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Sample records for hospitalized persons united

  1. [Fear of personal death among hospital physicians].

    PubMed

    Hamama-Raz, Y; Solomon, Z; Ohry, A

    1997-11-16

    Many studies have tried to explain why professionals experience difficulty when dealing with, and in treating efficiently situations connected with death. We studied levels of personal fear among physicians in general hospitals and addressed 2 questions: Does exposure to death on professional and personal levels, affect the level of the fear of personal death which physicians experience? Is there a relationship between personality variables, represented by the repression-sensitization dimension, and level of fear of personal death? A sample of 233 physicians from 22 general hospitals who specialized in oncology, internal medicine, surgery, psychiatry or pediatrics was studied. Each answered 4 questionnaires with regard to demographic information, fear of personal death, level of repression-sensitization and exposure to the death of relatives and significant others. There were no differences in level of fear of personal death of physicians according to specialization, but those who had been exposed to death on the personal level, feared less their own death. With respect to the personality variable, tendency to sensitization, it was found that those who were sensitized exhibited a higher level of the fear of their own death compared to those who were repressive. Of the various demographic variables examined (sex, level of religious observance, age, number of children, health, professional experience) it was found that those: with many years of professional experience, who were relatively older, who were nonobservant religiously and who were in good health, had lower levels of personal fear of death; gender was not a factor.

  2. Geriatric assessment unit in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, D.; Christ, L. W.; Stalder, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    A geriatric assessment unit has been in operation in a Canadian teaching hospital since October 1979. In the first 15 months of operation there were 203 admissions involving 153 persons aged 65 years or older, many of whom were impaired both physically and mentally.In many cases these patients could be discharged back to the community following assessment and rehabilitation. Only a few had to be placed immediately in extended care facilities. The mean stay in the unit was less than 3 weeks. There was a mortality of 3% among patients in the unit. For older persons who present with complex health problems a geriatric assessment unit provides an environment for comprehensive assessment, treatment and rehabilitation. A thorough assessment at, or preferably before, the point at which their health breaks down enables older people to return to and remain in the community and helps to prevent them from being admitted to an institution while they are still able to function with reasonable independence. PMID:7074507

  3. Hospital and Health Sciences Libraries in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Antonia J.

    The Sir Evelyn Wrench Travelling Fellowship for Librarians 1969 was awarded to Antonia J. Bunch. In this personal account of her one month tour of the United States, the author reviews her impressions of the twenty-one hospital and health science libraries she visited. (MM)

  4. The work of chronically ill children on a hospital unit.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, N

    1984-01-01

    A nurse watches chronically ill children at work on a hospital unit. Food procurement work, body work, composure work, work during an IV procedure, resisting work, personal relations work, sick role work, and information work are among the extensive kinds of work children are observed carrying out. However, the child's work is seldom recognized or valued. Nurses need to evaluate how their own work facilitates or impedes the work of the child.

  5. 31 CFR 515.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Person within the United States. 515... Definitions § 515.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  6. 31 CFR 515.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Person within the United States. 515... Definitions § 515.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  7. 31 CFR 500.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person within the United States. 500... Definitions § 500.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term, person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  8. 31 CFR 515.330 - Person within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person within the United States. 515... Definitions § 515.330 Person within the United States. (a) The term person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person, wheresoever located, who is a resident of the United States; (2) Any person...

  9. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section... General Definitions § 596.313 United States person. The term United States person means any United States... States, or any person in the United States....

  10. 42 CFR 412.25 - Excluded hospital units: Common requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospital units: Common requirements. 412... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Hospital... Inpatient Capital-Related Costs § 412.25 Excluded hospital units: Common requirements. (a) Basis...

  11. Aspects of Fear of Personal Death, Levels of Awareness, and Professional Affiliation among Dialysis Unit Staff Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ungar, Lea; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined expressions of fear of personal death among physicians, nurses, and social workers working in hospital dialysis units. Results indicated no differences in fear of personal death between 71 dialysis personnel and 68 other hospital personnel serving as controls. Physicians had lowest scores of fear of personal death followed by nurses and…

  12. 31 CFR 560.314 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person. 560.314 Section... § 560.314 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or...

  13. 31 CFR 560.314 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person. 560.314 Section... § 560.314 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or...

  14. 31 CFR 560.314 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person. 560.314 Section... § 560.314 United States person. The term United States person means any United States citizen, permanent resident alien, entity organized under the laws of the United States (including foreign branches), or...

  15. The Methodist Hospital CCU: a Beacon unit of excellence.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Tricia; Abanobi, Beatrice; Alleman, Paula; Ballinas, Eva; Botbyl, Brenda; Bries, Girlie; Clark, Liz; Clarkson, Terri; Cooper, Bridgette; Cooper, Jason; Cox, Shelly; Cude, Rebecca; Davis, Juanita; Delosreyes, Arlene; Durst, Kimberly; East, Ana; Edwards, Erving; Ellison, Rose; Eparwa, Perlita; Forjuoh, Harriet; Foster, Donald; Foytik, Lisa; Gordon, Maria; Grace, Jean; Green, Lisa; Harrison, Cassandra; Herrera, Rubin; Horn, Mary; Hunsinger, Cheryce; Issac, Annamma; Jackson, Valerie; Johnson, Athie; Kitayama, Susanna; Karaan, Juliet; Kezmarski, Mary; Kleinrock, Richard; Latson, Maria; Lee, Valerie; Long, Robin; Macapagal, Fred; Magsino, Diana; Manojkumar, Saleena; Martin, Denise; Matura, Lea Ann; McCarthy, Cynthia; McClellan, Emma; McDaniel, Christy; Mengo, Pam; Meurer, Judy; Muttathottil, Liz; Osayande, Esther; Osei-Frimpong, Diana; Phillips, Betty; Pittman, James; Pratt, Craig; Putney, David; Refuerzo, Laarni; Rendon, Lavinia; Richter, Russ; Simms, Sylvia; Sitoy, Diana; Small-Nelson, Judith; Sosa, Tomas; Stuckey, Denise; Tacquard, Natalie; Talbott, Sarah; Talladen, Aleine; Taylor, Shani; Thomas, Lini; Thompson, Pam; Walters, Gordon; West, Rachel

    2005-06-01

    This article features the Coronary Care Unit of The Methodist Hospital of Houston, Texas. This unit was one of the first Beacon Critical Care Units recognized by the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. This article focuses on how to achieve this award. The Coronary Care Unit nursing infrastructure is described, and specific unit examples are included.

  16. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes...

  17. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes...

  18. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes...

  19. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes...

  20. 31 CFR 103.39 - Person outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person outside the United States. 103... Person outside the United States. For the purposes of this subpart, a remittance or transfer of funds, or... the United States, shall be deemed to be a remittance or transfer to a person outside the...

  1. 26 CFR 1.957-3 - United States person defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 10 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false United States person defined. 1.957-3 Section 1... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Controlled Foreign Corporations § 1.957-3 United States person defined. (a) Basic rule—(1) In general. The term United States person has the same meaning for purposes of sections...

  2. Unit Cost of Medical Services at Different Hospitals in India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Susmita; Levin, Carol; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2013-01-01

    Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010–11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital) to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital) (USD 1 = INR 52). The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country’s hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising payment rates

  3. Hospital librarianship in the United States: at the crossroads

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Diane G.; Chastain-Warheit, Christine C.; Easterby-Gannett, Sharon; Chayes, Marion C.; Long, Bradley A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines recent developments in hospital librarianship in the United States, including the current status of hospital-based clinical library services. Several examples of hospital library services are presented that demonstrate some characteristics of struggling and thriving services. The implications of the informationist concept are considered. The continuation of the hospital librarian's primary role in support of patient care is explored, as core competencies are reexamined for relevancy in the new millennium. PMID:11838458

  4. Post-hospital medical respite care and hospital readmission of homeless persons.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Stefan G; Posner, Michael A; O'Connell, James J; Swain, Stacy; Mullins, Ashley N; Shwartz, Michael; Ash, Arlene S

    2009-01-01

    Medical respite programs offer medical, nursing, and other care as well as accommodation for homeless persons discharged from acute hospital stays. They represent a community-based adaptation of urban health systems to the specific needs of homeless persons. This article examines whether post-hospital discharge to a homeless medical respite program was associated with a reduced chance of 90-day readmission compared to other disposition options. Adjusting for imbalances in patient characteristics using propensity scores, respite patients were the only group that was significantly less likely to be readmitted within 90 days compared to those released to Own Care. Respite programs merit attention as a potentially efficacious service for homeless persons leaving the hospital.

  5. Sporotrichosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 2000–2013

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Jeremy A.W.; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    To determine frequency and risk for sporotrichosis-associated hospitalizations, we analyzed the US 2000–2013 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 1,471 hospitalizations occurred (average annual rate 0.35/1 million persons). Hospitalizations were associated with HIV/AIDS, immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although rare, severe sporotrichosis should be considered for at-risk patients. PMID:27648881

  6. Sporotrichosis-Associated Hospitalizations, United States, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeremy A W; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K; Benedict, Kaitlin

    2016-10-01

    To determine frequency and risk for sporotrichosis-associated hospitalizations, we analyzed the US 2000-2013 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 1,471 hospitalizations occurred (average annual rate 0.35/1 million persons). Hospitalizations were associated with HIV/AIDS, immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although rare, severe sporotrichosis should be considered for at-risk patients. PMID:27648881

  7. 42 CFR 412.22 - Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 412.22, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Excluded hospitals and hospital units: General... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL...

  8. 31 CFR 1010.440 - Person outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Person outside the United States. 1010... Maintained § 1010.440 Person outside the United States. For the purposes of this chapter, a remittance or... transfer, to be outside the United States, shall be deemed to be a remittance or transfer to a...

  9. 31 CFR 1010.440 - Person outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Person outside the United States. 1010... Maintained § 1010.440 Person outside the United States. For the purposes of this chapter, a remittance or... transfer, to be outside the United States, shall be deemed to be a remittance or transfer to a...

  10. 31 CFR 539.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION TRADE CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 539.313 United States person; U.S. person. The term...

  11. Personality disorders in a Swedish peacekeeping unit.

    PubMed

    Michel, Per-Olof; Lundin, Tom; Larsson, Gerry

    2005-01-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the incidence of personality disorders and their consequences among peacekeepers. Moreover, most studies are follow-up studies in which, if at all, personality traits are screened for after the soldiers have left their service abroad. The aim of this paper was to study personality disorders in a longitudinal perspective. The method used was to screen the personnel in a Swedish mechanized battalion serving in Bosnia from March until October 1996 on four occasions: before deployment, immediately after deployment, 6 months after deployment and 1 year after deployment. Serving in the battalion were 724 individuals of whom 516 took part in the survey. The screening instrument used was the DSM-IV and ICD-10 Personality Questionnaire (DIP-Q). The result shows that the rate of personality disorders were on the same level, or a little bit lower, than in the general population. Moreover, personality disorders were related to impaired general mental health and to reported traumatic experiences. Personality disorders also seemed to contribute to poor mental health 1 year after returning home from a mission abroad. The implications of these results for the future selection of peacekeepers are discussed. PMID:16195111

  12. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  13. Influenza-Related Hospitalizations and Poverty Levels - United States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Hadler, James L; Yousey-Hindes, Kimberly; Pérez, Alejandro; Anderson, Evan J; Bargsten, Marisa; Bohm, Susan R; Hill, Mary; Hogan, Brenna; Laidler, Matt; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista L; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Morin, Craig; Parker, Erin; Zansky, Shelley M; Chaves, Sandra S

    2016-02-12

    Annual influenza vaccine is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months in the United States, with recognition that some persons are at risk for more severe disease (1). However, there might be previously unrecognized demographic groups that also experience higher rates of serious influenza-related disease that could benefit from enhanced vaccination efforts. Socioeconomic status (SES) measures that are area-based can be used to define demographic groups when individual SES data are not available (2). Previous surveillance data analyses in limited geographic areas indicated that influenza-related hospitalization incidence was higher for persons residing in census tracts that included a higher percentage of persons living below the federal poverty level (3-5). To determine whether this association occurs elsewhere, influenza hospitalization data collected in 14 FluSurv-NET sites covering 27 million persons during the 2010-11 and 2011-12 influenza seasons were analyzed. The age-adjusted incidence of influenza-related hospitalizations per 100,000 person-years in high poverty (≥20% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts was 21.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 20.7-22.4), nearly twice the incidence in low poverty (<5% of persons living below the federal poverty level) census tracts (10.9, 95% CI: 10.3-11.4). This relationship was observed in each surveillance site, among children and adults, and across racial/ethnic groups. These findings suggest that persons living in poorer census tracts should be targeted for enhanced influenza vaccination outreach and clinicians serving these persons should be made aware of current recommendations for use of antiviral agents to treat influenza (6).

  14. Delirium in Prolonged Hospitalized Patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Vahedian Azimi, Amir; Ebadi, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Saadat, Soheil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prolonged hospitalization in the intensive care unit (ICU) can impose long-term psychological effects on patients. One of the most significant psychological effects from prolonged hospitalization is delirium. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of prolonged hospitalization of patients and subsequent delirium in the intensive care unit. Patients and Methods: This conventional content analysis study was conducted in the General Intensive Care Unit of the Shariati Hospital of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, from the beginning of 2013 to 2014. All prolonged hospitalized patients and their families were eligible participants. From the 34 eligible patients and 63 family members, the final numbers of actual patients and family members were 9 and 16, respectively. Several semi-structured interviews were conducted face-to-face with patients and their families in a private room and data were gathered. Results: Two main themes from two different perspectives emerged, 'patients' perspectives' (experiences during ICU hospitalization) and 'family members' perspectives' (supportive-communicational experiences). The main results of this study focused on delirium, Patients' findings were described as pleasant and unpleasant, factual and delusional experiences. Conclusions: Family members are valuable components in the therapeutic process of delirium. Effective use of family members in the delirium caring process can be considered to be one of the key non-medical nursing components in the therapeutic process. PMID:26290854

  15. Hospital Mortality in the United States following Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Michael E.; Marshall, Emily J.; Matheny, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common reason for hospital admission and complication of many inpatient procedures. The temporal incidence of AKI and the association of AKI admissions with in-hospital mortality are a growing problem in the world today. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology of AKI and its association with in-hospital mortality in the United States. AKI has been growing at a rate of 14% per year since 2001. However, the in-hospital mortality associated with AKI has been on the decline starting with 21.9% in 2001 to 9.1 in 2011, even though the number of AKI-related in-hospital deaths increased almost twofold from 147,943 to 285,768 deaths. We discuss the importance of the 71% reduction in AKI-related mortality among hospitalized patients in the United States and draw on the discussion of whether or not this is a phenomenon of hospital billing (coding) or improvements to the management of AKI. PMID:27376083

  16. Unit-based incident reporting and root cause analysis: variation at three hospital unit types

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Cordula; Merten, Hanneke; Zwaan, Laura; Lubberding, Sanne; Timmermans, Danielle; Smits, Marleen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To minimise adverse events in healthcare, various large-scale incident reporting and learning systems have been developed worldwide. Nevertheless, learning from patient safety incidents is going slowly. Local, unit-based reporting systems can help to get faster and more detailed insight into unit-specific safety issues. The aim of our study was to gain insight into types and causes of patient safety incidents in hospital units and to explore differences between unit types. Design Prospective observational study. Setting 10 emergency medicine units, 10 internal medicine units and 10 general surgery units in 20 hospitals in the Netherlands participated. Patient safety incidents were reported by healthcare providers. Reports were analysed with root cause analysis. The results were compared between the 3 unit types. Results A total of 2028 incidents were reported in an average reporting period of 8 weeks per unit. More than half had some consequences for patients, such as a prolonged hospital stay or longer waiting time, and a small number resulted in patient harm. Significant differences in incident types and causes were found between unit types. Emergency units reported more incidents related to collaboration, whereas surgical and internal medicine units reported more incidents related to medication use. The distribution of root causes of surgical and emergency medicine units showed more mutual similarities than those of internal medicine units. Conclusions Comparable incidents and causes have been found in all units, but there were also differences between units and unit types. Unit-based incident reporting gives specific information and therefore makes improvements easier. We conclude that unit-based incident reporting has an added value besides hospital-wide or national reporting systems that already exist in various countries. PMID:27329443

  17. Paying the Hospital: Foreign Lessons For the United States

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, William A.

