminant levels: chemicals (1.1.2), microbial and endotoxins: [table: see text] Monitoring frequency, maintenance and corrective actions were specified. Methods of sampling and analysis were described in appendix (Anexos). For microbiological monitoring, TSA or R2A medium are recommended, incubated during 5 days at a temperature of 30-35 degrees C. The dialysate quality assurance process involves all dialysis staff members and requires strict protocols. The physician in charge of hemodialysis has the ultimate responsibility for dialysate quality. All suggestions and questions about this Guideline are wellcome to www.senefro.org PMID:15083969

  18. Appraising and monitoring a life on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Brunier, G

    1990-01-01

    I feel that the adaptation theories proposed by Nerenz and Leventhal (1983) and by Taylor (1983), although offering insights into how chronically sick individuals may interpret and manage their illness, do not capture completely the complexities of how D.R. has successfully learned over the years to live with renal disease and dialysis. I find it interesting that Lazarus and Folkman's theory of stress, adaptation and coping, which is based more on the belief that everyone experiences stress every day and, thereby, does not single out chronically ill people as being different, has more to offer in interpreting D.R.'s own perceptions on how he monitors his health than the illness-based models of Nerenz/Leventhal and Taylor. After eight years of continuous appraisal and reappraisal, D.R. has taught himself, through his own perceptions and interactions with those close to him, how he can live successfully with renal failure. The recording of his insights has helped me appreciate more deeply what an endless challenge a life lived on dialysis is.

  19. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. 414.316 Section 414.316 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PAYMENT FOR PART...

  20. Oral Tori in Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Lin; Hsu, Ching-Wei; Chang, Pei-Ching; Huang, Wen-Hung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Yang, Huang-Yu; Liu, Shou-Hsuan; Chen, Kuan-Hsing; Weng, Shu-Man; Chang, Chih-Chun; Wang, I-Kuan

    2016-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of oral tori has long been debated and is thought to be the product of both genetic and environmental factors, including occlusal forces. Another proposed mechanism for oral tori is the combination of biomechanical forces, particularly in the oral cavity, combined with cortical bone loss and trabecular expansion, as one might see in the early stages of primary hyperparathyroidism. This study investigated the epidemiology of torus palatinus (TP) and torus mandibularis (TM) in peritoneal dialysis patients, and analyzed the influences of hyperparathyroidism on the formation of oral tori. Method In total, 134 peritoneal dialysis patients were recruited between July 1 and December 31, 2015 for dental examinations for this study. Patients were categorized into two subgroups based on the presence or absence of oral tori. Demographic, hematological, biochemical, and dialysis-related data were obtained for analysis. Results The prevalence of oral tori in our sample group was high at 42.5% (57 of 134), and most patients with oral tori were female (61.4%). The most common location of tori was TP (80.7%), followed by TP and TM (14.0%), then TM (5.3%). All 54 TP cases were at the midline, and most were <2 cm (59.3%), flat (53.7%), and located in the premolar region (40.7%). Of the 11 TM cases, all were bilateral and symmetric, mostly <2 cm (81.9%), lobular (45.4%), and located at premolar region (63.6%). Interestingly, patients with oral tori had slightly lower serum levels of intact parathyroid hormones than those without oral tori, but the difference was not statistically significant (317.3±292.0 versus 430.1±492.6 pg/mL, P = 0.126). In addition, patients with oral tori did not differ from patients without tori in inflammatory variables such as serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (6.6±8.2 versus 10.3±20.2 mg/L, P = 0.147) or nutritional variables such as serum albumin levels (3.79±0.38 versus 3.77±0.45 g/dL, P = 0

  1. Cost-effectiveness of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: A national cohort study with 14 years follow-up and matched for comorbidities and propensity score.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Tzu; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Tsai, Min-Sung; Wu, Jia-Ling; Sung, Junne-Ming; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment for the dialysis population is resource intensive, a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) by matched pairs is still lacking. After matching for clinical characteristics and propensity scores, we identified 4,285 pairs of incident HD and PD patients from a Taiwanese national cohort during 1998-2010. Survival and healthcare expenditure were calculated by data of 14-year follow-up and subsequently extrapolated to lifetime estimates under the assumption of constant excess hazard. We performed a cross-sectional EQ-5D survey on 179 matched pairs of prevalent HD and PD patients of varying dialysis vintages from 12 dialysis units. The product of survival probability and the mean utility value at each time point (dialysis vintage) were summed up throughout lifetime to obtain the quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE). The results revealed the estimated life expectancy between HD and PD were nearly equal (19.11 versus 19.08 years). The QALE's were also similar, whereas average lifetime healthcare costs were higher in HD than PD (237,795 versus 204,442 USD) and the cost-effectiveness ratios for PD and HD were 13,681 and 16,643 USD per quality-adjusted life year, respectively. In conclusion, PD is more cost-effective than HD, of which the major determinants were the costs for the dialysis modality and its associated complications. PMID:27461186

  2. Cost-effectiveness of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: A national cohort study with 14 years follow-up and matched for comorbidities and propensity score

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tzu; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Hung, Shih-Yuan; Tsai, Min-Sung; Wu, Jia-Ling; Sung, Junne-Ming; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment for the dialysis population is resource intensive, a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) by matched pairs is still lacking. After matching for clinical characteristics and propensity scores, we identified 4,285 pairs of incident HD and PD patients from a Taiwanese national cohort during 1998–2010. Survival and healthcare expenditure were calculated by data of 14-year follow-up and subsequently extrapolated to lifetime estimates under the assumption of constant excess hazard. We performed a cross-sectional EQ–5D survey on 179 matched pairs of prevalent HD and PD patients of varying dialysis vintages from 12 dialysis units. The product of survival probability and the mean utility value at each time point (dialysis vintage) were summed up throughout lifetime to obtain the quality-adjusted life expectancy (QALE). The results revealed the estimated life expectancy between HD and PD were nearly equal (19.11 versus 19.08 years). The QALE’s were also similar, whereas average lifetime healthcare costs were higher in HD than PD (237,795 versus 204,442 USD) and the cost-effectiveness ratios for PD and HD were 13,681 and 16,643 USD per quality-adjusted life year, respectively. In conclusion, PD is more cost-effective than HD, of which the major determinants were the costs for the dialysis modality and its associated complications. PMID:27461186

  3. Improving clinical outcomes among hemodialysis patients: a proposal for a "volume first" approach from the chief medical officers of US dialysis providers.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Daniel E; Brunelli, Steven M; Hunt, Abigail; Schiller, Brigitte; Glassock, Richard; Maddux, Frank W; Johnson, Douglas; Parker, Tom; Nissenson, Allen

    2014-11-01

    Addressing fluid intake and volume control requires alignment and coordination of patients, providers, dialysis facilities, and payers, potentially necessitating a "Volume First" approach. This article reports the consensus opinions achieved at the March 2013 symposium of the Chief Medical Officers of 14 of the largest dialysis providers in the United States. These opinions are based on broad experience among participants, but often reinforced by only observational and frequently retrospective studies, highlighting the lack of high-quality clinical trials in nephrology. Given the high morbidity and mortality rates among dialysis patients and the absence of sufficient trial data to guide most aspects of hemodialysis therapy, participants believed that immediate attempts to improve care based on quality improvement initiatives, physiologic principles, and clinical experiences are warranted until such time as rigorous clinical trial data become available. The following overarching consensus opinions emerged. (1) Extracellular fluid status should be a component of sufficient dialysis, such that approaching normalization of extracellular fluid volume should be a primary goal of dialysis care. (2) Fluid removal should be gradual and dialysis treatment duration should not routinely be less than 4 hours without justification based on individual patient factors. (3) Intradialytic sodium loading should be avoided by incorporating dialysate sodium concentrations set routinely in the range of 134-138 mEq/L, avoidance of routine use of sodium modeling, and avoidance of hypertonic saline solution. (4) Dietary counseling should emphasize sodium avoidance.

  4. Dialysis Withdrawal: Impact and Evaluation of a Multidisciplinary Deliberation Within an Ethics Committee as a Shared-Decision-Making Model.

    PubMed

    Maurizi Balzan, Jocelyne; Cartier, Jean Charles; Calvino-Gunther, Silvia; Carron, Pierre Louis; Baro, Patrice; Palacin, Pedro; Vialtel, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Since dialysis withdrawal in maintenance dialysis patients with limited life expectancy results always in short-term death, nephrologists need a referenced process to make their decision. This study reviews 8 years of operation of an Ethics Committee in Nephrology (ECN). The ECN, within a multidisciplinary team, once a month explores cases reported by caregivers when maintaining dialysis seems not to be in the patient's best interest. Discussion is required when the vital prognosis is engaged by the evolution of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) or the occurrence of an acute medical event. Data are analyzed using a discussion guide. The informed decision is completed with an appropriated palliative care project involving the patient, and recorded in their file. Since 2006, the ECN has deliberated yearly for 10 sessions on 6-18 cases, concerning 380 identified maintenance dialysis patients. Characteristics of the population, cases, sessions and proposals are recorded and analyzed. The only variable associated with dialysis withdrawal was having at least one new comorbid condition. End of life is supported with the help of the palliative care team in the hospital or exceptionally at home. The ECN, through a multidisciplinary deliberation and resolution process, proposes an ethical shared-decision-making model ensuring that dialysis withdrawal follows professional guidelines, and is registered as a method for evaluating professional practice (EPP). Annual activity reports are submitted to the Hospital's Medical Evaluation and Quality Unit. Benefits are individual and collective for patients, relatives and caregivers. Prospects for reducing non-implemented decisions and identifying cases earlier would improve the Committee effectiveness.

  5. Dialysis Withdrawal: Impact and Evaluation of a Multidisciplinary Deliberation Within an Ethics Committee as a Shared-Decision-Making Model.

    PubMed

    Maurizi Balzan, Jocelyne; Cartier, Jean Charles; Calvino-Gunther, Silvia; Carron, Pierre Louis; Baro, Patrice; Palacin, Pedro; Vialtel, Paul

    2015-08-01

    Since dialysis withdrawal in maintenance dialysis patients with limited life expectancy results always in short-term death, nephrologists need a referenced process to make their decision. This study reviews 8 years of operation of an Ethics Committee in Nephrology (ECN). The ECN, within a multidisciplinary team, once a month explores cases reported by caregivers when maintaining dialysis seems not to be in the patient's best interest. Discussion is required when the vital prognosis is engaged by the evolution of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) or the occurrence of an acute medical event. Data are analyzed using a discussion guide. The informed decision is completed with an appropriated palliative care project involving the patient, and recorded in their file. Since 2006, the ECN has deliberated yearly for 10 sessions on 6-18 cases, concerning 380 identified maintenance dialysis patients. Characteristics of the population, cases, sessions and proposals are recorded and analyzed. The only variable associated with dialysis withdrawal was having at least one new comorbid condition. End of life is supported with the help of the palliative care team in the hospital or exceptionally at home. The ECN, through a multidisciplinary deliberation and resolution process, proposes an ethical shared-decision-making model ensuring that dialysis withdrawal follows professional guidelines, and is registered as a method for evaluating professional practice (EPP). Annual activity reports are submitted to the Hospital's Medical Evaluation and Quality Unit. Benefits are individual and collective for patients, relatives and caregivers. Prospects for reducing non-implemented decisions and identifying cases earlier would improve the Committee effectiveness. PMID:25807845

  6. 77 FR 9665 - Submission for OMB Emergency Review; Comment Request: A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Multi- Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI... currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: A Multi-Center International Hospital- Based... viral infections, ultraviolet radiation exposure, medical conditions, and other lifestyle factors...

  7. Quality of Life and Self-Efficacy in Three Dialysis Modalities: Incenter Hemodialysis, Home Hemodialysis, and Home Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linda S; Wilson, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated improved outcomes for patients on dialysis who have better quality of life and self-efficacy, but has focused almost exclusively on those receiving hemodialysis. The goal of this study was to describe the quality of life and self-efficacy of patients receiving incenter hemodialysis versus those receiving a home dialysis modality (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis). The study utilized a correlational cross-sectional design and quota sampling methods. Participants were recruited from outpatient dialysis facilities and included 77 community dwelling adult patients who had been on dialysis for at least six months. Quality of life was measured using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life instrument, and self-efficacy was measured using the Strategies Used by People to Promote Health instrument. Findings suggest equal outcomes between treatment groups, with no contraindication to the use of home therapies.

  8. Caring for severely ill cancer patients. A comparison of working conditions in hospital-based home care and in hospital.

    PubMed

    Beck-Friis, B; Strang, P; Sjödén, P O

    1993-05-01

    The goal of the study was to compare working conditions in a hospital with the conditions in a specialized hospital-based home care (HBHC) unit, which aims to replace hospital care for patients in need of institutional car. Staff (doctors included) in a HBHC unit (n = 35) and on three hospital wards (n = 113) participated in the study. All staff members worked regularly with severely ill cancer patients. Question about stress, job satisfaction and working conditions were asked in a self-administered questionnaire. Both groups showed a limited degree of continuous stress and a high degree of job satisfaction. Thus, the overall perception was than the working conditions were good. When significant differences were found, the responses of the HBHC staff were more positive. This included items such as more freedom to make their own decisions (P < 0.001), better co-operation between day and night shifts (P < 0.001), a more reasonable work load (P = 0.0001), fewer problems in communication with patients (P < 0.001), and fewer problems with tension (P < 0.05) and with sleeping (P < 0.05). The findings may be due to several factors: the HBHC staff were older, more often married, had more children, had worked longer in health care and were thus more experienced. Complementary explanations may be continuous education within the HBHC and an organization stimulating the staff's own initiative, but also capable of supporting when necessary.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses. PMID:22673696

  10. Comparison of oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis patients with non-diabetic dialysis patients and healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Roozbeh-Shahroodi, Jamshid; Pooladi, Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Zamani, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is associated with higher rates of caries, on the other hand some studies have shown that renal failure can be protective against dental caries. Objectives: In this study we compared oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis and non-diabetic dialysis patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: During November 2014 to January 2014, 85 people that referred to our medical care center entered the study. The sample included 30 diabetic dialysis, 28 non-diabetic dialysis patients and 27 healthy people. Oral saliva samples were obtained from their tongue and oral floor for microbiological examination. Patients’ data were compared before and after dialysis. Results: The amount of Lactobacillus and S. mutans did not show a significant difference between the three groups (P=0.092 and P=0.966 for S. mutans and lactobacillus, respectively). A positive and meaningful correlation was seen between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and the amount of S. mutans in the diabetic dialysis group (P=0.023; r=0.413). A meaningful and positive correlation was also seen between the amount of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after dialysis and the amount of oral S. mutans in the non-diabetic dialysis group (P=0.03; r=0.403). Conclusion: Despite the differences in the prevalence of caries that have been reported between renal failure patients and diabetic patients, we did not find any significant difference between diabetic dialysis, non-diabetic dialysis patients and the healthy population, regarding their amount of oral cariogenic bacteria. PMID:27689112

  11. Comparison of oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis patients with non-diabetic dialysis patients and healthy people

    PubMed Central

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Bazargani, Abdollah; Roozbeh-Shahroodi, Jamshid; Pooladi, Ali; Arasteh, Peyman; Zamani, Khosro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diabetes is associated with higher rates of caries, on the other hand some studies have shown that renal failure can be protective against dental caries. Objectives: In this study we compared oral Lactobacillus and Streptococcus mutans between diabetic dialysis and non-diabetic dialysis patients and the normal population. Patients and Methods: During November 2014 to January 2014, 85 people that referred to our medical care center entered the study. The sample included 30 diabetic dialysis, 28 non-diabetic dialysis patients and 27 healthy people. Oral saliva samples were obtained from their tongue and oral floor for microbiological examination. Patients’ data were compared before and after dialysis. Results: The amount of Lactobacillus and S. mutans did not show a significant difference between the three groups (P=0.092 and P=0.966 for S. mutans and lactobacillus, respectively). A positive and meaningful correlation was seen between fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and the amount of S. mutans in the diabetic dialysis group (P=0.023; r=0.413). A meaningful and positive correlation was also seen between the amount of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) after dialysis and the amount of oral S. mutans in the non-diabetic dialysis group (P=0.03; r=0.403). Conclusion: Despite the differences in the prevalence of caries that have been reported between renal failure patients and diabetic patients, we did not find any significant difference between diabetic dialysis, non-diabetic dialysis patients and the healthy population, regarding their amount of oral cariogenic bacteria.

  12. Organizational issues in the implementation of a hospital-based syringe exchange program.

    PubMed

    Masson, Carmen L; Sorensen, James L; Grossman, Nina; Sporer, Karl A; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlman, David C

    2010-05-01

    Little published information exists to guide health care institutions in establishing syringe exchange program (SEP) services. To address this gap, this article discusses organizational issues encountered in the implementation of a hospital-based SEP in San Francisco, California (USA). Investigators collaborated with a community organization in implementing a county hospital-based SEP. SEP services integrated into a public hospital presented unique challenges directly related to their status as a health care institution. In the course of introducing SEP services into a hospital setting as part of a clinical trial, various ethical, legal, and logistical issues were raised. Based on these experiences, this paper provides guidance on how to integrate an SEP into a traditional health care institution.

  13. Organizational Issues in the Implementation of a Hospital-Based Syringe Exchange Program

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Carmen L.; Sorensen, James L.; Grossman, Nina; Sporer, Karl A.; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlman, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Little published information exists to guide health care institutions in establishing syringe exchange program (SEP) services. To address this gap, this article discusses organizational issues encountered in the implementation of a hospital-based SEP in San Francisco, California (USA). Investigators collaborated with a community organization in implementing a county hospital-based SEP. SEP services integrated into a public hospital presented unique challenges directly related to their status as a health care institution. In the course of introducing SEP services into a hospital setting as part of a clinical trial, various ethical, legal, and logistical issues were raised. Based on these experiences, this paper provides guidance on how to integrate an SEP into a traditional health care institution. PMID:20397875

  14. Determinants of client termination in hospital-based case management programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Warrick, L H; Christianson, J B; Williams, F G

    1994-01-01

    Increasing attention is being focused on hospital-based programs that address the needs of the frail elderly. This article reports results from a demonstration of hospital-based case management (HBCC). Baseline, 3-, 6-, and 12-month assessment data are analyzed to determine why clients terminated from HBCC programs. Subsamples of community- and hospital-originated clients are examined to determine what factors predict case management termination. About half of both hospital- and community-originated clients left case management within 12 months because of death, nursing home placement, referral to another case management agency, relocation out of the service area, or discharge as self-sufficient. Hospital-originated clients were more likely to die within the first 6 months after entering case management than were community-originated clients. Cognitive and functional abilities were important predictors of termination status.

  15. Adherence in paediatric renal failure and dialysis: an ethical analysis of nurses' attitudes and reported practice.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Joe Scott; Hulton, Sally-Anne; Draper, Heather

    2015-02-01

    Minors have difficulty adhering to the strict management regimen required whilst on renal dialysis for chronic renal failure. This leads to ethical tensions as healthcare professionals (HCPs) and parents try, in the minor's best interests, to ensure s/he adheres. All 11 dialysis nurses working in a large, regional paediatric dialysis unit were interviewed about their perceptions and management of non-adherence and the ethical issues this raised for them. Participants reported negative attitudes to non-adherence alongside sympathy and feelings of frustration. They discussed the competing responsibilities between nurses, parents and minors, and how responsibility ought to be transferred to the minor as s/he matures; the need for minors to take responsibility ahead of transferring to adult services; and, the process of transferring this responsibility. Our discussion concentrates on the ethical issues raised by the participants' reports of how they respond to non-adherence using persuasion and coercion. We consider how understandings of capacity, traditional individual autonomy, and willpower can be used to comprehend the issue of non-adherence. We consider the relational context in which the minor receives, and participates in, healthcare. This exposes the interdependent triad of relationships between HCP, parent and minor and aids understanding of how to provide care in an ethical way. Relational ethics is a useful alternative understanding for professionals reflecting upon how they define their obligations in this context.

  16. Aliskiren Prevents the Toxic Effects of Peritoneal Dialysis Fluids during Chronic Dialysis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martínez, Juan; Pérez-Martínez, Francisco C.; Carrión, Blanca; Masiá, Jesús; Ortega, Agustín; Simarro, Esther; Nam-Cha, Syong H.; Ceña, Valentín

    2012-01-01

    The benefits of long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD) in patients with end-stage renal failure are short-lived due to structural and functional changes in the peritoneal membrane. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vitro and in vivo participation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in the signaling pathway leading to peritoneal fibrosis during PD. Exposure to high-glucose PD fluids (PDFs) increases damage and fibrosis markers in both isolated rat peritoneal mesothelial cells and in the peritoneum of rats after chronic dialysis. In both cases, the addition of the RAAS inhibitor aliskiren markedly improved damage and fibrosis markers, and prevented functional modifications in the peritoneal transport, as measured by the peritoneal equilibrium test. These data suggest that inhibition of the RAAS may be a novel way to improve the efficacy of PD by preventing inflammation and fibrosis following peritoneal exposure to high-glucose PDFs. PMID:22558414

  17. Hospital based ethics, current situation in France: between "Espaces" and committees.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, M

    2006-09-01

    Unlike research ethics committees, which were created in 1988, the number of functioning hospital based ethical organisations in France, such as clinical ethics committees, is unknown. The objectives of such structures are diverse. A recent law created regional ethical forums, the objectives of which are education, debate, and research in relation to healthcare ethics. This paper discusses the current situation in France and the possible evolution and conflicts induced by this law. The creation of official healthcare ethics structures raises several issues.

  18. Starting a hospital-based home health agency: Part II--Key success factors.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, P

    1993-09-01

    In Part II of a three-part series, the financial, technological and legislative issues of a hospital-based home health-agency are discussed. Beginning a home healthcare service requires intensive research to answer key environmental and operational questions--need, competition, financial projections, initial start-up costs and the impact of delayed depreciation. Assessments involving technology, staffing, legislative and regulatory issues can help project service volume, productivity and cost-control.

  19. Hospital-based Surveillance of Rotavirus Diarrhea among Under- five Children in Chandigarh.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Singh, M P; Guglani, Vishal; Mahajan, K S; Pandit, S

    2016-07-01

    In a prospective hospital-based surveillance of 958 under five children admitted with acute gastroenteritis in Chandigarh (May 2011 to July 2012), 239 stool samples were collected. Rotavirus antigen was detected in 18.8% of samples by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes G1P[8] (53.3%), G12P[6] (15.6%) were prevalent, and G3 not detected. PMID:27508548

  20. Policies to enhance coordination in hospital-based case management programs.

    PubMed

    Netting, F E; Williams, F G; Jones-McClintic, S; Warrick, L

    1990-02-01

    Social work practitioners in health and social services are expected to develop and implement programs and client care plans that require cooperation and coordination with numerous other individuals and programs. Such cooperation and coordination often are accomplished through informal networking. As programs develop, these relationships may be formalized in written policy agreements. In this article, the authors examine four policies designed to improve cooperation and coordination at different levels in hospital-based case management systems. Implications for social work practice are discussed.

  1. 42 CFR 494.120 - Condition: Special purpose renal dialysis facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Special purpose renal dialysis... RENAL DISEASE FACILITIES Patient Care § 494.120 Condition: Special purpose renal dialysis facilities. A special purpose renal dialysis facility is approved to furnish dialysis on a short-term basis at...

  2. Con: Higher serum bicarbonate in dialysis patients is protective.

    PubMed

    Chauveau, Philippe; Rigothier, Claire; Combe, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic acidosis is often observed in advanced chronic kidney disease, with deleterious consequences on the nutritional status, bone and mineral status, inflammation and mortality. Through clearance of the daily acid load and a net gain in alkaline buffers, dialysis therapy is aimed at correcting metabolic acidosis. A normal bicarbonate serum concentration is the recommended target in dialysis patients. However, several studies have shown that a mild degree of metabolic acidosis in patients treated with dialysis is associated with better nutritional status, higher protein intake and improved survival. Conversely, a high bicarbonate serum concentration is associated with poor nutritional status and lower survival. It is likely that mild acidosis results from a dietary acid load linked to animal protein intake. In contrast, a high bicarbonate concentration in patients treated with dialysis could result mainly from an insufficient dietary acid load, i.e. low protein intake. Therefore, a high pre-dialysis serum bicarbonate concentration should prompt nephrologists to carry out nutritional investigations to detect insufficient dietary protein intake. In any case, a high bicarbonate concentration should be neither a goal of dialysis therapy nor an index of adequate dialysis, whereas mild acidosis could be considered as an indicator of appropriate protein intake. PMID:27411724

  3. Management of chronic kidney disease and dialysis in homeless persons

    PubMed Central

    Podymow, Tiina; Turnbull, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis are complicated illnesses to manage in homeless persons, who often suffer medical comorbidities, psychiatric disease, cognitive impairment and addictions; descriptions of this population and management strategies are lacking. A retrospective review of dialysis patients who were homeless or unstably housed was undertaken at an urban academic Canadian center from 2001 to 2011. Electronic hospital records were analyzed for demographic, housing, medical, and psychiatric history, dialysis history, adherence to treatment, and outcomes. Two detailed cases of homeless patients with chronic kidney disease are presented. Eleven homeless dialysis patients with a mean age of 52.7±12.3 years, mostly men and mostly from minority groups were dialyzed for 41.1±29.2 months. Most resided permanently in shelters, eventually obtained fistula access, and were adherent to dialysis schedules. Patients were often nonadherent to pre-dialysis management, resulting in emergency starts. Many barriers to care for homeless persons with end-stage kidney disease and on dialysis are identified, and management strategies are highlighted. Adherence is optimized with shelter-based health care and intensive team-oriented case management. PMID:25018988

  4. Students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Shehla Jabbar; Louw, Jakobus Murray; Hugo, Jannie; Rauf, Waqar-un Nisa; Sandars, John Edward

    2016-01-01

    Background An innovative, three-year training programme, the Bachelor of Clinical Medical Practice (BCMP), for mid-level medical healthcare workers was started in 2009 by the Department of Family Medicine, University of Pretoria. Aim To measure the students’ perceptions of the instructional quality of district hospital-based training. Setting Training of students took place at clinical learning centres in rural district hospitals in the Mpumalanga and Gauteng provinces. Methods A survey using the MedEd IQ questionnaire was performed in 2010 and 2011 to measure BCMP second- and third-year students’ perceptions of instructional quality of district hospital-based training. The MedEd IQ questionnaire is composed of four subscales: preceptor activities, learning opportunities, learner involvement and the learning environment. Composite scores of instructional quality were used to present results. Results The preceptor activities, learning opportunities and the learning environment were considered by second- and third-year BCMP students to be of consistently high instructional quality. In the area of learner involvement, instructional quality increased significantly from second to third year. Conclusion Overall, instructional quality of district hospital-based training was high for both second- and third-year BCMP students, and the instructional quality of learner involvement being significantly higher in third year students. The MedEd IQ tool was a useful tool for measuring instructional quality and to inform programme quality improvement. PMID:27543282

  5. Prevalence of patients with end-stage renal disease on dialysis in the West Bank, Palestine.

    PubMed

    Khader, Mohammed I; Snouber, Shehab; Alkhatib, Abdallah; Nazzal, Zaher; Dudin, Anwar

    2013-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the point prevalence of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on dialysis in the West Bank, Palestine. As part of this study, the following parameters were studied: District, gender, age and presumed cause. This cross-sectional study was undertaken during the period 26-30 December 2010 at all dialysis units in the West Bank, and included all cases of ESRD on dialysis. The total prevalence of patients with ESRD on dialysis during the study period was 240.3 per million population (PMP). The highest prevalence was seen in Jericho city. There were 57.7% males and 42.4% females in the study. The majority of patients (62.3%) were living in villages, while 28.8% were living in cities and 8.9% were living in refugee camps. Most of the patients (45%) were aged between 45 and 64 years. The vast majority of patients were either diabetic (22.5%) or hypertensive (11.1%) or both at the same time (10.6%). There were a considerable number of patients in whom the cause was undetermined (27.6%). The majority of recorded cases of congenital causes were from the Hebron, Jenin and Tubas districts. The prevalence of ESRD noted in our study is comparable with other regional countries but far below the rate recorded in industrialized countries. In the Palestinian territories, there is a general lack of national statistics and surveys, particularly in the public health section. Increased efforts and awareness should be focused on the prevention and treatment of diabetes mellitus and hypertension as they are the main causes of ESRD. There should also be an additional enhancement and implementation of strategies for the registration of data in order to conduct periodic comparisons and analytical studies to improve the management and quality of life of ESRD patients.

  6. Determinants of survival in patients receiving dialysis in Libya.

    PubMed

    Alashek, Wiam A; McIntyre, Christopher W; Taal, Maarten W

    2013-04-01

    Maintenance dialysis is associated with reduced survival when compared with the general population. In Libya, information about outcomes on dialysis is scarce. This study, therefore, aimed to provide the first comprehensive analysis of survival in Libyan dialysis patients. This prospective multicenter study included all patients in Libya who had been receiving dialysis for >90 days in June 2009. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected upon enrollment and survival status after 1 year was determined. Two thousand two hundred seventy-three patients in 38 dialysis centers were followed up for 1 year. The majority were receiving hemodialysis (98.8%). Sixty-seven patients were censored due to renal transplantation, and 46 patients were lost to follow-up. Thus, 2159 patients were followed up for 1 year. Four hundred fifty-eight deaths occurred, (crude annual mortality rate of 21.2%). Of these, 31% were due to ischemic heart disease, 16% cerebrovascular accidents, and 16% due to infection. Annual mortality rate was 0% to 70% in different dialysis centers. Best survival was in age group 25 to 34 years. Binary logistic regression analysis identified age at onset of dialysis, physical dependency, diabetes, and predialysis urea as independent determinants of increased mortality. Patients receiving dialysis in Libya have a crude 1-year mortality rate similar to most developed countries, but the mean age of the dialysis population is much lower, and this outcome is thus relatively poor. As in most countries, cardiovascular disease and infection were the most common causes of death. Variation in mortality rates between different centers suggests that survival could be improved by promoting standardization of best practice.

  7. Albumin dialysis in artificial liver support systems: open-loop or closed-loop dialysis mode?

    PubMed

    Pei, Yingying; Sun, Yize; Sun, Sijie; Gao, Dayong; Ding, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    In artificial liver support systems, the open-loop albumin dialysis mode (OLM) is usually used to remove protein-bound toxins from the blood of patients with liver failure. However, there is still interest in the closed-loop albumin dialysis mode (CLM) because this mode may enable not only the regeneration and reuse of albumin but also the miniaturization of artificial liver systems. In this article, we compared the two modes under a fixed amount of albumin in dialysate experimentally and theoretically. The results show that according to the detoxification efficiency in the 3 hour dialysis for removing albumin-bound bilirubin, CLM is better than OLM. The usage efficiency of albumin in CLM is also higher. Moreover, the advantage of CLM is more significant when the concentration of bilirubin in blood is lower. Under a given amount of albumin in dialysate, if the concentration of bilirubin in blood is high, one may further increase the performance of CLM by means of increasing the flow rate of the albumin dialysate or using the highly concentrated albumin dialysate.

  8. Prevalence and clinical characteristics of HIV type 1-infected patients receiving dialysis in Spain: results of a Spanish survey in 2006: GESIDA 48/05 study.

