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Sample records for hospitalizados con tuberculosis

  1. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? TB ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  2. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Teens > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... Duration When to Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis TB Basics Tuberculosis (also known as "TB") is ...

  3. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dheda, Keertan; Barry, Clifton E; Maartens, Gary

    2016-03-19

    Although the worldwide incidence of tuberculosis has been slowly decreasing, the global disease burden remains substantial (∼9 million cases and ∼1·5 million deaths in 2013), and tuberculosis incidence and drug resistance are rising in some parts of the world such as Africa. The modest gains achieved thus far are threatened by high prevalence of HIV, persisting global poverty, and emergence of highly drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis is also a major problem in health-care workers in both low-burden and high-burden settings. Although the ideal preventive agent, an effective vaccine, is still some time away, several new diagnostic technologies have emerged, and two new tuberculosis drugs have been licensed after almost 50 years of no tuberculosis drugs being registered. Efforts towards an effective vaccine have been thwarted by poor understanding of what constitutes protective immunity. Although new interventions and investment in control programmes will enable control, eradication will only be possible through substantial reductions in poverty and overcrowding, political will and stability, and containing co-drivers of tuberculosis, such as HIV, smoking, and diabetes.

  4. Your Child with Tuberculosis: A Guide for Parents and Guardians = Su Nino con Tuberculosis: Un Manual para Los Padres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amaro, Rodolfo

    Presented in both Spanish and English versions, this booklet is a guide for parents and guardians of children who have tuberculosis (TB). The booklet is organized around specific questions covering topics such as the causes and spread of TB, demographics of TB sufferers, detecting and curing TB, TB treatment and medications, research on the…

  5. Pros and cons of BCG vaccination in countries with low incidence of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tala, E O; Tala-Heikkilä, M M

    1994-07-01

    Preventive bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination, together with case finding and effective chemotherapy, has formed an integral part of the tuberculosis (TB) control program in most countries. In some low-incidence countries the balance of prevention has been more on the side of chemoprophylaxis than of BCG vaccination. The time clearly has come when the strategy of mass BCG vaccination no longer is indicated medically, nor is it cost-effective. The pros and cons of the programs need to be critically evaluated against the present epidemiological background, taking into account the facts that TB, the killer disease, is recovering strength, human immunodeficiency virus infection is on the increase, and multidrug-resistant TB has changed the outcome of this previously fully curable disease. Although no longer appropriate for mass programs, BCG vaccination still should be considered for the protection of selected risk groups in low-incidence countries. The overall efficacy may be of the order 50% to 80%, but the variation is great. Therefore, further research urgently is needed on the effectiveness of BCG as an intervention in local TB programs.

  6. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-03-10

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  7. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2017-02-22

    Essential facts Tuberculosis (TB) is an infection caused by a bacterium, mycobacterium tuberculosis. While it can affect any part of the body, only pulmonary TB is infectious. According to the charity TB Alert, there were 5,758 cases of TB in the UK in 2015 and 39% of them were in London. This represented a fall from a peak of 8,919 cases in 2011. Left untreated, TB is life-threatening, but is usually curable with antibiotics. The sooner it is diagnosed and treated, the better, both for the person's health and in preventing them from passing the infection on to others.

  8. Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Karen R

    2017-02-07

    This issue provides a clinical overview of tuberculosis, focusing on screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of additional science writers and physician writers.

  9. Tuberculosis screening in immigrants from high-prevalence countries: interview first or chest radiograph first? A pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Mor, Zohar; Leventhal, Alex; Diacon, Andreas H; Finger, Rebekka; Schoch, Otto D

    2013-04-01

    Immigration from high tuberculosis (TB) prevalence countries has a substantial impact on the epidemiology of TB in receiving countries with low TB incidence. Cross-border migration offers an ideal opportunity for active case finding that will result in a lower caseload in the host country and a reduced spread of disease to both the indigenous and migrant populations. Screening strategies can start 'offshore', thereby indirectly assisting and empowering public health systems in the source countries, or be performed at ports of entry with or without long-term engagement of 'onshore' facilities and systems to provide either preventive therapy or surveillance for reactivation of latent TB. The chest radiograph seems to be playing a key role in this process, but questions remain regarding when, where and in whom radiographs are best done for optimal yield and cost-effectiveness, and with what other tests they might best be combined to further increase the usefulness of transborder TB control.

  10. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Tuberculosis (TB) Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious and often ... are drug resistant. Why Is the Study of Tuberculosis (TB) a Priority for NIAID? Tuberculosis is one ...

  11. Cutaneous Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Amylynne; Penrose, Carolin

    2009-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis occurs rarely, despite a high and increasing prevalence of tuberculosis worldwide. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterrium bovis, and the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccine can cause tuberculosis involving the skin. Cutaneous tuberculosis can be acquired exogenously or endogenously and present as a multitude of differing clinical morphologies. Diagnosis of these lesions can be difficult, as they resemble many other dermatological conditions that are often primarily considered. Further, microbiological confirmation is poor, despite scientific advances, such as the more frequent use of polymerase chain reaction. The authors report a case that illustrates the challenges faced by dermatologists when considering a diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis. PMID:20725570

  12. Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB) in animals and humans may result from exposure to bacilli within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (i.e., M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum, M. pinnipedii, M. microti, M. caprae, or M. canetti). Mycobacterium bovis is the species most often isolated from tuberculous catt...

  13. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Training Home Conditions Tuberculosis (TB) Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Clinical Trials For more than ...

  14. [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ketata, W; Rekik, W K; Ayadi, H; Kammoun, S

    2015-01-01

    Each year, there are more than eight million new cases of tuberculosis and 1.3 million deaths. There is a renewed interest in extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis as its relative frequency increases. Among extrapulmonary organs, pleura and lymph nodes are the most common. Their diagnosis is often difficult and is based on clinical, radiological, bacteriological and histological findings. Extrapulmonary lesions are paucibacillary and samplings, in most cases, difficult to obtain, so diagnosis is often simply presumptive. Nucleic acid amplification tests, which are fast and specific, have greatly facilitated the diagnosis of some forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. However, their sensitivity is poor and a negative test does not eliminate the diagnosis. Treatment is the same as for pulmonary forms, but its duration is nine to 12 months for central nervous system and for bone tuberculosis. Corticosteroids are indicated in meningeal and pericardial localizations. Complementary surgery is used for certain complicated forms.

  15. [Extrapulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mazza-Stalder, J; Nicod, L; Janssens, J-P

    2012-04-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis represents an increasing proportion of all cases of tuberculosis reaching 20 to 40% according to published reports. Extrapulmonary TB is found in a higher proportion of women, black people and immunosuppressed individuals. A significant proportion of cases have a normal chest X-Ray at the time of diagnosis. The most frequent clinical presentations are lymphadenitis, pleuritis and osteoarticular TB. Peritoneal, urogenital or meningeal tuberculosis are less frequent, and their diagnosis is often difficult due to the often wide differential diagnosis and the low sensitivity of diagnostic tests including cultures and genetic amplification tests. The key clinical elements are reported and for each form the diagnostic yield of available tests. International therapeutic recommendations and practical issues are reviewed according to clinical presentation.

  16. MULTIFOCAL TUBERCULOSIS VERRUCOSA CUTIS

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Jiby; Mathai, Ashok Thomas; Prasad, P V S; Kaviarasan, P K

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been a well-known affliction of human kind, since antiquity. Cutaneous tuberculosis constitutes only a small proportion of extra pulmonary tuberculosis and multifocal involvement of cutaneous tuberculosis is an even rarer manifestation. We report one such case of multifocal tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 17-year old male patient in the absence of any primary tuberculous focus. PMID:21772603

  17. Tuberculosis of the Gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K.; Ayub, M.; Kumar, Mohan; Keswani, N. K.

    2000-01-01

    Analysis of 5 patients with gallbladder tuberculosis who had open cholecystectomy and review of literature have shown that, although still rare it presents as a part of systemic miliary tuberculosis, abdominal tuberculosis, isolated gallbladder tuberculosis and as acalculus cholecystitis in anergic patients. There are no pathognomonic signs, the diagnosis depends on suspicion of tuberculosis, peroperative findings and histological examination. PMID:10977119

  18. Tuberculosis Infection and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Active tuberculosis (TB) has a greater burden of TB bacilli than latent TB and acts as an infection source for contacts. Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is the state in which humans are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis without any clinical symptoms, radiological abnormality, or microbiological evidence. TB is transmissible by respiratory droplet nucleus of 1–5 µm in diameter, containing 1–10 TB bacilli. TB transmission is affected by the strength of the infectious source, infectiousness of TB bacilli, immunoresistance of the host, environmental stresses, and biosocial factors. Infection controls to reduce TB transmission consist of managerial activities, administrative control, engineering control, environmental control, and personal protective equipment provision. However, diagnosis and treatment for LTBI as a national TB control program is an important strategy on the precondition that active TB is not missed. Therefore, more concrete evidences for LTBI management based on clinical and public perspectives are needed. PMID:27790271

  19. HIV and Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections and Coinfections HIV and Tuberculosis (TB) (Last updated 9/1/2016; last reviewed ... depends on a person’s individual circumstances. What is tuberculosis? Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease that can ...

  20. Tuberculosis: General Information

    MedlinePlus

    TB Elimination Tuberculosis: General Information What is TB? Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by germs that are spread from person ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination CS227840_A What Does a Positive Test ...

  1. Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Han-Lim; Kim, Dong-Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    Even in an era of remarkable medical advances, there is an issue of why tuberculosis remains in the list of disastrous diseases, afflicting humans and causing suffering. There has not been a plausible answer to this, and it has been suggested that clinicians and medical scientists could presently not win the war against the tubercle bacilli. With regards to this issue, based on the authors' own clinical and research experiences, in this review, the available literature was revisited in order to address the raised questions and to provide recent information on characteristics of tubercle bacilli and possible ways to more effectively treat tuberculosis. PMID:28243382

  2. Abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, V. K.

    1998-01-01

    Tuberculosis has staged a global comeback and forms a dangerous combination with AIDS. The abdomen is one of the common sites of extrapulmonary involvement. Patients with abdominal tuberculosis have a wide range and spectrum of symptoms and signs; the disease is therefore a great mimic. Diagnosis, mainly radiological and supported by endoscopy, is difficult to make and laparotomy is required in a large number of patient. Management involves judicious combination of antitubercular therapy and surgery which may be required to treat complications such as intestinal obstruction and perforation. The disease, though potentially curable, carries a significant morbidity and mortality. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 PMID:9926119

  3. [Tuberculosis, today].

    PubMed

    Scala, Raffaele

    2012-06-01

    Tuberculosis is still a major health and social problem because, on the one hand, we have witnessed the dismantling of the sanatoriums, with a reduced level of diagnostic suspicion, knowledge and expertise on the management of the disease, while, the other side, are considered migratory flows, the lower socio-economic faced by immigrants, the states of immunosuppression associated with HIV prevalence of malnutrition and other diseases, and the phenomenon of multidrug-resistance, which often turns out to be iatrogenic. The success of the strategy of control/elimination of tuberculosis promoted by the World Health Organization requires a well coordinated multidisciplinary approach in which everyone does their part, the general practitioner, the pulmonologist, the infectious disease specialist, and the microbiologist.

  4. Tracheobronchial tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Vikas; Shepherd, Ray W.

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial tuberculosis (TBTB) is reported in approximately 10% to 39% of the patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. It is defined as the tubercle infection of the trachea and or bronchi. Due to its non-specific presentation, insidious onset and normal chest radiography in about 10–20% of the patients, the diagnosis is delayed. Bronchoscopy is the most definite method of diagnosis which provides adequate specimens for microbiological and histopathological diagnosis. Tracheobronchial stenosis is one of the most common long term complications of TBTB resulting in significant morbidity. It is estimated that 90% of patients with TBTB have some degree of tracheal and or bronchial stenosis. In this review article, we will discuss the pathogenesis, symptoms, imaging, bronchoscopic findings, and treatment of TBTB and management of tracheobronchial stenosis. PMID:28149582

  5. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis A A A What's in this article? Signs ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  6. Tuberculosis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Tuberculosis KidsHealth > For Parents > Tuberculosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... When to You Call the Doctor en español Tuberculosis Tuberculosis (popularly known as "TB") is a disease ...

  7. Tuberculosis Data and Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  8. Tuberculosis and Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    TUBERCULOSIS www.who.int/tb & DIABETES THE DUAL EPIDEMIC OF TB AND DIABETES DEADLY LINKAGES  People with ... higher risk of progressing from latent to active tuberculosis.  Diabetes triples a person’s risk of developing TB. ...

  9. Tuberculosis Treatment and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  10. Global Tuberculosis Report 2016

    MedlinePlus

    ... WHO Language عربي 中文 English Français Русский Español Tuberculosis (TB) Menu Tuberculosis The End TB Strategy Areas ... data News, events and features About us Global tuberculosis report 2016 WHO has published a global TB ...

  11. Miliary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mert, Ali; Arslan, Ferhat; Kuyucu, Tülin; Koç, Emine Nur; Yılmaz, Mesut; Turan, Demet; Altın, Sedat; Pehlivanoglu, Filiz; Sengoz, Gonul; Yıldız, Dilek; Dokmetas, Ilyas; Komur, Suheyla; Kurtaran, Behice; Demirdal, Tuna; Erdem, Hüseyin A.; Sipahi, Oguz Resat; Batirel, Ayse; Parlak, Emine; Tekin, Recep; Tunçcan, Özlem Güzel; Balkan, Ilker Inanc; Hayran, Osman; Ceylan, Bahadır

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the clinical features, and outcome of the patients with miliary tuberculosis (TB). We retrospectively evaluated 263 patients (142 male, 121 female, mean age: 44 years, range: 16–89 years) with miliary TB. Criteria for the diagnosis of miliary TB were at least one of the followings in the presence of clinical presentation suggestive of miliary TB such as prolonged fever, night sweats, anorexia, weight loss: radiologic criterion and pathological criterion and/or microbiological criterion; pathological criterion and/or microbiological criterion. The miliary pattern was seen in 88% of the patients. Predisposing factors were found in 41% of the patients. Most frequent clinical features and laboratory findings were fever (100%), fatigue (91%), anorexia (85%), weight loss (66%), hepatomegaly (20%), splenomegaly (19%), choroid tubercules (8%), anemia (86%), pancytopenia (12%), and accelerated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (89%). Tuberculin skin test was positive in 29% of cases. Fifty percent of the patients met the criteria for fever of unknown origin. Acid-fast bacilli were demonstrated in 41% of patients (81/195), and cultures for Mycobacterium tuberculosis were positive in 51% (148/292) of tested specimens (predominantly sputum, CSF, and bronchial lavage). Blood cultures were positive in 20% (19/97). Granulomas in tissue samples of liver, lung, and bone marrow were present in 100% (21/21), 95% (18/19), and 82% (23/28), respectively. A total of 223 patients (85%) were given a quadruple anti-TB treatment. Forty-four (17%) patients died within 1 year after diagnosis established. Age, serum albumin, presence of military pattern, presence of mental changes, and hemoglobin concentration were found as independent predictors of mortality. Fever resolved within first 21 days in the majority (90%) of the cases. Miliary infiltrates on chest X-ray should raise the possibility of miliary TB especially in countries where TB is

  12. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, Gomathy; Ramesh, Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that accounts for 1% to 2% of cases. Childhood skin tuberculosis represents 18% to 82% of all cutaneous tuberculosis cases. Scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris are the two most common clinical forms in children. An increase in the number of tuberculids, especially lichen scrofulosorum, has been observed in the last several years. Cutaneous tuberculosis in children can be severe and have a protracted course. Multiplicity of lesions and multifocal disseminated involvement in scrofuloderma and lupus vulgaris is common. Scrofuloderma progressing to gummatous lesions (scrofulous gumma) is mostly described in children. Morbidities and deformities are more severe in children.

  13. [Childhood tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Hamzaoui, A

    2015-01-01

    Childhood TB is an indication of failing TB control in the community. It allows disease persistence in the population. Mortality and morbidity due to TB is high in children. Moreover, HIV co-infection and multidrug-resistant diseases are as frequent in children as in adults. Infection is more frequent in younger children. Disease risk after primary infection is greatest in infants younger than 2 years. In case of exposure, evidence of infection can be obtained using the tuberculin skin test (TST) or an interferon-gamma assay (IGRA). There is no evidence to support the use of IGRA over TST in young children. TB suspicion should be confirmed whenever possible, using new available tools, particularly in case of pulmonary and lymph node TB. Induced sputum, nasopharyngeal aspiration and fine needle aspiration biopsy provide a rapid and definitive diagnosis of mycobacterial infection in a large proportion of patients. Analysis of paediatric samples revealed higher sensitivity and specificity values of molecular techniques in comparison with the ones originated from adults. Children require higher drugs dosages than adults. Short courses of steroids are associated with TB treatment in case of respiratory distress, bronchoscopic desobstruction is proposed for severe airways involvement and antiretroviral therapy is mandatory in case of HIV infection. Post-exposure prophylaxis in children is a highly effective strategy to reduce the risk of TB disease. The optimal therapy for treatment of latent infection with a presumably multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain is currently not known.

  14. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  15. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  16. Tuberculosis in the lung (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is caused by a group of organisms: Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M bovis , M africanum and a few other rarer subtypes. Tuberculosis usually appears as a lung (pulmonary) infection. However, ...

  17. Non-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Carrol, E D; Clark, J E; Cant, A J

    2001-06-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease of global importance, with a rising incidence in the developed world in recent years. Tuberculous lymphadenitis, tuberculous meningitis, osteoarticular tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis are some of the more well-recognised manifestations of non-pulmonary TB in childhood. The diagnosis of non-pulmonary TB poses a particular challenge for clinicians because of the protean ways in which the disease presents. The omission of tuberculosis from the differential diagnosis of patients with obscure illnesses and the relatively insensitive bacteriological methods for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis add to the complexity of the problem. A high index of suspicion is required in order to avoid delays in diagnosis which may influence treatment outcome. The advent of DNA amplification techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction may herald a promising new era in the prompt and accurate management of extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

  18. Childhood tuberculosis and malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Jaganath, Devan; Mupere, Ezekiel

    2012-12-15

    Despite the burden of both malnutrition and tuberculosis in children worldwide, there are few studies on the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. From available research, it appears that malnutrition is a predictor of tuberculosis disease and is associated with worse outcomes. This is supported through several lines of evidence, including the role of vitamin D receptor genotypes, malnutrition's effects on immune development, respiratory infections among malnourished children, and limited work specifically on pediatric tuberculosis and malnutrition. Nutritional supplementation has yet to suggest significant benefits on the course of tuberculosis in children. There is a critical need for research on childhood tuberculosis, specifically on how nutritional status affects the risk and progression of tuberculosis and whether nutritional supplementation improves clinical outcomes or prevents disease.

  19. Tuberculosis versus vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Baig, Zahid Farooq; Raja, Khalid Mahmood; Abbas, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Vasculitis (Wegeners Granulomatosis and Microscopic Polyangiitis) and Tuberculosis share many features including constitutional symptoms and respiratory tract involvement. The presence of kidney involvement with new onset azotaemia and active urine sediment support the diagnosis of vasculitis. We describe two cases that were diagnosed to be suffering from tuberculosis and placed on anti-tuberculosis therapy. On further workup they were found to be suffering from pauci- immune glomerulonephritis and recovered well with treatment.

  20. Abdominal involvement in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Edward G; Georgiades, Christos S; Fishman, Elliot K

    2002-10-01

    Rising incidence of disseminated and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB), especially in immunocompromised hosts and patients with multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis, has resulted in an increase of unusual clinical and radiographic presentations of TB. With CT being a common part of emergency room (ER) evaluation of abdominal pain, it is imperative that radiologists be able to recognize abdominal presentations of TB. We discuss and illustrate typical and less common CT manifestations of tuberculosis in the abdomen to help ER radiologists in this task.

  1. TUBERCULOSIS COMO ENFERMEDAD OCUPACIONAL

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Existe evidencia suficiente para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en diversos profesionales especialmente entre los trabajadores de salud. En el Perú están normados y reglamentados los derechos laborales inherentes a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional, como la cobertura por discapacidad temporal o permanente. Sin embargo, estos derechos aún no han sido suficientemente socializados. En este trabajo se presenta información sobre el riesgo de adquirir tuberculosis en el lugar de trabajo, se revisan las evidencias para declarar a la tuberculosis como enfermedad ocupacional en trabajadores de salud y se presenta la legislación peruana vigente al respecto. PMID:22858771

  2. [Multifocal tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients].

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Amel; Fredj, Fatma Ben; Mzabi, Anis; Karmani, Monia; Laouani, Chadia

    2016-01-01

    Multifocal tuberculosis is defined as the presence of lesions affecting at least two extrapulmonary sites, with or without pulmonary involvement. This retrospective study of 10 cases aims to investigate the clinical and evolutionary characteristics of multifocal tuberculosis. It included 41 cases with tuberculosis collected between 1999 and 2013. Ten patients had multifocal tuberculosis (24%): 9 women and 1 man, the average age was 50 years (30-68 years). Our patients were correctly BCG vaccinated. The evaluation of immunodepression was negative in all patients. 7 cases had lymph node tuberculosis, 3 cases digestive tuberculosis, 2 cases pericardial tuberculosis, 2 cases osteoarticular tuberculosis, 1 case brain tuberculosis, 2 cases urinary tuberculosis, 4 cases urogenital tuberculosis, 1 case adrenal tuberculosis, 1 case cutaneous and 1 case muscle tuberculosis. All patients received anti-tuberculosis treatment for a mean duration of 10 months, with good evolution. Multifocal tuberculosis is difficult to diagnose. It can affect immunocompetent patients but often has good prognosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy must be initiated as soon as possible to avoid sequelae.

  3. [Tuberculosis in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Shang, H; Desgrandchamps, D

    1995-10-03

    In Switzerland, in 1992, 957 persons suffered from tuberculosis; 52.3% were Swiss, 47.7% foreigners. Most of the swiss TB patients were more than 65 years old, whereas the foreigners generally were young patients originating from countries with high TB-infection rates. Asylum seekers had much higher TB-case rates (131 cases per 100,000) than other foreigners (27 cases per 100,000) or Swiss (9 cases per 100,000). Special refuge reception centers have been set up in Switzerland, in charge of tuberculosis screening procedures in this high-risk group on arrival to this country. Although HIV and AIDS patients bear a much higher risk of developing tuberculosis once infected, the HIV epidemic did not lead to an increase of tuberculosis in Switzerland so far, since young Swiss are rarely infected with tuberculosis. HIV-infected, drug addicts, homeless persons and alcoholics run a higher risk of contracting tuberculosis only when congregating with a person suffering from active tuberculosis not yet diagnosed or improperly treated. In order to maintain low levels of tuberculosis in Switzerland DOT (directly observed therapy) must be implemented in all patients with uncertain compliance, especially as cultural and social backgrounds become increasingly complex.

  4. Tuberculosis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    Lidder, Surjit; Lang, Kathryn; Haroon, Mallick; Shahidi, Mitra; El-Guindi, Magdi

    2009-01-01

    Extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis are reported in less than one in five cases with the knee affected in 8% after the spine and hip. We report a case of isolated highly erosive tuberculosis of the knee presenting in a previously fit Vietnamese woman. The difficulties of diagnosis, modalities of chemotherapeutic management, and surgical treatment are discussed. PMID:21808686

  5. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to…

  6. Tuberculosis in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Turpie, I D

    2008-05-01

    This is a description of a tuberculosis treatment programme in a country at war where security and the absence of order pose problems to health care delivery. It is also a description of an epidemic of tuberculosis where treatment and diagnosis are difficult and the methods used have changed little in many years. More international pressure is needed.

  7. Genitourinary manifestations of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wise, Gilbert J; Marella, Venkata K

    2003-02-01

    By the 1980s, the availability of antituberculosis chemotherapy reduced the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis. Changing patterns of population emigration and the development of large pools of immune-compromised individuals reversed the downward trend of tuberculosis. The incidence of genitourinary tuberculosis has remained constant. The manifestations of GU TB can be variable and cause a variety of clinical patterns that mimic other diseases. Adrenal insufficiency, renal disease, obstructive uropathy, and chronic cystitis are not uncommon with TB. The patient with TB may have genital disease that simulates STD or scrotal tumors. Infertility can be caused by GU tuberculosis. Awareness of environmental factors and patient history should alert the urologist to the wide array of clinical findings in the genitourinary system that can be caused by tuberculosis.

  8. 68 FR 75767 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-12-31

    ... Tuberculosis; Proposed Rule; Termination of Rulemaking Respiratory Protection for M. Tuberculosis; Final Rule... Exposure to Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION... Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis (TB). Because of a broad range of Federal and community initiatives,...

  9. Tuberculosis vaccine development: recent progress.

    PubMed

    Orme, I M; McMurray, D N; Belisle, J T

    2001-03-01

    Recent years have seen a renewed effort to develop new vaccines against tuberculosis. As a result, several promising avenues of research have developed, including the production of recombinant vaccines, auxotrophic vaccines, DNA vaccines and subunit vaccines. In this article we briefly review this work, as well as consider the pros and cons of the animal models needed to test these new vaccines. Screening to date has been carried out in mouse and guinea pig models, which have been used to obtain basic information such as the effect of the vaccine on bacterial load, and whether the vaccine can prevent or reduce lung pathology. The results to date lead us to be optimistic that new candidate vaccines could soon be considered for evaluation in clinical trials.

  10. The evolution of tuberculosis virulence.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Galvani, Alison P

    2009-07-01

    The evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis presents several challenges for public health. HIV and resistance to antimycobacterial medications have evolutionary implications for how Mycobacterium tuberculosis will evolve, as these factors influence the host environment and transmission dynamics of tuberculosis strains. We present an evolutionary invasion analysis of tuberculosis that characterizes the direction of tuberculosis evolution in the context of different natural and human-driven selective pressures, including changes in tuberculosis treatment and HIV prevalence. We find that the evolution of tuberculosis virulence can be affected by treatment success rates, the relative transmissibility of emerging strains, the rate of reactivation from latency among hosts, and the life expectancy of hosts. We find that the virulence of tuberculosis strains may also increase as a consequence of rising HIV prevalence, requiring faster case detection strategies in areas where the epidemics of HIV and tuberculosis collide.

  11. [Epidemiology of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Mjid, M; Cherif, J; Ben Salah, N; Toujani, S; Ouahchi, Y; Zakhama, H; Louzir, B; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Beji, M

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a contagious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It represents, according to World Health Organization (WHO), one of the most leading causes of death worldwide. With nearly 8 million new cases each year and more than 1 million deaths per year, tuberculosis is still a public health problem. Despite of the decrease in incidence, morbidity and mortality remain important partially due to co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus and emergence of resistant bacilli. All WHO regions are not uniformly affected by TB. Africa's region has the highest rates of morbidity and mortality. The epidemiological situation is also worrying in Eastern European countries where the proportion of drug-resistant tuberculosis is increasing. These regional disparities emphasize to develop screening, diagnosis and monitoring to the most vulnerable populations. In this context, the Stop TB program, developed by the WHO and its partner's, aims to reduce the burden of disease in accordance with the global targets set for 2015.

  12. Update on cutaneous tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis Gavazzoni; Bernardes Filho, Fred; Quaresma, Maria Victória; do Nascimento, Leninha Valério; Nery, José Augusto da Costa; Azulay, David Rubem

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to draw special attention from health care professionals and society in general. Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infection caused by M. tuberculosis complex, M. bovis and bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Depending on individual immunity, environmental factors and the type of inoculum, it may present varied clinical and evolutionary aspects. Patients with HIV and those using immunobiological drugs are more prone to infection, which is a great concern in centers where the disease is considered endemic. This paper aims to review the current situation of cutaneous tuberculosis in light of this new scenario, highlighting the emergence of new and more specific methods of diagnosis, and the molecular and cellular mechanisms that regulate the parasite-host interaction. PMID:25387498

  13. Tuberculosis in tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Roelsgaard, E.; Iversen, E.; Bløcher, C.

    1964-01-01

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century the tubercle bacillus apparently had little opportunity of disseminating among the rather isolated tribes of tropical Africa. With the creation of large centres of trade and industry in the wake of European colonization, tuberculosis seems to have spread rapidly over the continent and is today found everywhere. In a number of tuberculosis prevalence surveys conducted by WHO during 1955-60, randomly selected population groups were tuberculin tested, X-rayed and had sputa examined by direct microscopy. The three methods of examination were applied independently of one another. Data collected during the surveys have been analysed with a view to discovering common epidemiological features of tuberculosis in tropical Africa, assessing the reliability of the diagnostic methods employed and discussing their usefulness in future tuberculosis control programmes. PMID:14178027

  14. [Tuberculosis of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Streltsova, O S; Krupin, V N; Yunusova, K E; Mamonov, M V

    2016-12-01

    Genitourinary tract is the second most common site where extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) occurs. Genitourinary TB is notable for a latent clinical course and difficult diagnosis. The paper presents clinical observations of two patients treated in a urology department of a general public hospital. One of them was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the prostate, MTB+. In the other, TB of the prostate was suspected based on pathologic assessment of the surgical specimen after surgery for prostate cancer.

  15. [Primary infection and pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Toujani, S; Ben Salah, N; Cherif, J; Mjid, M; Ouahchy, Y; Zakhama, H; Daghfous, J; Beji, M; Mehiri-Ben Rhouma, N; Louzir, B

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem worldwide. Indeed, a third of the world population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and more than 8 million new cases of tuberculosis each year. Pulmonary tuberculosis is the most common location. Its diagnosis is difficult and often established with a delay causing a spread of infection. The diagnosis of tuberculosis infection is mainly based on immunological tests represented by the tuberculin skin test and detection of gamma interferon, while the diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis is suspected on epidemiological context, lasting general and respiratory symptoms, contrasting usually with normal lung examination, and a chest radiography showing suggestive lesions. The radioclinical feature may be atypical in patients with extreme ages and in case of immunodeficiency. Confirmation of tuberculosis is bacteriological. Conventional bacteriological methods remain the reference. Innovative tests using the technique of molecular biology have improved the diagnosis of tuberculosis in terms of sensitivity and especially speed. However, those techniques are of limited use.

  16. Tuberculosis-resistant transgenic cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis is a devastating disease that affects humans and many animal species. In humans, tuberculosis (TB) is mainly caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, while most cases in cattle are caused by Mycobacterium bovis. However, Mb can also cause, albeit rarely, human TB. In this issue, Wu et al. ...

  17. Tuberculosis among Children in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gessner, Bradford D.

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis among Alaskan children under 15 was more than twice the national rate, with Alaska Native children showing a much higher incidence. Children with household exposure to adults with active tuberculosis had a high risk of infection. About 22 percent of pediatric tuberculosis cases were identified through school…

  18. Tuberculosis: A Problem for Lifeguards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaros, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Lifeguards run the risk of workplace infection by tuberculosis-carrying swimmers. Even if they work in ventilated, sunlit areas (which reduces risk), they can contract tuberculosis when performing respiratory resuscitation. Without appropriate precautions, lifeguards may be unnecessarily exposed. A tuberculosis infection control plan is needed in…

  19. Childhood Tuberculosis, Still with Us...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaulet, Pierre; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The first section of this report on childhood tuberculosis in developed and developing countries discusses the epidemiology of tuberculosis in children. Information is presented on: (1) sources and prevalence of infection; (2) risks, frequency, and types of tuberculosis; (3) mortality rates; and (4) the relation of poverty and AIDS to…

  20. [Urogenital tuberculosis today].

    PubMed

    Zhukova, I I; Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P; Brizhatiuk, E V; Khomiakov, V T; Osadchiĭ, A V

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyze the structure of urogenital tuberculosis, retrospective analysis of medical records of 131 patients with newly diagnosed urogenital tuberculosis observed in the Novosibirsk Regional TB Dispensary from 2009 to 2011 was performed. The renal tuberculosis is main form in the structure is urotuberculosis, detected in 75% of patients, and widespread destructive forms of the disease were diagnosed in more than half of cases. Isolated nephrotuberculosis was more often diagnosed in women--56.8%. 15.9% of patients had asymptomatic nephrotuberculosis; one-third of patients complained of pain in the lumbar region and frequent painful urination (35.2 and 39.8%, respectively); symptoms of intoxication were present in 17% of patients, renal colic--in 9.1%, and gross hematuria--in 7.9% of patients. Mycobacteriuria in isolated nephrotuberculosis was detected in 31.8% of cases. Acute tuberculous orchiepididymitis developed in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia was observed in 7.1% of patients, dysuria was in 35.7% of patients. The pain in the perineum, frequent painful urination (both by 31.6%), hemospermia (26.3%) were main complaints in prostate tuberculosis. Mycobacteria was detected in 10.5% of cases. It was found that urogenital tuberculosis has no pathognomonic symptoms; the most alarming manifestations include long-term dysuria, hematuria, hemospermia.

  1. [Tuberculosis and immigration].

    PubMed

    Salas-Coronas, Joaquín; Rogado-González, M Cruz; Lozano-Serrano, Ana Belén; Cabezas-Fernández, M Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of tuberculosis worldwide is declining. However, in Western countries this decline is slower due to the impact of immigration. Tuberculosis in the immigrant population is related to health status in the country of origin and with overcrowding and poverty conditions in the host country. Immigrants with tuberculosis are younger, have a higher prevalence of extrapulmonary forms, greater proportion of drug resistance and higher treatment default rates than those of natives. New molecular techniques not only reduce diagnostic delay time but also allow the rapid identification of resistances and improve knowledge of transmission patterns. It is necessary to implement measures to improve treatment compliance in this population group like facilitating access to health card, the use of fixed-dose combination drugs, the participation of cultural mediators and community health workers and gratuity of drugs.

  2. Tuberculosis of the oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Fahmy, A. R.; Guindi, R.; Farid, A.

    1969-01-01

    A case of primary tuberculosis of the oesophagus is presented; the patient was successfully treated by oesophagectomy. The condition, being rare, has stimulated the authors to review the literature concerning primary and secondary oesophageal tuberculosis. The history, modes of infection, the pathology, clinical picture, diagnosis, investigations, and methods of treatment are discussed. In contradistinction to the secondary disease, which is terminal, primary tuberculosis of the oesophagus is a curable disease with a fairly good prognosis. The case report shows that the surgeon should pay careful attention to the site of the anastomosis; otherwise post-operative stricture can develop. Even this responds well to dilatations and the patient can regain normal health. PMID:5821628

  3. CT of abdominal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, B.M.; Mann, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    Intraabdominal tuberculosis (TB) presents with a wide variety of clinical and radiologic features. Besides the reported computed tomographic (CT) finding of high-density ascites in tuberculous peritonitis, this report describes additional CT features highly suggestive of abdominal tuberculosis in eight cases: (1) irregular soft-tissue densities in the omental area; (2) low-density masses surrounded by thick solid rims; (3) a disorganized appearance of soft-tissue densities, fluid, and bowel loops forming a poorly defined mass; (4) low-density lymph nodes with a multilocular appearance after intravenous contrast administration; and (5) possibly high-density ascites. The differential diagnosis of these features include lymphoma, various forms of peritonitis, peritoneal carcinomatosis, and peritoneal mesothelioma. It is important that the CT features of intraabdominal tuberculosis be recognized in order that laparotomy be avoided and less invasive procedures (e.g., laparoscopy, biopsy, or a trial of antituberculous therapy) be instituted.

  4. [The diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Sekiya; Sakaguchi, Nobuki; Hotta, Jyunnichi

    2012-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) infects all organs in the body; however, lung infection is the primary lesion. The total number of infections is decreasing, but the percentage of infections in older people is rising. Because this disease is due to infection with M. tuberculosis, the diagnosis requires the presence of M. tuberculosis. Chest X-ray and CT are very powerful tools to suggest the presence of M. tuberculosis infection. Pathological examination of the tissues also shows the typical findings of M. tuberculosis infection; however, the presence of the bacterium was not proven in certain cases of M. tuberculosis infection, and especially in cases of latent infection. Recently, the whole-blood interferon--gamma test (QuantiFERON-TB, QFT) became more popular than the tuberculin skin test. It is reported that the specificity and sensitivity of QFT are similar to or better than the tuberculin skin test. However, it should be noted that QFT positive does not automatically lead to a diagnosis of active M. tuberculosis infection and that QFT is one of the supplementary tests in the diagnosis of M. tuberculosis infection. Currently, massive infection with M. tuberculosis is increasing. The precise responsible linkage in massive infection with M. tuberculosis needs DNA polymorphism analysis using variable numbers of tandem repeats (VNTR) or restricted fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  5. Spectrum of urogenital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Zhukova, Irina; Kholtobin, Denis

    2013-10-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) plays an important role because its complications may be fatal, it significantly reduces quality of life, and it is often associated with AIDS. Diagnosis of UGTB is often delayed. We analyzed 131 case histories of UGTB patients from the years 2009-2011. Gender, age, and the clinical form and main features of the disease were taken into account. The most common form was kidney tuberculosis (74.8%). Isolated kidney tuberculosis (KTB) more often occurs in women: 56.8%. Patients of middle and old age more often showed the stage of cavernous KTB; younger patients had smaller forms. Among all cases, an asymptomatic course was seen in 12.2% and, among cases of KTB, in 15.9%. Every third patient complained of flank pain and dysuria (35.2% and 39.8%, respectively); 17% presented with toxicity symptoms, 9.1% with renal colic, and 7.9% with gross hematuria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in urine was found in 31.8% of cases in all levels of isolated KTB. UGTB has no specific symptom; even sterile pyuria occurs only in 25%. The acute onset of tuberculous orchiepididymitis was seen in 35.7% of patients, hemospermia in 7.1%, and dysuria in 35.7%. The most common complaints for prostate tuberculosis were perineal pain (31.6%), dysuria (also 31.6%), and hemospermia (26.3%). MTB in prostate secretion/ejaculate was revealed in 10.5% of this group. All urogenital tract infections should be suspected as UGTB in patients who are living in a region with a high incidence rate, who have had contact with tuberculosis infection, and who have a recurrence of the disease that is resistant to standard therapy.

  6. Metallobiology of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, G. Marcela; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are essential constituents of all living organisms, playing crucial structural and catalytic parts in many enzymes and transcription factors. However, transition metals can also be toxic when present in excess. Their uptake and efflux rates must therefore be carefully controlled by biological systems. In this chapter, we summarize the current knowledge about uptake and efflux systems in Mycobacterium tuberculosis for mainly three of these metals, namely iron, zinc and copper. We also propose questions fur future research in the field of metallobiology of host-pathogen interactions in tuberculosis. PMID:26103977

  7. 63 FR 5905 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-02-05

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Proposed rule... to tuberculosis and is announcing the dates and locations of the informal public hearings to be held...-5986. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: OSHA's proposed standard on Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis...

  8. 64 FR 34625 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-28

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice..., 1997, OSHA published its proposed standard to regulate occupational exposure to tuberculosis (TB) (62... preliminary risk assessment for occupational exposure to tuberculosis. DATES: Comments and data...

  9. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  10. Antigen smuggling in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hudrisier, Denis; Neyrolles, Olivier

    2014-06-11

    The importance of CD4 T lymphocytes in immunity to M. tuberculosis is well established; however, how dendritic cells activate T cells in vivo remains obscure. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Srivastava and Ernst (2014) report a mechanism of antigen transfer for efficient activation of antimycobacterial T cells.

  11. [Surgery for thoracic tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Kilani, T; Boudaya, M S; Zribi, H; Ouerghi, S; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is mainly a medical disease. Surgery has been the unique therapeutic tool for a long time before the advent of specific antituberculous drugs, and the role of surgery was then confined to the treatment of the sequelae of tuberculosis and their complications. The resurgence of tuberculosis and the emergence of multidrug-resistant TB combined to immunosuppressed patients represent a new challenge for tuberculosis surgery. Surgery may be indicated for a diagnostic purpose in patients with pulmonary, pleural, mediastinal or thoracic wall involvement, or with a therapeutic purpose (drainage, resection, residual cavity obliteration). Modern imaging techniques and the advent of video-assisted thoracic surgery allowed a new approach of this pathology; the majority of diagnostic interventions and selected cases requiring lung resection can be performed through a mini-invasive approach. Patients proposed for aggressive surgery may be treated with the best results thanks to a good evaluation of the thoracic lesions, of the patients' nutritional, infectious and general status combined with a good coordination between the specialized medical team for an optimal preparation to surgery.

  12. Skeletal tuberculosis in children.

    PubMed

    Teo, Harvey E L; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this review is to present the imaging findings of skeletal tuberculosis in children. The incidence of tuberculosis is increasing and skeletal tuberculosis accounts for 10-20% of all extra-pulmonary cases. The most common manifestations of skeletal tuberculosis in children are spondylitis, arthritis and osteomyelitis. Tuberculous spondylitis involves the intervertebral disc only late in the disease. Subligamentous spread of the infection may lead to multiple levels of vertebral body involvement that may either be continuous or skipped. Extension of the disease into the paravertebral or extra-dural space may occur. Tuberculous arthritis usually occurs as a result of metaphyseal spread to the joint. Tuberculous osteomyelitis may appear as cystic, well-defined lesions, infiltrative lesions or spina ventosa. The latter is a term used to describe a form of tuberculous osteomyelitis where underlying bone destruction, overlying periosteal reaction and fusiform expansion of the bone results in cyst-like cavities with diaphyseal expansion. Radiographs are still the mainstay of evaluation of patients with bony lesions. Ultrasonography can detect soft-tissue extension of the bony lesions and guide drainage or biopsy procedures. CT accurately demonstrates bony sclerosis and destruction, especially in areas difficult to assess on radiographs such as the posterior elements of the vertebral body. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluating early marrow involvement and soft-tissue extension of the lesion.

  13. Migratory journeys and tuberculosis risk.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ming-Jung

    2003-12-01

    After decades of decline, tuberculosis case rates in New York City more than tripled between 1978 and 1992. While the number of cases of those born in the United States declined after 1992, the proportion of immigrant tuberculosis cases continued to increase and reached 58 percent in 1999. This article questions the biomedical explanation of immigrant tuberculosis as being imported from immigrants' countries of origin. Illness narratives of illegal Chinese immigrants with tuberculosis detailing risks associated with migratory journeys are presented. The social and cultural nature of the concept of risk, as well as the adverse implication of biomedical identification of immigrants as being at higher risk of tuberculosis, are also discussed. The author concludes that the dominant biomedical explanation of immigrant tuberculosis could be modified with the incorporation of the migratory process as a risk factor.