    1983-01-01

    This special report synthesizes the findings of a Health Care Financing Administration grant which allowed the author to analyze hospital finance in six foreign countries and in the United States. The author identified the principal problems facing hospital owners, carriers, and governments in the United States, and he conducted lengthy field work abroad to learn how each country dealt with the same problems. One set of the author's conclusions makes more clear issues that are debated in the United States, such as the meaning of “cost-based reimbursement” and “prospective reimbursement”. Some of the author's findings show the difficulty of implementing policies often proposed in the United States, such as incentive reimbursement schemes. Other findings of the author show the conditions necessary for cost containment, such as strong representation of consumers and firm political will by government. PMID:10310003

  18. Spreading nursing unit innovation in large hospital systems.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Marjorie L; Upenieks, Valda V; Yee, Tracy; Needleman, Jack

    2008-03-01

    Healthcare administrators increasingly face the challenge of how to spread innovation throughout their organizations. The authors present the results of an evaluation of the efforts of 3 major hospital systems to internally disseminate nursing unit change among medical-surgical units. The findings show that all 3 organizations carefully planned, coordinated, and implemented a spread process; none left dissemination to chance. Although clear differences were evident in the way they engineered their spread, many similarities also were found.

  19. Upward trend in dengue incidence among hospitalized patients, United States.

    PubMed

    Streit, Judy A; Yang, Ming; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Polgreen, Philip M

    2011-05-01

    International travel and a global expansion of dengue fever have the potential to increase the incidence of dengue in the United States. We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of trends in dengue among hospitalized patients by using the National Inpatient Sample (2000-2007); the number of cases more than tripled (p<0.0001).

  20. An inexpensive, interdisciplinary, methodology to conduct an impact study of homeless persons on hospital based services.

    PubMed

    Parker, R David; Regier, Michael; Brown, Zachary; Davis, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    Homelessness is a primary concern for community health. Scientific literature on homelessness is wide ranging and diverse. One opportunity to add to existing literature is the development and testing of affordable, easily implemented methods for measuring the impact of homeless on the healthcare system. Such methodological approaches rely on the strengths in a multidisciplinary approach, including providers, both healthcare and homeless services and applied clinical researchers. This paper is a proof of concept for a methodology which is easily adaptable nationwide, given the mandated implementation of homeless management information systems in the United States and other countries; medical billing systems by hospitals; and research methods of researchers. Adaptation is independent of geographic region, budget restraints, specific agency skill sets, and many other factors that impact the application of a consistent methodological science based approach to assess and address homelessness. We conducted a secondary data analysis merging data from homeless utilization and hospital case based data. These data detailed care utilization among homeless persons in a small, Appalachian city in the United States. In our sample of 269 persons who received at least one hospital based service and one homeless service between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013, the total billed costs were $5,979,463 with 10 people costing more than one-third ($1,957,469) of the total. Those persons were primarily men, living in an emergency shelter, with pre-existing disabling conditions. We theorize that targeted services, including Housing First, would be an effective intervention. This is proposed in a future study.

  1. Unit cost analysis in a university hospital: an example from Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen.

    PubMed

    Vatanasapt, V; Kosuwon, W; Pengsaa, P

    1993-12-01

    This is the first analytic study to identify the unit cost in the University Hospital using the standard method of analysis in health economics. The unit costs in the report can be used to calculate the cost of each service for any disease. The costs of the hospital administration cost center and the supportive cost center were both allocated to the patient care service center by the simultaneous allocation method. The cost of teaching personnel was excluded from the analysis because it is quite difficult to estimate and differentiate the ratio of teaching costs to service costs. The hotel cost of the inpatient ward varied from 77.81 baht to 604.7 baht per day. The unit cost per service per day is different from the charge which is presently used at Srinagarind Hospital. Some services, such as in-house transportation are not included in the charge. This study was conducted to identify the unit cost of each service. The decision to establish charges can depend partly on this data and partly on the administrator's judgement. Other factors, such as patient poverty can dictate the final decision. In any case, the hospital and health service center should identify their own unit costs to be able to plan for effective budget management.

  2. Unit cost analysis in a university hospital: an example from Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen.

    PubMed

    Vatanasapt, V; Kosuwon, W; Pengsaa, P

    1993-12-01

    This is the first analytic study to identify the unit cost in the University Hospital using the standard method of analysis in health economics. The unit costs in the report can be used to calculate the cost of each service for any disease. The costs of the hospital administration cost center and the supportive cost center were both allocated to the patient care service center by the simultaneous allocation method. The cost of teaching personnel was excluded from the analysis because it is quite difficult to estimate and differentiate the ratio of teaching costs to service costs. The hotel cost of the inpatient ward varied from 77.81 baht to 604.7 baht per day. The unit cost per service per day is different from the charge which is presently used at Srinagarind Hospital. Some services, such as in-house transportation are not included in the charge. This study was conducted to identify the unit cost of each service. The decision to establish charges can depend partly on this data and partly on the administrator's judgement. Other factors, such as patient poverty can dictate the final decision. In any case, the hospital and health service center should identify their own unit costs to be able to plan for effective budget management. PMID:7798815

  3. Hospital stays, hospital charges, and in-hospital deaths among infants with selected birth defects--United States, 2003.

    PubMed

    2007-01-19

    Birth defects (BDs) are conditions that 1) result from a malformation, deformation, or disruption in one or more parts of the body; 2) are present at birth; and 3) have a serious, adverse effect on health, development, or functional ability. BDs are leading causes of pediatric hospitalizations, medical expenditures, and infant mortality. To estimate national hospital charges and rates of in-hospital deaths for a greater number of specific BDs than estimated in previous reports, investigators at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and CDC used the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project 2003 Kids' Inpatient Database (KID), developed and distributed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. KID is a 10% sample of hospital discharges after uncomplicated births and an 80% sample of all other pediatric discharges from 36 participating states. Data are weighted to represent all pediatric hospitalizations in the United States. The investigators analyzed hospital stays during 2003 for newborn infants with any of 35 BDs. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated substantial variation among BDs regarding average length of stay, average hospital charge, and the incidence of in-hospital deaths. Average length of stay was greatest for infants with surgically repaired gastroschisis or omphalocele. Average hospital charges were highest for infants with hypoplastic left heart syndrome and common truncus arteriosus. Although anencephaly, trisomy 13, and trisomy 18 were associated with the highest rates of in-hospital death, the largest total numbers of deaths associated with neonatal hospitalizations occurred in infants with diaphragmatic hernia and renal agenesis. Further studies are needed to distinguish outcomes for infants with isolated and multiple defects and to assess longer-term outcomes. PMID:17230142

  4. Hospital and emergency department crowding in the United States.

    PubMed

    Schafermeyer, Robert W; Asplin, Brent R

    2003-02-01

    Every emergency physician in the United States and, for that matter, in many countries around the world recognizes that the demand for timely access to quality emergency care is one that patients highly value. Unfortunately, hospitals in the USA have become stretched beyond capacity, resulting in overloaded emergency departments, diverted ambulances, and greater risks for patients and providers. Some of the causes and consequences of emergency department crowding are unique to the USA health care system, while others are common to countries throughout the world. The goals for this paper are to provide a brief overview of hospital and emergency department crowding in the USA, to identify commonly cited causes of the problem, and to outline future directions in the search for solutions. A large number of hospitals, inpatient beds, and emergency departments have closed during the past 10 years in the USA. In 1992 there were around 6000 hospitals with emergency departments and there are now less than 4000. While hospitals scrambled to decrease an excess supply of inpatient beds, the demand for emergency department care steadily rose. Between 1992 and 2000, the annual number of emergency department visits in the USA increased from 89.8 to 108 million. While some areas of the USA have been affected more seriously than others (particularly the coasts), almost every state has reported problems with boarding of inpatients in the emergency department. Inpatient boarding is the most frequently cited reason for emergency department crowding within the emergency medicine community. United States hospitals are also struggling with a shortage of health care professionals, particularly registered nurses. There are several policy issues that must be addressed to alleviate hospital and emergency department crowding over the long term. We list these as 'long-term' goals simply because policy changes, in the USA, are often incremental and rarely occur quickly. In order to achieve any

  5. Unit-based interprofessional leadership models in six US hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Christopher S; King, Emmanuel; Stein, Jason; Robinson, Edmondo; Salameh, Mohammad; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2014-08-01

    The landscape of hospital-based care has shifted to place greater emphasis on improving quality and delivering value. In response, hospitals and healthcare organizations must reassess their strategies to improve care delivery in their facilities and beyond. Although these institutional goals may be defined at the executive level, implementation takes place at local sites of care. To lead these efforts, hospitals need to appoint effective leaders at the frontlines. Hospitalists are well poised to take on the role of the local clinical care improvement leader based on their experiences as direct frontline caregivers and their integral roles in hospital-wide quality and safety initiatives. A unit-based leadership model consisting of a medical director paired with a nurse manager has been implemented in several hospitals to function as an effector arm in response to the changing landscape of inpatient care. We provide an overview of this new model of leadership and describe the experiences of 6 hospitals that have implemented it. PMID:24799385

  6. Rural model dedicated education unit: partnership between college and hospital.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Lisa M

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the pilot project development of a rural model Dedicated Education Unit (DEU) by a rural college nursing program and a rural hospital to increase student nurses' confidence and proficiency and improve recruitment of prepared rural staff nurses. Traditionally, for economies of scale, most student clinical rotations occurred in urban settings with the number of students per clinical instructor allowed by the state board of nursing. College budget constraints negated the placement of fewer than this mandated maximum number of students in a rural hospital with a clinical instructor; moreover, rural hospitals could not accommodate 10 students at one time. Rural nursing students were anxious in the urban settings, and this anxiety precluded learning in many instances. Rural hospitals face higher registered nurse vacancies than urban centers. Of the nurses applying for open positions, many were not prepared for the demands of rural nursing, resulting in increased turnover and high orientation costs. The rural model DEU addressed issues of both the nursing program and the hospital. The design and development of the rural model DEU and the advantages of the partnership for the college nursing program and the hospital are discussed. Initial outcomes and serendipitous findings from the pilot project are also discussed.

  7. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  10. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING...

  11. 31 CFR 536.316 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 536.316 Section 536.316 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 589.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 589.312 Section 589.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL...

  16. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 592.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 592.312 Section 592.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 551.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 551.311 Section 551.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS...

  19. 31 CFR 541.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 541.312 Section 541.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 551.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 551.311 Section 551.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 551.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 551.311 Section 551.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  2. 31 CFR 551.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 551.311 Section 551.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 551.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 551.311 Section 551.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 548.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 548.312 Section 548.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  10. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  11. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 510.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 510.311 Section 510.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 545.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 545.315 Section 545.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  14. 31 CFR 594.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 594.315 Section 594.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 594.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 594.315 Section 594.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 594.315 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 594.315 Section 594.315 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  17. 31 CFR 544.312 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 544.312 Section 544.312 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WEAPONS OF MASS...

  18. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  19. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  20. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  1. 31 CFR 576.317 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 576.317 Section 576.317 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  2. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  3. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  4. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  5. 31 CFR 562.311 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person; U.S. person. 562.311 Section 562.311 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  6. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... hospital or domiciliary care. 17.43 Section 17.43 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  7. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination. 17.41 Section 17.41 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Examinations and Observation and Examination § 17.41 Persons eligible for hospital observation and...

  8. Analyzing staffing trade-offs on acute care hospital units.

    PubMed

    Berkow, Steven; Vonderhaar, Kate; Stewart, Jennifer; Virkstis, Katherine; Terry, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Given today's resource-limited environment, nurse leaders must make judicious staffing decisions to deliver safe, cost-effective care. Investing in 1 element of staffing often requires scaling back in another. A national cross section of acute care hospital unit leaders was surveyed regarding staffing resources, including nurse workload, education, specialty certification, experience, and level of support staff. The authors report findings from the survey and discuss the trade-offs observed among units regarding nurse-to-patient ratios and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. PMID:25208268

  9. Sickle cell hospital unit: a disease-specific model.

    PubMed

    Adams-Graves, Patricia; Ostric, Elizabeth J; Martin, Mary; Richardson, Pat; Lewis, James B

    2008-01-01

    American urban hospitals often serve large populations of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Those hospitals that choose to implement an adult SCD-specific inpatient unit have the opportunity to acquire multiple operational benefits. Such units may ultimately reduce patient morbidity and mortality; improve timely access to quality medical care in a cost-effective manner; reduce overcrowding in the emergency department; and increase patient, family, physician, and payer satisfaction. SCD is a serious, painful, genetic blood disorder that affects a growing population of adults in the United States. A single mistake in the gene that codes for hemoglobin causes crescent-shaped red blood cells that are sticky, are stiff, and have a short life span. These cells cause blockages, tremendous pain brought on by lack of oxygen in the muscles, organ damage, stroke, and problems with infections. The cells' short life span often results in anemia. The unpredictable pain event-sickle cell disease with crisis-is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department and for hospital admission. For many SCD patients, the emergency department process and the general, overly conservative approach to pain relief lead to a delay in treatment and prolong needless suffering. Regional Medical Center at Memphis (Tennessee) established an SCD unit and developed an inpatient care delivery model that decreases the burden of caring for SCD patients on its busy emergency department, improves SCD patients' satisfaction and access to timely quality care, and reduces the needless pain and suffering of SCD patients. This SCD model may be replicated in large urban hospitals with a daily SCD patient census of five or more. PMID:18856136

  10. Hospitalizations of children with neurological disorders in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Jacqueline F.; Fink, Ericka L.; Hartman, Mary E.; Angus, Derek C.; Bell, Michael J.; Linde-Zwirble, Walter T.; Watson, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Objective Although neurologic disorders are among the most serious acute pediatric illnesses, epidemiologic data are scarce. We sought to determine the scope and outcomes of children with these disorders in the US. Design Retrospective cohort study Setting All non-federal hospitals in 11 states encompassing 38% of the US pediatric population. Patients Children 29 days-19 years old hospitalized in 2005 Interventions None Measurements and Main Results Using ICD-9-CM codes, we identified admissions with neurological diagnoses, analyzed patient and hospitalization characteristics, and generated age- and sex-adjusted national estimates. Of 960,020 admissions in the 11 states, 10.7% (103,140) included a neurological diagnosis, which yields a national estimate of 273,900 admissions of children with neurological diagnoses. The most common were seizures (53.9%) and traumatic brain injury (17.3%). Children with neurological diagnoses had nearly 3 times greater intensive care unit (ICU) use than other hospitalized children (30.6% vs. 10.6%, p<0.001). Neurological diagnoses were associated with nearly half of deaths (46.2%, n=1,790). Among ICU patients, children with neurological diagnoses had more than 3 times the mortality of other patients (4.8% vs.1.5%, p<.001). Children with neurological diagnoses had a significantly longer median hospital LOS than other children (3 days [1, 5] vs. 2 days [2,4], p<.001) and greater median hospital costs ($4,630 [$2,380, $9,730] vs. $2,840 [$1,520, $5,550], p<.001). Conclusions Children with neurological diagnoses account for a disproportionate amount of ICU stays and deaths compared to children hospitalized for other reasons. PMID:23842588

  11. Personality and personal projects: linking big five and PAC units of analysis.

    PubMed

    Little, B R; Lecci, L; Watkinson, B

    1992-06-01

    This article examines the relationships between classical trait units as represented by the five-factor model (e.g., Digman, 1990) and personal action construct (PAC) units as measured by Personal Projects Analysis (Little, 1983). One hundred and forty-seven students were administered the NEO Personality Inventory (Costa & McCrae, 1985) and two components of Personal Projects methodology during their first term in university. Neuroticism and Conscientiousness were related to problematic and positive project systems, respectively, with these effects generalizing across the academic and interpersonal project domains. Extraversion and Agreeableness were also associated with positive evaluations of personal projects, particularly in the interpersonal domain. Openness was distinctively linked with project initiation and value congruency. We suggest theoretical and applied implications of using PAC methods to expand and refine the classical trait research agenda.

  12. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section 596.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section 596.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section 596.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 596.313 - United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false United States person. 596.313 Section 596.313 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TERRORISM LIST GOVERNMENTS SANCTIONS...