    PubMed

    Trullàs, J-C; Barril, G; Cofan, F; Moreno, A; Cases, A; Fernandez-Lucas, M; Martinez-Ara, J; Ceballos, M; Garcia-de-Diego, J; Muñiz, M-L; Molina, J; Martínez-Castelao, A; González-Garcia, J; Miró, J-M

    2008-10-01

    End-stage renal diseases (ESRD) are becoming more frequent in HIV-infected patients. In Europe there is little information about HIV-infected patients on dialysis. A cross-sectional multicenter survey in 328 Spanish dialysis units was conducted in 2006. Information from 14,876 patients in dialysis was obtained (81.6% of the Spanish dialysis population). Eighty-one were HIV infected (0.54%; 95% CI, 0.43-0.67), 60 were on hemodialysis, and 21 were on peritoneal dialysis. The mean (range) age was 45 (28-73) years. Seventy-two percent were men and 33% were former drug users. The mean (range) time of HIV infection was 11 (1-27) years and time on dialysis was 4.6 (0.4-25) years. ESRD was due to glomerulonephritis (36%) and diabetes (15%). HIV-associated nephropathy was not reported. Eighty-five percent were on HAART, 76.5% had a CD4 T cell count above 200 cells, and 73% had undetectable viral load. Thirty-nine percent of patients met criteria for inclusion on the renal transplant (RT) waiting list but only 12% were included. Sixty-one percent had HCV coinfection. HCV-coinfected patients had a longer history of HIV, more previous AIDS events, parenteral transmission as the most common risk factor for acquiring HIV infection, and less access to the RT waiting list (p < 0.05). The prevalence of HIV infection in Spanish dialysis units in 2006 was 0.54% HCV coinfection was very frequent (61%) and the percentage of patients included on the Spanish RT waiting list was low (12%).

  9. Clinical effects of icodextrin in peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Cnossen, Trijntje T; Konings, Constantijn J; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M; Kooman, Jeroen P

    2008-10-01

    Objective. This study reviews the relevant publications on the clinical effects of icodextrin in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Design. The study provides a systematic review of the literature (MEDLINE search with icodextrin as the keyword). Results. Icodextrin induces sustained transcapillary ultrafiltration during long dwell periods. It also stimulates increased removal of sodium by the peritoneal membrane, reduction of extracellular water (ECW) and total body water (TBW). Effects of icodextrin on blood pressure control and residual renal function are discrepant. Icodextrin induces a reduction in the formation of advanced glycation end-products, while the longitudinal changes in the peritoneal membrane transport are less prominent. Conclusions. Use of icodextrin in PD improves the sodium and fluid balance. Icodextrin is potentially more biocompatible, when compared with the conventional glucose solutions. The side effects are rare.

  10. Dialysis membrane for separation on microchips

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Anup K.; Kirby, Brian J.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2010-07-13

    Laser-induced phase-separation polymerization of a porous acrylate polymer is used for in-situ fabrication of dialysis membranes inside glass microchannels. A shaped 355 nm laser beam is used to produce a porous polymer membrane with a thickness of about 15 .mu.m, which bonds to the glass microchannel and forms a semi-permeable membrane. Differential permeation through a membrane formed with pentaerythritol triacrylate was observed and quantified by comparing the response of the membrane to fluorescein and fluorescently tagging 200 nm latex microspheres. Differential permeation was observed and quantified by comparing the response to rhodamine 560 and lactalbumin protein in a membrane formed with SPE-methylene bisacrylamide. The porous membranes illustrate the capability for the present technique to integrate sample cleanup into chip-based analysis systems.

  11. [Acquired renal cysts in maintenance dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lie, B; Hust, W; Asgarzadeh, A; Mann, H

    1986-03-01

    Ultrasonographic examination of the kidneys of 111 patients on long term maintenance hemodialysis was performed. None of the patients had genuine polycystic kidney disease. In many patients acquired cysts were found. Frequency and volume of these cysts were the same on the right and left side. There was no correlation between the age of the patients and the number of cysts. There were no differences concerning sex and type of primary renal disease. There was a significant positive correlation between time on maintenance hemodialysis and number of cysts but no correlation between number of cysts and hemoglobin concentration. This is in contrast to data in the literature. Clinical relevance of acquired kidney cysts in dialysis patients concerns hematuria, retroperitoneal bleeding, kidney stone formation, septicemia and malignancy.

  12. Living with a Change in Dialysis Modalities: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Nephrology nurses play a major role in every aspect of caring for patients on dialysis. It is always challenging to witness patients and families struggling through dialysis modality changes coupled with end-of-life decisions. Open discussions and care provided by an interdisciplinary team approach provides the foundational structure for quality care necessary for this population. In the case of Mr. T., a dialysis modality change was a necessary change in his life. The FNP PCP played a significant role in coordinating his care to achieve the desired outcomes and ensure there was a coordinated team approach.

  13. Clinical outcomes and mortality in elderly peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sakacı, Tamer; Ahbap, Elbis; Koc, Yener; Basturk, Taner; Ucar, Zuhal Atan; Sınangıl, Ayse; Sevınc, Mustafa; Kara, Ekrem; Akgol, Cuneyt; Kayalar, Arzu Ozdemır; Caglayan, Feyza Bayraktar; Sahutoglu, Tuncay; Ünsal, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical outcomes and identify the predictors of mortality in elderly patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study including all incident peritoneal dialysis cases in patients ≥65 years of age treated from 2001 to 2014. Demographic and clinical data on the initiation of peritoneal dialysis and the clinical events during the study period were collected. Infectious complications were recorded. Overall and technique survival rates were analyzed. RESULTS: Fifty-eight patients who began peritoneal dialysis during the study period were considered for analysis, and 50 of these patients were included in the final analysis. Peritoneal dialysis exchanges were performed by another person for 65% of the patients, whereas 79.9% of patients preferred to perform the peritoneal dialysis themselves. Peritonitis and catheter exit site/tunnel infection incidences were 20.4±16.3 and 24.6±17.4 patient-months, respectively. During the follow-up period, 40 patients were withdrawn from peritoneal dialysis. Causes of death included peritonitis and/or sepsis (50%) and cardiovascular events (30%). The mean patient survival time was 38.9±4.3 months, and the survival rates were 78.8%, 66.8%, 50.9% and 19.5% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years after peritoneal dialysis initiation, respectively. Advanced age, the presence of additional diseases, increased episodes of peritonitis, the use of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, and low albumin levels and daily urine volumes (<100 ml) at the initiation of peritoneal dialysis were predictors of mortality. The mean technique survival duration was 61.7±5.2 months. The technique survival rates were 97.9%, 90.6%, 81.5% and 71% at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years, respectively. None of the factors analyzed were predictors of technique survival. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality was higher in elderly patients. Factors affecting mortality in elderly patients included advanced age, the presence of comorbid

  14. Behavioral Stage of Change and Dialysis Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    McGrail, Anna; Lewis, Steven A.; Schold, Jesse; Lawless, Mary Ellen; Sehgal, Ashwini R.; Perzynski, Adam T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Behavioral stage of change (SoC) algorithms classify patients’ readiness for medical treatment decision-making. In the precontemplation stage, patients have no intention to take action within 6 months. In the contemplation stage, action is intended within 6 months. In the preparation stage, patients intend to take action within 30 days. In the action stage, the change has been made. This study examines the influence of SoC on dialysis modality decision-making. Design, setting, participants, & measurements SoC and relevant covariates were measured, and associations with dialysis decision-making were determined. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 patients on dialysis to elicit experiences. Qualitative interview data informed the survey design. Surveys were administered to adults with CKD (eGFR≤25 ml/min/1.73 m2) from August, 2012 to June, 2013. Multivariable logistic regression modeled dialysis decision-making with predictors: SoC, provider connection, and dialysis knowledge score. Results Fifty-five patients completed the survey (71% women, 39% white, and 59% black), and median annual income was $17,500. In total, 65% of patients were in the precontemplation/contemplation (thinking) and 35% of patients were in the preparation/maintenance (acting) SoC; 62% of patients had made dialysis modality decisions. Doctors explaining modality options, higher dialysis knowledge scores, and fewer lifestyle barriers were associated with acting versus thinking SoC (all P<0.02). Patients making modality decisions had doctors who explained dialysis options (76% versus 43%), were in the acting versus the thinking SoC (50% versus 10%), had higher dialysis knowledge scores (1.4 versus 0.5), and had lower eGFR (13.9 versus 16.8 ml/min/1.73 m2; all P<0.05). In adjusted analyses, dialysis knowledge was significantly associated with decision-making (odds ratio, 4.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 12.9; P=0.01), and SoC was of borderline significance

  15. Living with a Change in Dialysis Modalities: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Nephrology nurses play a major role in every aspect of caring for patients on dialysis. It is always challenging to witness patients and families struggling through dialysis modality changes coupled with end-of-life decisions. Open discussions and care provided by an interdisciplinary team approach provides the foundational structure for quality care necessary for this population. In the case of Mr. T., a dialysis modality change was a necessary change in his life. The FNP PCP played a significant role in coordinating his care to achieve the desired outcomes and ensure there was a coordinated team approach. PMID:27501634

  16. Strategies for preserving residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Nongnuch, Arkom; Assanatham, Montira; Panorchan, Kwanpeemai; Davenport, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) over the last 50 years, in terms of reducing cardiovascular risk, mortality remains unacceptably high, particularly for those patients who progress to stage 5 CKD and initiate dialysis (CKD5d). As mortality risk increases exponentially with progressive CKD stage, the question arises as to whether preservation of residual renal function once dialysis has been initiated can reduce mortality risk. Observational studies to date have reported an association between even small amounts of residual renal function and improved patient survival and quality of life. Dialysis therapies predominantly provide clearance for small water-soluble solutes, volume and acid-base control, but cannot reproduce the metabolic functions of the kidney. As such, protein-bound solutes, advanced glycosylation end-products, middle molecules and other azotaemic toxins accumulate over time in the anuric CKD5d patient. Apart from avoiding potential nephrotoxic insults, observational and interventional trials have suggested that a number of interventions and treatments may potentially reduce the progression of earlier stages of CKD, including targeted blood pressure control, reducing proteinuria and dietary intervention using combinations of protein restriction with keto acid supplementation. However, many interventions which have been proven to be effective in the general population have not been equally effective in the CKD5d patient, and so the question arises as to whether these treatment options are equally applicable to CKD5d patients. As strategies to help preserve residual renal function in CKD5d patients are not well established, we have reviewed the evidence for preserving or losing residual renal function in peritoneal dialysis patients, as urine collections are routinely collected, whereas few centres regularly collect urine from haemodialysis patients, and haemodialysis dialysis

  17. Management of the patient with ESRD after withdrawal from dialysis.

    PubMed

    DeVelasco, R; Dinwiddie, L C

    1998-12-01

    When dialysis no longer achieves the goal of prolonging quality life for the ESRD patient, withdrawal from dialysis is an option. Many patients, their families, and caregivers cannot make an informed decision to withdraw because they do not have sufficient information or, worse, are misinformed about what the patient might experience. This paper reviews the clinical circumstances in which dialysis is discontinued as well as the physiological signs and symptoms of the uremic-related death. Palliative management of those symptoms is from one nephrologist's model and provides a starting point for dialogue about this necessary care. PMID:10188396

  18. Peritoneal infection in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Jitendra; Gupta, Amit; Gulati, Sanjeev

    2003-11-01

    A prospective study was done to evaluate the incidence and microbiological trend of peritoneal infection in patients undergoing acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis (PD). Complete sterile procedure was ensured and at the completion of the procedure PD fluid was sent for bacteriological culture, sensitivity, and total and differential cell count. During the period September 2000 to February 2001 a total of 100 patients were evaluated. Male female ratio was 72:28. Mean age was 43.17 +/- 17.2 years. In 26 patients cyclers were used. Bacterial culture was positive in total of 30 cases (30%). Gram positive, Gram negative and mixed infection was found in 10%, 15%, and 5% respectively. Number of exchanges (31.61 +/- 7.7 vs. 31.3 +/- 6, p = 0.8) were similar and number of repositioning was significantly more in the infected group (23.3% vs. 11.4%, p < 0.01). Total cell count was significantly higher in infected group (274.3 +/- 502 vs. 31.25 +/- 79.34, p < 0.01). Among Gram +ve organisms Staphylococcus was found in 7, Enterococcus faecalis in 4 and Coryne bacterium sps. in 2 cases. Among Gram -ve organisms, E. coli was found in 4, Enterobacter in 3, Klebsiella 1, Pseudomonas 1, Acinetobacter arinatus 5, Acinetobacter baumani 3, and Citrobacter freundii 3. Mixed flora comprised of Enterococcus faecalis 3, Enterobacter 1, Staphlococcus 1, E. coli 3, Citrobacter 1, Acinobacter baumani 1. Although with the cyclers using collapsible bags, staphylococcus was not isolated, the total incidence of infection (11/26 cases) was not decreased with the use of cyclers. We conclude that in acute intermittent peritoneal dialysis the incidence of bacterial infection is 30% with preponderance of Gram -ve over Gram +ve organisms and organism of fecal origin being commoner than those of skin origin. Use of cycler-assisted over manual PD do not improve the incidence of infection. Repositioning of the stiff catheter significantly increases the incidence of infection.

  19. Bladder perforation in a peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Ounissi, M; Sfaxi, M; Fayala, H; Abderrahim, E; Ben Abdallah, T; Chebil, M; Ben Maiz, H; Kheder, A

    2012-05-01

    The dysfunction of the catheter in peritoneal dialysis (PD) is a frequent complication. However, perforation of organs are rare, particularly that of the urinary bladder. This requires an early diagnosis and prompt treatment of patients. We report here the case of a 38-year-old woman having end-stage renal disease due to autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease treated by PD since November 2000. Three years later, she was treated for Staphylococcal peritonitis. Four months later, she presented with a severe urge to urinate at the time of the fluid exchanges. The biochemical analysis of the fluid from the bladder showed that it was dialysis fluid. Injection of contrast through the catheter demonstrated the presence of a fistula between the bladder and the peritoneal cavity. She underwent cystoscopic closure of the fistulous tract and the PD catheter was removed. Subsequently, the patient was treated by hemodialysis. One month later, a second catheter was implanted surgically after confirming the closure of the fistula. Ten days later, she presented with pain at the catheter site and along the tunnel, which was found to be swollen along its track. The injection of contrast produced swelling of the subcutaneous tunnel but without extravasation of the dye. PD was withdrawn and the patient was put back on hemodialysis. Bladder fistula is a rare complication in PD and diagnosis should be suspected when patient complains of an urge to pass urine during the exchanges, which can be confirmed by contrast study showing presence of dye in the bladder. PD may be possible after the closure of the fistula, but recurrence may occur. PMID:22569443

  20. Comparison of the Effects of Dialysis Methods (Haemodialysis vs Peritoneal Dialysis) on Diastolic Left Ventricular Function Dialysis Methods and Diastolic Function

    PubMed Central

    Ellouali, Fedoua; Berkchi, Fatimazahra; Bayahia, Rabia; Benamar, Loubna; Cherti, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In patients undergoing chronic dialysis, several factors appear to influence the occurrence of cardiac abnormalities. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of two different methods of renal replacement therapy (chronic haemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD)) on left ventricular (LV) diastolic function. Patients and Methods: We enrolled 63 patients: 21 patients on CAPD, and 42 age- and gender-matched patients on HD; 35 patients were men (55.6%). Median of age was 46.4 (35-57) years. The median duration of renal replacement therapy was 3(2-5) years. Results: The two groups (HD vs PD) were similar concerning body mass index, dialysis duration and cardiovascular risk factors. The comparison of echocardiographic parameters showed statistically significant differences between two groups, regarding the presence of calcification, cardiac effusion, severely abnormal left ventricular hypertrophy(LVH) and the ratio of mitral velocity to early diastolic velocity of the mitral annulus (E/e’) >13 (p= 0.001, p= 0.003, p= 0.02, p= 0.004, respectively). In multivariate analysis, an E/e’>13 was higher in PD group ( OR= 5.8, CI [1.3-25.5], p=0.002). Conclusion: The method of dialysis seems to influence LV diastolic function. We observed a higher prevalence of diastolic LV dysfunction in the PD group. Echocardiographic follow up is essential as this could improve the management of cardiovascular complications in dialysis patients. PMID:27583042

  1. Sleep disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis: comparison between hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Losso, Ricardo L M; Minhoto, Gisele R; Riella, Miguel C

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disorders for patients on dialysis are significant causes of a poorer quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality. No study has evaluated patients undergoing automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assess their sleep disorders compared to hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A total of 166 clinically stable patients who had been on dialysis for at least 3 months were randomly selected for the study and divided into HD, CAPD or APD. Socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters and self-administered questionnaires were collected for the investigation of insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), bruxism, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), sleepwalking, sleep hygiene, depression and anxiety. Insomnia was detected in more than 80 % of patients on the three modalities. OSAS was lower for patients on HD (36 %) than on CAPD (65 %) (p < 0.01) or APD (60 %) (p < 0.04). Patients on APD were more likely to have RLS compared to those on HD or CAPD (p < 0.04) (50 vs. 23 vs. 33 %). No differences among the modalities were found in bruxism, EDS, sleepwalking, sleep hygiene, depression or anxiety. ESRD patients undergoing any one of the three dialysis modalities studied had a high prevalence of sleep disorders. Patients on HD had a lower proportion of OSAS than those on CAPD and APD, which is most likely attributed to their lower body mass indices. The possible causes of higher RLS rates in APD patients have not been established.

  2. Peritoneal dialysis prescription during the third trimester of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Batarse, Rodolfo R; Steiger, Ralph M; Guest, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Management of the pregnant patient on peritoneal dialysis (PD) is potentially challenging because uterine enlargement may negatively affect catheter function and prescribed dwell volumes. Additional reports of the management of these patients are needed. Here, we describe a near-full-term delivery in a 27-year-old woman who had been on dialysis for 7 years. Peritoneal dialysis was continued during the entire pregnancy. In the third trimester, a higher delivered automated PD volume allowed for adequate clearance and control of volume status. A decision to hospitalize the patient to limit activity and facilitate the delivery of increased dialysate is believed to have contributed to the successful outcome for mother and infant. Our report discusses the management of this patient and reviews published dialysis prescriptions used during the third trimester of pregnancy in patients treated with PD. PMID:24711639

  3. [Electrochemical regeneration of dialysis solution in experimental and clinical conditions].

    PubMed

    Eventov, V L; Andrianova, M I; Maksimenko, V A; Nefedkin, S I; Ostodi, T

    1997-01-01

    The authors have created a new system for electrochemical regeneration of dialysis solution and conducted 67 experiments using a model solution. Two groups of patients with terminal renal failure were treated. The regeneration system was applied in the treatment of Group 1 patients (n = 14), the traditional acetate hemodialysis procedure was used in Group 2 (n = 11). Hemodialysis with electrochemical regeneration of dialysis fluid removed creatinine and potassium ions from critically ill patients' blood as effectively as the traditional hemodialysis procedure. During electrochemical hemodialysis, middle-molecular toxins were removed better those with the traditional one, but urea and inorganic phosphorus were eliminated slowler. Electrochemical regeneration provided continuous purification of dialysis fluid. The regenerator block can be used many times. Sodium hypochlorite ensured self-sterilization of the system. The use of electrochemical regeneration does not require water purification, water communications and dialysis concentrate, which enables the detoxification procedure to be performed outside the specially equipped rooms. PMID:9376743

  4. Campylobacter jejuni peritonitis complicating continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Pepersack, F; D'Haene, M; Toussaint, C; Schoutens, E

    1982-01-01

    We report the occurrence of Campylobacter jejuni peritonitis complicating C. jejuni enteritis in a patient treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Cure followed oral administration of erythromycin and intraperitoneal therapy with gentamicin. PMID:7153322

  5. The Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Obese Children and Adolescents in Dalmatia: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Milić, Lukrecija; Unić, Ivana; Škrabić, Veselin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome (MS) are one of the biggest public health issues in child and adolescent population. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this hospital based study is the first report on the prevalence of MS in obese children and adolescents in Dalmatia, the Mediterranean part of Croatia. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of individual cardiovascular risk factors and MS. Between January 2009 and June 2014, 201 obese subjects aged 6 to 18 were analyzed retrospectively from our Pediatric Endocrine Unit database. The subjects were then classified in two groups of obesity; subjects with BMI z score 2.0–3.0 were classified as moderately obese and subjects with BMI z score > 3.0 were classified as severely obese. The overall prevalence of MS using the modified IDF criteria was 30.3%. The most common component of MS in both groups was arterial hypertension, while impaired fasting glucose was the least common component of MS. Our finding of high prevalence of MS underlines the importance of early childhood obesity treatment. PMID:27752263

  6. Graves' disease in a dialysis dependent chronic renal failure patient

    PubMed Central

    Nair, C. G.; Jacob, P.; Menon, R.; Babu, M. J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone level may be altered in chronic renal failure patients. Low levels of thyroxine protect the body from excess protein loss by minimizing catabolism. Hyperthyroidism is rarely encountered in end-stage dialysis dependent patients. Less than 10 well-documented cases of Graves' disease (GD) are reported in literature so far. We report a case of GD in a patient on dialysis. PMID:25484538

  7. [Dialysis adequacy: the clinical illogicality of Kt/V urea].

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s Gotch and Sargent proposed a mathematical model based on the dialytic removal of urea, introducing the concept of Kt/V urea. The main issue which justifies the fact that Kt/V urea be considered the key of the adequacy of dialysis is that it is related to mortality. However, many studies have highlighted the limits of Kt/V urea: mainly, scaling for the volume of distribution is a confounding factor since gender and body mass index directly affect morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. On the other hand, several observational studies and preliminary randomized controlled trials have suggested that longer and/or more frequent treatments may lead to better outcomes. In conclusion, an assessment of the amount of dialysis delivered is vital. Kt/V urea, although not perfect, is a useful marker of adequacy. However, the most logical approach in order to diminish the mortality on dialysis must be the individualized prescription of the duration and/or frequency of dialysis treatment, developed through a global assessment of the proven predictors of morbidity and mortality. These parameters include nutrition, albuminemia, mineral metabolism, inflammatory markers, volume control, blood pressure, maintenance of residual renal function, and hemodynamic stability. Each of these variables seems to be associated with the duration and/or frequency of dialysis treatments. Even though several observational studies and preliminary randomized controlled trials seem to confirm these associations, time has come for interventional studies to confirm these complex relationships.

  8. [Radiologic and clinical aspects of osteoarticular amyloidosis caused by dialysis].

    PubMed

    Baldrati, L; Rocchi, A; Balbi, B; Bonsanto, R; Mughetti, M; Pasini, A; Feletti, C; Capponcini, C; Docci, D

    1991-06-01

    Many long-term (greater than 60 months) hemodialysis patients develop a severe osteoarticular disease, called "dialysis arthropathy", which is characterized by the deposition in bone and synovia of a new type of amyloid made mainly of beta 2-microglobulin. In the present study, 31 patients (17 males, 14 females; age 54.1 +/- 13 years), undergoing chronic hemodialysis for 60-125 months, were examined for dialysis arthropathy by means of clinics and of radiological investigations (conventional radiography and computed tomography). Sixteen patients (51.6%) had radiographic evidence of dialysis arthropathy: geodes (shoulders, 12 cases; wrists, 11; hips, 2; knees, 2) and/or destructive arthropathies (cervical spine, 13 cases, dorsolumbar spine, 2; hands, 2; hips, 1). Within 24 months, these lesions were found to progress slowly in the majority of cases. In the diagnostic process, CT should be employed in the study of spine, shoulders and hips when the lesions have not been sufficiently demonstrated by conventional radiography in the presence of evident clinical signs. Patients with dialysis arthropathy had undergone dialysis for longer periods than those without it (p less than 0.005) and showed a significantly higher incidence of both carpal tunnel syndrome (p less than 0.0005) and shoulder pain (p less than 0.005). Our findings confirm the high incidence and clinical importance of dialysis arthropathy in long-term hemodialysis patients and the value of diagnostic imaging in screening such patients for those lesions.

  9. [Survey among French dialysis practitioners about the screening and decolonization of nasal Staphylococcus aureus carriage in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Botelho-Nevers, Élisabeth; Verhoeven, Paul O; Thibaudin, Damien; Gagnaire, Julie; Gagneux-Brunon, Amandine; Lucht, Frédéric; Berthelot, Philippe; Mariat, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is frequent in dialysis patients and is associated with an increased risk of staphylococcal infections in this population. Data from the literature showed that decolonization of S. aureus nasal carriers in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis reduce S. aureus catheter-related infections. During the last national congress of nephrology, a survey was conducted among volunteer dialysis physicians to evaluate their practice about screening and decolonization of S. aureus nasal carriage among their patients. Only 30 participants (45.5% [30/66]) declared to screen S. aureus nasal carriage in patients of hemodialysis and 59.6% (31/52) in peritoneal dialysis. Participants declared to decolonize their patients before insertion of a vascular catheter in 55.8% of cases. This small study would need to be completed by a national survey. PMID:26725174

  10. Burnout, psychological morbidity, job satisfaction, and stress: a survey of Canadian hospital based child protection professionals

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, S; Plint, A; Clifford, T

    2005-01-01

    Aims: (1) To measure the prevalence of burnout, psychological morbidity, job satisfaction, job stress, and consideration of alternate work among multidisciplinary hospital based child and youth protection (CYP) professionals; (2) to understand the relations between these variables; and (3) to understand the reasons for leaving among former programme members. Methods: Mailed survey of current and former members of all Canadian academic hospital based CYP programmes. Surveys for current members contained validated measures of burnout, psychological morbidity, job satisfaction/stress, and questions about consideration of alternate work. Surveys for former members examined motivation(s) for leaving. Results: One hundred and twenty six of 165 current members (76.4%) and 13/14 (92.9%) former members responded. Over one third (34.1%) of respondents exhibited burnout while psychological morbidity was present in 13.5%. Job satisfaction was high, with 68.8% finding their job "extremely" or "quite" satisfying, whereas 26.2% found their job "extremely" or "quite" stressful. Psychological morbidity, job satisfaction, and job stress were not associated with any of the demographic variables measured, but burnout was most prevalent among non-physician programme members. Almost two thirds of current members indicated that they had seriously considered a change in work situation. Former members indicated that burnout and high levels of job stress were most responsible for their decision to leave and that increasing the number of programme staff and, consequently, reducing the number of hours worked would have influenced their decision to stay. Conclusions: Current levels of burnout and the large proportion of individuals who have contemplated leaving the service suggest a potential crisis in Canadian hospital based CYP services. PMID:16243862

  11. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. Results The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of “days of work loss” were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Conclusion Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated

  12. Costing of a hospital-based outbreak of poultry-borne salmonellosis.

    PubMed

    Yule, B F; Macleod, A F; Sharp, J C; Forbes, G I

    1988-02-01

    Poultry-borne salmonellosis is the most common form of foodborne infection in Scotland for which the vehicle can be identified, yet little is known about the costs imposed on society by this disease, or the costs of preventing it. The present study identifies and values the costs of a hospital based outbreak of poultry-borne salmonellosis. Account is taken of costs falling on individuals, the health services and society as a whole. Depending on assumptions made about the value of 'intangibles', the cost of the outbreak is estimated to be between pounds 200,000 and pounds 900,000. PMID:3338505

  13. Solute clearance measurement in the assessment of dialysis adequacy among African continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Aliyu; Naidoo, Sagren; Malgas, Shirin; Naicker, Jocelyn T; Paget, Graham; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-01-01

    Solute clearance measurement is an objective means of quantifying the dose of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Despite continued debate on the interpretation and precise prognostic value of small solute clearance in PD patients, guidelines based on solute clearance values are common in clinical practice. There is limited information on the solute clearance indices and PD adequacy parameters among this predominantly low socioeconomic status PD population. We investigated the solute clearance among continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients at the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital and its relationship with other parameters of PD adequacy. Seventy patients on CAPD were studied in this cross-sectional study. Solute clearance was assessed using urea clearance (Kt/V). Linear regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with solute clearance, while analysis of variance was used to test the influence of weekly Kt/V on blood pressure (BP), hemoglobin (Hb) and other biochemical parameters. The mean age of the study population was 37.9 ± 12.4 years, 43% were females and 86% were black Africans. The mean duration on CAPD was 19.7 ± 20.8 months. Mean systolic and diastolic BP were 144 ± 28 and 92 ± 17 mm Hg, respectively. The mean Hb was 11.1 ± 2.2 g/dL and the mean weekly Kt/V was 1.7 ± 0.3. Factors like systolic BP, Hb level, serum levels of cholesterol, calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone and albumin were not significantly associated with the weekly Kt/V. We conclude that the dose of PD received by the majority of our patients in terms of the weekly Kt/V is within the recommended values and that this finding is significant considering the low socioeconomic background of our patients. There is no significant association between Kt/V and other indices of dialysis adequacy. PMID:26178569

  14. [Electro-encephalographic study of the disequilibrium syndrome during bicarbonate dialysis and acetate dialysis].

    PubMed

    Hampl, H; Klopp, H W; Michels, N; Mahiout, A; Schilling, H; Wolfgruber, M; Schiller, R; Hanefeld, F; Kessel, M

    1983-01-01

    Continuous long-time electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring was performed during AHD and BHD in 20 patients. Persisting normal basic activity of the EEG without neurological symptoms could be found only during the course of BHD. However, in AHD, during the decrease of arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) we registered EEG disturbances with moderate to severe slowing down, dysrythmic activity and high voltage discharges. The decrease in PaCO2 and the deterioration in EEG activity in the patients during AHD was concomitant with severe neurological alterations, e.g. the typical symptoms of so-called "disequilibrium" causing a cessation of dialysis in 3 patients.

  15. Advance Care Planning: A Qualitative Study of Dialysis Patients and Families

    PubMed Central

    Eneanya, Nwamaka D.; Feinberg, Rebecca; Germain, Michael J.; Marr, Lisa; Berzoff, Joan; Cohen, Lewis M.; Unruh, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives More than 90,000 patients with ESRD die annually in the United States, yet advance care planning (ACP) is underutilized. Understanding patients’ and families’ diverse needs can strengthen systematic efforts to improve ACP. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In-depth interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of patients and family/friends from dialysis units at two study sites. Applying grounded theory, interviews were audiotaped, professionally transcribed, and analyzed in an iterative process. Emergent themes were identified, discussed, and organized into major themes and subthemes. Results Thirteen patients and nine family/friends participated in interviews. The mean patient age was 63 years (SD 14) and five patients were women. Participants identified as black (n=1), Hispanic (n=4), Native American (n=4), Pacific Islander (n=1), white (n=11), and mixed (n=1). Three major themes with associated subthemes were identified. The first theme, “Prior experiences with ACP,” revealed that these discussions rarely occur, yet most patients desire them. A potential role for the primary care physician was broached. The second theme, “Factors that may affect perspectives on ACP,” included a desire for more of a connection with the nephrologist, positive and negative experiences with the dialysis team, disenfranchisement, life experiences, personality traits, patient-family/friend relationships, and power differentials. The third theme, “Recommendations for discussing ACP,” included thoughts on who should lead discussions, where and when discussions should take place, what should be discussed and how. Conclusions Many participants desired better communication with their nephrologist and/or their dialysis team. A number expressed feelings of disenfranchisement that could negatively impact ACP discussions through diminished trust. Life experiences, personality traits, and relationships with family and friends may

  16. A neglected issue in dialysis practice: haemodialysate.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo; Lomonte, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The intended function of dialysate fluid is to correct the composition of uraemic blood to physiologic levels, both by reducing the concentration of uraemic toxins and correcting electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities. This is accomplished principally by formulating a dialysate whose constituent concentrations are set to approximate normal values in the body. Sodium balance is the cornerstone of intradialysis cardiovascular stability and good interdialytic blood pressure control; plasma potassium concentration and its intradialytic kinetics certainly play a role in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias; calcium is related to haemodynamic stability, mineral bone disease and also cardiac arrhythmias; the role of magnesium is still controversial; lastly, acid buffering by means of base supplementation is one of the major roles of dialysis. In conclusion, learning about the art and the science of fashioning haemodialysates is one of the best ways to further the understanding of the pathophysiologic processes underlying myriad acid-base, fluid, electrolyte as well as blood pressure abnormalities of the uraemic patient on maintenance haemodialysis.