  14. Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo, Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    COW 03 PUBLICATION REPORT 94-30227 * ABDOMINAL TUBERCULOSIS IN CAIRO, BY RWIavni 0. IHibbs6 M. Kuanmm ad Z. Fun .Y .~ ... W I Form ApprovedREPORT...Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED 8 April 1993 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE S. FUNDING NUMBERS Abdominal Tuberculosis in Cairo...abdominal tuberculosis patients seen at Abbassia Fever Hospital in Cairo, Egypt from January 1990 to August 1992 are described; their mean age was 21.5

  15. The dynamics of tuberculosis epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Hans L

    2014-01-01

    A conceptual framework to study the epidemiologic basis of tuberculosis control is provided. The basic model to discuss the epidemiology of tuberculosis is based on a classification of tuberculosis based on its pathogenesis with exposure, latent infection, tuberculosis, and death from tuberculosis, showing the conditional probabilities leading from one to the next step in the chain of events. Historical data are utilized to demonstrate how the dynamics of tuberculosis over multiple decades have contributed to shape the present. It is shown that the key concept to understand the dynamics is related to current and past incidence and prevalence of latent infection with M. tuberculosis. The dynamics of the epidemic are shaped both by the behaviour of the causative organism of tuberculosis as well as the population structure and changes that take place in parallel in which M. tuberculosis thrives. Both the present and the future shape of the epidemic, as well as the principles applied to its control lie very much in the past of a society. While new risk factors such as HIV or diabetes have been or are emerging more strongly, it is noted that the majority of all new cases emerging cannot be pinned to one or the other such factor. It is the historical experience of a population that offers the most valuable key to understanding the present and the future.

  16. [Tuberculosis after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Korzeniewska, Anna; Dyła, Tomasz; Kosacka, Monika; Jankowska, Renata

    2009-01-01

    Renal transplant recipients carry a relatively high risk of developing tuberculosis (TB). In most cases, active TB is the result of reactivation of a latent infection and is located in the lungs. In these patients, clinical presentation of TB can often be atypical and there is a high risk of dissemination and high mortality rates. Therefore, the use of invasive procedures for proper diagnosis is recommended, as well as anti-tuberculosis therapy instituted whenever there is a strong suspicion of TB on clinical grounds, even without microbiological evidence. The treatment of active TB in renal transplant recipients should be the same as in the general population. To avoid graft rejection, blood levels of calcineurin inhibitors should be monitored closely. Prophylaxis is recommended for high-risk patients.

  17. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  18. [Meningoencephalitis tuberculosis--primary isolation of resistant M. tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bajramović, Nermina; Koluder, Nada; Dautović, Sajma; Muratović, Planinka

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the main causes of serious diseases in developing countries. Despite of decreasing tuberculosis in industrial countries, diseases is not eradicated. In last fifth years the picture of diseases is changed with large number atypical cases. Factor that is responsible for this are variable and includes primary infection in old ages, or problems that are in relation with immigration of populations. Tuberculosis meningitis disease witch appears mostly in childhood with high incidence in first three years of life. Most cases tuberculosis meningitis are caused with human types of tuberculosis bacillus, while bovines type is responsible for less than 5% of cases, but there are also reported cases of tuberculosis meningitis caused 3% atypical mycobacterium. In report is described a girl in age of two years sick of tuberculosis meningitis, she come from Kosovo, with positive epidemiological anamnesis. When she came to the hospital diseases had all clinical manifestation of serious meningoencefalitis. Very soon signs of decompensate hydrocephalus are developed. In the culture of cerebrospinalis fluid isolated Mycobacterium tuberculosis primary resistant on etambutol and rifampicin.

  19. Hepatic tuberculosis in absence of disseminated abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag S; Josh, Anand G; Abraham, Philip; Desai, Devendra C; Deshpande, Ramesh B; Bhaduri, Anita; Shah, Sudeep R

    2006-01-01

    Liver involvement in tuberculosis in absence of miliary tuberculosis is rare. This study was performed to analyse the spectrum and response to treatment of hepatic tuberculosis in the absence of miliary abdominal tuberculosis. Retrospective analysis of seven cases of hepatic tuberculosis without miliary abdominal tuberculosis who presented at the single tertiary referral center were analyzed. All patients presented with fever and hepatomegaly. Five of them had pain in upper abdomen and vomiting. HIV serology was positive in one patient. All patients had normocytic normochromic anaemia, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (Mean 65). Mild elevation of liver enzymes and low albumin (Mean 2.4 gm%) with reversal of albumin globulin ratio (Mean 0.6) were seen in all. Two had jaundice. Prothrombin time was normal in all and lactate dehydrogenase values were elevated in all (Mean 794 IU/L). On ultrasonography, 2 had multiple hypodense lesion, 1 had coarse echotexture of liver, 1 had hyperechoic pattern and 3 had just hepatomegaly. Complete resolution of liver lesions on treatment with 4-drug anti-tuberculosis drug chemotherapy was seen. In conclusion, liver tuberculosis has protean manifestations with nonspecific alteration of liver function tests and is best diagnosed on liver biopsy. Overall response to therapy is satisfactory.

  20. John Keats and tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Radetsky, M

    2001-05-01

    John Keats was trained as an apothecary, the general practitioner of the day. Precocious in his sensibilities and fluent in his imagery, he also was the model of the romantic poet. That he was a physician and a poet makes his early death from tuberculosis poignant and revealing. This history traces his life and death against the backdrop of medicine at the turn of the 19th century.

  1. Challenges in childhood tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, S; Ramachandran, G

    2015-09-01

    While tuberculosis (TB) typically causes respiratory disease in adults, the spectrum of disease is different in children, ranging from paucibacillary lymphadenitis or limited intrathoracic disease to severe disseminated disease. Diagnosing pediatric TB and monitoring treatment response is challenging, as collecting respiratory specimens is difficult in children and disease may be extrapulmonary. While basic principles of treatment are similar to adults, developmental differences in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics require that drug dosages in children be adjusted for body weight and age.

  2. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  3. Pathology of bovine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M; Vidal, E; Marco, A

    2014-10-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic granulomatous caseous-necrotising inflammatory process that mainly affects the lungs and their draining lymph nodes (Ln.). The pathological changes associated with bTB infection reflect the interplay between the host defence mechanisms and the mycobacterial virulence factors and the balance between the immunologic protective responses and the damaging inflammatory processes. Inhalation is the most common infection route and causes lesions of the nasopharynx and lower respiratory tract, including its associated lymph nodes. The initial infection (primary complex) may be followed by chronic (post-primary) tuberculosis or may be generalised. Goat tuberculosis often produces liquefactive necrosis and caverns, similarly to human TB. The assessment of the severity of TB lesions is crucial for vaccine trials. Semi-quantitative gross lesion scoring systems have been developed for cattle, but imaging technology has allowed the development of more standardised, objective, and quantitative methods, such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT), which provides quantitative measures of lesion volume.

  4. Primary tuberculosis in a malnourished adolescent.

    PubMed

    Zawaideh, Mazen; Chao, Cherng; Poole, Patricia; Naheedy, John

    2012-07-01

    Although the overall prevalence of tuberculosis has decreased in the United States, with the increasing prevalence of tuberculosis globally, higher rates of tuberculosis in some states and localities have been reported, with some component probably related to immigrant populations. We report a case of primary pulmonary tuberculosis in a malnourished adolescent.

  5. Tuberculosis endometritis presenting as a leiomyoma.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis.

  6. Tuberculosis Endometritis Presenting as A Leiomyoma

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Shahbazi, Fatemeh; Pirzadeh, Leila; Mohammadi, Seyed Rahim; Ghaffari, Parisa; Eftekhar, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis. Taking into consideration that genitourinary tuberculosis may be associated with a diversity of presentations, its diagnoses may be difficult. A young woman with an initial presumptive diagnosis of a uterine leiomyoma presented with abdominal pain and a pelvic mass that after further investigations, she was diagnosed with genital tuberculosis. PMID:25780530

  7. [Imaging features of CNS tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; El Kharras, A; Mahi, M; Hsaini, Y; Benameur, M; Aziz, N; Chaouir, S; Akjouj, S

    2008-02-01

    CNS tuberculosis remains relatively frequent in endemic regions. Both CT and MRI are valuable for diagnosis. Even though non-specific, MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging and proton spectroscopy is more sensitive than CT for detection of some lesions. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the imaging features of CNS tuberculosis.

  8. Tuberculosis, Fiji, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, Lorenzo; Gounder, Shakti; Tamani, Talatoka; Daulako, Mary Raori; Underwood, Frank; Mainawalala, Sakiusa; Nawadra-Taylor, Vasiti; Rafai, Eric; Gillini, Laura

    2016-03-01

    During 2002-2013, a total of 1,890 tuberculosis cases were recorded in Fiji. Notification rates per 100,000 population increased from 17.4 cases in 2002 to 28.4 in 2013. Older persons were most affected, but tuberculosis also increased sharply in persons 25-44 years of age.

  9. [Tuberculous cheilitis revealing pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Bricha, Myriem; Slimani, Hajar; Hammi, Sanae; Bourkadi, Jamal Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the oral cavity is rare. It is associated with clinical polymorphism and poses above all a diagnostic problem. We report the case of a 42-year-old male patient with tubercular cheilitis. This study aims to focus attention on tuberculosis that can be detected exceptionally in specific locations, such as the oral lip.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis epidemiology in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Iverson, D A; Hurley, B; Pueringer, R

    1994-03-01

    Tuberculosis incidence in the United States has recently increased from its rate of decline resulting in an excess of cases nationwide. The increase has been attributed largely to the HIV epidemic. Although tuberculosis incidence in South Dakota has increased similar to the national trend, South Dakota has not reported a single HIV-associated case of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis incidence in South Dakota has decreased in younger individuals. As a result, the percentage of tuberculosis cases in the elderly has increased. Though the reported cases of pulmonary tuberculosis have decreased, the reported cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis have not changed. Furthermore, the percentage of extrapulmonary tuberculosis occurring in the elderly has increased. Tuberculosis incidence in South Dakota is, in part, increasing because of the persistence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the elderly.

  11. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Jennifer L; Karp, Christopher L

    2015-10-19

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response-independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools.

  12. Student Pharmacists as Tuberculosis Screeners

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop, implement, and evaluate a targeted educational module on tuberculosis screening with second-year professional pharmacy students that improves their knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. Design. A tuberculosis-screening educational module was developed in collaboration with the Washington State Pharmacy Association and Department of Health and incorporated in a core student pharmacist class. Students completed online didactic training and a live practicum, each lasting 90 minutes. Assessment. Students were assessed using a pre/postdidactic assessment, live practicum tuberculin skin testing (TST) administration and evaluation assessment, and postprogram written reflection. Student pre/postknowledge assessment scores improved in all areas except in documentation. Conclusion. The tuberculosis screening educational module significantly improved student knowledge, skills, and attitudes regarding tuberculosis screening. PMID:27073277

  13. Transformative tools for tackling tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The world is in need of more effective approaches to controlling tuberculosis. The development of improved control strategies has been hampered by deficiencies in the tools available for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis and defining the dynamic consequences of the interaction of M. tuberculosis with its human host. Key needs include a highly sensitive, specific nonsputum diagnostic; biomarkers predictive of responses to therapy; correlates of risk for disease development; and host response–independent markers of M. tuberculosis infection. Tools able to sensitively detect and quantify total body M. tuberculosis burden might well be transformative across many needed use cases. Here, we review the current state of the field, paying particular attention to needed changes in experimental paradigms that would facilitate the discovery, validation, and development of such tools. PMID:26458772

  14. Oral tuberculosis: unusual radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Sansare, K; Gupta, A; Khanna, V; Karjodkar, F

    2011-05-01

    Oral tuberculosis and its radiographic findings are not commonly encountered in an oral and maxillofacial radiology practice. Literature has occasional mention of the radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis, which are still ambiguous. When affected, it is manifested majorly in the oral mucosa and rarely in the jaw bones. Here, we report certain unusual radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis which have been rarely mentioned in the literature. Four illustrative cases describe bony resorption, condylar resorption, resorption of the inferior border of the mandible and rarefaction of the alveolar bone as radiographic findings of oral tuberculosis. Follow up of the first case demonstrated regeneration of the condylar head after anti-Kochs therapy was completed, a hitherto unreported phenomenon. The importance of including tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of some of the unusual radiographic manifestations is emphasized.

  15. [New tuberculosis drugs in resistant and multiresistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Lapausa, Marta; Pascual Pareja, José Francisco; Noguerado Asensio, Arturo

    2013-10-05

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis is a globally emerging problem with a rising incidence. According to the WHO in 2008, 17% of strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in untreated cases were resistant to at least one drug and 3.6% were resistant to rifampicin and isoniazid, which is called multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The problem is greater in patients previously treated and in some countries, where rates of multidrug resistance reach 60%. Approximately 5% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients are also resistant to any fluoroquinolone and at least one injectable drug, being called extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. The treatment of these forms of tuberculosis requires the use of second-line drugs, which causes higher cost, higher toxicity and a longer duration of treatment. There is a need for new compounds with efficacy and safety profiles better than those currently used to treat these forms of tuberculosis. In the last decade different drugs have being reassessed and appeared, which are at different stages of development.

  16. 65 FR 63227 - Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2000-10-23

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Declaration of Emergency Because of Bovine Tuberculosis Bovine tuberculosis (tuberculosis) is a chronic debilitating disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis. The... animal health agencies to eradicate tuberculosis from domestic livestock in the United States...

  17. Spinal tuberculosis in an infant associated with maternal urinary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Rachel Ranitha; Agarwal, Indira; Gibikote, Sridhar

    2012-07-01

    A ten-month-old infant who presented with regression of milestones and seizures was noted to have a gibbus deformity in the upper thoracic region. She was diagnosed to have spine and central nervous system tuberculosis by culture of pus from the paravertebral abcess which showed a growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The mother, who had been having recurrent episodes of Urinary tract infection, was diagnosed to have Urinary TB proven by culture. Spinal tuberculosis, though rare, can be encountered in infancy and should be kept in mind while treating infants presenting with related symptoms.

  18. New prodrugs against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mori, Giorgia; Chiarelli, Laurent Roberto; Riccardi, Giovanna; Pasca, Maria Rosalia

    2017-03-01

    The term 'prodrug' was first introduced by Albert in 1958. Generally, prodrugs can be utilized for improving active drug solubility and bioavailability, increasing drug permeability and absorption, modifying the distribution profile, preventing fast metabolism and excretion, and reducing toxicity. Previously, the prodrug approach was a final resort during the drug discovery process only after all other approaches had been exhausted. However, this strategy is now considered during the early stages of the drug development process. Most antitubercular agents are defined as 'prodrugs', including isoniazid and ethionamide. Thus, the prodrug approach could provide novel targets for the rational design of more effective treatments for tuberculosis (TB).

  19. Fish mycobacteriosis (Tuberculosis)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parisot, T.J.; Wood, J.W.

    1959-01-01

    The etiologic agent for the bacterial disease, "fish tuberculosis" (more correctly "mycobacteriosis"), was first observed in carp in 189& from a pond in France. Subsequently similar agents have been isolated from or observed in fish in fresh water, salt water, and brackish water, in fish in aquaria, hatcheries, and natural habitat~ (wild populations of fish). The disease has been recognized as an important infection among hatchery reared salmonid fishes on the West Coast of the United States, and in aquarium fishes such as the neon tetra, the Siamese fighting fish, and in salt water fish held in zoological displays.

  20. Tuberculosis and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole▿

    PubMed Central

    Forgacs, Pierre; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Hall, Leslie; Zimmerman, Sarah K.; Silverman, Mark L.; Roberts, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The sulfonamides were the first drugs with antituberculous effects. Their use was abandoned and basically forgotten with the advent of streptomycin and isoniazid combination treatment. There is a widespread belief, apparently based on testing a single isolate on questionable media, that Mycobacterium tuberculosis is resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). We saw a complex immunocompromised patient with tuberculosis who was initially treated with TMP-SMX without antituberculous drugs and defervesced on this treatment. An isolate of M. tuberculosis from this patient was found to be sensitive to TMP-SMX. We examined how frequently M. tuberculosis is sensitive to TMP-SMX. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to TMP-SMX on supplemented Middlebrook 7H10 plates. We found that 43 of 44 (98%) isolates of M. tuberculosis were susceptible to the combination of ≤1 μg/ml of TMP and 19 μg/ml of SMX (≤1/19 μg/ml). Thus, the vast majority of our M. tuberculosis isolates were susceptible to TMP-SMX at an MIC similar to that for Mycobacterium kansasii, Mycobacterium marinum, and sensitive rapidly growing mycobacteria, organisms successfully treated with TMP-SMX as part of the treatment regimen. It is possible that TMP-SMX may be useful in treating patients with multiple-drug-resistant and extended drug-resistant tuberculosis. We feel that a clinical trial looking at the effectiveness of TMP-SMX as an antituberculous drug is worthwhile. PMID:19564358

  1. Tuberculosis in the AIDS era.

    PubMed Central

    Sepkowitz, K A; Raffalli, J; Riley, L; Kiehn, T E; Armstrong, D

    1995-01-01

    A resurgence of tuberculosis has occurred in recent years in the United States and abroad. Deteriorating public health services, increasing numbers of immigrants from countries of endemicity, and coinfection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to the rise in the number of cases diagnosed in the United States. Outbreaks of resistant tuberculosis, which responds poorly to therapy, have occurred in hospitals and other settings, affecting patients and health care workers. This review covers the pathogenesis, epidemiology, clinical presentation, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease. In addition, public health and hospital infection control strategies are detailed. Newer approaches to epidemiologic investigation, including use of restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, are discussed. Detailed consideration of the interaction between HIV infection and tuberculosis is given. We also review the latest techniques in laboratory evaluation, including the radiometric culture system, DNA probes, and PCR. Current recommendations for therapy of tuberculosis, including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, are given. Finally, the special problem of prophylaxis of persons exposed to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis is considered. PMID:7621399

  2. Cryptogenic Tuberculosis - 1990 Cairo - Egypt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    AD-A269 664 i l•l lI ,iI I i h4Ji PUBLICATION REPORT 1753 SEP TE5195, 31/93EYP CRYPTOGENIC TUBERCULOSIS - 1990 CAIRO - EGYPT BY Z. Farid, M.E...FUNDING NUMBERS Cryptogenic Tuberculosis - 1990 Cairo - Egypt PE- 61102A WU- 3M161102BS13.AK.311 6. AUTHORjS) Farid, Z., Kilpatrick, M.E. and Kamal...is unlimited. 13- A8B TRACT %’ 4 , n ;.’ Please see attached. DTIC 7T-3 t A 2-d~~t (r’ oa Dist__ _._ .S pecial. Cryptogenic tuberculosis ; Prolonged

  3. Osteoarticular manifestations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Zychowicz, Michael E

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has affected humans for much of our existence. The incidence of global tuberculosis infection continues to rise, especially in concert with HIV coinfection. Many disease processes, such as diabetes, increase the likelihood of tuberculosis infection. Tuberculosis bacteria can infect any bone, joint, tendon, or bursa; however, the most common musculoskeletal site for infection includes the spine and weight-bearing joints of the hip and knee. Many patients who present with osteoarticular tuberculosis infection will have a gradual onset of pain at the site of infection. Many patients who develop a musculoskeletal tuberculosis infection will have no evidence of a pulmonary tuberculosis infection on x-ray film and many will have very mild symptoms with the initial infection. Healthcare providers must remember that many patients who develop tuberculosis infection do not progress to active tuberculosis disease; however, the latent infection may become active with immune compromise.

  4. Tuberculosis epidemiology in Croydon.

    PubMed

    Harding, M J; Pilkington, P; Thomas, J

    1995-07-01

    A survey of tuberculosis in Croydon between 1988 and 1991, using Chest Clinic health visitor records, showed that the disease occurred most frequently in those of Indian Sub-Continent (ISC) ethnic origin. Of the 222 cases during the 4-year period, 65% were of ISC ethnic origin, 22% were Caucasian and 11% Afro-Caribbean. Non-Caucasian cases were younger (P < 0.0001), and more likely to be female (P = 0.064) or present with non-pulmonary disease (P = 0.064). One-quarter of ISC patients developed active tuberculosis more than 15 years after immigration into the UK. Only seven cases were children. The contact tracing procedure resulted in three additional cases, all of whom were contacts of smear-positive index cases. There were significantly fewer Heaf or radiologically positive contacts of non-smear positive pulmonary, or non-pulmonary index cases (P = 0.0002). The value of the current contact tracing system is discussed.

  5. Tuberculosis: Epidemiology and Control

    PubMed Central

    Sulis, Giorgia; Roggi, Alberto; Matteelli, Alberto; Raviglione, Mario C.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health concern worldwide: despite a regular, although slow, decline in incidence over the last decade, as many as 8.6 million new cases and 1.3 million deaths were estimated to have occurred in 2012. TB is by all means a poverty-related disease, mainly affecting the most vulnerable populations in the poorest countries. The presence of multidrug-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis in most countries, with somewhere prevalence is high, is among the major challenges for TB control, which may hinder recent achievements especially in some settings. Early TB case detection especially in resource-constrained settings and in marginalized groups remains a challenge, and about 3 million people are estimated to remain undiagnosed or not notified and untreated. The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently launched a new global TB strategy for the “post-2015 era” aimed at “ending the global TB epidemic” by 2035. This strategy is based on the three pillars that emphasize patient-centred TB care and prevention, bold policies and supportive systems, and intensified research and innovation. This paper aims to provide an overview of the global TB epidemiology as well as of the main challenges that must be faced to eliminate the disease as a public health problem everywhere. PMID:25408856

  6. Immunometabolism in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lanbo; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2016-01-01

    Immunometabolism, the study of the relationship between bioenergetic pathways and specific functions of immune cells, has recently gained increasing appreciation. In response to infection, activation of the host innate and adaptive immune cells is accompanied by a switch in the bioenergetic pathway from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, a metabolic remodeling known as the Warburg effect, which is required for the production of antimicrobial and pro-inflammatory effector molecules. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the Warburg effect and discuss its association with the expression of host immune responses in tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We also discuss potential mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect with a focus on the expression and regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α), the regulatory subunit of HIF-1, a major transcription regulator involved in cellular stress adaptation processes, including energy metabolism and antimicrobial responses. We also propose a novel hypothesis that Mtb perturbs the Warburg effect of immune cells to facilitate its survival and persistence in the host. A better understanding of the dynamics of metabolic states of immune cells and their specific functions during TB pathogenesis can lead to the development of immunotherapies capable of promoting Mtb clearance and reducing Mtb persistence and the emergence of drug resistant strains. PMID:27148269

  7. [Strategical use of genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in tuberculosis control].

    PubMed

    David, Susana

    2008-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation in Portugal justifies the use of a strategy for the genotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, particularly as Portugal is part of the global backdrop of human mobility, something which has a knock-on effect on the pandemic. Several international studies have placed spoligotyping and MIRU- VNTR typing as first line techniques for the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis as these techniques rely on simple technologies (PCR) and produce patterns which are easily translated into a direct interpretation numerical code. Spoligotyping has been accordingly proposed for all the isolates, while MIRU-VNTR typing should be applied to isolates with a common spoliotype. Other techniques, including IS6110-RFLP, should be reserved for use ill accordance with selected criteria. Previous studies in Portugal using spoligotyping have underlined the advantages of a strategy based on sampling consecutive patient isolates with no prior selection criteria. This allows characterisation of the M. tuberculosis population structure through monitoring the distribution of the genotypes geographically over time and within the various risk groups. On the other hand, the association of spoligotyping, MIRU-VNTF (typing and, possibly, other techniques, needs evaluating as part of bigger pictures, including identifying recent transmission situations, distinguishing between reinfection and relapse episodes and mapping the size and dynamics of disease transmission. The solution to the tuberculosis problem in Portugal implies structuring genotyping's role in tuberculosis prevention and control and its evaluation through concrete examples and results.

  8. [Treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. In developed countries there is an increased number of cases due to different reasons. The most likely determinant cause is from immigrants coming from high endemic areas. This phenomenon is a direct cause of the increase in extrapulmonary and complicated pulmonary forms of tuberculosis. There are only a few controlled clinical trials evaluating therapies for extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Consequently, documented evidence is scarce, particularly in paediatrics. The majority of therapeutic recommendations are based on series of cases or expert opinions, with a lack of uniformity provided by the different consensus of the main scientific societies. The main objective of this fourth consensus by the Tuberculosis Study Group of the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (Sociedad Española de Infectología Pediátrica, SEIP) is to perform a thorough revision of the data obtained from scientific literature, in order to establish recommendations for the treatment of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and complicated forms of pulmonary tuberculosis, adapted to the characteristics and drugs available in Spain.

  9. Tuberculosis care: an evaluability study

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Ardigleusa Alves; Martiniano, Cláudia Santos; Brito, Ewerton Willian Gomes; Negrão, Oswaldo Gomes Corrêa; Arcêncio, Ricardo Alexandre; Uchôa, Severina Alice da Costa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify whether the tuberculosis control program (TCP) is evaluable and to examine the feasibility of building an evaluation model in apriority municipality for the control of tuberculosis. METHOD: this evaluability study was conducted in a municipality in northeastern Brazil. For data collection, documental analysis and interviews with key informants were performed. For indicator validation, the nominal group technique was adopted. RESULTS: the details of TCP were described, and both the logical model and the classification framework for indicators were developed and agreed up on, with the goal of characterizing the structural elements of the program, defining the structure and process indicators, and formulating the evaluation questions. CONCLUSION: TCP is evaluable. Based on logical operational analysis, it was possible to evaluate the adequacy of the program goals for the control of tuberculosis. Therefore, the performance of a summative evaluation is recommended, with a focus on the analysis of the effects of tuberculosis control interventions on decreasing morbidity and mortality. PMID:25493675

  10. Imaging Spectrum of Extrathoracic Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Raut, Abhijit A; Naphade, Prashant S; Ramakantan, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of extrathoracic tuberculosis (ETB) continues to increase slowly, especially in immunocompromised and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) patients. ETB manifests with nonspecific clinical symptoms, and being less frequent, is less familiar to most physicians. Imaging modalities of choice are computed tomography (lymphadenopathy and abdominal TB) and MR imaging (central nervous system and musculoskeletal system TB). ETB commonly involves multiple organ systems with characteristic imaging findings that permit accurate diagnosis and timely management.

  11. Psoriatic disease and tuberculosis nowadays.

    PubMed

    Balato, Nicola; Di Costanzo, Luisa; Ayala, Fabio; Balato, Anna; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Bocchino, Marialuisa

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic, relapsing and remitting inflammatory skin and joint disease that has a prevalence of 2-3% in the world's population, whereas of 1-2% in Europe. The traditional concept of psoriasis as the "healthy people's" disease has been recently revised because of ever-increasing reports of associations with various pathological conditions (hypertension, Crohn's disease, type II diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, infectious conditions). Particularly, advances in psoriasis therapies have introduced biologic agents. All the tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are associated with an increased risk of developing active disease in patients with latent tuberculosis infection, because of TNF-α key role against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For this reason, exclusion of active tuberculosis and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection are clinical imperatives prior to starting this therapy. Moreover active surveillance for a history of untreated or partially treated tuberculosis or latent form has already been shown to be effective in reducing the number of incident tuberculosis cases.

  12. Pre-Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Strain Associated with Disseminated Tuberculosis in a Pet Dog

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, João; Canto, Ana; Albuquerque, Teresa; Leal, Nuno; Macedo, Rita; Portugal, Isabel; Cunha, Mónica V.

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to isoniazid, ethambutol, and streptomycin was detected in a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, belonging to the Beijing family lineage, isolated from two nodule exudates of a Yorkshire terrier with generalized tuberculosis. This report alerts medical practitioners to the risk of dissemination of pre-multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (preMDR-TB) through exposure to M. tuberculosis-shedding pets. PMID:24153119

  13. Typical and unusual cases of female genital tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, E; Dubrovina, S

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease with myriad presentations and manifestations; it can affect any organ or tissue, excluding only hair and nails. Doctors who are not familiar with extrapulmonary tuberculosis often overlook this disease. Urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB) is the second most common form of TB in countries with severe epidemic situation and the third most common form in regions with low incidence of TB. The term "Urogenital tuberculosis" includes kidney tuberculosis; male and female tuberculosis and urinary tract tuberculosis as complication of kidney tuberculosis. We describe rarest case of tuberculosis of a placenta in young woman, suffered from genital tuberculosis, which was overlooked before delivery, as well as typical tubo-ovarian tuberculomas.

  14. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: are statistical reports accurate?

    PubMed

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina

    2014-04-01

    Before discussing the epidemiology of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) and particularly urogenital tuberculosis (UGTB), unification of the terminology is necessary. The term 'urogenital tuberculosis' is preferable to 'genitourinary tuberculosis', as renal and urinary tract tuberculosis is more common than genital tuberculosis. Some understand the term 'extrapulmonary tuberculosis' as a specific tuberculosis (TB) lesion of all organs excluding the bronchus, lungs, pleura and intrathoracic bronchopulmonary lymph nodes, but others consider pleural TB as one form of EPTB - and it is a reason for very different proportions in the spectrum of EPTB. Enigmatic tendencies have also been revealed in patients' distribution - in neighbouring regions the incidence rate may differ significantly. Although there is no clear explanation for these tendencies, careful study of the epidemiology of EPTB in different conditions will improve early diagnosis.

  15. 67 FR 9934 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-03-05

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Extension of comment... ``Tuberculosis in the Workplace'' and to request comments on these documents. OSHA is extending the deadline...

  16. Tuberculosis, advanced - chest x-rays (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis is an infectious disease that causes inflammation, the formation of tubercules and other growths within tissue, ... death. These chest x-rays show advanced pulmonary tuberculosis. There are multiple light areas (opacities) of varying ...

  17. [Pulmonary actinomycosis and tuberculosis. A comorbidity pediatric case].

    PubMed

    Bisero, Elsa D; Luque, Graciela F; Rizzo, Cristina N; Zapata, Alejandra E; Cuello, María S

    2016-08-01

    La actinomicosis es una infección supurativa crónica, producida por bacterias Gram-positivas anaeróbicas o especies Actinomyces microaerófilas. Es rara en niños y adolescentes; es más común en inmunodeprimidos. El Mycobacterium tuberculosis colabora en el desarrollo de la enfermedad. La afectación pulmonar aparece como un cuadro de condensación crónica que no mejora con el tratamiento antibiótico convencional. Las complicaciones clásicas de afectación de la pared torácica con fistulización y supuración en «granulo de azufre» son descritas con menor frecuencia en la actualidad. El diagnóstico es un verdadero desafío y se establece mediante el aislamiento de las especies de Actinomyces. El tratamiento de elección para todas las formas clínicas de la enfermedad es el uso prolongado de antibióticos. Objetivo. Presentar un caso pediátrico de comorbilidad entre tuberculosis y actinomicosis. Resaltar la importancia de la sospecha diagnóstica de actinomicosis frente a todo proceso supurado crónico.

  18. Tuberculosis: a breast-feeding challenge.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Suzanne; Winkelman, Theresa

    2008-01-01

    A recent resurgence of tuberculosis in the world community has brought the disease into the forefront of communicable disease control. Acknowledging the proven benefits of breast-feeding infants, the question of compatibility arises regarding the safety of breast-feeding an infant in the event of active tuberculosis disease in the mother. This article will discuss the emerging trends of tuberculosis disease and review the evidence that addresses the issues of safety while breast-feeding during tuberculosis treatment.

  19. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  20. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  1. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  2. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  3. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  4. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  5. 9 CFR 381.81 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 381.81 Section 381.81 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY... § 381.81 Tuberculosis. Carcasses of poultry affected with tuberculosis shall be condemned....

  6. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  7. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  8. 38 CFR 3.959 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tuberculosis. 3.959..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Protection § 3.959 Tuberculosis. Any veteran who, on...) tuberculosis may receive compensation under 38 U.S.C. 1114(q) and 1156 as in effect before August 20,...

  9. 62 FR 65388 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-12-12

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor ACTION: Proposed rule... tuberculosis (62 FR 54160). An informal public hearing was scheduled for Washington, D.C., and deadlines were... a new standard for occupational exposure to tuberculosis on October 17, 1997 (62 FR 54160)....

  10. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-25

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 [Docket 91-161-2] Tuberculosis in Cattle and... amending the tuberculosis regulations by adding a definition for States whose accredited-free status has been suspended due to detection of tuberculosis in any cattle or bison in those States, and by...

  11. 67 FR 3465 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2002-01-24

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Limited re-opening of the rulemaking record for Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis (TB). SUMMARY: The Agency is re... Sciences/ Institute of Medicine (NAS/IOM) report, ``Tuberculosis in the Workplace'' and the comments by...

  12. 61 FR 14982 - Tuberculosis in Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-04-04

    ... Tuberculosis in Cervids AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: We propose to amend the regulations concerning tuberculosis and the interstate movement of... certificate stating that they have tested negative for tuberculosis within 90 days prior to export....

  13. 64 FR 32447 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-06-17

    ... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice... standard to regulate occupational exposure to tuberculosis (TB). Public hearings on the proposal were held... Tuberculosis'' (Ex. 179-3); ``Laboratory Performance Evaluation of N95 Filtering Facepiece Respirators,...

  14. 62 FR 54160 - Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-10-17

    ... Tuberculosis; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 62, No. 201 / Friday, October 17, 1997 / Proposed... 1218-AB46 Occupational Exposure to Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration... Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, 29 U.S.C. 655, to control occupational exposure to tuberculosis...

  15. 63 FR 72104 - Tuberculosis in Captive Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1998-12-31

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 77 and 91 RIN 0579-AA53 Tuberculosis in Captive... amending the regulations concerning tuberculosis and the interstate movement of animals by adding... have tested negative for tuberculosis within 90 days prior to export. Captive cervids have...

  16. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  17. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  18. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  19. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  20. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  1. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  2. 9 CFR 311.2 - Tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis. 311.2 Section 311.2... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.2 Tuberculosis. The... pathogenesis of tuberculosis in swine, cattle, sheep, goats, and equines. (a) Carcasses condemned. The...

  3. Natural history of tuberculosis. Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, S

    1991-12-01

    This Symposium honours the achievements of Dr Karel Styblo. In this presentation, specific epidemiologic insights are reviewed. Studies of the epidemiology of tuberculosis in Eskimos showed a picture of tuberculosis at the height of the epidemic. Very high incidence was observed in young people who experienced a high fatality rate. Application of specific control measures were accompanied by rapid decline in rates, greater than observed in any other human population, demonstrating that tuberculosis could be brought under control by specific intervention. Studies of the natural trend of tuberculosis in South India showed that, even in the absence of intervention, a decline was observed in the rates of this disease. In the absence of chemotherapy, 50 per cent of cases die within 5 years, 30 per cent recover spontaneously and 20 per cent remain sputum positive. Studies of the efficacy of BCG in Madras, enabled to study the impact of efficient case-finding associated with poor treatment results showing that such a situation multiplies the number of surviving, infectious cases in the community and, thus, actually deteriorates the epidemiological situation. These various basic studies have shown both how to create success and how to create failure in tuberculosis programmes.

  4. Miliary tuberculosis in an Indian lady: Looking beyond miliary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lakshman, Arjun; Dhir, Varun; Kumar, Narender; Singhal, Manphool

    2015-01-01

    Presence of miliary shadows in chest imaging in the appropriate clinical setting is often taken as a marker of miliary tuberculosis. If sputum is negative for acid -fast bacillus, empirical anti-tubercular therapy is given without securing a histological or microbiological diagnosis. We report a young female with human immunodeficiency virus infection who had miliary infiltrates on chest radiography. She was started on empirical anti-tubercular therapy. But an alternate diagnosis was achieved later with invasive sampling and ATT was stopped. This case illustrates the need for physicians to remain alert to diseases which mimic tuberculosis in presentation. PMID:26628767

  5. Significance of nutrition in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kant, Surya; Gupta, Harshita; Ahluwalia, Savita

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and tuberculosis are both problems mostly of the developing countries. Tuberculosis can lead to malnutrition and malnutrition may predispose to tuberculosis. Poor nutrition leads to protein-energy malnutrition and micronutrients deficiencies which lead to immunodeficiency. This secondary immunodeficiency increases the host's susceptibility to infection and hence increase the risk for developing tuberculosis. Tuberculosis itself leads to reduction in appetite, nutrient malabsorption, micronutrient malabsorption, and altered metabolism leading to wasting and poor nutritional status. Nutritional status and dietary intake and hence nutritional status of patients get improved during antituberculosis treatment.

  6. Progression to active tuberculosis, but not transmission, varies by M. tuberculosis lineage in The Gambia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Bouke C.; Hill, Philip C.; Aiken, Alex; Awine, Timothy; Antonio, Martin; Adetifa, Ifedayo M.; Jackson-Sillah, Dolly J.; Fox, Annette; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Gagneux, Sebastien; Borgdorff, Martien W.; McAdam, Keith P.W.J.; Corrah, Tumani; Small, Peter M.; Adegbola, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable variability exists in the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. We hypothesized that M. africanum was less likely than M. tuberculosis to transmit and progress to tuberculosis disease. In a cohort study of tuberculosis patients and their household contacts in the Gambia, we categorized 1,808 HIV negative tuberculosis contacts according to exposure to M. tuberculosis or to M. africanum. A positive skin test indicated transmission and development of tuberculosis during 2 years of follow-up indicated progression to disease. Transmission was similar, but progression to disease was significantly lower in contacts exposed to M. africanum than to M. tuberculosis (1.0% vs 2.9%; Hazard Ratio (HR) 3.1, 95% CI 1.1–8.7). Within M. tuberculosis sensu stricto, contacts exposed to a Beijing family strain were most likely to progress to disease (5.6%; HR 6.7 (2.0–22) relative to M. africanum). M. africanum and M. tuberculosis transmit equally well to household contacts, but contacts exposed to M. africanum are less likely to progress to tuberculosis disease than those exposed to M. tuberculosis. The variable rate of progression by lineage suggests that TB variability matters in clinical settings and should be taken into account in studies evaluating tuberculosis vaccines and treatment regimens for latent tuberculosis infection. PMID:18702608

  7. [Head and neck tuberculosis: a still urgent problem].

    PubMed

    Bruzgielewicz, A; Wysocki, J; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, E

    1995-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is an unusual site for tuberculous infection. Most of the cases are secondary to active pulmonary tuberculosis. We present thirty five cases of tuberculosis localize in the head and neck region. There were twelve patients with lymphonodular tuberculosis, eleven patients with laryngeal tuberculosis, six patients with oral and pharyngeal tuberculosis, three patients with partoid gland tuberculosis, two patients with nose and paranasal sinuses tuberculosis and one patient with middle ear tuberculosis. This cases exemplifies the difficulty in diagnosis of tuberculosis in such an unusual sites.

  8. Optimal intervention strategies for tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowong, Samuel; Aziz Alaoui, A. M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper deals with the problem of optimal control of a deterministic model of tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus). We first present and analyze an uncontrolled tuberculosis model which incorporates the essential biological and epidemiological features of the disease. The model is shown to exhibit the phenomenon of backward bifurcation, where a stable disease-free equilibrium co-exists with one or more stable endemic equilibria when the associated basic reproduction number is less than the unity. Based on this continuous model, the tuberculosis control is formulated and solved as an optimal control problem, indicating how control terms on the chemoprophylaxis and detection should be introduced in the population to reduce the number of individuals with active TB. Results provide a framework for designing the cost-effective strategies for TB with two intervention methods.

  9. What's new in tuberculosis vaccines?

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Ann M.

    2002-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development has resurged as an active area of investigation. The renewed interest has been stimulated by the recognition that, although BCG is delivered to approximately 90% of all neonates globally through the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to cause over 8 million new cases of TB and over 2 million deaths annually. Over one hundred TB vaccine candidates have been developed, using different approaches to inducing protective immunity. Candidate vaccines are typically screened in small animal models of primary TB disease for their ability to protect against a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. The most promising are now beginning to enter human safety trials, marking real progress in this field for the first time in 80 years. PMID:12132007

  10. Burden of tuberculosis in Kampala, Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Guwatudde, David; Zalwango, Sarah; Kamya, Moses R.; Debanne, Sara M.; Diaz, Mireya I.; Okwera, Alphonse; Mugerwa, Roy D.; King, Charles; Whalen, Christopher C.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis in one of Uganda's poor peri-urban areas. METHODS: Multi-stage sampling was used to select a sample of households whose members were evaluated for presence of signs and/or symptoms of active tuberculosis; history of tuberculosis treatment; and relevant demographic, socioeconomic, and household environment characteristics. Patients with suspected tuberculosis underwent standardized evaluation for active disease. FINDINGS: A sample of 263 households with 1142 individuals was evaluated. Nineteen people were classified as having had tuberculosis during the one-year reference period (May 2001-April 2002): nine (47%) cases already had been diagnosed through the health care system, while 10 cases (53%) were diagnosed through the survey. The prevalences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 14.0 (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8-20.3) and 4.4 (CI = 0.83-7.89) per thousand, respectively. The incidences for all forms of tuberculosis and for sputum smear-positive tuberculosis were 9.2 (CI = 3.97-14.4) and 3.7 (CI = 0.39-6.95) per thousand per year, respectively. CONCLUSION: The rate of tuberculosis in this peri-urban community was exceptionally high and may be underestimated by current surveillance systems. The need for interventions aimed at reducing tuberculosis transmission in this, and other similar communities with high case rates, is urgent. PMID:14758406

  11. A Case of Extensive Multifocal Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajesh; Vasudevan, Biju; Pragasam, Vijendran; Badad, Ambresh

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is probably as old as the human race itself. Cutaneous tuberculosis constitutes a very small proportion of extra pulmonary tuberculosis. Extensive, multifocal involvement of cutaneous tuberculosis is a very rare manifestation. We report one such case of extensive, multifocal tuberculosis verrucosa cutis in a 30-year-old immunocompetent male patient in the absence of any primary tubercular focus. PMID:25071280

  12. Risk Factors for Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Padmanesan; Wood, James; MacIntyre, Chandini Raina; Mathai, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    The risk of progression from exposure to the tuberculosis bacilli to the development of active disease is a two-stage process governed by both exogenous and endogenous risk factors. Exogenous factors play a key role in accentuating the progression from exposure to infection among which the bacillary load in the sputum and the proximity of an individual to an infectious TB case are key factors. Similarly endogenous factors lead in progression from infection to active TB disease. Along with well-established risk factors (such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malnutrition, and young age), emerging variables such as diabetes, indoor air pollution, alcohol, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and tobacco smoke play a significant role at both the individual and population level. Socioeconomic and behavioral factors are also shown to increase the susceptibility to infection. Specific groups such as health care workers and indigenous population are also at an increased risk of TB infection and disease. This paper summarizes these factors along with health system issues such as the effects of delay in diagnosis of TB in the transmission of the bacilli. PMID:23476764

  13. Field Friendly Tuberculosis Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proper, N.; Scherman, M. S.; Jevsevar, K. L.; Stone, J.; McNeil, M. R.; Krapf, D.