  16. Prenatal origins of hospitalization for personality disorders: the Helsinki birth cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lahti, Marius; Räikkönen, Katri; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Heinonen, Kati; Forsén, Tom; Kajantie, Eero; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Osmond, Clive; Barker, David J P; Eriksson, Johan G

    2010-09-30

    Although a suboptimal prenatal environment has been linked with schizophrenia and depression, possible associations with personality disorders remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of body size at birth and length of gestation with hospitalization for personality disorders in a cohort study of 6506 men and 5857 women born in Helsinki, Finland, between 1934 and 1944. International Classification of Diseases (-8, -9, -10) diagnoses of personality disorders were extracted from the national Finnish Hospital Discharge Register since 1969. 102 men and 80 women had been hospitalized due to any personality disorder. 41 men and 30 women had dramatic personality disorders. Among men, head circumference showed an inverse J-shaped, nonlinear association with hospitalization for personality disorders. Men with a small head circumference were at increased risk. Also in men, a smaller head-to-length ratio linearly predicted personality disorders. Among women, a smaller placental area predicted increased risk of hospitalization for dramatic personality disorders. Vulnerability to personality disorders may be programmed during fetal life. PMID:20493545

  17. Hospitalization for esophageal achalasia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Molena, Daniela; Mungo, Benedetto; Stem, Miloslawa; Lidor, Anne O

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess the outcome of different treatments in patients admitted for esophageal achalasia in the United States. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample over an 8-year period (2003-2010). Patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of achalasia were divided into 3 groups based on their treatment: (1) Group 1: patients who underwent Heller myotomy during their hospital stay; (2) Group 2: patients who underwent esophagectomy; and (3) Group 3: patients not undergoing surgical treatment. Primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and total hospital charges. RESULTS: Among 27141 patients admitted with achalasia, nearly half (48.5%) underwent Heller myotomy, 2.5% underwent esophagectomy and 49.0% had endoscopic or other treatment. Patients in group 1 were younger, healthier, and had the lowest mortality when compared with the other two groups. Group 2 had the highest LOS and hospital charges among all groups. Group 3 had the highest mortality (1.2%, P < 0.001) and the lowest home discharge rate (78.8%) when compared to the other groups. The most frequently performed procedures among group 3 were esophageal dilatation (25.9%) and injection (13.3%). Among patients who died in this group the most common associated morbidities included acute respiratory failure, sepsis and aspiration pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Surgery for achalasia carries exceedingly low mortality in the modern era; however, in complicated patients, even less invasive treatments are burdened by significant mortality and morbidity. PMID:26421106

  18. The federal government's use of Title VI and Medicare to racially integrate hospitals in the United States, 1963 through 1967.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P P

    1997-01-01

    Explicit discrimination against minorities existed in the 1960s in hospital patient admissions and physician and nurse staff appointments. With passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, along with Medicare legislation in 1965, civil rights advocates within the federal government had both a legislative mandate to guarantee equal access to programs funded by the federal government in Title VI and a federal program that affected every hospital in the country in Medicare. This study was conducted to determine the extent to which the Medicare hospital certification program was a major determinant in the racial integration of hospitals throughout the United States. In-depth interviews were conducted with individuals involved in hospital and health care policy in the 1950s and 1960s. Other primary resources include archival and personal manuscripts, government documents, newspapers, and periodicals. PMID:9366643

  19. 78 FR 28733 - Medical Devices; General Hospital and Personal Use Monitoring Devices; Classification of the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 880 Medical Devices; General Hospital and... CFR part 880 is amended as follows: PART 880--GENERAL HOSPITAL AND PERSONAL USE DEVICES 0 1....

  20. 19 CFR 148.71 - Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Status of persons in service of United States as... Civilian Employees of the United States, and Evacuees § 148.71 Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents. A person in the service of the United States and members of his...

  1. 19 CFR 148.71 - Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Status of persons in service of United States as... Civilian Employees of the United States, and Evacuees § 148.71 Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents. A person in the service of the United States and members of his...

  2. 19 CFR 148.71 - Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Status of persons in service of United States as... Civilian Employees of the United States, and Evacuees § 148.71 Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents. A person in the service of the United States and members of his...

  3. 19 CFR 148.71 - Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Status of persons in service of United States as... Civilian Employees of the United States, and Evacuees § 148.71 Status of persons in service of United States as returning residents. A person in the service of the United States and members of his...

  4. Non-Work-Related Use of Personal Mobile Phones by Hospital Registered Nurses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices (smartphones and tablet computers) provide users with an ever-increasing number and diversity of non-work-related activities while at work. In hospitals, where the vigilance of health care workers is essential for patient care, the potential distraction of these devices could be hazardous to patients. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of non-work-related use of personal mobile phones and other personal communication devices among hospital registered nurses. Methods In March 2014, a previously validated 30-question survey was emailed to the 10,978 members of the Academy of Medical Surgical Nurses. There were 825 respondents who met the inclusion criteria. Results The use of a personal mobile phone or other personal communication device while working (excluding meal times and breaks) was reported by 78.1% (644/825) of respondents. Nurses reported regularly (sometimes, often, or always) sending personal emails and text messages (38.6%, 318/825), reading news (25.7%, 212/825), checking/posting on social networking sites (20.8%, 172/825), shopping (9.6%, 79/825), and playing games (6.5%, 54/825) while working. Conclusions This study found that hospital nurses frequently use their personal mobile phones or other personal communication devices for non-work-related activities at work. The primary activity reported was to send personal emails and text messages to family and friends. PMID:25586982

  5. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  6. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  7. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  8. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  9. 24 CFR 891.863 - Maintenance as supportive housing units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... units for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. 891.863 Section 891.863 Housing and Urban... ELDERLY PROGRAM AND SECTION 811 SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES PROGRAM) SUPPORTIVE HOUSING FOR THE ELDERLY AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES For-Profit Limited Partnerships and...

  10. Understanding Personal Learning Environment Perspectives of Thai International Tourism and Hospitality Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanyong, Siriwan; Sharafuddin, Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    This paper is part of a periodic research conducted in developing a personal learning environment for Thailand's higher education students with English as medium of instruction. The objective of the first phase in this research was to understand the personal learning environment perspectives of Thai International tourism and hospitality higher…

  11. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  12. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  13. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  14. 38 CFR 17.43 - Persons entitled to hospital or domiciliary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provisions of 38 U.S.C. 1710, 1722, and 1729, and 38 CFR 17.44 and 17.45, for: (1) Persons in the Armed... VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.43 Persons entitled to...

  15. Histoplasmosis-Associated Hospitalizations in the United States, 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Derado, Gordana; Mody, Rajal K.

    2016-01-01

    We examined trends in histoplasmosis-associated hospitalizations in the United States using the 2001–2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. An estimated 50 778 hospitalizations occurred, with significant increases in hospitalizations overall and in the proportion of hospitalizations associated with transplant, diabetes, and autoimmune conditions often treated with biologic therapies; therefore, histoplasmosis remains an important opportunistic infection. PMID:26894201

  16. Exploring personal interests of physicians in hospitals and specialty clinics.

    PubMed

    Koelewijn, Wout T; Ehrenhard, Michel L; Groen, Aard J; van Harten, Wim H

    2014-01-01

    Physicians' interests substantially influence intra-organizational dynamics in hospitals, though little is known about the actual content and structure of these interests. The objective of this study was to both identify and build a structured model of physicians' interests. Based on literature and 27 semi-structured interviews with physicians, a questionnaire containing 10 interests was developed. Next, 1475 physicians in the Netherlands filled out an online survey. Analyses of the data revealed a distinction between the primary interest of 'helping patients as well as possible' and nine secondary interests. Factor analysis identified the main secondary interest dimensions as work-related, setting-related, and life-related. Value attached to interests differs between specialties and types of hospitals. The influence of hospital type on the value attached to interests is stronger than the influence of specialty group on the value attached to interests. Insight in the relative importance of different interests may help policy-makers make decisions that foster shared interests.

  17. The effects of hospital executives' personality traits on their perceptions and trust.

    PubMed

    Saccardi, T A; Banai, M

    1996-01-01

    This field study examines the relationship between hospital executives' personality traits and both their perceptions of their subordinates' levels of skills and their level of trust in those subordinates. CEOs or senior executives of 37 acute care hospitals with at least 200 beds were surveyed. The high Nurturant manager did not perceive greater trust or skills than the low Nurturant manager. However, there was a significant and negative correlation between Person-Dominant managers and trust scores. Furthermore, the high Goal-Dominant managers varied significantly less than the low Goal-Dominant managers in their perceptions of their subordinates' skill. The study calls for a reexamination of the influence of personality traits on hospital executives' perceptions and trust. Power in the hands of certain managers may lead to the devaluation of the abilities and motivations of subordinates, and even the devaluation of their subordinates themselves.

  18. Epidemiology of Abusive Abdominal Trauma Hospitalizations in United States Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Wendy Gwirtzman; Dubowitz, Howard; Langenberg, Patricia; Dischinger, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To estimate the incidence of abusive abdominal trauma (AAT) hospitalizations among US children age 0-9 years. (2) To identify demographic characteristics of children at highest risk for AAT. Design: Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional, national hospitalization database. Setting: Hospitalization data from the 2003 and 2006…

  19. Graduate Education for Hospital Administration in the United States: Trends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chester, Theodore E.

    In 1968, 75% of the 5,466 graduates of hospital administration were in management positions in hospitals and related institutions, and about 1,000 to 1,500 held key government jobs. The US needs approximately 40,000 trained hospital administrators, but the total graduate output is about one-eighth of that amount. Of the 23 existing programs, 8 are…

  20. Patient Safety Events and Harms During Medical and Surgical Hospitalizations for Persons With Serious Mental Illness

    PubMed Central

    Daumit, Gail L.; McGinty, Emma E.; Pronovost, Peter; Dixon, Lisa B.; Guallar, Eliseo; Ford, Daniel E.; Cahoon, Elizabeth K.; Boonyasai, Romsai T.; Thompson, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study explored the risk of patient safety events and associated nonfatal physical harms and mortality in a cohort of persons with serious mental illness. This group experiences high rates of medical comorbidity and premature mortality and may be at high risk of adverse patient safety events. Methods Medical record review was conducted for medical-surgical hospitalizations occurring during 1994–2004 in a community-based cohort of Maryland adults with serious mental illness. Individuals were eligible if they died within 30 days of a medical-surgical hospitalization and if they also had at least one prior medical-surgical hospitalization within five years of death. All admissions took place at Maryland general hospitals. A case-crossover analysis examined the relationships among patient safety events, physical harms, and elevated likelihood of death within 30 days of hospitalization. Results A total of 790 hospitalizations among 253 adults were reviewed. The mean number of patient safety events per hospitalization was 5.8, and the rate of physical harms was 142 per 100 hospitalizations. The odds of physical harm were elevated in hospitalizations in which 22 of the 34 patient safety events occurred (p<.05), including medical events (odds ratio [OR]=1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.3–1.7) and procedure-related events (OR=1.6, CI=1.2–2.0). Adjusted odds of death within 30 days of hospitalization were elevated for individuals with any patient safety event, compared with those with no event (OR=3.7, CI=1.4–10.3). Conclusions Patient safety events were positively associated with physical harm and 30-day mortality in nonpsychiatric hospitalizations for persons with serious mental illness. PMID:27181736

  1. 42 CFR 412.130 - Retroactive adjustments for incorrectly excluded hospitals and units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat during that cost reporting period, if the inpatient population actually treated in the hospital during that cost reporting period did not meet the... under § 412.29(c) regarding the inpatient population the hospital planned to treat in that unit...

  2. 42 CFR 412.130 - Retroactive adjustments for incorrectly excluded hospitals and units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... hospitals and units. 412.130 Section 412.130 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Payments to Hospitals Under the Prospective Payment Systems § 412.130 Retroactive adjustments...

  3. Computers in hospital management and improvements in patients care--new trends in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pierskalla, W P; Woods, D

    1988-12-01

    This article discusses the current state of informations systems in hospital management. Decision Support Systems (DSS) for the management, administrative and patient care units of the hospital are described. These DSS's include market planning, nurse scheduling and blood screening systems. Trends for future uses of information systems in the hospital environment are addressed.

  4. A study of New York City obstetrics units demonstrates the potential for reducing hospital inpatient capacity.

    PubMed

    Green, Linda V; Liu, Nan

    2015-04-01

    Hospitals are under significant pressure from payers to reduce costs. The single largest fixed cost for a hospital is inpatient beds, yet there is significant variation in hospital capacity utilization. We study bed capacity in New York City hospital obstetrics units and find that while many hospitals have an insufficient number of beds to provide timely access to care, overall there is significant excess capacity. Our findings, coupled with current demographic and clinical practice trends, indicate that a large fraction of obstetrics units nationwide could likely reduce their bed capacity while assuring timely access to care, resulting in large savings in capital and staffing costs. Given emerging health care delivery and payment models that will likely decrease demand for other types of hospital beds, our study suggests that data-based methodologies should be used by hospitals and policy makers to identify opportunities for reducing excess bed capacity in other inpatient units as well.

  5. Patterns of Inequality. Unit 3, The Philosophy of Equality and Inequality. Unit 4, Personal Inequality as an Ideological Concept.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hookham, Maurice; Holloway, Clive

    Open University course units are presented on the philosophy of equality and inequality (Unit 3) and on personal inequality as an ideological concept (Unit 4). The substance of Unit 3 consists of extracts from the writings of eight philosophers. The role of the philosopher in forming legitimatizing ideologies is also illustrated. The eight…

  6. Working Models of Attachment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Adolescents: Relation to Psychopathology and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenstein, Diana S.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

    This study examined the role of attachment in adolescent psychopathology among psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents. Subjects consisted of 60 adolescents and 27 of their mothers. Measures included the Adult Attachment Interview classification for both the adolescents and their mothers, and a battery of diagnostic and personality assessment of…

  7. Identifying Risk Factors for the Prediction of Hospital Readmission among Older Persons with Cardiovascular Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Renee Annette

    Older persons (55 years and older) with cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for hospital readmission when compared to other subgroups of our population. This issue presents an economic problem, a concern for the quality and type of care provided, and an urgent need to implement innovative strategies designed to reduce the rising cost of…

  8. Hospital Utilization among Persons with an Intellectual Disability, Ontario, Canada, 1995-2001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balogh, Robert S.; Hunter, Duncan; Ouellette-Kuntz, Helene

    2005-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that persons with an intellectual disability consume a disproportionate amount of hospital services. Policy changes in Ontario in the 1970s and 1980s made it necessary for community health services to accommodate this population that formerly received most of its medical care in the institutions where they lived.…

  9. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  10. Attachment dimensions as predictors of medical hospitalizations in individuals with DSM IV cluster B personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Hoermann, Simone; Clarkin, John F; Hull, James W; Fertuck, Eric A

    2004-12-01

    This study investigates predictors of health service utilization in individuals with cluster B personality disorders. We hypothesized an association of severity of psychopathology (that is, global psychosocial functioning and psychiatric comorbidity) and attachment style with the length of medical hospitalizations in this population. Forty-one female subjects were interviewed regarding their diagnoses, level of functioning and service utilization. Attachment style was assessed with a self-report questionnaire. Our findings indicate that degree of psychiatric comorbidity and level of psychosocial functioning do not predict length of hospital stays, whereas preoccupied attachment predicted 23.9% of the variance in the length of hospitalizations. We conclude that the quality of interpersonal relatedness appears to be a better predictor of health service use than severity of pathology in patients with cluster B personality disorders.

  11. Relationship between Personality Profiles and Suicide Attempt via Medicine Poisoning among Hospitalized Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shafiee-Kandjani, Ali Reza; Amiri, Shahrokh; Arfaie, Asghar; Ahmadi, Azadeh; Farvareshi, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Inflexible personality traits play an important role in the development of maladaptive behaviors among patients who attempt suicide. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between personality profiles and suicide attempt via medicine poisoning among the patients hospitalized in a public hospital. Materials and Methods. Fifty-nine patients who attempted suicide for the first time and hospitalized in the poisoning ward were selected as the experimental group. Sixty-three patients hospitalized in the other wards for a variety of reasons were selected as the adjusted control group. Millon Clinical Multiaxial Personality Inventory, 3rd version (MCMI-III) was used to assess the personality profiles. Results. The majority of the suicide attempters were low-level graduates (67.8% versus 47.1%, OR = 2.36). 79.7% of the suicide attempters were suffering from at least one maladaptive personality profile. The most common maladaptive personality profiles among the suicide attempters were depressive personality disorder (40.7%) and histrionic personality disorder (32.2%). Among the syndromes the most common ones were anxiety clinical syndrome (23.7%) and major depression (23.7%). Conclusion. Major depression clinical syndrome, histrionic personality disorder, anxiety clinical syndrome, and depressive personality disorder are among the predicators of first suicide attempts for the patients hospitalized in the public hospital due to the medicine poisoning. PMID:27433491

  12. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  13. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  14. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  15. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  16. 38 CFR 17.46 - Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52; or (2) If the veteran needs non-immediate hospitalization..., domiciliary or nursing home care of persons discharged or released from active military, naval, or air service... Hospital, Domiciliary and Nursing Home Care § 17.46 Eligibility for hospital, domiciliary or nursing...

  17. Perceptions of the hospital ethical environment among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2015-01-01

    Hospital social workers are in a unique context of practice, and one where the ethical environment has a profound influence on the ethical behavior. This study determined the ratings of ethical environment by hospital social workers in large nationwide sample. Correlates suggest by and compared to studies of ethical environment with nurses are explored. Positive ratings of the ethical environment are primarily associated with job satisfaction, as well as working in a centralized social work department and for a non-profit hospital. Religiosity and MSW education were not predictive. Implications and suggestions for managing the hospital ethical environment are provided.

  18. The Vocational Personality of School Psychologists in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toomey, Kristine D.; Levinson, Edward M.; Morrison, Takea J.