  17. John Dique: dialysis pioneer and political advocate.

    PubMed

    George, Charles R P

    2016-02-01

    John Dique (1915-1995) epitomized the internationalism of medicine, the intellectual and manual dexterity of many pioneers of dialysis, and the social concern evinced by many nephrologists. Born in Burma of French, German, British and Indian ancestry; educated in India; an Anglo-Indian who described himself as British without ever having visited Britain; he moved to Australia in 1948 to escape the murderous inter-ethnic conflict that befell multicultural India as it and Pakistan became independent. Settling in Brisbane, he pioneered several novel medical techniques. After inventing some simple equipment to facilitate intravenous therapy, he established a neonatal exchange blood transfusion programme. Then, between 1954 and 1963, he personally constructed and operated two haemodialysis machines with which to treat patients suffering from acute renal failure, the first such treatment performed in Australasia. His patients survival results were, for the era, remarkable. He subsequently helped found the Royal Australasian College of Pathologists and went on to establish a successful private pathology practice. The latter years of his life, however, saw him become a social and political advocate. He fiercely opposed the emerging ideologies of multiculturalism and social liberalism that, he predicted, would seriously damage the national fabric of Western society. Public vilification ensued, his medical achievements disregarded. It does seem likely, however, that in none of the areas that he touched - whether medical, social, or political - has the last word yet been said. PMID:26913881

  18. Hemodynamic Simulations in Dialysis Access Fistulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGah, Patrick; Leotta, Daniel; Beach, Kirk; Riley, James; Aliseda, Alberto

    2010-11-01

    Arteriovenous fistulae are created surgically to provide adequate access for dialysis in patients with End-Stage Renal Disease. It has long been hypothesized that the hemodynamic and mechanical forces (such as wall shear stress, wall stretch, or flow- induced wall vibrations) constitute the primary external influence on the remodeling process. Given that nearly 50% of fistulae fail after one year, understanding fistulae hemodynamics is an important step toward improving patency in the clinic. We perform numerical simulations of the flow in patient-specific models of AV fistulae reconstructed from 3D ultrasound scans with physiologically-realistic boundary conditions also obtained from Doppler ultrasound. Comparison of the flow features in different geometries and configurations e.g. end-to-side vs. side-to-side, with the in vivo longitudinal outcomes will allow us to hypothesize which flow conditions are conducive to fistulae success or failure. The flow inertia and pulsatility in the simulations (mean Re 700, max Re 2000, Wo 4) give rise to complex secondary flows and coherent vortices, further complicating the spatio- temporal variability of the wall pressure and shear stresses. Even in mature fistulae, the anastomotic regions are subjected to non-physiological shear stresses (>10.12pcPa) which may potentially lead to complications.

  19. A neglected issue in dialysis practice: haemodialysate.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo; Lomonte, Carlo

    2015-08-01

    The intended function of dialysate fluid is to correct the composition of uraemic blood to physiologic levels, both by reducing the concentration of uraemic toxins and correcting electrolyte and acid-base abnormalities. This is accomplished principally by formulating a dialysate whose constituent concentrations are set to approximate normal values in the body. Sodium balance is the cornerstone of intradialysis cardiovascular stability and good interdialytic blood pressure control; plasma potassium concentration and its intradialytic kinetics certainly play a role in the genesis of cardiac arrhythmias; calcium is related to haemodynamic stability, mineral bone disease and also cardiac arrhythmias; the role of magnesium is still controversial; lastly, acid buffering by means of base supplementation is one of the major roles of dialysis. In conclusion, learning about the art and the science of fashioning haemodialysates is one of the best ways to further the understanding of the pathophysiologic processes underlying myriad acid-base, fluid, electrolyte as well as blood pressure abnormalities of the uraemic patient on maintenance haemodialysis. PMID:26251705

  20. Evaluation report: dialysis and ancillary equipment.

    PubMed

    1986-01-01

    As part of the continuing programme of evaluation of medical equipment sponsored by the UK Health Departments, the evaluation of dialysis and ancillary equipment is being carried out within the University of Sheffield, under the direction of Professor M. M. Black. 'Health Equipment Information' Number 148, published in December 1985, carries full reports on the Cobe Centry 2Rx haemodialysis system with double blood pump module (DBPM), the Lucas Medical 2100 haemodialysis system, and the Permutit Series 8 water softener. It also contains summaries of full reports on the Organon-Teknika Sorbsystem and Cordis-Dow Seratron haemodialysis systems, and the Gordonsal RD500 and Elga Mediro D water softeners, which were published in 'HEI' 136. Readers should note that the Cordis Seratron and Lucas 2100 models are no longer available in the UK. Extracts of the evaluations of the Cobe Centry 2Rx + DBPM and the Permutit Series B models, together with summaries and overall comparisons, are given below. 'HEI' (ISSN 0261-0736) is free to NHS staff and 5.00 pounds/copy to others. Editorial enquiries to DHSS Scientific and Technical Branch, 14 Russell Square, London WC1B 5EP. PMID:3735384

  1. The heart and vascular system in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Shoji, Tetsuo

    2016-07-16

    The heart and the vascular tree undergo major structural and functional changes when kidney function declines and renal replacement therapy is required. The many cardiovascular risk factors and adaptive changes the heart undergoes include left ventricular hypertrophy and dilatation with concomitant systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Myocardial fibrosis is the consequence of impaired angio-adaptation, reduced capillary angiogenesis, myocyte-capillary mismatch, and myocardial micro-arteriopathy. The vascular tree can be affected by both atherosclerosis and arteriosclerosis with both lipid rich plaques and abundant media calcification. Development of cardiac and vascular disease is rapid, especially in young patients, and the phenotype resembles all aspects of an accelerated ageing process and latent cardiac failure. The major cause of left ventricular hypertrophy and failure and the most common problem directly affecting myocardial function is fluid overload and, usually, hypertension. In situations of stress, such as intradialytic hypotension and hypoxaemia, the hearts of these patients are more vulnerable to developing cardiac arrest, especially when such episodes occur frequently. As a result, cardiac and vascular mortality are several times higher in dialysis patients than in the general population. Trials investigating one pharmacological intervention (eg, statins) have shown limitations. Pragmatic designs for large trials on cardio-active interventions are mandatory for adequate cardioprotective renal replacement therapy. PMID:27226133

  2. Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Goodstein, Michael H; Bell, Theodore; Krugman, Scott D

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U). Knowledge and practices of infant safe sleep were compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study benchmark. There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents' room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study, the F/U group was more likely to use supine positioning and a bassinette or crib. Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines. PMID:25670685

  3. Improving infant sleep safety through a comprehensive hospital-based program.

    PubMed

    Goodstein, Michael H; Bell, Theodore; Krugman, Scott D

    2015-03-01

    We evaluated a comprehensive hospital-based infant safe sleep education program on parental education and safe sleep behaviors in the home using a cross-sectional survey of new parents at hospital discharge (HD) and 4-month follow-up (F/U). Knowledge and practices of infant safe sleep were compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study benchmark. There were 1092 HD and 490 F/U surveys. Supine sleep knowledge was 99.8% at HD; 94.8% of families planned to always use this position. At F/U, 97.3% retained supine knowledge, and 84.9% maintained this position exclusively (P < .01). Knowledge of crib as safest surface was 99.8% at HD and 99.5% F/U. Use in the parents' room fell to 91.9% (HD) and 68.2% (F/U). Compared to the National Infant Sleep Position Study, the F/U group was more likely to use supine positioning and a bassinette or crib. Reinforcing the infant sleep safety message through intensive hospital-based education improves parental compliance with sudden infant death syndrome risk reduction guidelines.

  4. Hospital-based nurse practitioner roles and interprofessional practice: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    This scoping review provides current global understanding of the rapidly evolving nurse practitioner role within hospital settings, and considers the level of understanding of its enactment within interprofessional teamwork. Arksey and O'Malley's framework was used to explore recent primary research, reviews, and gray literature in two ways. First, hospital-based nurse practitioner literature was mapped to country of origin, and thematically summarized. Second, clearly developed and consistently defined key interprofessional concepts were identified in the interprofessional literature then conceptually mapped to the nurse practitioner studies by their operationalization. The nurse practitioner review located 103 abstracts. Twenty-nine, originating from four countries, met the inclusion criteria. The interprofessional concept review identified a total of 137 relevant abstracts, however, only ten met the inclusion criteria. Understanding the nurse practitioner role within hospital teams remains limited due to a small number of countries producing evidence, the lack of nurse practitioner role title standardization hindering consistent knowledgebase development, and limited application and inconsistent operationalization of concepts within nurse practitioner research. Research focused on role enactment is needed to understand the uniqueness of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role.

  5. The decision to add a second hospital-based EMS helicopter.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R; Leicht, M J; Brotman, S

    1989-11-01

    An analysis of the first seven years of performance of our hospital-based emergency medical services (EMS) helicopter was conducted to evaluate the possible need for a second aircraft. A survey of seven hospitals currently operating two or more helicopters resulted in a consensus that one helicopter can effectively perform only 70 to 90 flights per month. The number of requests for our helicopter service has increased 148% from 610 to 1,512 in seven years while the number of completed missions has increased only 92% from 486 (40.5/month) to 935 (78/month). Requests denied due to inclement weather (265 in 1988) cannot be captured with a second visual-flight-rated (VFR) EMS helicopter; however, those missed due to maintenance requirements of the helicopter and overlapping requests (232 in 1988) can be captured. The need for a second aircraft exists when the number of requests for the service grows while the number of captured flights plateaus. Our data and industry survey suggests this will occur at 75 captured flights per month. Affordability and continued overall growth of trauma and other critical care referrals to the base hospital(s) is mandatory. This study provides a model for hospital-based EMS helicopter operators to apply to the decision whether to add a second aircraft. PMID:10296622

  6. Exploring information systems outsourcing in U.S. hospital-based health care delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Diana, Mark L

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the factors associated with outsourcing of information systems (IS) in hospital-based health care delivery systems, and to determine if there is a difference in IS outsourcing activity based on the strategic value of the outsourced functions. IS sourcing behavior is conceptualized as a case of vertical integration. A synthesis of strategic management theory (SMT) and transaction cost economics (TCE) serves as the theoretical framework. The sample consists of 1,365 hospital-based health care delivery systems that own 3,452 hospitals operating in 2004. The findings indicate that neither TCE nor SMT predicted outsourcing better than the other did. The findings also suggest that health care delivery system managers may not be considering significant factors when making sourcing decisions, including the relative strategic value of the functions they are outsourcing. It is consistent with previous literature to suggest that the high cost of IS may be the main factor driving the outsourcing decision.

  7. Hospital-based nurse practitioner roles and interprofessional practice: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; Forchuk, Cheryl; Orchard, Carole; van Soeren, Mary; Reeves, Scott

    2014-09-01

    This scoping review provides current global understanding of the rapidly evolving nurse practitioner role within hospital settings, and considers the level of understanding of its enactment within interprofessional teamwork. Arksey and O'Malley's framework was used to explore recent primary research, reviews, and gray literature in two ways. First, hospital-based nurse practitioner literature was mapped to country of origin, and thematically summarized. Second, clearly developed and consistently defined key interprofessional concepts were identified in the interprofessional literature then conceptually mapped to the nurse practitioner studies by their operationalization. The nurse practitioner review located 103 abstracts. Twenty-nine, originating from four countries, met the inclusion criteria. The interprofessional concept review identified a total of 137 relevant abstracts, however, only ten met the inclusion criteria. Understanding the nurse practitioner role within hospital teams remains limited due to a small number of countries producing evidence, the lack of nurse practitioner role title standardization hindering consistent knowledgebase development, and limited application and inconsistent operationalization of concepts within nurse practitioner research. Research focused on role enactment is needed to understand the uniqueness of the hospital-based nurse practitioner role. PMID:24330003

  8. Why does three times per week hemodialysis provide inadequate dialysis for children?

    PubMed

    Fischbach, Michel; Zaloszyc, Ariane; Laetitia, Higel; Menouer, Soraya; Terzic, Joelle

    2014-10-01

    The duration of chronic conventional dialysis is a risk factor in children, both in terms of growth retardation and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we need to develop alternative strategies, such as preemptive kidney transplantation and/or more intensive dialysis prescription. Indeed, conventional hemodialysis could be improved in all children by the use of high permeable membrane and ultrapure dialysis fluids (having very low endotoxin levels); by the addition of a convective dialysis dose to the urea diffusion dialysis dose (Kt/Vurea), i.e., hemodiafiltration; moreover, by the preservation of cardiovascular morphology and function (optimized blood pressure control); and also by the prescription of more frequent/longer dialysis sessions.

  9. New aspects of cerebrovascular diseases in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Naganuma, Toshihide; Takemoto, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that chronic kidney disease is a significant risk factor for stroke, subclinical cerebrovascular abnormalities, and cognitive impairment, independent of known cardiovascular risk factors. Cerebrovascular disease is also a major cause of death in dialysis patients, who have a much higher incidence of stroke compared to the normal population. Strokes in dialysis patients are also characterized by a higher incidence of hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage compared with those in the general population. Recent studies on dialysis cohorts have shown that asymptomatic cerebrovascular diseases, including silent cerebral infarction (SCI), white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), and cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), are related to future onset of stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed a higher prevalence of SCI in hemodialysis patients compared with that in controls, and a subsequent longitudinal study found that SCI is a risk factor for stroke and cardiovascular events as a whole. Other studies have shown that the prevalence of WMHs is significantly higher in dialysis patients than in healthy subjects and that WMHs are a risk factor for cardiovascular events. There is also a high prevalence of CMBs in hemodialysis patients, but the clinical significance of CMBs in these patients has not been examined in a longitudinal study. The incidence of cognitive impairment and dementia in dialysis patients is also twice as high as that in age-matched healthy subjects, and dialysis patients tend to have vascular-type dementia rather than Alzheimer-type dementia. More studies in dialysis patients are required to examine the prevention of stroke, cognitive impairment, and dementia in these patients.

  10. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Tamara; Xie, Huiliang; Barchi-Chung, Allison; Vargas, Gabriela; Sowden, Nicole; Houston, Jessica; Wahl, Patricia; Lundquist, Andrew; Epstein, Michael; Smith, Kelsey; Contreras, Gabriel; Ortega, Luis; Lenz, Oliver; Briones, Patricia; Egbert, Phyllis; Ikizler, T. Alp; Jueppner, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with ESRD. Before FGF23 testing can be integrated into clinical practice of ESRD, further understanding of its determinants is needed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In a study of 67 adults undergoing peritoneal dialysis, we tested the hypothesis that longer dialysis vintage and lower residual renal function and renal phosphate clearance are associated with higher FGF23. We also compared the monthly variability of FGF23 versus parathyroid hormone (PTH) and serum phosphate. Results In unadjusted analyses, FGF23 correlated with serum phosphate (r = 0.66, P < 0.001), residual renal function (r = −0.37, P = 0.002), dialysis vintage (r = 0.31, P = 0.01), and renal phosphate clearance (r = −0.38, P = 0.008). In adjusted analyses, absence of residual renal function and greater dialysis vintage associated with higher FGF23, independent of demographics, laboratory values, peritoneal dialysis modality and adequacy, and treatment with vitamin D analogs and phosphate binders. Urinary and dialysate FGF23 clearances were minimal. In three serial monthly measurements, within-subject variability accounted for only 10% of total FGF23 variability compared with 50% for PTH and 60% for serum phosphate. Conclusions Increased serum phosphate, loss of residual renal function, longer dialysis vintage, and lower renal phosphate clearance are associated with elevated FGF23 levels in ESRD patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. FGF23 may be a more stable marker of phosphate metabolism in ESRD than PTH or serum phosphate. PMID:21903990

  11. Determinants of survival among HIV-infected chronic dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Mendelson, Michael; O'Hare, Ann M; Hsu, Ling Chin; Schoenfeld, Patricia

    2003-05-01

    Over 100 HIV-infected patients have initiated chronic dialysis at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) since 1985. This study employed retrospective analysis to identify determinants of and trends in survival among HIV-infected patients who have initiated chronic dialysis at SFGH from January 1, 1985 to November 1, 2002 (n = 115). Cohort patient survival was compared with survival after an AIDS-opportunistic illness in all HIV-infected patients in San Francisco during the study period. Higher CD4 count (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86 per 50 cells/mm(3) increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.93) and serum albumin (HR, 0.53 per 1 g/dl increase; CI, 0.36 to 0.78) at initiation of dialysis were strongly associated with lower mortality. Survival for those initiating dialysis during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was 16.1 mo versus 9.4 mo for those initiating dialysis before this time, but this difference was not statistically significant. In adjusted analysis, only a non-statistically significant trend toward improved survival during the HAART era was noted (HR, 0.59; CI, 0.34 to 1.04). By comparison, survival for all HIV-infected patients after an AIDS-opportunistic illness in San Francisco increased from 16 mo in 1994 to 81 mo in 1996. The dramatic improvement in survival that has occurred since the mid-1990s for patients with HIV appears to be greatly attenuated in the sub-group undergoing dialysis. Although this may partly reflect confounding by race, injection drug use and HCV co-infection, future attempts to improve survival among HIV-infected dialysis patients should focus on barriers to the effective use of HAART in this group.

  12. Relationships between registered nurse staffing, processes of nursing care, and nurse-reported patient outcomes in chronic hemodialysis units.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Flynn, Linda; Clarke, Sean P

    2008-01-01

    Little attention has been given to the effects of registered nurse (RN) staffing and processes of nursing care on patient outcomes in hemodialysis units. This research examined the effects of patient-to-RN ratios and necessary tasks left undone by RNs on the likelihood of nurse-reported frequent occurrences of adverse patient events in chronic hemodialysis units. Study findings revealed that high patient-to-RN ratios and increased numbers of tasks left undone by RNs were associated with an increased likelihood of frequent occurrences of dialysis hypotension, skipped dialysis treatments, shortened dialysis treatments, and patient complaints in hemodialysis units. These findings indicate that federal, state, and dialysis organization policies must foster staffing structures and processes of care in dialysis units that effectively utilize the invaluable skills and services of professional, registered nurses.

  13. Challenges for dialysis facility medical directors and impact on patient care.

    PubMed

    Kossmann, Robert J

    2013-10-01

    My service within the RPA began with my need to be a part of the solution, to help navigate the direction of inevitable change, and to ensure we do not lose focus of our ultimate goal as nephrologists-the provision of excellent kidney care. I would encourage all of you to participate in this process as well. It is essential that we maintain our independence, ethics and principals, and excellence in our roles and responsibilities as nephrologists and dialysis unit medical directors, especially in challenging times such as these. Engaging with the RPA in advocating redress of the ESRD PPS proposed 9.4% cut and support for maintaining our critical role as independent dialysis unit medical directors is one way we can make a difference. Become involved in the process. Communicate your concerns to legislators and policy makers. Only with the support of our community and a firm commitment to our goals can we effect change and ensure nephrology patients continue to be well served in the years to come. PMID:24279209

  14. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality.

  15. Optical indicators of baseline blood status in dialysis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagali, Neil S.; Burns, Kevin D.; Zimmerman, Deborah L.; Munger, Rejean

    2007-06-01

    In a step towards the development of improved long-term prognostic indicators for patients with end-stage renal disease, we utilized absorption spectroscopy to determine the baseline status of whole blood in a cohort of 5 clinically-stable hemodialysis patients. The optical absorption spectrum of pre-dialysis and post-dialysis blood samples in the 400-1700nm wavelength range was measured for the cohort over a four-week period. Absorption spectra were consistent over time, with a maximum coefficient of variation (CV) of absorption under 2% (650-1650nm) for any given patient over the four-week period (pre and post-dialysis). Spectra varied by a greater amount across patients, with a maximum CV of 5% in any given week. Analysis of variance indicated a broad spectral range (650-1400nm) where within-patient spectral variation was significantly less than between-patient variation (p<0.001), providing the potential for development of stable baseline blood status indicators. The spectra were investigated using principal component analysis (PCA) including a further set of whole blood absorption spectra obtained from 4 peritoneal dialysis patients. PCA revealed the fingerprint-like nature of the blood spectrum, an overall similarity of the spectrum within each treatment mode (hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis), and a distinct spectral difference between the treatment modes.

  16. Vitamins in dialysis: who, when and how much?

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Carceles, Odette; Somda, Frederic; Aguilera, Didier

    2014-05-01

    Despite the significant technical evolution of the blood purification methods, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients is still several times higher than that observed in the general population. Vitamins are playing a crucial role in multiple key metabolic pathways. Due to multiple factors, dialysis patients present very often hypo- or hypervitaminosis for a broad range of vitamins. Dialysis in the context of renal replacement therapy is associated with a non-physiological potassium-sparing dietetic regime. Additionally, there is a non-selective intradialytic loss of micro- and macronutrients, deranged intracellular kinetics and gastrointestinal malabsorption due to uratemia. Frequent treatment with antibiotics due to infections associated with the acquired uremia-related immunosuppression may derange the vitamin-producing intestinal microflora. Certain agents prescribed in the context of renal failure or other conditions may reduce the absorption of vitamins from the gastrointestinal tract. These factors may deplete a dialysis patient from vitamins, especially the ones with antioxidant activity that may be associated with cardioprotective properties. In other cases, vitamins metabolized and excreted by the kidneys may be accumulated and exert toxic effects. The scope of this paper is to describe the main issues on vitamin therapy in dialysis patients in view of the ever contradictory opinions and practices.

  17. Updates on the Management of Diabetes in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Leung, Angela M.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Lynch, Katherine E.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the U.S. and many countries globally. The role of improved glycemic control in ameliorating the exceedingly high mortality risk of diabetic dialysis patients is unclear. The treatment of diabetes in ESRD patients is challenging, given changes in glucose homeostasis, the unclear accuracy of glycemic control metrics, and the altered pharmacokinetics of glucose-lowering drugs by kidney dysfunction, the uremic milieu, and dialysis therapy. Up to one-third of diabetic dialysis patients may experience spontaneous resolution of hyperglycemia with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels <6%, a phenomenon known as “Burnt-Out Diabetes,” which remains with unclear biologic plausibility and undetermined clinical implications. Conventional methods of glycemic control assessment are confounded by the laboratory abnormalities and comorbidities associated with ESRD. Similar to more recent approaches in the general population, there is concern that glucose normalization may be harmful in ESRD patients. There is uncertainty surrounding the optimal glycemic target in this population, although recent epidemiologic data suggest that HbA1c ranges of 6% to 8%, as well as 7 to 9%, are associated with increased survival rates among diabetic dialysis patients. Lastly, many glucose-lowering drugs and their active metabolites are renally metabolized and excreted, and hence, require dose adjustment or avoidance in dialysis patients. PMID:24588802

  18. Cooperation and successful outcomes in home dialysis.

    PubMed

    MacElveen, P M; Alexander, R A; Hoover, P M

    1975-11-01

    Cooperation among those involved in the triad of patient-partner-health professional is associated with desirable patient outcomes and has been demonstrated in 2 studies with consistent results. In the dyad analysis, cooperation between the patient and partner was associated with work and leisure activity. Spouses often encourage and facilitate the patients ability to engage in work and leisure activities and probably can impede activity equally well. The correlations of cooperation in the patient-doctor dyad with physical status and adherence is also of note. Many of the patients who have been on dialysis for several years and are doing well see their doctor for checkups only a few times a year, which might suggest patients' independence of their physicians or at least some distancing due primarily to the infrequency of contacts with each other. On the contrary, the data suggest some that the patient-doctor relationship remains important. Cooperation in the partner-doctor dyad did not relate to any of the patient outcomes; many of the partners and doctors hardly knew each other personally. Whether this is reflected by the data cannot be determined. How accurately triad members perceived each other (mutual perception) was related to adherence and total activity while trust was related to physical status and adherence. Empirical evidence has been presented to support the long held assumption that cooperation among those caring for a patient is associated with selected patient outcomes. The study also provides an alternative to the traditional model for interactions between health care providers and patients, which includes a family member. While the traditional model fits the needs of emergency and acute care situations effectively, the cooperation model is one alternative that may fit the different needs in the long term, self-care, chronic illness situation, which is the greatest health care delivery challenge of today and tommorrow. Patient and family

  19. Fat tissue and inflammation in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Rincón Bello, Abraham; Bucalo, Laura; Abad Estébanez, Soraya; Vega Martínez, Almudena; Barraca Núñez, Daniel; Yuste Lozano, Claudia; Pérez de José, Ana; López-Gómez, Juan M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Body weight has been increasing in the general population and is an established risk factor for hypertension, diabetes, and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD) gain weight, mainly during the first months of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between body composition and metabolic and inflammatory status in patients undergoing PD. Methods This was a prospective, non-interventional study of prevalent patients receiving PD. Body composition was studied every 3 months using bioelectrical impedance (BCM®). We performed linear regression for each patient, including all BCM® measurements, to calculate annual changes in body composition. Thirty-one patients in our PD unit met the inclusion criteria. Results Median follow-up was 26 (range 17–27) months. Mean increase in weight was 1.8 ± 2.8 kg/year. However, BCM® analysis revealed a mean increase in fat mass of 3.0 ± 3.2 kg/year with a loss of lean mass of 2.3 ± 4.1 kg/year during follow-up. The increase in fat mass was associated with the conicity index, suggesting that increases in fat mass are based mainly on abdominal adipose tissue. Changes in fat mass were directly associated with inflammation parameters such as C-reactive protein (r = 0.382, P = 0.045) and inversely associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (r=−0.50, P = 0.008). Conclusions Follow-up of weight and body mass index can underestimate the fat mass increase and miss lean mass loss. The increase in fat mass is associated with proinflammatory state and alteration in lipid profile. PMID:27274820

  20. Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction in Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cho-Kai; Lee, Jen-Kuang; Wu, Yi-Fan; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Hwang, Juey-Jen; Lin, Jiunn-Lee; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction (LVDD) is common among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). We examined the relationship between LVDD, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), and mortality in PD patients. A total of 149 patients undergoing PD with preserved left ventricular systolic function were included and followed for 3.5 years. LVDD was diagnosed (according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines) by conventional and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was measured. The location and volume of adipose tissue were assessed by computed tomography (CT) at the level of the fourth lumbar vertebra. Subjects with LVDD had higher levels of hsCRP, and more visceral and peritoneal fat than controls. The relationship between adjusted visceral adipose tissue and LVDD became nonsignificant when hsCRP and baseline demographic data were introduced into the logistic regression model (odds ratio = 1.52, P = 0.07). Subsequent hierarchical multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that LVDD was one of the most powerful determinants of MACE and mortality after adjusting for all confounding factors (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.43–3.51, P = 0.02 and HR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.45–2.91, P = 0.04, respectively). Systemic inflammation (hsCRP) was also significantly associated with MACE and mortality (HR: 2.03, P = 0.03 and HR: 2.16, P = 0.04, respectively). LVDD is associated with systemic inflammation and increased visceral fat in patients undergoing PD. LVDD is also a sensitive, independent indicator of future MACE and mortality in PD patients. PMID:25997054

  1. [Anemia treatment in peritoneal dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Janković, Nikola; Janković, Mateja

    2009-09-01

    Anemia is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and patients receiving renal replacement therapy. In this paper we will outline the prevention and treatment of anemia in patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD). PD patients are less anemic and more sensitive to erythropoesis-stimulating agent (ESA) than their hemodialysis (HD) counterparts and, in general, dosages required for achieving similar hemoglobin levels to those achieved in HD patients are remarkably less. Before starting with ESA treatment we have to evaluate the degree of anemia and excluded other causes which are not connected with CKD and method of treatment. Patient's compliance is crucial for a successful therapy and it can be improved by decreasing frequency of administration of ESA. Since ESAare expensive, "cost-effectivnes" studies represent an important factor in choosing a distinct drug. Subcutaneous administration provides better long-term utilization of ESA in comparison to intravenous administration and is therefore preferred in PD patients. Intraperitoneal administration is not recommended due to poor bioavailability. In some patients we can observe the reduced response to ESA therapy. The definition of reduced response is generally regarded as a failure to achieve target hemoglobin concentration of >11 g/dL. Identification of underlying cause is not always easy but every attempt should be made to investigate every patient with resistance to therapy because some causes are easily corrected. Since 2005 particular ESA drugs have been approved by Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and registered for use in Croatia. For PD patients the ESAcan be prescribed by general practitioner. The list of available drugs is available in the official government newspaper Nardone novine No.27, March 2nd, 2009. PMID:20232548

  2. Sleep disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis: comparison between hemodialysis, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and automated peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Losso, Ricardo L M; Minhoto, Gisele R; Riella, Miguel C

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disorders for patients on dialysis are significant causes of a poorer quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality. No study has evaluated patients undergoing automated peritoneal dialysis (APD) to assess their sleep disorders compared to hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). A total of 166 clinically stable patients who had been on dialysis for at least 3 months were randomly selected for the study and divided into HD, CAPD or APD. Socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory parameters and self-administered questionnaires were collected for the investigation of insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), bruxism, rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), sleepwalking, sleep hygiene, depression and anxiety. Insomnia was detected in more than 80 % of patients on the three modalities. OSAS was lower for patients on HD (36 %) than on CAPD (65 %) (p < 0.01) or APD (60 %) (p < 0.04). Patients on APD were more likely to have RLS compared to those on HD or CAPD (p < 0.04) (50 vs. 23 vs. 33 %). No differences among the modalities were found in bruxism, EDS, sleepwalking, sleep hygiene, depression or anxiety. ESRD patients undergoing any one of the three dialysis modalities studied had a high prevalence of sleep disorders. Patients on HD had a lower proportion of OSAS than those on CAPD and APD, which is most likely attributed to their lower body mass indices. The possible causes of higher RLS rates in APD patients have not been established. PMID:25358390

  3. [THE RISK FACTORS OF THE DIALYSIS PERITONITIS (THREE-YEARS PROSPECTIVE INVESTIGATION)].

    PubMed

    Mishalov, V G; Zavodovskiy, E S; Markulan, L Yu; Goyda, S M

    2015-09-01

    The risk factors of the dialysis peritonitis occurrence were determined in patients with chronic renal disease, to whom a substitute renal therapy, using peritoneal dialysis, was conducted. The results of a three-year prospective investigation and treatment of 73 patients in Kyiv City Oleksandrivska Clinical Hospital on the base of the general surgery and nephrology departments in 2007 - 2010 yrs were studied. The dialysis peritonitis (first episode) have occurred in 42 (57.5%) patients. Cumulative rate of a dialysis peritonitis in accordance to a censored data (the dialysis peritonitis suspension or other causes) have constituted 67.7%. Due to the dialysis peritonitis occurrence the peritoneal dialysis was stopped in 14 (19.2%) patients. The obesity, raising of a serum albumin level, constipation, preliminary injection into the site of the catheter exit site we consider a risk factors for the dialysis peritonitis occurrence.

  4. [Contamination by disinfection byproducts (DPBs) and microbiological quality of dialysis water: a study in an Italian hospital dialysis service].

    PubMed

    Viti, Angelo; Tinti, Patrizia; Verrucoli, Guia; Lorini, Chiara; Sacco, Cristiana; Lanciotti, Eudes

    2006-01-01

    Maintaining a high standard of quality of dialysis fluid has been shown to be difficult. For this reason, an evaluation of the microbiological quality (total bacterial count at 22 degrees C and 37 degrees C, pyrogenic Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, Acinetobacter and Enterobacteriaceae) and contamination by disinfection byproducts, of dialysis fluids was carried out in a hospital dialysis service in Arezzo (Italy). The analysis was carried out in different points of the water treatment system used for the preparation of dialysis fluids. Results show diffuse microbiological contamination especially at the point of entry of the dialyzer monitor; Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas were found to be the most frequent contaminants due to the presence of biofilms in the water system, while pyrogenic bacteria were found to be within regulatory limits. Trichloroethane and trichloroethylene were absent but traces of carbon tetrachloride, percloroethylene and bromoform were found; these were outnumbered by trialomethanes (chloroform at point of entry decalcifier: mean 90.14 microg/L). Contamination by trialomethanes decreased at the end of the distribution system (mean chloroform 8.55 microg/L). The yearly level of exposure of a dialysis patient to low molecular weight volatile halogenated organics (VHOs) that are able to pass the dialyser membrane, was therefore estimated to be approximately 100 mg. PMID:17206188

  5. Primary immunodeficiency disorders in the developing world: data from a hospital-based registry in India.

    PubMed

    Chinnabhandar, Vasant; Yadav, Satya Prakash; Kaul, Dinesh; Verma, I C; Sachdeva, Anupam

    2014-04-01

    Primary immunodeficiency disorders (PID) are under-reported from the developing world. We present data regarding diagnosis and outcome from a hospital-based registry in India. Forty-seven patients fulfilled diagnostic criteria. Majority were males. Subgroups were disorders of immune dysregulation-29%, B&T-cell abnormalities-28%, predominant antibody deficiencies-23%, other well-defined immunodeficiencies-15%, and phagocyte disorders-4%. Molecular diagnosis was attempted in 12 and was positive in seven. Overall 24 children died. Only three out of 28 children needing stem cell transplant (SCT) underwent the same. Registry data highlights that molecular diagnosis and SCT are a rarity for children with PIDs in the developing world and mortality is high.