    2009-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a fading threat in the United States, but in the developing world it is still a major health-care concern. Given the rising number of cases and lack of resources, there is a desperate need for an affordable, portable detection system. We are working towards the development of a field-friendly immunological biosensor that utilizes florescence microscopy to undertake this task. We observe fluorescently labeled antibodies/antigens as they bind to a glass slide treated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) in order to inhibit non-specific adsorption. Antibodies against the antigens of interest are bound to the PEGylated glass slides via biotin-streptavidin interactions. Then, fluorescently labeled antibodies are mixed with different concentrations of TB antigens and this solution is incubated on the treated glass slides for 30 minutes. The slides are thoroughly rinsed with water following the incubation period. The antigens are then detected by fluorescence using a low-cost biosensor. Our system includes a ``supermarket-scanner'' HeNe laser, home-built electronics, off-the-shelf optics and a Si photodiode. Work is underway to incorporate a flow-cell into the system, in a small portable box.

  14. Global Epidemiology of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Glaziou, Philippe; Sismanidis, Charalambos; Floyd, Katherine; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of effective chemotherapy, tuberculosis (TB) killed 1.3 million people in 2012. Alongside HIV, it remains a top cause of death from an infectious disease. Global targets for reductions in the epidemiological burden of TB have been set for 2015 and 2050 within the context of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and by the Stop TB Partnership. Achieving these targets is the focus of national and international efforts in TB control, and showing whether or not they are achieved is of major importance to guide future and sustainable investments. This article provides a short overview of sources of data to estimate TB disease burden; presents estimates of TB incidence, prevalence, and mortality in 2012 and an assessment of progress toward the 2015 targets for reductions in these indicators based on trends since 1990 and projections up to 2015; analyzes trends in TB notifications and in the implementation of the Stop TB Strategy; and considers prospects for elimination of TB after 2015. PMID:25359550

  15. Human Tuberculosis II. M. tuberculosis Mechanisms of Genetic and Phenotypic Resistance to Anti-Tuberculosis Drugs.

    PubMed

    Sgaragli, Giampietro; Frosini, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The great progress of knowledge of both M. tuberculosis physiology and how human host and bacilli interact has provided fertile ground for improving diagnosis and cure of TB infection. Once M. tuberculosis has infected humans, it elaborates strategies for evading the risk to killing by the cells of the host immune system and by the anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) agents employed to cure infection. These strategies give rise to a bacterial multidrug resistance (MDR) status. This stems firstly from genetic mutations targeting a constellation of drug-processing mechanisms that still need full identification, as drug efflux pumps and drug activating/ inactivating enzymes (genetic resistance). Secondly, from the bacterial adaptation to stressful environmental conditions by adopting a temporary dormancy state lasting for decades and characterized by indifference to anti-TB drugs (phenotypic resistance or tolerance). The clarification of the strategies elaborated for surviving by M. tuberculosis has brought to the identification in the last few years of a number of mycobacterial molecular targets worth to exploitation for the development of novel and powerful anti-TB drugs. These targets include drug-efflux pump systems, considered partly responsible for genetic multi-drug resistance, and several enzymes and pump systems, as well, that sustain the metabolic adaptations of M. tuberculosis in the host and give rise to its phenotypic drug resistance.

  16. Tuberculosis: is the past once again prologue?

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, G W

    1994-01-01

    Tuberculosis has been considered the result of hereditary susceptibility, miasmas in the environment, and contact with contagious patients. During most of the latter half of this century, tuberculosis control efforts have concentrated almost exclusively on contagion by treating patients to make them noninfectious, treating latent tuberculosis to prevent reactivation, and in some countries, vaccinating uninfected persons to protect them from the consequences of infection. With the resurgence of tuberculosis in 1985, interest in all methods of tuberculosis control has been rekindled. Much remains to be discovered and much needs to be done. If renewed efforts succeed in again forcing tuberculosis rates downward, will we have the wisdom to eliminate tuberculosis in the United States, or will we relax and bring about another resurgence? PMID:7977908

  17. Unusual presentation of renal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Aunp P; Ranganath, Ravi; Pavan, Malleshappa

    2011-07-01

    Urogenital tuberculosis (TB) is a common late manifestation of an earlier symptomatic or asymptomatic pulmonary TB infection. A latency period ranging from 5 to 40 years between the time of the initial infection and the expression of urogenital TB frequently occurs. As one of the most common sites of involvement of extrapulmonary TB, urogenital TB accounts for 15% to 20% of the infections. We present a patient who had culture-negative active tubercular kidney disease due to silent tuberculous infection. Our case demonstrates the limitations of noninvasive testing in establishing the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis.

  18. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis in paediatrics].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Altet Gómez, N; Baquero-Artigao, F; Escribano Montaner, A; Gómez-Pastrana Durán, D; González Montero, R; Mellado Peña, M J; Rodrigo-Gonzalo-de-Liria, C; Ruiz Serrano, M J

    2010-04-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important health problems worldwide. There are an increasing number of cases, including children, due to different reasons in developed countries. The most likely determining cause is immigration from highly endemic areas. Measures to optimise early and appropriate diagnosis of the different forms of tuberculosis in children are a real priority. Two Societies of the Spanish Paediatric Association (Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectology and Spanish Society of Paediatric Pneumology) have agreed this Consensus Document in order to homogenise diagnostic criteria in paediatric patients.

  19. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-05

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes.

  20. Tuberculosis eradication versus control.

    PubMed

    Schito, Marco; Hanna, Debra; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2017-03-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 10.4 million people died of tuberculosis (TB) in 2015, and the disease is now the number one cause of death from a preventable infectious disease worldwide. A bold vision is needed from global leaders to end the TB epidemic and plans to this end have been proposed. However enthusiasm must be matched by tangible and achievable goals based on the science and available funding. In order to reach the target and goals set by the WHO End TB Strategy, the challenges for TB eradication need to be addressed. In order to achieve the targets, several areas need to be bolstered, including the requirement to better identify and treat existing drug-susceptible cases and diagnose all the drug-resistant forms of the disease. Although treatment is available for most TB patients, stock-outs and other delays are problematic in some settings, resulting in ongoing transmission, especially for the drug-resistant forms of the disease. Despite the fact that a majority of multidrug-resistant cases are linked to treatment, the cure rate is only 50%, which highlights the need for safer, shorter, and more efficacious drug regimens that are more tolerable to patients. Prospects for a more efficacious vaccine are limited, with no correlates of protection identified; thus the availability of a vaccine by 2025 is highly improbable. Support for instituting infection control methods should be prioritized to subvert transmission while patients seek treatment and care. Finally, more adequate financial mechanisms should be instituted to reduce patient expenditures and support national TB programs. Moreover, funding to support basic science, drug development, clinical trials, vaccine development, diagnostics, and implementation research needs to be secured in order to reduce global TB incidence in the future.

  1. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Garvy, Beth A

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted.

  2. The treatment of tuberculosis in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Seung, K J; Bai, G H; Kim, S J; Lew, W J; Park, S K; Kim, J Y

    2003-10-01

    South Korea's complex system of tuberculosis control has never been fully described. The prevalence of tuberculosis has dropped dramatically since 1965, partly because of farsighted governmental policy that provided low-cost, accessible tuberculosis treatment to the entire population. Within the tuberculosis control system, public and private sector entities provide a wide variety of treatment options. The National Tuberculosis Program focuses on improving cure rates for new cases, while the private sector has taken more of a role in the treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and other types of complicated cases. There has been a decrease in drug-resistant tuberculosis since 1980 for multiple reasons, including increased cure rates from the introduction of rifampin-based regimens, improved nutrition and living standards, and the treatment of drug-resistant cases in the private sector. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, however, still poses a significant threat to public health. The limited outcomes data that exist in South Korea for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment suggest that cure rates are low and failure and abandonment rates are high. New public health measures are needed to improve the control of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.

  3. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  4. Tuberculosis and Cardiovascular Disease: Linking the Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Henson, David; Ticona, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R.; Garvy, Beth A.

    2016-01-01

    The burden of tuberculosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is enormous worldwide. CVD rates are rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Public health programs have been challenged with the overlapping tuberculosis and CVD epidemics. Monocyte/macrophages, lymphocytes and cytokines involved in cellular mediated immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are also main drivers of atherogenesis, suggesting a potential pathogenic role of tuberculosis in CVD via mechanisms that have been described for other pathogens that establish chronic infection and latency. Studies have shown a pro-atherogenic effect of antibody-mediated responses against mycobacterial heat shock protein-65 through cross reaction with self-antigens in human vessels. Furthermore, subsets of mycobacteria actively replicate during latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and recent studies suggest that LTBI is associated with persistent chronic inflammation that may lead to CVD. Recent epidemiologic work has shown that the risk of CVD in persons who develop tuberculosis is higher than in persons without a history of tuberculosis, even several years after recovery from tuberculosis. Together, these data suggest that tuberculosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of CVD. Further research to investigate a potential link between tuberculosis and CVD is warranted. PMID:26835156

  5. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system.

    PubMed

    Langemeier, Jane

    2007-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a deadly infectious disease. Pulmonary TB cases have decreased; yet, extrapulmonary cases such as genitourinary TB have not (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2005). Health care awareness of the clinical features of genitourinary TB is necessary to effectively treat patients with this disease.

  6. Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saltini, Cesare

    2006-12-01

    Since after the first streptomycin 1944 trials, anti-tuberculous chemotherapy research has been focused upon establishing drug combination regimens capable of overcoming drug resistance and amenable to ambulatory treatment in resource strapped countries. The first milestone being the 1959 Madras trial comparing home and sanatorium treatment in South India. Subsequently, the MRC trials led Fox and Mitchison to indicate rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide as the first line drugs for short course, 6 month, regimens and the 1982 Hong Kong Chest Service trials established intermittent therapy as the ambulatory treatment standard for directly observed therapy (DOT). The rising of the HIV epidemic at the beginning of the 1980s has refuelled tuberculosis spread in Africa and Asia and contributed to the expansion of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide making the development of new drugs and drug regimens for ambulatory treatment a top priority. Led by biotechnological advances, molecular biology has been brought into TB laboratory diagnosis for the highly sensitive and specific rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in biological samples. The field of immunological diagnosis of TB infection, dominated since the early 1900s by the intradermal tuberculin reaction has been put back in motion by the discovery of M. tuberculosis-specific proteins and peptides, now employed in blood tests of high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of latent TB which may help with the identification of contacts at higher risk of active disease and the eradication of epidemic cases.

  7. [Tuberculosis epidemiology in Mayotte Island].

    PubMed

    Woessner, J; Receveur, M C; Malvy, D; Taytard, A

    2008-10-01

    Mayotte is a French territory island, part of the Comoros Archipelago in the Indian Ocean with 200,000 inhabitants. The tuberculosis control program started in 1976, although available epidemiological data remains incomplete. We conducted a retrospective hospital-based survey in 202 outpatients and hospital medical records from the Hospital Centre of the main city to contribute to the epidemiological evaluation of tuberculosis patterns. The tuberculosis frequency remains unchanged since 2000. It affects a young population partly coming from the other neighbouring Comoro Islands (69%) with illegal immigrate status (53% in 2004). The systematic diagnostic screening efficiency of the condition appears marginal. Pulmonary involvement is the most frequent clinical manifestation (78%), although severe extrapulmonary manifestations are not exceptional. Co-infection with HIV and multi resistance to antituberculosis agents are not frequent. Up to 60% of cases have been proven to be bacteriologically linked. The notification rate remains critically low with an estimate of 39% of notifications to the local sanitary authorities in charge of secondary cases screening. The case coverage seems limited both by low socio-economical status and poor health facility accessibility The loss of follow up is dramatically high, 41% on the overall period, and up to 51% in 2004. Our results make mandatory the reinforcement of a tuberculosis survey and control involvement within the context of this French territory. Screening, care and follow up are to be implemented particularly for vulnerable and precarious groups and for patients.

  8. Tuberculosis Prevention in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Stephen J.; Bernardo, John; Daly, Jennifer S.; Husson, Robert

    2004-01-01

    To help college health services in all parts of the country improve their approach to latent tuberculosis, two Listservs were provided for them to post their questions on dealing with TB infection. In this article, the authors present some of the questions posted in the Listservs and their corresponding answers. In their answers, the authors have…

  9. Insertion element IS986 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a useful tool for diagnosis and epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, P W; van Soolingen, D; Dale, J W; Schuitema, A R; McAdam, R A; Catty, D; van Embden, J D

    1990-01-01

    IS986 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis belongs to the IS3-like family of insertion sequences, and it has previously been shown to be present in multiple copies in the chromosome of M. tuberculosis. In this study we investigated the value of a IS986-based DNA probe in the diagnosis and epidemiology of tuberculosis. IS986 was found only in species belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex. Independent isolates of M. tuberculosis complex strains showed a very high degree of polymorphism of restriction fragments which contained IS986 DNA. In contrast, Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccine strains as well as clinical isolates of M. bovis BCG contained one copy of IS986, which was present at the same location in the chromosome. Different M. tuberculosis isolates from a recent M. tuberculosis outbreak showed an identical banding pattern. We concluded that IS986 is an extremely suitable tool for the diagnosis and epidemiology of tuberculosis. Images PMID:1977765

  10. Tuberculosis: Medico-Legal Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Vetrugno, G.; De-Giorgio, F.; D’Alessandro, F.; Scafetta, I.; Berloco, F.; Buonsenso, D.; Abbate, F.; Scalise, G.; Pascali, V.L.; Valentini, P

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a diffusive infectious disease whose typical behaviour differentiates it from other infectious diseases spread by human-to-human transmission (flu, chicken pox, cholera, etc.) that follow a classic epidemic pattern. Indeed, in the presence of a known source of Koch bacilli that is capable of spreading the bacteria by air, not all exposed individuals inhale the bacteria, not all those who inhale them absorb them, not all those who absorb the bacteria are unable to eliminate them, not all who are able to eliminate them do so using delayed hypersensitivity, not all those who react with delayed hypersensitivity suffer lasting tissue damage (among other things, minor), not all who suffer tissue damage have anatomical sequelae, and not all those who have anatomical sequelae, however minimal, become carriers of bacilli in the latent period. The vast majority (90–95%) of the latter – which are in any case a portion, not the totality of those exposed – remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and never develop active tuberculosis. Based on these biological characteristics and the legal concepts of “epidemic” and “disease,” it becomes highly problematic, if not impossible, to assert both that tuberculosis can cause events of sufficient magnitude to be associated with the crime of “epidemic,” and that the mere diagnosis of a latent tuberculosis infection is sufficient to assume the presence of an illness legally prosecutable in criminal proceedings or a disability prosecutable in civil proceedings. Furthermore, clinically apparent tuberculosis is a temporarily—and in some cases permanently—disabling condition, and in certain work environments, even with the difficulties caused by the lack of available effective diagnostic tools and the insidious behaviour of the disease in the early stages, targeted monitoring to identify other persons who may become ill is appropriate. PMID:24804006

  11. [The development of tuberculosis control and tuberculosis epidemiology in East Germany].

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, P

    1983-01-01

    The fight against tuberculosis in the German Democratic Republic was performed from the very beginning as a task of the state and the society; it was developed according to the progress of economic possibilities and the epidemiological situation. The contribution of the community and of the social-economic development on tuberculosis epidemiology has proved to be decisively important factors in tuberculosis control. The specific methods applied in tuberculosis control in the course of more than 30 years have changed in their importance effectiveness and efficiency with the reduction of the tuberculosis problem and the development of new techniques. Therefore a continuous evaluation of the tuberculosis situation is necessary to recognize the most effective approach. By reducing the estimated annual infection rate to less than 0.05%, the incidence of smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis to less than 5/100,000 and the practical disappearance of tuberculosis among children tuberculosis has become an endemic localized disease among predominantly old citizens. People's mass x-ray examinations have considerably lost their value for finding tuberculosis. Early coverage and examination of persons with respiratory symptoms (21-days-coughers), of contact persons and high risk groups will determine the future activities of the chest clinics. Their integration into the system of outpatient clinics and the system of primary health care were an important step on this way. Successful treatment of each case of tuberculosis is now possible and must be attained. Early case finding + treatment considered as an united activity has become the decisively important measure in the control of tuberculosis. The endemic foci of tuberculosis in some communities have to be surveyed and eliminated with priority. Moreover, the cooperation of all physicians of public health is necessary. Only by this way tuberculosis can be eradicated in GDR in a defined time. (Aim of WHO and IUaT: 1 case of

  12. [A clinical observation on urogenital tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Noguchi, S; Shuin, T; Kitajima, N; Ishizuka, E

    1986-05-01

    A clinical observation was made on 30 cases of urogenital tuberculosis diagnosed and treated at the urological department of our Hospital between January, 1976 and December, 1984. Furthermore, 20 of them were examined for drug resistance and investigated for this tendency. They accounted for 0.23% of the outpatients. Male to female ratio was 2 to 1, but on urological tuberculosis this ratio was even. The average age was 43.7 and 50% of the patients who had a history of tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis could be detected in 24 of the 30 cases (80%) and 18 of the 21 cases (85.4%) of urological tuberculosis. Drug resistance was examined in 20 patients. The resistant ratio of M. tuberculosis against primary drugs such as SM, PAS, INAH was low and a high resistant ratio was observed on secondary drugs such as EB, RFP, TH. These clinical observations are reported and herein discussed.

  13. [Laryngeal tuberculosis: study of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Montejo, M; Alonso, M; Aguirrebengoa, K; Moreno, G; Goicoetxea, J; Petreñas, E; Bañuelos, S; Vergez, A

    2001-01-01

    We report 11 patients with laryngeal tuberculosis seen in our hospital, January 1990 to July 2000. Eight were men and all cases presented with dysphonia and/or disphagia. In 8 pulmonary tuberculosis was associated. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the sputum in 7 patients. Granulomatous laryngitis was demonstrated in the eight patients with laryngeal biopsy. The evolution with medical treatment was favourable in all patients.

  14. Neurons Are Host Cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Philippa J.; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M.; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system. PMID:24566619

  15. Neurons are host cells for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Lang, Dirk; Cooper, Susan; Sebesho, Boipelo; Allie, Nasiema; Keeton, Roanne; Francisco, Ngiambudulu M; Salie, Sumayah; Labuschagné, Antoinette; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Kellaway, Lauriston; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2014-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the central nervous system is thought to be initiated once the bacilli have breached the blood brain barrier and are phagocytosed, primarily by microglial cells. In this study, the interactions of M. tuberculosis with neurons in vitro and in vivo were investigated. The data obtained demonstrate that neurons can act as host cells for M. tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis bacilli were internalized by murine neuronal cultured cells in a time-dependent manner after exposure, with superior uptake by HT22 cells compared to Neuro-2a cells (17.7% versus 9.8%). Internalization of M. tuberculosis bacilli by human SK-N-SH cultured neurons suggested the clinical relevance of the findings. Moreover, primary murine hippocampus-derived neuronal cultures could similarly internalize M. tuberculosis. Internalized M. tuberculosis bacilli represented a productive infection with retention of bacterial viability and replicative potential, increasing 2- to 4-fold within 48 h. M. tuberculosis bacillus infection of neurons was confirmed in vivo in the brains of C57BL/6 mice after intracerebral challenge. This study, therefore, demonstrates neurons as potential new target cells for M. tuberculosis within the central nervous system.

  16. [Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Montoya, Manuel; Chumbiraico, Robert; Ricalde, Melvin; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo

    2012-06-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl-neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient's history included pulmonary tuberculosis twice and previous abandonment of therapy. Thus, it was necessary to use oral itraconazole combined with second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs administered through a gastrostomy tube. The clinical development was favorable.

  17. [Tuberculosis control of urban areas in Japan].

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    The rates of tuberculosis remain high in urban areas. The declining speed of tuberculosis incidence rate in urban areas has been slower than other areas. Efforts and resources to tuberculosis control must be concentrated on urban locations to eradicate tuberculosis in Japan. 1. Tuberculosis control in a public health center of urban area: Teru OGURA and Chiyo INOGUCHI (Toshima City, Ikebukuro Public Health Center, Tokyo Metropolitan) A wide range of TB control measures is implemented by public health centers, such as a patient registration, home-visit guidance, contact examination in urban areas. Directors of every health center have the direct responsibility for tuberculosis control measures in their jurisdiction. Ikebukuro is urban areas where there are many offices, shopping and amusement facilities. Urban people is often on the move looking for job, so public health centers are often not easy to carry out contact examinations as planned. In recent years, homelessness has been recognized as a growing urban social problem. Their incidence of tuberculosis is high. Special TB control program must be carried out in urban areas. 2. Tuberculosis Control in Tokyo Metropolitan: Kazumasa MATSUKI (Department of Infectious Diseases and Tuberculosis, Bureau of Public Health, Tokyo Metropolitan) There has been a steady decline in the TB wards. The beds for TB patients are running short and even smear positive TB cases cannot be put in a hospital without waiting several days. Staffs of an urban emergency department must protect tuberculosis infection by environmental controls of emergency room. Tokyo Metropolitan government supports the engineering improvements of emergency room to hospitals. Directly observed therapy for tuberculosis patients at a district has been implemented to complete their therapy. On DOT, a trained health worker observes the patient take anti-TB medication. 3. Usefulness of Molecular Epidemiologic approach on Tuberculosis Control: Atsushi HASE (Osaka

  18. Tuberculosis 2004: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Glassroth, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues as a major public health challenge worldwide. HIV-TB coinfection is especially concerning as it accelerates progression of infection to active disease and amplifies spread of TB including drug resistant disease. Application of molecular biology and insights from classic microbiology to TB control have resulted in important innovations in diagnosis and treatment. Radiometric assay and, particularly, PCR, with nucleic acid probing, have reduced the time to diagnosis. Moreover, the sensitivity of these techniques is potentially log orders of magnitude more sensitive. Molecular techniques can be adapted to drug susceptibility testing. The differential activity and post-antibiotic effect of various drugs against TB have led to highly effective briefer regimens and to directly observed therapy. Insights into basic host defense against TB and description of the M. tuberculosis genome have created optimism for developing new treatments and effective vaccines in the years to come. PMID:16555622

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  20. Tuberculosis and migration: a review.

    PubMed

    Kronfol, N M; Mansour, Z

    2013-08-01

    In the past decade, the number of new cases of tuberculosis worldwide has barely declined and national tuberculosis control and elimination programmes in many high-income countries worldwide are increasingly challenged to address the problem of disease in foreign-born residents and migrant workers. Routine immigration medical screening, either before or after arrival in the recipient country, is designed to avoid the admission of migrants who pose a public health threat. Screening measures, however, have changed with time largely based on respect for individuals' rights. This paper reviews the measures that are being used by countries to screen immigrants and improve their health well-being, and presents cases studies from two Eastern Mediterranean Region countries.

  1. [New aspects of tuberculosis therapy].

    PubMed

    Haegi, V

    1975-02-22

    The introduction of ethambutol and rifampicin has modified the therapy of tuberculosis. Therapy in hospitals or sanatoria can be shortened, and intermittent regimens (once or twice weekly under supervision) are possible. Better knowledge of the side effects of particular drugs, particularly rifampicin, (such as allergic reactions in intermittent administration and reduced effect of oral contraceptives) has been gained. Instead of mere supervision, preventive chemotherapy is given in many cases such as in recently discovered fibrotic lesions and in high risk cases (silicosis, treatment with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents)minadequate treatment may lead to functional impairment such as fibrosis and cor pulmonale. These aspects are discussed and the resultant guidelines for the treatment of tuberculosis are presented.

  2. Novel approaches in diagnosing tuberculosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolk, Arend H. J.; Dang, Ngoc A.; Kuijper, Sjoukje; Gibson, Tim; Anthony, Richard; Claassens, Mareli M.; Kaal, Erwin; Janssen, Hans-Gerd

    2011-06-01

    The WHO declared tuberculosis (TB) a global emergency. An estimated 8-9 million new cases occur each year with 2-3 million deaths. Currently, TB is diagnosed mostly by chest-X ray and staining of the mycobacteria in sputum with a detection limit of 1x104 bacteria /ml. There is an urgent need for better diagnostic tools for TB especially for developing countries. We have validated the electronic nose from TD Technology for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by headspace analysis of 284 sputum samples from TB patients. We used linear discriminant function analysis resulting in a sensitivity of 75% a specificity of 67% and an accuracy of 69%. Further research is still required to improve the results by choosing more selective sensors and sampling techniques. We used a fast gas chromatography- mass spectrometry method (GC-MS). The automated procedure is based on the injection of sputum samples which are methylated inside the GC injector using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM-GC-MS). Hexacosanoic acid in combination with tuberculostearic acid was found to be specific for the presence of M. tuberculosis. The detection limit was similar to microscopy. We found no false positives, all microscopy and culture positive samples were also found positive with the THM-GC-MS method. The detection of ribosomal RNA from the infecting organism offers great potential since rRNA molecules outnumber chromosomal DNA by a factor 1000. It thus may possible to detect the organism without amplification of the nucleic acids (NA). We used a capture and a tagged detector probe for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis in sputum. So far the detection limit is 1x106 bacteria / ml. Currently we are testing a Lab-On-A-Chip Interferometer detection system.

  3. Primary tuberculosis of the palate

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman. PMID:24925532

  4. Primary tuberculosis of the palate.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Pablo; Fuente, Eduardo; Gallego, Lorena; Calvo, Nicolás

    2014-06-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a life-threatening infectious disease with a high world incidence. However, TB with oral expression is considered rare. The importance of recognising this entity lies in its early diagnosis and treatment, as it can be easily confused with neoplastic or traumatic ulcers. We present a case of a primary TB located in the hard palate and gingiva in an 88-year-old woman.

  5. [Diagnosis of tuberculosis of bladder].

    PubMed

    Kul'chavenia, E V; Kholtobin, D P

    2014-01-01

    A comparative analysis of cystoscopic and pathologic patterns in 190 patients hospitalized for differential diagnosis or treatment of genitourinary tuberculosis in 2008-2011 was performed. All patients underwent polyfocal biopsy followed by pathologic examination of biopsy specimens. Furthermore, a comparison of results ofpathomorphological studies of tissue obtained by biopsy and after cystectomy was conducted. Cystoscopy in all patients with tuberculosis of the bladder (TB) revealed the reduced bladder capacity in contrast to patients with other urological diseases. Deformation of orifices, trabecularity and contact bleeding were observed in 66.7 to 94.4% of cases in patients with TB, which were significantly more common than in other diseases. Polymorphism of pathological pattern and the lack of specific changes in the majority of patients with TB were noted; multinucleated Pirogov-Langhans cells were found only in 11.8% of cases, and only in biopsies, whereas in the tissues obtained after cystectomy in same patients, lymphocytic infiltration and fibrosis were observed. The algorithm of diagnosis of tuberculosis of the bladder is suggested.

  6. [The global importance of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Rieder, Hans L

    2011-07-01

    In the western industrialized world tuberculosis has receded from its peak with an annual mortality of 1 % some 150 to 250 years ago to currently 10 to 20 new cases annually per 100,000 population. The introduction of chemotherapy in the 1950s reduced case fatality from some 70 % to a small fraction. Nowadays, the indigenous elderly and immigrants from high-prevalence countries contribute most of tuberculosis morbidity in the industrialized world. In contrast, tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in most resource-constrained countries and has substantially increased in sub-Saharan Africa as a result of the impact of HIV infection. The World Health Organization estimates that each year over 9 million new cases emerge in the world. Because of weak infrastructures low-income countries continue to experience shortages in the drug supply, facilitating the emergence of strains resistant to first-line drugs which are difficult or impossible to treat. The primordial task for the international community is to assist in strengthening the necessary infrastructures and to help ensuring that patients have unrestricted and uninterrupted access to antituberculosis medications and antiretroviral drugs.

  7. Tuberculosis presenting as posttraumatic panophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Ramandeep; Gupta, Suruchi; Kumar, Abhiraj; Kakkar, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Panophthalmitis is one of rare manifestations of tuberculosis described in atypical situations such as children, immune compromised patients, or drug abuse. The present report describes the first case of tubercular panophthalmitis developing after trauma in an otherwise healthy adult patient. A 46-year-old female patient presented with corneal infiltrate and endophthalmitis that developed after an injury to right eye with wooden object. Corneal scrapings and vitreous tap were sterile. The patient did not improve with antibiotics and developed panophthalmitis. On evisceration of the painful blind eye, histopathology showed the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacilli. The patient had no other systemic focus of tubercular infection. The patient was managed with anti-tubercular therapy for 6 months. Atypical presentations of tuberculosis like panophthalmitis pose a difficult problem in diagnosis as well as treatment. Direct inoculation of bacilli during trauma is a rare source of infection. This case report presents unusual development of tubercular panophthalmitis following direct inoculation of bacilli during trauma. Ocular tuberculosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of posttraumatic endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis, especially in endemic regions like India. PMID:27013830

  8. Viability of stressed Mycobacterium tuberculosis and association with multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Maria Conceição; Giampaglia, Carmen Maria Saraiva; Chimara, Erica; Oliveira, Rosângela Siqueira; Vedovello, Danielle; Sakamoto, Sidnei Miyoshi; Ferrazoli, Lucilaine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated biological characteristics of recovered stressed M. tuberculosis isolates that failed to grow in differential culture media for phenotypic identification and in culture media containing anti-tuberculosis drugs for drug-susceptibility testing, despite of having grown in primary culture. It represents an improvement in the diagnosis of MDR tuberculosis and tuberculosis control. PMID:24294238

  9. Tuberculosis of sacroiliac joint: an unusual presentation.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ranju; Bienenstock, Harry; Morano, Placido; Gupta, Anil

    2005-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with low back pain and fever. After an initial delay, a diagnosis of tuberculosis of left sacroiliac joint was established by fine-needle aspiration of the joint. Awareness of extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis and high index of suspicion will facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:16173335

  10. Tuberculosis immunity: Opportunities from studies with cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis are closely related (>99% genetic identity), inducing similar host responses and disease expression upon infection. There is a rich history of co-discovery in the development of control measures applicable to both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB) including s...

  11. Disseminated Tuberculosis Presenting as Baker's Cyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Sami; Waqar, Sana

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of coexisting immunocompromised state and lack of specific symptoms a reactivation of treated mycobacterial tuberculosis (MTB) infection is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis of leg pain. We present a unique case of disseminated tuberculosis presenting as an infected Baker's cyst in a 73-year-old immunocompetent male. PMID:28163945

  12. Tuberculosis: will it infect wild elk?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffe, T.J.; Smith, B.

    1992-01-01

    Tuberculosis! Just the name conjures up images of a devastating, chronic, debilitating disease. And so it is in both humans and animals. Tuberculosis (TB) is not known to be present to any significant degree in the free-ranging elk herds of North America. But increasing reports of TB in deer species-including elk-on game ranches prompt grave concern.

  13. Using Peer Helpers for Tuberculosis Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCue, Maureen; Afifi, Larry Anna

    1996-01-01

    Describes a peer helper program initiated by the University of Iowa Student Health Services to prevent active tuberculosis development among foreign national students. Before instituting the program, compliance with tuberculosis prevention efforts for those students was less than 5%. Since the peer program was instituted, compliance has risen to…

  14. Tuberculosis: Art Therapy with Patients in Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosner-David, Irene; Ilusorio, Shereen

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis is reappearing with increasing prevalence and presenting new treatment challenges. Art therapy, which partly originated in a tuberculosis sanatoria, again serves to assist patients in coping with their illness and confinement. Case examples illustrate aspects of the disease and related emotions and highlight the potential for such an…

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  16. Reprogramming the T cell response to Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Andersen, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recently, Coscolla, Copin et al. use comparative genomics of M.tuberculosis strains to show that most human T cell-recognized epitopes are hyperconserved, but bona fide variable epitopes also exist. This identification of two sets of antigens implies opposing evolutionary processes and has an important impact on Tuberculosis vaccine strategy and design. PMID:26777728

  17. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  18. Tuberculosis of the bones and joints

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, M.

    1988-01-01

    Bone and joint tuberculosis is common in developing countries, and surgeons in these countries are often faced with the dual problem of diagnosing and treating this disease. However, bone and joint tuberculosis has not yet completely disappeared from industrialized countries, either. This book discusses this issue.

  19. Late reactivation of tuberculosis in an oleothorax.

    PubMed

    Fahy, Ruairi J; Morales, Juan; King, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The injection of oil into the pleural cavity was a widely used treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis until the advent of effective anti-tuberculous therapy. Long-term complications of oleothorax can occur when the oil is not removed. The authors present an unusual complication of oleothorax, reactivation of tuberculosis, 54 years after oil instillation.

  20. Miliary tuberculosis and adult respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Piqueras, A R; Marruecos, L; Artigas, A; Rodriguez, C

    1987-01-01

    Although, miliary tuberculosis is an unusual cause of severe acute respiratory failure, we describe nine patients with miliary tuberculosis who developed adult respiratory distress syndrome. This complication occurred in seven patients despite treatment with antituberculous drugs. In two patients who developed the syndrome, miliary tuberculosis was diagnosed only at postmortem. The presence of pulmonary hypertension in all cases and disseminated intravascular coagulation in seven cases suggests a possible pathophysiologic relationship with severe pulmonary vascular damage. The high mortality rate (88.8%) was associated with nonpulmonary organ system failure. Miliary tuberculosis should be considered in patients with adult respiratory distress syndrome of unknown etiology, and simple diagnostic procedures such as sputum, bronchial brushing, and gastric examination should be followed by invasive diagnostic procedures to confirm this etiology. Since untreated miliary tuberculosis is usually fatal, early recognition of this disease is of great importance, and specific therapy may play a lifesaving role.

  1. Mathematical Models of Tuberculosis Reactivation and Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    The natural history of human infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is highly variable, as is the response to treatment of active tuberculosis. There is presently no direct means to identify individuals in whom Mtb infection has been eradicated, whether by a bactericidal immune response or sterilizing antimicrobial chemotherapy. Mathematical models can assist in such circumstances by measuring or predicting events that cannot be directly observed. The 3 models discussed in this review illustrate instances in which mathematical models were used to identify individuals with innate resistance to Mtb infection, determine the etiologic mechanism of tuberculosis in patients treated with tumor necrosis factor blockers, and predict the risk of relapse in persons undergoing tuberculosis treatment. These examples illustrate the power of various types of mathematic models to increase knowledge and thereby inform interventions in the present global tuberculosis epidemic. PMID:27242697

  2. Interference of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with macrophage responses.

    PubMed

    Scherr, Nicole; Jayachandran, Rajesh; Mueller, Philipp; Pieters, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has become an important health and economic burden, with more than four thousand people succumbing to the disease every day. Thus, there is an urgent need to understand the molecular basis of this pathogen's success in causing disease in humans, in order to develop new drugs superior to conventional drugs available at present. One reason why M. tuberculosis is such a dangerous microbe lies within its ability to survive within infected hosts, thereby efficiently circumventing host immune responses. Over the past few years, a number of mechanisms have been unravelled that are utilized by M. tuberculosis to survive within hosts and to avoid immune defence mechanisms. Several of these mechanisms have been described in this communication that may be useful for the development of novel compounds to treat tuberculosis.

  3. Primary nasal tuberculosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Ravi C; Al Kaabi, Juma; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2004-03-01

    During the past 2 decades, tuberculosis--both pulmonary and extrapulmonary--has re-emerged as a major health problem worldwide. Nasal tuberculosis--either primary or secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis or facial lupus--is rare, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nasal granulomas. We describe a case of primary nasal tuberculosis in an adult male who presented with a polypoid lesion in one nasal cavity. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the patient's successful response to antituberculous drug treatment. Given the rising incidence of tuberculosis, it is prudent that otolaryngologists remain cognizant of this infection as a potential cause of unusual lesions in the head and neck.

  4. A disguised tuberculosis in oral buccal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kanwar Deep Singh; Mehta, Anurag; Marwaha, Mohita; Kalra, Manpreet; Nanda, Jasmine

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It is a chronic granulomatous disease that can affect any part of the body, including the oral cavity. Oral lesions of tuberculosis, though uncommon, are seen in both the primary and secondary stages of the disease. This article presents a case of tuberculosis of the buccal mucosa, manifesting as non-healing, non-painful ulcer. The diagnosis was confirmed based on histopathology, sputum examination and immunological investigation. The patient underwent anti-tuberculosis therapy and her oral and systemic conditions improved rapidly. Although oral manifestations of tuberculosis are rare, clinicians should include them in the differential diagnosis of various types of oral ulcers. An early diagnosis with prompt treatment can prevent complications and potential contaminations.

  5. Cytokinins beyond plants: synthesis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Samanovic, Marie I.; Darwin, K. H.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) resides mainly inside macrophages, which produce nitric oxide (NO) to combat microbial infections. Earlier studies revealed that proteasome-associated genes are required for M. tuberculosis to resist NO via a previously uncharacterized mechanism. Twelve years later, we elucidated the link between proteasome function and NO resistance in M. tuberculosis in Molecular Cell, 57 (2015), pp. 984-994. In a proteasome degradation-defective mutant, Rv1205, a homologue of the plant enzyme LONELY GUY (LOG) that is involved in the synthesis of phytohormones called cytokinins, accumulates and as a consequence results in the overproduction of cytokinins. Cytokinins break down into aldehydes that kill mycobacteria in the presence of NO. Importantly, this new discovery reveals for the first time that a mammalian bacterial pathogen produces cytokinins and leaves us with the question: why is M. tuberculosis, an exclusively human pathogen, producing cytokinins? PMID:28357289

  6. [Characteristics of tuberculosis epidemiology in Moscow and improvement measures].

    PubMed

    Kovaleva, S I

    1994-01-01

    The trends in tuberculosis morbidity for the recent 30 years and factors that caused tuberculosis incidence to rise by 13.5% in 1992 are analyzed. Infiltrative-disseminated, disseminated and fibrous-cavernous tuberculosis were diagnosed in 58.7%, 11.7% and 1.8% of cases, respectively. Destructive lesion was found in 50% of the patients. Tuberculosis mortality reached in 1992 4.6 per 100,000. Measures to control tuberculosis spread in Moscow are suggested.

  7. Against all odds: diagnosing tuberculosis in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Douglas; Howell, Victoria; Toppozini, Christina; Dong, Krista; Clark, Michael; Hurtado, Rocio

    2011-11-15

    Clinical and logistic systems to support the timely diagnosis of tuberculosis are currently not preventing large numbers of tuberculosis deaths in South Africa. Context-appropriate systems for the diagnosis of tuberculosis are entirely dependent on effective and responsive management of human resources and an uninterrupted supply of clinical materials. Attention to these components of the tuberculosis program is urgently needed before new diagnostic technologies can be expected to impact on tuberculosis mortality in resource constrained settings.

  8. Tackling tuberculosis: Insights from an international TB Summit in London

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Arundhati; Danquah, Cynthia A; Scotti, Francesca; Howard, Tracey K; Kamil, Tengku K; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses a grave predicament to the world as it is not merely a scientific challenge but a socio-economic burden as well. A prime cause of mortality in human due to an infectious disease; the malady and its cause, Mycobacterium tuberculosis have remained an enigma with many questions that remain unanswered. The ability of the pathogen to survive and switch between varied physiological states necessitates a protracted therapeutic regimen that exerts an excessive strain on low-resource countries. To complicate things further, there has been a significant rise of antimicrobial resistance. Existing control measures, including treatment regimens have remained fairly uniform globally for at least half a century and require reinvention. Overcoming the societal and scientific challenges requires an increase in dialog to identify key regions that need attention and effective partners with whom successful collaborations can be fostered. In this report, we explore the discussions held at the International TB Summit 2015 hosted by EuroSciCon, which served as an excellent platform for researchers to share their recent findings. Ground-breaking results require outreach to affect policy design, governance and control of the disease. Hence, we feel it is important that meetings such as these reach a wider, global audience. PMID:26151309

  9. 77 FR 16661 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone Designations; NM; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State and Zone Designations; NM... tuberculosis regulations by establishing two separate zones with different tuberculosis risk classifications... INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. C. William Hench, Senior Staff Veterinarian, National Tuberculosis...

  10. Tuberculosis: distribution, risk factors, mortality.

    PubMed

    Kochi, A

    1994-10-01

    About a century after Koch's discovery of the TB bacilli the tuberculosis epidemic which had appeared to be under control was again recognized as a major global health threat. The decline in the epidemic in this century had been largely through the improved living standards and, eventually, the availability and use of effective antibiotics. While tuberculosis gradually disappeared from the health agenda in the western world it remained a big killer throughout the century and in 1992 an estimated 2.7 million TB deaths occurred; 30 million will die from TB during the 1990s if current trends are not reversed. The annual number of new cases will increase from 7.5 million estimated in 1990 to more than 10 million in the year 2000. The main factors for this increase are demographic forces, population movements, the HIV epidemic and increasing drug resistance. The impact of the HIV epidemic is already felt in many sub-Saharan African countries and now threatens Asia where almost two-thirds of the world's TB infected population live and where HIV is spreading. Tuberculosis has also reemerged as a major public health problem in industrialized countries due to international migration, the breakdown of health services, including TB services etc. The control of the epidemic can only be through a concerted action to reinstate TB as priority among health concerns, reflected in national and international resources. A coalition of public and private supporters must be mobilized to support the effort to fight the disease. Governments, non-governmental organizations, the business community, refugee organizations, medical institutions, and other UN agencies are invited to join with WHO in this effort.