    2008-01-01

    This study represents the first empirical test of the vocational personality of US school psychologists. Specifically, we investigated the personality of school psychologists using Holland's (1997) well-researched theory of vocational personalities and work environments. The sample consisted of 241 randomly selected members of the National…

  19. [The weighted health care unit: a new tool for hospital budgeting].

    PubMed

    Bestard Perelló, J J; Sevilla Pérez, F; Corella Monzón, I; Elola Somoza, J

    1993-01-01

    Hospital budgets must be based on estimated workload in order to fairly distribute available financial resources. A tool to measure hospital production is need to achieve this aim. We present in this article the results of a study on hospital cost which was carried out to design a new unit for measuring intermediate hospital products: the Weighted Health Care Unit (Unidad Ponderada Asistencial: UPA). Thereafter we use multiple regression to find out structure, services and activity variables which explain the variations in expenses per UPA among 64 hospitals of INSALUD. Significant variables include: doctors per hospital bed, hospital staff (sanitary personnel except doctors plus administrative assistants) per bed, hospital size (less than 200 beds), ICU beds percentage, oncology service, UPAs per bed average length of stay. These variables, along with interactions between them, explain 91.4% of the variance of expenses per UPA. The UPA and statistical modeling allow a better understanding of hospital expenses and can be very useful in coordinating budgets to hospital activity taking into account the different characteristics of each hospital. PMID:8169037

  20. Hospitalization frequency and charges for neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Seth E; Flecker, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003-2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20-44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money.

  1. U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    U.S. Veterans Hospital, Jefferson Barracks, Spinal Cord Injury Unit and Tuberculosis Neuropsychiatric Building, VA Medical Center, Jefferson Barracks Division 1 Jefferson Barracks Drive, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  2. Trends in Out-of-Hospital Births in the United States, 1990-2012

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurring out-of-hospital, by race and Hispanic origin of mother: United States, 1990–2012 NOTE: Non- ... in 1990; these states did not report Hispanic origin on their birth certificates for these years. SOURCE: ...

  3. Trends in Pneumonia Mortality Rates and Hospitalizations by Organism, United States, 2002–20111

    PubMed Central

    Wuerth, Brandon A.; Bonnewell, John P.; Wiemken, Timothy L.

    2016-01-01

    Because the epidemiology of pneumonia is changing, we performed an updated, population-based analysis of hospitalization and case-fatality rates for pneumonia patients in the United States. From 2002 to 2011, hospitalization rates decreased significantly for pneumonia caused by pneumococcus and Haemophilus influenzae but increased significantly for Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus. PMID:27532154

  4. Testing family-centered, function-focused care in hospitalized persons with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boltz, Marie; Chippendale, Tracy; Resnick, Barbara; Galvin, James E

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Hospital-acquired disability causes decreased quality of life for patients with dementia and family caregivers, and increased societal costs. Materials & methods A comparative, repeated measures study tested the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of the family-centered, function-focused care intervention (Fam-FFC) in dyads of hospitalized, medical patients with dementia and family caregivers (FCGs). Results The intervention group demonstrated better activities of daily living and walking performance, and less severity/duration of delirium and hospital readmissions, but no significant differences in gait/balance. FCGs showed increased preparedness for caregiving and less anxiety but no significant differences in depression, strain and mutuality. Conclusion Fam-FFC presents a possible pathway to meeting the Triple Aim of improved patient care, improved patient health and reduced costs for persons with dementia. PMID:26107319

  5. Rural Residents Who Are Hospitalized in Rural and Urban Hospitals: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Care Statistics. References Health Resources and Services Administration, Department of Health and Human Services. Area Resource File (ARF). 2012. Moscovice I, Stensland J. Rural hospitals: Trends, challenges, and a future research and policy analysis agenda. J Rural Health ...

  6. Use of dialectical behavior therapy in a partial hospital program for women with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Simpson, E B; Pistorello, J; Begin, A; Costello, E; Levinson, J; Mulberry, S; Pearlstein, T; Rosen, K; Stevens, M

    1998-05-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy, an outpatient psychosocial treatment for chronically suicidal women with borderline personality disorder, has been adapted for use in a partial hospital program for women. Patients attend the program for a minimum of five days of individual and group therapy, and full census is 12 women. About 65 percent of participants meet at least three criteria for borderline personality disorder, and most have suicidal and self-injurious behavior. Their comorbid diagnoses include trauma-related diagnoses and anxiety disorders, severe eating disorders, substance abuse, and depression. The partial hospital program is linked to an aftercare program offering six months of outpatient skills training based on dialectical behavior therapy. Both programs focus on teaching patients four skills: mindfulness (attention to one's experience), interpersonal effectiveness, emotional regulation, and distress tolerance. Two years of operation of the women's partial hospital program provides promising anecdotal evidence that dialectical behavioral therapy, an outpatient approach, can be effectively modified for partial hospital settings and a more diverse population.

  7. 78 FR 53478 - Proposed Information Collection; United States Park Police Personal History Statement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; United States Park Police Personal History Statement... information about this IC, contact Major Scott Fear, United States Park Police, 1100 Ohio Drive SW...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract The United States Park Police (USPP) is a unit of the National...

  8. Healthcare resource utilization and epidemiology of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations, United States, 2000.

    PubMed

    Shields, Brenda J; Comstock, R Dawn; Fernandez, Soledad A; Xiang, Huiyun; Smith, Gary A

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology and financial burden of burn-associated hospitalizations for children younger than 18 years in the United States. Retrospective data analysis of pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations was done using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database for 2000. An estimated 10,000 children younger than 18 years were hospitalized for burn-associated injuries in the United States in 2000. These children spent an estimated 66,200 days in the hospital with associated hospital charges equal to USD 211,772,700. Total charges and length of stay for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations in the United States during 2000 were associated with degree of burn, percentage of total body surface area burned, child's age, region of the United States, hospital location, and hospital type. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be nonwhite, be hospitalized for burns, and burn their hands/wrists, compared with children 3 to 17 years of age. Male children in both age groups were more likely to be hospitalized for burns than female children. Children 2 years old or younger were more likely to be burned by hot liquids/vapors and contact with hot substances/objects, while children 3 to 17 years were more likely to be burned by fire/flames. This study is the first national study on healthcare resource utilization for pediatric burn-associated hospitalizations to utilize the KID database. Burns are a major source of pediatric morbidity and are associated with significant national healthcare resource utilization annually. Future burn prevention efforts should emphasize implementing passive injury prevention strategies, especially for young children who are nonwhite and live in low-income communities.

  9. 26 CFR 301.7505-1 - Sale of personal property acquired by the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... to make deposits to secure the performance of their agreements. Any such deposit, but not more than... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sale of personal property acquired by the... Actions by the United States § 301.7505-1 Sale of personal property acquired by the United States....

  10. Chinese International Students' Personal and Sociocultural Stressors in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Kun; Berliner, David C.

    2013-01-01

    To date, no empirical research has focused solely upon understanding the personal and sociocultural stressors of Chinese international students in the United States. This qualitative inquiry examined what the most stressful aspects of their personal and social lives in the United States are, how they characterize their stress, and what conditions…

  11. Mode of Transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Burn Unit and an Intensive Care Unit in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kominos, Spyros D.; Copeland, Charles E.; Grosiak, Barbara

    1972-01-01

    The transmission of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in the burn unit and the intensive care unit of a 650-bed hospital. There was a tendency among patients in the burn unit to yield more than one type of P. aeruginosa, and several patients shared the same types at a particular point in time, suggesting cross-contamination among patients. Similar observations were made in the intensive care unit. Cultures from the hands of nurses caring for these patients yielded the same types of P. aeruginosa, suggesting the direct handling of patients by the nursing personnel to be the principal mode of transmission. PMID:4622827

  12. Development and Validation of a Web-Based Survey on the Use of Personal Communication Devices by Hospital Registered Nurses: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    LeVasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. Objective No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. Methods A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. Results The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation

  13. Organizational Effects on Patient Satisfaction in Hospital Medical-Surgical Units

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Cynthia Thornton; Mark, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between hospital context, nursing unit structure, and patient characteristics and patients’ satisfaction with nursing care in hospitals. Background Although patient satisfaction has been widely researched, our understanding of the relationship between hospital context and nursing unit structure and their impact on patient satisfaction is limited. Methods The data source for this study was the Outcomes Research in Nursing Administration Project, a multi-site organizational study to investigate relationships among nurse staffing, organizational context and structure and patient outcomes. The sample for this study was 2720 patients and 3718 RNs in 286 medical-surgical units in 146 hospitals. Results Greater availability of nursing unit support services and higher levels of work engagement were associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Older age, better health status and better symptom management were also associated with higher levels of patient satisfaction. Conclusions Organizational factors in hospitals and nursing units, particularly support services on the nursing unit and mechanisms that foster nurses’ work engagement and effective symptom management, are important influences on patient satisfaction. PMID:19423987

  14. Anxiety in family caregivers of hospitalized persons with dementia: Contributing factors and responses

    PubMed Central

    Chippendale, Tracy; Resnick, Barbara; Galvin, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Baseline health and functional vulnerabilities increase the risk for complications in persons with dementia and predispose family caregivers (FCGs) to increased stress. Methods This secondary analysis used a combined quantitative and qualitative approach. Regression analyses examined the contribution of patient and family caregiver characteristics to FCG anxiety. Interviews with FCGs explored the experiences and responses of FCGs during hospitalization of their family member with dementia. Results Lower patient physical function and higher caregiver strain were associated with higher FCG anxiety. FCGs described the following themes related to the hospitalization: 1) added strain; 2) care-related worries; 3) keeping vigil; 4) need to be heard; and 5) enablers of family caregivers. Conclusions Routine evaluation of caregiver strain and baseline patient function is integral to informing the transitional planning for persons with dementia. The FCG responses suggest that a multi-factorial approach (family-centered policies of partnership in care, staff education addressing the specialized needs of patients and family- members, and attention to promoting functional recovery) may benefit both hospitalized patients with dementia as well as FCGs and warrants future research. PMID:25635341

  15. Patients' experience of learning and gaining personal knowledge during a stay at a mental hospital.

    PubMed

    Borge, L; Hummelvoll, J K

    2008-06-01

    The focus is on voluntarily hospitalized patients' subjective experiences of learning and gaining personal knowledge during a stay at a mental hospital. The aim was to explore and describe patients' learning as personal knowledge acquisition related to the therapeutic process during hospitalization. The study was exploratory and descriptive, with a hermeneutic--phenomenological approach in data collection and analysis. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 15 patients during and after their stay. A re-analysis was conducted. The results underline the importance of the environmental effects on patients' motivation for learning and self-esteem in an acknowledging milieu. Moving towards relearning presupposes that the patient's motivation is aroused. Patients must participate in the treatment and the validity of the knowledge must be tested in the individual patient's life. The patients confirmed and helped each other to increase insight through recognizing each other's problems and reactions. Time in itself seemed to increase self-reflection. Receiving impulses and getting concrete tools through therapy stimulated meaning and hope for future living. The professionals must use a holistic approach including a learning climate in pleasant surroundings and a conjoint contribution from fellow patients and staff. Further research should focus on how to combine therapy with learning--preferably by means of a co-operative inquiry design.

  16. The United States does a poor job of evaluating Medicare hospitals: perhaps Australia can help.

    PubMed

    Bogart, G

    1992-01-01

    The United States spends more money per person on healthcare than does any other country in the world, and this rate of spending is increasing. Healthcare expenses currently absorb more than 12 percent of the American gross national product, and recent projections indicate that such expenses will exceed 16 percent by the year 2000. By the year 2005, the U.S. Medicare program is expected to absorb more of the national budget than either Social Security or defense. One justification for the high rate of spending has been that, for those who receive it, U.S. healthcare is the best in the world. There is, however, no way to validate this view because no national or international agreed-upon set of criteria for measuring quality of care exists. Proponents of the American system seem to assume that if it costs more, it must be better. If this is true, it is certainly not reflected in American consumer satisfaction: a recent poll of citizens of ten developed countries indicated that Americans were by far the least satisfied with their healthcare system. This article focuses on the American oversight of Medicare hospitals to determine it, in this narrow area, dissatisfied American consumers are justified. PMID:10122350

  17. The United States does a poor job of evaluating Medicare hospitals: perhaps Australia can help.

    PubMed

    Bogart, G

    1992-01-01

    The United States spends more money per person on healthcare than does any other country in the world, and this rate of spending is increasing. Healthcare expenses currently absorb more than 12 percent of the American gross national product, and recent projections indicate that such expenses will exceed 16 percent by the year 2000. By the year 2005, the U.S. Medicare program is expected to absorb more of the national budget than either Social Security or defense. One justification for the high rate of spending has been that, for those who receive it, U.S. healthcare is the best in the world. There is, however, no way to validate this view because no national or international agreed-upon set of criteria for measuring quality of care exists. Proponents of the American system seem to assume that if it costs more, it must be better. If this is true, it is certainly not reflected in American consumer satisfaction: a recent poll of citizens of ten developed countries indicated that Americans were by far the least satisfied with their healthcare system. This article focuses on the American oversight of Medicare hospitals to determine it, in this narrow area, dissatisfied American consumers are justified.

  18. Application of the Activity-Based Costing Method for Unit-Cost Calculation in a Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Mahdi; Hadian, Mohammad; Ghaderi, Hossein; Ghaffari, Shahram; Salehi, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Choosing an appropriate accounting system for hospital has always been a challenge for hospital managers. Traditional cost system (TCS) causes cost distortions in hospital. Activity-based costing (ABC) method is a new and more effective cost system. Objective: This study aimed to compare ABC with TCS method in calculating the unit cost of medical services and to assess its applicability in Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord City, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on accounting data of Kashani Hospital in 2013. Data on accounting reports of 2012 and other relevant sources at the end of 2012 were included. To apply ABC method, the hospital was divided into several cost centers and five cost categories were defined: wage, equipment, space, material, and overhead costs. Then activity centers were defined. ABC method was performed into two phases. First, the total costs of cost centers were assigned to activities by using related cost factors. Then the costs of activities were divided to cost objects by using cost drivers. After determining the cost of objects, the cost price of medical services was calculated and compared with those obtained from TCS. Results: The Kashani Hospital had 81 physicians, 306 nurses, and 328 beds with the mean occupancy rate of 67.4% during 2012. Unit cost of medical services, cost price of occupancy bed per day, and cost per outpatient service were calculated. The total unit costs by ABC and TCS were respectively 187.95 and 137.70 USD, showing 50.34 USD more unit cost by ABC method. ABC method represented more accurate information on the major cost components. Conclusion: By utilizing ABC, hospital managers have a valuable accounting system that provides a true insight into the organizational costs of their department. PMID:26234974

  19. APACHE II: preliminary report on 100 intensive care unit cases in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Teoh, G S; Mah, K K; abd Majid, S; Streram; Yee, M K

    1991-03-01

    A good overall assessment of the severity of illnesses of patients admitted to a general intensive care unit (ICU) is not without problems. The APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) prognostic scoring system enables us to stratify acutely ill patients and compare efficiency of ICU therapy in different hospitals. This preliminary study carried out on 100 consecutive admissions to the ICU in University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur showed the spectrum of ICU admissions and the direct relationship between APACHE II score and mortality.

  20. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shin Yuh; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33). In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout. PMID:27478835

  1. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dhaliwal, Satvinder S.; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33). In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout. PMID:27478835

  2. Demographics and Personality Factors Associated with Burnout among Nurses in a Singapore Tertiary Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ang, Shin Yuh; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Ayre, Tracy Carol; Uthaman, Thendral; Fong, Kuan Yok; Tien, Choo Eng; Zhou, Huaqiong; Della, Phillip

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of burnout among nurses in Singapore and investigate the influence of demographic factors and personal characteristics on the burnout syndrome. Methods. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted. All registered nurses working in Singapore General Hospital were approached to participate. A questionnaire eliciting data on demographics, burnout (measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory, MBI), and personality profile (measured using the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, NEO-FFI) was used. Results. 1830 nurses out of 3588 responded (response rate: 51%). Results from 1826 respondents were available for analysis. The MBI identified 39% to have high emotional exhaustion (EE, cut-off score of >27), 40% having high depersonalization (DP, cut-off score of >10), and 59% having low personal accomplishment (PA, cut-off score of <33). In multivariable analysis, age, job grade, and neuroticism were significantly associated with each of the 3 components of the MBI. Staff nurses less than 30 years with high to very high neuroticism were more likely to experience high EE, high DP, and low PA. Conclusion. Younger nurses in Singapore are at increased risk of burnout. Personality traits also played a significant role in the experience of burnout.