  6. A multidisciplinary hospital-based antimicrobial use program: Impact on hospital pharmacy expenditures and drug use.

    PubMed

    Salama, S; Rotstein, C; Mandell, L

    1996-03-01

    The authors' hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour. PMID:22514426

  7. A multidisciplinary hospital-based antimicrobial use program: Impact on hospital pharmacy expenditures and drug use

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Suzette; Rotstein, Coleman; Mandell, Lionel

    1996-01-01

    The authors’ hospital embarked on a three-component, multidisciplinary, hospital-based antimicrobial use program to cut costs and reduce inappropriate antimicrobial use. Initially, antimicrobial use patterns and costs were monitored for 12 months. For the next two years, an antimicrobial use program was implemented consisting of three strategies: automatic therapeutic interchanges; antimicrobial restriction policies; and parenteral to oral conversion. The program resulted in a reduction in the antimicrobial portion of the total pharmacy drug budget from 41.6% to 28.2%. Simultaneously, the average cost per dose per patient day dropped from $11.88 in 1991 to $10.16 in 1994. Overall, mean monthly acquisition cost savings rose from $6,810 in 1992 to $27,590 in 1994. This study demonstrates that a multidisciplinary antimicrobial use program in a Canadian hospital can effect dramatic cost savings and serve as a quality assurance activity of physician antimicrobial prescribing behaviour. PMID:22514426

  8. The challenge of sustaining a hospital-based biobank and core molecular laboratory: the Beaumont experience.

    PubMed

    Wilson, George D; D'Angelo, Kirsten; Pruetz, Barbara L; Geddes, Timothy J; Larson, Dianna M; Akervall, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The Beaumont Health System BioBank was established in 2008, not only to leverage the potential to collect biospecimens for translational research, but to undertake such research in a seamless facility that combined high quality biobanking with state-of-the-art laboratory platforms geared towards biospecimen-based research. This report describes the challenge of sustaining a hospital-based biobank with an operating budget exceeding $1,000,000 in a financial climate that favors short-term fiscal goals rather than long-term scientific ambitions. Some of the key areas that are discussed include grants, philanthropy, accreditation, process improvement and commercialization of samples and services. We conclude that grants are not a feasible avenue, in our case, to support a biobank and that philanthropy and commercialization represent the best options for external funding to support stalling internal support, in order to sustain the operations of the BioBank. PMID:25314610

  9. Hospital-based patient education programs and the role of the hospital librarian.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, C L

    1978-01-01

    This paper examines current advances in hospital-based patient education, and delineates the role of the hospital librarian in these programs. Recently, programs of planned patient education have been recognized by health care personnel and the public as being an integral part of health care delivery. Various key elements, including legislative action, the advent of audiovisual technology, and rising health care costs have contributed to the development of patient education programs in hospitals. As responsible members of the hospital organization, hospital librarians should contribute their expertise to patient education programs. They are uniquely trained with skills in providing information on other health education programs; in assembling, cataloging, and managing collections of patient education materials; and in providing documentation of their use. In order to demonstrate the full range of their skills and to contribute to patient care, education, and research, hospital librarians should actively participate in programs of planned patient education. PMID:418835

  10. The challenge of sustaining a hospital-based biobank and core molecular laboratory: the Beaumont experience.

    PubMed

    Wilson, George D; D'Angelo, Kirsten; Pruetz, Barbara L; Geddes, Timothy J; Larson, Dianna M; Akervall, Jan

    2014-10-01

    The Beaumont Health System BioBank was established in 2008, not only to leverage the potential to collect biospecimens for translational research, but to undertake such research in a seamless facility that combined high quality biobanking with state-of-the-art laboratory platforms geared towards biospecimen-based research. This report describes the challenge of sustaining a hospital-based biobank with an operating budget exceeding $1,000,000 in a financial climate that favors short-term fiscal goals rather than long-term scientific ambitions. Some of the key areas that are discussed include grants, philanthropy, accreditation, process improvement and commercialization of samples and services. We conclude that grants are not a feasible avenue, in our case, to support a biobank and that philanthropy and commercialization represent the best options for external funding to support stalling internal support, in order to sustain the operations of the BioBank.

  11. Proton linac for hospital-based fast neutron therapy and radioisotope production

    SciTech Connect

    Lennox, A.J.; Hendrickson, F.R.; Swenson, D.A.; Winje, R.A.; Young, D.E.; Rush Univ., Chicago, IL; Science Applications International Corp., Princeton, NJ; Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1989-09-01

    Recent developments in linac technology have led to the design of a hospital-based proton linac for fast neutron therapy. The 180 microamp average current allows beam to be diverted for radioisotope production during treatments while maintaining an acceptable dose rate. During dedicated operation, dose rates greater than 280 neutron rads per minute are achievable at depth, DMAX = 1.6 cm with source to axis distance, SAD = 190 cm. Maximum machine energy is 70 MeV and several intermediate energies are available for optimizing production of isotopes for Positron Emission Tomography and other medical applications. The linac can be used to produce a horizontal or a gantry can be added to the downstream end of the linac for conventional patient positioning. The 70 MeV protons can also be used for proton therapy for ocular melanomas. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Infrastructure Requirements for an Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis Program

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Arshia; Kumar, Vijay; Guest, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease nearing dialysis but without pre-established access almost uniformly initiate dialysis with a temporary central venous catheter. These catheters are associated with high rates of infection and flow disturbances, requiring removal and subsequent replacement. Many of these patients might be candidates for peritoneal dialysis (PD), but because of the absence of prior catheter placement, the default initial modality is hemodialysis. Recent reports, however, have demonstrated the feasibility of initiating PD urgently despite the late referral for access placement. Urgent-start PD clinical pathways require a unique infrastructure and treatment approach. This article reviews the salient features required to establish an urgent-start PD program. PMID:24335123

  13. The management of anemia in pediatric peritoneal dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Anemia is common in chronic renal failure. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of anemia in adult patients are available. With respect to the diagnosis and treatment in children on peritoneal dialysis, the European Pediatric Peritoneal Dialysis Working Group (EPPWG) has produced guidelines. After a thorough diagnostic work-up, treatment should aim for a target hemoglobin concentration of at least 11 g/l. This can be accomplished by the administration of erythropoietin and iron preparations. Although there is sufficient evidence to advocate the intraperitoneal administration of erythropoietin, most pediatric nephrologists still apply erythropoietin by the subcutaneous route. Iron should preferably be prescribed as an oral preparation. Sufficient attention has to be paid to the nutritional intake in these children. There is no place for carnitine supplementation in the treatment of anemia in pediatric peritoneal dialysis patients. PMID:12750985

  14. Prevalence of dry eye diseases in hospital-based population in West Bengal, Eastern India.

    PubMed

    Basak, Samar K; Pal, Partha Pratim; Basak, Soham; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choudhury, Sumit; Sar, Suchanda

    2012-11-01

    To determine the prevalence of dry eye diseases in general clinical ophthalmic practice in a hospital-based population in West Bengal, Eastern India, a cross-sectional study was undertaken among 3023 subjects with the age of > or = 30 years, attending general ophthalmic clinic in a tertiary eye hospital. Demographics, detailed history and 6-items McMonnies' dry eye questionnaire were asked. Tear film break-up time (TBUT), Schirmer-I test, Rose Bengal (RB) staining, slit lamp examination and Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) were studied. Dry eye diseases were significantly higher in women than in men ie, 51.9% versus 48.1% (p < 0.01). Symptom-based dry eye (one or more symptoms present often or most of the time) was diagnosed in 1234 subjects (40.8%). With symptoms and at least one sign [TBUT < 10 seconds, RB staining (van Bjisterveld score: 4 or more) and Schirmer-I test = 5 mm in 5 minutes], the prevalence of dry eye was 786 (26%). Different grades of MeibOmian gland dysfunction (MGD) were detected in 957 cases (31.7%). Primary Sjogren syndrome was found in 21.5%; and 10.9% patients of dry eye had some form of systemic collagen vascular disorders. Using computers was not a risk factor in this geographical area. No significant correlation was seen between significant symptoms and positive signs in the study population. The prevalence of dry eye disease is high in West Bengal, Eastern India in hospital-based population. The risk is higher with age, female gender, systemic collagen diseases and with oral antidepressant/anxiolytic medication. Meibomian gland dysfunction is found to be common among dry eye subjects.

  15. The use of hospital-based nurses for the surveillance of potential disease outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Durrheim, D. N.; Harris, B. N.; Speare, R.; Billinghurst, K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study a novel surveillance system introduced in Mpumalanga Province, a rural area in the north-east of South Africa, in an attempt to address deficiencies in the system of notification for infectious conditions that have the potential for causing outbreaks. METHODS: Hospital-based infection control nurses in all of Mpumalanga's 32 public and private hospitals were trained to recognize, report, and respond to nine clinical syndromes that require immediate action. Sustainability of the system was assured through a schedule of regular training and networking, and by providing feedback to the nurses. The system was evaluated by formal review of hospital records, evidence of the effective containment of a cholera outbreak, and assessment of the speed and appropriateness of responses to other syndromes. FINDINGS: Rapid detection, reporting and response to six imported cholera cases resulted in effective containment, with only 19 proven secondary cholera cases, during the two-year review period. No secondary cases followed detection and prompt response to 14 patients with meningococcal disease. By the end of the first year of implementation, all facilities were providing weekly zero-reports on the nine syndromes before the designated time. Formal hospital record review for cases of acute flaccid paralysis endorsed the value of the system. CONCLUSION: The primary goal of an outbreak surveillance system is to ensure timely recognition of syndromes requiring an immediate response. Infection control nurses in Mpumalanga hospitals have excelled in timely weekly zero-reporting, participation at monthly training and feedback sessions, detection of priority clinical syndromes, and prompt appropriate response. This review provides support for the role of hospital-based nurses as valuable sentinel surveillance agents providing timely data for action. PMID:11217663

  16. Tissue-Advanced Glycation End Product Concentration in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Natasha J.; Chesterton, Lindsay J.; John, Stephen G.; Jefferies, Helen J.; Burton, James O.; Taal, Maarten W.; Fluck, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Tissue-advanced glycation end products (AGE) are a measure of cumulative metabolic stress. Assessment of tissue AGE by skin autofluoresence (AF) correlates well with cardiovascular outcomes in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This study aimed to measure and compare tissue AGE levels in HD and peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and to evaluate the impact of systemic PD glucose exposure. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Tissue AGE were measured in 115 established dialysis patients (62 HD and 53 PD) using a cutaneous AF device (AGE Reader; DiagnOptics). Values were compared with an age-matched non–chronic kidney disease database. Review of all previous PD solution delivery/prescription data determined PD glucose exposure. Results: PD patients were similar in age to HD patients but had a shorter dialysis vintage. There were no differences in ischemic heart disease or smoking history, statin or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) use, lipids, biochemistry, or prevalence of diabetes. More than 90% of both groups had met current dialysis adequacy targets. Skin AF values in PD and HD patients were similar and strongly correlated with historical PD glucose exposure. Skin AF correlated with age in both groups but with dialysis vintage only in PD patients Conclusions: Cumulative metabolic stress and transient hyperglycemia results in grossly elevated levels of tissue AGE in dialysis patients. In PD patients, this high level of AGE deposition is associated with historical glucose exposure. This observation provides a previously unappreciated potential link between PD exposure to glucose and systemic cardiovascular disease. PMID:19965551

  17. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns.

  18. Types of vicarious learning experienced by pre-dialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sturt, Jackie; Adams, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis renal replacement treatment options are in clinical equipoise, although the cost of haemodialysis to the National Health Service is £16,411/patient/year greater than peritoneal dialysis. Treatment decision-making takes place during the pre-dialysis year when estimated glomerular filtration rate drops to between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Renal disease can be familial, and the majority of patients have considerable health service experience when they approach these treatment decisions. Factors affecting patient treatment decisions are currently unknown. The objective of this article is to explore data from a wider study in specific relation to the types of vicarious learning experiences reported by pre-dialysis patients. Methods: A qualitative study utilised unstructured interviews and grounded theory analysis during the participant’s pre-dialysis year. The interview cohort comprised 20 pre-dialysis participants between 24 and 80 years of age. Grounded theory design entailed thematic sampling and analysis, scrutinised by secondary coding and checked with participants. Participants were recruited from routine renal clinics at two local hospitals when their estimated glomerular filtration rate was between 15 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2. Results: Vicarious learning that contributed to treatment decision-making fell into three main categories: planned vicarious leaning, unplanned vicarious learning and historical vicarious experiences. Conclusion: Exploration and acknowledgement of service users’ prior vicarious learning, by healthcare professionals, is important in understanding its potential influences on individuals’ treatment decision-making. This will enable healthcare professionals to challenge heuristic decisions based on limited information and to encourage analytic thought processes. PMID:26770780

  19. Albumin Dialysis for Liver Failure: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Tsipotis, Evangelos; Shuja, Asim; Jaber, Bertrand L

    2015-09-01

    Albumin dialysis is the best-studied extracorporeal nonbiologic liver support system as a bridge or destination therapy for patients with liver failure awaiting liver transplantation or recovery of liver function. We performed a systematic review to examine the efficacy and safety of 3 albumin dialysis systems (molecular adsorbent recirculating system [MARS], fractionated plasma separation, adsorption and hemodialysis [Prometheus system], and single-pass albumin dialysis) in randomized trials for supportive treatment of liver failure. PubMed, Ovid, EMBASE, Cochrane's Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched. Two authors independently screened citations and extracted data on patient characteristics, quality of reports, efficacy, and safety end points. Ten trials (7 of MARS and 3 of Prometheus) were identified (620 patients). By meta-analysis, albumin dialysis achieved a net decrease in serum total bilirubin level relative to standard medical therapy of 8.0 mg/dL (95% confidence interval [CI], -10.6 to -5.4) but not in serum ammonia or bile acids. Albumin dialysis achieved an improvement in hepatic encephalopathy relative to standard medical therapy with a risk ratio of 1.55 (95% CI, 1.16-2.08) but had no effect survival with a risk ratio of 0.95 (95% CI, 0.84-1.07). Because of inconsistency in the reporting of adverse events, the safety analysis was limited but did not demonstrate major safety concerns. Use of albumin dialysis as supportive treatment for liver failure is successful at removing albumin-bound molecules, such as bilirubin and at improving hepatic encephalopathy. Additional experience is required to guide its optimal use and address safety concerns. PMID:26311600

  20. Barriers to Peritoneal Dialysis in Saudi Arabia: Nephrologists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, Randah; Qureshi, Mohammad; Akeely, Fatmah; Al Sayyari, Abdullah A

    In Saudi Arabia, only 9% of dialysis patients are on peritoneal dialysis (PD), and this has been the case for years. A number of centers around the world have sought to understand the underutilization of PD by asking nephrologists directly. In this study, we aimed to gather information that will answer the question "Why is PD underutilized in Saudi Arabia?" hoping that a roadmap may be developed to overcome the hurdles the study underscores, allowing for more patients to utilize this valuable modality. PMID:27659929

  1. Mitral valve replacement in a dialysis-dependent patient.

    PubMed

    Mo, Ansheng; Tao, Zhihu; Feng, Zhiqiang; Yang, Xiaoping; Wu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality than those without end-stage renal disease in cardiovascular surgery. Poor outcomes are especially found in patients who undergo valve surgery. We report successful mitral valve replacement (MVR) in a dialysis-dependent patient. The patient recovered well at postoperation and had the complication of anticoagulation at follow-up. Based on this successful case, we believe that myocardial protection, prevention of infection, nutritional support, and close monitoring of blood coagulation function are important in dialysis-dependent patients undergoing valve replacement. PMID:27668230

  2. Assessment and Management of Hypertension in Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Joseph; Pogue, Velvie; Rahman, Mahboob; Reisin, Efrain; Weir, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is common, difficult to diagnose, and poorly controlled among patients with ESRD. However, controversy surrounds the diagnosis and treatment of hypertension. Here, we describe the diagnosis, epidemiology, and management of hypertension in dialysis patients, and examine the data sparking debate over appropriate methods for diagnosing and treating hypertension. Furthermore, we consider the issues uniquely related to hypertension in pediatric dialysis patients. Future clinical trials designed to clarify the controversial results discussed here should lead to the implementation of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques that improve long-term cardiovascular outcomes in patients with ESRD. PMID:24700870

  3. Peritoneal Dialysis in Acute and Chronic Renal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, R. A.; Maybee, T. K.; Henry, E. W.; Eden, John

    1963-01-01

    Clinical experience with peritoneal dialysis in eight cases of acute and four cases of chronic renal failure is presented. Seven of the acute cases survived but in some of these hemodialysis was also employed. The relatively simple technique of peritoneal dialysis was found to be effective, although slower than hemodialysis. In three of the cases it was selected in preference to hemodialysis. Its main advantages are that it does not require elaborate arrangements, or the use of blood or anticoagulants. The authors conclude that when the peritoneum is intact the method can be employed whenever the use of a temporary kidney substitute is indicated. PMID:20327512

  4. Skin Autofluorescence and Mortality in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Mácsai, Emília; Benke, Attila; Kiss, István

    2015-11-01

    Skin autofluorescence (SAF) is a proven prognostic factor of mortality in hemodialysis patients. Traditional and nontraditional risk factors are almost equivalent in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. Moreover, peritoneal glucose absorption accelerates the degenerative processes of connective tissues as in diabetes. In our study, we examined the predictive value of SAF for total mortality in the PD population. Data were collected from 198 prevalently adult Caucasian PD patients. One hundred twenty-six patients (mean age 66.2 y, men [n = 73], diabetes ratio 75/126) had anamnestic CVD (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease). Initially, we evaluated factors affecting SAF and CVD by multivariate linear regression. Survival rates were estimated by recording clinical and demographic data associated with mortality during a 36-month follow-up using the Kaplan-Meier method. Analyses were further stratified based on the presence or absence of CVD and SAF levels above or below the upper tercile 3.61 arbitrary units.Skin autofluorescence was influenced by CVD (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1-0.5) and white blood cell counts (P < 0.001, 95% CI 0.031-0.117). According to the Spearman correlation, SAF correlated with peritoneal cumulative glucose exposure (P = 0.02) and elapsed time in PD (P = 0.008). CVD correlated with age (P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.24-1.65) and diabetes (P < 0.001, 95% CI 2.58-10.66). More deaths were observed in the high SAF group than in the low SAF group (34/68 vs 44/130; P = 0.04). Comparing the CVD(-) low SAF group survival (mean 33.9 mos, standard error [SE] 1.39) to CVD(+) low SAF (mean 30.5 mos, SE 1.37, P = 0.03) and to CVD(+) high SAF group (mean 27.1 mos, SE 1.83, P = 0.001), the difference was significant.In conclusion, among PD patients, SAF values over 3.61 arbitrary units seem to be a predictor of mortality

  5. Skin Autofluorescence and Mortality in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Mácsai, Emília; Benke, Attila; Kiss, István

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Skin autofluorescence (SAF) is a proven prognostic factor of mortality in hemodialysis patients. Traditional and nontraditional risk factors are almost equivalent in peritoneal dialysis (PD), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death. Moreover, peritoneal glucose absorption accelerates the degenerative processes of connective tissues as in diabetes. In our study, we examined the predictive value of SAF for total mortality in the PD population. Data were collected from 198 prevalently adult Caucasian PD patients. One hundred twenty-six patients (mean age 66.2 y, men [n = 73], diabetes ratio 75/126) had anamnestic CVD (coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease). Initially, we evaluated factors affecting SAF and CVD by multivariate linear regression. Survival rates were estimated by recording clinical and demographic data associated with mortality during a 36-month follow-up using the Kaplan–Meier method. Analyses were further stratified based on the presence or absence of CVD and SAF levels above or below the upper tercile 3.61 arbitrary units. Skin autofluorescence was influenced by CVD (P < 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.1–0.5) and white blood cell counts (P < 0.001, 95% CI 0.031–0.117). According to the Spearman correlation, SAF correlated with peritoneal cumulative glucose exposure (P = 0.02) and elapsed time in PD (P = 0.008). CVD correlated with age (P < 0.001, 95% CI 1.24–1.65) and diabetes (P < 0.001, 95% CI 2.58–10.66). More deaths were observed in the high SAF group than in the low SAF group (34/68 vs 44/130; P = 0.04). Comparing the CVD(−) low SAF group survival (mean 33.9 mos, standard error [SE] 1.39) to CVD(+) low SAF (mean 30.5 mos, SE 1.37, P = 0.03) and to CVD(+) high SAF group (mean 27.1 mos, SE 1.83, P = 0.001), the difference was significant. In conclusion, among PD patients, SAF values over 3.61 arbitrary units seem to be a

  6. The Different Association between Serum Ferritin and Mortality in Hemodialysis and Peritoneal Dialysis Patients Using Japanese Nationwide Dialysis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Yukio; Yokoyama, Keitaro; Yokoo, Takashi; Shigematsu, Takashi; Iseki, Kunitoshi; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Monitoring of serum ferritin levels is widely recommended in the management of anemia among patients on dialysis. However, associations between serum ferritin and mortality are unclear and there have been no investigations among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis (PD). Methods Baseline data of 191,902 patients on dialysis (age, 65 ± 13 years; male, 61.1%; median dialysis duration, 62 months) were extracted from a nationwide dialysis registry in Japan at the end of 2007. Outcomes, such as one-year mortality, were then evaluated using the registry at the end of 2008. Results Within one year, a total of 15,284 (8.0%) patients had died, including 6,210 (3.2%) cardiovascular and 2,707 (1.4%) infection-related causes. Higher baseline serum ferritin levels were associated with higher mortality rates among patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). In contrast, there were no clear associations between serum ferritin levels and mortality among PD patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis of HD patients showed that those in the highest serum ferritin decile group had higher rates of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality than those in the lowest decile group (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.31–1.81 and HR, 1.44; 95% CI, 1.13–1.84, respectively), whereas associations with infection-related mortality became non-significant (HR, 1.14; 95% CI, 0.79–1.65). Conclusions Using Japanese nationwide dialysis registry, higher serum ferritin values were associated with mortality not in PD patients but in HD patients. PMID:26599216

  7. Blood and Body Fluid Exposure Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Hospital Based Health Care Providers in United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Robin; Beshyah, Salem A; Myers, Julie; Zaidi, Mukarram A

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of healthcare providers related to occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens were assessed in a tertiary-care hospital in Middle East. Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken using a self-administered questionnaire based on 3 paired (infectivity known vs. not known-suspected) case studies. Only 17 out of 230 respondents had an exposure in the 12 months prior to the survey and of these, only 2 had complied fully with the hospital's exposure reporting policy. Results In the paired case studies, the theoretical responses of participating health professionals showed a greater preference for initiating self-directed treatment with antivirals or immunisation rather than complying with the hospital protocol, when the patient was known to be infected. The differences in practice when exposed to a patient with suspected blood pathogens compared to patient known to be infected was statistically significant (p < 0.001) in all 3 paired cases. Failure to test an infected patient's blood meant that an adequate risk assessment and appropriate secondary prevention could not be performed, and reflected the unwillingness to report the occupational exposure. Conclusion Therefore, the study demonstrated that healthcare providers opted to treat themselves when exposed to patient with infectious disease, rather than comply with the hospital reporting and assessment protocol. PMID:23019533

  8. Cost and effectiveness assessment of cardiac rehabilitation for dialysis patients following coronary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Rebecca; Culler, Steven; Kutner, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Dialysis patients have a high risk of cardiovascular disease. In the general population, cardiac rehabilitation is recommended as a standard component of care and is covered by Medicare for patients who have undergone coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Previous investigation demonstrated survival benefit of cardiac rehabilitation in dialysis patients. This study investigated its impact on Medicare expenditure and its cost effectiveness. A cohort of 4,324 end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients who initiated chronic hemodialysis and underwent CABG between 1998 and 2004 was selected from the United States Renal Data System. Cardiac rehabilitation was defined by Current Procedural Terminology codes for monitored and nonmonitored exercise in Medicare claims data. Medicare expenditure included inpatient and outpatient claims with cost adjusted to 1998 dollars. At 42 months of follow-up after a 6-month entry period following CABG hospitalization discharge, cardiac rehabilitation at baseline was associated with higher cumulative Medicare expenditure, incurring a statistically nonsignificant increment of $2,904 (95% CI: −7,028, 11,940). During the same period, cardiac rehabilitation was significantly associated with longer cumulative lifetime, having an incremental benefit of 76 days (95% CI: 22, 129). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was $13,887 per year of life saved, suggesting that cardiac rehabilitation is highly cost-effective in ESRD patients following CABG. PMID:18650790

  9. [Peritoneal dialysis for acute renal failure: Rediscovery of an old modality of renal replacement therapy].

    PubMed

    Issad, Belkacem; Rostoker, Guy; Bagnis, Corinne; Deray, Gilbert

    2016-07-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) in adults in the intensive care unit (ICU) often evolves in a context of multiple organ failure, which explains the high mortality rate and increase treatment needs. Among, two modalities of renal replacement therapy, peritoneal dialysis (PD) was the first modality used for the treatment of ARF in the 1950s. Today, while PD is generalized for chronic renal failure treatment, its use in the ICU is limited, particularly, due to the advent of new hemodialysis techniques and the development of continuous replacement therapy. Recently, a renewed interest in the use of PD in patients with ARF has manifested in several emerging countries (Brazil, Vietnam). A systematic review in 2013 showed a similar mortality in ARF patients having PD (58%) and those treated by hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration/hemofiltration (56.1%). In the International society of peritoneal dialysis (ISPD)'s guideline (2013), PD may be used in adult ARF as the other blood extracorporeal epuration technics (recommendation with grade 1B). PD is the preferred method in cardiorenal syndromes, in frailty patients with hemodynamic instability and those lacking vascular access; finally PD is also an option in elderly and patients with bleeding tendency. In industrial countries, high volume automated PD with a flexible catheter (usually Tenckhoff) is advocated.

  10. Personality, stress, coping, and sense of coherence among nephrology nurses in dialysis settings.

    PubMed

    Lewis, S L; Bonner, P N; Campbell, M A; Cooper, C L; Willard, A

    1994-10-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the relationships among personality types, personal and work-related stress, coping resources, and sense of coherence (SOC) among nephrology nurses in dialysis settings. Nurses (n = 49) from 13 dialysis units in New Mexico completed a demographic data form, Perceived and Nursing Stress Scales, SOC Scale, Coping Resources Inventory, and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). The results indicated that there was a positive correlation between perceived personal stress and work-related stress, especially work load. Conversely, there were negative correlations between (a) both personal and work-related stress with SOC, and (b) both coping resources and SOC with burnout. High levels of personal and work-related stress were related to inadequate coping resources. Regression analysis indicated that the main contributing factors to emotional exhaustion (a major component of burnout) were low SOC, lack of staff support, personal stress, and heavy work load. Increased utilization of coping resources may facilitate the nurses' management of personal and work-related stressors.

  11. Risk Adjustment and the Assessment of Disparities in Dialysis Mortality Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kalbfleisch, John; Wolfe, Robert; Bell, Sarah; Sun, Rena; Messana, Joseph; Shearon, Tempie; Ashby, Valarie; Padilla, Robin; Zhang, Min; Turenne, Marc; Pearson, Jeffrey; Dahlerus, Claudia; Li, Yi

    2015-11-01

    Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) reported by Medicare compare mortality at individual dialysis facilities with the national average, and are currently adjusted for race. However, whether the adjustment for race obscures or clarifies disparities in quality of care for minority groups is unknown. Cox model-based SMRs were computed with and without adjustment for patient race for 5920 facilities in the United States during 2010. The study population included virtually all patients treated with dialysis during this period. Without race adjustment, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had better survival outcomes; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had overall mortality rates approximately 7% lower than expected. After adjusting for within-facility racial differences, facilities with higher proportions of black patients had poorer survival outcomes among black and non-black patients; facilities with the highest percentage of black patients (top 10%) had mortality rates approximately 6% worse than expected. In conclusion, accounting for within-facility racial differences in the computation of SMR helps to clarify disparities in quality of health care among patients with ESRD. The adjustment that accommodates within-facility comparisons is key, because it could also clarify relationships between patient characteristics and health care provider outcomes in other settings.

  12. Urgent-Start Peritoneal Dialysis: A Chance for a New Beginning

    PubMed Central

    Arramreddy, Rohini; Zheng, Sijie; Saxena, Anjali B.; Liebman, Scott E.; Wong, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) remains greatly underutilized in the United States despite the widespread preference of home modalities among nephrologists and patients. A hemodialysis-centric model of end-stage renal disease care has perpetuated for decades due to a complex set of factors, including late end-stage renal disease referrals and patients who present to the hospital requiring urgent renal replacement therapy. In such situations, PD rarely is a consideration and patients are dialyzed through a central venous catheter, a practice associated with high infection and mortality rates. Recently, the term urgent-start PD has gained momentum across the nephrology community and has begun to change this status quo. It allows for expedited placement of a PD catheter and initiation of PD therapy within days. Several published case reports, abstracts, and poster presentations at national meetings have documented the initial success of urgent-start PD programs. From a wide experiential base, we discuss the multifaceted issues related to urgent-start PD implementation, methods to overcome barriers to therapy, and the potential impact of this technique to change the existing dialysis paradigm. PMID:24246221

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow in dialysis encephalopathy and primary degenerative dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, R.J.; Rabin, P.; Stone, W.J.; Wilson, W.H.

    1985-07-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in patients with dialysis encephalopathy, primary degenerative dementia, dialysis patients with no central nervous system (CNS) complications, and normal controls. Both groups of dialysis patients (with and without CNS complications) demonstrated higher CBF values, and the dementia patients, lower CBF values than the controls. The dialysis patients had lower hematocrit, which correlated inversely with the cerebral blood flow. No such correlations were present in normals and patients with primary degenerative dementia. The dialysis patients and controls obtained similar CBF when the flow values were adjusted for the differences in hematocrit.

  14. Electroencephalogram investigations of the disequilibrium syndrome during bicarbonate and acetate dialysis.

    PubMed

    Hampl, H; Klopp, H W; Michels, N; Mahiout, A; Schilling, H; Wolfgruber, M; Schiller, R; Hanefeld, F; Kessel, M

    1983-01-01

    Continuous long-time electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring was performed during acetate and bicarbonate dialysis in 20 patients. Persisting normal basic activity of the EEG without neurological symptoms was found only during the course of bicarbonate dialysis. However, in acetate dialysis, during the decrease of arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2), we registered EEG disturbances with moderate to severe slowing, dysrhythmic activity and high voltage discharges. The decrease in PaCO2 and the deterioration in EEG activity in the patients during acetate dialysis was concomitant with severe neurological alterations, e.g. the typical symptoms of so-called 'disequilibrium' causing a cessation of dialysis in three patients.

  15. [Technological advances and micro-inflammation in dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Ferro, Giuseppe; Ravaglia, Fiammetta; Ferrari, Elisa; Romoli, Elena; Michelassi, Stefano; Caiani, David; Pizzarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    As currently performed, on line hemodiafiltration reduces, but does not normalize, the micro-inflammation of uremic patients. Recent technological advances make it possible to further reduce the inflammation connected to the dialysis treatment. 
Short bacterial DNA fragments are pro-inflammatory and can be detected in the dialysis fluids. However, their determination is not currently within normal controls of the quality of the dialysate. The scenario may change once the analysis of these fragments yields reliable, inexpensive, quick and easy to evaluate the results. At variance with standard bicarbonate dialysate, Citrate dialysate induces far less inflammation both for the well-known anti-inflammatory effect of such buffer and also because it is completely acetate free, e.g. a definitely pro-inflammatory buffer. However, the extensive use of citrate dialysate in chronic dialysis is prevented because of concerns about its potential calcium lowering effect. In our view, high convective exchange on line hemodiafiltration performed with dialysate, whose sterility and a-pirogenicity is guaranteed by increasingly sophisticated controls and with citrate buffer whose safety is certified, can serve as the gold standard of dialysis treatments in future.