  11. Current strategies to treat tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Podany, Anthony T.; Swindells, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been a leading cause of death for more than a century. While effective therapies exist, treatment is long and cumbersome. TB control is complicated by the overlapping problems created by global inadequacy of public health infrastructures, the interaction of the TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics, and the emergence of drug-resistant TB. After a long period of neglect, there is now significant progress in the development of novel treatment regimens for TB. Focusing on treatment for active disease, we review pathways to TB regimen development and the new and repurposed anti-TB agents in clinical development. PMID:27853505

  12. Animal Models of Tuberculosis: Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, Lisanne M.; van der Sar, Astrid M.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decade the zebrafish (Danio rerio) has become an attractive new vertebrate model organism for studying mycobacterial pathogenesis. The combination of medium-throughput screening and real-time in vivo visualization has allowed new ways to dissect host pathogenic interaction in a vertebrate host. Furthermore, genetic screens on the host and bacterial sides have elucidated new mechanisms involved in the initiation of granuloma formation and the importance of a balanced immune response for control of mycobacterial pathogens. This article will highlight the unique features of the zebrafish–Mycobacterium marinum infection model and its added value for tuberculosis research. PMID:25414379

  13. Tracheobronchial tuberculosis: a clinical review

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial tuberculosis (EBTB) is defined as tuberculous infection of the tracheobronchial tree. The exact pathogenesis is unclear, and it has a heterogenous clinical course. Its diagnosis requires the clinician to have a high index of suspicion based on clinical symptoms and radiological features. Computed tomography and bronchoscopy are useful tools in its evaluation. The goal of treatment is in the eradication of tuberculous bacilli with appropriate anti-tuberculous therapy. Use of corticosteroids is controversial for the prevention of tracheobronchial stenosis. Interventional bronchoscopy or surgical intervention is employed to restore airway patency once significant stenosis occurs. PMID:28203440

  14. Tuberculosis elimination and the challenge of latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Matteelli, Alberto; Sulis, Giorgia; Capone, Susanna; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2017-03-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) affects one third to one fourth of the human population and is the reservoir for a significant proportion of emerging active tuberculosis (TB) cases, especially in low incidence countries. The World Health Organization launched in 2015 the END-TB strategy that aims at TB elimination and promotes, for the first time ever, the management of LTBI. The preventive package, basically consisting of testing and treatment for LTBI in groups at high risk of reactivation, is a mainstay of the first pillar of the strategy, alongside prompt diagnosis and early treatment of both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant TB disease. Testing and treatment for LTBI should be pursued with a programmatic perspective. This implies strong political commitment, adequate funding and an effective monitoring and evaluation system. People living with HIV and children under five years of age who are household contact of a contagious TB cases are primarily targeted in all epidemiological setting. In high resource and low incidence setting, additional at risk populations should also be the target for systematic LTBI testing and treatment. Research is urgently needed to develop diagnostic tests with higher predictive value to identify individuals that progress from infection to disease. Similarly, shorter and safer treatment regimens are needed to make the trade-off between potential benefits and harms more favourable for an increasing proportion of infected individuals.

  15. Genetic engineering of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a review.

    PubMed

    Lamrabet, Otmane; Drancourt, Michel

    2012-09-01

    Genetic engineering has been used for decades to mutate and delete genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome with the translational goal of producing attenuated mutants with conserved susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics. The development of plasmids and mycobacteriophages that can transfer DNA into the M. tuberculosis chromosome has effectively overcome M. tuberculosis slow growth rate and the capsule and mycolic acid wall, which limit DNA uptake. The use of genetic engineering techniques has shed light on many aspects of pathogenesis mechanisms, including cellular growth, mycolic acid biosynthesis, metabolism, drug resistance and virulence. Moreover, such research gave clues to the development of new vaccines or new drugs for routine clinical practice. The use of genetic engineering tools is mainly based on the underlying concept that altering or reducing the M. tuberculosis genome could decrease its virulence. A contrario, recent post-genomic analyses indicated that reduced bacterial genomes are often associated with increased bacterial virulence and that M. tuberculosis acquired genes by lateral genetic exchange during its evolution. Therefore, ancestors utilizing genetic engineering to add genes to the M. tuberculosis genome may lead to new vaccines and the availability of M. tuberculosis isolates with increased susceptibility to antituberculous antibiotics.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  17. [The causes of death of pulmonary tuberculosis: late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tomono, K

    1998-12-01

    We investigated the causes of death of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. Chronic respiratory failure is one of the most frequent cause of death in the patients of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We compared the long term prognosis of chronic respiratory failure in case of emphysema and pulmonary tuberculosis. In the patients with chronic respiratory failure by pulmonary emphysema, the prognosis was poor in those with pulmonary hypertension. But in case of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, prognosis was not affected by presence or absence of pulmonary hypertension. The determinants of prognosis of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis are the indication of home oxygen therapy, malnutrition, and hypoxemia. Fungal infection, especially aspergilloma, is a common secondary infection of late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis. We investigated forty-two cases of aspergilloma as late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and of those 15 patients died. The causes of death were pneumonia and respiratory failure. Measurement of galactomannan antigen of aspergillus in serum using ELISA or PCR, it was apparent that the outcome was poor in the patients positive for antigen. It suggested that the prognosis of the patients with aspergilloma related with some degree of invasion of Aspergillus in parenchyma. It was reported that neoplasm is closely related to chronic tuberculous empyema. Lymphoma is most frequently complicated with chronic tuberculous empyema, and squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, sarcoma and carcinoid were reported as complication of chronic empyema. We reported the case of angiosarcoma, originated from chronic empyema in left thoracic cavity formed after being treated for tuberculosis with artificial pneumothorax. Recently, the number of patients with late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis have been decreased, but some severe cases of patients of pulmonary tuberculosis will suffer from late sequelae of pulmonary tuberculosis, and

  18. Cancer-specific incidence rates of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Gi Hyeon; Kim, Min Jae; Seo, Soyoung; Hwang, Boram; Lee, Eugene; Yun, Yujin; Choi, Minsun; Kim, Moonsuk; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Kyoung-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Population-based studies of the incidence of tuberculosis in cancer patients according to the type of cancer are limited. We investigated the cancer-specific incidence of tuberculosis in a nationwide population-based cohort in a country with an intermediate burden of tuberculosis. We used mandatory National Health Insurance claims data to construct a cancer cohort of adults (aged 20–99 years) with newly diagnosed malignancies other than lung cancer, from January 2008 to December 2012. Patients who developed tuberculosis in this period were identified in the cancer cohort and the general population. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of tuberculosis in the cancer cohort according to type of cancer and time after cancer diagnosis were calculated by comparing the observed incidence rates with those inferred from the age- and gender-specific incidence rates in the general population. A total of 855,382 cancer patients and 1589,876 person-years (py) were observed. A total of 5745 patients developed tuberculosis; the mean incidence rate was 361.3 per 100,000 py, and the SIR was 2.22 (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.17–2.27). The incidence rate was highest for hematologic malignancy and lowest for thyroid cancer. It was also highest as 650.1 per 100,000 py, with SIR of 3.70 (CI, 3.57–3.83) for the first 6 months after diagnosis of malignancy and then declined. However, it still remained higher than that of the general population after 24 months (SIR = 1.43, CI, 1.36–1.51). The incidence of tuberculosis increases after diagnosis in patients with malignancies. The risk of tuberculosis differs according to the type of cancer and remains elevated even 24 months after cancer diagnosis. Tuberculosis should be considered an important comorbidity in patients with malignancies. PMID:27661041

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis wears what it eats.

    PubMed

    Russell, David G; VanderVen, Brian C; Lee, Wonsik; Abramovitch, Robert B; Kim, Mi-jeong; Homolka, Susanne; Niemann, Stefan; Rohde, Kyle H

    2010-07-22

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most pernicious of human pathogens. Current vaccines are ineffective, and drugs, although efficacious, require prolonged treatment with constant medical oversight. Overcoming these problems requires a greater appreciation of M. tuberculosis in the context of its host. Upon infection of either macrophages in culture or animal models, the bacterium realigns its metabolism in response to the new environments it encounters. Understanding these environments, and the stresses that they place on M. tuberculosis, should provide insights invaluable for the development of new chemo- and immunotherapeutic strategies.

  20. The pathology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, K

    2012-05-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an old enemy of the human race, with evidence of infection observed as early as 5000 years ago. Although more host-restricted than Mycobacterium bovis, which can infect all warm-blooded vertebrates, M. tuberculosis can infect, and cause morbidity and mortality in, several veterinary species as well. As M. tuberculosis is one of the earliest described bacterial pathogens, the literature describing this organism is vast and overwhelming. This review strives to distill what is currently known about this bacterium and the disease it causes for the veterinary pathologist.

  1. Medical management of genitourinary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kadhiravan, Tamilarasu; Sharma, Surendra K

    2008-07-01

    Antimycobacterial chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for the majority of patients with genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB). A large body of evidence from clinical trials suggests that short-course chemotherapy regimens, employing four drugs including rifampicin and pyrazinamide, achieve cure in most of the patients with tuberculosis (TB) and are associated with the lowest rates of relapse. Standard six-month regimens are adequate for the treatment of GUTB. Directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) is the internationally recommended comprehensive strategy to control TB, and directly observed treatment is just one of its five elements. DOTS cures not only the individual with TB but also reduces the incidence of TB as well as the prevalence of primary drug-resistance in the community. Corticosteroids have no proven role in the management of patients with GUTB. Errors in prescribing anti-TB drugs are common in clinical practice. Standardized treatment regimens at correct doses and assured completion of treatment have made DOTS the present-day standard of care for the management of all forms of TB including GUTB.

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis prevents inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Master, Sharon S; Rampini, Silvana K; Davis, Alexander S; Keller, Christine; Ehlers, Stefan; Springer, Burkhard; Timmins, Graham S; Sander, Peter; Deretic, Vojo

    2008-04-17

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) parasitizes host macrophages and subverts host innate and adaptive immunity. Several cytokines elicited by Mtb are mediators of mycobacterial clearance or are involved in tuberculosis pathology. Surprisingly, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), a major proinflammatory cytokine, has not been implicated in host-Mtb interactions. IL-1beta is activated by processing upon assembly of the inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory caspase-activating protein complex. Here, we show that Mtb prevents inflammasome activation and IL-1beta processing. An Mtb gene, zmp1, which encodes a putative Zn(2+) metalloprotease, is required for this process. Infection of macrophages with zmp1-deleted Mtb triggered activation of the inflammasome, resulting in increased IL-1beta secretion, enhanced maturation of Mtb containing phagosomes, improved mycobacterial clearance by macrophages, and lower bacterial burden in the lungs of aerosol-infected mice. Thus, we uncovered a previously masked role for IL-1beta in the control of Mtb and a mycobacterial system that prevents inflammasome and, therefore, IL-1beta activation.

  3. Perspectives on tuberculosis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Ahmed, Yusuf; Kapata, Nathan; Maeurer, Markus; Mwaba, Peter; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has been recognized as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnancy for nearly a century, but research and efforts to roll out comprehensive TB screening and treatment in high-risk populations such as those with a high prevalence of HIV or other diseases of poverty, have lagged behind similar efforts to address HIV infection in pregnancy and the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission. Immunological changes during pregnancy make the activation of latent TB infection or de novo infection more likely than among non-pregnant women. TB treatment in pregnancy poses several problems that have been under-researched, such as contraindications to anti-TB and anti-HIV drugs and potential risks to the neonate, which are particularly important with respect to second-line TB treatment. Whilst congenital TB is thought to be rare, data from high HIV burden settings suggest this is not the case. There is a need for more studies screening for TB in neonates and observing outcomes, and testing preventative or curative actions. National tuberculosis control programmes (NTPs) should work with antenatal and national HIV programmes in high-burden populations to provide screening at antenatal clinics, or to establish functioning systems whereby pregnant women at high risk can drop in to routine NTP screening stations.

  4. Field-Friendly Tuberculosis Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proper, Nathan; Stone, Jeremy; Jevsevar, Kristen L.; Scherman, Michael; McNeil, Michael R.; Krapf, Diego

    2010-03-01

    Tuberculosis is a fading threat in the United States, but in the developing world it is still a major health-care concern. With the rising number of cases and lack of resources, there is a desperate need for an affordable, portable detection system. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of a field-friendly immunological biosensor that utilizes florescence and specialized surface chemistries. We observe fluorescently labeled antibodies as they bind to a glass slide. Slides are treated with biotinylated polyethylene glycol to inhibit non-specific interactions and facilitate the binding of primary antibodies allowing for a high degree of specificity. Solutions of tuberculosis-specific antigens where mixed with fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies and incubated on the treated surfaces. An array of different concentrations of antigens bound to fluorescent tags is then read in an epifluorescnece microscope. This assay was used in the portable detector to show that higher concentrations of bound labeled antigens produce a greater emission when excited by a HeNe laser. Home-built electronics, off-the-shelf optics, and a Si photodiode (PD) were used. The data collected from multiple concentrations show a measurable photocurrent. Work is now underway to incorporate a avalanche (PD), flow-cell technology, in a portable box.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Success through dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Gengenbacher, Martin; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major health threat, killing near to 2 million individuals around this globe, annually. The sole vaccine developed almost a century ago, provides limited protection only during childhood. After decades without the introduction of new antibiotics, several candidates are currently undergoing clinical investigation. Curing TB requires prolonged combination chemotherapy with several drugs. Moreover, monitoring the success of therapy is questionable due to the lack of reliable biomarkers. To substantially improve the situation, a detailed understanding of the crosstalk between human host and the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is vital. Principally, Mtb’s enormous success is based on three capacities: First, reprogramming of macrophages after primary infection/phagocytosis in order to prevent its own destruction; second, initiating the formation of well-organized granulomas, comprising different immune cells to create a confined environment for the host–pathogen standoff; third, the capability to shut down its own central metabolism, terminate replication and thereby transit into a stage of dormancy rendering itself extremely resistant to host defense and drug treatment. Here we review the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes, draw conclusions in a working model of mycobacterial dormancy and highlight gaps in our understanding to be addressed in future research. PMID:22320122

  6. Antimicrobial therapy of pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Walsh

    1960-01-01

    The discovery, some nine years ago, of the highly specific antituberculous drug, isoniazid, marked an important advance in the antimicrobial therapy of tuberculosis, first practised successfully with streptomycin and p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in the late 'forties. Isoniazid is relatively non-toxic and, unlike streptomycin, can be administered orally, so that it is eminently suitable for use, either alone or in combination with PAS, in the domiciliary treatment of tuberculous patients. The wisdom of employing it on a large scale in home-treatment programmes, however, has been questioned on the ground that such wide-spread use might result in a spread of tubercle bacilli resistant to the drug. This controversial subject is discussed in some detail in this general review of the chemotherapy of tuberculosis. The author is convinced that, so far, the benefits of isoniazid therapy have outweighed the disadvantages and, though well aware of the possible consequences in terms of isoniazid-resistance, sees no reason at the present time for not making full use of this valuable weapon in the antituberculosis armamentarium. PMID:20604078

  7. HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nunn, P

    1991-11-01

    The problems of diagnosis, treatment and management of tuberculosis associated with HIV infection in Africa are placed in perspective by the former director of the Kenya Medical Research Institute. Tuberculosis (TB) has increased as much as 3-fold in many African countries due to heightened susceptibility of HIV patients. HIV infection may both re-activate latent TB, which virtually all Africans harbor, or increase the likelihood of exogenous infection or re-infection by TB. In most of Africa diagnosis by stained sputum smear is standard: in late AIDS, this method may yield false negatives due to non-pulmonary TB, or pulmonary TB with a negative smear. Chest x-rays are also atypical, since cavitation of the upper zones is not as common, but lobar consolidation and lower zone involvement, and various unusual findings are likely. There is no evidence that mycobacterium avium intracellular has occurred in Africa. Treatment in Africa often centers on long-term thiazina (thiacetazone and isoniazid combined). HIV+ patients are more prone to skin rashes or even lethal epidermal neurolysis as a complication of treatment. Treated patients should be monitored for other symptoms such as diarrhea, recurrent fevers, other chest infections, cerebral space occupying lesions, urinary infections. Many can be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics such as chloramphenicol. Nursing HIV-infected young adults is an expensive and burdensome prospect for overworked and underpaid staff, but curing TB in AIDS patients is possible and worthwhile because of the public health advantages.

  8. ConSCRIPT

    PubMed Central

    Mottarella, Scott E.; Rosa, Mario; Bangura, Abdul; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Craig, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Structural Biology Extensible Visualization Scripting Language (SBEVSL) project is to allow users who are experts in one scripting language to use that language in a second molecular visualization environment without requiring the user to learn a new scripting language. ConSCRIPT, the first SBEVSL release, is a plug-in for PyMOL that accepts RasMol scripting commands either as premade scripts or as line-by-line entries from PyMOL's own command line. The plug-in is available for download at http://sourceforge.net/projects/sbevsl/files in the ConSCRIPT folder. PMID:21567873

  9. Primary sinonasal tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Yeon; Bae, Jung Ho; Park, Jee Soo; Lee, Seung-Sin

    2014-01-01

    Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is not rare and occurs mainly in the head and neck region. Cervical tuberculous lymphadenopathy is the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Sinonasal tuberculosis is known to occur very rarely due to the protective functions of sinonasal mucosa. Although some signs of sinonasal tuberculosis may be present, such as associated facial abscesses, the symptoms and signs are usually nonspecific. Clinical suspicion is important for timely diagnosis and proper management of sinonasal tuberculosis due to its rarity and nonspecific clinical presentation. We report a case of tuberculosis confined to the unilateral maxillary sinus that was first misdiagnosed as recurrent rhinosinusitis after endoscopic sinus surgery.

  10. Central nervous system tuberculosis: pathophysiology and imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Patkar, Deepak; Narang, Jayant; Yanamandala, Rama; Lawande, Malini; Shah, Gaurang V

    2012-11-01

    With the onset of the human immunodeficiency virus pandemic, the incidence of tuberculosis, including central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis, has increased in developed countries. It is no longer a disease confined to underdeveloped and developing countries. The imaging appearance has become more complex with the onset of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Imaging plays an important role in the early diagnosis of CNS tuberculosis and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. This article presents an extensive review of typical and atypical imaging appearances of intracranial tuberculosis, and discusses pathogenesis, patterns of involvement, and advances in imaging of intracranial tuberculosis.

  11. Molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Cambodian children.

    PubMed

    Schopfer, K; Rieder, H L; Steinlin-Schopfer, J F; van Soolingen, D; Bodmer, T; Chantana, Y; Studer, P; Laurent, D; Zwahlen, M; Richner, B

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY We analysed Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains from children, hospitalized from January 2004 to July 2008 in the largest paediatric hospital complex in Cambodia. Specimens were tested for drug susceptibility and genotypes. From the 260 children, 161 strains were available. The East African-Indian genotype family was the most common (59.0%), increasing in frequency with distance from the Phnom Penh area, while the frequency of the Beijing genotype family strains decreased. The drug resistance pattern showed a similar geographical gradient: lowest in the northwest (4.6%), intermediate in the central (17.1%), and highest in the southeastern (30.8%) parts of the country. Three children (1.9%) had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The Beijing genotype and streptomycin resistance were significantly associated (P < 0.001). As tuberculosis in children reflects recent transmission patterns in the community, multidrug resistance levels inform about the current quality of the tuberculosis programme.

  12. Virulence factors of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Forrellad, Marina A.; Klepp, Laura I.; Gioffré, Andrea; Sabio y García, Julia; Morbidoni, Hector R.; Santangelo, María de la Paz; Cataldi, Angel A.; Bigi, Fabiana

    2013-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) consists of closely related species that cause tuberculosis in both humans and animals. This illness, still today, remains to be one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. The mycobacteria enter the host by air, and, once in the lungs, are phagocytated by macrophages. This may lead to the rapid elimination of the bacillus or to the triggering of an active tuberculosis infection. A large number of different virulence factors have evolved in MTBC members as a response to the host immune reaction. The aim of this review is to describe the bacterial genes/proteins that are essential for the virulence of MTBC species, and that have been demonstrated in an in vivo model of infection. Knowledge of MTBC virulence factors is essential for the development of new vaccines and drugs to help manage the disease toward an increasingly more tuberculosis-free world. PMID:23076359

  13. The effect of household poverty on tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Siroka, A; Law, I; Macinko, J; Floyd, K; Banda, R P; Hoa, N B; Tsolmon, B; Chanda-Kapata, P; Gasana, M; Lwinn, T; Senkoro, M; Tupasi, T; Ponce, N A

    2016-12-01

    pSETTING: Households in Malawi, Mongolia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Rwanda, Tanzania, Viet Nam and Zambia.OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between household socio-economic level, both relative and absolute, and individual tuberculosis (TB) disease.

  14. [Tuberculosis epidemiology and disease control in Uzbekistan].

    PubMed

    Ubaĭdullaev, A M; Khamrakulov, R Sh; Stoianovskiĭ, E A; Ataullaeva, D E

    2000-01-01

    The tuberculosis situation is complicated in Uzbekistan and in other countries of the world. In the past 5 years, due to the transition from mass prophylactic examinations to the differential surveys of population groups, the annual coverage of the population to be examined by fluorographic studies has reduced from 6 to 3.5 million along with a simultaneous rise in tuberculosis detection rates from 0.1 to 0.24% and in its incidence by 33.3%. Searches for new organizational forms of tuberculosis control work are under way. The State programme on tuberculosis control and the draft law of the Republic of Uzbekistan, which regulate associated measures have been developed.

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: an insurmountable epidemic?

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, Amitabha

    2011-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis has brought back the spectre of pre-antibiotic days. WHO surveillance data from 2007 showed multi-drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB)-tubercle bacillus resistant to both isoniazid and rifampicin accounting for 4.8% of all new and subsequent cases of tuberculosis. India and China-the two most populated countries of the world, house the maximum number of drug-resistant tuberculosis cases. In eastern European and central Asian countries, more than 6% of new TB cases are MDR-TB, whereas the number is <3% in the countries of the western world. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has emerged with the prospect of tuberculosis becoming an incurable disease. A surveillance spreading over the six continents showed 10% of MDR-TB cases were also XDR-TB. The fact that tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic infection among HIV-infected patients in developing countries makes the challenge almost insurmountable. The mortality of HIV and MDR-TB co-infected patients is exceedingly high. The absence of guidelines for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis and of infrastructure for delivery of DOT program and rapid laboratory diagnostic facilities, including drug susceptibility testing for both first and second-line drugs, and lack of trained human resource in most of the developing world account for the emergence and perpetuation of this menacing problem. WHO along with partnership with Green Light Committee and individual national governments has started DOT plus program to control this global epidemic.

  16. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Adhvaryu, Meghna; Vakharia, Bhasker

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has emerged worldwide, with an increasing incidence due to failure of implementation of apparently effective first-line antituberculous therapy as well as primary infection with drug-resistant strains. Failure of current therapy is attributed to a long duration of treatment leading to nonadherence and irregular therapy, lack of patient education about the disease, poverty, irregular supply by care providers, drug–drug interactions in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), inadequate regulations causing market overlap and irresponsible drug usage in the private sector, and lack of research, with no addition of new drugs in the last four decades. Present standards of care for the treatment of drugsusceptible tuberculosis, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, and latent tuberculosis infection are all unsatisfactory. Since 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) has focused on drug development for tuberculosis, as well as research in all relevant aspects to discover new regimens by 2015 and to eliminate tuberculosis as a public health concern by 2050. As a result, some 20 promising compounds from 14 groups of drugs have been discovered. Twelve candidates from eight classes are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Ongoing research should prioritize identification of novel targets and newer application of existing drugs, discovery of multitargeted drugs from natural compounds, strengthening host factors by immunopotentiation with herbal immunomodulators, as well as protective vaccines before and after exposure, consideration of surgical measures when indicated, development of tools for rapid diagnosis, early identification of resistant strains, and markers for adequacy of treatment and an integrative approach to fulfill WHO goals. However, regulatory control over the drug market, as well as public-private partnership to use health program facilities to track patients and ensure

  17. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging.

  18. Tuberculosis, a rare cause of haematuria.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Joshua Anton; Patel, Kunal; Hotston, Matthew

    2016-07-20

    Tuberculosis of the bladder is a rare pathology in the western world and often not considered as a differential when seeing patients with common urological presentations. This case illustrates a 69-year-old woman in rural England who presented with visible haematuria and was subsequently diagnosed with tuberculosis of the bladder. The case aims to highlight the significance of early diagnosis and treatment, which in turn may help prevent disease progression and organ dysfunction.

  19. [Osteoarticular tuberculosis in children (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bumbic, S; Zegarac, D; Lukac, R

    1978-01-01

    A group of sixteen children suffering from osteoarticular tuberculosis were seen over the past five years in the Belgrade Paediatric Surgery Clinic. This disease is now extremely rare and effects chiefly children born outside maternity departments and not receiving BCG vaccination at birth for different reasons. The osteoarticular tuberculosis rate in the Socialist Republic of Serbia over this period was thus one in 500,000 children. The disease is three times as common in male children, most often affecting the hip and presenting above all at about the age of nine. At the time of admission, eight children had tuberculosis lesions affecting the lungs, visible and active or latent, partially or completely. In five children, one of the parents was receiving treatment for active pulmonary tuberculosis at the time of onset of the disease. Conservative treatment (immobilisation, tuberculous bacteriostatic therapy and general measures) was used in fifteen children and only one underwent surgery, in addition to the standard treatment described. In only one child, there was ankylosis of the hip and the end of treatment, the others having less sequelae of returning completely to normal. In one girl, osteoarticular tuberculosis was complicated by exsudative tuberculosis pericarditis.

  20. [Epidemiology and control of tuberculosis in Italy].

    PubMed

    Girardi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, incidence of tuberculosis in Europe was 52.2 cases per 100,000 population, with lower rates in European Union (average 16.7 per 100.000) e and rates above 100 per 100.000 in the former Soviet Union. In Italy, incidence rates of tuberculosis have been fairly stable in the last two decades around 7 reported cases per 100.000 population. However, the epidemiological picture has clearly changed. Spread of HIV infection and immigration from high incidence countries had a major impact on epidemiological dynamics. In particular, the proportion of reported cases occurring among persons born in high incidence countries increase during the last decade, and it is now close to 50%. A similar trend has been observed in most Western European countries. Strategies for tuberculosis control should include: a general approach to tuberculosis which favor access to care and ensures rapid detection and treatment of all the cases; screening and provision of preventive treatment for contacts of contagious cases and for persons in other high risk groups. Upstream social determinants of tuberculosis need also to be addressed in order to move towards the goal of tuberculosis elimination.

  1. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia; El Hazmi, Malak M

    2010-01-01

    Studies from developed countries have reported that extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is on the rise due to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, similar studies from high-burden countries with low prevalence of HIV like Saudi Arabia are lacking. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. A retrospective analysis was carried out on all patients (n=431) with a culture - proven diagnosis of tuberculosis seen at University teaching hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2001 to December 2007. A total of 183 (42.5%) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 248 (57.5%) extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) cases were compared in terms of age, sex, and nationality. There were 372 Saudis (SA) (86.3%) and the remaining non-Saudis (NSA) 59 (13.7%). The age distribution of the PTB patients had a bimodal distribution. EPTB was more common at young age (20-29 years). The proportion of EPTB cases was significantly higher among NSA patients (72.9%) compared to SA patients (55.1%). Females had higher proportion (59.5%) of EPTB than males (55.6%). The most common site was lymph node tuberculosis (42%). In conclusion, our data suggest that EPTB was relatively common in younger age, female gender and NSA. Tuberculosis (TB) control program may target those populations for EPTB case-finding.

  2. [Retrospect of tuberculosis control in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Hijjar, Miguel Aiub; Gerhardt, Germano; Teixeira, Gilmário M; Procópio, Maria José

    2007-09-01

    The aim of the study was to look back on the course of action involving measures of tuberculosis control in Brazil since the end of the 19th century, covering the history of social struggles and pointing out institutions and people that have dedicated themselves to looking for solutions to these issues. The Brazilian response to tuberculosis started in society with the Ligas Contra a Tuberculose (Leagues Against Tuberculosis), promoting scientific advances, such as the BCG vaccination, which begun in 1927. From the public power, the Inspetoria de Profilaxia da TB (TB Prophylaxis Inspection Service - 1920), the Serviço Nacional de Tuberculose (National Service of Tuberculosis - 1940), and the Campanha Nacional Contra a Tuberculose (National Campaign Against Tuberculosis - 1946), coordinated national policies such as chemotherapy, beginning with the discovery of streptomycin in 1944. The emergence of bacterial resistance led to the development of several therapeutic schemes. The Scheme 1 (rifampycin, hydrazide and pyrazinamid), which was the main one in 1979 and is still used nowadays, had a great epidemiological effect. The WHO declared TB a public health emergency in 1993. In response, Brazil developed some strategies; the first one was the Plano Emergencial para Controle da Tuberculose (Emergency Plan for Tuberculosis Control - 1994), prioritizing 230 municipalities. The current prospects are an effective municipalization of actions and their greater integration with the Programas de Agentes Comunitários e Saúde da Família (Humanitarian Agents and Family Health Programs).

  3. Congenital tuberculosis: presentation of a rare case.

    PubMed

    Şen, Velat; Selimoğlu Şen, Hadice; Aktar, Fesih; Uluca, Ünal; Karabel, Müsemma; Fuat Gürkan, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Congenital tuberculosis is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Congenital tuberculosis is considered the result of mother-to-child transmission from the placenta to the fetus, through the ingestion of the amniotic fluid, or via transplacental transmission through the umbilical vein. Given the non-specific clinical signs of tuberculosis, it is usually difficult to diagnose it. The case of a 48-day-old male infant hospitalized due to weight loss, fever, cough, hemoptysis, and respiratory distress for the past 20 days, is presented. In this period, he had received broad spectrum antibiotics but with no improvement. A chest x-ray showed the presence of consolidation and a cavitary lesion in the upper and middle left lung fields. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction in a bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. Congenital tuberculosis was diagnosed based on this finding; hence, a tuberculostatic regimen was started accordingly. The patient died 13 days after treatment initiation. Congenital tuberculosis should be considered in infants with weight loss, fever, cough, hemoptysis and respiratory distress.

  4. The epidemiology of tuberculosis in Chile.

    PubMed

    1985-01-01

    Chile's tuberculosis morbidity notification statistics suggest that there has been a 3% average annual decrease in tuberculosis cases in the last 5 years (1978-82). In addition, over the period 1974-83, there was a 50% decline in the number of deaths from tuberculosis. In 1982, there were 6941 recorded cases of tuberculosis in Chile, only 6.5% of which involved children under 15 years of age; in that same year, there were 984 deaths from tuberculosis, 14.4% of which occurred in children. The majority of cases reported (78%) involve pulmonary tuberculosis. Over 90% of children under 15 years of age are covered by Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination. This was achieved by immunizing 91% of all newborns, 83% of children in their first year of school, and 98% of those in their final year. Laboratories capable of case-finding now cover 95% of Chile's total area. Since 1975, an average of 47 bacilloscopies have been performed per 1000 consultations. Abandonment of treatment has been reduced to 12% and fewer than 20% of cases require hospitalization. Finally, the introduction of shortened rifampicin treatment has reduced the case-fatality rate from 6% to 3%.

  5. Tuberculosis chemotherapy: current drug delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    du Toit, Lisa Claire; Pillay, Viness; Danckwerts, Michael Paul

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of young adults worldwide and the global scourge of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is reaching epidemic proportions. It is endemic in most developing countries and resurgent in developed and developing countries with high rates of human immunodeficiency virus infection. This article reviews the current situation in terms of drug delivery approaches for tuberculosis chemotherapy. A number of novel implant-, microparticulate-, and various other carrier-based drug delivery systems incorporating the principal anti-tuberculosis agents have been fabricated that either target the site of tuberculosis infection or reduce the dosing frequency with the aim of improving patient outcomes. These developments in drug delivery represent attractive options with significant merit, however, there is a requisite to manufacture an oral system, which directly addresses issues of unacceptable rifampicin bioavailability in fixed-dose combinations. This is fostered by the need to deliver medications to patients more efficiently and with fewer side effects, especially in developing countries. The fabrication of a polymeric once-daily oral multiparticulate fixed-dose combination of the principal anti-tuberculosis drugs, which attains segregated delivery of rifampicin and isoniazid for improved rifampicin bioavailability, could be a step in the right direction in addressing issues of treatment failure due to patient non-compliance. PMID:16984627

  6. Peptide mimotopes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis carbohydrate immunodeterminants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Cell-surface saccharides of Mycobacterium tuberculosis appear to be crucial factors in tuberculosis pathogenicity and could be useful antigens in tuberculosis immunodiagnosis. In the present study, we report the successful antigenic and immunogenic mimicry of mannose-containing cell-wall compounds of M. tuberculosis by dodecamer peptides identified by phage-display technology. Using a rabbit antiserum raised against M. tuberculosis cell-surface saccharides as a target for biopanning, peptides with three different consensus sequences were identified. Phage-displayed and chemically synthesized peptides bound to the anticarbohydrate antiserum. Rabbit antibodies elicited against the peptide QEPLMGTVPIRAGGGS recognize the mannosylated M. tuberculosis cell-wall antigens arabinomannan and lipoarabinomannan, and the glycosylated recombinant protein alanine/proline-rich antigen. Furthermore, antibodies were also able to react with mannan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but not with phosphatidylinositol dimannosides or arabinogalactan from mycobacteria. These results suggest that the immunogenic peptide mimics oligomannosidic epitopes. Interestingly, this report provides evidence that, in contrast with previously known carbohydrate mimotopes, no aromatic residues are necessary in a peptide sequence for mimicking unusual glycoconjugates synthesized by mycobacteria. The possible usefulness of the identified peptide mimotopes as surrogate reagents for immunodiagnosis and for the study of functional roles of the native non-peptide epitopes is discussed. PMID:15560754

  7. Permutations of time and place in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2015-11-01

    Tuberculosis remains a global health pandemic. The current depiction of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis life cycle proposes that airborne bacilli are inhaled and phagocytosed by alveolar macrophages, resulting in the formation of a granuloma that ruptures into the airways to reinitiate the infectious cycle. However, this widely proposed model overlooks the fact, established 100 years ago, that the initial site of M tuberculosis implantation is in the lower zones of the lungs, whereas infectious cavitary pulmonary disease develops at the lung apices. The immunological events at these two pulmonary locations are different--cavitation only occurs in the apices and not in the bases. Yet the current conceptual model of tuberculosis renders the immunology of these two temporally and spatially separated events identical. One key consequence is that prevention of primary childhood tuberculosis at the lung bases is regarded as adequate immunological protection, but extensive evidence shows that greater immunity could predispose to immunopathology and transmission at the lung apex. A much greater understanding of time and place in the immunopathological mechanisms underlying human tuberculosis is needed before further pre-exposure vaccination trials can be done.

  8. Did ice-age bovids spread tuberculosis?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, Bruce M.; Martin, Larry D.

    2006-11-01

    Pathognomonic metacarpal undermining is a skeletal pathology that has been associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in bovids. Postcranial artiodactyl, perissodactyl, and carnivore skeletons were examined in major university and museum collections of North America and Europe for evidence of this and other pathology potentially attributable to tuberculosis. Among nonproboscidean mammals from pre-Holocene North America, bone lesions indicative of tuberculosis were restricted to immigrant bovids from Eurasia. No bone lesions compatible with diagnosis of tuberculosis were found in large samples of other pre-Holocene (164 Oligocene, 397 Miocene, and 1,041 Plio Pleistocene) North American mammals, including 114 antilocaprids. Given the unchanged frequency of bovid tubercular disease during the Pleistocene, it appears that most did not die from the disease but actually reached an accommodation with it (as did the mastodon) (Rothschild and Laub 2006). Thus, they were sufficiently long-lived to assure greater spread of the disease. The relationships of the proboscidean examples need further study, but present evidence suggests a Holarctic spread of tuberculosis during the Pleistocene, with bovids acting as vectors. While the role of other animals in the transmission of tuberculosis could be considered, the unique accommodation achieved by bovids and mastodons makes them the likely “culprits” in its spread.

  9. Vaccine approaches for bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model of the One Health Concept. M. bovis Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) was first proven effective in cattle prior to use in humans. Recent experimental trials with cattle have d...

  10. The immune response to bovine tuberculosis: Correlates of protection and relevance to human tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis (TB), primarily due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and Mycobacterium bovis in cattle, is a classic model for demonstration of the One Health Concept. Early studies with cattle were instrumental in the development of the use of Koch’s tuberculin as an in vivo measure of cell-med...

  11. Sub-speciation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex from tuberculosis patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ueyama, Masako; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Aono, Akio; Murase, Yoshiro; Kuse, Naoyuki; Morimoto, Kozo; Okumura, Masao; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Ogata, Hideo; Yoshimori, Kozo; Kudoh, Shoji; Azuma, Arata; Gemma, Akihiko; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the major causative agent of tuberculosis in humans. It is well known that Mycobacterium bovis and other species in the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC) can cause respiratory diseases as zoonosis. We analyzed the MTC isolates collected from tuberculosis patients from Japan in 2002 using a multiplex PCR system that detected cfp32, RD9 and RD12. A total of 970 MTC isolates that were representative of the tuberculosis cases throughout Japan, were examined using this method. As a result, 966 (99.6%) M. tuberculosis, two Mycobacterium africanum and two Mycobacterium canettii were identified using a multiplex PCR system, while no M. bovis was detected. Two isolates that lacked RD9 were initially considered to be M. canettii, but further analysis of the hsp65 sequence revealed them to be M. tuberculosis. Also two M. africanum were identified as M. tuberculosis using the -215 narG nucleotide polymorphism. Though PCR-linked methods have been used for a rapid differentiation of MTC and NTM, from our cases we suggest careful interpretation of RD based identification.

  12. [Tuberculosis and HIV infection: experience of the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti: 1990-1996].

    PubMed

    Renoux, E; Matan, A Barreh; Sevre, J P; Mohamed Ali, I; Chami, D; Vincent, V

    2002-01-01

    Based on analysis of data collected from the national tuberculosis prevention program in Djibouti between 1990 and 1996, the authors analyzed the relationship between HIV infection and tuberculosis. The study cohort comprised a total of 22,000 patients including 14,000 with documented HIV infection. Although HIV infection probably worsened the situation, it was neither the only nor the main factor involved in the resurgence of tuberculosis. Demographic growth, higher population density, and increasing poverty as well as the quality of the national tuberculosis prevention program must be taken into account. The incidence of smear-negative tuberculosis was not significantly higher in HIV-infected patients (incidence of smear positive cases, > 92%). Extrapulmonary tuberculosis especially of pleural involvement was more common (15% versus 9.4%). Treatment was effective in HIV-infected patients. If directly observed (DOT) therapy was used, there was no risk of emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains. Drug side-effects associated with the protocols used in Djibouti were not greater in HIV-infected patients. Most additional mortality observed in HIV-infected tuberculosis patients (10.5% versus 2%) was due to progression of HIV infection.

  13. Psychosis secondary to tuberculosis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Mohd Jazman Che; Ghazali, Wan Syamimee Wan

    2016-03-11

    We report a case of a 19-year-old immunocompetent Malay woman who presented with a worsening psychotic disorder of 1-year duration. She initially presented with social isolation with subsequent mutism and stupor. Physical examination revealed a stuporous, emaciated, dehydrated woman with Glasgow Coma Scale of 11/15 (E4V2M5). She had a blank stare, mutism and akinesia. Motor examination revealed upper motor neuron findings. Neck stiffness was present, however, Kernig's and Brudzinski's signs were negative. There were no other findings on other systems. Brain imaging and EEG were normal. Cerebrospinal fluid investigations revealed positive cerebrospinal fluid Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR (MTB PCR). The patient was treated with empirical antituberculosis drugs and steroids. On follow-up visit 1 month later, her psychotic symptoms had fully resolved. She was able to ambulate and care for herself; she was unable to recall the symptoms she had experienced before and during admission.

  14. Spinal tuberculosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Mirkoohi, Maryam; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-12-01

    The spinal column is involved in less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB). Spinal TB is a very dangerous type of skeletal TB as it can be associated with neurologic deficit due to compression of adjacent neural structures and significant spinal deformity. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of spinal TB has special importance in preventing these serious complications. In order to extract current trends in diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment of spinal TB we performed a narrative review with analysis of all the articles available for us which were published between 1990 and 2011. Althoug h the development of more accurate imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and advanced surgical techniques have made the early diagnosis and management of spinal TB much easier, these are still very challenging topics. In this review we aim to discuss the diagnosis and management of spinal TB based on studies with acceptable design, clearly explained results and justifiable conclusions.

  15. Reactivation tuberculosis: role of surveillance.

    PubMed

    DiNardo, Andrew R; Guy, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and death rates from tuberculosis (TB) have declined through concerted efforts in the diagnosis and treatment of active disease. Despite this, 9.6 million new cases and 1.1 million deaths in 2014 are unacceptably high. To decrease the rates of TB further, the huge number of persons with latent TB infection (LTBI) from whom new cases will arise has to be addressed with a sense of priority. Identifying the highest risk groups and providing effective treatment has been shown to decrease active TB. Further research to refine the predictors of reactivation and shorter effective treatments are urgently needed. Implementing intensified case finding, testing and treatment for LTBI will require continued investment in health care capacity at multiple levels.