  3. Compliance by hospitals and healthcare facilities with the revised United States pharmacopeia chapter 797.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2009-01-01

    All hospitals and healthcare facilities, JCAHO-accredited and non accredited, must comply with the revised United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 standards. For those facilites that met the January 2008 JCAHP deadline, compliance with the revised standards should be relatively simple to accomplish. The revised chapter should be read and a new gap analysis performed to determine the facility's compliance. Investments should be made in good training programs to make sure that everyone, compounding personnel and other hospital staff, is properly trained. The revised American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' guidelines for sterile compounding that will be published and available by 2010 should be obtained and read. This document will be a compliment to United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797. Finally, the assessment tools and detailed information from United States Pharmacopeia Chapter 797 should be utilized to develop a good quality-assurance program for your hospital or healthcare facility.

  4. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR... under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States (including...

  5. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR... under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States (including...

  6. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR... under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States (including...

  7. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES TAYLOR... under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States (including...

  8. 31 CFR 593.313 - United States person; U.S. person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FORMER LIBERIAN REGIME OF CHARLES... organized under the laws of the United States or any jurisdiction within the United States...

  9. Trends in pediatric pulmonary hypertension–related hospitalizations in the United States from 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Crystal, Matthew A.; Morales, David L. S.; Gerald, Ken; Hanna, Brian D.; Mallory, George B.; Rossano, Joseph W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There are few data on the epidemiology of pulmonary hypertension (PH)–related hospitalizations in children in the United States. Our aim was to determine hospital mortality, length of hospitalization, and hospital charges pertaining to PH-related hospitalizations and also the effects of codiagnoses and comorbidities. A retrospective review of the Kids’ Inpatient Database during the years 2000, 2003, 2006, and 2009 was analyzed for patients ≤20 years of age with a diagnosis of PH by ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) codes, along with associated diagnoses and comorbidities. Descriptive statistics, including Rao-Scott χ2, ANOVA, and logistic regression models, were utilized on weighted values with survey analysis procedures. The number of PH-related hospital admissions is rising, from an estimated 7,331 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5,556–9,106) in 2000 to 10,792 (95% CI: 8,568–13,016) in 2009. While infant age and congenital heart disease were most commonly associated with PH-related hospitalizations, they were not associated with mortality. Overall mortality for PH-related hospitalizations was greater than that for hospitalizations not associated with PH, 5.7% versus 0.4% (odds ratio: 16.22 [95% CI: 14.78%–17.8%], P < 0.001), but mortality is decreasing over time. Sepsis, respiratory failure, acute renal failure, hepatic insufficiency, arrhythmias, and the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are associated with mortality. The number of PH-related hospitalizations is increasing in the United States. The demographics of PH in this study are evolving. Despite the increasing prevalence, mortality is improving. PMID:26064460

  10. [Access to health care for destitute persons at Public Assistance Hospitals in Paris].

    PubMed

    Brücker, G; Nguyen, D T; Lebas, J

    1997-11-01

    All legal French residents are entitled to health care. The 1992 regulatory measures, which create a contractual agreement between the government and public medical institutions, aim at facilitating access to health care by resolving the financial obstacles to accessing health care. The Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP) has set up a medical reception center in several hospitals since 1993. This system is integrated in the general structure of each hospital: in some cases, there is a single and centralized unit; in other cases, all departments of the hospital, including the emergency room, are involved in caring for destitute patients. Whatever the type of the structure may be, social workers are a key element to helping the patients recover their social rights. Thirty to seventy-percent of patients visiting these centers regain access to social and health care coverage. The epidemiological survey of the active file of patients revealed that 70% are male, more than 50% are non-French nationals, half of which do not have legal immigration status in France. Homeless people represent 40 to 80% of the population. The average age is around 35. The number of medical visits varies greatly from one hospital to another and range from 20 to 60 per month. The reasons for visiting the center and the identified medical disorders are strongly related to the patients' life conditions and vary significantly with the risk factors related to the social and economic situation. The frequency of some diseases (psychiatric disorders, tuberculosis, infections by the HIV and HCV) is higher in this population than in general population. Delayed visits to the medical center represents a severity factor. The hospitals' mission statement is not only to ensure that patients facing a precarious social and professional situation have equal access to health care, but also to help such patients recover their social rights, facilitate their integration in the society and fight against

  11. Hospitalization frequency and charges for neurocysticercosis, United States, 2003-2012.

    PubMed

    O'Neal, Seth E; Flecker, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis, brain infection with Taenia solium larval cysts, causes substantial neurologic illness around the world. To assess the effect of neurocysticercosis in the United States, we reviewed hospitalization discharge data in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 2003-2012 and found an estimated 18,584 hospitalizations for neurocysticercosis and associated hospital charges totaling >US $908 million. The risk for hospitalization was highest among Hispanics (2.5/100,000 population), a rate 35 times higher than that for the non-Hispanic white population. Nearly three-quarters of all hospitalized patients with neurocysticercosis were Hispanic. Male sex and age 20-44 years also incurred increased risk. In addition, hospitalizations and associated charges related to cysticercosis far exceeded those for malaria and were greater than for those for all other neglected tropical diseases combined. Neurocysticercosis is an increasing public health concern in the United States, especially among Hispanics, and costs the US health care system a substantial amount of money. PMID:25988221

  12. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects. PMID:23823398

  13. Network security vulnerabilities and personal privacy issues in Healthcare Information Systems: a case study in a private hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Namoğlu, Nihan; Ulgen, Yekta

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare industry has become widely dependent on information technology and internet as it moves from paper to electronic records. Healthcare Information System has to provide a high quality service to patients and a productive knowledge share between healthcare staff by means of patient data. With the internet being commonly used across hospitals, healthcare industry got its own share from cyber threats like other industries in the world. The challenge is allowing knowledge transfer to hospital staff while still ensuring compliance with security mandates. Working in collaboration with a private hospital in Turkey; this study aims to reveal the essential elements of a 21st century business continuity plan for hospitals while presenting the security vulnerabilities in the current hospital information systems and personal privacy auditing standards proposed by regulations and laws. We will survey the accreditation criteria in Turkey and counterparts in US and EU. We will also interview with medical staff in the hospital to understand the needs for personal privacy and the technical staff to perceive the technical requirements in terms of network security configuration and deployment. As hospitals are adopting electronic transactions, it should be considered a must to protect these electronic health records in terms of personal privacy aspects.

  14. Legal Outcomes of Sexually Abused Children Evaluated at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugue-Castillo, Mariella

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the legal outcomes and factors associated with case reaching court and conviction for sexual abuse of children seen at the Philippine General Hospital Child Protection Unit (PGH-CPU) from 1997 to 2000. Methods: Mixed transdisciplinary research design combined longitudinal cohort with qualitative methods. Data were obtained…

  15. [Development of activity of ophthalmological center of multi purpose hospital unit on the basis of IT].

    PubMed

    Beliakin, S A; Kriachko, N S

    2012-08-01

    The article explores the potential information technologies have to intensify the diagnosis and treatment process in the ophthalmological centre of multipurpose military hospital unit and examines the present information analysis system that automates the ophthalmologist's workplace. The operation algorithm of the given system in ophthalmology is peculiar and distinct from the ones in other fields.

  16. Factors Affecting Code Status in a University Hospital Intensive Care Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Scoy, Lauren Jodi; Sherman, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The authors collected data on diagnosis, hospital course, and end-of-life preparedness in patients who died in the intensive care unit (ICU) with "full code" status (defined as receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation), compared with those who didn't. Differences were analyzed using binary and stepwise logistic regression. They found…

  17. [The vulnerability experienced by the family of children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Côa, Thatiana Fernanda; Pettengill, Myriam Aparecida Mandetta

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the vulnerability experienced by the family of children hospitalized in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). The Symbolic Interactionism and the Concept of Family Vulnerability were the frameworks used to understand this experience. Qualitative Content Analysis was used. Data was collected through interviews and observation with 11 families of children hospitalized in a PICU of a university hospital in São Paulo. Six analytical categories regarding the family experience emerged. The categories were compared to the conceptual categories of Family and Vulnerability, and revealed the elements that defined the concept within this context. The child's hospitalization in a PICU triggers intense suffering within the family, as it refers to the possibility of losing their child. Thus, the power and the autonomy of the family in relation to their child are reduced, intensifying the feeling of vulnerability.

  18. Personal Economic and Financial Security. Unit 7: A Core Curriculum of Related Instruction for Apprentices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Occupational and Career Curriculum Development.

    The personal economic and financial security unit is presented to assist apprentices to acquire a general knowledge of how to maintain economic security and stability. The unit consists of six modules: (1) Fair Labor Standards Act: minimum wages and maximum hours, (2) unemployment insurance: payments for the unemployed worker, (3) workmen's…

  19. Marianne Wahnschaff Ballester's Personal Experiences: United States, World War Two, Soviet Zone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Paula Popow

    This family history recounts the life and personal experiences of Marianne Wahnschaff Ballester who was born in the United States in 1929 to German parents. Marianne and her mother spent the World War II years in Stassfurt, Germany, and returned to the United States in 1946. The overview of her life includes a reunion with her father, attendance…

  20. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... planning; decision making; designing, ordering or transporting goods; and financial, insurance, and other... against facilitation by a United States person of the exportation or reexportation of goods, technology, or services between Sudan and any destination (including the United States) bars any...

  1. Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001-2010.

    PubMed

    Schmeltz, Michael T; Petkova, Elisaveta P; Gamble, Janet L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how heat waves affect morbidity and mortality, as well as the associated economic costs, is essential for characterizing the human health impacts of extreme heat under a changing climate. Only a handful of studies have examined healthcare costs associated with exposures to high temperatures. This research explores costs associated with hospitalizations for heat-related illness (HRI) in the United States using the 2001 to 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Descriptive statistics of patient data for HRI hospitalizations were examined and costs of hospitalizations were reported using the all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio. Costs were examined using a log-gamma model with patient and hospital characteristics included as fixed effects. Adjusted mean costs were then compared across racial groups. The mean costs of HRI hospitalizations were higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared to Whites, who accounted for almost 65% of all HRI hospitalizations. Observed differences in costs based on income, insurance, and gender were also significant. These results suggest that these populations are suffering disproportionately from health inequity, thus, they could shoulder greater disease and financial burdens due to climate change. These findings may have important implications in understanding the economic impact public health planning and interventions will have on preventing hospitalizations related to extreme heat. PMID:27618079

  2. Economic Burden of Hospitalizations for Heat-Related Illnesses in the United States, 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Schmeltz, Michael T.; Petkova, Elisaveta P.; Gamble, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how heat waves affect morbidity and mortality, as well as the associated economic costs, is essential for characterizing the human health impacts of extreme heat under a changing climate. Only a handful of studies have examined healthcare costs associated with exposures to high temperatures. This research explores costs associated with hospitalizations for heat-related illness (HRI) in the United States using the 2001 to 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). Descriptive statistics of patient data for HRI hospitalizations were examined and costs of hospitalizations were reported using the all-payer inpatient cost-to-charge ratio. Costs were examined using a log-gamma model with patient and hospital characteristics included as fixed effects. Adjusted mean costs were then compared across racial groups. The mean costs of HRI hospitalizations were higher among racial/ethnic minorities compared to Whites, who accounted for almost 65% of all HRI hospitalizations. Observed differences in costs based on income, insurance, and gender were also significant. These results suggest that these populations are suffering disproportionately from health inequity, thus, they could shoulder greater disease and financial burdens due to climate change. These findings may have important implications in understanding the economic impact public health planning and interventions will have on preventing hospitalizations related to extreme heat. PMID:27618079

  3. Heat, Heat Waves, and Hospital Admissions among the Elderly in the United States, 1992–2006

    PubMed Central

    Zanobetti, Antonella; Schwartz, Joel D.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; O’Neill, Marie S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heat-wave frequency, intensity, and duration are increasing with global climate change. The association between heat and mortality in the elderly is well documented, but less is known regarding associations with hospital admissions. Objectives: Our goal was to determine associations between moderate and extreme heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions for nonaccidental causes among Medicare beneficiaries ≥ 65 years of age in 114 cities across five U.S. climate zones. Methods: We used Medicare inpatient billing records and city-specific data on temperature, humidity, and ozone from 1992 through 2006 in a time-stratified case-crossover design to estimate the association between hospitalization and moderate [90th percentile of apparent temperature (AT)] and extreme (99th percentile of AT) heat and heat waves (AT above the 95th percentile over 2–8 days). In sensitivity analyses, we additionally considered confounding by ozone and holidays, different temperature metrics, and alternate models of the exposure–response relationship. Results: Associations between moderate heat and hospital admissions were minimal, but extreme heat was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 4%) increase in all-cause hospital admissions over the subsequent 8 days. In cause-specific analyses, extreme heat was associated with increased hospitalizations for renal (15%; 95% CI: 9%, 21%) and respiratory (4%; 95% CI: 2%, 7%) diseases, but not for cardiovascular diseases. An added heat-wave effect was observed for renal and respiratory admissions. Conclusion: Extreme heat is associated with increased hospital admissions, particularly for renal causes, among the elderly in the United States. Citation: Gronlund CJ, Zanobetti A, Schwartz JD, Wellenius GA, O’Neill MS. 2014. Heat, heat waves, and hospital admissions among the elderly in the United States, 1992–2006. Environ Health Perspect 122:1187–1192; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1206132 PMID:24905551

  4. Clinical assessment of the oral cavity of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit of an emergency hospital

    PubMed Central

    da Cruz, Maristela Kapitski; de Morais, Teresa Márcia Nascimento; Trevisani, Deny Munari

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe the oral health status of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit. Methods Clinical assessment of the oral cavity was performed in 35 patients at two time-points (up to 48 hours after admission and 72 hours after the first assessment) and recorded in data collection forms. The following data were collected: plaque index, condition of the mucosa, presence or absence of dental prosthesis, number of teeth present, and tongue coating index. Results The prevalence of nosocomial infection was 22% (eight patients), with 50% respiratory tract infections. All patients exhibited oral biofilm, and 20 (57%) showed biofilm visible to the naked eye; tongue coating was present on more than two thirds of the tongue in 24 patients (69%) and was thick in most cases. A significant increase in plaque index (p=0.007) occurred after 72 hours, although the tongue coating index was p<0.001 regarding the area and p=0.5 regarding the thickness. Conclusion The plaque and tongue coating indices increased with the length of hospital stay at the intensive care unit. PMID:25607267

  5. Decline in Tuberculosis among Mexico-Born Persons in the United States, 2000–2010

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brian J.; Jeffries, Carla D.; Moonan, Patrick K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2010, Mexico was the most common (22.9%) country of origin for foreign-born persons with tuberculosis in the United States, and overall trends in tuberculosis morbidity are substantially influenced by the Mexico-born population. Objectives To determine the risk of tuberculosis disease among Mexico-born persons living in the United States. Methods Using data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the American Community Survey, we examined tuberculosis case counts and case rates stratified by years since entry into the United States and geographic proximity to the United States–Mexico border. We calculated trends in case rates over time measured by average annual percent change. Results The total tuberculosis case count (−14.5%) and annual tuberculosis case rate (average annual percent change −5.1%) declined among Mexico-born persons. Among those diagnosed with tuberculosis less than 1 year since entry into the United States (newly arrived persons), there was a decrease in tuberculosis cases (−60.4%), no change in tuberculosis case rate (average annual percent change of 0.0%), and a decrease in population (−60.7%). Among those living in the United States for more than 5 years (non-recently arrived persons), there was an increase in tuberculosis cases (+3.4%), a decrease in tuberculosis case rate (average annual percent change of −4.9%), and an increase in population (+62.7%). In 2010, 66.7% of Mexico-born cases were among non–recently arrived persons, compared with 51.1% in 2000. Although border states reported the highest proportions (>15%) of tuberculosis cases that were Mexico-born, the highest Mexico-born–specific tuberculosis case rates (>20/100,000 population) were in states in the eastern and southeastern regions of the United States. Conclusions The decline in tuberculosis morbidity among Mexico-born persons may be attributed to fewer newly arrived persons from Mexico and lower tuberculosis case rates among

  6. Healthcare associated infections in Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India: Hospital stay & extra costs

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Jitender; Satpathy, Sidhartha; Sharma, D.K.; Lodha, Rakesh; Kapil, Arti; Wadhwa, Nitya; Gupta, Shakti Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) increase the length of stay in the hospital and consequently costs as reported from studies done in developed countries. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of HAIs on length of stay and costs of health care in children admitted to Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of a tertiary care hospital in north India. Methods: This prospective study was done in the seven bedded PICU of a large multi-specialty tertiary care hospital in New Delhi, India. A total of 20 children with HAI (cases) and 35 children without HAI (controls), admitted to the PICU during the study period (January 2012 to June 2012), were matched for gender, age, and average severity of illness score. Each patient's length of stay was obtained prospectively. Costs of healthcare were estimated according to traditional and time driven activity based costing methods approach. Results: The median extra length of PICU stay for children with HAI (cases), compared with children with no HAI (controls), was seven days (IQR 3-16). The mean total costs of patients with and without HAI were 2,04,787 (US$ 3,413) and 56,587 (US$ 943), respectively and the mean difference in the total cost between cases and controls was 1,48,200 (95% CI 55,716 to 2,40,685, P<0.01). Interpretation & conclusions: This study highlights the effect of HAI on costs for PICU patients, especially costs due to prolongation of hospital stay, and suggests the need to develop effective strategies for prevention of HAI to reduce costs of health care. PMID:27377508