  16. [Effect of the temperature of the dialysis bath in diabetics].

    PubMed

    Galli, Cintia N; López, Mirta; Beresan, Hugo; Elbert, Alicia

    2004-01-01

    During the dialysis procedure, arterial hypotension is one of the most common problems and it has been object of many studies. In hemodialysis, changes are produced in body volume through ultrafiltration that generate an increase in the production of thermic energy, which is removed during the treatment. The hypovolemia resulting from the removal of volume activates the sympathetic system, avoiding in this way heat loss and increasing body temperature that promotes vascular vasodilatation and interferes with the compensatory constrictive response to volume fall with consequent arterial hypotension. Patients with autonomic neuropathy would be the most affected by volume depletion and they are usually the ones that show the highest frecuency of hypotension episodes, typical of patients with diabetes. It has been proved before that the use of a cold bath does not decrease the efficiency of the dialysis treatment and improves the cardiovascular stability as well, mostly in patients proned to it, such as diabetics, elderly, and patients with cardiac failure. In this study, it was observed that patients showed low basal temperatures before dialysis treatment and that the use of bath temperature of 35.5 degrees C increased the temperature post dialysis less than with the standard bath at 37 degrees C. The bath at 35.5 degrees C decreased the episodes of arterial hypotension, with an improvement in patient's welfare, and lower requirement of attention and treatment costs.

  17. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... peritoneal dialysis, a source of dialysate, and, in some cases, a water purification mechanism. After the... together with the time course of each cycle of filling, dwell time, and draining of the peritoneal cavity...”) or dialysate prepared from dialysate concentrate and sterile purified water (for automatic...

  18. INVESTIGATION OF SERUM MICROCYSTIN CONCENTRATIONS AMONG DIALYSIS PATIENTS, BRAZIL, 1996

    EPA Science Inventory

    Investigation of Serum Microcystin Concentrations Among Dialysis Patients, Brazil, 1996

    Elizabeth D. Hilborn 1, Wayne W. Carmichael 2, Sandra M.F.O. Azevedo 3
    1- USEPA/ORD/NHEERL, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2- Wright State University, Dayton, OH
    3- Federal Univers...

  19. The Dialysis Exercise: A Clinical Simulation for Preclinical Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Bernstein, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A clinical decision-making simulation that helps students understand the relationship between psychosocial factors and medical problem-solving is described. A group of medical students and one faculty member comprise a selection committee to agree on the order in which four patients will be selected for renal dialysis. (MLW)

  20. Candidate Gene Analysis of Mortality in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Verschuren, Jeffrey J. W.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Rabelink, Ton J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Rotmans, Joris I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dialysis patients have high cardiovascular mortality risk. This study aimed to investigate the association between SNPs of genes involved in vascular processes and mortality in dialysis patients. Methods Forty two SNPs in 25 genes involved in endothelial function, vascular remodeling, cell proliferation, inflammation, coagulation and calcium/phosphate metabolism were genotyped in 1330 incident dialysis patients. The effect of SNPs on 5-years cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular mortality was investigated. Results The mortality rate was 114/1000 person-years and 49.4% of total mortality was cardiovascular. After correction for multiple testing, VEGF rs699947 was associated with all-cause mortality (HR1.48, 95% CI 1.14–1.92). The other SNPs were not associated with mortality. Conclusions This study provides further evidence that a SNP in the VEGF gene may contribute to the comorbid conditions of dialysis patients. Future studies should unravel the underlying mechanisms responsible for the increase in mortality in these patients. PMID:26587841

  1. Arterial Stiffening and Clinical Outcomes in Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kato, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in dialysis patients. Brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) is more efficient to handily assess arteriosclerosis than aortic PWV. The cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is also a novel blood pressure-independent arterial stiffness parameter. In dialysis patients, both baPWV and CAVI are increased compared to general subjects. Several studies have demonstrated that increased baPWV is associated with carotid atherosclerosis and diastolic left ventricular dysfunction in hemodialysis (HD) patients. In addition, higher baPWV is related to all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. CAVI is similarly associated with CVD. However, baPWV is superior to CAVI as a predictor of CV outcomes in HD patients. Besides these outcomes, a close relationship exists between sarcopenia, abdominal visceral obesity and arterial stiffening. Reduction of thigh muscle mass is inversely correlated with baPWV and CAVI in males. Abdominal fatness is also associated with increased arterial stiffness in females. These observations provide further evidence of higher risk of CV events in HD patients with sarcopenic obesity. In addition, arterial stiffness is associated with cerebral small vessel disease and decreased cognitive function in the elderly. However, it is unknown whether arterial stiffness may be useful as an early indicator of cognitive decline in dialysis patients. Because dialysis patients are at risk of developing dementia, more studies are needed to elucidate the causal link between arterial stiffness and cognitive impairment. PMID:26587457

  2. A pre-training assessment tool for home dialysis (JPAT).

    PubMed

    Chow, J

    2005-01-01

    A tool for assessing the suitability of candidates for home dialysis (Jo-Pre-training Assessment Tool version 2.1 - JPAT) was developed, pilot-tested at one hospital and field-tested at two major teaching hospitals in Sydney. JPAT acts as a screening instrument to distinguish suitable candidates for the home dialysis programme, identifying patients with the greatest chance of learning to manage the programme. This study included an interview/test of home dialysis patients based on the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36). JPAT version 2.1 is in the form of an interview questionnaire consisting of 38 assessment items in six domains: physical stability, nutritional status, communication ability, ability to maintain self-care, psychological suitability and social support. Overall, results suggest that JPAT version 2.1 is sufficiently reliable to be used as a tool for assessing patients who suffer from end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and to identify patients most likely to succeed in a home dialysis programme. PMID:16083022

  3. Is vitamin C intake too low in dialysis patients?

    PubMed

    Raimann, Jochen G; Levin, Nathan W; Craig, Ronald G; Sirover, William; Kotanko, Peter; Handelman, Garry

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C has several well-established roles in physiology including synthesis of collagen, carnitine and epinephrine, absorption of dietary iron, and mobilization of storage iron for erythropoeisis. Loss of several of these functions explains the pathology of scurvy, where defective collagen synthesis and anemia are major symptoms. Vitamin C deficiency is very common in dialysis patients and may arise from dialytic vitamin C clearance, restricted intake of vitamin C-rich foods, and increased vitamin C catabolism in vivo from inflammation. In the dialysis population, greater vitamin C intake may be needed for optimal health. Relationships between intake, body distribution, inflammation, and dialytic losses are complex and need further study. Concern about vitamin C metabolism leading to accumulation of tissue oxalate has led to the recommendation that vitamin C intake equals, but not exceeds, the intake recommended for the general population. Vitamin C deficiency in dialysis patients may have clinical consequences; a study in Renal Research Institute clinics found an association with periodontal disease. Data also support a role for vitamin C in prevention of dialysis-related anemia. New research questions are proposed in this editorial, with a discussion of strategies to determine the optimal provision of vitamin C for CKD patients. PMID:23106569

  4. Shewanella algae Peritonitis in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shanmuganathan, Malini; Goh, Bak Leong; Lim, Christopher; NorFadhlina, Zakaria; Fairol, Ibrahim

    Patients with peritonitis present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and turbid peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid. Shewanella algae peritonitis has not yet been reported in PD patients in the literature. We present the first 2 cases of Shewanella algae peritonitis in PD patients. Mupirocin cream is applied on the exit site as prophylactic antibiotic therapy. PMID:27659933

  5. [The management of arteriovenous fistula for dialysis patients].

    PubMed

    Lopez, Teodoro; Casino, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    A well-functioning vascular access is a basic requirement for a good dialysis treatment. Among the vascular accesses, the Artero-venous fistula (FAV) with native vessels is preferred for increasing survival rate, reducing risk of infection and with fewer complications. This review examines some aspects concerning the preparation and the surveillance of AVF.

  6. 21 CFR 876.5630 - Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peritoneal dialysis system and accessories. 876.5630 Section 876.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices §...

  7. Dialysis facility joint ventures--current structures and issues.

    PubMed

    Riley, James B; Pristave, Robert

    2005-07-01

    With the ongoing consolidation of the health care industry, including renal care, providers and physicians alike are using joint ventures as a means to partner on business transactions. This article discusses the expanding use of joint ventures in health care, including the dialysis industry, and looks at the types of structures being utilized and key legal concerns relating to such structures and issues.

  8. Disposition kinetics of cefamandole during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bliss, M; Mayersohn, M; Arnold, T; Logan, J; Michael, U F; Jones, W

    1986-01-01

    Cefamandole disposition kinetics were examined in six male subjects with renal impairment who were undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Creatinine clearance values ranged from less than 1 to 11 ml/min. Cefamandole was given as a 1-g intravenous dose infused over 30 min. Cefamandole concentrations were determined in serum, urine, and dialysis fluid by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The following average parameter values were obtained (range): half-life, 6.1 h (4.6 to 9.7); systemic clearance, 21.9 ml/min (8.4 to 35.5); renal clearance, 11.5 ml/min (0.03 to 22.3); dialysis clearance, 0.92 ml/min (0.7 to 1.3); nonrenal clearance, 12.2 ml/min (2.9 to 27.0); volume of distribution, 0.18 liter/kg (0.09 to 0.25); steady-state volume of distribution, 0.17 liter/kg (0.09 to 0.24). Approximately 5% of the dose was dialyzed (range, 2.8 to 8.3), indicating that there is no need to supplement a dosing regimen of cefamandole due to loss by dialysis. There was a positive correlation between creatinine clearance and the terminal elimination rate constant of cefamandole (r2 = 0.41) and cefamandole renal clearance (r2 = 0.83). PMID:3707113

  9. Acute Genital Edema during Peritoneal Dialysis: A Review for Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Juaquito; Haggerty, Stephen P

    2015-11-01

    Acute genital edema (AGE) is an infrequent but disruptive complication in patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. It is a common manifestation of dialysate leakage caused by inguinal, umbilical, femoral, or incisional hernias; peritoneal tears; leaks around the dialysis catheter; trauma; fluid overload; and malignancy. The evaluation of AGE begins with a history and physical exam. However, the physical exam in these patients is often indeterminate. Several diagnostic measures exist to evaluate and guide management of AGE occurring during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis but little agreement exists on an optimum method. We have conducted a review of the literature on the evaluation and management of AGE and present a summary of the data. CT peritoneography and peritoneal scintigraphy have been used extensively to evaluate AGE although no comparative studies exist. MRI peritoneography has also been described. CT peritoneography offers more anatomical detail but may not be as sensitive as peritoneal scintigraphy in detecting a peritoneal fluid leak as the cause for AGE. CT is also more costly and subjects the patient to more radiation. MRI is a noncontrast study without radiation risk, but has not been studied to the same degree. If testing is equivocal or bilateral hernias are suspected, diagnostic laparoscopy is helpful and can be combined with hernia repair. Whether the etiology is a leak or tear, low-volume peritoneal dialysis (PD) or cessation of PD for two to four weeks will allow closure. However, hernias almost always require operative repair with mesh usually without disrupting PD.

  10. The medical director and quality requirements in the dialysis facility.

    PubMed

    Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-01

    Four decades after the successful implementation of the ESRD program currently providing life-saving dialysis therapy to >430,000 patients, the definitions of and demands for a high-quality program have evolved and increased at the same time. Through substantial technological advances ESRD care improved, with a predominant focus on the technical aspects of care and the introduction of medications such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and active vitamin D for anemia and bone disease management. Despite many advances, the size of the program and the increasingly older and multimorbid patient population have contributed to continuing challenges for providing consistently high-quality care. Medicare's Final Rule of the Conditions for Coverage (April 2008) define the medical director of the dialysis center as the leader of the interdisciplinary team and the person ultimately accountable for quality, safety, and care provided in the center. Knowledge and active leadership with a hands-on approach in the quality assessment and performance improvement process (QAPI) is essential for the achievement of high-quality outcomes in dialysis centers. A collaborative approach between the dialysis provider and medical director is required to optimize outcomes and deliver evidence-based quality care. In 2011 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services introduced a pay-for-performance program-the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP)- with yearly varying quality metrics that result in payment reductions in subsequent years when targets are not achieved during the performance period. Success with the QIP requires a clear understanding of the structure, metrics, and scoring methods. Information on achievement and nonachievement is publicly available, both in facilities (through the facility performance score card) and on public websites (including Medicare's Dialysis Facility Compare). By assuming the leadership role in the quality program of dialysis facilities, the medical

  11. The Medical Director and Quality Requirements in the Dialysis Facility

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Four decades after the successful implementation of the ESRD program currently providing life-saving dialysis therapy to >430,000 patients, the definitions of and demands for a high-quality program have evolved and increased at the same time. Through substantial technological advances ESRD care improved, with a predominant focus on the technical aspects of care and the introduction of medications such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and active vitamin D for anemia and bone disease management. Despite many advances, the size of the program and the increasingly older and multimorbid patient population have contributed to continuing challenges for providing consistently high-quality care. Medicare's Final Rule of the Conditions for Coverage (April 2008) define the medical director of the dialysis center as the leader of the interdisciplinary team and the person ultimately accountable for quality, safety, and care provided in the center. Knowledge and active leadership with a hands-on approach in the quality assessment and performance improvement process (QAPI) is essential for the achievement of high-quality outcomes in dialysis centers. A collaborative approach between the dialysis provider and medical director is required to optimize outcomes and deliver evidence-based quality care. In 2011 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services introduced a pay-for-performance program—the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP)— with yearly varying quality metrics that result in payment reductions in subsequent years when targets are not achieved during the performance period. Success with the QIP requires a clear understanding of the structure, metrics, and scoring methods. Information on achievement and nonachievement is publicly available, both in facilities (through the facility performance score card) and on public websites (including Medicare’s Dialysis Facility Compare). By assuming the leadership role in the quality program of dialysis facilities, the medical

  12. Tattoo Practices in North-East India: A Hospital-based Cross-sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Binod Kumar; Verma, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tattooing has become increasingly popular, particularly among young people. However, little is known about the tattoo practices in North-East India. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to know the reasons and motivations of tattoo application and tattoo removal in individuals asking for tattoo removal. The secondary objective was to identify the demography, methods and safety of tattoo practices in these tattooed individuals. Materials and Methods: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 212 consecutive individuals seeking tattoo removal. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were performed for intergroup comparisons. Results: There were 178 (84%) males and 34 (16%) females. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of individuals seeking tattoo removal was 21.8 ± 4 years. The mean ± SD age of doing tattoo was 15.8 ± 3 years. Most individuals possessed an amateur tattoo (94.3%), 4.2% a professional one and 1.4% had a combination. Sewing needle was the most common instrument used for making tattoos in 51.4%. The individuals made their tattoos in an unsterile manner in 49.1%. The most common reason for doing tattoo was for fashion in 87.7%. The participants wanted tattoo removal to qualify for jobs, especially in armed forces in 49.5% and due to regret in 21.7%. Black was the most preferred colour in 37.3% followed by green in 28.3%. The fabric ink was the choice of ink in maximum number of individuals, i.e. 93.9%. Limitations: It was a hospital-based study done only on individuals seeking tattoo removal. It needs caution to generalise the findings in population. In addition, there may be recall bias in the participants. Conclusion: The tattoo was done mostly below 18 years of age in a crude unsterile way. The individuals had poor risk perceptions about various infections and complications of tattooing. There is an urgent need to caution and educate the youngsters and school-going children about safe tattooing and

  13. Rebasing the Medicare Payment for Dialysis: Rationale, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Doug

    2014-01-01

    After Medicare’s implementation of the bundled payment for dialysis in 2011, there has been a predictable decrease in the use of intravenous drugs included in the bundle. The change in use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, which decreased by 37% between 2007, when its allowance in the bundle was calculated, and 2012, was because of both changes in the Food and Drug Administration labeling for erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in 2011 and cost-containment efforts at the facility level. Legislation in 2012 required Medicare to decrease (rebase) the bundled payment for dialysis in 2014 to reflect this decrease in intravenous drug use, which amounted to a cut of 12% or $30 per treatment. Medicare subsequently decided to phase in this decrease in payment over several years to offset the increase in dialysis payment that would otherwise have occurred with inflation. A 3% reduction from the rebasing would offset an approximately 3% increase in the market basket that determines a facility’s costs for 2014 and 2015. Legislation in March of 2014 provides that the rebasing will result in a 1.25% decrease in the market basket adjustment in 2016 and 2017 and a 1% decrease in the market basket adjustment in 2018 for an aggregate rebasing of 9.5% spread over 5 years. Adjusting to this payment decrease in inflation-adjusted dollars will be challenging for many dialysis providers in an industry that operates at an average 3%–4% margin. Closure of facilities, decreases in services, and increased consolidation of the industry are possible scenarios. Newer models of reimbursement, such as ESRD seamless care organizations, offer dialysis providers the opportunity to align incentives between themselves, nephrologists, hospitals, and other health care providers, potentially improving outcomes and saving money, which will be shared between Medicare and the participating providers. PMID:25189926

  14. Predicting Mortality in Patients with Diabetes Starting Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Dekkers, Olaf M.; Rotmans, Joris I.; Krediet, Raymond T.; Boeschoten, Elisabeth W.; Dekker, Friedo W.

    2014-01-01

    Background While some prediction models have been developed for diabetic populations, prediction rules for mortality in diabetic dialysis patients are still lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify predictors for 1-year mortality in diabetic dialysis patients and use these results to develop a prediction model. Methods Data were used from the Netherlands Cooperative Study on the Adequacy of Dialysis (NECOSAD), a multicenter, prospective cohort study in which incident patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) were monitored until transplantation or death. For the present analysis, patients with DM at baseline were included. A prediction algorithm for 1-year all-cause mortality was developed through multivariate logistic regression. Candidate predictors were selected based on literature and clinical expertise. The final model was constructed through backward selection. The model's predictive performance, measured by calibration and discrimination, was assessed and internally validated through bootstrapping. Results A total of 394 patients were available for statistical analysis; 82 (21%) patients died within one year after baseline (3 months after starting dialysis therapy). The final prediction model contained seven predictors; age, smoking, history of macrovascular complications, duration of diabetes mellitus, Karnofsky scale, serum albumin and hemoglobin level. Predictive performance was good, as shown by the c-statistic of 0.810. Internal validation showed a slightly lower, but still adequate performance. Sensitivity analyses showed stability of results. Conclusions A prediction model containing seven predictors has been identified in order to predict 1-year mortality for diabetic incident dialysis patients. Predictive performance of the model was good. Before implementing the model in clinical practice, for example for counseling patients regarding their prognosis, external validation is necessary. PMID:24594735

  15. Delivered dialysis dose is suboptimal in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Obialo, C I; Hernandez, B; Carter, D

    1998-01-01

    Underdialyzed patients have high hospitalization and mortality rates. It is unclear if such patients receive adequate dialysis during hospitalization. In this cross-sectional study, we evaluated single treatment delivered dialysis dose during hospitalization and compared this to the dosage received at the free-standing outpatient clinics in the same patients. Eighty-four patients (54% male) aged 23-63 years (means +/- SD 55.5 +/- 14.6) who have been on dialysis for at least 3 months were evaluated. Hypertension and diabetes were the most common diagnoses, while thrombosed graft or fistula accounted for 40% of admissions. The mean dialysis treatment time (Td) was 30 min longer in the outpatient (OP) setting than the hospital (H): 3.6 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.1 +/- 0.2 h (p < 0.0001). Attained blood flow (QB) was 15% greater in the OP than H: 394 +/- 40 vs. 331 +/- 54 ml/min (p < 0.0001). The Kt/V was analyzed in 49 of 84 patients; the OP Kt/V was 20% greater than the H Kt/V: 1.38 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.11 +/- 0.1 (p < 0.0001). A further breakdown of H Kt/V according to access and membrane types showed that patients with functional grafts/fistula had a higher Kt/V than those with temporary accesses 1.14 +/- 0.1 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.1 (p = 0.01). We conclude that hospitalized patients receive suboptimal dialysis dose, this could have a negative impact on survival if hospitalization is recurrent and prolonged. Kinetic modeling should be routinely performed in such patients and Td should be increased in patients with temporary accesses. PMID:9845829

  16. Quality of life in dialysis: A Malaysian perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen J; Musa, Ramli; Chew, Thian F; Lim, Christopher T S; Morad, Zaki; Bujang, Adam

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest to use quality of life as one of the dialysis outcome measurement. Based on the Malaysian National Renal Registry data on 15 participating sites, 1569 adult subjects who were alive at December 31, 2012, aged 18 years old and above were screened. Demographic and medical data of 1332 eligible subjects were collected during the administration of the short form of World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF) in Malay, English, and Chinese language, respectively. The primary objective is to evaluate the quality of life among dialysis patients using WHOQOL-BREF. The secondary objective is to examine significant factors that affect quality of life score. Mean (SD) transformed quality of life scores were 56.2 (15.8), 59.8 (16.8), 58.2 (18.5), 59.5 (14.6), 61.0 (18.5) for (1) physical, (2) psychological, (3) social relations, (4) environment domains, and (5) combined overall quality of life and general health, respectively. Peritoneal dialysis group scored significantly higher than hemodialysis group in the mean combined overall quality of life and general health score (63.0 vs. 60.0, P < 0.001). Independent factors that were associated significantly with quality of life score in different domains include gender, body mass index, religion, education, marital status, occupation, income, mode of dialysis, hemoglobin, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, cerebral vascular accident and leg amputation. Subjects on peritoneal dialysis modality achieved higher combined overall quality of life and general health score than those on hemodialysis. Religion and cerebral vascular accident were significantly associated with all domains and combined overall quality of life and general health.

  17. Quality of life of caregivers and patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Stanley Lin-Sun; Sathick, Insara; McKitty, Khadija; Punzalan, Sally

    2008-05-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is the archetypal home-based therapy and is often favoured by patients. However, as patients with end-stage renal failure become more elderly, with more co-morbidity, their dependence on carers to provide physical, emotional and logistical support increases. The effect of this chronic burden has not been systematically studied. We have prospectively studied patients with end-stage renal failure starting peritoneal dialysis and their carers over a 1-year period. We selected a cohort of caregivers that are actively involved with the care of their partners' dialysis. Quality of Life (QoL) assessed by SF-36 questionnaires showed the patients and carers had impairment of QoL at the start of dialysis. As expected, the baseline QoL Physical Component Scores highly correlated with co-morbidity and assessment of functional capacity. Scores of all QoL domains improved after 1 year and this reached statistical significance for social functioning for both patients and carers. When we compared carers of highly dependent patients (required to perform daily dialysis) with carers of less dependent patients, we noted that the former had a statistically significant worsening of their mental health but other parameters were not different. We have shown that despite increasing the burden for caregivers, with careful selection, education and support, we did not adversely impact on the QoL of carers whilst there was some evidence of improvement, especially in social functioning. This gives reassurance that establishing dependent patients on PD is compatible with a holistic approach to the patients and their families. PMID:18182410

  18. Pharmacokinetics of cefepime in patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Barbhaiya, R H; Knupp, C A; Pfeffer, M; Zaccardelli, D; Dukes, G M; Mattern, W; Pittman, K A; Hak, L J

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cefepime were studied in 10 male patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis therapy. Five patients received a single 1,000-mg dose and the other five received a single 2,000-mg dose; all doses were given as 30-min intravenous infusions. Serial plasma, urine, and peritoneal dialysate samples were collected; and the concentrations of cefepime in these fluids were measured over 72 h by using a high-performance liquid chromatographic assay with UV detection. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by noncompartmental methods. The peak concentrations in plasma and the areas under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve for the 2,000-mg dose group were twice as high as those observed for the 1,000-mg dose group. The elimination half-life of cefepime was about 18 h and was independent of the dose. The steady-state volume of distribution was about 22 liters, and values for the 1,000- and 2,000-mg doses were not significantly different. The values for total body clearance and peritoneal dialysis clearance were about 15 and 4 ml/min, respectively. No dose dependency was observed for the clearance estimates. Over the 72-h sampling period, about 26% of the dose was excreted intact into the peritoneal dialysis fluid. For 48 h postdose, mean concentrations of cefepime in dialysate at the end of each dialysis interval exceeded the reported MICs for 90% of the isolates (MIC90s) for bacteria which commonly cause peritonitis resulting from continuous peritoneal dialysis. A parenteral dose of 1,000 or 2,000 mg of cefepime every 48 h would maintain the antibiotic levels in plasma and peritoneal fluid above the MIC90s for the most susceptible bacteria for the treatment of systemic and intraperitoneal infections [corrected]. PMID:1510432

  19. Ferric citrate controls phosphorus and delivers iron in patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia B; Sika, Mohammed; Koury, Mark J; Chuang, Peale; Schulman, Gerald; Smith, Mark T; Whittier, Frederick C; Linfert, Douglas R; Galphin, Claude M; Athreya, Balaji P; Nossuli, A Kaldun Kaldun; Chang, Ingrid J; Blumenthal, Samuel S; Manley, John; Zeig, Steven; Kant, Kotagal S; Olivero, Juan Jose; Greene, Tom; Dwyer, Jamie P

    2015-02-01

    Patients on dialysis require phosphorus binders to prevent hyperphosphatemia and are iron deficient. We studied ferric citrate as a phosphorus binder and iron source. In this sequential, randomized trial, 441 subjects on dialysis were randomized to ferric citrate or active control in a 52-week active control period followed by a 4-week placebo control period, in which subjects on ferric citrate who completed the active control period were rerandomized to ferric citrate or placebo. The primary analysis compared the mean change in phosphorus between ferric citrate and placebo during the placebo control period. A sequential gatekeeping strategy controlled study-wise type 1 error for serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, and intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent usage as prespecified secondary outcomes in the active control period. Ferric citrate controlled phosphorus compared with placebo, with a mean treatment difference of -2.2±0.2 mg/dl (mean±SEM) (P<0.001). Active control period phosphorus was similar between ferric citrate and active control, with comparable safety profiles. Subjects on ferric citrate achieved higher mean iron parameters (ferritin=899±488 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=39%±17%) versus subjects on active control (ferritin=628±367 ng/ml [mean±SD]; transferrin saturation=30%±12%; P<0.001 for both). Subjects on ferric citrate received less intravenous elemental iron (median=12.95 mg/wk ferric citrate; 26.88 mg/wk active control; P<0.001) and less erythropoietin-stimulating agent (median epoetin-equivalent units per week: 5306 units/wk ferric citrate; 6951 units/wk active control; P=0.04). Hemoglobin levels were statistically higher on ferric citrate. Thus, ferric citrate is an efficacious and safe phosphate binder that increases iron stores and reduces intravenous iron and erythropoietin-stimulating agent use while maintaining hemoglobin. PMID:25060056

  20. Dialysis outcomes in Colombia (DOC) study: a comparison of patient survival on peritoneal dialysis vs hemodialysis in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Sanabria, M; Muñoz, J; Trillos, C; Hernández, G; Latorre, C; Díaz, C S; Murad, S; Rodríguez, K; Rivera, A; Amador, A; Ardila, F; Caicedo, A; Camargo, D; Díaz, A; González, J; Leguizamón, H; Lopera, P; Marín, L; Nieto, I; Vargas, E

    2008-04-01

    The goal of the Dialysis Outcomes in Colombia (DOC) study was to compare the survival of patients on hemodialysis (HD) vs peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a network of renal units in Colombia. The DOC study examined a historical cohort of incident patients starting dialysis therapy between 1 January 2001 and 1 December 2003 and followed until 1 December 2005, measuring demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical variables. Only patients older than 18 years were included. As-treated and intention-to-treat statistical analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazard model. There were 1094 eligible patients in total and 923 were actually enrolled: 47.3% started HD therapy and 52.7% started PD therapy. Of the patients studied, 751 (81.3%) remained in their initial therapy until the end of the follow-up period, death, or censorship. Age, sex, weight, height, body mass index, creatinine, calcium, and Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) variables did not show statistically significant differences between the two treatment groups. Diabetes, socioeconomic level, educational level, phosphorus, Charlson Co-morbidity Index, and cardiovascular history did show a difference, and were less favorable for patients on PD. Residual renal function was greater for PD patients. Also, there were differences in the median survival time between groups: 27.2 months for PD vs 23.1 months for HD (P=0.001) by the intention-to-treat approach; and 24.5 months for PD vs 16.7 months for HD (P<0.001) by the as-treated approach. When performing univariate Cox analyses using the intention-to-treat approach, associations were with age > or =65 years (hazard ratio (HR)=2.21; confidence interval (CI) 95% (1.77-2.755); P<0.001); history of cardiovascular disease (HR=1.96; CI 95% (1.58-2.90); P<0.001); diabetes (HR=2.34; CI 95% (1.88-2.90); P<0.001); and SGA (mild or moderate-severe malnutrition) (HR=1.47; CI 95% (1.17-1.79); P=0.001); but no association was found with gender (HR=1

  1. Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Teams Can Prevent Unnecessary Child Abuse Reports and Out-of-Home Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Gregory H.; Makoroff, Kathi L.; Malott, Heidi A.; Shapiro, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To determine how often and for what reasons a hospital-based multidisciplinary child abuse team concluded that a report of alleged or suspected child abuse was unnecessary in young children with fractures. Methods: A retrospective review was completed of all children less than 12 months of age who, because of fractures, were referred to…

  2. A statewide nurse training program for a hospital based infant abusive head trauma prevention program.

    PubMed

    Nocera, Maryalice; Shanahan, Meghan; Murphy, Robert A; Sullivan, Kelly M; Barr, Marilyn; Price, Julie; Zolotor, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Successful implementation of universal patient education programs requires training large numbers of nursing staff in new content and procedures and maintaining fidelity to program standards. In preparation for statewide adoption of a hospital based universal education program, nursing staff at 85 hospitals and 1 birthing center in North Carolina received standardized training. This article describes the training program and reports findings from the process, outcome and impact evaluations of this training. Evaluation strategies were designed to query nurse satisfaction with training and course content; determine if training conveyed new information, and assess if nurses applied lessons from the training sessions to deliver the program as designed. Trainings were conducted during April 2008-February 2010. Evaluations were received from 4358 attendees. Information was obtained about training type, participants' perceptions of newness and usefulness of information and how the program compared to other education materials. Program fidelity data were collected using telephone surveys about compliance to delivery of teaching points and teaching behaviors. Results demonstrate high levels of satisfaction and perceptions of program utility as well as adherence to program model. These findings support the feasibility of implementing a universal patient education programs with strong uptake utilizing large scale systematic training programs.

  3. Use of Hospital-Based Food Pantries Among Low-Income Urban Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Gany, Francesca; Lee, Trevor; Loeb, Rebecca; Ramirez, Julia; Moran, Alyssa; Crist, Michael; McNish, Thelma; Leng, Jennifer C F

    2015-12-01

    To examine uptake of a novel emergency food system at five cancer clinics in New York City, hospital-based food pantries, and predictors of use, among low-income urban cancer patients. This is a nested cohort study of 351 patients who first visited the food pantries between October 3, 2011 and January 1, 2013. The main outcome was continued uptake of this food pantry intervention. Generalized estimating equation (GEE) statistical analysis was conducted to model predictors of pantry visit frequency. The median number of return visits in the 4 month period after a patient's initial visit was 2 and the mean was 3.25 (SD 3.07). The GEE model showed that younger patients used the pantry less, immigrant patients used the pantry more (than US-born), and prostate cancer and Stage IV cancer patients used the pantry more. Future long-term larger scale studies are needed to further assess the utilization, as well as the impact of food assistance programs such as the this one, on nutritional outcomes, cancer outcomes, comorbidities, and quality of life. Cancer patients most at risk should be taken into particular consideration.