  16. Pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis: mimicker of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Lall, Mahima; Sahni, Ajay Kumar; Rajput, A K

    2013-01-01

    Infection caused by the lung fluke is endemic in north eastern parts of India. Paragonimus westermani and Paragonimus heterotremus are known to be endemic in eastern Indian states of Manipur and Nagaland. The infection is related to eating habits of the locals and is acquired by ingestion of raw, inadequately cooked crabs or crayfish containing encysted metacercariae which act as second intermediate hosts during the life cycle of the lung fluke. Diagnosis is generally delayed due to lack of suspicion and presentation similar to tuberculosis which is endemic in the population. We report pleuropulmonary paragonimiasis in a soldier from eastern India who presented with chest pain, haemoptysis, and eosinophilia. He gave history of consumption of raw crabs while on leave at his native village in Nagaland. Ova morphologically resembling Paragonimus heterotremus were detected in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. Symptoms resolved with praziquantel treatment. PMID:23432864

  17. Turning the tide against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Padayatchi, Nesri; Naidu, Naressa; Friedland, Gerald; Naidoo, Kasavan; Conradie, Francesca; Naidoo, Kogieleum; O'Donnell, Max Roe

    2017-03-01

    Despite affecting men, women, and children for millennia, tuberculosis (TB) is the most neglected disease. In contrast, the global response to HIV has reached a defining moment. By uniting efforts, promptly integrating major scientific findings for both treatment and prevention, and scaling up services, the once inconceivable end to the HIV epidemic may no longer be an illusion. "The world has made defeating AIDS a top priority. This is a blessing. But TB remains ignored" - Nelson Mandela. While there is no doubt that revolutionary diagnostics and new and repurposed drugs have provided some hope in the fight against TB, it is evident that scientific advances on their own are inadequate to achieve the World Health Organization's ambitious goal to end TB by 2035. In this article, the consequences of a myopic and conventional biomedical approach to TB, which has ultimately permeated to the level of individual patient care, are highlighted.

  18. Tip of nose tuberculosis: A rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Darshan K.; Verma, Ajay K.; Jaiswal, Riddhi; Kant, Surya; Patel, Anand; Asnani, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tuberculosis is notorious that it affects various sites of the human body and presents in different ways. One of the uncommon or rather rare presentation of extra pulmonary tuberculosis is nasal tuberculosis. The nose apart from its physiological functions also contributes to facial aesthetics and gives a defined appearance and its deformity imparts cosmetic disfigurement and unsightly appearance. Both primary and secondary forms of nasal tuberculosis are rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of ulcerative or crusting lesions of the nose. Here we report such a case of nasal tuberculosis, which presented as an ulcerative and crusting lesion over the tip of the nose in a female child. The patient was given antituberculous chemotherapy after establishing the diagnosis and responded well to treatment. PMID:27195200

  19. Unusual Sites of Cutaneous Tuberculosis: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Dimple; Sharma, Aastha; Chopra, Siddharth; Aggarwal, Shivali; Goyal, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB) is an uncommon small subset of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, comprising 1–1.5% of all extrapulmonary tuberculosis manifestations, which manifests only in 8.4–13.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Lupus vulgaris (LV) and tuberculosis verrucosa cutis (TBVC) are forms of reinfection tuberculosis and often occur in presensitized patients, by exogenous inoculation. We report two cases of cutaneous tuberculosis at unusual sites. A 35-year-old female having a forehead lesion for 2 years was diagnosed as having tuberculosis verrucosa cutis and another 16-year-old girl with lesion in left axilla for 10 years was proven to have lupus vulgaris. The delayed diagnosis was possibly due to lower clinical suspicion due to the presentation of CTB at unusual sites. This highlights the importance of keeping TB as an important differential as misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis of this entity can lead to prolonged morbidity. PMID:28348900

  20. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  1. [Tuberculosis Annual Report 2011--(1) Summary of tuberculosis notification statistics and tuberculosis in foreign nationals].

    PubMed

    2013-06-01

    The Tuberculosis Surveillance Center (TSC) at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis has published a series of annual reports on tuberculosis (TB) statistics in Japan since 2008. These reports are based on information on the nationwide computerized TB surveillance system database, which has been in operation since 1987. This is the first of a new series of reports for the "TB Annual Report 2011" that includes a summary of TB statistics and an overview of TB cases with foreign nationality in 2011. A total of 22,681 cases with all types of TB were notified in 2011 with a notification rate of 17.7 per 100,000 population. The TB notification rates decreased to less than 20 per 100,000 population in 2007 and continued to decline until 2011. A total of 8,654 sputum-smear positive pulmonary TB were notified in 2011, at a rate of 6.8 per 100,000 population. The number of latent TB infection (LTBI) cases requiring prophylactic treatment drastically increased from 4,930 cases in 2010 to 10,046 cases in 2011. Surveillance data on TB cases with foreign nationality in Japan have been collected since 1998. The number of TB cases with foreign nationality increased from 739 in 1998 to 931 in 2004 but has been stagnated since then, that indicated 921 in 2011. The TB cases with foreign nationality accounted for 2.1 % of all new TB cases in 1998, and this percentage increased to 4.1% in 2011. Of note, new TB cases with foreign nationality aged 20-29 years accounted for 30.0% of all new TB cases among the same age group in 2011. Among the TB cases with foreign nationality, more than half were from China (29.6%) and the Philippines (23.7%) taken together. In most cases, foreign nationals developed TB within 5 years of entry into Japan, including 80.0% of those aged 10-19 years and 80.8% of those aged 20-29 years. Of these TB cases with foreign nationality, 27% were noted in full-time employees, followed by unemployed persons (21%) and students (20%). With an increase in the number of

  2. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: tuberculous meningitis new developments.

    PubMed

    Galimi, R

    2011-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) can involve any organ system in the body. Extrapulmonary involvement can occur in isolation or along with a pulmonary focus as in the case of patients with disseminated tuberculosis. Tuberculosis meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. TBM a medical emergency, is still a major cause of serious illness in many parts of the world. TBM remains difficult to diagnose, and it is usually due to hematogenous dissemination of the tubercle bacillus. The exact incidence and prevalence are not known. The clinical spectrum is broad and may be non-specific making early diagnosis difficult. Improved outcome requires early recognition and treatment of these conditions. Clinical features included fever for more than 7 days, headache, or neck stiffness. While TBM is a disease of childhood, tuberculomas and spinal tuberculosis are invariably an adult manifestation. In HIV infection, TB is often atypical in presentation, frequently causing extrapulmonary disease, and patients have a high incidence of TBM. Clinical response to antituberculous therapy in all forms of neurotuberculosis is excellent if the diagnosis is made early before irreversible neurological deficit is established. Diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, neuroimaging abnormalities, cerebrospinal fluid changes and the response to anti-tuberculosis drugs. Diagnosis is best made with lumbar puncture and examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Suspect TBM if there is a CSF leucocytosis (predominantly lymphocytes), the CSF protein is raised, and the CSF plasma glucose is <50%. Rapid techniques based on nucleic acid amplification such as PCR are more sensitive and specific as they attempt to detect specific DNA sequences of the organism. The hallmark pathological processes are meningeal inflammation, basal exudates, vasculitis and hydrocephalus. Treatment delay is strongly associated with death and empirical anti-tuberculosis therapy should be

  3. Rare Offshoot of a Common Malady Anaemia and Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kolla, Gautham; Acharya, Vishak; Balanthimogru, Prashantha; Mani, Arun; Ruman, Shehzad

    2016-08-01

    Haematological manifestations are one of the rarer presentations of tuberculosis and are usually of normocytic normochromic type. An association of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia (AIHA) with active pulmonary tuberculosis is an exceeding rare entity, though anaemia and tuberculosis commonly co-exist. We report a patient with sputum negative pulmonary tuberculosis with associated Coomb's positive AIHA. The patient responded well to Anti- Tubercular Therapy (ATT) and low dose steroids tapered over a month.

  4. Rare Offshoot of a Common Malady Anaemia and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Vishak; Balanthimogru, Prashantha; Mani, Arun; Ruman, Shehzad

    2016-01-01

    Haematological manifestations are one of the rarer presentations of tuberculosis and are usually of normocytic normochromic type. An association of Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia (AIHA) with active pulmonary tuberculosis is an exceeding rare entity, though anaemia and tuberculosis commonly co-exist. We report a patient with sputum negative pulmonary tuberculosis with associated Coomb’s positive AIHA. The patient responded well to Anti- Tubercular Therapy (ATT) and low dose steroids tapered over a month. PMID:27656489

  5. The Con Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the format of the Con Test, an Australian television game show which followed the same general rules and game play as the UK show PokerFace. At the end of each round a contestant needs to decide whether or not he or she should fold. A contestant needs to know how likely it is that he or she is in last place.…

  6. [Bacteriological diagnosis of renal tuberculosis: an experience at the regional tuberculosis laboratory in Córdoba Province, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Berta, Mariana; Sturm, Gabriela; Juri, Leticia; Cosiansi, Maria C; Barzón, Silvia; Barnes, Ana I; Rojo, Silvia C

    2011-01-01

    Given the incidence of renal tuberculosis in patients suffering of pulmonary tuberculosis, we seek to study both the frequency of this association in diagnosed cases of renal tuberculosis and the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species that were identified (period 1997-2009), observing its incidence by sex, demonstrating the importance of serial culture of urine samples and evaluating the convenience of using solid and liquid media. The analysis of urine samples from 383 patients indicated renal tuberculosis in 24 cases; in most cases, (95.8 %) Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species prevailed, whereas the presence of Mycobacterium bovis accounted for 4.2 % of the cases. The association of pulmonary and renal tuberculosis was found in 6 cases. The isolation of Mycobacterium bovis indicates the importance of including Stonebrink medium along with Lowenstein- Jensen medium. The liquid medium made no significant contribution to the diagnosis of renal tuberculosis, but indeed, cultivating serial samples increases sensitivity.

  7. Tuberculosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sites Podcasts QR Codes RSS Feeds Social Bookmarking Social Network Sites Text Messaging Twitter Video Games Video Sharing ... possible, and that people whose initial test is negative and who are at high risk for TB ...

  8. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part I

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide scourge and its incidence appears to be increasing due to various factors, such as the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The insidious onset and non-specific constitutional symptoms of genitourinary tuberculosis (GUTB) often lead to delayed diagnosis and rapid progression to a non-functioning kidney. Due to hematogenous dissemination of TB, there is a potential risk of involvement of the contralateral kidney too. Imaging plays an important role in the making of a timely diagnosis and in the planning of treatment, and thus helps to avoid complications such as renal failure. Imaging of GUTB still remains a challenge, mainly on account of the dearth of literature, especially related to the use of the newer modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This two-part article is a comprehensive review of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and imaging findings in renal TB. Various imaging features of GUTB are outlined, from the pathognomonic lobar calcification on plain film, to finer early changes such as loss of calyceal sharpness and papillary necrosis on intravenous urography (IVU); to uneven caliectasis and urothelial thickening, in the absence of renal pelvic dilatation, as well as the hitherto unreported ‘lobar caseation’ on ultrasonography (USG). Well-known complications of GUTB such as sinus tracts, fistulae and amyloidosis are described, along with the relatively less well-known complications such as tuberculous interstitial nephritis (TIN), which may remain hidden because of its ‘culture negative’ nature and thus lead to renal failure. The second part of the article reviews the computed tomography (CT) and MRI features of GUTB and touches upon future imaging techniques along with imaging of TB in transplant recipients and in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986618

  9. Tuberculosis in domestic livestock: pathogenesis, transmission, and vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex includes agents such as M. tuberculosis and M. bovis, the cause of tuberculosis in most animals and a zoonotic pathogen. Mycobacterium bovis has one of the broadest host ranges of any pathogen, infecting most mammals, including humans. Models are used to study ...

  10. Tuberculosis of the patella masquerading as prepatellar bursitis.

    PubMed

    MacLean, S; Kulkarni, S

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis of bone is an uncommon entity in the western world. We present a case of tuberculosis of the patella mimicking prepatellar bursitis in an otherwise fit and well woman of Bangladeshi origin. We believe tuberculosis of bone should form a differential diagnosis of the swollen knee in high-risk patients.

  11. 76 FR 26239 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis... framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis programs in the United States. The... tuberculosis (TB) and bovine brucellosis in the United States. In keeping with its commitment to...

  12. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.34 Official tuberculosis tests. (a) Single cervical tuberculin (SCT) test. (1) The SCT...

  13. 9 CFR 77.34 - Official tuberculosis tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Official tuberculosis tests. 77.34... AGRICULTURE INTERSTATE TRANSPORTATION OF ANIMALS (INCLUDING POULTRY) AND ANIMAL PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.34 Official tuberculosis tests. (a) Single cervical tuberculin (SCT) test. (1) The SCT...

  14. 76 FR 38602 - Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Bovine Tuberculosis and Brucellosis; Program Framework AGENCY... extending the comment period on a new framework being developed for the bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis... (USDA) is currently developing proposed revisions to its programs regarding bovine tuberculosis (TB)...

  15. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-07-19

    ... AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 [Docket No. 94-068-1] Tuberculosis in...: Interim rule and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis is the contagious, infectious, and...

  16. 69 FR 52506 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-08-26

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., October 6, 2004. 8... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  17. 60 FR 44416 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-08-28

    ... CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the tuberculosis regulations concerning the...-18729, Docket No. 95-020-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing...

  18. 68 FR 52401 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-09-03

    ... Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... following council meeting. Name: Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and... tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council makes recommendations regarding policies, strategies,...

  19. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-11-25

    ...] Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... change, an interim rule that amended the tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of... (59 FR 36691-36692, Docket No. 94-068-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77...

  20. 73 FR 28479 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2008-05-16

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 17, 2008. 8:30 a.m.-2... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis. Specifically, the Council makes...

  1. 71 FR 37583 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-06-30

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., July 26, 2006. 8:30... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  2. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-11-29

    ...] Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Interim rule and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations... designation as a modified accredited State. This change is necessary to prevent the spread of tuberculosis...

  3. 69 FR 30300 - Tuberculosis Elimination and Laboratory Cooperative Agreements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tuberculosis Elimination and Laboratory... Tuberculosis (TB) Elimination Cooperative Agreement Program is to assist the current efforts of State and local... in tuberculosis to State and local health agencies and other partners. Working with State and...

  4. 60 FR 62988 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-12-08

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of...) State. This change is necessary to prevent the spread of tuberculosis in cattle and bison....

  5. 71 FR 62112 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-10-23

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., December 5, 2006; 8... the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council makes recommendations...

  6. 69 FR 40329 - Tuberculosis; Amend the Definition of Affected Herd

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-07-02

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis; Amend the.... SUMMARY: We are proposing to amend the tuberculosis regulations by removing the two different definitions... Beals, National Tuberculosis Program Coordinator, Eradication and Surveillance Team, National Center...

  7. 73 FR 70310 - Public Meetings; National Tuberculosis Program Listening Sessions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2008-11-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Public Meetings; National Tuberculosis Program Listening... challenges and new approaches for future tuberculosis control methods and eradication in view of budgetary..., Program Manager, National Tuberculosis Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 43, Riverdale, MD,...

  8. 62 FR 13293 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-03-20

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of... tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing Oklahoma from the list of modified accredited States...

  9. 62 FR 34612 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-06-27

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of...-7727; or e-mail: messey@aphis.usda.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis...

  10. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-06-21

    ... and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 [Docket No. 94-053-1] Tuberculosis in Cattle and... and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning the... accredited-free (suspended) State. This change is necessary to prevent the spread of tuberculosis in...

  11. 69 FR 49783 - Tuberculosis in Cattle; Import Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-08-12

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis in Cattle; Import Requirements AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... horn growth that are entering the United States meet the same tuberculosis testing requirements as... CONTACT: Dr. Terry Beals, National Tuberculosis Program Coordinator, Eradication and Surveillance...

  12. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-08-31

    ...] Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... change, an interim rule that amended the tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of... FR 29185-29186, Docket No. 94-047-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77...

  13. 79 FR 43923 - Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-07-29

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the regulations regarding official tuberculosis tests for captive cervids to remove the CervidTB Stat- Pak as an official bovine tuberculosis test for the following...

  14. 60 FR 48882 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-09-21

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of... (60 FR 33100-33101, Docket No. 93-058-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77...

  15. 68 FR 35529 - Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-06-16

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis Testing for Imported Cattle AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health...; to require certification regarding the tuberculosis history of the herds from which a group of cattle... necessary to help us better ensure that imported cattle are free of tuberculosis, thereby protecting...

  16. 62 FR 3445 - Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-01-23

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 91 Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test... requirements for pre- export diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and brucellosis in certain cattle being exported... tuberculosis and brucellosis test requirements for slaughter cattle exported from States free of brucellosis...

  17. 61 FR 6917 - Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1996-02-23

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 91 Cattle Exportations; Tuberculosis and Brucellosis Test... requirements for pre-export diagnostic tests for tuberculosis and brucellosis in certain cattle being exported... States free of brucellosis or tuberculosis and those exported to countries that have a...

  18. 70 FR 24048 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-05-06

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 8, 2005., 8:30... Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  19. 69 FR 43283 - Tuberculosis in Cattle; Import Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-07-20

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis in Cattle; Import Requirements AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... entering the United States meet the same tuberculosis testing requirements as sexually intact animals... to tuberculosis, it will contract the disease, develop generalized disease, and spread it to...

  20. 60 FR 11898 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-03-03

    ... CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the tuberculosis regulations concerning the... a modified accredited State. This change was necessary to prevent the spread of tuberculosis...

  1. 69 FR 26606 - Community Preparation for Tuberculosis (TB) Vaccine Trials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Community Preparation for Tuberculosis (TB..., , as amended. Purpose: The purpose of the program is for CDC to test new Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines... limited to, World Health Organization (WHO), International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung...

  2. 69 FR 51960 - Tuberculosis in Cattle; Import Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-08-24

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 93 Tuberculosis in Cattle... heifers with any evidence of horn growth that are entering the United States meet the same tuberculosis... animal, the greater the chances are that, if exposed to tuberculosis, it will contract the...

  3. 69 FR 29958 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2004-05-26

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., June 23, 2004. 8:30... the Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the Council...

  4. 59 FR- Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-06-06

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 [Docket No. 94-047-1] Tuberculosis in Cattle and... and request for comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the tuberculosis regulations concerning the... INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis is the contagious, infectious, and communicable disease caused...

  5. 70 FR 61978 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-10-27

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., November 16, 2005... Secretary for Health, and the Director, CDC, regarding the elimination of tuberculosis. Specifically,...

  6. 60 FR 18728 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-04-13

    ... CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of...-1231, (301) 734-7727. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Bovine tuberculosis is the...

  7. 79 FR 53430 - Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2014-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Georgia Tuberculosis Outbreak Among Homeless... Department of Public Health, Tuberculosis (TB) Program. This award will be in the amount of $419,095.00. The purpose of this award is to halt the further spread of a drug- resistant strain of tuberculosis...

  8. 62 FR 48165 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-09-15

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation AGENCY.... SUMMARY: We are adopting as a final rule, without change, an interim rule that amended the tuberculosis...), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing Virginia from the list...

  9. 64 FR 58769 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-11-01

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the bovine tuberculosis regulations to allow zones within a State to be... bovine tuberculosis. We are also amending the regulations to increase the amount of testing that must...

  10. 71 FR 3519 - Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2006-01-23

    ... Tuberculosis In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the... Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis (ACET). Times and Dates: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., February 15, 2006... elimination of tuberculosis (TB). Specifically, the council makes recommendations regarding...

  11. 60 FR 33100 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-06-27

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... because of tuberculosis by raising the designation of Kansas from a modified accredited State to an...-1231, (301) 734-7727. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The ``Tuberculosis'' regulations,...

  12. 68 FR 75776 - Respiratory Protection for M. Tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2003-12-31

    .... Tuberculosis AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Final rule; revocation. SUMMARY: OSHA is revoking ``Respiratory Protection for M. Tuberculosis'' (29 CFR 1910.139) which... Protection for M. tuberculosis''. However, in a document published elsewhere in this separate part of...

  13. 70 FR 61025 - Tuberculosis; Amend the Definition of Affected Herd

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2005-10-20

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis; Amend the Definition of Affected Herd AGENCY... INFORMATION: Background The regulations in 9 CFR part 77, ``Tuberculosis'' (referred to below as the regulations), and the ``Uniform Methods and Rules--Bovine Tuberculosis Eradication'' (UMR), January 22,...

  14. 62 FR 42044 - Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1997-08-05

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Tuberculosis in Cattle and Bison; State... tuberculosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of cattle and bison by raising the designation of...-093-1), we amended the tuberculosis regulations in 9 CFR part 77 by removing Wisconsin from the...

  15. 45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provider of tuberculosis services; and (3) Will implement infection control procedures established by the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127... Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis....

  16. 45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... provider of tuberculosis services; and (3) Will implement infection control procedures established by the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127... Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis....

  17. 78 FR 1718 - Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-09

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 77 Approved Tests for Bovine Tuberculosis in... comments. SUMMARY: We are adding the CervidTB Stat-Pak and DPP tests as official tuberculosis tests for the... of antibodies to bovine tuberculosis in certain species of captive cervids. This action is...

  18. 45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provider of tuberculosis services; and (3) Will implement infection control procedures established by the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127... Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis....

  19. Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0149 TITLE: Real Time Measurement of Host Bioenergetics During Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Infection ... Tuberculosis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Infection 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...resistant state, sometimes reactivating to cause tuberculosis (TB) decades after the primary infection , has puzzled scientists for years. This

  20. 45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provider of tuberculosis services; and (3) Will implement infection control procedures established by the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127... Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis....

  1. 45 CFR 96.127 - Requirements regarding tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provider of tuberculosis services; and (3) Will implement infection control procedures established by the... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements regarding tuberculosis. 96.127... Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant § 96.127 Requirements regarding tuberculosis....

  2. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection among Asian Elephants in Captivity

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Gary; Zimmerman, Ralph; Shashkina, Elena; Chen, Liang; Richard, Michael; Bradford, Carol M.; Dragoo, Gwen A.; Saiers, Rhonda L.; Peloquin, Charles A.; Daley, Charles L.; Planet, Paul; Narachenia, Apurva; Mathema, Barun

    2017-01-01

    Although awareness of tuberculosis among captive elephants is increasing, antituberculosis therapy for these animals is not standardized. We describe Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission between captive elephants based on whole genome analysis and report a successful combination treatment. Infection control protocols and careful monitoring of treatment of captive elephants with tuberculosis are warranted. PMID:28221115

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis TlyA Protein Negatively Regulates T Helper (Th) 1 and Th17 Differentiation and Promotes Tuberculosis Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Aejazur; Sobia, Parveen; Dwivedi, Ved Prakash; Bhawsar, Aakansha; Singh, Dhiraj Kumar; Sharma, Pawan; Moodley, Prashini; Van Kaer, Luc; Bishai, William R; Das, Gobardhan

    2015-06-05

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is an ancient pathogen and a major cause of death worldwide. Although various virulence factors of M. tuberculosis have been identified, its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. TlyA is a virulence factor in several bacterial infections and is evolutionarily conserved in many Gram-positive bacteria, but its function in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we report that TlyA significantly contributes to the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis. We show that a TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis strain induces increased IL-12 and reduced IL-1β and IL-10 cytokine responses, which sharply contrasts with the immune responses induced by wild type M. tuberculosis. Furthermore, compared with wild type M. tuberculosis, TlyA-deficient M. tuberculosis bacteria are more susceptible to autophagy in macrophages. Consequently, animals infected with the TlyA mutant M. tuberculosis organisms exhibited increased host-protective immune responses, reduced bacillary load, and increased survival compared with animals infected with wild type M. tuberculosis. Thus, M. tuberculosis employs TlyA as a host evasion factor, thereby contributing to its virulence.

  4. Interferon-Gamma Improves Macrophages Function against M. tuberculosis in Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, Humaira; Muhammad, Niaz; Abbas, Muhammad Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Background. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) that causes tuberculosis (TB) kills millions of infected people annually especially multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). On infection, macrophages recognize the mycobacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR) followed by phagocytosis and control of mycobacteria. In addition, macrophages also secrete IL-12 to induce IFN-γ production by T, which, in turn, increases the phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Individuals with defects in innate or adaptive immunity exhibit increased susceptibility to M. tuberculosis. Understanding these immunologic mechanisms will help in TB control. We aimed to investigate the immunopathologic mechanisms in MDR-TB and role of recombinant human interferon-gamma (rhIFN-γ). Study Design and Methods. Monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of MDR-TB patients and healthy subjects and were investigated for immunologic response by ELISA and flow cytometry. Results. Different functional and molecular anomalies were observed in macrophages. In addition, a defective immune response to M. tuberculosis from the patient's MDMs was characterized, which in turn improved by pretreatment with rhIFN-γ. Conclusion. This work highlights the fact that rhIFN-γ improves macrophages function against M. tuberculosis and treatment of patients with poor responsiveness to TB therapy may be needed in future to include IFN-γ as adjuvant therapy after the full characterization of pathological and molecular mechanisms in these and in other more multidrug-resistant TB patients. PMID:27478636

  5. Optimizing Tuberculosis Testing for Basic Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eric; Schumacher, Samuel G.; Siedner, Mark; Herrera, Beatriz; Quino, Willi; Alvarado, Jessica; Montoya, Rosario; Grandjean, Louis; Martin, Laura; Sherman, Jonathan M.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2010-01-01

    Optimal tuberculosis testing usually involves sputum centrifugation followed by broth culture. However, centrifuges are biohazardous and scarce in the resource-limited settings where most tuberculosis occurs. To optimize tuberculosis testing for these settings, centrifugation of 111 decontaminated sputum samples was compared with syringe-aspiration through polycarbonate membrane-filters that were then cultured in broth. To reduce the workload of repeated microscopic screening of broth cultures for tuberculosis growth, the colorimetric redox indicator 2,3-diphenyl-5-(2-thienyl) tetrazolium chloride was added to the broth, which enabled naked-eye detection of culture positivity. This combination of filtration and colorimetric growth-detection gave similar results to sputum centrifugation followed by culture microscopy regarding mean colony counts (43 versus 48; P = 0.6), contamination rates (0.9% versus 1.8%; P = 0.3), and sensitivity (94% versus 95%; P = 0.7), suggesting equivalency of the two methods. By obviating centrifugation and repeated microscopic screening of cultures, this approach may constitute a more appropriate technology for rapid and sensitive tuberculosis diagnosis in basic laboratories. PMID:20889887

  6. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-01-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  7. Primary Tuberculosis of Hand Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Altaf Mir, Mohd; Ahmad, Imran; Yaseen, Mihd

    2016-01-01

    The musculoskeletal extrapulmonary tuberculosis is uncommon, the upper extremity tuberculosis is not common and the mycobacterial involvement of skin of hands and synovial sheath of tendons is rare. This prospective observational study was undertaken between August 2014 and December 2015 in a tertiary referral hospital. Patients attending with suspected primary tuberculosis of soft tissue of the hand were included. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the hand, wrist and lung and MRI were undertaken. A diagnosis of tuberculosis was made based on histology, and positive culture for Mycobacterium. Split thickness skin grafting was done after excision of tubercular cutaneous ulcers of hand. Postoperatively patients were treated with home based anti-tubercular chemotherapy. Lesions of synovial sheath of tendons were excised. Splints or plaster slabs were used in all patients. There were 3 males and 2 females with a mean age of 44.75±6.61 years (19-48 years). Based on clinical suspicion, plain radiographs and MRI, there were 3 patients with involvement of synovial sheath of tendons and 2 patients with involvement of skin of hand. Tuberculosis was confirmed histologically and Mycobacterium bovis was confirmed microbiologically. The delayed diagnosis is often due to slow progression and numerous differential diagnoses, which often leads to complications. Early radical excision of the infected tissues combined with anti- tubercular multidrug therapy gives good functional results and prevents recurrence. PMID:27853698

  8. Tuberculosis: current trends in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bello, A K; Njoku, C H; Njoku, A K

    2005-12-01

    Among communicable diseases, tuberculosis (TB) is the second leading cause of death worldwide, killing nearly 2 million people each year. It is estimated that about one-third of the world population are infected with TB (2 billion people) and about 10% of this figure will progress to disease state. Most cases are in the less-developed countries of the world. Tuberculosis incidence has been on the increase in Africa, mainly as a result of the burden of HIV infection. Definitive diagnosis of tuberculosis remains based on culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but rapid diagnosis of infectious tuberculosis by simple sputum smear for acid fast bacilli remains an important tool, as more rapid molecular techniques are being developed. Treatment with several drugs for 6 months or more can cure more than 95% of patients. Direct observation of treatment, a component of the recommended five-element DOTS strategy, is judged to be the standard of care by most authorities. Currently only a third of cases worldwide are treated using this approach. There may be need to modify the treatment modalities especially with the choice of drugs and duration of therapy when TB infection occurs in special situation like pregnancy, liver disease, renal failure or even in coexistence with HlV/AIDS or the drug resistant state.

  9. Multifocal bilateral metatarsal tuberculosis: a rare presentation.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Vipul; Sud, Alok; Mehtani, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis, or phthisis (consumption) as it was popularly known in the Greek era, has been endemic in Southeast Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa; however, the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic has seen the re-emergence of this disease in the areas in which it was not very commonly reported. With this, the need for understanding and treatment of rare presentations of tuberculosis has become of paramount importance to achieve the World Health Organization millennium goal of a "reversal of incidence by 2015." Foot involvement has been reported in 0.1% to 0.3% of extrapulmonary cases. Multifocal lesions have an incidence of <10% in osteoarticular tuberculosis. Bilateral feet involvement in multifocal tuberculosis has not yet been reported in either children or adults in published studies. We report a case of tuberculosis with lesions in the bilateral metatarsals, the occurrence of which is very rare. The diagnosis was mainly histopathologic owing to the paucibacillary nature of the disease. Early identification and treatment with antitubercular drugs will normally result in a good cosmetic and functional result.

  10. Combating Tuberculosis Infection: A Forbidding Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Tejal; Butani, Shital

    2016-01-01

    After 50 years drought, several drugs are looming from the pipeline to combat tuberculosis. They will serve as a boon to the field that has been burdened with primitive, inadequate treatments and drug-resistant bacterial strains. From the decades, due to lack of interest and resources, the field has suffered a lot. Learning from the flaws, scientists have renovated their approaches to the finding of new antitubercular drugs. The first line drugs take about six months or more for the entire treatment. The second line remedy for resistant-tuberculosis requires daily injections which carry severe side effects. Drug resistance remains a constant menace because patients stop the medication once they start feeling better. So new drugs are required to be explored which are effective against tuberculosis especially drug resistant tuberculosis. These drugs need to work well with other drugs as well as with antivirals used for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus. It is also very important to be considered that the treatments need to be cheap, as tuberculosis primarily affects people more in the developing countries. Further, new drugs must cure the disease in short span of time than the current six to nine month regimen. Recently a few new and potent drugs such as bedaquiline, delamanid, teixobactin have been evolved which may serve as a nice step forward, with a better outcome. Teixobactin, a new antibiotic has been found to have promising action against resistant strains, is also under consideration. PMID:27168676

  11. Health-system strengthening and tuberculosis control.

    PubMed

    Atun, Rifat; Weil, Diana E C; Eang, Mao Tan; Mwakyusa, David

    2010-06-19

    Weak health systems are hindering global efforts for tuberculosis care and control, but little evidence is available on effective interventions to address system bottlenecks. This report examines published evidence, programme reviews, and case studies to identify innovations in system design and tuberculosis control to resolve these bottlenecks. We outline system bottlenecks in relation to governance, financing, supply chain management, human resources, health-information systems, and service delivery; and adverse effects from rapid introduction of suboptimum system designs. This report also documents innovative solutions for disease control and system design. Solutions pursued in individual countries are specific to the nature of the tuberculosis epidemic, the underlying national health system, and the contributors engaged: no one size fits all. Findings from countries, including Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Tanzania, Thailand, and Vietnam, suggest that advances in disease control and system strengthening are complementary. Tuberculosis care and control are essential elements of health systems, and simultaneous efforts to innovate systems and disease response are mutually reinforcing. Highly varied and context-specific responses to tuberculosis show that solutions need to be documented and compared to develop evidence-based policies and practice.

  12. Autophagy in the fight against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bento, Carla F; Empadinhas, Nuno; Mendes, Vítor

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB.

  13. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-03-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs.

  14. [New methods of diagnosis in tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Slim-Saidi, L; Mehiri-Zeghal, E; Ghariani, A; Tritar, F

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriological diagnosis of tuberculosis has benefited in recent years from many technological advances to improve rapidity and sensitivity of the techniques. Thus, new LED fluorescence microscopes are in the process of replacing the optical microscopes and the Ziehl-Neelsen technique, making the examination more precise, faster and easier. The manual and automatic liquid culture has improved Lowenstein-Jensen culture and helped shorten antibiotic sensitivity test, allowing appropriate management of patients. The development and standardization of molecular biology methods led to the rapid detection and identification of mycobacterium directly in clinical samples but also of resistance genes for early diagnosis of MDR-TB and dealing with them quickly. However, the performance of these techniques does not sufficiently cover the diagnosis of smear-negative tuberculosis, extrapulmonary forms, children- and immune-compromised tuberculosis where sensitivity is limited. The diagnosis of latent tuberculosis is reinforced by the in vitro release testing of gamma interferon overcoming the lack of specificity of the tuberculin skin test. Despite considerable progress, more amelioration is still needed to improve these techniques in order to extend them to the paucibacillary tuberculosis and to facilitate their access to low-resource countries.

  15. [Management of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Tritar, F; Daghfous, H; Ben Saad, S; Slim-Saidi, L

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant TB in many countries has become a major public health problem and an obstacle to effective tuberculosis control. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), which is most often the result of poor adherence, is a particularly dangerous form of tuberculosis because it is caused by bacilli resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the two most effective anti-tuberculosis drugs. Techniques for rapid diagnosis of resistance have greatly improved the care of patients by allowing early treatment which remains complex and costly establishment, and requires skills and resources. The treatment is not standardized but it includes in all cases attack phase with five drugs (there must be an injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone that form the basis of the regimen) for eight months and a maintenance phase (without injectable agent) with a total duration of 20 months on average. Surgery may be beneficial as long as the lesions are localized and the patient has a good cardiorespiratory function. Evolution of MDR-TB treated is less favorable than tuberculosis with germ sensitive. The cure rate varies from 60 to 75% for MDR-TB, and drops to 30 to 40% for XDR-TB. Mortality remains high, ranging from 20 to 40% even up to 70-90% in people co-infected with HIV.

  16. Assessment of Diagnostic Techniques of Urinary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Khaled; Afifi, Magdy; El-Gohary, Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    Early diagnosis of active tuberculosis remains an elusive challenge. In addition, one third of the world’s population is latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and up to 10% of infected individuals develop tuberculosis (TB) in their lifetime. In this investigation, the incidence of urinary tuberculosis among renal patients was studied. Three hundreds urine samples were processed for detection of Mtb by Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) smear examination, Lowenstein Jensen (LJ) medium, radiometric BACTEC460 system as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by DNA Enzyme Immunoassay (DEIA) test. Out of 300 urine samples, 2 were positive by both ZN smears and LJ medium with incidence rate of 0.66 %, 3 positive samples by BACTEC460 culture system with incidence of 1%. PCR assay gave more positive results than smear and culture examination (i.e. 8 positive samples with incidence rate of 2.6%). The specificities were 25% for both ZN smears and LJ medium, 37.5% for BACTEC460 culture system, and 100% for PCR test, while sensitivities of all assays were 100%. Thus PCR is a rapid and sensitive method for the early diagnosis of urinary tuberculosis. PMID:23795272

  17. Autophagy in the Fight Against Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Carla F.; Empadinhas, Nuno

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease mainly caused by the tubercle bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is one of the world's deadliest diseases that has afflicted humanity since ancient times. Although the number of people falling ill with TB each year is declining, its incidence in many developing countries is still a major cause of concern. Upon invading host cells by phagocytosis, M. tuberculosis can replicate within infected cells by arresting the maturation of the phagosome whose function is to target the pathogen for elimination. Host cells have mechanisms of controlling this evasion by inducing autophagy, an elaborate cellular process that targets bacteria for progressive elimination, decreasing bacterial loads within infected cells. In addition, autophagy activation also aids in the control of inflammation, contributing to a more efficient innate immune response against M. tuberculosis. Several innovative TB therapies have been envisaged based on autophagy manipulation, with some of them revealing high potential for future clinical trials and eventual implementation in healthcare systems. Thus, this review highlights the recent advances on the innate immune response regulation by autophagy upon M. tuberculosis infection and the promising new autophagy-based therapies for TB. PMID:25607549

  18. T-Cell Immunophenotyping Distinguishes Active From Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M.; Whitworth, Hilary S.; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J.; Grass, Lisa; Cooke, Graham S.; Kapembwa, Moses S.; Kon, Onn M.; Sampson, Robert D.; Taylor, Graham P.; Lalvani, Ajit

    2013-01-01

    Background. Changes in the phenotype and function of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis)-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to stage of infection may allow discrimination between active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection. Methods. A prospective comparison of M. tuberculosis-specific cellular immunity in subjects with active tuberculosis and latent tuberculosis infection, with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) coinfection. Polychromatic flow cytometry was used to measure CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subset phenotype and secretion of interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α). Results. Frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ cells secreting IFN-γ-only, TNF-α-only and dual IFN-γ/TNF-α were greater in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection. All M. tuberculosis-specific CD4+ subsets, with the exception of IL-2-only cells, switched from central to effector memory phenotype in active tuberculosis vs latent tuberculosis infection, accompanied by a reduction in IL-7 receptor α (CD127) expression. The frequency of PPD-specific CD4+ TNF-α-only-secreting T cells with an effector phenotype accurately distinguished active tuberculosis from latent tuberculosis infection with an area under the curve of 0.99, substantially more discriminatory than measurement of function alone. Conclusions. Combined measurement of T-cell phenotype and function defines a highly discriminatory biomarker of tuberculosis disease activity. Unlocking the diagnostic and monitoring potential of this combined approach now requires validation in large-scale prospective studies. PMID:23966657

  19. High Tuberculosis Prevalence in a South African Prison: The Need for Routine Tuberculosis Screening

    PubMed Central

    Telisinghe, Lilanganee; Fielding, Katherine L.; Malden, Justin L.; Hanifa, Yasmeen; Churchyard, Gavin J.; Grant, Alison D.; Charalambous, Salome

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis is a major health concern in prisons, particularly where HIV prevalence is high. Our objective was to determine the undiagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis (“undiagnosed tuberculosis”) prevalence in a representative sample of prisoners in a South African prison. In addition we investigated risk factors for undiagnosed tuberculosis, to explore if screening strategies could be targeted to high risk groups, and, the performance of screening tools for tuberculosis. Methods and Findings In this cross-sectional survey, male prisoners were screened for tuberculosis using symptoms, chest radiograph (CXR) and two spot sputum specimens for microscopy and culture. Anonymised HIV antibody testing was performed on urine specimens. The sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of symptoms and investigations were calculated, using Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated on sputum culture as the gold standard. From September 2009 to October 2010, 1046 male prisoners were offered enrolment to the study. A total of 981 (93.8%) consented (median age was 32 years; interquartile range [IQR] 27–37 years) and were screened for tuberculosis. Among 968 not taking tuberculosis treatment and with sputum culture results, 34 (3.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.4–4.9%) were culture positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. HIV prevalence was 25.3% (242/957; 95% CI 22.6–28.2%). Positive HIV status (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.0; 95% CI 1.0–4.2) and being an ex-smoker (aOR 2.6; 95% CI 1.2–5.9) were independently associated with undiagnosed tuberculosis. Compared to the gold standard of positive sputum culture, cough of any duration had a sensitivity of 35.3% and specificity of 79.6%. CXR was the most sensitive single screening modality (sensitivity 70.6%, specificity 92.2%). Adding CXR to cough of any duration gave a tool with sensitivity of 79.4% and specificity of 73.8%. Conclusions Undiagnosed tuberculosis and HIV prevalence was high in this prison

  20. Tuberculosis diagnosis after bleach processing for early stage tuberculosis laboratory capacity building.

    PubMed

    David, S; Sutre, A F; Sanca, A; Mané, A; Henriques, V; Portugal, C; Sancho, L; Cardoso, A; Paixão, E; Duarte, E L; Leite, C Q F; Salem, J I; Antunes, A

    2012-11-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculosis is seriously hampered in the absence of standard biosafety laboratory facilities for specimen concentration and Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. Within a laboratory twinning arrangement, heat-fixed direct smear and sediment from 74 bleach-processed and 20 non-processed specimens from Cumura Hospital, Guinea-Bissau, were sent to Lisbon for molecular evaluation of rifampicin resistance. Sequence analysis of a 369 base-pair rpoB locus detected 3.2% (3/94) resistant specimens. To our knowledge, this represents the first report on the molecular analysis of M. tuberculosis from bleach-processed sputum, an alternative to current diagnostic practice in low-resource settings.

  1. Mixed-Strain Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections and the Implications for Tuberculosis Treatment and Control

    PubMed Central

    van Helden, Paul D.; Wilson, Douglas; Colijn, Caroline; McLaughlin, Megan M.; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Warren, Robin M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Numerous studies have reported that individuals can simultaneously harbor multiple distinct strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. To date, there has been limited discussion of the consequences for the individual or the epidemiological importance of mixed infections. Here, we review studies that documented mixed infections, highlight challenges associated with the detection of mixed infections, and discuss possible implications of mixed infections for the diagnosis and treatment of patients and for the community impact of tuberculosis control strategies. We conclude by highlighting questions that should be resolved in order to improve our understanding of the importance of mixed-strain M. tuberculosis infections. PMID:23034327

  2. Primary gastric tuberculosis – report of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Patel, Nikhil D; Amarapurkar, Anjali D

    2003-01-01

    Background Gastric tuberculosis is rare, and usually associated with pulmonary tuberculosis or an immunodeficient state. Here, we report five cases of gastric tuberculosis in immunocompetent patients without evidence of pulmonary involvement. Case presentation Three patients presented with gastric outlet obstruction that required surgery to relieve the obstruction as well as to confirm the diagnosis. The remaining two had involvement of gastroesophageal junction. All of them responded well to standard antitubercular treatment. Conclusion Though gastric tuberculosis is rare, it should be considered a possibility when patients present with gastric outlet obstruction or with endoscopic evidence of diffuse chronic inflammatory activity, particularly in areas endemic for tuberculosis. PMID:12703983

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the macrophage: maintaining a balance.

    PubMed

    Pieters, Jean

    2008-06-12

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a highly efficient pathogen, killing millions of infected people annually. The capacity of M. tuberculosis to survive and cause disease is strongly correlated to their ability to escape immune defense mechanisms. In particular, M. tuberculosis has the remarkable capacity to survive within the hostile environment of the macrophage. Understanding M. tuberculosis virulence strategies will not only define novel targets for drug development but will also help to uncover previously unknown signaling pathways related to the host's response to M. tuberculosis infection.