  7. Acinetobacter infections prevalence and frequency of the antibiotics resistance: comparative study of intensive care units versus other hospital units

    PubMed Central

    Uwingabiye, Jean; Frikh, Mohammed; Lemnouer, Abdelhay; Bssaibis, Fatna; Belefquih, Bouchra; Maleb, Adil; Dahraoui, Souhail; Belyamani, Lahcen; Bait, Abdelouahed; Haimeur, Charki; Louzi, Lhoussain; Ibrahimi, Azeddine; Elouennass, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study aims to determine the Acinetobacter sp clinical isolates frequency and its antibiotic susceptibility pattern by comparing results obtained from the Intensive Care Units (ICUs) to that of other units at the Mohammed V Military Teaching Hospital in Rabat. Methods This is a retrospective study over a 2-years period where we collected all clinical isolates of Acinetobacter sp obtained from samples for infection diagnosis performed on hospitalized patients between 2012 to 2014. Results During the study period, 441 clinical and non-repetitive isolates of Acinetobacter sp were collected representing 6.94% of all bacterial clinical isolates (n = 6352) and 9.6% of Gram negative rods (n = 4569). More than a half of the isolates were from the ICUs and were obtained from 293 infected patients of which 65, 2% (191 cases) were males (sex ratio = 1.9) and the median age was 56 years (interquartile range: 42-68 years). Acinetobacter clinical isolates were obtained from respiratory samples (44.67%) followed by blood cultures (14.51%). The resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftazidime, piperacillin / tazobactam, imipenem, amikacin, tobramycin, netilmicin, rifampicin and colistin was respectively 87%, 86%, 79%, 76%; 52%, 43%, 33% 32% and 1.7%. The difference in resistance between the ICUs and the other units was statistically significant (p <0.05) except for colistin, tetracycline and rifampicin. Conclusion This paper shows that solving the problem of prevalence and high rate of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter infection which represents a therapeutic impasse, requires the control of the hospital environment and optimizing hands hygiene and antibiotics use in the hospital. PMID:27347280

  8. Influenza Hospitalizations Among American Indian/Alaska Native People and in the United States General Population

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Prabhu P.; Callinan, Laura S.; Holman, Robert C.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Bruce, Michael G.; Redd, John T.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Bresee, Joseph; Hennessy, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Background.  Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people have experienced a disproportionate burden of infectious disease morbidity compared with the general US population. We evaluated whether a disparity in influenza hospitalizations exists between AI/AN people and the general US population. Methods.  We used Indian Health Service hospital discharge data (2001–2011) for AI/AN people and 13 State Inpatient Databases (2001–2008) to provide a comparison to the US population. Hospitalization rates were calculated by respiratory year (July–June). Influenza-specific hospitalizations were defined as discharges with any influenza diagnoses. Influenza-associated hospitalizations were calculated using negative binomial regression models that incorporated hospitalization and influenza laboratory surveillance data. Results.  The mean influenza-specific hospitalization rate/100 000 persons/year during the 2001–2002 to 2007–2008 respiratory years was 18.6 for AI/AN people and 15.6 for the comparison US population. The age-adjusted influenza-associated hospitalization rate for AI/AN people (98.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 51.6–317.8) was similar to the comparison US population (58.2; CI, 34.7–172.2). By age, influenza-associated hospitalization rates were significantly higher among AI/AN infants (<1 year) (1070.7; CI, 640.7–2969.5) than the comparison US infant population (210.2; CI, 153.5–478.5). Conclusions.  American Indian/Alaska Native people had higher influenza-specific hospitalization rates than the comparison US population; a significant influenza-associated hospitalization rate disparity was detected only among AI/AN infants because of the wide CIs inherent to the model. Taken together, the influenza-specific and influenza-associated hospitalization rates suggest that AI/AN people might suffer disproportionately from influenza illness compared with the general US population. PMID:25734102

  9. Multi-unit Providers Survey. For-profits report decline in acute-care hospitals ... newcomers to top 10.

    PubMed

    Bellandi, D; Kirchheimer, B

    1999-05-24

    For-profit hospital systems cleaned house last year. After years of adding hospitals, investor-owned operators shed facilities in 1998, recording the first decline in the number of acute-care hospitals they've owned or managed since 1991, according to our 23rd annual Multi-unit Providers Survey.

  10. Housing as an intervention on hospital use: access among chronically homeless persons with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Parker, David

    2010-12-01

    A study examining demographics and hospital utilization for chronically homeless persons with disabilities was conducted at pre-housing enrollment and at 6 months post-housing. Of the 20 participants, 70% (n = 14) were Black American and 30% (n = 6) were White; 100% (n = 20) were non-Hispanic; 90% (n = 18) were men; 40% (n = 8) were veterans; Median years since last permanent housing and total homelessness were 7 and 10.5 respectively. The following increases were observed: employment (0 to 1); income (20%, n = 4 to 35%, n = 7); primary care (25%, n = 5 to 95%, n = 19); and mental health service use (25%, n = 5 to 60%, n = 12). Known disabilities included HIV (15%, n = 3); hepatitis C (45%, n = 9); mental illness (60%, n = 12) and substance abuse (80%, n = 16) with 45% (n = 9) dually diagnosed. Over the course of the study, Emergency department visits and inpatient hospitalization use decreased. While these differences were not statistically significant (p = 0.14 and p = 0.31, respectively), they translate to an estimated $250,208 savings.

  11. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  12. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  13. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  14. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  15. 46 CFR 108.209 - Hospital spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hospital spaces. 108.209 Section 108.209 Shipping COAST... Construction and Arrangement Accommodation Spaces § 108.209 Hospital spaces. (a) Each unit carrying twelve or more persons on a voyage of more than three days must have a hospital space. (b) Each hospital...

  16. Hospital Use by Children in the United States and Canada. Comparative International Vital and Health Statistics Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozak, Lola Jean; McCarthy, Eileen

    1984-01-01

    This document presents a statistical study of hospital use by children in the United States and Canada designed to determine why the hospital discharge rate of children in the United States is lower than many other Western industrialized nations, although the discharge rate for the general U.S. population is higher. Several reasons for the lower…

  17. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  18. A prospective, observational study of a chest pain observation unit in a British hospital

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, S; Morris, F; Campbell, S; Arnold, J; Angelini, K

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To establish a chest pain observation unit, monitor its performance in terms of appropriate discharge after assessment, and estimate the cost per patient. Methods: Prospective, observational, cohort study of patients attending a large, city, teaching hospital accident and emergency department between 1 March 1999 and 29 February 2000 with acute undifferentiated chest pain. Patients were managed on a chest pain observation unit, entailing two to six hours of observation, serial electrocardiograph recording, cardiac enzyme measurement, and, where appropriate, exercise stress test. Patients were discharged home if all tests were negative and admitted to hospital if tests were positive or equivocal. The following outcomes were measured—proportion of participants discharged after assessment; clinical status three days after discharge; cardiac events and procedures during the following six months; and cost of assessment and admission. Results: Twenty three participants (4.3%) had a final diagnosis of myocardial infarction. All were detected and admitted to hospital. A total of 461 patients (86.3%) were discharged after assessment, 357 (66.9%) avoided hospital admission entirely. At review three days later these patients had no new ECG changes and only one raised troponin T measurement. In the six months after assessment, three cardiac deaths, two myocardial infarctions, and two revascularisation procedures were recorded among those discharged. The mean cost of assessment and hospital admission was £221 per patient, or £323 if subsequent interventional cardiology costs were included. Conclusions: The chest pain observation unit is a practical alternative to routine care for acute chest pain in the United Kingdom. Negative assessment effectively rules out immediate, serious morbidity, but not longer term morbidity and mortality. Costs seem to be similar to routine care. PMID:11904256

  19. Optimization of clinical teaching unit call schedules at the Ottawa hospital through tabu search heuristics.

    PubMed

    White, Christine A; White, George M

    2002-01-01

    The task of scheduling medical staff for evening rounds in the Clinical Teaching Unit of the Ottawa Hospital is a long complicated task due to its complexity. Three main classifications of staff, combined with various rotations, skill sets, clinical teams and vacation periods have combined to create a difficult scheduling problem. As there were no commercial packages available to solve this particular task, a study was made of heuristic scheduling and optimization techniques and a program based on a variation of the tabu search heuristic was written and tested. This system is being used to schedule medical staff at the Ottawa Hospital.

  20. Health care policy reform: a microanalytic model for comparing hospitals in the United States and Germany.

    PubMed

    Parsons, R J; Woller, G M; Neubauer, G; Rothaemel, F T; Zelle, B

    1999-01-01

    Microcomparison, or single-component analysis, of health care systems offers a potentially better basis for reform than traditional macrocomparison analysis of aggregate elements. Using macroanalysis, available evidence shows that Germany provides cheaper but more effective hospital care than the United States. To find the causes for this outcome, we developed a microanalytic model of hospital administrators' perceptions, financial ratios, medical outcomes, and pharmaceutical costs. However, only data on pharmaceutical costs were available, and these were similar in both countries. Our significant outcome was development of a microcomparative model that gives world medical care providers new criteria for analyzing and improving cost to care ratios.

  1. Impact of Hospital Admission Care At a Pediatric Unit: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Macías, Marta; Zornoza, Carmen; Rodriguez, Elena; García, José A; Fernández, José A; Luque, Rafaela; Collado, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    The time of admission to a hospital, especially when unplanned, has been reported as the most stressful moment of hospitalization for both parents and children (Odievre, 2001). This qualitative study explored parents and hospital staff's perceptions and experiences related to the process of admission to a pediatric unit. Focus groups, two with parents (total n = 12) and one with health care professionals (n = 6), were conducted, and content analysis inspired by Graneheim and Lundman (2004) was performed. Parents identified four categories of perceptions: 1) management of an uncertain situation at the time of admission, 2) feelings related to the child's illness, 3) parent perception of professional's performance, and 4) parent experience of their role. Health care professionals identified two categories: 1) hospital admission as a continuous care process, and 2) undertaking improvements in the admission process. A common theme emerged about the importance of parents' trust in professionals in order to build a therapeutic relationship. Findings underscore the need for strategies to improve the hospital pediatric admission process based on a parent-professional relationship of trust and confidence through continuous quality communication and support. These strategies would include providing a nurse in charge of the admission process to assure continuity of care throughout the child's hospitalization.

  2. Implementation of a Personal Fitness Unit Using the Personalized System of Instruction Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prewitt, Steven; Hannon, James C.; Colquitt, Gavin; Brusseau, Timothy A.; Newton, Maria; Shaw, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Levels of physical activity and health-related fitness (HRF) are decreasing among adolescents in the United States. Several interventions have been implemented to reverse this downtrend. Traditionally, physical educators incorporate a direct instruction (DI) strategy, with teaching potentially leading students to disengage during class. An…

  3. Pain treatment in a palliative unit or team of a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Scott, J F

    1982-01-01

    A Palliative Care Unit and Team provides a model for delivering care, in which narcotic analgesics can be optimally effective in the treatment of cancer pain. Our rapidly expanding knowledge of pain physiology and narcotic pharmacokinetics will not benefit patients unless we design more appropriate organizational structures to implement therapy and to teach symptom control. The Palliative Care Service model, as developed at several university hospitals in Canada, is designed to assist and complement oncology departments. Its primary role is to provide a consultation service to cancer patients wherever they may be in the health care system (home, O.P.D., hospital). A multi-specialty and interdisciplinary team offers assessment and therapy of pain and other symptoms. The McGill Pain Questionnaire is one useful tool in evaluating pain treatment. The Service also provides the university with a Palliative Care Unit designed for patients with advanced cancer who have complex symptomatology. Hospital organization must reflect the fact that environmental and psychosocial factors alter pain perception and response. Oral morphine is more effective when administered in a Palliative Care Unit than when it is given to patients in other settings. The Unit provides personnel skilled in analgesic titration and a supportive environment in which psychological, social and spiritual components of the pain experience can be evaluated and treated. PMID:6953724

  4. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Stephen J; Richardson, Liana J; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness-measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses-influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units.

  5. Nurses' Patient-Centeredness and Perceptions of Care among Medicaid Patients in Hospital Obstetrical Units

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Stephen J.; Richardson, Liana J.; Lawrence, Wanda; Gesell, Sabina B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. This study examined to what degree patient-centeredness—measured as an underlying ability of obstetrical nurses—influenced Medicaid patients' satisfaction with care in hospital obstetrical units. Design. Multigroup structural equation modeling design, using three cross-sectional random samples (n = 300 each) from the 2003 Press Ganey National Inpatient Database. Setting. Self-administered mail surveys. Participants. 900 Medicaid recipients recently discharged from inpatient hospital obstetrical units across the United States. Methods. Multigroup structural equation modeling was used to test the goodness of fit between a hypothesized model based on the Primary Provider Theory and patients' ratings of nurses. Results. The model fitted the data well, was stable across three random samples, and was sustained when compared to a competing model. The patient-centeredness of nurses significantly influenced overall patient satisfaction and explained 66% of its variability. When nurses' patient-centeredness increased by one standard deviation, patients' satisfaction increased by 0.80 standard deviation. Conclusion. This study offers a novel approach to the measurement of the patient-centeredness of nurses and a paradigm for increasing it and its influence on Medicaid patients' satisfaction in hospital obstetrical units. PMID:24027634

  6. 31 CFR 500.518 - Payments for living, traveling, and similar personal expenses in the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... similar personal expenses in the United States. 500.518 Section 500.518 Money and Finance: Treasury... § 500.518 Payments for living, traveling, and similar personal expenses in the United States. (a... and transfers of credit may be made only for the living, traveling, and similar personal expenses...

  7. 31 CFR 535.415 - Payment by Iranian entities of obligations to persons within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... obligations to persons within the United States. A person receiving payment under § 535.904 may distribute all... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment by Iranian entities of obligations to persons within the United States. 535.415 Section 535.415 Money and Finance:...

  8. 31 CFR 535.415 - Payment by Iranian entities of obligations to persons within the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... obligations to persons within the United States. A person receiving payment under § 535.904 may distribute all... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Payment by Iranian entities of obligations to persons within the United States. 535.415 Section 535.415 Money and Finance:...

  9. Engagement in Outpatient Care for Persons Living with HIV in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Stacy Cooper; Johnson, Terence L.; Mao, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Prior studies that have assessed engagement within the various stages of care for persons living with HIV (PLWH) studied patients receiving care in HIV medical care facilities. These data are not representative of care received throughout the United States, as not all PLWH receive care in HIV clinics. This study evaluated engagement in outpatient care and healthcare utilization for PLWH, beyond facilities that specialize in HIV. Cross-sectional data were from the 2009–2010 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. Levels of care included receiving any care, receiving HIV-related care, established in care, engaged in care, and prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ARV). Factors associated with ARV prescription were determined by logistic regression. We analyzed data for ∼2.6 million outpatient clinic visits for PLWH. Of these, 90% were receiving HIV-related care, 86% were established in care, 75% were engaged in care, and 65% were prescribed ARV. In stratified analysis, the proportion of PWLH who were engaged in care varied by race/ethnicity (p<0.001) and ARV prescription varied significantly across the three age groups (p=0.004). Clinic visits within the past year did not differ for those prescribed ARV vs. not prescribed ARV [median, IQR=3.3 visits (1.8–5.6) vs. 3.6 visits (1.3–5.9); p=0.7]. Seeing a physician was associated with ARV prescription (OR=0.27, 95% CI=0.15–0.51), whereas routine engagement in care was not associated with ARV prescription (OR=0.99, 95% CI=0.96–1.03). Given that non-ARV-treated PLWH utilized outpatient care services at rates similar to ARV-treated PLWH, these routine clinic visits are missed opportunities for increasing ARV prescription in untreated patients. PMID:25386831

  10. Decreased mortality in patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases after installation of an intensive care unit in a secondary hospital in the interior of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Bahlis, Laura Fuchs; Wajner, André; Waldemar, Fernando Starosta

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between the in-hospital mortality of patients hospitalized due to respiratory diseases and the availability of intensive care units. Methods This retrospective cohort study evaluated a database from a hospital medicine service involving patients hospitalized due to respiratory non-terminal diseases. Data on clinical characteristics and risk factors associated with mortality, such as Charlson score and length of hospital stay, were collected. The following analyses were performed: univariate analysis with simple stratification using the Mantel Haenszel test, chi squared test, Student’s t test, Mann-Whitney test, and logistic regression. Results Three hundred thirteen patients were selected, including 98 (31.3%) before installation of the intensive care unit and 215 (68.7%) after installation of the intensive care unit. No significant differences in the clinical and anthropometric characteristics or risk factors were observed between the groups. The mortality rate was 18/95 (18.9%) before the installation of the intensive care unit and 21/206 (10.2%) after the installation of the intensive care unit. Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of death after the installation of the intensive care unit decreased by 58% (OR: 0.42; 95%CI 0.205 -0.879; p = 0.021). Conclusion Considering the limitations of the study, the results suggest a benefit, with a decrease of one death per every 11 patients treated for respiratory diseases after the installation of an intensive care unit in our hospital. The results corroborate the benefits of the implementation of intensive care units in secondary hospitals. PMID:26465244

  11. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  12. 75 FR 1396 - The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration The General Hospital and Personal Use Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public advisory committee of the Food and...