  4. The Impact of Hospital-Based Skilled Nursing Facility Closures on Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of reductions in hospital-based (HB) skilled nursing facility (SNF) bed supply on the rate of rehospitalization of patients discharged to any SNF from zip codes that lost HB beds. Data Source We used Medicare enrollment records, Medicare hospital and SNF claims, and nursing home Minimum Dataset assessments and characteristics (OSCAR) to examine nearly 10 million Medicare fee-for-service hospital discharges to SNFs between 1999 and 2006. Study Design We calculated the number of HB and freestanding (FS) SNF beds within a 22 km radius from the centroid of all zip codes in which Medicare beneficiaries reside in all years. We examined the relationship between HB and FS bed supply and the rehospitalization rates of the patients residing in corresponding zip codes in different years using zip code fixed effects and instrumental variable methods including extensive sensitivity analyses. Principal Findings Our estimated coefficients suggest that closure of 882 HB homes during our study period resulted in 12,000–18,000 extra rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. The effect was largely concentrated among the most acutely ill, high-need patients. Conclusions SNF patient-based prospective payment resulted in closure of higher cost HB facilities that had served most postacute patients. As other, less experienced SNFs replaced HB facilities, they were less able to manage high acuity patients without rehospitalizing them. PMID:23033808

  5. Using lean Six Sigma to improve hospital based outpatient imaging satisfaction.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Angelic P; Kirk, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Within the hospital based imaging department at Methodist Willowbrook, outpatient, inpatient, and emergency patients are all performed on the same equipment with the same staff. The critical nature of the patient is the deciding factor as to who gets done first and in what order procedures are performed. After an aggressive adoption of Intentional Tools, the imaging department was finally able to move from a two year mean Press Ganey, outpatient satisfaction average score of 91.2 and UHC percentile ranking of 37th to a mean average of 92.1 and corresponding UHC ranking of 60th percentile. It was at the 60th percentile ranking that the department flat lined. Using the Six Sigma DMAIC process, opportunity for further improvement was identified. A two week focus pilot was conducted specifically on areas identified through the Six Sigma process. The department was able to jump to 88th percentile ranking and a mean of 93.7. With pay for performance focusing on outpatient satisfaction and a financial incentive to improving and maintaining the highest scores, it was important to know where the imaging department should apply its financial resources to obtain the greatest impact.

  6. A Hospital-Based Interdisciplinary Model for Increasing Nurses' Engagement in Legislative Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Waddell, Ashley; Audette, Kathryn; DeLong, Amy; Brostoff, Marcie

    2016-02-01

    The Legislative Action Interest Group (LAIG) is a hospital-based health policy forum that engages nurses in exploring clinical implications of existing and pending health policies and regulations, while also creating a feedback loop to inform policy makers about the realities nursing practice and patient care. The LAIG is a collaborative effort between the hospital's Department of Nursing and Patient Care Services and the Office of Government Relations at an academic children's hospital. Nurses participating in the LAIG forums build a working knowledge of health policy and can articulate the practice realities for policy decision makers. Participants explore the political context of nursing and pediatric policies while learning about the state legislative process. Beyond the monthly meetings, members build policy advocacy skills and have testified at public hearings, met with state and federal legislators, and led tours for policy makers through the hospital. The LAIG model also benefits the government relations staff by providing time for them to discuss clinical implications of pending policies with nurses from practice settings in the hospital. Forum discussions enhance the ability of the hospital's lobbyists to articulate practice implications of health policy to lawmakers. This case study, describing the origin, structure, operations, and outcomes of the LAIG model, and has implications for nurses in hospitals and academic settings who are interested in engaging in policy work. Opportunities to research the sustainability, replicability, and patient-centered outcomes of LAIG forums represent future work needed to advance nursing's participation in policy. PMID:26880725

  7. Seroprevalence of Cysticercus Antibodies in Japanese Encephalitis Patients in Upper Assam, India: A Hospital Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Himangshu; Saikia, Lahari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Co-infection of Japanese Encephalitis (JE) and Cysticercosis is attributed mainly to the common epidemiological features between the two diseases. Not much is known about the clinical implications of one infection over the other. Aim The study aimed at establishing whether JE-Cysticercosis co-infection is prevalent in the Upper Assam districts and to explore additional details about such co-infections both clinically and epidemiologically. Materials and Methods The present study was a retrospective cross-sectional hospital based study conducted between July 2013 and June 2014 and included 272 Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES) patients. Out of this, 137 JE positive and 135 non-JE Acute encephalitis patients were taken as cases and controls respectively. The diagnosis of JE and Cysticercosis was established by ELISA. Statistical Analysis EpiInfo ver. 7 was used for statistical analysis. Chi-square was used and p-value < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results The association of Cysticercosis with JE was found to be statistically significant (14.6%, p = 0.0019) in the cases with reference to the controls (3.7%). Moreover, the co-infections were found to be more common in case of adults (19.32%, p = 0.0360); with males having a greater odds (5.25, p = 0.0008) of harbouring the parasite as compared to females. Conclusion The study proves that the association of Cysticercosis and JE holds true in this region. PMID:27437215

  8. Using lean Six Sigma to improve hospital based outpatient imaging satisfaction.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Angelic P; Kirk, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Within the hospital based imaging department at Methodist Willowbrook, outpatient, inpatient, and emergency patients are all performed on the same equipment with the same staff. The critical nature of the patient is the deciding factor as to who gets done first and in what order procedures are performed. After an aggressive adoption of Intentional Tools, the imaging department was finally able to move from a two year mean Press Ganey, outpatient satisfaction average score of 91.2 and UHC percentile ranking of 37th to a mean average of 92.1 and corresponding UHC ranking of 60th percentile. It was at the 60th percentile ranking that the department flat lined. Using the Six Sigma DMAIC process, opportunity for further improvement was identified. A two week focus pilot was conducted specifically on areas identified through the Six Sigma process. The department was able to jump to 88th percentile ranking and a mean of 93.7. With pay for performance focusing on outpatient satisfaction and a financial incentive to improving and maintaining the highest scores, it was important to know where the imaging department should apply its financial resources to obtain the greatest impact. PMID:23577532

  9. Consensus statement by hospital based dentists providing dental treatment for patients with inherited bleeding disorders.

    PubMed

    Hewson, I D; Daly, J; Hallett, K B; Liberali, S A; Scott, C L M; Spaile, G; Widmer, R; Winters, J

    2011-06-01

    Avoidance of dental care and neglect of oral health may occur in patients with inherited bleeding disorders because of concerns about perioperative and postoperative bleeding, but this is likely to result in the need for crisis care, and more complex and high-risk procedures. Most routine dental care in this special needs group can be safely managed in the general dental setting following consultation with the patient's haematologist and adherence to simple protocols. Many of the current protocols for dental treatment of patients with inherited bleeding disorders were devised many years ago and now need revision. There is increasing evidence that the amount of factor cover previously recommended for dental procedures can now be safely reduced or may no longer be required in many cases. There is still a need for close cooperation and discussion between the patient's haematologist and dental surgeon before any invasive treatment is performed. A group of hospital based dentists from centres where patients with inherited bleeding disorders are treated met and, after discussions, a management protocol for dental treatment was formulated.

  10. Home-Based versus Hospital-Based Rehabilitation Program after Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    López-Liria, Remedios; Padilla-Góngora, David; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel; Rocamora-Pérez, Patricia; Pérez-de la Cruz, Sagrario; Fernández-Sánchez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To compare home-based rehabilitation with the standard hospital rehabilitation in terms of improving knee joint mobility and recovery of muscle strength and function in patients after a total knee replacement. Materials and Methods. A non-randomised controlled trial was conducted. Seventy-eight patients with a prosthetic knee were included in the study and allocated to either a home-based or hospital-based rehabilitation programme. Treatment included various exercises to restore strength and joint mobility and to improve patients' functional capacity. The primary outcome of the trial was the treatment effectiveness measured by the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Results. The groups did not significantly differ in the leg side (right/left) or clinical characteristics (P > 0.05). After the intervention, both groups showed significant improvements (P < 0.001) from the baseline values in the level of pain (visual analogue scale), the range of flexion-extension motion and muscle strength, disability (Barthel and WOMAC indices), balance, and walking. Conclusions. This study reveals that the rehabilitation treatments offered either at home or in hospital settings are equally effective. PMID:25961017

  11. Hospital-based surveillance of Japanese encephalitis at a tertiary hospital in Manila.

    PubMed

    Alera, Ma Theresa P; Velasco, John Mark S; Ypil-Cardenas, Charity Ann; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda N; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Gibbons, Robert V; Dimaano, Efren M; Yoon, In-Kyu

    2013-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is endemic in the Philippines but the incidence and burden of disease are not well established. We conducted a prospective hospital-based study at San Lazaro Hospital, a tertiary level hospital in Manila, from September 2005 to December 2006. Cases were determined using an in-house dengue and Japanese encephalitis (JE) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in order to detect the proportion of JE cases among the acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) cases admitted to our hospital. Fifteen patients were found to have AES, of whom 6 (40%) had confirmed JE. Of the JE cases, 4 were females and 2 were males with an age range of 3-14 years. Three of the 6 JE cases occurred during July. The most common signs and symptoms on admission among JE cases were: fever, headache, loss of appetite, neck rigidity and altered sensorium. JE likely comprises a significant proportion of hospitalized AES cases among children from Manila and nearby provinces. Further studies on the nation-wide prevalence and distribution of JE in the Philippines are needed to guide health authorities in disease control and prevention strategies.

  12. Depression and Anxiety Disorders among Patients with Psoriasis: A Hospital-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Golpour, Masoud; Hosseini, Seyed Hamzeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ebadi, Aghdas; Koohkan, Fatemeh; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2012-01-01

    Background. Psoriasis is a common, genetically determined inflammatory and proliferative disease of the skin. Psychological stress can exacerbate the disease. This study sought to investigate the depression and anxiety disorders among patients with psoriasis and control group. Method. In this hospital-based case-control study, One hundred patients with psoriasis (case) referred to the dermatology department and 100 patients with otolaryngology problems and dermatological healthy volunteers (control) who referred to the Otolaryngology Department of Bouali Sina Hospital in Sari, Iran, in 2007 were studied. Demographic characteristics were recorded. Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale I-II were administered to the patients in both groups. Data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and descriptive statistical tests. Results. From One-hundred patients in each group, 44 (45%) were men. Depression score was 67% and 12% in psoriatic patients and control, respectively. The Beck depression scores of patients with psoriasis were significantly higher than scores of the control group (P < 0.05). Based on Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Scale, anxiety was found in 45% of patients in case group and 18% of controls. Conclusion. The results revealed that psoriatic patients reported significantly higher degrees of depression and anxiety than controls. In addition, psoriatic women were more depressed than psoriatic men.

  13. A report of the Malaysian dialysis registry of the National Renal Registry, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Y N; Lim, T O; Lee, D G; Wong, H S; Ong, L M; Shaariah, W; Rozina, G; Morad, Z

    2008-09-01

    The Malaysian National Renal Registry was set up in 1992 to collect data for patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT). We present here the report of the Malaysian dialysis registry. The objectives of this papar are: (1) To examine the overall provision of dialysis treatment in Malaysia and its trend from 1980 to 2006. (2) To assess the treatment rate according to the states in the country. (3) To describe the method, location and funding of dialysis. (4) To characterise the patients accepted for dialysis treatment. (5) To analyze the outcomes of the dialysis treatment. Data on patients receiving dialysis treatment were collected at initiation of dialysis, at the time of any significant outcome, as well as yearly. The number of dialysis patients increased from 59 in 1980 to almost 15,000 in 2006. The dialysis acceptance rate increased from 3 per million population in 1980 to 116 per million population in 2006, and the prevalence rate from 4 to 550 per million population over the same period. The economically advantaged states of Malaysia had much higher dialysis treatment rates compared to the less economically advanced states. Eighty to 90% of new dialysis patients were accepted into centre haemodialysis (HD), and the rest into the chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) programme. The government provided about half of the funding for dialysis treatment. Patients older than 55 years accounted for the largest proportion of new patients on dialysis since the 1990s. Diabetes mellitus has been the main cause of ESRD and accounted for more than 50% of new ESRD since 2002. Annual death rate averaged about 10% on HD and 15% on CAPD. The unadjusted 5-year patient survival on both HD and CAPD was about 80%. Fifty percent of dialysis patients reported very good median QoL index score. About 70% of dialysis patients were about to work full or part time. There has been a very rapid growth of dialysis provision in Malaysia particularly in the older age groups. ESRD

  14. Quality of Life and Physical Function in Older Patients on Dialysis: A Comparison of Assisted Peritoneal Dialysis with Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Iyasere, Osasuyi U.; Brown, Edwina A.; Johansson, Lina; Huson, Les; Smee, Joanna; Maxwell, Alexander P.; Farrington, Ken; Davenport, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives In-center hemodialysis (HD) is often the default dialysis modality for older patients. Few centers use assisted peritoneal dialysis (PD), which enables treatment at home. This observational study compared quality of life (QoL) and physical function between older patients on assisted PD and HD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Patients on assisted PD who were >60 years old and on dialysis for >3 months were recruited and matched to patients on HD (needing hospital transport) by age, sex, diabetes, dialysis vintage, ethnicity, and index of deprivation. Frailty was assessed using the Clinical Frailty Scale. QoL assessments included Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Short Form-12, Palliative Outcomes Symptom Scale (renal), Illness Intrusiveness Rating Scale, and Renal Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (RTSQ). Physical function was evaluated by Barthel Score and timed up and go test. Results In total, 251 patients (129 PD and 122 HD) were recruited. In unadjusted analysis, patients on assisted PD had a higher prevalence of possible depression (HADS>8; PD=38.8%; HD=23.8%; P=0.05) and higher HADS depression score (median: PD=6; HD=5; P=0.05) but higher RTSQ scores (median: PD=55; HD=51; P<0.01). In a generalized linear regression model adjusting for age, sex, comorbidity, dialysis vintage, and frailty, assisted PD continued to be associated with higher RTSQ scores (P=0.04) but not with other QoL measures. Conclusions There are no differences in measures of QoL and physical function between older patients on assisted PD and comparable patients on HD, except for treatment satisfaction, which is higher in patients on PD. Assisted PD should be considered as an alternative to HD for older patients, allowing them to make their preferred choices. PMID:26712808

  15. Dialysis adequacy and nutritional status of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Teixeira Nunes, Fernanda; de Campos, Gianine; Xavier de Paula, Sandra M; Merhi, Vânia A Leandro; Portero-McLellan, Kátia C; da Motta, Denise G; de Oliveira, Maria R M

    2008-01-01

    To characterize the nutritional status of renal failure patients and its relationship with hemodialysis adequacy measured by Kt/V, a study was carried out with a population of 44 adult patients with renal failure and mean age 51+/-15 years. Anthropometric data, such as dry weight, height, arm circumference, triceps skinfold thickness, mid-arm muscle circumference, and body mass index were assessed, and biochemical tests were conducted for urea, potassium, creatinine, serum albumin, and phosphorus levels, in addition to hemogram and quarterly urea reduction rate average (Kt/V). In order to evaluate calorie intake, a dietary questionnaire on habitual daily food ingestion was administered, taking into consideration the hemodialysis date. The patients were divided into 2 separate groups for the statistical analysis, with 50% of the patients in each group: A (Kt/V<1.2) and B (Kt/V>1.2). The data were tabulated as mean and standard deviation, with differences tested by Student's t test. The correlations between variables were established by the coefficient p of Pearson. Most of the patients (43%) were considered eutrophic, based on the BMI, and presented inadequate calorie intake, corresponding to 88.5+/-24% (30.8 kcal/kg actual weight) of the total energy required and adequate protein intake, reaching 109.9+/-40% of the recommended daily allowance (1.24 g/kg of actual weight). There was a correlation of Kt/V with anthropometric parameters such as body mass index, arm circumference, and mid-arm muscle circumference. The biochemical parameters related to dialysis adequacy were albumin, ferritin, and urea (predialysis). Well-dialyzed patients presented better levels of serum albumin. There was an influence of gender and age on correlations of the analyzed variables. Female and younger patients presented better dialysis adequacy. The dialysis adequacy was related to the nutritional status and influenced by the protein intake and body composition. Gender and age had an

  16. Strategies for Postmarketing Surveillance of Drugs and Devices in Patients with ESRD Undergoing Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Moshe; Yeh, Robert W.; Herzog, Charles A.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Setoguchi, Soko

    2013-01-01

    Summary The lack of evidence on the effectiveness and safety of interventions in chronic dialysis patients has been a subject of continuing criticism. New technologies are often introduced into the market without having specifically studied or even included patients with advanced kidney disease. Therefore, the need to generate valid effectiveness and safety data in this vulnerable subpopulation is of utmost importance. The US Food and Drug Administration has recently placed an increased focus on safety surveillance, and sponsors must now meet this additional postmarketing commitment. In patients with ESRD, the unique data collection environment in the United States allows for creative and efficient study designs to meet the needs of patients, providers, and sponsors. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the methodological and practical aspects of the different options for postmarketing study design in this field, with critical appraisal of their advantages and disadvantages. PMID:23970129

  17. Dialysis exercise team: the way to sustain exercise programs in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Capitanini, Alessandro; Lange, Sara; D'Alessandro, Claudia; Salotti, Emilio; Tavolaro, Alba; Baronti, Maria E; Giannese, Domenico; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2014-01-01

    Patients affected by end-stage renal disease (ESRD) show quite lower physical activity and exercise capacity when compared to healthy individuals. In addition, a sedentary lifestyle is favoured by lack of a specific counseling on exercise implementation in the nephrology care setting. Increasing physical activity level should represent a goal for every dialysis patient care management. Three crucial elements of clinical care may contribute to sustain a hemodialysis exercise program: a) involvement of exercise professionals, b) real commitment of nephrologists and dialysis professionals, c) individual patient adaptation of the exercise program. Dialysis staff have a crucial role to encourage and assist patients during intra-dialysis exercise, but other professionals should be included in the ideal "exercise team" for dialysis patients. Evaluation of general condition, comorbidities (especially cardiovascular), nutritional status and physical exercise capacity are mandatory to propose an exercise program, in either extra-dialysis or intra-dialysis setting. To this aim, nephrologist should lead a team of specialists and professionals including cardiologist, physiotherapist, exercise physiologist, renal dietician and nurse. In this scenario, dialysis nurses play a pivotal role since they guarantee a constant and direct approach. Unfortunately dialysis staff may often lack of information and formation about exercise management while they take care patients during the dialysis session. Building an effective exercise team, promoting the culture of exercise and increasing physical activity levels lead to a more complete and modern clinical care management of ESRD patients.

  18. Pattern of congenital anomalies in newborn: a hospital-based study

    PubMed Central

    El Koumi, Mohamed A.; Al Banna, Ehab A.; Lebda, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Birth defects, encountered frequently by pediatricians, are important causes of childhood morbidity and mortality. Birth defects can be classified according to their severity, pathogenic mechanism, or whether they are involving a single system or multiple systems. This hospital-based prospective descriptive study highlights the prevalence of Congenital Anomalies (CAs) in one year among live born neonates delivered in Zagazig University Hospital (Egypt). All women giving birth to viable babies were included. Demographic details, associated risk factors and the type of CAs in all babies were recorded. Diagnosis of CAs was based on clinical evaluation, radiographic examination, ultrasonography, echocardiography and chromosomal analysis of the newborn whenever recommended. The overall incidence of CAs among live born neonates was 2.5%, as most of the cases were referred to Zagazig University Hospital (Egypt) for delivery. The musculoskeletal system (23%) was the most commonly involved followed by the central nervous system (20.3%). Involvement of more than one system was observed in (28.6%) cases. Among maternal and fetal risk factors; parental consanguinity, maternal under nutrition and obesity, positive history of an anomaly in the family, low birth weight, and prematurity were significantly associated with higher frequency of CAs (P<0.05), with non-significant differences for maternal age and the sex of the neonates. The current study highlights the prevalence of congenital anomalies in one year in Zagazig University Hospital. It revealed a high prevalence of congenital anomalies in our locality and stressed the importance of carrying out a thorough clinical examination of all neonates at birth. PMID:23667734

  19. Clinico-bacteriological profile of primary pyodermas in Kashmir: a hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Y J; Hassan, I; Bashir, S; Farhana, A; Maroof, P

    2016-03-01

    Pyodermas are a common group of infectious dermatological conditions on which few studies have been conducted. This study aimed to characterise the clinical and bacteriological profile of pyodermas, and to determine the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in primary pyodermas in a dermatology outpatient department in Kashmir. Methods We conducted a hospital based cross-sectional study in the outpatient Department of Dermatology, Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Leprosy of Shri Maharaja Hari Singh Hospital, Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir, India. Patients presenting with primary pyodermas were included in the study. A detailed history and complete physical and cutaneous examination was carried out along with microbiological testing to find aetiological microorganisms and their respectiveantimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing, including that for methicillin resistance, was carried out by standard methods as outlined in the current Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results In total, 110 patients were included; the age of the study population ranged from 3 to 65 years (mean age 28 years); 62% were male. Poor personal hygiene was noted in 76 (69%). Furunculosis (56; 51%) was the most common clinical presentation. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in 89 (81%) of cases, and MRSA formed 54/89 (61%) of Staphylococcus aureus isolates. All MRSA strains were sensitive to vancomycin. Conclusion The prevalence of MRSA was high in this sample of communityacquired primary pyodermas. It is therefore important to monitor the changing trends in bacterial infection and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and to formulate a definite antibiotic policy which may be helpful in decreasing the incidence of MRSA infection.

  20. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: survival in population based and hospital based cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Mapel, D.; Hunt, W.; Utton, R.; Baumgartner, K.; Samet, J.; Coultas, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—To ascertain whether findings from hospital based clinical series can be extended to patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in the general population, the survival of patients with IPF in a population based registry was compared with that of a cohort of patients with IPF treated at major referral hospitals and the factors influencing survival in the population based registry were identified.
METHODS—The survival of 209 patients with IPF from the New Mexico Interstitial Lung Disease Registry and a cohort of 248 patients with IPF who were participating in a multicentre case-control study was compared. The determinants of survival for the patients from the Registry were determined using life table and proportional hazard modelling methods.
RESULTS—The median survival times of patients with IPF in the Registry and case-control cohorts were similar (4.2 years and 4.1 years, respectively), although the average age at diagnosis of the Registry patients was greater (71.7 years versus 60.6 years, p < 0.01). After adjusting for differences in age, sex, and ethnicity, the death rate within six months of diagnosis was found to be greater in the Registry patients (relative hazard (RH) 6.32, 95% CI 2.19to 18.22) but more than 18 months after diagnosis the death rate was less (RH 0.35, 95% CI 0.19 to 0.66) than in the patients in the case-control study. Factors associated with poorer prognosis in the Registry included advanced age, severe radiographic abnormalities, severe reduction in forced vital capacity, and a history of corticosteroid treatment.
CONCLUSIONS—The adjusted survival of patients with IPF in the general population is different from that of hospital referrals which suggests that selection biases affect the survival experience of referral hospitals.

 PMID:9713446

  1. Local level inequalities in the use of hospital-based maternal delivery in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is global concern with geographical and socio-economic inequalities in access to and use of maternal delivery services. Little is known, however, on how local-level socio-economic inequalities are related to the uptake of needed maternal health care. We conducted a study of relative socio-economic inequalities in use of hospital-based maternal delivery services within two rural sub-districts of South Africa. Methods We used both population-based surveillance and facility-based clinical record data to examine differences in the relative distribution of socio-economic status (SES), using a household assets index to measure wealth, among those needing maternal delivery services and those using them in the Bushbuckridge sub-district, Mpumalanga, and Hlabisa sub-district, Kwa-Zulu Natal. We compared the SES distributions in households with a birth in the previous year with the household SES distributions of representative samples of women who had delivered in hospitals in these two sub-districts. Results In both sub-districts, women in the lowest SES quintile were significantly under-represented in the hospital user population, relative to need for delivery services (8% in user population vs 21% in population in need; p < 0.001 in each sub-district). Exit interviews provided additional evidence on potential barriers to access, in particular the affordability constraints associated with hospital delivery. Conclusions The findings highlight the need for alternative strategies to make maternal delivery services accessible to the poorest women within overall poor communities and, in doing so, decrease socioeconomic inequalities in utilisation of maternal delivery services. PMID:25927416

  2. Profile of HIV infected children: A hospital based study at Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Prakash; Pokharel, Rita; Chitlangia, Mohit; Chaudhary, Shipra

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical, laboratory, epidemiological profiles and outcome in human immunodeficiency virus infected Nepalese children. Methods This was a hospital based prospective study. Human immunodeficiency virus-infected children presenting to pediatric immunology clinic at BP Koirala Institute of Health Sciences were enrolled and followed up. Results Median age at diagnosis among 39 enrolled children was 58 months. All children acquired infection vertically. Unsafe sex (74.4%) and intravenous drug use (25.6%) were the major risk behaviors in fathers. At presentation, 20.8% children were asymptomatic, 54.0% were malnourished, 41.0% were in WHO clinical stage 1, 17.9% were in stage 4, 74.4% were anemic, 17.9% had thrombocytopenia and median CD4 count was 543. Fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, skin eruptions and oral lesions were common presenting features (16.2%, 16.2%, 13.5%, 10.8%, and 8.1% respectively out of 74 features). Tuberculosis (16.0%), chronic otitis media (12.0%), scabies (10.7%), bacterial pneumonia (9.3%) and oropharyngeal candidiasis (6.7%) were common opportunistic infections. Antiretroviral treatment was started in 18 (46.2%) cases at median age of 67 months. Median change in CD4 count at follow up was significantly different between the groups receiving and not receiving antiretroviral treatment (+192 vs. -72; P=0.045). Conclusions Infection in children is vertical. Undernutrition, anemia, fever, lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, skin eruptions, and ear discharge are common presenting features. Opportunistic infections are common and tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection followed by chronic ear infection, scabies, candidiasis and bacterial pneumonia. Timely antiretroviral treatment improves immune response.

  3. How to make a hospital-based wound center financially viable: the Georgetown University Hospital model.

    PubMed

    Attinger, Christopher E; Hoang, Han; Steinberg, John; Couch, Kara; Hubley, Katherine; Winger, Linda; Kugler, Margaret

    2008-11-01

    As the medical need and expenditure for chronic wound care have increased markedly over the past decade, wound centers have grown exponentially throughout the country. They can be community-based or hospital-based, and in either case, can be run by the facility or by a national chain. The wound center's viability is dependent on generated revenue, and its clinical effectiveness is based on a multidisciplinary approach to wound care. By incorporating the wound center into an existing hospital system, one can take advantage of the hospital's resources to effectively treat the more complex patients. Additionally, by focusing on limb salvage, the hospital attracts the critical limb ischemia and other complex patients that often require inpatient admission. We examined the Georgetown University Hospital Center for Wound Healing performance over the first 6 years of operation. Since opening the wound center in 1999, the number of outpatient visits has doubled, the wound care inpatient census has doubled, and the operative cases have increased 3-fold. Because the outpatient segment of the wound center can at best cover its direct cost, it cannot financially justify its existence. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) can increase the revenue to the point where the indirect costs are covered as well and the wound center can be revenue neutral. Due to the medical complexity of limb salvage patients, the inpatient collections are much higher than those of the outpatient wound center and therefore can serve as justification for the latter's financial viability. More importantly, with the wound center in place, the hospital can provide the local/regional community with a comprehensive service that can effectively treat the most challenging wounds. The success is built on a multidisciplinary team approach, use of evidence-based treatment protocols, efficient clinical structure, and a supportive hospital system. The beneficiaries include the patient with a healed wound, the physician with a

  4. Trends and characteristics of injuries in the State of Qatar: hospital-based study.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Abdul Rahman, Yassir S; Abdel Aleem, Eltayib Y; Khalid, Muayad K

    2012-01-01

    Injuries account for a large burden of mortality and morbidity in the State of Qatar. No comprehensive study has been conducted on all types of injuries in the State of Qatar. The objective of this study was to determine the trend in the number, incidence and pattern of injuries in the State of Qatar. This hospital-based study is a retrospective analysis of 53,366 patients treated at the accident and emergency and trauma centres for injuries during the period from 2006 to 2010. Injuries were determined according to the ICD 10 criteria. The details of the entire trauma patients who were involved in occupational/domestic injuries were extracted from the database of the Emergency Medical Services (EMS), Hamad Medical Corporation. Our results demonstrated that the rates of injury remained relatively stable in the State of Qatar over the five-year period. Those most at risk of injury were non-Qatari males who were below 30 years. Road traffic accidents (RTA) (36.7%) followed by falls causing back injuries (11.0%) were the most common types of injuries during the period. Most of the injuries occurred at the head for both males (17.7%) and females (13.5%); this was consistently the case across all of the age groups. The greatest proportion of RTA (21.2%), industrial machinery injuries (16.4%), construction injuries (15.5%), recreational sporting injuries (20.5%) and beach/sea/ocean injuries (15.0%) resulted in head injuries. Intervention efforts need to be aimed at reducing occupational injuries, RTA injuries and work-related hazards in the State of Qatar. PMID:22455450

  5. Support for hospital-based HIV testing and counseling: a national survey of hospital marketing executives.

    PubMed Central

    Boscarino, J A; Steiber, S R

    1995-01-01

    Today, hospitals are involved extensively in social marketing and promotional activities. Recently, investigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimated that routine testing of hospital patients for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) could identify more than 100,000 patients with previously unrecognized HIV infections. Several issues are assessed in this paper. These include hospital support for voluntary HIV testing and AIDS education and the impact that treating AIDS patients has on the hospital's image. Also tested is the hypothesis that certain hospitals, such as for-profit institutions and those outside the AIDS epicenters, would be less supportive of hospital-based AIDS intervention strategies. To assess these issues, a national random sample of 193 executives in charge of hospital marketing and public relations were surveyed between December 1992 and January 1993. The survey was part of an ongoing annual survey of hospitals and included questions about AIDS, health education, marketing, patient satisfaction, and hospital planning. Altogether, 12.4 percent of executives indicated their hospital had a reputation for treating AIDS patients. Among hospitals without an AIDS reputation, 34.1 percent believed developing one would be harmful to the hospital's image, in contrast to none in hospitals that had such a reputation (chi 2 = 11.676, df = 1, P = .0006). Although 16.6 percent did not know if large-scale HIV testing should be implemented, a near majority (47.7 percent) expressed some support. In addition, 15 percent reported that HIV-positive physicians on the hospital's medical staff should not be allowed to practice medicine, but 32.1 percent indicated that they should.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7638335

  6. Association of self–reported frailty with falls and fractures among patients new to dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Cynthia; Shieh, Stephanie; Grimes, Barbara; Chertow, Glenn M.; Dalrymple, Lorien S.; Kaysen, George A.; Kornak, John; Johansen, Kirsten L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although frailty has been linked to higher risk of falls and fracture in the general population, few studies have examined the extent to which frailty is associated with these outcomes among patients with ESRD, who are at particularly high risk for these events. Methods 1,646 patients beginning maintenance hemodialysis in 297 dialysis units throughout the United States from September 2005 to June 2007 were enrolled in the Comprehensive Dialysis Study (CDS), and 1053 Medicare beneficiaries were included in this study. Self-reported frailty defined by patients endorsing two or more of the following: poor physical functioning, exhaustion, or low physical activity. Falls and fractures requiring medical attention were identified through Medicare claims data. We examined the association between frailty and the time to first fall or fracture using the Fine-Gray modification of Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusted for demographics, Quételet’s (body mass) index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, heart failure, and atherosclerosis. Results Seventy-seven percent of patients were frail by self-report. The median length of follow up was 2.5 [1.0, 3.9] years. Crude rates of first medically urgent falls or fractures were 66 and 126 per 1000 person-years in non-frail and self-reported frail participants, respectively. After accounting for demographic factors, comorbidities and the competing risk of death, self-reported frailty was associated with a higher risk of falls or fractures requiring medical attention (hazard ratio 1.60, 95% confidence interval 1.16–2.20). Conclusion Participants reporting frailty experienced nearly twice the risk of medically urgent falls or fractures compared to participants who did not report frailty. PMID:26381744

  7. Demography and survival of patients receiving treatment for chronic renal failure in Australia and New Zealand: report on dialysis and renal transplantation treatment from the Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Disney, A P

    1995-01-01

    There were 7,059 (403 per million) Australian patients and 1,341 (388 per million) New Zealand patients receiving renal replacement treatment at the end of 1992. Fifty-three percent and 50%, respectively, were dependent on a functioning transplant, 87% and 80%, respectively, from a cadaver donor. In Australia the majority of dialysis patients depended on hemodialysis (68%) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) (31%); 68% of patients were dialysing at home or in a satellite (free-standing) facility. The majority (62%) of home dialysis patients used CAPD treatment. In New Zealand there were 44% of patients on hemodialysis; 83% dialyzed at home and the majority (65%) used CAPD treatment. Few dialysis units (five of 71) in Australia were "for-profit" facilities; there was none in New Zealand. Universal health care has been available for renal replacement treatment for 20 years. The annual incidence of new patients increased steadily during the past 10 years, to 61 per million (Australia) and 69 per million (New Zealand) in 1992. There were disproportionate numbers of indigenous Australian Aboriginals (51%), New Zealand Maoris (30%), and Polynesian Pacific Islanders (11%) compared with their distribution in the general population. There was a considerable increase in elderly and diabetic patients during the period from 1983 to 1992: in Australia, 25% of patients were over 65 years of age and 14% of patients were diabetic, and in New Zealand, 16% of patients were over 65 years of age and 25% of patients were diabetic. The renal transplantation rate has remained unchanged since 1983 at 27 per million in Australia, but has increased markedly from 20 to 33 per million in New Zealand. The annual transplantation rate was 20% to 30% of those patients aged 15 to 64 years who were likely to be transplanted. The multifactorial analysis of risk factors for survival of dialysis patients showed age, male gender, CAPD treatment, Aboriginal race, and diabetic or

  8. Phosphate balance in peritoneal dialysis patients: role of ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Granja, Carlos Andres; Juergensen, Peter; Finkelstein, Fredric O

    2009-01-01

    Current National Kidney Foundation's Disease Outcome Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) clinical practice guidelines for bone metabolism and disease in chronic kidney disease (CKD) recommend maintenance of serum phosphorus levels below 5.5 mg/dl. About 40% of patients maintained on chronic peritoneal dialysis (CPD) have phosphate levels above 5.5 mg%. The present study was designed to examine the relative contribution of ultrafiltration to phosphate removal in CPD patients. 24-hour dialysate collections were obtained in 28 CPD patients and the diffuse and ultrafiltration (UF) contributions to phosphate removal determined. 11% of phosphate removal was accounted for by UF. There was a highly significant correlation between UF rate and the % of phosphate removed by UF. The results of this study underscore the importance of individualizing the peritoneal dialysis prescription. PMID:19494614

  9. Tuberculous peritonitis in a child undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, T C; Hsu, J C; Chou, L H; Lee, M L

    1994-01-01

    We present a 13-year-old girl with Arnold-Chiari syndrome and uremia secondary to neurogenic bladder. She had been treated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) for 13 months prior to the development of peritonitis. The patient demonstrated no improvement with a 3-day therapy of intraperitoneal vancomycin and netilmicin. Meanwhile, smear of centrifuged dialysate revealed acid fast bacilli on two occasions. We, then, started anti-TB therapy with oral isoniazid (INAH), rifampin and ethambutal. The symptoms subsided within three days. In the first week, the patient lost her peritoneal ultrafiltration and needed daytime automatic peritoneal dialysis. At the last follow-up examination, 12 months after treatment, she remained well on standard CAPD.