  4. Tuberculosis of Spine: Current Views in Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is the chronic consumptive disease and currently the world's leading cause of death. Tuberculous spondylitis is a less common yet the most dangerous form of skeletal tuberculosis. The recent re-emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) hints at a possible resurgence of tuberculosis in the coming years. This article discusses the clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment of tuberculous spondylitis, and updates material that the author has previously published on the subject. Treatment should be individualized according to different indications which is essential to recovery. A treatment model is suggested on the basis of the author's vast personal experiences. PMID:24596613

  5. Unusual presentation of tuberculosis in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Amedia, C; Oettinger, C W

    1977-08-01

    Four patients developed miliary tuberculosis while undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Two patients had diabetes mellitus. Three of the four patients were hemodialyzed 18--24 months prior to the onset of symptoms. Signs and symptoms included prolonged fever, pleural effusion, pericarditis with pericardial effusion, abdominal pain, weight loss, and ascites. All patients were PPD negative and without historical or radiographic evidence of latent tuberculosis. Disseminated tuberculosis was proven at autopsy in three patients. M. tuberculosis was eventually recovered from pleural fluid and urine in the fourth patient. The immune deficiencies of chronic renal failure and diabetes mellitus are suspected predisposing factors to the development of miliary tuberculosis in these patients.

  6. Cytokine and lipid mediator networks in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Sher, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Summary A major approach for immunologic intervention in tuberculosis involves redirecting the outcome of the host immune response from the induction of disease to pathogen control. Cytokines and lipid mediators known as eicosanoids play key roles in regulating this balance and as such represent important targets for immunologic intervention. While the evidence for cytokine/eicosanoid function derives largely from the investigation of murine and zebra fish experimental infection models, clinical studies have confirmed the existence of many of the same pathways in tuberculosis patients. Here we summarize new data that reveal important intersections between the cytokine and eicosanoid networks in the host response to mycobacteria and discuss how targeting this crosstalk can promote resistance to lethal Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This approach could lead to new host-directed therapies to be used either as an adjunct for improving the efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment or for the management of drug-resistant infections. PMID:25703565

  7. Tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus: merging epidemics.

    PubMed

    Sen, Tiyas; Joshi, Shashank R; Udwadia, Zarir F

    2009-05-01

    The link between tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes mellitus (DM) has occupied the center stage of discussion. Experts have raised concern about the merging epidemics of tuberculosis and diabetes particularly in the low to medium income countries like India and China that have the highest burden of TB in the world, and are experiencing the fastest increase in the prevalence of DM. There is good evidence that DM makes a substantial contribution to TB incidence. The huge prevalence of DM in India, may be contributing to the increasing prevalence of TB. This review looks at the link between these two merging epidemics. We discuss the epidemiology, clinical features, microbiology and radiology, and management and treatment outcomes of patients with tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus.

  8. Tuberculosis surveillance in a therapeutic community.

    PubMed

    Foley, M E; Ehr, A P; Raza, B; Devlin, C J

    1995-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a chronic communicable bacterial infection of epidemic proportions in the United States, is more common among debilitated and immunocompromised persons, for example, alcoholics, drug abusers, and HIV/AIDS patients, than among the general population. Daytop Village Inc., a drug free therapeutic community for chemical dependency treatment, initiated a program of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance and prevention education with grant support. Continuous educational sessions for staff and residents have raised awareness of the threat of TB. From March 1991 until September 1992, 2,932 clients screened for TB found 272 (9.2%) PPD positive. Of these 272, 125 also tested for HIV found 28 (22.4%) HIV positive. The TB screening program had no negative impact on the retention rate of Daytop residents. With sufficient fiscal and personnel support, tuberculosis education, screening, and treatment has been naturally integrated into the primary care agenda within the therapeutic community model of drug abuse rehabilitation.

  9. [New drugs for treatment of tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Schaberg, T

    2016-02-01

    New effective drugs for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) are necessary for two main reasons: firstly, it would be desirable to reduce the duration of TB treatment from 6 to 4 months and secondly, new drugs are urgently needed for the treatment of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. For the first time since 1960 the two new drugs bedaquiline and delamanid were approved and licensed in 2014 for the treatment of multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis; however, efforts to reduce the duration of treatment to 4 months using fluoroquinolones have not been successful. Further new drugs are currently in phase 2 and phase 3 studies; therefore, new treatment options can be expected within the next few years.

  10. Advancing tuberculosis control within reforming health systems.

    PubMed

    Weil, D E

    2000-07-01

    In developing nations, diverse health reform programs are affecting the design, financing and delivery of health care services as well as public health practice. This paper summarizes the characteristics of major reform strategies seeking to improve efficiency, equity and quality. Opportunities and risks for tuberculosis control are identified, as are responses in managing the reform transition. Recommendations are provided to advance tuberculosis control in this dynamic environment. These include participation in the planning process; demonstration of synergy between reform objectives and tuberculosis control; articulation of core functions to be protected; technical, managerial and leadership capacity-building; documentation of effects and best practices; and collaboration with those pursuing other public health priorities and reform analysis.

  11. Cytological Diagnosis of Primary Thyroid Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Goyal, P; Mittal, D; Ghosh, S; Agrawal, D; Sehgal, S; Singh, S

    2015-01-01

    Primary thyroid tuberculosis is an extremely rare disease, even in countries where other forms of tuberculosis are abundant. TT has no age bar but usually affects women in fourth and fifth decade. Hereby, we report a case of 16-years-old girl presented with complaint of progressively increasing, painful thyroid swelling. Diagnosis of TT was made on cytology and there was no evidence of involvement of any other organ by tuberculosis. Despite of its rarity, TT is usually misdiagnosed. So, a clinician should always consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of thyroid swelling. Fine needle aspiration cytology is the best diagnostic method and can result in the avoidance of unnecessary thyroid surgeries.

  12. Nam Con Son Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tin, N.T.; Ty, N.D.; Hung, L.T.

    1994-07-01

    The Nam Con Son basin is the largest oil and gas bearing basin in Vietnam, and has a number of producing fields. The history of studies in the basin can be divided into four periods: Pre-1975, 1976-1980, 1981-1989, and 1990-present. A number of oil companies have carried out geological and geophysical studies and conducted drilling activities in the basin. These include ONGC, Enterprise Oil, BP, Shell, Petro-Canada, IPL, Lasmo, etc. Pre-Tertiary formations comprise quartz diorites, granodiorites, and metamorphic rocks of Mesozoic age. Cenozoic rocks include those of the Cau Formation (Oligocene and older), Dua Formation (lower Miocene), Thong-Mang Cau Formation (middle Miocene), Nam Con Son Formation (upper Miocene) and Bien Dong Formation (Pliocene-Quaternary). The basement is composed of pre-Cenozoic formations. Three fault systems are evident in the basin: north-south fault system, northeast-southwest fault system, and east-west fault system. Four tectonic zones can also be distinguished: western differentiated zone, northern differentiated zone, Dua-Natuna high zone, and eastern trough zone.

  13. [A report of outbreaks of pulmonary tuberculosis in two bars].

    PubMed

    Ishibatake, H; Onizuka, R

    1997-11-01

    We experienced small outbreaks of M. tuberculosis infection in two bars. 9 patients were diagnosed as tuberculosis by identifying M. tuberculosis from their sputa. Six of them were regular customers or employees of the bar, one of them was a family members. Each outbreak within the two bars was suspected of the common source of infection, because one patient was a regular customer of the both bars. The analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was done on 5 strains of M. tuberculosis which were isolated from five of 9 patients. The result unexpectedly showed that 5 isolates were classified into 3 groups. Within each group, identical fingerprints were shown. It does mean that each outbreak in two bars was originated from independent source. There was also one relapsed case of tuberculosis. He was suspected of relapsed tuberculosis after a period of 7 years because of the similarity of drug resistance compared with his primary tuberculosis. It was cleared up that 3 different strains of M. tuberculosis were concerned with these outbreaks in the two bars. In this case, almost all patients were heavy drinkers, however, liver dysfunction and malnutrition were not recognized among them. These experiences indicate that a place like bar may be a space of infection of M. tuberculosis. We should always keep in mind a spread of tuberculosis in a place like a bar as one of problems in tuberculosis control.

  14. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  15. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  16. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  17. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  18. 38 CFR 3.375 - Determination of inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... inactivity (complete arrest) in tuberculosis. 3.375 Section 3.375 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...) in tuberculosis. (a) Pulmonary tuberculosis. A veteran shown to have had pulmonary tuberculosis will...) Nonpulmonary disease. Determination of complete arrest of nonpulmonary tuberculosis requires absence...

  19. 81 FR 12832 - Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis; Update of General Provisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2016-03-11

    ...-AD65 Brucellosis and Bovine Tuberculosis; Update of General Provisions AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health... tuberculosis and those governing brucellosis and revise the bovine tuberculosis- and brucellosis-related import... bovine tuberculosis and those governing brucellosis, as well as to revise the bovine tuberculosis-...

  20. Tuberculosis notifications in Australia, 2011.

    PubMed

    Bareja, Christina; Waring, Justin; Stapledon, Richard; Toms, Cindy; Douglas, Paul

    2014-12-31

    The National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System received 1,385 tuberculosis (TB) notifications in 2011, representing a rate of 6.2 cases per 100,000 population. While Australia has maintained a rate of 5 to 6 cases per 100,000 for TB since the mid-1980s, there has been a steady increase in incidence over the past decade. In 2011, Australia's overseas-born population continued to represent the majority of TB notifications (88%) with a notification rate of 20.2 per 100,000. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born Indigenous population has fluctuated over the last decade and showed no clear trend; however, in 2011 the notification rate was 4.9 per 100,000, which is a notable decrease from the 7.5 per 100,000 recorded in 2010. The incidence of TB in the Australian-born non-Indigenous population has continued to remain low at 0.9 per 100,000. Australia continued to record only a small number of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases nationally (n=25), all of which were identified in the overseas-born population. To ensure that Australia can retain its low TB rate and work toward reducing rates further, it is essential that Australia maintains good centralised national TB reporting to monitor trends and identify at-risk populations, and continues to contribute to global TB control initiatives.

  1. Global Burden of Childhood Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Helen E.

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared tuberculosis (TB) to be responsible for more deaths than any other single infectious disease. The burden of TB among children has frequently been dismissed as relatively low with resulting deaths contributing very little to global under-five all-cause mortality, although without rigorous estimates of these statistics, the burden of childhood TB was, in reality, unknown. Recent work in the area has resulted in a WHO estimate of 1 million new cases of childhood TB in 2014 resulting in 136,000 deaths. Around 3% of these cases likely have multidrug-resistant TB and at least 40,000 are in HIV-infected children. TB is now thought to be a major or contributory cause of many deaths in children under five years old, despite not being recorded as such, and is likely in the top ten causes of global mortality in this age group. In particular, recent work has shown that TB is an under-lying cause of a substantial proportion of pneumonia deaths in TB-endemic countries. Childhood TB should be given higher priority: we need to identify children at greatest risk of TB disease and death and make more use of tools such as active case-finding and preventive therapy. TB is a preventable and treatable disease from which no child should die. PMID:28003956

  2. Universal tuberculosis screening in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Nadav; Wagner, Sarah A; Keeler, Sean M; Mierlak, Julian; Seubert, David E; Caughey, Aaron B

    2009-06-01

    We reviewed our practice of universal tuberculosis (TB) screening in an at-risk pregnant population with regards to utility and patient compliance. The Gouverneur Healthcare Services prenatal database was analyzed for compliance with TB screening. Age, ethnicity, country of origin, and education level were also analyzed. Of 4049 patients, 95.0% were compliant with their purified protein derivative (PPD) testing. Universal screening identified 1935 (50.4%) PPD+ patients, with chest X-rays (CXR) available for 95.1%. Only one patient had a CXR consistent with active TB, although sputum testing was negative for acid-fast bacilli. Asian women were more likely to be PPD-compliant (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 4.94, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.34 to 10.45). Similarly, PPD+ Asian women were more likely to be compliant with CXR (aOR: 12.67, 95% CI: 3.44 to 46.7). U.S.-born women were significantly less likely to be compliant with PPD (aOR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.30 to 0.64) or with CXR (aOR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.61). Universal prenatal TB screening is associated with excellent compliance rates and is an effective way to identify a high prevalence of latent TB, but not active disease.

  3. Surviving the macrophage: tools and tricks employed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jayachandran, Rajesh; BoseDasgupta, Somdeb; Pieters, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has evolved to withstand one of the most inhospitable cells within the human body, namely the macrophage, a cell that is normally geared toward the destruction of any invading microbe. How M. tuberculosis achieves this is still incompletely understood; however, a number of mechanisms are now known that provide advantages to M. tuberculosis for its survival and proliferation inside the macrophage. While some of these mechanisms are mediated by factors released by M. tuberculosis, others rely on host components that are being hijacked to benefit survival of M. tuberculosis within the macrophage as well to avoid the generation of an effective immune response. Here, we describe several of these mechanisms, also pointing out the potential usage of this knowledge toward the development of novel strategies to treat tuberculosis. Furthermore, we attempt to put the 'macrophage niche' into context with other intracellular pathogens and discuss some of the generalities as well as specializations that M. tuberculosis employs to survive.

  4. [The development of tuberculosis epidemiology in the German Democratic Republic].

    PubMed

    Steinbrück, P; Herrmann, H

    1982-01-01

    The development of tuberculosis in GDR is analysed upon the different points of view. After assessing the validity of the parameters for evaluating the tuberculosis problem (mortality, incidence and prevalence of disease and infection) some aspects remarkable for tuberculosis control are discussed. Tuberculosis has been vastly reduced in all parameters since 1949. However, the regression of tuberculosis did not occur with the same rate in the various age and finding groups. By this the efficacy of the control measures has changed making necessary a reconsideration of the methods. The Volkskrankheit (common disease in the population) tuberculosis has become a vastly reduced endemic disease in GDR. For future tuberculosis control conclusions are drawn from the analysis.

  5. CD8 T cells and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease that is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis can persist and replicate in macrophages in vivo, usually in organized cellular structures called granulomas. There is substantial evidence for the importance of CD4 T cells in control of tuberculosis, but the evidence for a requirement for CD8 T cells in this infection has not been proven in humans. However, animal model data support a non-redundant role for CD8 T cells in control of M. tuberculosis infection. In humans, infection with this pathogen leads to generation of specific CD8 T cell responses. These responses include classical (MHC Class I restricted) and non-classical CD8 T cells. Here, we discuss the potential roles of CD8 T cells in defense against tuberculosis, and our current understanding of the wide range of CD8 T cell types seen in M. tuberculosis infection.

  6. Tuberculosis and mental health in the Asia-Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Paul H; Sweetland, Annika C; Fox, Greg J; Halovic, Shaun; Nguyen, Thu Anh; Marks, Guy B

    2017-01-01

    Objective This opinion piece encourages mental health researchers and clinicians to engage with mental health issues among tuberculosis patients in the Asia-Pacific region in a culturally appropriate and ethical manner. The diversity of cultural contexts and the high burden of tuberculosis throughout the Asia-Pacific presents significant challenges. Research into tuberculosis and mental illness in this region is an opportunity to develop more nuanced models of mental illness and treatment, while simultaneously contributing meaningfully to regional tuberculosis care and prevention. Conclusions We overview key issues in tuberculosis and mental illness co-morbidity, highlight ethical concerns and advocate for a regional approach to tuberculosis and mental health that is consistent with the transnational challenges presented by this airborne infectious disease. Integrating tuberculosis and mental health services will go a long way to addressing the needs of vulnerable populations and stopping the transmission of one of the world’s biggest infectious killers. PMID:27206468

  7. Understanding tuberculosis epidemiology using structured statistical models.

    PubMed

    Getoor, Lise; Rhee, Jeanne T; Koller, Daphne; Small, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Molecular epidemiological studies can provide novel insights into the transmission of infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. Typically, risk factors for transmission are identified using traditional hypothesis-driven statistical methods such as logistic regression. However, limitations become apparent in these approaches as the scope of these studies expand to include additional epidemiological and bacterial genomic data. Here we examine the use of Bayesian models to analyze tuberculosis epidemiology. We begin by exploring the use of Bayesian networks (BNs) to identify the distribution of tuberculosis patient attributes (including demographic and clinical attributes). Using existing algorithms for constructing BNs from observational data, we learned a BN from data about tuberculosis patients collected in San Francisco from 1991 to 1999. We verified that the resulting probabilistic models did in fact capture known statistical relationships. Next, we examine the use of newly introduced methods for representing and automatically constructing probabilistic models in structured domains. We use statistical relational models (SRMs) to model distributions over relational domains. SRMs are ideally suited to richly structured epidemiological data. We use a data-driven method to construct a statistical relational model directly from data stored in a relational database. The resulting model reveals the relationships between variables in the data and describes their distribution. We applied this procedure to the data on tuberculosis patients in San Francisco from 1991 to 1999, their Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains, and data on contact investigations. The resulting statistical relational model corroborated previously reported findings and revealed several novel associations. These models illustrate the potential for this approach to reveal relationships within richly structured data that may not be apparent using conventional statistical approaches. We show that Bayesian

  8. Control strategies for wildlife tuberculosis in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Gormley, E; Corner, L A L

    2013-11-01

    The principal domestic maintenance host for Mycobacterium bovis is infected cattle. In countries where comprehensive surveillance schemes have been applied, tuberculosis rarely affects an animal to the extent that it presents with clinical disease. In the latter stages of an eradication campaign, the aim is to maintain the disease-free status of clear herds and eliminate foci of infection in herds as well as restricting movement of infected animals from these herds, other than to slaughter. However, the eradication of tuberculosis from cattle herds may be compromised if infected wildlife species, such as Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), share the same environment and contribute to transmission of infection. The options for dealing with tuberculosis in the wildlife reservoir hosts are limited to segregation of domestic animals from the wildlife, culling of the wildlife host or vaccination. Options are further limited by conservation and social reasons, particularly where culling is concerned. In Ireland and the UK, vaccination of badgers against M. bovis, if successfully employed, could directly facilitate the completion of bovine tuberculosis eradication. Programmes of research into vaccination of badgers are being undertaken in both countries, and there is clear evidence that vaccination induces protection. Vaccine trials in captive badgers have established that the M. bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine can induce a protective response that limits the distribution and severity of tuberculosis disease following experimental challenge. In Ireland, a large-scale field trial of oral BCG vaccination is being conducted to measure the protection generated in wild badgers subjected to natural transmission of infection and to estimate vaccine efficacy. The results will provide a framework for the development and implementation of a national strategy to address the disease in badger populations and if successful will remove this major impediment to tuberculosis

  9. Clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M M; Ghose, A; Islam, M B; Amin, R; Rahman, R; Faiz, M A

    2010-04-01

    This prospective observational clinical study was done to find out the clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis patients, to find out a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosis and to see the effectively of a standard anti-TB regime Isoniazide, Rifampicine, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol, (2HRZE/4HR) for treatment of pleural tuberculosis in an adult medicine unit, department of Medicine, Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. A series of total thirty-three consecutive pleural tuberculosis patients admitted in that unit over a period of 6 months were enrolled. All thirty-three pleural tuberculosis patients were observed for their demographic and clinical parameters and undergone some relevant investigations like complete blood count, Mantoux test, pleural fluid study and pleural histopathological study. Later on, they were put on anti-tuberculosis therapy without steroid and followed their response after one month. All patients of pleural tuberculosis presented in this medicine unit had fever and cough associated with chest pain (87.9%), dysnoea (42.4%), haemoptysis (9.1%), weight loss (84.4%), anorexia (90.9%). Age of presentation was 34.1+/-16.2 years and of them, 60.7% patients were below 30. Mean Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) was 97.04 mm in 1st hour and 57.6% cases had ESR more than 100. 63.6% had Mantoux Test (MT) positive (>10 mm). Only 6.1% had hemorrhagic effusion and others had straw colored fluid. Mean pleural fluid protein is 5.9 gram/L and sugar 65.7 mg/dl. No Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) was seen on microscopy in pleural fluid. Pleural biopsy revealed 54.5% granulomatous lesion with or without caseation and another 24.2% shows chronic inflammation. Seventy seven percentage (77%) patients were attended follow-up clinic after 1 month and all patients (100%) were improved with this anti-TB therapy. Of the total patient treated with anti TB drug, 53.5% had no pleural effusion, other had minimum effusion. Only 6

  10. [The physicians' awareness of urogenital system tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, G V; Leont'ev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The chair of public health of the Omsk State medical academy conjointly with the municipal TB dispensary No 4 carried out the medical social study of the urogenital system tuberculosis since no profound and research of this problem was organized on the territory of Omsk oblast. The article presents the fragment of the data related to the survey of he physicians of medical institutions form city of Omsk and the Omsk oblast about the effectiveness of the medical social care to the patients suffering from the urogenital system tuberculosis.

  11. Tuberculosis of Glans Penis- A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gangalakshmi, C.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of penis is a very rare entity, even in developing countries. It may present as primary or secondary to Pulmonary TB (PTB). Penile TB mimics carcinoma penis, granulomatous penile ulcer, genital herpes simplex, granuloma inguinale and HIV infection. We, hereby, present the case of a 57-year-old male patient who presented to us with ulcerative growth over glans penis and was clinically diagnosed as carcinoma penis, however biopsy of the lesion showed evidence of tuberculosis which was supported by chest X-ray. PMID:28208927

  12. Pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis in Sorsogon, Philippines.

    PubMed

    Belizario, V; Guan, M; Borja, L; Ortega, A; Leonardia, W

    1997-01-01

    The clinical epidemiology of pulmonary paragonimiasis and tuberculosis was investigated in a known endemic municipality of Sorsogon, Philippines. Records of diagnosed tuberculosis patients on treatment and follow up at the local Rural Health Unit over a two year period from 1993 to 1994 were reviewed to provide an overview of pulmonary tuberculosis in the area, specifically to describe the population at risk, the basis for diagnosis and the proportion of case notification who were sputum negative. Patients from the same group of individuals as well as undiagnosed tuberculosis patients with productive cough, fever with chest and/or back pain, or hemoptysis were examined to look into clinical manifestations, duration of symptoms, history of crab-eating and sputum examination results for acid-fast bacilli and Paragonimus. There was difficulty in determining the number of non-responders as the records did not have any provision for the recording of such. Annual tuberculosis case notification rates for the two years (374 and 401 per 100,000 population) were higher than the national figure in 1991 (325 per 100,000 population) indicating that tuberculosis is still a major health problem in the area and tuberculosis control efforts may have to be more aggressive to better contain the disease. Twenty-six out of 160 individuals surveyed were sputum smear positive for Paragonimus. Paragonimiasis rates were not significantly different in the two groups (15.6% vs 16.9%, respectively) indicating that there is a need for routine sputum examination for Paragonimus which is not available at present. Only six patients surveyed were sputum smear positive for acid-fast bacilli. A high index of suspicion is necessary to diagnose paragonimiasis and to be able to differentiate it from tuberculosis. The diagnosis may be suggested by a patient's place of origin being a known endemic area, a long period of chronic cough and the habit of eating raw or insufficiently cooked crabs or crayfish

  13. Intrathoracic goitre associated with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tinu; Gera, Kamal; Modi, Nikhil; Shah, Ashok

    2015-04-01

    Intrathoracic goitre is an uncommon condition which usually occurs in females in the fifth decade. It can cause compression of several mediastinal structures. A 42-year-old female with goitre since childhood was evaluated for dry cough, occasional wheezing and low grade fever. Imaging showed patchy airspace opacities with cavitation in left lung. Imaging of the neck revealed retrosternal extension of the goitre. Stains and cultures of bronchial aspirate were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. A diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis with intrathoracic goitre was established, an unusual association.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  15. Advancing host-directed therapy for tuberculosis:

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chul-Su

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) drug-development strategies, a wide range of candidate host-directed therapies (HDT)s-including new and repurposed drugs, biologics, and cellular therapies-have been proposed to accelerate eradication of infection and overcome the problems associated with current treatment regimens. By investigating the interaction between macrophages and the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), we uncovered that infection-induced signaling pathways suggest possibilities for the development of novel therapeutic modalities for TB that target the intracellular signaling pathways permitting the replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). PMID:28357397

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis adhesins: potential biomarkers as anti-tuberculosis therapeutic and diagnostic targets.

    PubMed

    Govender, Viveshree S; Ramsugit, Saiyur; Pillay, Manormoney

    2014-09-01

    Adhesion to host cells is a precursor to host colonization and evasion of the host immune response. Conversely, it triggers the induction of the immune response, a process vital to the host's defence against infection. Adhesins are microbial cell surface molecules or structures that mediate the attachment of the microbe to host cells and thus the host-pathogen interaction. They also play a crucial role in bacterial aggregation and biofilm formation. In this review, we discuss the role of adhesins in the pathogenesis of the aetiological agent of tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We also provide insight into the structure and characteristics of some of the characterized and putative M. tuberculosis adhesins. Finally, we examine the potential of adhesins as targets for the development of tuberculosis control strategies.

  17. [Delay in childhood tuberculosis detection as a negative factor in the anti-tuberculosis struggle].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Llopis González, A; Sanz Aliaga, S A; Otero, M C; Pérez-Tamarit, D; Asensi Botet, F

    1992-12-01

    Childhood morbidity due to tuberculosis infection in Spain is not diminishing at the expected rate in relation with available knowledge and facilities. An important factor is the delay in diagnosis, which evaluation constitutes the objective of this publication. Said delay is due to several causes, patient does not consult on time (mean value between onset of symptoms and consult is 34.3 days), or physician does not think in tuberculosis as first diagnosis, which meant an added mean delay of 7.6 days more. These delays mean an important detriment for the patient, and one of the objectives in the anti-tuberculosis struggle is to shorten delays through information to the lay public and health professionals on the highly important current issue of tuberculosis.

  18. Spatial Analysis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Antananarivo Madagascar: Tuberculosis-Related Knowledge, Attitude and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Rakotosamimanana, Sitraka; Mandrosovololona, Vatsiharizandry; Rakotonirina, Julio; Ramamonjisoa, Joselyne; Ranjalahy, Justin Rasolofomanana; Randremanana, Rindra Vatosoa; Rakotomanana, Fanjasoa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis infection may remain latent, but the disease is nevertheless a serious public health issue. Various epidemiological studies on pulmonary tuberculosis have considered the spatial component and taken it into account, revealing the tendency of this disease to cluster in particular locations. The aim was to assess the contribution of Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) to the distribution of tuberculosis and to provide information for the improvement of the National Tuberculosis Program. Methods We investigated the role of KAP to distribution patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis in Antananarivo. First, we performed spatial scanning of tuberculosis aggregation among permanent cases resident in Antananarivo Urban Township using the Kulldorff method, and then we carried out a quantitative study on KAP, involving TB patients. The KAP study in the population was based on qualitative methods with focus groups. Results The disease still clusters in the same districts identified in the previous study. The principal cluster covered 22 neighborhoods. Most of them are part of the first district. A secondary cluster was found, involving 18 neighborhoods in the sixth district and two neighborhoods in the fifth. The relative risk was respectively 1.7 (p<10−6) in the principal cluster and 1.6 (p<10−3) in the secondary cluster. Our study showed that more was known about TB symptoms than about the duration of the disease or free treatment. Knowledge about TB was limited to that acquired at school or from relatives with TB. The attitude and practices of patients and the population in general indicated that there is still a stigma attached to tuberculosis. Conclusion This type of survey can be conducted in remote zones where the tuberculosis-related KAP of the TB patients and the general population is less known or not documented; the findings could be used to adapt control measures to the local particularities. PMID:25386655

  19. Tuberculosis of the genitourinary system-Urinary tract tuberculosis: Renal tuberculosis-Part II

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Suleman; Bharati, Alpa; Merchant, Neesha

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of renal tuberculosis (TB), including TB in transplant recipients and immunocompromised patients. Multi detector computed tomography (MDCT) forms the mainstay of cross-sectional imaging in renal TB. It can easily identify calcification, renal scars, mass lesions, and urothelial thickening. The combination of uneven caliectasis, with urothelial thickening and lack of pelvic dilatation, can also be demonstrated on MDCT. MRI is a sensitive modality for demonstration of features of renal TB, including tissue edema, asymmetric perinephric fat stranding, and thickening of Gerota's fascia, all of which may be clues to focal pyelonephritis of tuberculous origin. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values may help in differentiating hydronephrosis from pyonephrosis. ADC values also have the potential to serve as a sensitive non-invasive biomarker of renal fibrosis. Immunocompromised patients are at increased risk of renal TB. In transplant patients, renal TB, including tuberculous interstitial nephritis, is an important cause of graft dysfunction. Renal TB in patients with HIV more often shows greater parenchymal affection, with poorly formed granulomas and relatively less frequent findings of caseation and stenosis. Atypical mycobacterial infections are also more common in immunocompromised patients. PMID:23986619

  20. Associations between national tuberculosis program budgets and tuberculosis outcomes: an ecological study

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Will; Katz, Alan Roy; Li, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to explore the associations between national tuberculosis program (NTP) budget allocation and tuberculosis related outcomes in the World Health Organization's 22 high burden countries from 2007–2009. Methods This ecological study used mixed effects and generalized estimating equation models to identify independent associations between NTP budget allocations and various tuberculosis related outcomes. Models were adjusted for a number of independent variables previously noted to be associated with tuberculosis incidence. Results Increasing the percent of the NTP budget for advocacy, communication and social mobilization was associated with an increase in the case detection rate. Increasing TB-HIV funding was associated with an increase in HIV testing among TB patients. Increasing the percent of the population covered by the Directly Observed Therapy (DOT) program was associated with an increase in drug susceptibility testing. Laboratory funding was positively associated with tuberculosis notification. Increasing the budgets for first line drugs, management and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) was associated with a decrease in smear positive deaths. Conclusion Effective TB control is a complex and multifaceted challenge. This study revealed a number of budget allocation related factors associated with improved TB outcome parameters. If confirmed with future longitudinal studies, these findings could help guide NTP managers with allocation decisions. PMID:23024825

  1. Effect of common and experimental anti-tuberculosis treatments on Mycobacterium tuberculosis growing as biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, James P.; Uy, Benedict; Phummarin, Narisa; Copp, Brent R.; Denny, William A.; Swift, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Much is known regarding the antibiotic susceptibility of planktonic cultures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium responsible for the lung disease tuberculosis (TB). As planktonically-grown M. tuberculosis are unlikely to be entirely representative of the bacterium during infection, we set out to determine how effective a range of anti-mycobacterial treatments were against M. tuberculosis growing as a biofilm, a bacterial phenotype known to be more resistant to antibiotic treatment. Light levels from bioluminescently-labelled M. tuberculosis H37Rv (strain BSG001) were used as a surrogate for bacterial viability, and were monitored before and after one week of treatment. After treatment, biofilms were disrupted, washed and inoculated into fresh broth and plated onto solid media to rescue any surviving bacteria. We found that in this phenotypic state M. tuberculosis was resistant to the majority of the compounds tested. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) increased by 20-fold to greater than 1,000-fold, underlying the potential of this phenotype to cause significant problems during treatment. PMID:27904808

  2. Genotypic characteristics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from household contacts of tuberculosis patients in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Philippines has an extremely high rate of tuberculosis but little is known about M. tuberculosis genotypes and transmission dynamics in this country. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of household contacts who develop active TB due to direct transmission from an index case in that household. Methods Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from household contacts of tuberculosis patients in the Philippines were characterized using restriction-fragment-length polymorphism analysis, spoligotyping, and mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units – variable number tandem repeats typing (12-loci) to determine their utility in elucidating transmission in an area of high tuberculosis prevalence. Drug susceptibility patterns for these isolates were also determined. Results Spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing results matched in 10 (62.5%) of 16 index patient-household contact pairs while IS6110 fingerprints matched in only six (37.5%) pairs. Only 3/16 (18.8%) index patient-household contact pairs had identical drug susceptibility results. Conclusions Strain typing of M. tuberculosis isolates from household contacts in the Philippines indicates that transmission of strains does not necessarily occur directly from the index patient living in close proximity in the same household but rather that community-based transmission also frequently occurs. Accurate susceptibility testing of all isolates is necessary to insure optimal care of both the index patients and any culture-positive household contacts. PMID:24308751

  3. Tuberculosis, AIDS and tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection in a large city

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Nanci Michele; de Oliveira, Helenice Bosco

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the incidence of tuberculosis (TB), AIDS and tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection in the municipality of Campinas, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in the period 2001 – 2009. A historical trend study, it uses secondary data from the Tuberculosis Surveillance Database of the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and the São Paulo State STD-AIDS Center of Excellence and Training. It included new cases of TB, AIDS, and of tuberculosis-AIDS reported in the municipality of Campinas. A decrease in cases of TB until 2007 was observed, with an increase in 2008 and 2009. There was a general reduction in AIDS from 2007, but with an increase among men aged 60 or over, in the years 2007 to 2009. For tuberculosis-AIDS co-infection, the tendency was to reduce. The proportion of HIV tests not undertaken, among patients with tuberculosis, was high (27.5%). This scenario shows the need for integration of the databanks into the planning and control activities. PMID:22990163

  4. Malaria and tuberculosis: our concerns.

    PubMed

    Shiva, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1978 the concept of primary health care was adopted by 116 countries at Alma Ata, yet the negative impact of structural readjustment programs in Africa and South America could be felt due to the cuts in expenditures on health, education, and social matters. The result is a resurgence of communicable diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis. Another factor in this resurgence is extreme poverty. In 1994 over 1000 people died in Rajasthan, India, of a malaria epidemic, and during the same time in Delhi over 300 deaths were attributed to hemorrhagic dengue fever. Malariogenic and tuberculous conditions continue to flourish owing to distorted development patterns and commercialization of medical care as public health and community health services are being replaced by profit-oriented curative care, 80% of which is in private hands. This has resulted in spiraling medical care costs and rural indebtedness. Socioeconomic deprivation in developing countries threatens TB control. Factors contributing to the spread of TB were established in 1899 and are still valid in India and other developing countries: TB contamination of air, inadequate food, overcrowded dwelling, and low state of physical health. Even in developed countries TB is on the rise: there were 172 cases in 1991 in England vs. 305 cases in 1993, half of them among immigrants. The increase occurred in the poorest 30% of the population. The World Bank is providing loans for a revised TB and malaria strategy, and the Disability Adjusted Life Year has been used to identify the greatest burden of diseases. On the other hand, the Indian National Health Policy has not been revised since 1983. Priority must be given to those living in extreme poverty to curb the resurgence of once controlled diseases.

  5. Pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a horse: zoonotic concerns and limitations of antemortem testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of pulmonary tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in a horse. Clinical evaluation performed prior to euthanasia did not suggest tuberculosis, but postmortem examination provided pathological and bacteriological evidence of disease. In the lungs, multiple tuberculoid...

  6. 77 FR 16126 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Nucleic Acid-Based Systems for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... and control materials with the possibility of transmission of tuberculosis infection to healthcare... materials with the possibility of transmission of tuberculosis infection to healthcare workers could be... of rapid detection of infection in patients with suspected tuberculosis as compared to...

  7. Tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus: convergence of two epidemics.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kelly E; Chaisson, Richard E

    2009-12-01

    The link between diabetes mellitus and tuberculosis has been recognised for centuries. In recent decades, tuberculosis incidence has declined in high-income countries, but incidence remains high in countries that have high rates of infection with HIV, high prevalence of malnutrition and crowded living conditions, or poor tuberculosis control infrastructure. At the same time, diabetes mellitus prevalence is soaring globally, fuelled by obesity. There is growing evidence that diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for tuberculosis and might affect disease presentation and treatment response. Furthermore, tuberculosis might induce glucose intolerance and worsen glycaemic control in people with diabetes. We review the epidemiology of the tuberculosis and diabetes epidemics, and provide a synopsis of the evidence for the role of diabetes mellitus in susceptibility to, clinical presentation of, and response to treatment for tuberculosis. In addition, we review potential mechanisms by which diabetes mellitus can cause tuberculosis, the effects of tuberculosis on diabetic control, and pharmacokinetic issues related to the co-management of diabetes and tuberculosis.

  8. Improving the estimation of the tuberculosis burden in India.

    PubMed

    Cowling, Krycia; Dandona, Rakhi; Dandona, Lalit

    2014-11-01

    Although India is considered to be the country with the greatest tuberculosis burden, estimates of the disease's incidence, prevalence and mortality in India rely on sparse data with substantial uncertainty. The relevant available data are less reliable than those from countries that have recently improved systems for case reporting or recently invested in national surveys of tuberculosis prevalence. We explored ways to improve the estimation of the tuberculosis burden in India. We focused on case notification data - among the most reliable data available - and ways to investigate the associated level of underreporting, as well as the need for a national tuberculosis prevalence survey. We discuss several recent developments - i.e. changes in national policies relating to tuberculosis, World Health Organization guidelines for the investigation of the disease, and a rapid diagnostic test - that should improve data collection for the estimation of the tuberculosis burden in India and elsewhere. We recommend the implementation of an inventory study in India to assess the underreporting of tuberculosis cases, as well as a national survey of tuberculosis prevalence. A national assessment of drug resistance in Indian strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis should also be considered. The results of such studies will be vital for the accurate monitoring of tuberculosis control efforts in India and globally.

  9. A Perspective of the Diagnosis and Management of Congenital Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saramba, Manou Irmina

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a prevalent disease in the world and a global public health issue in many countries. The disease is more complicated in pregnant women because it imperils unborn offspring and results in congenital tuberculosis later if undiagnosed and untreated. Congenital tuberculosis is rare entity and an uncommon disease along with a high mortality rate. Congenital tuberculosis, a severe clinical type of tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a serious and fatal disease if left untreated. Our study emphasizes that it is necessary and mandatory to consider congenital tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis of neonatal or pulmonary infections in infants, essentially in countries where the incidence of tuberculosis is high burden. Mother to neonatal transmission of disease is well known via transplacental transmission through the umbilical vein to the fetus, through the ingestion of infected amniotic fluid. Early detection is challenging, because of the nonspecific nature of the signs and symptoms in tuberculosis during pregnancy and infancy. The degree of clinical suspicion is the essential component of diagnosis. Furthermore, it generally has a difficult treatment and it should not be delayed while waiting for diagnostic test results. Prompt identification and proper treatment regimens for congenital tuberculosis strongly relate with enhanced outcomes. PMID:27999684

  10. Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis in Children: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Tolman, Arielle W.; Cohen, Ted; Parr, Jonathan B.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Isoniazid resistance is an obstacle to the treatment of tuberculosis disease and latent tuberculosis infection in children. We aim to summarize the literature describing the risk of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis among children with tuberculosis disease. Methods We did a systematic review of published reports of children with tuberculosis disease who had isolates tested for susceptibility to isoniazid. We searched PubMed, Embase and LILACS online databasesuptoJanuary 12, 2012. Results Our search identified 3,403 citations, of which 95 studies met inclusion criteria. These studies evaluated 8,351 children with tuberculosis disease for resistance to isoniazid. The median proportion of children found to have isoniazid-resistant strains was 8%; the distribution was right-skewed (25th percentile: 0% and 75th percentile: 18%). Conclusions High proportions of isoniazid resistance among pediatric tuberculosis patients have been reported in many settings suggesting that diagnostics detecting only rifampin resistance are insufficient to guide appropriate treatment in this population. Many children are likely receiving sub-standard tuberculosis treatment with empirical isoniazid-based regimens, and treating latent tuberculosis infection with isoniazid may not be effective in large numbers of children. Work is needed urgently to identify effective regimens for the treatment of children sick with or exposed to isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis and to better understand the scope of this problem. PMID:23348808

  11. Co-evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Homo sapiens

    PubMed Central

    Brites, Daniela; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2015-01-01

    The causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is an obligate pathogen that evolved to exclusively persist in human populations. For M. tuberculosis to transmit from person to person, it has to cause pulmonary disease. Therefore, M. tuberculosis virulence has likely been a significant determinant of the association between M. tuberculosis and humans. Indeed, the evolutionary success of some M. tuberculosis genotypes seems at least partially attributable to their increased virulence. The latter possibly evolved as a consequence of human demographic expansions. If co-evolution occurred, humans would have counteracted to minimize the deleterious effects of M. tuberculosis virulence. The fact that human resistance to infection has a strong genetic basis is a likely consequence of such a counter-response. The genetic architecture underlying human resistance to M. tuberculosis remains largely elusive. However, interactions between human genetic polymorphisms and M. tuberculosis genotypes have been reported. Such interactions are consistent with local adaptation and allow for a better understanding of protective immunity in TB. Future ‘genome-to-genome’ studies, in which locally associated human and M. tuberculosis genotypes are interrogated in conjunction, will help identify new protective antigens for the development of better TB vaccines. PMID:25703549

  12. New weapons in the war on tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sujata; Yoder, Mark A

    2011-07-01

    Tuberculosis continues to be a global threat. Efforts to eradicate this disease are hampered by the long course and potential toxicity of currently available treatment regimens, the increasing prevalence of tuberculosis-HIV coinfection, the evolution of drug resistant organisms, and the lack of a highly effective vaccine. Recent studies have suggested methods to improve the cost effectiveness of existing treatment strategies. Decreasing the relapse rate among high-risk individuals by extending therapy can be balanced by the cost savings of self-administered therapy for low-risk individuals. For the first time in over 30 years, new medications are flowing through the drug discovery pipeline. New agents with activity against slowly dividing bacilli have the potential to shorten the duration of therapy. Many have a more favorable side-effect profile than currently available medications. And even extensively drug-resistant organisms will be susceptible to these secret weapons. The fully sequenced genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been exploited to develop safer and more effective candidate vaccines. Highly immunogenic mycobacterial fragments, revved-up versions of the existing vaccine, and toned-down versions of M. tuberculosis are all in various phases of clinical testing. This expanded arsenal has the potential to deliver a fatal blow to one of humanity's greatest enemies.