  13. Vaccination coverage among persons with asthma -- United States, 2010-2011 influenza season.

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Asthma was the most common underlying condition among persons hospitalized with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection in 2009. Although persons with asthma are not more likely than others to get influenza, influenza can make asthma symptoms worse, trigger asthma attacks, and lead to pneumonia or other complications that result in hospitalization and even death. During 1964-2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended that all adults and children aged ≥6 months with asthma receive an influenza vaccination annually. Beginning with the 2010-11 influenza season, ACIP expanded its annual vaccination recommendation to include all persons aged ≥6 months, while emphasizing that protection of persons at higher risk for influenza-related complications continue as a focus of vaccination efforts. To provide the first update of national vaccination coverage among persons aged ≥2 years with asthma since the new ACIP recommendation, CDC analyzed data from the 2010 and 2011 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that influenza vaccination during the 2010-11 season among persons with asthma was 50%, up from 36% 5 years earlier. However, vaccination coverage across all age groups, including among those with health insurance, a usual place for health care, and one or more health-care visits in the past 12 months, remained well below Healthy People 2020 targets of 80% for children aged 6 months-17 years and 90% for adults aged ≥18 years who are at high risk. These findings highlight the need to educate health-care providers and persons with asthma about the importance of annual influenza vaccination.

  14. 26 CFR 1.956-3T - Certain trade or service receivables acquired from United States persons (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... from United States persons (temporary). 1.956-3T Section 1.956-3T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Corporations § 1.956-3T Certain trade or service receivables acquired from United States persons (temporary). (a) In general. For purposes of section 956(a) and § 1.956-1, the term “United States property”...

  15. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  16. Does a specialist unit improve outcomes for hospitalized patients with Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Skelly, Rob; Brown, Lisa; Fakis, Apostolos; Kimber, Lindsey; Downes, Charlotte; Lindop, Fiona; Johnson, Clare; Bartliff, Caroline; Bajaj, Nin

    2014-01-01

    Objective Suboptimal management of Parkinson's disease (PD) medication in hospital may lead to avoidable complications. We introduced an in-patient PD unit for those admitted urgently with general medical problems. We explored the effect of the unit on medication management, length of stay and patient experience. Methods We conducted a single-center prospective feasibility study. The unit's core features were defined following consultation with patients and professionals: specially trained staff, ready availability of PD drugs, guidelines, and care led by a geriatrician with specialty PD training. Mandatory staff training comprised four 1 h sessions: PD symptoms; medications; therapy; communication and swallowing. Most medication was prescribed using an electronic Prescribing and Administration system (iSOFT) which provided accurate data on time of administration. We compared patient outcomes before and after introduction of the unit. Results The general ward care (n = 20) and the Specialist Parkinson's Unit care (n = 24) groups had similar baseline characteristics. On the specialist unit: less Parkinson's medication was omitted (13% vs 20%, p < 0.001); of the medication that was given, more was given on time (64% vs 50%, p < 0.001); median length of stay was shorter (9 days vs 13 days, p = 0.043) and patients' experience of care was better (p = 0.01). Discussion If replicated and generalizable to other hospitals, reductions in length of stay would lead to significant cost savings. The apparent improved outcomes with Parkinson's unit care merit further investigation. We hope to test the hypothesis that specialized units are cost-effective and improve patient care using a randomized controlled trial design. PMID:25264022

  17. Feeling at hospitals: perspective-taking, empathy and personal distress among professional nurses and nursing students.

    PubMed

    López-Pérez, Belén; Ambrona, Tamara; Gregory, Jennifer; Stocks, Eric; Oceja, Luis

    2013-04-01

    When facing a person in need, professional nurses will tend to adopt an objective perspective compared to nursing students who, instead, will tend to adopt an imagine-other perspective. Consequently, professional nurses will show lower vicarious emotional reaction such as empathy and distress. Using samples from Spain (Studies 1 and 2) and United states (Study 3), we compared perspective taking strategies and the emotional responses of nurses and nursing students when perceiving a sick child (Study 1) and a sick adult (Studies 2 and 3). Taken together, the results supported our hypotheses. We discuss the applied value of considering the relationship between perspective-taking and its emotional consequences for the nursing profession.

  18. 27 CFR 70.182 - Disposition of personal property acquired by the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... secure the performance of their agreements. Any such deposit, but not more than $200, shall be retained... § 70.182 Disposition of personal property acquired by the United States. (a) Sale—(1) In general. Any... accordance with instructions issued by the appropriate TTB officer. (2) Time, place, manner and terms of...

  19. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... having jurisdiction over the alien's actual place of residence; (6) Has resided continuously within...

  20. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... having jurisdiction over the alien's actual place of residence; (6) Has resided continuously within...

  1. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse. 319.1 Section 319.1 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... having jurisdiction over the alien's actual place of residence and in which the alien has filed...

  2. 22 CFR 124.13 - Procurement by United States persons in foreign countries (offshore procurement).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procurement by United States persons in foreign countries (offshore procurement). 124.13 Section 124.13 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS AGREEMENTS, OFF-SHORE PROCUREMENT AND OTHER DEFENSE SERVICES §...

  3. 31 CFR 535.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. 535.329 Section 535.329 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN...

  4. 31 CFR 500.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. 500.329 Section 500.329 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN...

  5. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  6. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  7. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  8. 30 CFR 74.5 - Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... under these regulations complies with the applicable permissibility provisions of 30 CFR 18.68. ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests of coal mine dust personal sampler units. 74.5 Section 74.5 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR...

  9. Task-Contingent Conscientiousness as a Unit of Personality at Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minbashian, Amirali; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the viability of incorporating task-contingent units into the study of personality at work, using conscientiousness as an illustrative example. We used experience-sampling data from 123 managers to show that (a) momentary conscientiousness at work is contingent on the difficulty and urgency demands of the tasks people…

  10. 31 CFR 515.329 - Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUBAN ASSETS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 515.329 Person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States... States as defined in § 515.330; (c) Any corporation, partnership, association, or other...

  11. Active personal dosemeters in interventional radiology: tests in laboratory conditions and in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Clairand, I; Bordy, J-M; Daures, J; Debroas, J; Denozière, M; Donadille, L; Ginjaume, M; Itié, C; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Lebacq, A-L; Martin, P; Struelens, L; Sans-Mercé, M; Tosic, M; Vanhavere, F

    2011-03-01

    The work package 3 of the ORAMED project, Collaborative Project (2008-11) supported by the European Commission within its seventh Framework Programme, is focused on the optimisation of the use of active personal dosemeters (APDs) in interventional radiology and cardiology (IR/IC). Indeed, a lack of appropriate APD devices is identified for these specific fields. Few devices can detect low-energy X rays (20-100 keV), and none of them are specifically designed for working in pulsed radiation fields. The work presented in this paper consists in studying the behaviour of some selected APDs deemed suitable for application in IR/IC. For this purpose, measurements under laboratory conditions, both with continuous and pulsed X-ray beams, and tests in real conditions on site in different European hospitals were performed. This study highlights the limitations of APDs for this application and the need of improving the APD technology so as to fulfil all needs in the IR/IC field.

  12. Primary immunodeficiency investigation in patients during and after hospitalization in a pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Suavinho, Érica; de Nápolis, Ana Carolina R.; Segundo, Gesmar Rodrigues S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze whether the patients with severe infections, admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, underwent the active screening for primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Methods: Retrospective study that assessed the data records of patients with any severe infections admitted in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, covering a period from January 2011 to January 2012, in order to confirm if they performed an initial investigation for PID with blood count and immunoglobulin dosage. Results: In the studied period, 53 children were hospitalized with severe infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, and only in seven (13.2%) the initial investigation of PID was performed. Among these patients, 3/7 (42.8%) showed quantitative alterations in immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels, 1/7 (14.3%) had the diagnosis of cyclic neutropenia, and 1/7 (14.3%) presented thrombocytopenia and a final diagnosis of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome. Therefore, the PID diagnosis was confirmed in 5/7 (71.4%) of the patients. Conclusions: The investigation of PID in patients with severe infections has not been routinely performed in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Our findings suggest the necessity of performing PID investigation in this group of patients. PMID:24676187

  13. An Evaluation and Ranking of Children’s Hospital Websites in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Daniel M; Ford, Eric W

    2016-01-01

    Background Children’s hospitals are faced with the rising need for technological innovation. Their prospective health care consumers, who increasingly depend on the Web and social media for communication and consumer engagement, drive this need. As patients and family members navigate the Web presence of hospitals, it is important for these specialized organizations to present themselves and their services efficiently. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the website content of children’s hospitals in order to identify opportunities to improve website design and create benchmarks to judge improvement. Methods All websites associated with a children’s hospital were identified using a census list of all children’s hospitals in the United States. In March of 2014, each website and its social media were evaluated using a Web crawler that provided a 5-dimensional assessment that included website accessibility, marketing, content, technology, and usability. The 5-dimensional assessment was scored on a scale ranging from 0 to 10 with positive findings rated higher on the scale. Websites were ranked by individual dimensions as well as according to their average ranking across all dimensions. Results Mean scores of 153 websites ranged from 5.05 to 8.23 across all 5 dimensions. Results revealed that no website scored a perfect 10 on any dimension and that room exists for meaningful improvement. Conclusions Study findings allow for the establishment of baseline benchmarks for tracking future website and social media improvements and display the need for enhanced Web-based consumer engagement for children’s hospitals. PMID:27549074

  14. Suicide trends among persons aged 10-24 years--United States, 1994-2012.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Erin M; Annest, Joseph L; Simon, Thomas R; Luo, Feijun; Dahlberg, Linda L

    2015-03-01

    Suicide is the second leading cause of death among persons aged 10-24 years in the United States and accounted for 5,178 deaths in this age group in 2012. Firearm, suffocation (including hanging), and poisoning (including drug overdose) are the three most common mechanisms of suicide in the United States. Previous reports have noted that trends in suicide rates vary by mechanism and by age group in the United States, with increasing rates of suffocation suicides among young persons. To test whether this increase is continuing and to determine whether it varies by demographic subgroups among persons aged 10-24 years, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System mortality data for the period 1994-2012. Trends in suicide rates were examined by sex, age group, race/ethnicity, region of residence, and mechanism of suicide. Results of the analysis indicated that, during 1994-2012, suicide rates by suffocation increased, on average, by 6.7% and 2.2% annually for females and males, respectively. Increases in suffocation suicide rates occurred across demographic and geographic subgroups during this period. Clinicians, hotline staff and others who work with young persons need to be aware of current trends in suffocation suicides in this group so that they can accurately assess risk and educate families. Media coverage of suicide incidents and clusters should follow established guidelines to avoid exacerbating risk for "suicide contagion" among vulnerable young persons.* Suicide contagion is a process by which exposure to the suicide or suicidal behavior of one or more persons influences others who are already vulnerable and thinking about suicide to attempt or die by suicide. Early prevention strategies are needed to reduce the likelihood of young persons developing suicidal thoughts and behavior.

  15. Multiple casualties in the Bastion UK Role 3 hospital: personal reflections on the positive evolution of deployed military hospital care.

    PubMed

    Ross, R A; Selwood, P

    2014-01-01

    In this article a snapshot of casualty presentations to the UK Role 3 hospital in Camp Bastion, Afghanistan, will be briefly described. The observations allow reflection on the advances and strength of clinical provision at the time of the incident, written from a medical command perspective.

  16. [Sodium azide poisoning--a rare reason of hospitalization in toxicological units--case report].

    PubMed

    Kostek, Halina; Sawiniec, Jarosław; Lewandowska-Stanek, Hanna; Kujawa, Anna; Majewska, Magdalena; Szponar, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Sodium azide poisonings are a rare reason for hospitalization in toxicological units. They are observed as rarely as once within a number of years per hospital. Consequently, an algorithm for the optimum procedure of treating such intoxications does not exist and, as a result, there is a need to describe every single clinical case. A female, aged 55, was directed to the toxicological unit from a county hospital after swallowing four tablets of sodium azide, 150 mg each, in the form of preservative for fresh milk samples. Two hours after the incident a gastric lavage was performed and the tableting blend was retrieved. In the clinical examination higher concentration of lactic acid, ALAT and TSH were observed. In the ECG record unspecific aberrations in the ST segment were noticed. Due to the patient's general good condition and the fact that the tableting blend had been retrieved from the gastric rinse, further use of the antidote indicated in the therapy of cyanide intoxications was abandoned. Symptomatic treatment was used along with the patient's eight-day observation. In the described case the early decontamination prevented the development of acute poisoning.

  17. Implementation of a large-scale hospital information infrastructure for multi-unit health-care services.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sun K; Kim, Dong Keun; Kim, Jung C; Park, Youn Jung; Chang, Byung Chul

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in demand for high quality medical services, the need for an innovative hospital information system has become essential. An improved system has been implemented in all hospital units of the Yonsei University Health System. Interoperability between multi-units required appropriate hardware infrastructure and software architecture. This large-scale hospital information system encompassed PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications Systems), EMR (Electronic Medical Records) and ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning). It involved two tertiary hospitals and 50 community hospitals. The monthly data production rate by the integrated hospital information system is about 1.8 TByte and the total quantity of data produced so far is about 60 TByte. Large scale information exchange and sharing will be particularly useful for telemedicine applications. PMID:18430292

  18. Acute Care For Elders Units Produced Shorter Hospital Stays At Lower Cost While Maintaining Patients’ Functional Status

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Deborah E.; Palmer, Robert M.; Kresevic, Denise M.; Fortinsky, Richard H.; Kowal, Jerome; Chren, Mary-Margaret; Landefeld, C. Seth

    2013-01-01

    Acute Care for Elders Units offer enhanced care for older adults in specially designed hospital units. The care is delivered by interdisciplinary teams, which can include geriatricians, advanced practice nurses, social workers, pharmacists, and physical therapists. In a randomized controlled trial of 1,632 elderly patients, length-of-stay was significantly shorter—6.7 days per patient versus 7.3 days per patient—among those receiving care in the Acute Care for Elders Unit compared to usual care. This difference produced lower total inpatient costs—$9,477 per patient versus $10,451 per patient—while maintaining patients’ functional abilities and not increasing hospital readmission rates. The practices of Acute Care for Elders Units, and the principles they embody, can provide hospitals with effective strategies for lowering costs while preserving quality of care for hospitalized elders. PMID:22665834

  19. Mortality profile across our Intensive Care Units: A 5-year database report from a Singapore restructured hospital.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Shahla

    2015-12-01

    Intensive care remains an area of high acuity and high mortality across the globe. With a rapidly aging population, the disease burden requiring intensive care is growing. The cost of critical care also is rising with new technology becoming available rapidly. We present the all-cause mortality results of 5 years database established in a restructured, large public hospital in Singapore, looking at all three types of Intensive Care Units present in our hospital. These include medical, surgical, and coronary care units.