  10. Hemoperitoneum in a peritoneal dialysis patient from a retroperitoneal source.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Cristina; Guest, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Hemoperitoneum in peritoneal dialysis patients is a known but infrequent complication. Hemoperitoneum is more frequent in women because of its association with a variety of gynecologic presentations such as reflux menstruation, ovulation, endometrial tissue implants within the peritoneal cavity (endometriosis), and bleeding follicular cysts. Other intraperitoneal causes of hemoperitoneum include minor catheter or abdominal trauma, vascular anomalies, or hepatic or splenic cysts. Less frequently encountered is a presentation of hemoperitoneum from a retroperitoneal source. These presentations result either from peritoneal inflammation and subsequent peritoneal bleeding or retroperitoneal cavity pathology rupturing into the peritoneal cavity. Here, we present the case of a peritoneal dialysis patient presenting with hemoperitoneum several days after undergoing cardiac catheterization. The catheterization was complicated by a large retroperitoneal hematoma. Details of the case are reported, and other retroperitoneal causes of hemoperitoneum are reviewed.

  11. [Danaparoid sodium for dialysis in heparin-associated thrombocytopenia].

    PubMed

    Ben Ami, R; Rachmimov, R; Berliner, S

    1999-03-01

    Danaparoid sodium is an antithrombin composed of 3 glycosaminoglycans: heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate. Similar to heparin, danaparoid operates by activating antithrombin 3, but does not contain heparin or heparin fragments, and is therefore antigenically distinct. Danaparoid has been advocated as a safe and effective anticoagulant for heparin-associated thrombocytopenia. However, there is little experience in its use as a substitute for heparin in hemodialysis. We report 2 men, aged 82 and 73 years, respectively, who developed thrombocytopenia while undergoing hemodialysis with heparin, and who subsequently underwent successful dialysis with danaparoid. There was a rise in platelet levels in both while receiving danaparoid, and dialysis was completed without hemorrhagic or thrombotic complications. Danaparoid is a safe and effective substitute for heparin, and may be used as an anticoagulant in hemodialysis. PMID:10914239

  12. Chronic peritoneal dialysis in South Asia - challenges and future.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Georgi; Pratap, Balaji; Sankarasubbaiyan, Suresh; Govindan, Priyanka; Nayak, K Shivanand; Sheriff, Rezvi; Naqvi, S A Jaffar

    2008-01-01

    Chronic peritoneal dialysis (PD), especially continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD), is being increasingly utilized in South Asian countries (population of 1.4 billion). There are divergent geopolitical and socioeconomic factors that influence the growth and expansion of CAPD in this region. The majority of the countries in South Asia are lacking in government healthcare system for reimbursing renal replacement therapy. The largest utilization of chronic PD is in India, with nearly 6500 patients on this treatment by the end of 2006. A large majority of patients are doing 2 L exchanges 3 times per day, using glucose-based dialysis solution manufactured in India. Chronic PD is not being utilized in Myanmar, Bhutan, or Seychelles. Affirmative action by the manufacturing industry, medical professionals, government policy makers, and nongovernmental organizations for reducing the cost of chronic PD will enable the growth and utilization of this life-saving therapy. PMID:18178941

  13. [The social environment of patients on peritoneal dialysis].

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Gauna, R; Minguela Pesquera, I; Ocharán-Corcuera, J; Gimeno Martín, I; Chena Alejandro, A

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering chronic illnesses, such as those on replacement therapy, condition and are conditioned by their family, work, and social environment. A continuous psychophysical impairment occurs and alters the hormonal stress mediators from the central nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Such stress situation causes a pathological effect additional to the factors inherent to the disease. Psychological disorders (depression, anxiety, and others) are associated to an increased morbidity, directly acting upon treatment course, subsequent treatment failure, and personal perception of one's own state of health. Individual factors (sex, lifestyles, health and dietary habits, spirituality, financial and family situation, personal skills for coping with disease, cultural level, and social status) condition morbidity in these patients, and the course and complications of peritoneal dialysis. Interactions between healthcare staff and patients on peritoneal dialysis cause these patients to have a more active attitude and a greater involvement in their treatment, which has an impact on the course of disease and clinical status.

  14. ["I believe that dialysis has improved my health status"].

    PubMed

    Chaput, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    For JM, dialysis is not a battle but a life contract which requires a time of adaptation both on a physical as well as an organisational level. After a few months of treatment, he describes here in simple terms how he feels about this new and unknown world, one which he is getting to grips with little by little thanks to the confidence he has in the professionals surrounding with him.

  15. Elevated levels of procoagulant plasma microvesicles in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Burton, James O; Hamali, Hassan A; Singh, Ruchir; Abbasian, Nima; Parsons, Ruth; Patel, Amit K; Goodall, Alison H; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) death remains the largest cause of mortality in dialysis patients, unexplained by traditional risk factors. Endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) are elevated in patients with traditional CV risk factors and acute coronary syndromes while platelet MVs (PMVs) are associated with atherosclerotic disease states. This study compared relative concentrations of circulating MVs from endothelial cells and platelets in two groups of dialysis patients and matched controls and investigated their relative thromboembolic risk. MVs were isolated from the blood of 20 haemodialysis (HD), 17 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and 20 matched controls. Relative concentrations of EMVs (CD144(+ ve)) and PMVs (CD42b(+ ve)) were measured by Western blotting and total MV concentrations were measured using nanoparticle-tracking analysis. The ability to support thrombin generation was measured by reconstituting the MVs in normal plasma, using the Continuous Automated Thrombogram assay triggered with 1µM tissue factor. The total concentration of MVs as well as the measured sub-types was higher in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.05). MVs from HD and PD patients were able to generate more thrombin than the controls, with higher peak thrombin, and endogenous thrombin potential levels (p<0.02). However there were no differences in either the relative quantity or activity of MVs between the two patient groups (p>0.3). Dialysis patients have higher levels of circulating procoagulant MVs than healthy controls. This may represent a novel and potentially modifiable mediator or predictor of occlusive cardiovascular events in these patients. PMID:23936542

  16. Elevated Levels of Procoagulant Plasma Microvesicles in Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burton, James O.; Hamali, Hassan A.; Singh, Ruchir; Abbasian, Nima; Parsons, Ruth; Patel, Amit K.; Goodall, Alison H.; Brunskill, Nigel J.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) death remains the largest cause of mortality in dialysis patients, unexplained by traditional risk factors. Endothelial microvesicles (EMVs) are elevated in patients with traditional CV risk factors and acute coronary syndromes while platelet MVs (PMVs) are associated with atherosclerotic disease states. This study compared relative concentrations of circulating MVs from endothelial cells and platelets in two groups of dialysis patients and matched controls and investigated their relative thromboembolic risk. MVs were isolated from the blood of 20 haemodialysis (HD), 17 peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients and 20 matched controls. Relative concentrations of EMVs (CD144+ ve) and PMVs (CD42b+ ve) were measured by Western blotting and total MV concentrations were measured using nanoparticle-tracking analysis. The ability to support thrombin generation was measured by reconstituting the MVs in normal plasma, using the Continuous Automated Thrombogram assay triggered with 1µM tissue factor. The total concentration of MVs as well as the measured sub-types was higher in both patient groups compared to controls (p<0.05). MVs from HD and PD patients were able to generate more thrombin than the controls, with higher peak thrombin, and endogenous thrombin potential levels (p<0.02). However there were no differences in either the relative quantity or activity of MVs between the two patient groups (p>0.3). Dialysis patients have higher levels of circulating procoagulant MVs than healthy controls. This may represent a novel and potentially modifiable mediator or predictor of occlusive cardiovascular events in these patients. PMID:23936542

  17. Growth in Very Young Children Undergoing Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Azocar, Marta; Borzych, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Büscher, Anja; Edefonti, Alberto; Bilge, Ilmay; Askenazi, David; Leozappa, Giovanna; Gonzales, Claudia; van Hoeck, Koen; Secker, Donna; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Rönnholm, Kai; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Stewart, Heather; Ariceta, Gema; Ranchin, Bruno; Warady, Bradley A.; Schaefer, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Very young children with chronic kidney disease often have difficulty maintaining adequate nutrition, which contributes to the high prevalence of short stature in this population. Characteristics of the dialysis prescription and supplemental feeding via a nasogastric (NG) tube or gastrostomy may improve growth, but this is not well understood. Here, we analyzed data from 153 children in 18 countries who commenced chronic peritoneal dialysis at <24 months of age. From diagnosis to last observation, 57 patients were fed on demand, 54 by NG tube, and 10 by gastrostomy; 26 switched from NG to gastrostomy; and 6 returned from NG to demand feeding. North American and European centers accounted for nearly all feeding by gastrostomy. Standardized body mass index (BMI) uniformly decreased during periods of demand feeding and increased during NG and gastrostomy feeding. Changes in BMI demonstrated significant regional variation: 26% of North American children were obese and 50% of Turkish children were malnourished at last observation (P < 0.005). Body length decreased sharply during the first 6 to 12 months of life and then tended to stabilize. Time fed by gastrostomy significantly associated with higher lengths over time (P < 0.001), but adjustment for baseline length attenuated this effect. In addition, the use of biocompatible peritoneal dialysate and administration of growth hormone independently associated with improved length, even after adjusting for regional factors. In summary, growth and nutritional status vary regionally in very young children treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis. The use of gastrostomy feeding, biocompatible dialysis fluid, and growth hormone therapy associate with improved linear growth. PMID:22021715

  18. ["I believe that dialysis has improved my health status"].

    PubMed

    Chaput, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    For JM, dialysis is not a battle but a life contract which requires a time of adaptation both on a physical as well as an organisational level. After a few months of treatment, he describes here in simple terms how he feels about this new and unknown world, one which he is getting to grips with little by little thanks to the confidence he has in the professionals surrounding with him. PMID:26805645

  19. Respecting shape memory to optimize peritoneal dialysis catheter outcomes.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Victoria R; Shrestha, Badri M; Wilkie, Martin E

    2014-11-01

    Disruption of the shape memory of a peritoneal dialysis catheter at the time of insertion may be a factor responsible for tip migration and catheter dysfunction. The use of postimplantation radiology to confirm the preservation of both the swan neck angle and the inclination angle may have a role in standardizing insertion technique with the potential to reduce the impact of operator variation on catheter outcomes. PMID:25360492

  20. Inflammation and the paradox of racial differences in dialysis survival.

    PubMed

    Crews, Deidra C; Sozio, Stephen M; Liu, Yongmei; Coresh, Josef; Powe, Neil R

    2011-12-01

    African Americans experience a higher mortality rate and an excess burden of ESRD compared with Caucasians in the general population, but among those treated with dialysis, African Americans typically survive longer than Caucasians. We examined whether differences in inflammation may explain this paradox. We prospectively followed a national cohort of incident dialysis patients in 81 clinics for a median of 3 years (range 4 months to 9.5 years). Among 554 Caucasians and 262 African Americans, we did not detect a significant difference in median CRP between African Americans and Caucasians (3.4 versus 3.9 mg/L). Mortality was significantly lower for African Americans versus Caucasians (34% versus 56% at 5 years); the relative hazard was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9) after adjusting for age, gender, dialysis modality, smoking, body mass index, diabetes, BP, cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, comorbid disease, hemoglobin, albumin, CRP, and IL-6. However, the risk varied by CRP tertile: the relative hazards for African Americans compared with Caucasians were 1.0 (95% CI, 0.7 to 1.4), 0.7 (95% CI, 0.4 to 1.3), and 0.5 (95% CI, 0.3 to 0.8) in the lowest, middle, and highest tertiles, respectively. We obtained similar results when we accounted for transplantation as a competing event, and we examined mortality across tertiles of IL-6. In summary, racial differences in survival among dialysis patients are not present at low levels of inflammation but are large at higher levels. Differences in inflammation may explain, in part, the racial paradox of ESRD survival. PMID:22021717

  1. [Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis in schizophrenia. Experimentation in 3 cases].

    PubMed

    Sichel, J P; Baldauf, A; Horber, M; Wasser, P; Marichal, J F; Faller, B

    1981-01-01

    The authors report their experience in using Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (C.A.P.D.), in the treatment of chronic schizophrenia. This attempt refers to studies which confirm any role of endorphins in the origin of schizophrenia. Consecutively to american authors who found endorphins (molecular weight 3 300) in the dialysat of hemodialysed schizophrenics, they choose C.A.P.D. This continue technic of dialysis is more efficient than hemodialysis in removal of substances which molecular weight is between 1 500 and 5 000. This technic was used in 3 chronic schizophrenics: the disease has developed since 6 to 17 years and all the previous treatments failed. The duration of C.A.P.D. was 3 to 6 months. The only complication was one episode of inflammation of the peritoneum during 14 months of dialysis. Followed by the same staff with the AMDP 3 scale, the psychiatric evolution includes: --improvement and relapse in 2 patients (but we have to consider the difficulties of socioprofessional rehabilitation of these long term patients); --"clinical recovery" (17 months) in the third patient. The incidence of mothering and institutionalism is not negligible. Dosage of Met-enkephalin and beta-endorphin by radioimmunoassay in the drained dialysat did not show any difference between schizophrenics and the reference chronic renal patient. The results obtained with C.A.P.D. are not very satisfactory so far. But further research especially on the role of endorphins in schizophrenia and on their analysis technics in the body fluids perhaps will allow to treat schizophrenia again by dialysis.

  2. Mycobacterium fortuitum peritonitis associated with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, G L; Hall, G S; Schreiber, M J

    1986-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum has been isolated from skin and soft tissue lesions with increasing frequency. Rarely, however, has it been a documented cause of peritonitis in patients receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. We report here the second such case and discuss both the possibility of M. fortuitum or similar organisms as one cause of "sterile" peritonitis in this patient population and the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing of such isolates. PMID:3700629

  3. An Overview of Regular Dialysis Treatment in Japan (As of 31 December 2013).

    PubMed

    Masakane, Ikuto; Nakai, Shigeru; Ogata, Satoshi; Kimata, Naoki; Hanafusa, Norio; Hamano, Takayuki; Wakai, Kenji; Wada, Atsushi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2015-12-01

    A nationwide survey of 4325 dialysis facilities was conducted at the end of 2013, among which 4268 (98.7%) responded. The number of new dialysis patients was 38,095 in 2013. Since 2008, the number of new dialysis patients has remained almost the same without any marked increase or decrease. The number of dialysis patients who died in 2013 was 30,751. The dialysis patient population has been growing every year in Japan; it was 314,438 at the end of 2013. The number of dialysis patients per million at the end of 2013 was 2470. The crude death rate of dialysis patients in 2013 was 9.8%. The mean age of new dialysis patients was 68.7 years and the mean age of the entire dialysis patient population was 67.2 years. The most common primary cause of renal failure among new dialysis patients was diabetic nephropathy (43.8%). The actual number of new dialysis patients with diabetic nephropathy has almost been unchanged for the last few years. Diabetic nephropathy was also the most common primary disease among the entire dialysis patient population (37.6%), followed by chronic glomerulonephritis (32.4%). The percentage of dialysis patients with diabetic nephropathy has been increasing continuously, whereas the percentage of dialysis patients with chronic glomerulonephritis has been decreasing. The number of patients who underwent hemodiafiltration (HDF) at the end of 2013 was 31,371, a marked increase from that in 2012. This number is more than twice that at the end of 2011 and approximately 1.5 times the number at the end of 2012. In particular, the number of patients who underwent online HDF increased approximately fivefold over the last 2 years. Among 151,426 dialysis patients with primary causes of renal failure other than diabetic nephropathy, 10.8% had a history of diabetes. Among those with a history of diabetes, 26.8% used glycoalbumin as an indicator of blood glucose level; and 33.0 and 27.6% were administered insulin and dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor

  4. Fluid mechanics and clinical success of central venous catheters for dialysis--answers to simple but persisting problems.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen R

    2007-01-01

    Over 60% of patients initiating chronic hemodialysis in the United States have a chronic central venous catheter (CVC) as their first blood access device. Although it would be better if these patients started dialysis with fistulas, the CVC is used because it is a reliable and relatively safe method for obtaining blood access over a period of months. Drawing blood from a vein at 300-400 ml/minute is a relatively delicate and somewhat unpredictable process, and there is always a tendency for the vein wall to draw over the arterial tip and obstruct flow. Several methods have been employed to minimize this problem and maximize blood flow, and differing catheter designs have resulted. With all of the different catheter designs now on the market, it is natural to ask what is the logic of different designs. Moreover, in the absence of many direct comparative studies it is natural to ask whether one design is really better than another. There is some misinformation regarding catheter design and function. The following is a list of 10 frequently asked questions In this review, the hydraulic features of CVC are discussed and explained, and logical answers are provided for the following questions: 1. Why do ''D'' catheters flow better than concentric or side by side catheters? 2. Why are all catheters about the same diameter? Does making them bigger really decrease the resistance to flow? 3. Why might a split tip catheter flow better than a solid body catheter? 4. What happens to injections of lock solution at catheter volume? 5. What's better-numerous side holes or none? 6. Why does blood rise into some internal jugular catheters over time, displacing the lock solution? 7. How can a little kink (or stenosis) decrease flow so much? 8. Where should the tips be placed-superior vena cava or right atrium? 9. Which is really better, splitsheath or over-the-wire placement? 10. Which dialysis access has a lower complication rate--CVC or arteriovenous (AV) graft? There remain

  5. A baseline study of pediatric dialysis in Texas.

    PubMed

    Tai, T W; Kalia, A

    2001-12-01

    This study provides a cross-sectional view of the management of 94 Texas children with end-stage renal disease in 1996 and serves as a point of comparison for future changes in management practice. Data collected in 6 pediatric and 18 adult dialysis facilities in Texas revealed that a greater proportion of younger pediatric patients received peritoneal dialysis (PD). Patients on PD had a significantly lower serum albumin level than those on hemodialysis (HD). HD and PD patients were 2.3 and 1.7 standard deviation scores (SDS) below the average height of the age- and gender-matched populations, respectively. There was no significant difference in hematocrit, use of growth hormone, parathyroid hormone level, weight SDS, or bone age by treatment modality. However, patients dialyzed in pediatric facilities were more likely to receive growth hormone and to be regularly evaluated for Tanner stage and bone age than those in adult facilities. Measurement of creatinine clearance as a measure of adequacy of PD in young children was not a common practice. Instead pediatric nephrologists tended to rely more on anthropometric measurements, developmental maturation, and serum albumin to assess adequacy. Opportunities remain to maximize the growth potential and to develop standards for the adequacy of dialysis in the younger patient.

  6. Medicare Advantage associated with lower mortality for incident dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Steven M; Sibbel, Scott; Colson, Carey; Hunt, Abigail; Nissenson, Allen R; Krishnan, Mahesh

    2015-12-01

    Physicians across the care continuum are increasingly aligned around the belief that coordinated care can improve patient outcomes. As the principal caregivers for one of the most medically fragile patient groups in healthcare, nephrologists are especially attuned to the potential value of integrated care. Medicare Advantage (MA) offers one way to test this hypothesis. By law, end-stage renal disease patients currently cannot enroll into an MA plan, but if they develop ESRD while in such a plan, they may continue to be enrolled. The contrast between these patients and their counterparts who carry Medicare fee for service (MFFS) thereby represents a natural experiment that affords an opportunity to examine whether enrollment in a coordinated care system may improve outcomes. In order to promote (unbiased) comparison of patients in a non-randomized context, we propensity score-matched incident dialysis patients enrolled in MA versus those in MFFS. The data demonstrate that patients who were enrolled in an MA plan upon initiation of dialysis had a 9% lower mortality rate than their MFFS counterparts. This beneficial association of MA enrollment was found to be sustained over the first two years of dialysis treatment.

  7. Damage of the endothelial glycocalyx in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vlahu, Carmen A; Lemkes, Bregtje A; Struijk, Dirk G; Koopman, Marion G; Krediet, Raymond T; Vink, Hans

    2012-11-01

    Damage to the endothelial glycocalyx, which helps maintain vascular homeostasis, heightens the sensitivity of the vasculature to atherogenic stimuli. Patients with renal failure have endothelial dysfunction and increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but the state of the endothelial glycocalyx in these patients is unknown. Here, we used Sidestream Darkfield imaging to detect changes in glycocalyx dimension in dialysis patients and healthy controls from in vivo recordings of the sublingual microcirculation. Dialysis patients had increased perfused boundary region and perfused diameters, consistent with deeper penetration of erythrocytes into glycocalyx, indicating a loss of glycocalyx barrier properties. These patients also had higher serum levels of the glycocalyx constituents hyaluronan and syndecan-1 and increased hyaluronidase activity, suggesting the shedding of these components. Loss of residual renal function had no influence on the imaging parameters but did associate with greater shedding of hyaluronan in blood. Furthermore, patients with higher levels of inflammation had more significant damage to the glycocalyx barrier. In conclusion, these data suggest that dialysis patients have an impaired glycocalyx barrier and shed its constituents into blood, likely contributing to the sustained endothelial cell activation observed in ESRD.

  8. Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome: A preventable fatal acute complication.

    PubMed

    Mah, D Y; Yia, H J; Cheong, W S

    2016-04-01

    Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS) is a neurological disorder with varying severity that is postulated to be associated with cerebral oedema. We described a case of DDS resulting in irreversible brain injury and death following acute haemodialysis. A 13-year-old male with no past medical history and weighing 30kg, presented to hospital with severe urosepsis complicated by acute kidney injury (Creatinine 1422mmol/L; Urea 74.2mmol/L, Potassium 6.3mmol/L, Sodium 137mmol/L) and severe metabolic acidosis (pH 6.99, HC03 1.7mmol/L). Chest radiograph was normal. Elective intubation was done for respiratory distress. Acute haemodialysis performed due to refractory metabolic acidosis. Following haemodialysis, he became hypotensive which required inotropes. His Riker's score was low with absence of brainstem reflexes after withholding sedation. CT Brain showed generalised cerebral oedema consistent with global hypoxic changes involving the brainstem. The symptoms of DDS are caused by water movement into the brain causing cerebral oedema. Two theories have been proposed: reverse osmotic shift induced by urea removal and a fall in cerebral intracellular pH. Prevention is the key to the management of DDS. It is important to identify high risk patients and haemodialysis with reduced dialysis efficacy and gradual urea reduction is recommended. Patients who are vulnerable to DDS should be monitored closely. Low efficiency haemodialysis is recommended. Acute peritoneal dialysis might be an alternative option, but further studies are needed. PMID:27326954

  9. The need for dialysis in Haiti: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Exantus, Judith; Desrosiers, Florence; Ternier, Alexandra; Métayer, Audie; Abel, Gérard; Buteau, Jean-Hénold

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization reports, nowadays burden of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is well documented. The high prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, which are the main causes of CKD, is a big concern in the world health scenario. These NCD can progress slowly to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the low-middle income countries (LMIC) like Haiti are not left unscathed by this worldwide scourge. Several well-known public health issues prevalent in Haiti such as acute diarrheal infections, malaria, tuberculosis, cholera, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), can also impair the function of the kidney. Dialysis, a form of renal replacement therapy (RRT), represents a life-saving therapy for all patients affected with impaired kidney. In Haiti, few patients have access to health insurance or disability financial support. Considering that seventy-two percent (72%) of Haitians live with less than USD 2 per day, survival with CKD can be quite stressful for them. Data on the weight of the dialysis and its management are scarce. Addressing the need for dialysis in Haiti is an important component in decision-making and planning processes in the health sector. This paper is intended to bring forth discussion on the use of this type of renal replacement therapy in Haiti: the past, the present, and the challenges it presents. We will also make some recommendations in order to manage this serious problem.

  10. Effect of Hurricane Katrina on the mortality of dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kutner, Nancy G; Muntner, Paul; Huang, Yijian; Zhang, Rebecca; Cohen, Andrew J; Anderson, Amanda H; Eggers, Paul W

    2009-10-01

    To investigate whether Hurricane Katrina's landfall in August 2005 resulted in excess mortality, we conducted a cohort study of patients who started dialysis between January 2003 and late August 2005 and who received treatment at 94 Katrina-affected clinics in the area. Survival, regardless of patient location after the storm, was followed through February 2006. In adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, Hurricane Katrina (time-varying indicator) was not significantly associated with mortality risk for patients from regions of the Gulf Coast affected by Katrina or those from a subset of 40 New Orleans clinics. Subgroup analyses indicated no significant increased mortality risk by race, income status, or dialysis modality. Sensitivity analyses indicated no significant increased mortality risk for patients from clinics closed for 10 days or longer, patients in their first 90 days of dialysis, or patients not evacuated from the affected areas. Patients remaining in the New Orleans area may have been more vulnerable due to age and comorbidities; however, the change in their mortality risk in the month following the storm was not statistically significant. We suggest that disaster-related education for patients must be ongoing, and that each disaster may present a different set of circumstances and challenges that will require unanticipated response efforts.

  11. The need for dialysis in Haiti: dream or reality?

    PubMed

    Exantus, Judith; Desrosiers, Florence; Ternier, Alexandra; Métayer, Audie; Abel, Gérard; Buteau, Jean-Hénold

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization reports, nowadays burden of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is well documented. The high prevalence of noncommunicable diseases (NCD) such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity, which are the main causes of CKD, is a big concern in the world health scenario. These NCD can progress slowly to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the low-middle income countries (LMIC) like Haiti are not left unscathed by this worldwide scourge. Several well-known public health issues prevalent in Haiti such as acute diarrheal infections, malaria, tuberculosis, cholera, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), can also impair the function of the kidney. Dialysis, a form of renal replacement therapy (RRT), represents a life-saving therapy for all patients affected with impaired kidney. In Haiti, few patients have access to health insurance or disability financial support. Considering that seventy-two percent (72%) of Haitians live with less than USD 2 per day, survival with CKD can be quite stressful for them. Data on the weight of the dialysis and its management are scarce. Addressing the need for dialysis in Haiti is an important component in decision-making and planning processes in the health sector. This paper is intended to bring forth discussion on the use of this type of renal replacement therapy in Haiti: the past, the present, and the challenges it presents. We will also make some recommendations in order to manage this serious problem. PMID:25672966

  12. Relationship of aluminum to neurocognitive dysfunction in chronic dialysis patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sprague, S.M.; Corwin, H.L.; Tanner, C.M.; Wilson, R.S.; Green, B.J.; Goetz, C.G.

    1988-10-01

    Aluminum has been proposed as the causative agent in dialysis encephalopathy syndrome. We prospectively assessed whether other, less severe, neuropsychologic abnormalities were also associated with aluminum. A total of 16 patients receiving chronic dialytic therapy were studied. The deferoxamine infusion test (DIT) was used to assess total body aluminum burden. Neurologic function was evaluated by quantitative measures of asterixis, myoclonus, motor strength, and sensation. Cognitive function was assessed by measures of dementia, memory, language, and depression. There were four patients with a positive DIT (greater than 125 micrograms/L increment in serum aluminum) that was associated with an increase in the number of neurologic abnormalities observed, as well as an increase in severity of myoclonus, asterixis, and lower extremity weakness. Patients with a positive DIT also showed significant impairment in memory; however, no differences were noted on tests of dementia, depression, or language. There was no significant correlation between sex, age, presence of diabetes, mode of dialysis, years of chronic renal failure, years of dialysis or years of aluminum ingestion and any neurologic or neurobehavioral measurement, serum aluminum level, or DIT. These changes may represent early aluminum-associated neurologic dysfunction.

  13. Wet or dry in dialysis--can new technologies help?

    PubMed

    Kooman, Jeroen P; van der Sande, Frank M; Leunissen, Karel M L

    2009-01-01

    Whereas clinical assessment remains the mainstay of estimating dry weight in dialysis patients, subtle over- and under-hydration may remain undetected, which may result in increased short- and long-term morbidity. Various technological tools have been developed to aid the clinician in the assessment of fluid state in dialysis patients. Chest X-ray is useful in clinical management, but does not fulfill the need for rapid, noninvasive bedside testing. Vena cava echography provides a reliable estimation of right atrial pressure and was shown to be useful in the clinical management of dialysis patients, but the timing of measurement is of critical importance. New developments in bioimpedance techniques hold great promise for the routine application of this technique in the assessment and follow-up of hydration state. Cardiac biomarkers have a strong prognostic value, and may reflect overhydration indirectly because of its effect on left ventricular stress. Blood volume monitoring as a tool to assess dry weight needs further validation and standardization. Summarizing technological tools may certainly aid the clinician in the assessment of fluid state, but should always be interpreted in the clinical context of the patient. Controlled studies are needed to definitively establish the role of technological tools in detecting dry weight.