  13. Primary Tuberculosis of Cervix: A Coincidental Finding

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nalini; Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Khonglah, Yookarin; Mishra, Jaya

    2016-01-01

    Background: 95% of Tuberculosis (TB) of the female genital tract (FGT) is located in tissues other than the cervix. A rare case of primary TB of the cervix which was diagnosed coincidently in a patient of endometrioma was reported in this study. Case Presentation: A 34 year old nullipara, a diagnosed case of endometrioma had a small cervical growth. Pap smear and biopsy was taken and sent for histopathological examination. Her histopathological examination revealed multiple epitheloid cell granuloma and langerhans type giant cell caeseation. Ziehl neelsen staining was positive for acid fast bacilli (AFB). The patient was started on antituberculosis under directly observed therapy along with oral contraceptive pills. Patient was on regular follow-up and clinically she was doing well. Conclusion: Although cervical tuberculosis is very rare but for an abnormal looking cervix, cervical tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis in woman of all the age groups especially in areas where tuberculosis is rampant since these cases are potentially curable with medical therapy. Many of these patients are in reproductive age group. In young women, early diagnosis prevents further damage in reproductive tract and can improve their reproductive potential. PMID:27921005

  14. Tuberculosis in wild and captive deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deer are found on every continent, save for Antarctica and Australia. Of the over 50 species of deer worldwide, tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis has been documented in at least 14. The broad host range of M. bovis includes most mammals, including humans and livestock. Eradication programs hav...

  15. Rifapentine for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Munsiff, Sonal S; Kambili, Chrispin; Ahuja, Shama Desai

    2006-12-01

    Rifapentine is a recently approved antituberculosis drug that has not yet been widely used in clinical settings. Clinical data support intermittent use of rifapentine with isoniazid during the continuation phase of tuberculosis treatment. Patients with culture-positive, noncavitary, pulmonary tuberculosis whose sputum smear is negative for acid-fast bacilli at the end of the 2-month intensive treatment phase are eligible for rifapentine therapy. Rifapentine should not be used in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, given their increased risk of developing rifampin resistance with currently recommended dosages. Rifapentine is not currently recommended for children aged <12 years, pregnant or lactating women, or individuals with culture-negative or extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Rifapentine (600 mg) is administered once weekly with isoniazid (900 mg) during the continuation phase of treatment. This combination should only be given under direct observation. As with rifampin, drug-drug interactions are common, and regular patient monitoring is required. Ease of administration makes this regimen attractive both for tuberculosis-control programs and for patients.

  16. Novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kathleen A; Laver, Pete N; Michel, Anita L; Williams, Mark; van Helden, Paul D; Warren, Robin M; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C

    2010-08-01

    Seven outbreaks involving increasing numbers of banded mongoose troops and high death rates have been documented. We identified a Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogen, M. mungi sp. nov., as the causative agent among banded mongooses that live near humans in Chobe District, Botswana. Host spectrum and transmission dynamics remain unknown.

  17. Tuberculosis Comorbidity with Communicable and Noncommunicable Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Marais, Ben J; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-02-06

    The 18th WHO Global Tuberculosis Annual Report indicates that there were an estimated 8.6 million incident cases of tuberculosis (TB) in 2012, which included 2.9 million women and 530,000 children. TB caused 1.3 million deaths including 320,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected people; three-quarters of deaths occurred in Africa and Southeast Asia. With one-third of the world's population latently infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), active TB disease is primarily associated with a break down in immune surveillance. This explains the strong link between active TB disease and other communicable diseases (CDs) or noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) that exert a toll on the immune system. Comorbid NCD risk factors include diabetes, smoking, malnutrition, and chronic lung disease, all of which have increased relentlessly over the past decade in developing countries. The huge overlap between killer infections such as TB, HIV, malaria, and severe viral infections with NCDs, results in a "double burden of disease" in developing countries. The current focus on vertical disease programs fails to recognize comorbidities or to encourage joint management approaches. This review highlights major disease overlaps and discusses the rationale for better integration of tuberculosis care with services for NCDs and other infectious diseases to enhance the overall efficiency of the public health responses.

  18. [Case report: cutaneous tuberculosis and tuberculous osteomyelitis].

    PubMed

    Celikbaş, Aysel Kocagul; Ulu, Ayfegül; Ergönül, Onder; Eren, Sebnem; Baykam, Nurcan; Dokuzoguz, Başak

    2005-01-01

    In this report, a 27 years old male patient diagnosed to have skin and bone tuberculosis (TB) has been presented. The patient admitted to the hospital with the complaints of fever, weight loss and night sweats. Patient's history revealed that following a trauma a skin lesion in the right ankle was developed and this was followed by the development of many lesions in different parts of the body. The lesions persisted despite the use of various antibiotics since a year. It has been recorded that his father has already been receiving anti-tuberculosis treatment. Osteomyelitis was detected in the distal part of right tibia by computerized tomography, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the specimens of skin lesion. The patient was immunocompetent, and there was no pulmonary involvement. Isoniazid (INAH), rifampin (RIF), ethambutol and morphozinamid therapy has been started and completed to 12 months with INAH and RIF. In the post-treatment follow-up of patient for one year, no relapse was detected. As a result, tuberculosis should be considered in patients with persistent skin lesions especially in endemic countries.

  19. Evaluation of a Tuberculosis Skin Testing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    There has been a recent slowdown in the decline of rates of tuberculosis (TB) in the United States. However, there are disparities in TB diagnosis between U.S.-born and foreign-born persons and between Whites and minorities. Measures for achieving TB elimination include identification of high-risk persons, including children and adolescents, at…

  20. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  1. 64 FR 3340 - Tuberculosis in Captive Cervids

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-01-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 13 / Thursday, January 21, 1999 / Corrections#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 50, 77 and 91 RIN 0579-AA53 Tuberculosis in Captive...

  2. Public Transportation and Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Pérez, Héctor J.; Sánchez, Inma; Bedoya, Alfredo; Martín, Miguel

    2007-01-01

    The association between public transportation for commuting and pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) was analyzed in workers in Lima, Peru. Traveling in minibuses was a risk factor for pulmonary TB. Preventive measures need to be taken by health services to prevent spread of this disease. PMID:18257992

  3. Dentistry and tuberculosis in the 1900s.

    PubMed

    Riben, P D; Epstein, J B; Mathias, R G

    1995-06-01

    The number of new cases--or incidence--of tuberculosis is increasing in nearly every region of the world. A number of forces have resulted in the increased incidence of TB in developed countries, including the HIV epidemic, homelessness, and emigration from highly endemic regions. Although the number of new cases in Canada is relatively constant, the TB experience in the United States serves as a reminder that this situation could change rapidly. The appearance of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis has added to the urgency of situation. The basic methods of preventing TB transmission include preventing the release of the organism into the air, removing the organism from the air, and preventing the inhalation of the organism. Identifying and appropriately treating every person with active tuberculosis is an extremely important component of the control strategy; adequate ventilation, filtering air, and ultraviolet germicidal irradiation are methods used to remove the organism from the air; and masks and other personal protective devices, such as high-efficiency particulate air filters (HEPA), have been suggested as a means of preventing inhalation of the organism. In addition, identifying new TB infections and using chemoprophylaxis often prevents infection from progressing to active disease. Given the route by which tuberculosis is transmitted, it is necessary for both dentists and allied dental personnel to be aware of the risks they may face in day-to-day practice, and the means by which they can protect themselves and their patients.

  4. Global and Regional Burden of Isoniazid-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Courtney M.; Jenkins, Helen E.; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Keshavjee, Salmaan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Isoniazid has been the backbone of tuberculosis chemotherapy for 6 decades. Resistance to isoniazid threatens the efficacy of treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection. To inform policies around treatment of tuberculosis disease and infection in children, we sought to estimate both the proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance and the number of incident isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis cases in children, by region. METHODS: We determined the relationship between rates of isoniazid resistance among child cases and among treatment-naive adult cases through a systematic literature review. We applied this relationship to regional isoniazid resistance estimates to estimate proportions of childhood tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance. We applied these proportions to childhood tuberculosis incidence estimates to estimate numbers of children with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. RESULTS: We estimated 12.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 9.8% to 14.8%) of all children with tuberculosis had isoniazid-resistant disease, representing 120 872 (95% CI 96 628 to 149 059) incident cases of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children in 2010. The majority of these occurred in the Western Pacific and Southeast Asia regions; the European region had the highest proportion of child tuberculosis cases with isoniazid resistance, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0% to 33.6%). CONCLUSIONS: The burden of isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis in children is substantial, and risk varies considerably by setting. The large number of child cases signals extensive ongoing transmission from adults with isoniazid-resistant tuberculosis. The risk of isoniazid resistance must be considered when evaluating treatment options for children with disease or latent infection to avoid inadequate treatment and consequent poor outcomes. PMID:26034243

  5. The National Tuberculosis Programme and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Banerji, D

    1995-01-01

    India has formulated a nationally applicable, socially acceptable, and epidemiologically effective National Tuberculosis Program (NTP), which served as an example for many other countries. In the 1940s, the New Delhi Tuberculosis Center pioneered organized domiciliary treatment of TB cases; the Union Mission Tuberculosis Sanatorium, Madanapalle, had started conducting epidemiological surveys in the late 1930s; the 1954-56 national sample survey of TB is still considered a classic; and this was followed by outstanding longitudinal surveys and epidemiological studies demonstrating that BCG does not provide protection to adults against TB. Halfdan Mahler joined P.V. Benjamin in launching the National BCG Campaign in the 1950s. India demonstrated in the 1950s that home treatment of patients is as efficacious as sanatorium treatment. The National Tuberculosis Institute was set up in 1959 with the specific mandate of making TB services available to larger masses of people. Social science data were also collected to show that TB patients were seeking help from health institutions; they helped diagnose patients in remote rural areas, they proved that the TB program had to be part of the general health services, and they demonstrated the epidemiological potential of a felt-need oriented TB program. The NTP diagnosed TB cases in rural institutions by sputum examination and treated them with chemotherapy. The Tuberculosis Center at district headquarters (DTC) was responsible for providing training to health workers, keeping track of all TB cases and referring them. By 1983-84, the NTP program had been implemented in 353 districts and during that year 1,308,880 cases were treated. Nevertheless, hundreds of thousands of infectious patients are not treated because health authorities put priority on child immunization and are preoccupied with malaria and family planning. The indifference of the bureaucracy and public health leadership is to be blamed for thousands of TB deaths

  6. Inhibition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine synthetase as a novel antibiotic strategy against tuberculosis: demonstration of efficacy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Harth, Günter; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains one of humankind's greatest killers, and new therapeutic strategies are needed to combat the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is rapidly developing resistance to conventional antibiotics. Using the highly demanding guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis, we have investigated the feasibility of inhibiting M. tuberculosis glutamine synthetase (GS), an enzyme that plays a key role in both nitrogen metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis, as a novel antibiotic strategy. In guinea pigs challenged by aerosol with the highly virulent Erdman strain of M. tuberculosis, the GS inhibitor L-methionine-SR-sulfoximine (MSO) protected the animals against weight loss, a hallmark of tuberculosis, and against the growth of M. tuberculosis in the lungs and spleen; MSO reduced the CFU of M. tuberculosis at 10 weeks after challenge by approximately 0.7 log unit compared with that in control animals. MSO acted synergistically with isoniazid in protecting animals against weight loss and bacterial growth, reducing the CFU in the lungs and spleen by approximately 1.5 log units below the level seen with isoniazid alone. In the presence of ascorbate, which allows treatment with a higher dose, MSO was highly efficacious, reducing the CFU in the lungs and spleen by 2.5 log units compared with that in control animals. This study demonstrates that inhibition of M. tuberculosis GS is a feasible therapeutic strategy against this pathogen and supports the concept that M. tuberculosis enzymes involved in cell wall biosynthesis, including major secretory proteins, have potential as antibiotic targets.

  7. Differential influence of nutrient-starved Mycobacterium tuberculosis on adaptive immunity results in progressive tuberculosis disease and pathology.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jes; Roy, Sugata; Rosenkrands, Ida; Lindenstrøm, Thomas; Filskov, Jonathan; Rasmussen, Erik Michael; Cassidy, Joseph; Andersen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    When infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, most individuals will remain clinically healthy but latently infected. Latent infection has been proposed to partially involve M. tuberculosis in a nonreplicating stage, which therefore represents an M. tuberculosis phenotype that the immune system most likely will encounter during latency. It is therefore relevant to examine how this particular nonreplicating form of M. tuberculosis interacts with the host immune system. To study this, we first induced a state of nonreplication through prolonged nutrient starvation of M. tuberculosis in vitro. This resulted in nonreplicating persistence even after prolonged culture in phosphate-buffered saline. Infection with either exponentially growing M. tuberculosis or nutrient-starved M. tuberculosis resulted in similar lung CFU levels in the first phase of the infection. However, between week 3 and 6 postinfection, there was a very pronounced increase in bacterial levels and associated lung pathology in nutrient-starved-M. tuberculosis-infected mice. This was associated with a shift from CD4 T cells that coexpressed gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) or IFN-γ, TNF-α, and interleukin-2 to T cells that only expressed IFN-γ. Thus, nonreplicating M. tuberculosis induced through nutrient starvation promotes a bacterial form that is genetically identical to exponentially growing M. tuberculosis yet characterized by a differential impact on the immune system that may be involved in undermining host antimycobacterial immunity and facilitate increased pathology and transmission.

  8. Genetic diversity and dynamic distribution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates causing pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Srilohasin, Prapaporn; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nishida, Nao; Prammananan, Therdsak; Smittipat, Nat; Mahasirimongkol, Surakameth; Chaiyasirinroje, Boonchai; Yanai, Hideki; Palittapongarnpim, Prasit

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the genetic diversity and dynamicity of circulating Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in Thailand using nearly neutral molecular markers. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based genotypes of 1,414 culture-positive M. tuberculosis isolates from 1,282 pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 132 extrapulmonary TB (EPTB) patients collected from 1995 to 2011 were characterized. Among the eight SNP cluster groups (SCG), SCG2 (44.1%), which included the Beijing (BJ) genotype, and SCG1 (39.4%), an East African Indian genotype, were dominant. Comparisons between the genotypes of M. tuberculosis isolates causing PTB and EPTB in HIV-negative cases revealed similar prevalence trends although genetic diversity was higher in the PTB patients. The identification of 10 reported sequence types (STs) and three novel STs was hypothesized to indicate preferential expansion of the SCG2 genotype, especially the modern BJ ST10 (15.6%) and ancestral BJ ST19 (13.1%). An association between SCG2 and SCG1 genotypes and particular patient age groups implies the existence of different genetic advantages among the bacterial populations. The results revealed that increasing numbers of young patients were infected with M. tuberculosis SCGs 2 and 5, which contrasts with the reduction of the SCG1 genotype. Our results indicate the selection and dissemination of potent M. tuberculosis genotypes in this population. The determination of heterogeneity and dynamic population changes of circulating M. tuberculosis strains in countries using the Mycobacterium bovis BCG (bacillus Calmette-Guérin) vaccine are beneficial for vaccine development and control strategies.

  9. [Susceptibilities of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains collected from regional tuberculosis laboratories to major antituberculous drugs].

    PubMed

    Sayğan, M Bakir; Ocak, Fatih; Cesur, Salih; Tarhan, Gülnur; Ceyhan, Ismail; Gümüişlü, Feyzullah; Beker, Gülşan; Güner, Uğur; Coşkun, Erol

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the susceptibility rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains sent to Refik Saydam Hygiene Center, Tuberculosis Reference and Research Laboratory, Ankara, from seven different regional tuberculosis laboratories between the 1999-2002 period against major antituberculous drugs. The sensitivities of a total 505 M. tuberculosis strains to isoniazid (INAH), rifampicin (RIF), streptomycin (SM) and ethambutol (EMB) were determined by using proportion method in Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Of the strains, 385 (76.2%) were found sensitive to all of the tested drugs, while 120 strains were resistant to at least one of the antituberculous drugs. The resistant strains showed 14 different resistance patterns. The resistance rates were detected as 13.3% for INAH and RIF (67 strains of each), 9.1% for SM (46 strains), and 3.4% (17 strains) for EMB. Multidrug resistant (INAH+RIF) M. tuberculosis was 7.9% (40 strains). The highest resistance rate to INAH, RIF and EMB (21.2%, 21.2% and 10.6%, respectively) was detected in the isolates which were sent from Bursa province (located in northwestern Turkey); the highest SM (18.8%) and multidrug resistance (INAH+RIF) rates (18.8% and 10.6%, respectively) were detected in the strains sent from Elazig and Van provinces (both located in eastern Turkey). Since the inappropriate use of the first and second line antituberculous drugs leads to the development and spread of the resistant strains, "Directly Observed Therapy Shortcourse (DOTS)" is a very important practice. Therefore regional tuberculosis laboratories should be worth considering as the chains of a well-organized national laboratory network, in order to detect the antituberculous drug resistance patterns of the M. tuberculosis strains over the country.

  10. Rapid Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Real-Time High-Resolution Imaging of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Colonies.

    PubMed

    Ghodbane, Ramzi; Asmar, Shady; Betzner, Marlena; Linet, Marie; Pierquin, Joseph; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Culture remains the cornerstone of diagnosis for pulmonary tuberculosis, but the fastidiousness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may delay culture-based diagnosis for weeks. We evaluated the performance of real-time high-resolution imaging for the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis colonies growing on a solid medium. A total of 50 clinical specimens, including 42 sputum specimens, 4 stool specimens, 2 bronchoalveolar lavage fluid specimens, and 2 bronchial aspirate fluid specimens were prospectively inoculated into (i) a commercially available Middlebrook broth and evaluated for mycobacterial growth indirectly detected by measuring oxygen consumption (standard protocol) and (ii) a home-made solid medium incubated in an incubator featuring real-time high-resolution imaging of colonies (real-time protocol). Isolates were identified by Ziehl-Neelsen staining and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. Use of the standard protocol yielded 14/50 (28%) M. tuberculosis isolates, which is not significantly different from the 13/50 (26%) M. tuberculosis isolates found using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00 by Fisher's exact test), and the contamination rate of 1/50 (2%) was not significantly different from the contamination rate of 2/50 (4%) using the real-time protocol (P = 1.00). The real-time imaging protocol showed a 4.4-fold reduction in time to detection, 82 ± 54 h versus 360 ± 142 h (P < 0.05). These preliminary data give the proof of concept that real-time high-resolution imaging of M. tuberculosis colonies is a new technology that shortens the time to growth detection and the laboratory diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  11. Tuberculosis in indigenous communities of Antioquia, Colombia: epidemiology and beliefs.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sarmiento, José Mauricio; Dávila Osorio, Victoria Lucia; Martínez Sánchez, Lina María; Restrepo Serna, Laura; Grajales Ospina, Diana Carolina; Toro Montoya, Andrés Eduardo; Arango Urrea, Verónica; Vargas Grisales, Natalia; Estrada Gómez, Manuela; Lopera Valle, Johan Sebastián; García Gil, Juan José; Restrepo, Lady; Mejía, Gloria; Zapata, Elsa; Gómez, Verónica; Lopera, Diver; Domicó Domicó, José Leonardo; Robledo, Jaime

    2013-02-01

    Morbidity and mortality caused by tuberculosis are increased in most of the Latin-American indigenous communities. Factors that could explain this situation are poverty and limited health services access due to social conflicts and geographical isolation. We determined the frequency of tuberculosis in Colombian indigenous communities and described their knowledge related to transmission and control. We developed a descriptive study and health survey. Interviews were performed to find ancestral knowledge about tuberculosis. Sputum samples from patients with respiratory symptoms were analyzed. 10 indigenous communities were studied, which tuberculosis incidence was 291/100,000. Communities believe that tuberculosis is a body and spirit disease, which transmission is by direct contact or by witchcraft. Tuberculosis incidence in the studied communities was ninefold higher than that of the general population from Antioquia Department. Knowledge exchange could facilitate the community empowerment and implementation of educational activities which might improve the control of the disease.

  12. Tuberculosis in haemodialysis patients: A single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Rao, T Manmadha; Ram, R; Swarnalatha, G; Santhosh Pai, B H; Ramesh, V; Rao, C Shyam Sunder; Naidu, G Diwaker; Dakshinamurty, K V

    2013-09-01

    We prospectively followed-up new patients of tuberculosis while on maintenance hemodialysis at a State Government-run tertiary care institute. Between 2000 and 2010, 1237 new patients were initiated on maintainence hemodialysis. The number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis after initiation of hemodialysis was 131 (10.5% of 1237). The age was 46.4 ± 10.4 (range 8-85) years and there were 90 (68.7%) males. The number of patients diagnosed with tuberculosis on the basis of organ involvement were: Pulmonary-60, pleural effusion-31, lymph node-21, meningitis-8, pericardial effusion-7, peritoneum-2, latent tuberculosis-2. The incidence of tuberculosis in hemodialysis was found to be 105.9 per 1000 patient years. Male gender, diabetes mellitus, past history of tuberculosis, mining as an occupation, low serum albumin, and duration of hemodialysis more than 24 months, and unemployment were found to be significant risk-factors on univariate analysis.

  13. [Tuberculosis in infants less than 3 months of age].

    PubMed

    Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa; Baquero-Artigao, Fernando; Méndez-Echevarría, Ana María; Mellado Peña, María José

    2015-04-29

    A review was conducted on infants less than 3 months of age diagnosed with tuberculosis between 1978 and 2014. Eight patients were diagnosed (1.4% of paediatric tuberculosis cases): 3 confirmed congenital tuberculosis, 3 suspected (endometrial biopsy was not performed), and 2 postnatal tuberculosis. Tuberculin skin test was negative in two patients. Diagnostic performance of culture (7/7, 100%) and PCR (3/3, 100%) of gastric aspirates was higher than that of acid-fast bacilli smears (5/8, 62%) and IGRA test (1/3, 33%). Three patients developed miliary disease, and one died. In conclusion, tuberculosis in this age group is rare, severe, and difficult to diagnose. In cases lacking known postnatal contacts, maternal genital tuberculosis should be ruled out by endometrial biopsy.

  14. Oropharyngeal and miliary pulmonary tuberculosis without respiratory symptom.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jung Hyun; Kim, Jung Hyun; Kang, Ju Wan; Kim, Jeong Hong

    2014-07-01

    Tuberculosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. We report the case of a 52-year-old man who presented with a two month history of sore throat without other general or respiratory symptoms. Oral ex- amination revealed ulcerative and granulomatous lesions on the soft palate and tonsils. Histological examination of the lesions showed granulomatous tissue with caseaous necrosis consistent with tuberculosis. A chest x-ray and computed to- mography of the chest showed miliary tuberculosis of both lungs. The oral lesions improved with antituberculous medication by one month. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral lesions which do not respond to appropriate antibiotic therapy. Pulmonary tuberculosis should also be considered in patients with oral tuberculosis even if they do not have respiratory symptoms.

  15. [Tuberculosis of the posterior vertebral arch. A case report].

    PubMed

    Nassar, I; Mahi, M; Semlali, S; Kacemi, L; El Quessar, A; Chakir, N; El Hassani, M R; Jiddane, M

    2002-09-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine usually involves the vertebral body and intervertebral disk. Involvement of the posterior arch is rare. We report a case of tuberculosis involving the posterior elements of the T4 and T5 vertebrae in a 38 year old woman. CT is helpful to assess bony structures whereas MRI is ideal to evaluate the neural structures. Clinical, radiographic, and therapeutic considerations regarding tuberculosis of the spine are reviewed.

  16. Tuberculosis in a renal allograft: a successful outcome.

    PubMed

    George, Pratish; Pawar, Basant; Calton, Nalini

    2008-09-01

    Tuberculosis is endemic in most South-East Asian countries including India. It causes significant morbidity and mortality in renal transplant recipients and often, it is not diagnosed early, due to its innocuous clinical presentations. A high index of suspicion and proactive management in the early phase of presentation can reduce allograft nephropathy, graft nephrectomy and mortality. A patient with an unusual presentation of tuberculosis localized to the allograft and successful management with anti-tuberculosis medications is described.

  17. ON THE SUBJECT OF PSEUDO-TUBERCULOSIS IN THE MONKEY

    DTIC Science & Technology

    J. Verge and Placidi have reported a case of pseudo- tuberculosis in a Macaque (Macacus rhesus). They emphasize that this ailment is found rarely in...the monkey. It may be true that there are only a few authentic observations of pseudo- tuberculosis in this animal; however, this ailment is not as rare...as Verge and Placidi indicate. If autopsies are performed on all the monkeys that die in the zoos, pseudo- tuberculosis will be found often enough

  18. Tuberculosis in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Rouzier, Vanessa; Vilbrun, Stalz Charles; Morose, Willy; Collins, Sean E; Joseph, Patrice; Decome, Diessy; Ocheretina, Oksana; Galbaud, Stanislas; Hashiguchi, Lauren; Pierrot, Julma; Pape, Jean William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Problem In 2010, Haiti sustained a devastating earthquake that crippled the health-care infrastructure in the capital city, Port-au-Prince, and left 1.5 million people homeless. Subsequently, there was an increase in reported tuberculosis in the affected population. Approach We conducted active tuberculosis case finding in a camp for internally displaced persons and a nearby slum. Community health workers screened for tuberculosis at the household level. People with persistent cough were referred to a physician. The National Tuberculosis Program continued its national tuberculosis reporting system. Local setting Even before the earthquake, Haiti had the highest tuberculosis incidence in the Americas. About half of the tuberculosis cases occur in the Port-au-Prince region. Relevant changes The number of reported tuberculosis cases in Haiti has increased after the earthquake, but data are too limited to determine if this is due to an increase in tuberculosis burden or to improved case detection. Compared to previous national estimates (230 per 100 000 population), undiagnosed tuberculosis was threefold higher in a camp for internally displaced persons (693 per 100 000) and fivefold higher in an urban slum (1165 per 100 000). With funding from the World Health Organization (WHO), active case finding is now being done systematically in slums and camps. Lessons learnt Household-level screening for prolonged cough was effective in identifying patients with active tuberculosis in this study. Without accurate data, early detection of rising tuberculosis rates is challenging; data collection should be incorporated into pragmatic disease response programmes. PMID:26170508

  19. Comprehensive Treatment of Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Shin, Sonya S.; Seung, Kwonjune J.; Rich, Michael L.; Atwood, Sidney S.; Furin, Jennifer J.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Alcantara Viru, Felix A.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Bayona, Jaime N.; Bonilla, Cesar A.; Chalco, Katiuska; Choi, Sharon; Franke, Molly F.; Fraser, Hamish S.F.; Guerra, Dalia; Hurtado, Rocio M.; Jazayeri, Darius; Joseph, Keith; Llaro, Karim; Mestanza, Lorena; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Muñoz, Maribel; Palacios, Eda; Sanchez, Epifanio; Sloutsky, Alexander; Becerra, Mercedes C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported in 45 countries, including countries with limited resources and a high burden of tuberculosis. We describe the management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and treatment outcomes among patients who were referred for individualized outpatient therapy in Peru. METHODS A total of 810 patients were referred for free individualized therapy, including drug treatment, resective surgery, adverse-event management, and nutritional and psychosocial support. We tested isolates from 651 patients for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis and developed regimens that included five or more drugs to which the infecting isolate was not resistant. RESULTS Of the 651 patients tested, 48 (7.4%) had extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis; the remaining 603 patients had multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis had undergone more treatment than the other patients (mean [±SD] number of regimens, 4.2±1.9 vs. 3.2±1.6; P<0.001) and had isolates that were resistant to more drugs (number of drugs, 8.4±1.1 vs. 5.3±1.5; P<0.001). None of the patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis were coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Patients with extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis received daily, supervised therapy with an average of 5.3±1.3 drugs, including cycloserine, an injectable drug, and a fluoroquinolone. Twenty-nine of these patients (60.4%) completed treatment or were cured, as compared with 400 patients (66.3%) with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (P=0.36). CONCLUSIONS Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis can be cured in HIV-negative patients through outpatient treatment, even in those who have received multiple prior courses of therapy for tuberculosis. PMID:18687637

  20. Tuberculosis in early medieval Switzerland--osteological and molecular evidence.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Christine; Fellner, Robert; Heubi, Olivier; Maixner, Frank; Zink, Albert; Lösch, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Lesions consistent with skeletal tuberculosis were found in 13 individuals from an early medieval skeletal sample from Courroux (Switzerland). One case of Pott's disease as well as lytic lesions in vertebrae and joints, rib lesions and endocranial new bone formation were identified. Three individuals with lesions and one without were tested for the presence of Myobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) ancient DNA (aDNA), and in two cases, evidence for MTBC aDNA was detected. Our results suggest the presence of tuberculosis in the analysed material, which is in accordance with other osteological and biomolecular research that reported a high prevalence of tuberculosis in medieval skeletons.

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs in Mozambique*, **

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Germano Manuel; Folgosa, Elena; Nquobile, Ndlovu; Gitta, Sheba; Cadir, Nureisha

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the drug resistance profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mozambique. METHODS: We analyzed secondary data from the National Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Maputo, Mozambique, and from the Beira Regional Tuberculosis Referral Laboratory, in the city of Beira, Mozambique. The data were based on culture-positive samples submitted to first-line drug susceptibility testing (DST) between January and December of 2011. We attempted to determine whether the frequency of DST positivity was associated with patient type or provenance. RESULTS: During the study period, 641 strains were isolated in culture and submitted to DST. We found that 374 (58.3%) were resistant to at least one antituberculosis drug and 280 (43.7%) were resistant to multiple antituberculosis drugs. Of the 280 multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases, 184 (65.7%) were in previously treated patients, most of whom were from southern Mozambique. Two (0.71%) of the cases of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis were confirmed to be cases of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis was most common in males, particularly those in the 21-40 year age bracket. CONCLUSIONS: M. tuberculosis resistance to antituberculosis drugs is high in Mozambique, especially in previously treated patients. The frequency of M. tuberculosis strains that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, and streptomycin in combination was found to be high, particularly in samples from previously treated patients. PMID:24831398

  2. Multidrug resistant tuberculosis diagnosed by synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    van Zeller, M; Monteiro, R; Ramalho, J; Almeida, I; Duarte, R

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem worldwide. HIV co-infection is contributing to an increased incidence of the disease, particularly that caused by multidrug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT). We describe an HIV-infected patient with pleural and lymph node tuberculosis diagnosed by pleural effusion characteristics and biopsy specimens, without MT identification, that further presented with knee-joint involvement. Arthrocentesis allowed MT isolation and drug susceptibility testing, resulting in a diagnosis of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis and an appropriate treatment regimen. MT identification and drug susceptibility tests are very important, especially for HIV co-infected patients.

  3. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  4. [Update on the radiological study of pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Navarro Ballester, A; Marco Domenech, S F

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis has made a comeback in recent years. This upsurge has been attributed to factors such as increased immigration and the human immunodeficiency virus epidemic. Primary pulmonary tuberculosis manifests radiologically with parenchymal involvement, lymph node involvement, pleural effusion, and/or miliary disease. In post-primary tuberculosis, the earliest radiological sign is small nodules and branching centrilobular lesions that increase in size and coalesce to form ill-defined patchy consolidations; cavitations are very characteristic of active disease. The aim of this article is to describe the radiologic findings for pulmonary tuberculosis and its complications.

  5. Role for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Membrane Vesicles in Iron Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Prados-Rosales, Rafael; Weinrick, Brian C.; Piqué, Daniel G.; Jacobs, William R.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis releases membrane vesicles packed with molecules that can modulate the immune response. Because environmental conditions often influence the production and content of bacterial vesicles, this study examined M. tuberculosis microvesicles released under iron limitation, a common condition faced by pathogens inside the host. The findings indicate that M. tuberculosis increases microvesicle production in response to iron restriction and that these microvesicles contain mycobactin, which can serve as an iron donor and supports replication of iron-starved mycobacteria. Consequently, the results revealed a role of microvesicles in iron acquisition in M. tuberculosis, which can be critical for survival in the host. PMID:24415729

  6. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis, epidemiology and patterns in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A; Al-Barrak, Ali M

    2002-05-01

    Annual incidence rates of extrapulmonary tuberculosis have been increasing over the last few years in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. True rates may even be higher due to incomplete reporting. Diagnosis of this condition requires high clinical suspicion, special diagnostic procedures, special staining, and culture media for acid fast bacilli. Delayed diagnosis results in increasing morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system. Particularly in areas of high endemicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, clinicians should be aware of the various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The available epidemiology and patterns of various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are presented in this review.

  7. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis, epidemiology and patterns in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alrajhi, Abdulrahman A; Al-Barrak, Ali M

    2002-07-01

    Annual incidence rates of extrapulmonary tuberculosis have been increasing over the last few years in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. True rates may even be higher due to incomplete reporting. Diagnosis of this condition requires high clinical suspicion, special diagnostic procedures, special staining, and culture media for acid fast bacilli. Delayed diagnosis results in increasing morbidity, mortality, and cost to the health care system. Particularly in areas of high endemicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, clinicians should be aware of the various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. The available epidemiology and patterns of various forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are presented in this review.

  8. Tuberculosis in pediatric oncology and bone marrow transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Andrea T; Airewele, Gladstone; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2014-08-01

    Five children with malignancies (3 hematologic, 1 medulloblastoma, 1 hepatoblastoma) and one bone marrow transplant patient were treated for tuberculosis over a 30-year period. Three had pulmonary disease, 3 disseminated tuberculosis, and 1 had scrofula. Four of five had positive tuberculin skin tests, cultures were positive in 5/6 children. One child died of disseminated TB after engraftment, and one child had hepatotoxicity likely related to tuberculosis therapy. All cases were potentially preventable had they been screened due to established risk factors of foreign birth (4/6) or parental foreign birth (2/6). All children should be screened for latent tuberculosis before chemotherapy.

  9. THE PROBLEM OF TUBERCULOSIS IN THE POSTATTACK ENVIRONMENT,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    DISASTERS, *PUBLIC HEALTH, *MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS , DISEASES, NUCLEAR WARFARE, UNITED STATES, MORTALITY RATE, METABOLIC DISEASES, HOUSING(DWELLINGS), CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS, VACCINES, STATISTICAL DATA, POPULATION.

  10. Tuberculosis and diabetes: current state and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Di Gennaro, Francesco; Chhaganlal, Kajal D; Fabrizio, Claudia; Monno, Laura; Putoto, Giovanni; Saracino, Annalisa

    2016-06-01

    This review outlines the association between tuberculosis and diabetes, focusing on epidemiology, physiopathology, clinical aspects, diagnosis and treatment, and evaluates future perspectives, with particular attention to developing countries.

  11. The association of tuberculosis and HIV infection in Burundi.

    PubMed

    Standaert, B; Niragira, F; Kadende, P; Piot, P

    1989-04-01

    AIDS and tuberculosis (TB) are both endemic in Bujumbura, Burundi. An 11% failure rate to standard antituberculosis treatment (n = 173) was observed at the Tuberculosis Treatment Center of Bujumbura (CATB) in 1985-1986. All resistant cases (n = 19) were HIV seropositive. Among 328 consecutive cases with tuberculosis at the CATB during a 3 month period in 1986, 54.5% were HIV seropositive, which is five times higher than the prevalence in the general population in Bujumbura. More female patients than male cases were HIV antibody positive (62 versus 49%, respectively; p less than 0.02). Persistent weight loss, cough, and an anergic tuberculin test were more common in the HIV-seropositive group. Among 48 household members of HIV-seropositive patients with tuberculosis, 6 (12.5%) new cases of tuberculosis were identified, compared with none among 28 household members of HIV-seronegative patients with tuberculosis (odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-33.2). HIV infection is a new risk factor for tuberculosis in Africa, and HIV-infected cases of tuberculosis may be more infectious than HIV-negative patients. The AIDS epidemic may drastically complicate the diagnosis, management, and control of tuberculosis in populations in which both infections are endemic.

  12. FDG PET/CT findings of common bile duct tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aisheng; Wang, Yang; Gong, Jing; Zuo, Changjing

    2014-01-01

    Common bile duct (CBD) tuberculosis is rare. A 39-year-old woman was referred because of a 5-month history of abdominal pain. Abdominal enhanced MRI and CT showed dilatation of the distal CBD with irregularly thickened wall. Enhanced CT revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymph nodes. FDG PET/CT showed increased FDG uptake of the CBD lesion and several retroperitoneal lymph nodes with slight FDG uptake. CBD cholangiocarcinoma with retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis was suspected. CBD tuberculosis was confirmed by endoluminal biopsy. Tuberculosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abnormal biliary FDG accumulation, particularly in tuberculosis endemic areas.

  13. [Detection of mycobacteria tuberculosis in patients with urogenital tuberculosis by PCR method].

    PubMed

    Dochviri, T Z; Katsitadze, V A; Khosiashvili, G Z; Chigogidze, T G

    2005-02-01

    The study was carried out in hospital patients as well as in outpatients at the National Centre of Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases of Georgia (2002-2004). The group consisting of 32 patients with tuberculosis of urogenital system has been studied (newly detected forms). Except clinical laboratory, culture and X-ray contrast methods, two additional methods were used in testing of this group of patients. The examination of their urine, at the same time, was carried out by the Polymerase Chain Reaction method in order to detect Kochi bacillus and by three-time bacterioscopy of urine for acid resistant bacteria. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in urine has been detected in 26 (81,25%) patients by PCR method, and by urine bacterioscopy--acid fast bacilli (AFB+) in 18 (56,25%) patients. The histo-morphological investigation of specimens obtained by surgery confirmed the TB diagnosis in all patients. This study on patients suspected of Tuberculosis of genital-urinary system gives us an opportunity to update the diagnostic algorithm by including the modern molecular methods. This algorithm will help in timely detection of Tuberculosis, in selection of adequate therapy and in prevention of the further progression of the disease.

  14. Implication of the RD(Rio) Mycobacterium tuberculosis sublineage in multidrug resistant tuberculosis in Portugal.

    PubMed

    David, Susana; Duarte, Elsa L; Leite, Clarice Queico Fugimura; Ribeiro, João-Nuno; Maio, José-Nuno; Paixão, Eleonora; Portugal, Clara; Sancho, Luísa; Germano de Sousa, José

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug and extensively drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis are a threat to tuberculosis control programs. Genotyping methods, such as spoligotyping and MIRU-VNTR typing (Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetitive Units), are useful in monitoring potentially epidemic strains and estimating strain phylogenetic lineages and/or genotypic families. M. tuberculosis Latin American Mediterranean (LAM) family is a major worldwide contributor to tuberculosis (TB). LAM specific molecular markers, Ag85C(103) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and RD(Rio) long-sequence polymorphism (LSP), were used to characterize spoligotype signatures from 859 patient isolates from Portugal. LAM strains were found responsible for 57.7% of all tuberculosis cases. Strains with the RD(Rio) deletion (referred to as RD(Rio)) were estimated to represent 1/3 of all the strains and over 60% of the multidrug resistant (MDR) strains. The major spoligotype signature SIT20 belonging to the LAM1 RD(Rio) sublineage, represented close to 1/5th of all the strains, over 20% of which were MDR. Analysis of published datasets according to stipulated 12loci MIRU-VNTR RD(Rio) signatures revealed that 96.3% (129/134) of MDR and extensively drug resistant (XDR) clusters were RD(Rio). This is the first report associating the LAM RD(Rio) sublineage with MDR. These results are an important contribution to the monitoring of these strains with heightened transmission for future endeavors to arrest MDR-TB and XDR-TB.

  15. Evaluation of the semiautomated Abbott LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis assay for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ausina, V; Gamboa, F; Gazapo, E; Manterola, J M; Lonca, J; Matas, L; Manzano, J R; Rodrigo, C; Cardona, P J; Padilla, E

    1997-01-01

    Five hundred twenty processed respiratory specimens from 326 patients received for the diagnosis of tuberculosis or other mycobacterial infections were tested by means of the LCx Mycobacterium tuberculosis Assay from Abbott Laboratories, which uses ligase chain reaction technology for the direct detection of M. tuberculosis complex in respiratory specimens. The results of the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were compared with the results of culture and staining techniques. After a combination of culture results and the patient's clinical data, a total of 195 specimens were collected from 110 patients who were positively diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis. Twenty-three of these 195 specimens which corresponded to 10 patients with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and anti-TB treatment ranging from 1 to 6 months were culture negative. The other 172 specimens were culture positive for M. tuberculosis. With an overall positivity rate of 37.5% (195 of 520 specimens), the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 90.8, 100, 100, and 94.7%, respectively, for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay; 88.2, 100, 100, and 93.4%, respectively, for culture; and 82.6, 92, 72.9, and 97.6%, respectively, for acid-fast staining. For 161 specimens (82.6%) from patients smear positive for the disease and 34 specimens (17.4%) from patients smear negative for the disease, the sensitivity values for the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay were 98.8 and 53%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the sensitivities and specificities between the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay and culture (P > 0.05). Conclusively, the LCx M. tuberculosis Assay has proved to have an acceptable sensitivity and a high specificity in detecting M. tuberculosis and has the potential of reducing the diagnosis time to an 8-h working day. PMID:9230369

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Malate Synthase- and MPT51-Based Serodiagnostic Assay as an Adjunct to Rapid Identification of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Dong, Yuxin; Holzman, Robert S.; Belisle, John; Kourbeti, Irene S.; Sherpa, Tsering; Condos, Rany; Rom, William N.; Laal, Suman

    2006-01-01

    The 81-kDa malate synthase (MS; Rv 1837c) and the 27-kDa MPT51 (Rv 3803c) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are immunodominant antigens recognized by serum antibodies from ∼80% of human immunodeficiency virus-negative smear-positive tuberculosis patients from India. We now provide evidence that the use of the MS/MPT51-based serodiagnostic assay can serve as an adjunct to sputum microscopy in the rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:17090645

  17. γδ T cells response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pulmonary tuberculosis patients using preponderant complementary determinant region 3 sequence

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Xueyan; Han, Xiqin; Li, Liang; Zhao, Zhendong

    2011-01-01

    Background & objectives: The unique immunological functions of γδ T lymphocytes to contribute immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis attracted interest of researchers. However, little is known about the specificity of γδ Τ cell in tuberculosis patients and the lack of exact tuberculosis antigen recognized by γδ T cells limited its application. The analysis of complementary determinant region (CDR)3 sequence characteristic in γδ T cells of tuberculosis patients would contribute to understand the distribution specificity of γδ T cell. In present study, we investigated the diversity of the γ9/δ2 T cell immunorepertoire and analysed the specificity of the expressed CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods: The total RNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cell of 50 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 10 healthy controls was extracted. The polymerase chain reaction was used to specifically amplify the CDR3 region of γ9 and δ2 chain. The PCR products were ligated into the pGEM-T easy vector. The plasmid DNA was sequenced using the ABI3700 and the T7 primer. Results: Our findings showed that predominant CDR3 sequence of δ2 chain in pulmonary tuberculosis patients was CACDTLVSTDKLIFGKG. The sequence specifically exists in almost all pulmonary tuberculosis patients. The conserved hydrophobic acid residue in 97 positions is present in the γδ T cell reactive to M. tuberculosis. The length of δ2 CDR3 in pulmonary tuberculosis patients has no relation with the disease progress. Interpretation & conclusions: Our results suggest that γδ T cells appear to use CDR3 sequence to recognise M. tuberculosis antigen. γδ T cells reactive to M. tuberculosis were diverse and polyclonal. PMID:21985819

  18. [Spinal tuberculosis: experience in a third level medical facility in Puebla, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Medina-Peñasco, Rolando Joshua; Rosas-Ramírez, Martha Imelda; Barragán-Hervella, Rodolfo Gregorio; Alvarado-Ortega, Ivan; López-Cázares, Gerardo; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro José; Romero-Figueroa, María Socorro

    2017-01-01

    Introducción: La tuberculosis de la columna (TBC) es una enfermedad infecciosa grave, ocasionada por la migración de la bacteria Mycobacterium tuberculosis hacia la columna vertebral. El conocimiento de esta enfermedad es prioritario para el médico no familiar y familiar. Presentamos la experiencia en pacientes con TBC de un hospital del tercer nivel en Puebla, México. Métodos: estudio descriptivo. De enero a diciembre de 2014 recolectamos expedientes de pacientes con TBC. Las variables fueron edad, género, tiempo de estancia intrahospitalaria, enfermedades asociadas, sintomatología, métodos diagnósticos, segmento de la columna vertebral afectado, tipo de tratamiento empleado y complicaciones. Se usó estadística descriptiva, medidas de tendencia central y de dispersión. Resultados: fueron 14 pacientes (71.4% hombres); la edad promedio fue 60.29 ± 16.54 años (33-93), la estancia intrahospitalaria promedio fue de 18.93 ± 9.32 días (4-34). El segmento afectado fue el dorsal en seis pacientes (42.85%) y el lumbar en ocho (57.15%). Hubo enfermedades asociadas en nueve pacientes (64.28%). Todos los pacientes recibieron tratamiento médico. Se realizaron 11 procedimientos quirúrgicos a cinco pacientes (35.7%). Las complicaciones se presentaron en dos pacientes (14.3%). Conclusiones: La TBC debe ser manejada tempranamente para evitar complicaciones graves. La atención con el primer nivel de atención médica se debe coordinar y debemos apegarnos a lineamientos nacionales e internacionales de tratamiento.