  14. Intracellular dialysis disrupts Zn2+ dynamics and enables selective detection of Zn2+ influx in brain slice preparations.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Isamu; West, Adrian K; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    We examined the impact of intracellular dialysis on fluorescence detection of neuronal intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation. Comparison between two dialysis conditions (standard; 20 min, brief; 2 min) by standard whole-cell clamp revealed a high vulnerability of intracellular Zn(2+) buffers to intracellular dialysis. Thus, low concentrations of zinc-pyrithione generated robust responses in neurons with standard dialysis, but signals were smaller in neurons with short dialysis. Release from oxidation-sensitive Zn(2+) pools was reduced by standard dialysis, when compared with responses in neurons with brief dialysis. The dialysis effects were partly reversed by inclusion of recombinant metallothionein-3 in the dialysis solution. These findings suggested that extensive dialysis could be exploited for selective detection of transmembrane Zn(2+) influx. Different dialysis conditions were then used to probe responses to synaptic stimulation. Under standard dialysis conditions, synaptic stimuli generated significant FluoZin-3 signals in wild-type (WT) preparations, but responses were almost absent in preparations lacking vesicular Zn(2+) (ZnT3-KO). In contrast, under brief dialysis conditions, intracellular Zn(2+) transients were very similar in WT and ZnT3-KO preparations. This suggests that both intracellular release and transmembrane flux can contribute to intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation after synaptic stimulation. These results demonstrate significant confounds and potential use of intracellular dialysis to investigate intracellular Zn(2+) accumulation mechanisms. PMID:23517525

  15. Effect of magnesium on nerve conduction velocity during regular dialysis treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Laura W.; Lenman, J. A. R.; Stewart, W. K.

    1972-01-01

    Serial nerve conduction velocities in the peroneal and ulnar nerves have been measured in 10 patients on regular dialysis treatment over a three year period. Each patient alternated between phases on dialysis with magnesium-containing dialysate (1·5-1·7 m-equiv/l.) and phases on `magnesium-free' dialysate (0·2 m-equiv/l.). Plasma magnesium concentrations were high both pre- and post-dialysis during magnesium-containing dialysis, and normal to low on magnesium-free dialysis. All patients had defects in nerve conduction, mainly asymptomatic. Increases in nerve conduction velocity coincided with magnesium-free dialysis, and decreases occurred when the patients reverted to magnesium-containing dialysate. The significance of the correlation by the sign test was P<0·0005. It is concluded that extracellular magnesium levels can influence the rate of nerve conduction in vivo. PMID:4338446

  16. Kidney function decline after a non-dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury is associated with higher long-term mortality in critically ill survivors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The adverse consequences of a non-dialysis-requiring acute kidney injury (AKI) are unclear. This study aimed to assess the long-term prognoses for critically ill patients experiencing a non-dialysis-requiring AKI. Methods This retrospective observational cohort study investigated non-dialysis-requiring AKI survivors in surgical intensive care units between January 2002 and June 2010. All longitudinal post-discharge serum creatinine measurements and information regarding end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and death were collected. We assessed the long-term outcomes of chronic kidney disease (CKD), ESRD and all-cause mortality beyond discharge. Results Of the 922 identified critically ill patients with a non-dialysis-requiring AKI, 634 (68.8%) patients who survived to discharge were enrolled. A total of 207 patients died after a median follow-up of 700.5 days. The median intervals between the onset of the AKI and the composite endpoints "stage 3 CKD or death", "stage 4 CKD or death", "stage 5 CKD or death", and "ESRD or death" were 685, 1319, 1743, and 2048 days, respectively. This finding shows a steady long-term decline in kidney function after discharge. Using the multivariate Cox proportional hazard model, we found that every 1 mL/min/1.73 m2 decrease from baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of individuals who progressed to stage 3, 4, and 5 CKD increased the risks of long-term mortality by 0.7%, 2.3%, and 4.1%, respectively (all p < 0.05). This result indicates that the mortality risk increased significantly in a graded manner as kidney function declined from the baseline eGFR to advanced stages of CKD during the follow-up period. Conclusions In critically ill patients who survive a non-dialysis-requiring AKI, there is a need for continuous monitoring and kidney function protection beyond discharge. PMID:22789111

  17. Critical Incidents of Nonadherence with Standard Precautions Guidelines Among Community Hospital-based Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Kristi J; Waitzkin, Howard; Beekmann, Susan E; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To identify, categorize, and assess critical incidents of nonadherence to standard precautions. DESIGN Qualitative and quantitative analysis of a written, mail-out survey. SETTING Community hospitals. PARTICIPANTS Statewide stratified random sample of community hospital-based health care workers at risk for blood exposure. MAIN VARIABLE Responses to the question: “Think of an incident during the past year when you didn't adhere to universal precautions. Please describe the situation and why you didn't adhere.” RESULTS Reasons given for not using precautions included: belief that stopping to use standard precautions would have put the patient at risk (22%); using precautions would have interfered with patient care (20%); precautions were not warranted in a specific situation (14%); did not anticipate the potential for exposure (14%); and high job demands that had caused respondent to be in a hurry (11%). Less often, equipment was not available (7%), respondent forgot (6%), respondent thought that the patient did not pose a risk (4%), or the available equipment was not effective (3%). In terms of overall exposure rates, 34% of those who described an incident had experienced a sharps injury during the previous 3 months and 42% had experienced a mucocutaneous exposure. In terms of overall nonadherence, 44% wore gloves less than 100% of the time, while 61% washed their hands less than 100% of the time. Needlestick injuries were lowest among those who had forgotten to use precautions, while mucocutaneous exposures were highest among those who had not anticipated potential exposure while performing the task. Failure to wear gloves routinely was highest among those who said that following precautions interfered with their ability to provide care and among those who believed a particular patient to be low risk; failure to wash hands routinely was also highest among the latter group and lowest among those who said necessary equipment was not available

  18. Arthritis associated with calcium oxalate crystals in an anephric patient treated with peritoneal dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, A.; Ryan, L.M.; McCarty, D.J.

    1988-09-02

    The authors report a case of calcium oxalate arthropathy in a woman undergoing intermittent peritoneal dialysis who was not receiving pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid. She developed acute arthritis, with calcium oxalate crystals in Heberden's and Bouchard's nodes, a phenomenon previously described in gout. Intermittent peritoneal dialysis may be less efficient than hemodialysis in clearing oxalate, and physicians should now consider calcium oxalate-associated arthritis in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis who are not receiving large doses of ascorbic acid.

  19. Measuring residual renal function in dialysis patients: can we dispense with 24-hour urine collections?

    PubMed

    Davenport, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Residual renal function is associated with improved survival and quality of life for dialysis patients. Whereas residual renal function is monitored in peritoneal dialysis patients, many hemodialysis centers simply concentrate on achieving dialyzer urea clearance targets. Accurately quantifying residual renal function from urine collections is arduous. Thus, there is a clinical need to develop alternative methods of assessing residual renal function based on serum testing, especially for patients receiving less than thrice weekly dialysis.

  20. Hurricane Katrina and chronic dialysis patients: better tidings than originally feared?

    PubMed

    Vanholder, Raymond C; Van Biesen, Wim A; Sever, Mehmet S

    2009-10-01

    Besides victims with acute kidney injury, disasters may also affect the destiny of chronic dialysis patients. This Commentary discusses the article by Kutner et al. describing the outcome of chronic dialysis patients who were victims of Hurricane Katrina. The importance of advance disaster plans, including instructions to chronic dialysis patients, is emphasized. In addition, it is expected that specific recommendations, which are currently being prepared, will offer ad hoc advice to rescuers.

  1. Humicola sp. as a Cause of Peritoneal Dialysis-Associated Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Burns, Nathan; Arthur, Ian; Leung, Michael; Ketharanathan, Selva; Sandoval-Denis, Marcelo; Gené, Josepa; Guarro, Josep; Chakera, Aron

    2015-09-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is the renal replacement modality used by ∼20% of patients with end-stage kidney disease (S. McDonald, P. Clayton, and K. Hurst, p. 6.2-6.27, in ANZDATA 2012 Annual Report, 35th ed., 2012). A major complication of peritoneal dialysis is the development of peritonitis. We describe a case of Humicola sp. causing peritoneal dialysis (PD)-associated peritonitis, successfully treated with a prolonged course of antifungal therapy.

  2. Long-term therapy for heart failure with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    McKinnie, J J; Bourgeois, R J; Husserl, F E

    1985-06-01

    This article reports the treatment with continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis of a patient with intractable congestive heart failure secondary to an ischemic cardiomyopathy. Although the use of peritoneal dialysis to treat refractory heart failure is not new, the advent of an effective continuous peritoneal dialysis system has allowed its use over prolonged periods of time. The two-year treatment interval described herein represents the longest reported application of this technique, to the best of our knowledge.

  3. [Prevention of hepatitis in dialysis centers. A catalog of recommendations and suggestions. 3].

    PubMed

    Thieler, H; Schmidt, U

    1979-07-01

    This last of three reports on the prevention of hepatitis in dialysis centres deals with the kind and frequency of desinfection measures in the dialysis area, contains advices to the mode of transfer of patients between dialysis centres and makes demands to the tests of hepatitis-B-antigen and antibodies. Finally proposals concerning the frequency of controls for HBs-antigen and anti-HBs and for the passive immunisation with anti-HBs-enriched immunoglobulin are rendered.

  4. Simple models for fluid transport during peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Waniewski, J; Heimbürger, O; Werynski, A; Lindholm, B

    1996-08-01

    Peritoneal fluid transport can be predicted using different simplified formulas. To evaluate three such models, fluid transport was studied in 38 single six hour dwell studies using standard glucose 1.36% (n = 9), 2.27% (n = 9) and 3.86% (n = 20) dialysis fluids as well as amino acid 2.70% fluid (n = 8) in 33 patients on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Dialysate volume and the peritoneal absorption rate were measured using radioiodinated serum albumin (RISA) as a marker. The dialysate volume over dwell time curves were examined using three mathematical models of fluid transport for solutions with a crystalloid osmotic agent: Model P based on phenomenologically derived exponential function of time (Pyle, 1981), Model OS based on linear relationship between the rate of net volume change, Qv, to the difference of osmolality in dialysate and blood, and Model G based on linear relationship between Qv and the difference of glucose concentration in dialysate and blood. All these models provided a good description of the measured dialysate volume over time curves, however the descriptions with Models OS and G for glucose 3.86% fluid were slightly but significantly less precise. The coefficients of Model OS were stable in time, but the coefficients of Model G and P dependend in general on the time period used for their estimation, especially for glucose 3.86% dialysis fluid. The evaluation of dwell studies with solutions containing amino acid 2.70% (instead of glucose) as osmotic agent, using Model OS and P, showed that the transport coefficients were stable in time and both models provided equally precise descriptions. These results suggested that all three models can be used but models P and OS can be preferred for practical applications such as predictions of fluid transport with alternative cristalloid osmotic agents. Furthermore, we found that the peritoneal barrier for fluid transport may change transiently during exchanges with the standard glucose

  5. Hypomagnesemia Is Associated with Increased Mortality among Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiwei; Zhu, Beixia; Fei, Jinping; Xue, Congping; Wu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hypomagnesemia has been associated with an increase in mortality among the general population as well as patients with chronic kidney disease or those on hemodialysis. However, this association has not been thoroughly studied in patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between serum magnesium concentrations and all-cause and cardiovascular mortalities in peritoneal dialysis patients. Methods This single-center retrospective study included 253 incident peritoneal dialysis patients enrolled between July 1, 2005 and December 31, 2014 and followed to June 30, 2015. Patient’s demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory measurements were collected. Results Of 253 patients evaluated, 36 patients (14.2%) suffered from hypomagnesemia. During a median follow-up of 29 months (range: 4–120 months), 60 patients (23.7%) died, and 35 (58.3%) of these deaths were attributed to cardiovascular causes. Low serum magnesium was positively associated with peritoneal dialysis duration (r = 0.303, p < 0.001) as well as serum concentrations of albumin (r = 0.220, p < 0.001), triglycerides (r = 0.160, p = 0.011), potassium (r = 0.156, p = 0.013), calcium(r = 0.299, p < 0.001)and phosphate (r = 0.191, p = 0.002). Patients in the hypomagnesemia group had a lower survival rate than those in the normal magnesium groups (p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, serum magnesium was an independent negative predictor of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.075, p = 0.011) and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 0.003, p < 0.001), especially in female patients. However, in univariate and multivariate Cox analysis, △Mg(difference between 1-year magnesium and baseline magnesium) was not an independent predictor of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Conclusion Hypomagnesemia was common among peritoneal dialysis patients and was independently associated with all

  6. [Concerning: aging, the beginning of dialysis, the beginning of dependence: repercussions on the psychopathology of the very old dialysis patient].

    PubMed

    Antoine, V; Edy, T; Souid, M; Barthélémy, F; Saint-Jean, O

    2004-01-01

    The incidence of psychopathology, particularly depression, is high in dialysed elderly patients whereas their perceived level of health in the mental domain is similar to that of a non-dialysed and, even younger, population. Although the losses associated with advancing years, chronic disease and then entry into dialysis renders the psyche of elderly people frail, they do not strictly add in negative terms: their psychological reserve or resignation helps very elderly people to tolerate dialysis and its constraints. However, maintaining functional autonomy (ability to provide for one's fundamental needs and preserve leisure activities) while remaining independent to take decisions (particularly in controlling ways of receiving assistance) and preserving close relationships emerge as major determinant factors of the quality of life of very elderly dialysed patients. Added to the dependency due to dialysis, losses in these domains very often represent a turning point by changing the patient's identity, predisposing to the development of relationship problems, leading the patient to question his self-esteem or even resulting in psychological dependency, which itself adversely affects the quality of life. These mechanisms of psychopathology may not hide the possibility of an underlying dementia. PMID:15185555

  7. Health-related quality of life in patients on hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Okpechi, Ikechi G; Nthite, Tebogo; Swanepoel, Charles R

    2013-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, and its treatment imposes a considerable burden on patients and their families. Limitations in everyday activity may worsen the situation and affect the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients with CKD. There are no studies on the HRQOL of dialysis patients in South Africa. We assessed the HRQOL of patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD) and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD) attending the Groote Schuur Hospital renal unit by using the Kidney Disease Quality of Life-Short Form version 1.3 questionnaire. Baseline demographic and clinical details of the participants were recorded. Analysis was performed (unpaired t test and univariate analysis) to compare the HRQOL between HD and PD patients and to identify factors influencing HRQOL. The HRQOL was low but not significantly different between HD and PD patients. In PD patients, the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) significantly contributed to the emotional well-being (r 2 = 0.267; P = 0.01) and alleviation of pain (r 2 = 0.073; P = 0.049); in HD patients also, ESA use was associated with emotional well-being (r 2 = 0.258; P <0.0001) as well as improvement in energy/fatigue (r 2 = 0.390; P <0.0001). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures significantly influenced cognitive function in PD patients (P <0.05). Parathyroid hormone level significantly influenced the physical functioning and energy/fatigue domains in HD patients (P <0.0001). Serum ferritin (r 2 = 0.441; P = 0.002) and level of hemoglobin concentration (r 2 = 0.180; P = 0.006) were significantly associated with the domain role emotional in PD and HD patients, respectively. Although HRQOL is low in dialysis patients in Cape Town, the factors that have been identified to be associated with these scores (such as anemia and hyperparathyroidism) if aggressively managed and corrected may assist in improving patients' HRQOL.

  8. Dialysis buffer with different ionic strength affects the antigenicity of cultured nervous necrosis virus (NNV) suspensions.

    PubMed

    Gye, Hyun Jung; Nishizawa, Toyohiko

    2016-09-01

    Nervous necrosis virus (NNV) belongs to the genus Betanodavirus (Nodaviridae). It is highly pathogenic to various marine fishes. Here, we investigated the antigenicity changes of cultured NNV suspensions during 14days of dialyses using a dialysis tube at 1.4×10(4) molecular weight cut off (MWCO) in three different buffers (Dulbecco's phosphate buffered saline (D-PBS), 15mM Tris-HCl (pH 8.0), and deionized water (DIW)). Total NNV antigen titers of cultured NNV suspension varied depending on different dialysis buffers. For example, total NNV antigen titer during D-PBS dialysis was increased once but then decreased. During Tris-HCl dialysis, it was relatively stable. During dialysis in DIW, total NNV antigen titer was increased gradually. These antigenicity changes in NNV suspension might be due to changes in the aggregation state of NNV particles and/or coat proteins (CPs). ELISA values of NNV suspension changed due to changing aggregates state of NNV antigens. NNV particles in suspension were aggregated at a certain level. These aggregates were progressive after D-PBS dialysis, but regressive after Tris-HCl dialysis. The purified NNV particles self-aggregated after dialysis in D-PBS or in Tris-HCl containing 600mM NaCl, but not after dialysis in Tris-HCl or DIW. Quantitative analysis is merited to determine NNV antigens in the highly purified NNV particles suspended in buffer at low salt condition. PMID:27381060

  9. A Palliative Approach to Dialysis Care: A Patient-Centered Transition to the End of Life

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Alvin H.; Cohen, Lewis M.; Fischer, Michael J.; Germain, Michael J.; Jassal, S. Vanita; Perl, Jeffrey; Weiner, Daniel E.; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2014-01-01

    As the importance of providing patient-centered palliative care for patients with advanced illnesses gains attention, standard dialysis delivery may be inconsistent with the goals of care for many patients with ESRD. Many dialysis patients with life expectancy of <1 year may desire a palliative approach to dialysis care, which focuses on aligning patient treatment with patients’ informed preferences. This commentary elucidates what comprises a palliative approach to dialysis care and describes its potential and appropriate use. It also reviews the barriers to integrating such an approach into the current clinical paradigm of care and existing infrastructure and outlines system-level changes needed to accommodate such an approach. PMID:25104274

  10. Rates of Intentional and Unintentional Nonadherence to Peritoneal Dialysis Regimes and Associated Factors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on expanding home-based dialysis, there is a need to understand adherence outcomes. This study set out to examine the prevalence and predictors of nonadherence among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. A cross sectional sample of 201 peritoneal dialysis patients recruited between 2010–2011 from Singapore General Hospital completed measures of quality of life, medication beliefs, self-efficacy and emotional distress. Nonadherence rates were high; 18% for dialysis, 46% for medication and 78% for diet. Intentional nonadherence was more common for dialysis (p = .03), whereas unintentional nonadherence was more common for medication (p = .002). Multivariate models indicated significant associations for higher education (intermediate vs low OR = 3.18, high vs low OR = 4.70), lower environment quality of life (OR = 0.79), dialysis self-efficacy (OR = 0.80) with dialysis nonadherence; higher education (OR = 2.22), self-care peritoneal dialysis (OR = 3.10), perceived necessity vs concerns over medication (OR = 0.90), self-efficacy (OR = 0.76) with nonadherence to medication. The odds for nonadherence to diet were higher among patients who were younger (OR = 0.96), of Chinese ethnicity (OR = 2.99) and those reporting better physical health (OR = 1.30) and lower self-efficacy (OR = 0.49). Nonadherence is common in peritoneal dialysis. Self-efficacy and beliefs about medication are promising targets for interventions designed to improve adherence. PMID:26919323

  11. Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Lori; Clark, Alexander M

    2012-03-01

    Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease This paper examines home-dialysis decision making in people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) from the perspective of critical realism. CKD programmes focus on patient education for self-management to delay the progression of kidney disease and the preparation and support for renal replacement therapy e.g.) dialysis and transplantation. Home-dialysis has clear health, societal and economic benefits yet service usage is low despite efforts to realign resources and educate individuals. Current research on the determinants of modality selection is superficial and insufficient to capture the complexities embedded in the process of dialysis modality selection. Predictors of home-dialysis selection and the effect of chronic kidney disease educational programmes provide a limited explanation of this experience. A re-conceptualization of the problem is required in order to fully understand this process. The epistemology and ontology of critical realism guides our knowledge and methodology particularly suited for examination of these complexities. This approach examines the deeper mechanisms and wider determinants associated with modality decision making, specifically who chooses home dialysis and under what circumstances. Until more is known regarding dialysis modality decision making service usage of home dialysis will remain low as interventions will be based on inadequate epistemology.

  12. Circulating Angiopoietin-2 Is a Marker for Early Cardiovascular Disease in Children on Chronic Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Rukshana C.; Price, Karen L.; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Todd, Alexandra F.; Wells, David; Deanfield, John; Johnson, Richard J.; Rees, Lesley; Woolf, Adrian S.; Long, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasingly recognised as a complication of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD) even in the absence of diabetes and hypertension. We hypothesized that an alteration in angiopoietin-1 and -2, growth factors which regulate endothelial and vascular function could be involved. We report that the endothelial survival factor, angiopoietin-1 is low in children with pre-dialysis CKD whereas the pro-inflammatory angiopoietin-2 is elevated in children on dialysis. In dialysis patients, angiopoietin-2 positively correlated with time on dialysis, systolic blood pressure, and carotid artery intima media thickness. Elevated angiopoietin-2 levels in dialysis versus pre-dialysis CKD patients were also associated with an anti-angiogenic (high soluble VEGFR-1 and low VEGF-A) and pro-inflammatory (high urate, E-selectin, P-selectin and VCAM-1) milieu. Ang-2 was immunodetected in arterial biopsy samples whilst the expression of VEGF-A was significantly downregulated in dialysis patients. Serum urate correlated with angiopoietin-2 levels in dialysis patients and addition of uric acid was able to induce rapid release of angiopoietin-2 from cultured endothelial cells. Thus, angiopoietin-2 is a marker for cardiovascular disease in children on chronic dialysis and may act as an anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory effector in this context. The possibility that the release of angiopoietin-2 from endothelia is mediated by urate should be explored further. PMID:23409162

  13. Rates of Intentional and Unintentional Nonadherence to Peritoneal Dialysis Regimes and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhen Li; Lee, Vanessa Yin Woan; Kang, Augustine Wee Cheng; Chan, Sally; Foo, Marjorie; Chan, Choong Meng; Griva, Konstadina

    2016-01-01

    With increasing emphasis on expanding home-based dialysis, there is a need to understand adherence outcomes. This study set out to examine the prevalence and predictors of nonadherence among patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis. A cross sectional sample of 201 peritoneal dialysis patients recruited between 2010-2011 from Singapore General Hospital completed measures of quality of life, medication beliefs, self-efficacy and emotional distress. Nonadherence rates were high; 18% for dialysis, 46% for medication and 78% for diet. Intentional nonadherence was more common for dialysis (p = .03), whereas unintentional nonadherence was more common for medication (p = .002). Multivariate models indicated significant associations for higher education (intermediate vs low OR = 3.18, high vs low OR = 4.70), lower environment quality of life (OR = 0.79), dialysis self-efficacy (OR = 0.80) with dialysis nonadherence; higher education (OR = 2.22), self-care peritoneal dialysis (OR = 3.10), perceived necessity vs concerns over medication (OR = 0.90), self-efficacy (OR = 0.76) with nonadherence to medication. The odds for nonadherence to diet were higher among patients who were younger (OR = 0.96), of Chinese ethnicity (OR = 2.99) and those reporting better physical health (OR = 1.30) and lower self-efficacy (OR = 0.49). Nonadherence is common in peritoneal dialysis. Self-efficacy and beliefs about medication are promising targets for interventions designed to improve adherence. PMID:26919323

  14. Financial advantages of operating a skilled nursing unit.

    PubMed

    Fogel, L A

    1994-07-01

    Hospitals may accrue specific financial advantages from the operations of a skilled nursing unit (SNU), such as the ability to allocate some fixed costs to a hospital-based unit that receives cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. The level of reimbursement SNUs receive from Medicare, however, can be optimized by obtaining an exemption or an exception to routine cost limits.

  15. The impact of remifentanil on incidence and severity of postoperative nausea and vomiting in a university hospital-based ambulatory surgery center: a retrospective observation study

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Risa; Sato, Masami; Tanabe, Hiroko; Yazawa, Tomoko; Habara, Toshie; Fukuda, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Ambulatory surgery, including short-stay surgery, has become a common choice in clinical practice. For the success of ambulatory surgery, perioperative care with safe and effective anesthesia and postoperative analgesia, which can reduce the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), is essential. The effect of remifentanil on the occurrence and severity of PONV has not been thoroughly examined, particularly, in an ambulatory surgery setting. Here, we investigate whether remifentanil influences the occurrence and severity of PONV in a university hospital-based ambulatory unit. Methods We retrospectively analyzed a total of 1,765 cases of patients who had undergone general anesthesia at our ambulatory surgery unit. Parameters, such as occurrence and severity of nausea, vomiting or retching, use of antiemetic drugs, amount of postoperative analgesic and patient satisfaction, were extracted from the records and analyzed between the groups that received and not received remifentanil. Results Within 565 patients of the RF group, 39 patients (6.6%) experienced nausea, 7 patients (1.2%) experienced vomiting or retching, and 10 patients (1.8%) were given antiemetic; in addition, the maximum VAS value for nausea was 12.1 mm. In 1,200 patients of the non RF group, 102 patients (8.5%) experienced nausea, 19 patients (1.6%) experienced vomiting or retching, and 34 patients (2.8%) were given antiemetic, and the maximum VAS value was 13.2 mm. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions Our results indicate that remifentanil did not increase the occurrence of PONV in patients within the ambulatory surgery unit. PMID:24023997

  16. Estimating increases in outpatient dialysis costs resulting from scientific and technological advancement.

    PubMed

    Ozminkowski, R J; Hassol, A; Firkusny, I; Noether, M; Miles, M A; Newmann, J; Sharda, C; Guterman, S; Schmitz, R

    1995-04-01

    The Medicare program's base payment rate for outpatient dialysis services has never been adjusted for the effects of inflation, productivity changes, or scientific and technological advancement on the costs of treating patients with end-stage renal disease. In recognition of this, Congress asked the Prospective Payment Assessment Commission to annually recommend an adjustment to Medicare's base payment rate to dialysis facilities. One component of this adjustment addresses the cost-increasing effects of technological change--the scientific and technological advances (S&TA) component. The S&TA component is intended to encourage dialysis facilities to adopt technologies that, when applied appropriately, enhance the quality of patient care, even though they may also increase costs. We found the appropriate increase to the composite payment rate for Medicare outpatient dialysis services in fiscal year 1995 to vary from 0.18% to 2.18%. These estimates depend on whether one accounts for the lack of previous adjustments to the composite rate. Mathematically, the S&TA adjustment also depends on whether one considers the likelihood of missing some dialysis sessions because of illness or hospitalization. The S&TA estimates also allow for differences in the incremental costs of technological change that are based on the varying advice of experts in the dialysis industry. The major contributors to the cost of technological change in dialysis services are the use of twin-bag disconnect peritoneal dialysis systems, automated peritoneal dialysis cyclers, and the new generation of hemodialysis machines currently on the market. Factors beyond the control of dialysis facility personnel that influence the cost of patient care should be considered when payment rates are set, and those rates should be updated as market conditions change. The S&TA adjustment is one example of how the composite rate payment system for outpatient dialysis services can be modified to provide appropriate

  17. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A; Mahamud-ur Rashid; Mahmud, Md Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, R Bradley; Alam, Munirul

    2016-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention. PMID:26728766

  18. Sustained Uptake of a Hospital-Based Handwashing with Soap and Water Treatment Intervention (Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 Days [CHoBI7]): A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    George, Christine Marie; Jung, Danielle S; Saif-Ur-Rahman, K M; Monira, Shirajum; Sack, David A; Mahamud-ur Rashid; Mahmud, Md Toslim; Mustafiz, Munshi; Rahman, Zillur; Bhuyian, Sazzadul Islam; Winch, Peter J; Leontsini, Elli; Perin, Jamie; Begum, Farzana; Zohura, Fatema; Biswas, Shwapon; Parvin, Tahmina; Sack, R Bradley; Alam, Munirul

    2016-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children under 5 years of age globally. The time patients and caregivers spend at a health facility for severe diarrhea presents the opportunity to deliver water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) interventions. We recently developed Cholera-Hospital-Based Intervention for 7 days (CHoBI7), a 1-week hospital-based handwashing with soap and water treatment intervention, for household members of cholera patients. To investigate if this intervention could lead to sustained WASH practices, we conducted a follow-up evaluation of 196 intervention household members and 205 control household members enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of the CHoBI7 intervention 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Compared with the control arm, the intervention arm had four times higher odds of household members' handwashing with soap at a key time during 5-hour structured observation (odds ratio [OR]: 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.61, 8.49) (18% versus 50%) and a 41% reduction in households in the World Health Organization very high-risk category for stored drinking water (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.15, 0.96) (58% versus 34%) 6 to 12 months post-intervention. Furthemore, 71% of observed handwashing with soap events in the intervention arm involved the preparation and use of soapy water, which was promoted during the intervention, compared to 9% of control households. These findings demonstrate that the hospital-based CHoBI7 intervention can lead to significant increases in handwashing with soap practices and improved stored drinking water quality 6 to 12 months post-intervention.

  19. AngioJet Thrombectomy for Occluded Dialysis Fistulae: Outcome Data

    SciTech Connect

    Littler, Peter Cullen, Nicola; Gould, Derek; Bakran, Ali; Powell, Steven

    2009-03-15

    This study evaluates AngioJet thrombectomy of occluded autogenous dialysis fistulae and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts in a UK hemodialysis population. Comparison is made with published data of alternative percutaneous thrombectomy methods. All patients with occluded dialysis fistulae who sought care at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital between October 2006 and June 2008 were included in the study. All patients were treated with the AngioJet Rheolytic Thrombectomy Device (Possis, Minneapolis, MN). Demographics, time of occlusion, adjunctive therapies, complications, and follow-up data have been prospectively recorded. A total of 64 thrombectomy procedures were performed in 48 patients. Forty-four autogenous fistulas were treated in 34 patients (19 brachiocephalic, 8 radiocephalic, and 7 transposed brachiobasilic). Twenty PTFE grafts were treated in 14 patients (9 brachioaxillary, 3 brachiocephalic loop grafts, 1 brachiobasilic, and 1 femoro-femoral). The average length of occlusion was 24 cm. Average time to intervention was 4 days. Immediate primary patency was 91%. Primary patency at 1, 3, and 6 months, respectively, was 71%, 60%, and 37%. Secondary patency at 3, 6, and 12 months was 87%, 77%, and 62%, respectively. Angioplasty was carried out in all procedures. Patients required stent insertion in 34 of the 64 thrombectomies to treat angioplasty-resistant stenoses. Complications included a puncture-site hematoma, and three angioplasty-related vein ruptures in one patient, all treated with covered stent grafts. Two cases of distal brachial arterial embolization were successfully treated by thrombosuction. AngioJet thrombectomy in dialysis access occlusion is safe and effective, comparing favorably with other methods.

  20. Incidence of sleep pattern disturbance in a peritoneal dialysis sample.

    PubMed

    Huyge, L; Locking-Cusolito, H

    2000-01-01

    Our experience and the research literature suggest that sleep pattern disturbance (SPD) is a problem among dialysis patients. The purpose of this study was to describe the scope of sleep problems among willing patients on peritoneal dialysis at a mid-size university teaching hospital. To examine SPD, this descriptive study used a sleep diary that patients completed each morning for a week. Patients were asked to describe sleep latency, perceived difficulty falling asleep, number of arousals, use of sedatives, whether they awoke feeling rested, sleep efficiency, and factors preventing or inducing sleep. The sample consisted of 22 respondents whose average age was 60.5 years. With respect to the variables included in the sleep diary, respondents reported: 82% sleep latency of 40 minutes or less; of 154 nights studied, difficulty falling asleep on 41 (27%) of the nights; 82% experience of 15 or fewer sleep arousals per week (that is, approximately 2 arousals per night); 64% no use of sedatives during the week; 55% experience of feeling rested on awakening 5 or more mornings per week; and 55% experience of sleep efficiency above 80%. Of the factors reported to interfere with sleep, treatment-related factors such as alarms and other machine-related problems were, by far, the most predominant, reported by 82% of respondents. These findings compare very favorably with reports in the literature noting the incidence of SPD among dialysis patients to be as high as 73%. Information regarding factors that are barriers or facilitators to sleep have formed the basis of some practice changes within our program to address this distressing problem.