  19. New Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Sublineage, Brazzaville, Congo

    PubMed Central

    Malm, Sven; Linguissi, Laure S. Ghoma; Tekwu, Emmanuel M.; Vouvoungui, Jeannhey C.; Kohl, Thomas A.; Beckert, Patrick; Sidibe, Anissa; Rüsch-Gerdes, Sabine; Madzou-Laboum, Igor K.; Kwedi, Sylvie; Penlap Beng, Véronique; Frank, Matthias; Ntoumi, Francine

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of illness and death in Congo. No data are available about the population structure and transmission dynamics of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains prevalent in this central Africa country. On the basis of single-nucleotide polymorphisms detected by whole-genome sequencing, we phylogenetically characterized 74 MTBC isolates from Brazzaville, the capital of Congo. The diversity of the study population was high; most strains belonged to the Euro-American lineage, which split into Latin American Mediterranean, Uganda I, Uganda II, Haarlem, X type, and a new dominant sublineage named Congo type (n = 26). Thirty strains were grouped in 5 clusters (each within 12 single-nucleotide polymorphisms), from which 23 belonged to the Congo type. High cluster rates and low genomic diversity indicate recent emergence and transmission of the Congo type, a new Euro-American sublineage of MTBC. PMID:28221129

  20. Imaging of gastrointestinal and abdominal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoenacker, F M; De Backer, A I; Op de, Beeck B; Maes, M; Van Altena, R; Van Beckevoort, D; Kersemans, P; De Schepper, A M

    2004-03-01

    This article discusses the range of manifestations of tuberculosis (TB) of the abdomen, including involvement of the gastrointestinal tract, the peritoneum, mesentery, omentum, abdominal lymph nodes, solid abdominal organs, the genital system and the abdominal aorta. Abdominal TB is a diagnostic challenge, particularly when pulmonary TB is absent. It may mimic many other abdominal diseases, both clinically and radiologically. An early correct diagnosis, however, is important in order to ensure proper treatment and a favorable outcome. Modern imaging is a cornerstone in the early diagnosis of abdominal TB and may prevent unnecessary morbidity and mortality. Generally, CT appears to be the imaging modality of choice in the detection and assessment of abdominal tuberculosis, other than gastrointestinal TB. Barium studies remain superior for demonstrating mucosal intestinal lesions. Ultrasound may be used for follow-up to monitor therapy response. The diagnosis of abdominal TB should be considered if suggestive imaging findings are found in patients with a high index of suspicion.

  1. Miliary tuberculosis presenting with hyponatremia and thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, D. W.; Donevan, R. E.; Copland, G. M.; Ibbott, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman with miliary tuberculosis had moderately severe hyponatremia due to inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) and very severe thrombocytopenia without other hematologic abnormalities. She was treated with isoniazid, rifampin, ethambutol, prednisone, vincristine and fluid restriction and recovered completely. The SIADH may have been a response by the posterior pituitary to a decrease in intravascular volume resulting from the extensive pulmonary disease or associated hypoxia, or the tuberculous lung may have released ADH or an ADH-like substance. The thrombocytopenia may have resulted from a direct or indirect toxic effect of infection or, less likely, the tuberculosis may have activated latent idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:991033

  2. Association-rule-based tuberculosis disease diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asha, T.; Natarajan, S.; Murthy, K. N. B.

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It usually spreads through the air and attacks low immune bodies such as patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This work focuses on finding close association rules, a promising technique in Data Mining, within TB data. The proposed method first normalizes of raw data from medical records which includes categorical, nominal and continuous attributes and then determines Association Rules from the normalized data with different support and confidence. Association rules are applied on a real data set containing medical records of patients with TB obtained from a state hospital. The rules determined describes close association between one symptom to another; as an example, likelihood that an occurrence of sputum is closely associated with blood cough and HIV.

  3. Integrating Lung Physiology, Immunology, and Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Torrelles, Jordi B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2017-03-30

    Lungs are directly exposed to the air, have enormous surface area, and enable gas exchange in air-breathing animals. They are constantly 'attacked' by microbes from both outside and inside and thus possess a unique, highly regulated local immune defense system which efficiently allows for microbial clearance while minimizing damaging inflammatory responses. As a prototypic host-adapted airborne pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis traverses the lung and has several 'interaction points' (IPs) which it must overcome to cause infection. These interactions are critical, not only from a pathogenesis perspective but also in considering the effectiveness of therapies and vaccines in the lungs. Here we discuss emerging views on immunologic interactions occurring in the lungs for M. tuberculosis and their impact on infection and persistence.

  4. [Control of tuberculosis in refugees and displaced].

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Connolly, M; Levy, M; Chaulet, P

    1997-10-01

    As a result of national and international conflicts, the number of refugees and displaced persons in various countries of the world is increasing. The complex and protracted nature of these conflicts often forces refugees to remain away from their countries for long periods, living in refugee camps. Many refugees come from countries where tuberculosis is endemic and, once the immediate problems of establishing a camp are overcome, this disease becomes the principal problem affecting refugee camps. In order to advise the persons in charge of refugee camps on how to set up tuberculosis control programs, this document details the general requirements and specific recommendations of WHO for the implementation of such programs, as well as guidelines for their evaluation and monitoring, including criteria that would justify camp closure.

  5. Pulmonary Tuberculosis Diagnosis: Where We Are?

    PubMed

    Leylabadlo, Hamed Ebrahimzadeh; Kafil, Hossein Samadi; Yousefi, Mehdi; Aghazadeh, Mohammad; Asgharzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, in spite of medical advancement, tuberculosis (TB) remains a worldwide health problem. Although many laboratory methods have been developed to expedite the diagnosis of TB, delays in diagnosis remain a major problem in the clinical practice. Because of the slow growth rate of the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis, isolation, identification, and drug susceptibility testing of this organism and other clinically important mycobacteria can take several weeks or longer. During the past several years, many methods have been developed for direct detection, species identification, and drug susceptibility testing of TB. A good understanding of the effectiveness and practical limitations of these methods is important to improve diagnosis. This review summarizes the currently-used advances in nonmolecular and molecular diagnostics.

  6. [Spontaneous pneumothorax associated to active pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Díaz Rojas, F; Córdova Gutiérrez, H; Aguirre Gas, H

    1978-01-01

    This paper reviewed 8 cases of spontaneous pneumothorax, associated to pulmonary tuberculosis during a period of time of two years at the A.L.M. General Hospital of Toluca, Mex. The diagnosis was confirmed by clinical picture, radiology and bacteriology studies. Six males and two females proceding of the low class; farmers all of them. Their age ranged between 18 and 35 years. Two of the patients showed cavitary lesions, five had difusse fibrosis of the lung. We analized the clinical manifestations and reviewed the pathogenic mechanisms as well the medical and surgical treatment. No deaths ocurred en this series. We concluded that the direct relation between active pulmonary tuberculosis and spontaneous pneumothorax is not clear, but their association in this serie suggested further studies to stablished this. We emphasized the importance of this complication rare in the world literature.

  7. Epidemiology and Treatment of Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitnick, Carole D.; Appleton, Sasha C.; Shin, Sonya S.

    2010-01-01

    Multidrug resistant tuberculosis is now thought to afflict between 1 and 2 million patients annually. Although significant regional variability in the distribution of disease has been recorded, surveillance data are limited by several factors. The true burden of disease is likely underestimated. Nevertheless, the estimated burden is substantial enough to warrant concerted action. A range of approaches is possible, but all appropriate interventions require scale-up of laboratories and early treatment with regimens containing a sufficient number of second-line drugs. Ambulatory treatment for most patients, and improved infection control, can facilitate scale-up with decreased risk of nosocomial transmission. Several obstacles have been considered to preclude worldwide scale-up of treatment, mostly attributable to inadequate human, drug, and financial resources. Further delays in scale-up, however, risk continued generation and transmission of resistant tuberculosis, as well as associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:18810684

  8. [Evaluation of children with tuberculosis contact].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez C, Daniela; Moreno M, Claudia; Araya D, Andrea; González L, Marcela

    2010-10-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a worldwide infectious disease, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch bacilli), that has re-emerged since the decade of the 80's in relation to the pandemic of HIV infection. Chile has one of the lowest TB prevalence rates in Latin America. In children, TB exhibits some differences from adult disease in terms of pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and probability of progression from the infected state to disease, making it more difficult to diagnose and increasing the likelihood of developing the disease once the infection is acquired. There is a National Program for the Prevention and Control of TB that allows us to develop prevention and chemoprophylaxis strategies. This article summarizes these strategies to guide the study and management of children in contact with TB patients.

  9. Web tools for molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shabbeer, Amina; Ozcaglar, Cagri; Yener, Bülent; Bennett, Kristin P

    2012-06-01

    In this study we explore publicly available web tools designed to use molecular epidemiological data to extract information that can be employed for the effective tracking and control of tuberculosis (TB). The application of molecular methods for the epidemiology of TB complement traditional approaches used in public health. DNA fingerprinting methods are now routinely employed in TB surveillance programs and are primarily used to detect recent transmissions and in outbreak investigations. Here we present web tools that facilitate systematic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) genotype information and provide a view of the genetic diversity in the MTBC population. These tools help answer questions about the characteristics of MTBC strains, such as their pathogenicity, virulence, immunogenicity, transmissibility, drug-resistance profiles and host-pathogen associativity. They provide an integrated platform for researchers to use molecular epidemiological data to address current challenges in the understanding of TB dynamics and the characteristics of MTBC.

  10. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  11. Bovine tuberculosis and the endangered Iberian lynx.

    PubMed

    Briones, V; de Juan, L; Sánchez, C; Vela, A I; Galka, M; Montero; Goyache, J; Aranaz, A; Domìnguez, L

    2000-01-01

    We report the first case of bovine tuberculosis in a free-living Iberian lynx (Lynx pardina), an extremely endangered feline, from Doñana National Park in Spain. The isolate (Mycobacterium bovis) correlates by molecular characterization with other isolates from wild ungulates in the park, strongly suggesting an epidemiologic link. Mycobacterium bovis infects many animal species, with wild and free-ranging domestic ungulates being the main reservoirs in nature (1).

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Manipulator of Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Korb, Vanessa C.; Chuturgoon, Anil A.; Moodley, Devapregasan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is one of the most successful pathogens in human history and remains a global health challenge. MTB has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade the immune response sufficiently to survive within the macrophage in a bacterial-immunological equilibrium, yet causes sufficient immunopathology to facilitate its transmission. This review highlights MTB as the driver of disease pathogenesis and presents evidence of the mechanisms by which MTB manipulates the protective immune response into a pathological productive infection. PMID:26927066

  13. Comparative Mycobacterium tuberculosis Spoligotype Distribution in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Alvarez, Jessica; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Rendón, Adrian; Quiñones-Falconi, Francisco; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, we studied the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates from patients according to their gender, age, and geographic location in Mexico. We did not observe any statistically significant differences in regard to age or gender. We found that spoligo international type 53 (SIT53) is more frequent in the northern states and that SIT119 predominates in central Mexico. PMID:24850349

  14. Neonatal tuberculosis and cardiac inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor.

    PubMed

    Banque, Maria Niña F; Ribu, Ramon O; Policarpio, Maria Theresa T

    2013-04-01

    A 1-month-old neonate was admitted in respiratory distress. Two-dimensional echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed a mass anterior to the left ventricle and right ventricular outflow tract. A biopsy revealed an inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. A tuberculin test showed an 18-mm diameter induration. Three of the 6 household contacts were also positive for pulmonary tuberculosis. Antituberculosis medication was started. After 1 year, echocardiography and computed tomography scan showed complete resolution of the mass.

  15. Anemia in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis*

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina Gribel; Delogo, Karina Neves; de Oliveira, Hedi Marinho de Melo Gomes; Ruffino-Netto, Antonio; Kritski, Afranio Lineu; Oliveira, Martha Maria

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalence of anemia and of its types in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a descriptive, longitudinal study involving pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients at one of two tuberculosis referral hospitals in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We evaluated body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold thickness (TST), arm muscle area (AMA), ESR, mean corpuscular volume, and red blood cell distribution width (RDW), as well as the levels of C-reactive protein, hemoglobin, transferrin, and ferritin. RESULTS: We included 166 patients, 126 (75.9%) of whom were male. The mean age was 39.0 ± 10.7 years. Not all data were available for all patients: 18.7% were HIV positive; 64.7% were alcoholic; the prevalences of anemia of chronic disease and iron deficiency anemia were, respectively, 75.9% and 2.4%; and 68.7% had low body weight (mean BMI = 18.21 kg/m2). On the basis of TST and AMA, 126 (78.7%) of 160 patients and 138 (87.9%) of 157 patients, respectively, were considered malnourished. Anemia was found to be associated with the following: male gender (p = 0.03); low weight (p = 0.0004); low mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.03);high RDW (p = 0; 0003); high ferritin (p = 0.0005); and high ESR (p = 0.004). We also found significant differences between anemic and non-anemic patients in terms of BMI (p = 0.04), DCT (p = 0.003), and ESR (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample, high proportions of pulmonary tuberculosis patients were classified as underweight and malnourished, and there was a high prevalence of anemia of chronic disease. In addition, anemia was associated with high ESR and malnutrition. PMID:25210963

  16. Tuberculosis Risk among Medical Trainees, Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Basavaraj, Anita; Chandanwale, Ajay; Patil, Akhil; Kadam, Dileep; Joshi, Samir; Gupte, Nikhil; McIntire, Katie; Jain, Divyashri; Dalal, Hamza; Badave, Rohan; DeLuca, Andrea; Gupta, Amita; Bollinger, Robert; Mave, Vidya

    2016-03-01

    During 2012-2013, at a public hospital in Pune, India, 26 (3.9%) cases of tuberculosis were reported among 662 medical trainees, representing an estimated incidence of 3,279 cases/100,000 person-years. Three of these infections were isoniazid-resistant, 1 was multidrug-resistant, and 1 occurred in a trainee who had fulminant hepatitis after starting treatment for TB.

  17. Nasopharyngeal tuberculosis presenting with auditory symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pankhania, Miran; Elloy, Marianne; Conboy, Peter J

    2012-10-09

    We present an unusual case of a 54-year-old Chinese lady presenting to the ears, nose and throat clinic after family members noticed that her hearing had progressively deteriorated over the preceding weeks. She also complained of tinnitus. Examination of the ears, nose and throat was unremarkable. Flexible nasoendoscopy demonstrated swelling in the postnasal space, which, following biopsy, was shown to be pathognomonic of tuberculosis. This was successfully treated with multidisciplinary input and the patient made a complete recovery.

  18. Population Structure among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates from Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Realpe, Teresa; Correa, Nidia; Rozo, Juan Carlos; Ferro, Beatriz Elena; Gomez, Verónica; Zapata, Elsa; Ribon, Wellman; Puerto, Gloria; Castro, Claudia; Nieto, Luisa María; Diaz, Maria Lilia; Rivera, Oriana; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin; Arbelaez, Maria Patricia; Robledo, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Background Phylogeographic composition of M. tuberculosis populations reveals associations between lineages and human populations that might have implications for the development of strategies to control the disease. In Latin America, lineage 4 or the Euro-American, is predominant with considerable variations among and within countries. In Colombia, although few studies from specific localities have revealed differences in M. tuberculosis populations, there are still areas of the country where this information is lacking, as is a comparison of Colombian isolates with those from the rest of the world. Principal Findings A total of 414 M. tuberculosis isolates from adult pulmonary tuberculosis cases from three Colombian states were studied. Isolates were genotyped using IS6110-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), spoligotyping, and 24-locus Mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units variable number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTRs). SIT42 (LAM9) and SIT62 (H1) represented 53.3% of isolates, followed by 8.21% SIT50 (H3), 5.07% SIT53 (T1), and 3.14% SIT727 (H1). Composite spoligotyping and 24-locus MIRU- VNTR minimum spanning tree analysis suggest a recent expansion of SIT42 and SIT62 evolved originally from SIT53 (T1). The proportion of Haarlem sublineage (44.3%) was significantly higher than that in neighboring countries. Associations were found between M. tuberculosis MDR and SIT45 (H1), as well as HIV-positive serology with SIT727 (H1) and SIT53 (T1). Conclusions This study showed the population structure of M. tuberculosis in several regions from Colombia with a dominance of the LAM and Haarlem sublineages, particularly in two major urban settings (Medellín and Cali). Dominant spoligotypes were LAM9 (SIT 42) and Haarlem (SIT62). The proportion of the Haarlem sublineage was higher in Colombia compared to that in neighboring countries, suggesting particular conditions of co-evolution with the corresponding human population that favor the success of this

  19. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade.

    PubMed

    Pepperell, Caitlin S; Granka, Julie M; Alexander, David C; Behr, Marcel A; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L; Jamieson, Frances B; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W

    2011-04-19

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6(Quebec) genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710-1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate.

  20. Dispersal of Mycobacterium tuberculosis via the Canadian fur trade

    PubMed Central

    Pepperell, Caitlin S.; Granka, Julie M.; Alexander, David C.; Behr, Marcel A.; Chui, Linda; Gordon, Janet; Guthrie, Jennifer L.; Jamieson, Frances B.; Langlois-Klassen, Deanne; Long, Richard; Nguyen, Dao; Wobeser, Wendy; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2011-01-01

    Patterns of gene flow can have marked effects on the evolution of populations. To better understand the migration dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we studied genetic data from European M. tuberculosis lineages currently circulating in Aboriginal and French Canadian communities. A single M. tuberculosis lineage, characterized by the DS6Quebec genomic deletion, is at highest frequency among Aboriginal populations in Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta; this bacterial lineage is also dominant among tuberculosis (TB) cases in French Canadians resident in Quebec. Substantial contact between these human populations is limited to a specific historical era (1710–1870), during which individuals from these populations met to barter furs. Statistical analyses of extant M. tuberculosis minisatellite data are consistent with Quebec as a source population for M. tuberculosis gene flow into Aboriginal populations during the fur trade era. Historical and genetic analyses suggest that tiny M. tuberculosis populations persisted for ∼100 y among indigenous populations and subsequently expanded in the late 19th century after environmental changes favoring the pathogen. Our study suggests that spread of TB can occur by two asynchronous processes: (i) dispersal of M. tuberculosis by minimal numbers of human migrants, during which small pathogen populations are sustained by ongoing migration and slow disease dynamics, and (ii) expansion of the M. tuberculosis population facilitated by shifts in host ecology. If generalizable, these migration dynamics can help explain the low DNA sequence diversity observed among isolates of M. tuberculosis and the difficulties in global elimination of tuberculosis, as small, widely dispersed pathogen populations are difficult both to detect and to eradicate. PMID:21464295

  1. Apolipoprotein E Polymorphism in Tuberculosis Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naserpour Farivar, Taghi; Sharifi Moud, Batool; Sargazi, Mansur; Moeenrezakhanlou, Alireza

    In this study, we aimed to determine the significance of association between Tuberculosis and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. The apolipoprotein E genotypes were assayed in 250 tuberculosis patients by polymerase chain reaction followed by enzymatic digestion with Hha I. The results were compared with the results of the same experiments on 250 sex and age matched control peoples. Present results showed that in studied populations, prevalence of E4 genotype was lower in controls than in patients (8 v. 13.2%; OR = 1.75, p<0.05) and prevalence of E3 genotype was high in controls than in patients (86 v.51%; OR = 0.17, p<0.05). Statistically significant difference was found between patients and controls with respect to ɛ2 allele frequencies, while ɛ2 allele frequency was found to be much less prevalent in controls (6%) than in patients (35.8%; OR = 8.72, p<0.05). Also, our study revealed that there is an association between apolipoprotein E genotypes and amplitude to tuberculosis in studied populations. However, large population-based studies are needed to understand the exact role played by the locus in causing the condition.

  2. igr Genes and Mycobacterium tuberculosis cholesterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jennifer C; Miner, Maurine D; Pandey, Amit K; Gill, Wendy P; Harik, Nada S; Sassetti, Christopher M; Sherman, David R

    2009-08-01

    Recently, cholesterol was identified as a physiologically important nutrient for Mycobacterium tuberculosis survival in chronically infected mice. However, it remained unclear precisely when cholesterol is available to the bacterium and what additional bacterial functions are required for its metabolism. Here, we show that the igr locus, which we previously found to be essential for intracellular growth and virulence of M. tuberculosis, is required for cholesterol metabolism. While igr-deficient strains grow identically to the wild type in the presence of short- and long-chain fatty acids, the growth of these bacteria is completely inhibited in the presence of cholesterol. Interestingly, this mutant is still able to respire under cholesterol-dependent growth inhibition, suggesting that the bacteria can metabolize other carbon sources during cholesterol toxicity. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that the growth-inhibitory effect of cholesterol in vitro depends on cholesterol import, as mutation of the mce4 sterol uptake system partially suppresses this effect. In addition, the Delta igr mutant growth defect during the early phase of disease is completely suppressed by mutating mce4, implicating cholesterol intoxication as the primary mechanism of attenuation. We conclude that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol throughout infection.

  3. [The new Tuberculosis Control Program of Japan].

    PubMed

    Mori, Toru

    2006-07-01

    The 1951 Tuberculosis Control Law of Japan was amended extensively and has been in effect since April, 2005. The revision of the National Tuberculosis Program (NTP) is to respond to the tremendous changes that have occurred during the last 50 years in tuberculosis epidemiology and in the environment in tuberculosis control implementation. In this review, the main points and framework of the revisions were summarized and the perspective of the development of new technical innovations relevant to each area of the revised TB control legislation is discussed. Also, challenges of Japan's NTP in the recent future are discussed, including the controversies over the proposed abolishment of the Tuberculosis Control Law. 1. IMMUNIZATION: In the revision of NTP, the BCG vaccination of elementary school and junior-high school entrants was discontinued. In order to strengthen the early primary vaccination for infants, the new Law has adopted the direct vaccination scheme omitting tuberculin testing prior to immunization. This program is implemented to young babies, i.e., less than six months old, as defined by the decree. It is a heavy responsibility for the municipalities to ensure the high coverage of immunization when the period of legal vaccination is rather strictly limited practically to the fourth to sixth months after birth. The safe direct vaccination is another new challenge where appropriate management of the Koch's phenomenon or similar reactions should be warranted. 2. CHEMOPROPHYLAXIS: Though unfortunately suspended for some legal reason currently, the expansion and improvement of chemoprophylaxis, or treatment of latent tuberculosis infection, to cover anyone with higher risk of clinical development of TB would have a tremendous effect in Japan, especially since 90% of patients who developed TB were infected tens of years ago. The technical innovations in diagnosis of TB infection such as QuantiFERON will be very helpful. Development of new drugs or drug regimens

  4. Mortality of tuberculosis patients in Chennai, India.

    PubMed Central

    Kolappan, C.; Subramani, R.; Karunakaran, K.; Narayanan, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to measure the mortality rate and excess general mortality as well as identify groups at high risk for mortality among a cohort of tuberculosis patients treated in Chennai Corporation clinics in south India. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study we followed up 2674 patients (1800 males and 874 females) who were registered and treated under the DOTS strategy in Chennai Corporation clinics in 2000. The follow-up period from the date of start of treatment to either the date of interview, or death was 600 days. FINDINGS: The mortality rate among this cohort of tuberculosis patients was 60/1000 person-years. The excess general mortality expressed as standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was 6.1 (95% confidence interval (CI)=5.4-6.9). Younger patients, men, patients with Category II disease, patients who defaulted on, or failed courses of treatment, and male smokers who were alcoholics, all had higher mortality ratios when compared to the rest of the cohort. CONCLUSION: The excess mortality in this cohort was six times more than that in the general population. Young age, male sex, smear-positivity, treatment default, treatment failure and the combination of smoking and alcoholism were identified as risk factors for tuberculosis mortality. We suggest that mortality rate and excess mortality be routinely used as a monitoring tool for evaluating the efficiency of the national control programme. PMID:16878229

  5. Nanotechnology-Based Approach in Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Md. Kausar; Das, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB, is the second most fatal infectious disease after AIDS, caused by bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Prolonged treatment, high pill burden, low compliance, and stiff administration schedules are factors that are responsible for emergence of MDR and XDR cases of tuberculosis. Till date, only BCG vaccine is available which is ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of disease. Various unique antibodies have been developed to overcome drug resistance, reduce the treatment regimen, and elevate the compliance to treatment. Therefore, we need an effective and robust system to subdue technological drawbacks and improve the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs which still remains a major challenge for pharmaceutical technology. Nanoparticle-based ideology has shown convincing treatment and promising outcomes for chronic infectious diseases. Different types of nanocarriers have been evaluated as promising drug delivery systems for various administration routes. Controlled and sustained release of drugs is one of the advantages of nanoparticle-based antituberculosis drugs over free drug. It also reduces the dosage frequency and resolves the difficulty of low poor compliance. This paper reviews various nanotechnology-based therapies which can be used for the treatment of TB. PMID:28210505

  6. Molecular Epidemiology of Tuberculosis: Current Insights

    PubMed Central

    Mathema, Barun; Kurepina, Natalia E.; Bifani, Pablo J.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of tuberculosis (TB) have focused largely on utilizing molecular techniques to address short- and long-term epidemiologic questions, such as in outbreak investigations and in assessing the global dissemination of strains, respectively. This is done primarily by examining the extent of genetic diversity of clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. When molecular methods are used in conjunction with classical epidemiology, their utility for TB control has been realized. For instance, molecular epidemiologic studies have added much-needed accuracy and precision in describing transmission dynamics, and they have facilitated investigation of previously unresolved issues, such as estimates of recent-versus-reactive disease and the extent of exogenous reinfection. In addition, there is mounting evidence to suggest that specific strains of M. tuberculosis belonging to discrete phylogenetic clusters (lineages) may differ in virulence, pathogenesis, and epidemiologic characteristics, all of which may significantly impact TB control and vaccine development strategies. Here, we review the current methods, concepts, and applications of molecular approaches used to better understand the epidemiology of TB. PMID:17041139

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicates within necrotic human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas R.; Repnik, Urska; Herbst, Susanne; Collinson, Lucy M.; Griffiths, Gareth

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis modulation of macrophage cell death is a well-documented phenomenon, but its role during bacterial replication is less characterized. In this study, we investigate the impact of plasma membrane (PM) integrity on bacterial replication in different functional populations of human primary macrophages. We discovered that IFN-γ enhanced bacterial replication in macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages more than in granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor–differentiated macrophages. We show that permissiveness in the different populations of macrophages to bacterial growth is the result of a differential ability to preserve PM integrity. By combining live-cell imaging, correlative light electron microscopy, and single-cell analysis, we found that after infection, a population of macrophages became necrotic, providing a niche for M. tuberculosis replication before escaping into the extracellular milieu. Thus, in addition to bacterial dissemination, necrotic cells provide first a niche for bacterial replication. Our results are relevant to understanding the environment of M. tuberculosis replication in the host. PMID:28242744

  8. A rare cause of small bowel perforation by intestinal and peritoneal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Uranüs, S

    1990-02-01

    Tuberculosis of the intestine and peritoneum has become a rare disease. This is the result of a general decrease in pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, rigorous BCG vaccination programs, and the eradication of tuberculosis in cattle. A case of tuberculosis in this frequent location, which was discovered unexpectedly during an emergency laparotomy, is reportet.

  9. Tuberculosis and risk of acute myocardial infarction: a propensity score-matched analysis.

    PubMed

    Huaman, M A; Kryscio, R J; Fichtenbaum, C J; Henson, D; Salt, E; Sterling, T R; Garvy, B A

    2017-02-16

    Several pathogens have been associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Whether this occurs with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is unclear. We assessed if tuberculosis disease increased the risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We identified patients with tuberculosis index claims from a large de-identified database of ~15 million adults enrolled in a U.S. commercial insurance policy between 2008 and 2010. Tuberculosis patients were 1:1 matched to patients without tuberculosis claims using propensity scores. We compared the occurrence of index AMI claims between the tuberculosis and non-tuberculosis cohorts using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox Proportional Hazard models. Data on 2026 patients with tuberculosis and 2026 propensity-matched patients without tuberculosis were included. AMI was more frequent in the tuberculosis cohort compared with the non-tuberculosis cohort, 67 (3·3%) vs. 32 (1·6%) AMI cases, respectively, P < 0·01. Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1·98, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 1·3-3·0). The results were similar when the analysis was restricted to pulmonary tuberculosis (adjusted HR 2·43, 95% CI 1·5-4·1). Tuberculosis was associated with an increased risk of AMI. CVD risk assessment should be considered in tuberculosis patients. Mechanistic studies of tuberculosis and CVD are warranted.

  10. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  11. 9 CFR 77.33 - Testing procedures for tuberculosis in captive cervids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Testing procedures for tuberculosis in... PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.33 Testing procedures for tuberculosis in captive cervids. (a) Approved testers. Except as explained in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, official tuberculosis tests...

  12. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  13. 78 FR 690 - Guidelines for the Control of Tuberculosis in Elephants

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-04

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Guidelines for the Control of Tuberculosis in Elephants AGENCY... regulations as related to elephant tuberculosis as well as to aid users in their compliance with those... Tuberculosis in Elephants'' developed by The National Tuberculosis Working Group for Zoo and Wildlife...

  14. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  15. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  16. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  17. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  18. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  19. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  20. 9 CFR 50.6 - Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... destroyed because of tuberculosis. 50.6 Section 50.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... DISEASES ANIMALS DESTROYED BECAUSE OF TUBERCULOSIS General Indemnity § 50.6 Identification of animals to be destroyed because of tuberculosis. (a) Livestock to be destroyed because of tuberculosis must be...

  1. 9 CFR 77.3 - Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tuberculosis classifications of States... TUBERCULOSIS General Provisions § 77.3 Tuberculosis classifications of States and zones. The Administrator shall classify each State for tuberculosis in accordance with this part. A zone comprising less than...

  2. 9 CFR 77.33 - Testing procedures for tuberculosis in captive cervids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Testing procedures for tuberculosis in... PRODUCTS TUBERCULOSIS Captive Cervids § 77.33 Testing procedures for tuberculosis in captive cervids. (a) Approved testers. Except as explained in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, official tuberculosis tests...

  3. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  4. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  5. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  6. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  7. 29 CFR 1904.11 - Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tuberculosis (TB), and that employee subsequently develops a tuberculosis infection, as evidenced by a positive... 29 Labor 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases... Forms and Recording Criteria § 1904.11 Recording criteria for work-related tuberculosis cases. (a)...

  8. Polymorphisms of twenty regulatory proteins between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis are responsible for tuberculosis in humans or animals, respectively. Both species are closely related and belong to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. tuberculosis is the most ancient species from which M. bovis and the other members o...

  9. Clinico-Pathological Profile and Surgical Outcome of Patients of Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis Undergoing Laparotomy.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Priyank; Sahu, Shantanu Kumar; Agrawal, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the earliest diseases affecting the mankind. Abdominal tuberculosis constitutes a common public health issue in developing countries like ours. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis often involves the ileocecal region. Surgery in case of abdominal tuberculosis is required to overcome the deleterious effects of the disease like tissue disorganization, obstruction and perforatio.

  10. [Optimisation of diagnostics and differential diagnostics disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Demikhova, O V; Karpina, N L; Lepekha, L N; Bagirov, M A; Amansakhedov, R B

    2012-01-01

    One of the reasons of dramatic situation with tuberculosis in Russia is untimely diagnostics of tuberculosis. The aim of the study was to identify the causes of diagnostic mistakes when we deal with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis at current stage and to modernize the diagnostic process. The analysis of the diagnostic activity of the consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute of Russian Academy Medical Sciences for 2011 was performed with special attention on the results of the survey of 505 patients with pulmonary dissemination. The frequency of discrepancies of disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis diagnostics was 96.1%. Based on the studies carried out the main causes diagnostic mistakes in patients with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis were determined. New directions of improving of tuberculosis diagnostics were developed: overall high-technology examination of patient, adherence to the diagnostic procedure, developed by consultative diagnostic center of Central Tuberculosis Research Institute (CTRI), timely performing fiber-optic bronchoscopy with complex biopsy and diagnostic surgery procedures, further training of primary health care doctors. Implementation of proposed activities will significantly (by 3-5 times) reduce the time for diagnostics of respiratory system disease.

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Free-Roaming Wild Asian Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Shivashankar, Beechagondahalli Papanna; Umashankar, Kunigal Srinivasa; Nandini, Poojappa; Giridhar, Papanna; Byregowda, Somenahalli Munivenkatappa; Shrinivasa, Basavegowdanadoddi Marinaik

    2017-01-01

    Postmortem examination of a wild Asian elephant at Rajiv Gandhi National Park, India, revealed nodular lesions, granulomas with central caseation, and acid-fast bacilli in the lungs. PCR and nucleotide sequencing confirmed the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This study indicates that wild elephants can harbor M. tuberculosis that can become fatal. PMID:28221114

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Wild Asian Elephants, Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Zachariah, Arun; Pandiyan, Jeganathan; Madhavilatha, G.K.; Mundayoor, Sathish; Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Sajesh, P.K.; Santhosh, Sam

    2017-01-01

    We tested 3 ild Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in southern India and confirmed infection in 3 animals with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, an obligate human pathogen, by PCR and genetic sequencing. Our results indicate that tuberculosis may be spilling over from humans (reverse zoonosis) and emerging in wild elephants. PMID:28221104

  13. Novel cause of tuberculosis in meerkats, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sven D C; Drewe, Julian A; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D

    2013-12-01

    The organism that causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) has been poorly characterized. Our genetic analysis showed it to be a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and closely related to the dassie bacillus. We have named this epidemiologically and genetically unique strain M. suricattae.

  14. Pyrosequencing assay for rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex organisms to the species level is important for diagnostic, therapeutic and epidemiologic perspectives. Indeed, isolates are routinely identified as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex without further discrimination in agreement with the high genomic similarity of the M. tuberculosis complex members and the resulting complex available identification tools. Findings We herein develop a pyrosequencing assay analyzing polymorphisms within glpK, pykA and gyrB genes to identify members of the M. tuberculosis complex at the species level. The assay was evaluated with 22 M. tuberculosis, 21 M. bovis, 3 M. caprae, 3 M. microti, 2 M. bovis BCG, 2 M. pinnipedii, 1 M. canettii and 1 M. africanum type I isolates. The resulted pyrograms were consistent with conventional DNA sequencing data and successfully identified all isolates. Additionally, 127 clinical M. tuberculosis complex isolates were analyzed and were unambiguously identified as M. tuberculosis. Conclusion We proposed a pyrosequencing-based scheme for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis complex isolates at the species level. The assay is robust, specific, rapid and can be easily introduced in the routine activity. PMID:22011383

  15. Paleopathology of Human Tuberculosis and the Potential Role of Climate

    PubMed Central

    Nerlich, Andreas G.; Lösch, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Both origin and evolution of tuberculosis and its pathogens (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex) are not fully understood. The paleopathological investigation of human remains offers a unique insight into the molecular evolution and spread including correlative data of the environment. The molecular analysis of material from Egypt (3000–500 BC), Sudan (200–600 AD), Hungary (600–1700 AD), Latvia (1200–1600 AD), and South Germany (1400–1800 AD) urprisingly revealed constantly high frequencies of tuberculosis in all different time periods excluding significant environmental influence on tuberculosis spread. The typing of various mycobacteria strains provides evidence for ancestral M. tuberculosis strains in Pre- to early Egyptian dynastic material (3500–2650 BC), while typical M. africanum signatures were detected in a Middle Kingdom tomb (2050–1650 BC). Samples from the New Kingdom to Late Period (1500–500 BC) indicated modern M. tuberculosis strains. No evidence was seen for M. bovis in Egyptian material while M. bovis signatures were first identified in Siberian biomaterial dating 2000 years before present. These results contraindicates the theory that M. tuberculosis evolved from M. bovis during early domestication in the region of the “Fertile Crescent,” but supports the scenario that M. tuberculosis probably derived from an ancestral progenitor strain. The environmental influence of this evolutionary scenario deserves continuing intense evaluation. PMID:19360109

  16. The Extracellular Matrix Regulates Granuloma Necrosis in Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Al Shammari, Basim; Shiomi, Takayuki; Tezera, Liku; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Workman, Victoria; Sathyamoorthy, Tarangini; Mauri, Francesco; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Robertson, Brian D; D'Armiento, Jeanine; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2015-08-01

    A central tenet of tuberculosis pathogenesis is that caseous necrosis leads to extracellular matrix destruction and bacterial transmission. We reconsider the underlying mechanism of tuberculosis pathology and demonstrate that collagen destruction may be a critical initial event, causing caseous necrosis as opposed to resulting from it. In human tuberculosis granulomas, regions of extracellular matrix destruction map to areas of caseous necrosis. In mice, transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase 1 causes caseous necrosis, the pathological hallmark of human tuberculosis. Collagen destruction is the principal pathological difference between humanised mice and wild-type mice with tuberculosis, whereas the release of proinflammatory cytokines does not differ, demonstrating that collagen breakdown may lead to cell death and caseation. To investigate this hypothesis, we developed a 3-dimensional cell culture model of tuberculosis granuloma formation, using bioelectrospray technology. Collagen improved survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected cells analyzed on the basis of a lactate dehydrogenase release assay, propidium iodide staining, and measurement of the total number of viable cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that collagen destruction is an initial event in tuberculosis immunopathology, leading to caseous necrosis and compromising the immune response, revealing a previously unappreciated role for the extracellular matrix in regulating the host-pathogen interaction.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis "Beijing" epidemics: a race against mutations?

    PubMed

    Bhatter, P; Chatterjee, A; Mistry, N

    2012-01-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Beijing strains exhibit different drug-resistance mutations (DRM) in different locations. By comparing DRM in Beijing reported from Tuberculosis endemic and epidemic locations, we propose that DRM selected in a population cannot tolerate biologically available drugs in different populations resulting in further evolution through novel DRM.

  18. Palaeogenomics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: epidemic bursts with a degrading genome.

    PubMed

    Djelouadji, Zoheira; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2011-08-01

    Genome-scale analysis suggests that the last common ancestor of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Mycobacterium leprae diverged 36 million years ago, and members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex differentiated 40,000 years ago. Analysis of palaeomicrobiological data from a 17,000-year-old sample from a bison and a 9000-year-old sample from a human being suggested that M tuberculosis preceded Mycobacterium bovis and related species. Whole-genome comparisons show that members of the M tuberculosis complex form a unique bacterial species with distinct ecotypes that are transmissible from any infected mammalian species to several others. Genomic deletions identified several M tuberculosis lineages that could be placed on a phylogeographical map, suggesting adaptation to local host populations. The degrees of transmissibility and virulence vary between M tuberculosis clones, with increased virulence mainly linked to gene loss in regulatory pathways. Such data suggest that most M tuberculosis clones have a restricted spreading capacity between the host population, allowing unpredictable bursts of highly transmissible, virulent, and successful clones, such as the east Asian (Beijing) clone. Advances in genomics have helped the development of molecular techniques for accurate identification of species and clones in the M tuberculosis complex, which is essential for tracing the source of infections.

  19. Novel Cause of Tuberculosis in Meerkats, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Drewe, Julian A.; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C.; Warren, Robin M.; van Helden, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    The organism that causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) has been poorly characterized. Our genetic analysis showed it to be a novel member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and closely related to the dassie bacillus. We have named this epidemiologically and genetically unique strain M. suricattae. PMID:24274183

  20. Understanding the Mechanisms of Immunopathogenesis of Human and Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extensive investigations have revealed that zoonotic pathogens in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) evolved from a common ancestor. Although all the members can cause disease in one or more species of mammals, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and M. bovis (Mbv) are the major pathogens ...