  20. Prolonged stays in hospital acute geriatric care units: identification and analysis of causes.

    PubMed

    Parent, Vivien; Ludwig-Béal, Stéphanie; Sordet-Guépet, Hélène; Popitéan, Laura; Camus, Agnès; Da Silva, Sofia; Lubrano, Anne; Laissus, Frederick; Vaillard, Laurence; Manckoundia, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    In France, the population of very old frail patients, who require appropriate high-quality care, is increasing. Given the current economic climate, the mean duration of hospitalization (MDH) needs to be optimized. This prospective study analyzed the causes of prolonged hospitalization in an acute geriatric care unit. Over 6 months, all patients admitted to the target acute geriatric care unit were included and distributed into two groups according to a threshold stay of 14 days: long MDH group (LMDHG) and short MDH group (SMDHG). These two groups were compared. 757 patients were included. The LMDHG comprised 442 with a mean age of 86.7 years, of whom 67.65% were women and the SMDHG comprised 315 with a mean age of 86.6 years, of whom 63.2% were women. The two groups were statistically similar for age, sex, living conditions at home (alone or not, help), medical history and number of drugs. Patients in the LMDHG were more dependent (p=0.005), and were more likely to be hospitalized for social reasons (p=0.024) and to have come from their homes (p=0.011) than those in the SMDHG. The reasons for the prolonged stay, more frequent in the LMDHG than the SMDHG (p<0.05), were principally: waiting for imaging examinations, medical complications, and waiting for discharge solutions, assistance from social workers and/or specialist consultations. In order to reduce the MDH in acute geriatric care unit, it is necessary to consider the particularities of the patients who are admitted, their medico-socio-psychological management, access to technical facilities/consultations and post-discharge accommodation. PMID:27277146

  1. Rising United States Hospital Admissions for Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Recent Trends and Economic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Kaye, Keith S.; Patel, Dipen A.; Stephens, Jennifer M.; Khachatryan, Alexandra; Patel, Ayush; Johnson, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of ambulatory patients seeking treatment for skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) are increasing. The objective of this study is to determine recent trends in hospital admissions and healthcare resource utilization and identify covariates associated with hospital costs and mortality for hospitalized adult patients with a primary SSSI diagnosis in the United States. Methods We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis (years 2005–2011) of data from the US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample. Recent trends, patient characteristics, and healthcare resource utilization for patients hospitalized with a primary SSSI diagnosis were evaluated. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted to assess patient and hospital characteristics. Results A total of 1.8% of hospital admissions for the years 2005 through 2011 were for adult patients with a SSSI primary diagnosis. SSSI-related hospital admissions significantly changed during the study period (P < .001 for trend) ranging from 1.6% (in 2005) to 2.0% (in 2011). Mean hospital length of stay (LOS) decreased from 5.4 days in the year 2005 to 5.0 days in the year 2011 (overall change, P < .001) with no change in hospital costs. Patients with postoperative wound infections had the longest hospital stays (adjusted mean, 5.81 days; 95% confidence interval (CI), 5.80–5.83) and highest total costs (adjusted mean, $9388; 95% CI, $9366-$9410). Year of hospital admission was strongly associated with mortality; infection type, all patient refined diagnosis related group severity of illness level, and LOS were strongly associated with hospital costs. Conclusions Hospital admissions for adult patients in the United States with a SSSI primary diagnosis continue to increase. Decreasing hospital inpatient LOS and mortality rate may be due to improved early treatment. Future research should focus on identifying alternative treatment processes for patients with SSSI

  2. Professional Culture and Personality Traits of Hospital Pharmacists across Canada: A Fundamental First Step in Developing Effective Knowledge Translation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Meagen; Hall, Kevin W; Bussières, Jean-François; Tsuyuki, Ross T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Evidence for the value of pharmacists’ interventions in the care of patients is strong and continues to grow, but the rate at which these new practice opportunities are being integrated into daily practice has not kept pace. The knowledge translation literature suggests that before effective change strategies can be implemented, a better understanding of the current environment must be obtained. Two important factors within the practice environment are the professional culture and personality traits of group members. Objective: To gain insight, at a national level, into the culture of hospital pharmacy, using the Organizational Culture Profile, and into hospital pharmacists’ personality traits, using the Big Five Inventory. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of hospital pharmacists from across Canada was conducted intermittently over the period August 2012 to September 2013. The online survey contained questions about demographic characteristics and practice setting, as well as questions from the Organizational Culture Profile and Big Five Inventory. The survey link was distributed directly to hospital pharmacists or made available through provincial monthly newsletters. All data were analyzed descriptively and inferentially. Results: In total, 401 surveys were returned. Descriptive analyses from the Organizational Culture Profile revealed that most respondents perceived value in the factors of supportiveness, competitiveness, and stability. Descriptive analyses from the Big Five Inventory revealed that respondents may have been more likely to exhibit behaviours in line with the trait of conscientiousness. Several significant subgroup differences were noted in relation to levels of education, regions of practice within Canada, years in practice, and proportion of time spent conducting clinical duties. Conclusions: The results from this survey provide preliminary insight into the professional culture and personality traits of Canadian hospital

  3. Childhood intelligence predicts hospitalization with personality disorder in adulthood: evidence from a population-based study in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Moran, Paul; Klinteberg, Britt A F; Batty, G David; Vågerö, Denny

    2009-10-01

    Although low pre-morbid IQ is an established risk factor for severe mental illness, its association with personality disorder (PD) is unclear. We set out to examine whether there is a prospective association between childhood intelligence and PD in adulthood. Using a population-based prospective cohort study, we linked childhood IQ scores to routinely collected hospital discharge records in adulthood. Lower IQ scores were related to higher risk of being hospitalized with a PD across the full range of IQ scores, (odds ratio per one SD increase in IQ was 0.60; 95% CI: 0.49-0.75; p(trend) = 0.001). Adjusting for potential confounding variables had virtually no impact. We conclude that low childhood IQ predicts hospitalization with PD and may be an important factor in the development of PD. PMID:19817633

  4. [Resistance of hospital flora to imipenem. Experience in two intensive care units].

    PubMed

    Hamon-Poupinel, V; Le Coutour, X; Vergnaud, M; Malbruny, B

    1991-10-19

    Imipenem is a beta-lactam antibiotic active against most Gram-negative bacilli. Between July 1, 1987 and September 30, 1989 (9 semesters), the activity of imipenem against 6 micro-organisms was tested in two intensive care units attached to the university hospital of Caen (Normandy). During the same period, the consumption of imipenem was evaluated from the number of vials drawn by each of these two units from the central pharmacy. Imipenem was found to be 100 percent effective against 5 of the 6 micro-organisms tested, but transient falls in sensitivity and an increase in imipenem consumption were observed when Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the pathogen. The most probable cause of these transient decreases of imipenem activity against Ps. aeruginosa was the existence of a resistant strain which showed a protein abnormality in its outer membrane by temporary selection pressure.

  5. [No floroquinolone resistance in non typhoidal salmonellas from hospitalized persons in an endemic area of Apulia, Italy].

    PubMed

    Rollo, Marco Arturo; Buccoliero, Giovanni; Lonero, Gaetano; Romanelli, Chiara; Loperfido, Pietro; Cristiano, Letizia; Chimienti, Angelo; Angelini, Pasquale; Resta, Francesco

    2004-09-01

    Non typhi-salmonella is the most common cause of hospitalization or death associated with acute diarrhea. It is usually a self limiting disease and antibiotic therapy is not required, but in immunocompromised people it is essential. Increasing antimicrobial resistance in salmonella, in future, would limit the therapeutic options. During 2002, 198 persons were hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis. The 55% of cases were female, the age ranged between 4 and 94 years and the 25% of them were > 60 years old. The 58.5% of hospitalizations occurred between June and October. Non-typhi salmonella was isolated in the stool of 49 persons, with a rate of hospitalization of 24.7% respect to other causes of gastroenteritis. The incidence of resistance that was defined as resistance to one or more drugs was 14.3%. Only one non-typhi salmonella showed a multiple resistance (> four drugs). Among all antibiotics tested, only the fluorquinolones showed a susceptibility in vitro in all strains. Non typhoidal Salmonellosis is a public healt problem in the world and it will be important to restrict the use of antibiotics in medicine and veterinary to reduce the spread of multiresistant strains.

  6. Organizational culture and the implementation of person centered care: results from a change process in Swedish hospital care.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Tariq Saleem J; Ekman, Inger; Olsson, Lars-Eric; Dudas, Kerstin; Carlström, Eric

    2012-12-01

    Sweden has one of the oldest, most coherent and stable healthcare systems in the world. The culture has been described as conservative, mechanistic and increasingly standardized. In order to provide a care adjusted to the patient, person centered care (PCC) has been developed and implemented into some parts of the health care industry. The model has proven to decrease patient uncertainty. However, the impact of PCC has been limited in some clinics and hospital wards. An assumption is that organizational culture has an impact on desired outcomes of PCC, such as patient uncertainty. Therefore, in this study we identify the impact of organizational culture on patient uncertainty in five hospital wards during the implementation of PCC. Data from 220 hospitalized patients who completed the uncertainty cardiovascular population scale (UCPS) and 117 nurses who completed the organizational values questionnaire (OVQ) were investigated with regression analysis. The results seemed to indicate that in hospitals where the culture promotes stability, control and goal setting, patient uncertainty is reduced. In contrast to previous studies suggesting that a culture of flexibility, cohesion and trust is positive, a culture of stability can better sustain a desired outcome of reform or implementation of new care models such as person centered care. It is essential for health managers to be aware of what characterizes their organizational culture before attempting to implement any sort of new healthcare model. The organizational values questionnaire has the potential to be used as a tool to aid health managers in reaching that understanding.

  7. Is a chest pain observation unit likely to be cost saving in a British hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Goodacre, S.; Morris, F.; Arnold, J.; Angelini, K.

    2001-01-01

    Background—Studies from the United States (US) suggest that using a chest pain observation unit (CPOU) saves from $567 to $2030 per case compared with hospital admission. These savings will only be reproduced in the United Kingdom (UK) if the cost of routine hospital admission is similar. This study aimed to review current practice to determine the proportion of patients suitable for CPOU evaluation, the cost per case of routine admission and compare this with control groups in US studies. Methods—300 patients were randomly selected from those admitted with chest pain between January and June 1998. Two independent observers reviewed the case notes to determine who would have been suitable for CPOU management. Resource use of those selected was then determined. Results—Notes were retrieved for 285 patients. A total of 106 (37.2%) were suitable for CPOU care. Mean length of stay was 51 hours (median 24). Only two patients were admitted to the coronary care unit. Interventional cardiology was limited to two angiograms, one angioplasty and one bypass graft. Estimated mean cost per patient was £458 ($733) with interventional cardiology included, £356 ($570) without. Conclusion—Potential exists for the introduction of CPOU care to reduce health service costs in the UK. However, the magnitude of cost savings demonstrated in US studies were achieved by comparison to relatively high inpatient costs and should not be extrapolated. Economic evaluation of the CPOU should be repeated in the UK. The inclusion of interventional cardiology costs is an important determinant of cost effectiveness. PMID:11310454

  8. A prospective study of patients absconding from a general hospital psychiatry unit in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Khisty, N; Raval, N; Dhadphale, M; Kale, K; Javadekar, A

    2008-08-01

    Characteristics of patients absconding from an open psychiatry ward in a developing country may be different from both those in developed countries and a mental hospital setting. The aim of this paper is to study the incidence and characteristics of patients absconding from an open psychiatric ward in a general hospital-based psychiatric unit in India. We studied patients consecutively admitted to an open psychiatric ward over a 2-month period. We compared those who absconded with those who did not. Out of 231 patients admitted, 33 absconded. Among those who absconded, 15 had bipolar disorder, 11 had schizophrenia and five had substance-related disorders. Nine had indicated their intention to do so at admission. Ten patients had absconded by the second day. The treatment cost was the likely influencing factor for seven patients who absconded after deemed fit for discharge on clinical grounds. Only 10 patients were readmitted to the hospital within 2 weeks of absconding. The risk of absconding is highest in the early days following. Absconding patients did not differ significantly from others in many socio-demographic and clinical features. Treatment costs are an important consideration in India. PMID:18638205

  9. Drug utilization study in medical emergency unit of a tertiary care hospital in north India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sharonjeet; Rajagopalan, Sujit; Kaur, Navjot; Shafiq, Nusrat; Bhalla, Ashish; Pandhi, Promila; Malhotra, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To generate data on the drug utilization pattern and cost of drug treatment and to determine the rationality of prescriptions. Methods. A retrospective cross-sectional drug utilization study was conducted in the medical emergency unit of our hospital. Patient case records were reviewed to extract data on the pattern of drug use. Cost of drug treatment for the emergency visit was calculated by referring to the cost mentioned in Monthly Index of Medical Specialties and the rationality of prescriptions was evaluated using WHO core indicators of drug utilization. Results. 1100 case records were reviewed. Majority of patients received proton pump inhibitors followed by multivitamins. The median cost per prescription was 119.23$ (7.32$-7663.46$). Majority (49.9%) of drug cost was driven by antibiotics alone. An average of 4.9 drugs was prescribed per prescription. There were 14.89% encounters with antibiotics. 75.17% of the drugs were given as injectables and only 29.27% of the drugs were prescribed as generics. Conclusion. There is need to rationalize the drug therapy in terms of increasing prescribing of drugs by generic name and to avoid overuse of PPIs and multivitamins in emergency unit. Also the hospital pharmacy should be encouraged to procure more cost effective alternative antibiotics in future. PMID:24883208

  10. The German health care system: a model for hospital reform in the United States?

    PubMed

    Weil, T P

    1992-01-01

    Experience in Germany illustrates that the United States could potentially achieve universal access, comprehensive and high-quality services, and value for the money expended with what is often referred to as a "quasi-private and quasi-public" health care system. The German hospital system is analyzed from a number of perspectives, and it is concluded that this approach has some advantages over a single-payer, monolithic-type national health insurance model. This is primarily because of its pluralistic prepayment system and because the commencement of reimbursement negotiations are without direct governmental intervention. The adoption of the German design in the United States, it is concluded, would result in a sharp change in policy direction from a conceptually procompetitive, market-driven hospital environment to a highly federally regulated, state-administered one. The implementation of the German approach in this country would also require a shift from managed care plans and other third party payers having to micromanage the use of health care services for individual patients to tightly centralized national and state fiscal controls (e.g., institutional global capital and operating budgets) targeted at providers.

  11. Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in a Neonatal Unit of a Greek Tertiary Hospital: Clinical Characteristics and Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Koukou, Dimitra; Chatzichristou, Panagiota; Trimis, Georgios; Siahanidou, Tania; Skiathitou, Anna-Venetia; Koutouzis, Emmanouil I.; Syrogiannopoulos, George A.; Lourida, Athanasia; Michos, Athanasios G.; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rotavirus (RV) infection in neonatal age can be mild or even asymptomatic. Several studies have reported that RV is responsible for 31%-87% of pediatric nosocomial diarrhea and causes gastroenteritis outbreaks in pediatric and neonatal units. Objectives Study clinical characteristics, genotypes and risk factors of RV infection in neonatal age. Methods A prospective study was conducted from April 2009 till April 2013 in the neonatal special care unit of the largest tertiary pediatric hospital of Greece. Fecal samples and epidemiological data were collected from each neonate with gastrointestinal symptoms. RV antigen was detected with a rapid immunochromatography test. RV positive samples were further genotyped with RT PCR and sequencing using specific VP7 and VP4 primers. Results Positive for RV were 126/415 samples (30.4%). Mean age of onset was 18 days. Seventy four cases (58%) were hospital acquired. Seasonality of RV infection did not differ significantly throughout the year with the exception of 4 outbreaks. Genotypes found during the study period were G4P[8] (58.7%), G1P[8] (14.7%), G12P[8] (9.3%), G3P[8] (9.3%), G12P[6] (5.3%), G9P[8] (1.3%) and G2P[4] (1.3%). RV cases presented with: diarrhea (81%), vomiting (26.2%), fever (34.9%), dehydration (28.6%), feeding intolerance (39.7%), weight loss (54%), whilst 19% of cases were asymptomatic. Comparing community with hospital acquired cases differences in clinical manifestations were found. Conclusions Significant incidence of nosocomially transmitted RV infection in neonatal age including asymptomatic illness exists. Genotypes causing nosocomial outbreaks are not different from community strains. Circulating vaccines can be effective in prevention of nosocomial RV infection through herd immunity. PMID:26214830

  12. Mortality and Morbidity During Delivery Hospitalization Among Pregnant Women With Epilepsy in the United States

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Sarah C.; Bateman, Brian T.; McElrath, Thomas F.; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Between 0.3% and 0.5% of all pregnancies occur among women with epilepsy. Evidence suggests an increase in perinatal morbidity and mortality among women with epilepsy. However, these risks have not been quantified in large population-based samples. OBJECTIVE To report on the risk for death and adverse outcomes at the time of delivery for women with epilepsy in the United States. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study of pregnant women identified through delivery hospitalization records from the 2007-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. From this representative sample of 20% of all US hospitals, we obtained a weighted sample of delivery hospitalizations from 69 385 women with epilepsy and 20 449 532 women without epilepsy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Obstetrical outcomes including maternal death, cesarean delivery, length of stay, preeclampsia, preterm labor, and stillbirth. RESULTS Women with epilepsy had a risk of death during delivery hospitalization of 80 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies, significantly higher than the 6 deaths per 100 000 pregnancies found among women without epilepsy (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 11.46 [95% CI, 8.64-15.19]). Women with epilepsy were also at a heightened risk for other adverse outcomes, including preeclampsia (adjusted OR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.54-1.63]), preterm labor (adjusted OR, 1.54 [95% CI, 1.50-1.57]), and stillbirth (adjusted OR, 1.27 [95% CI, 1.17-1.38]), and had increased health care utilization, including an increased risk of cesarean delivery (adjusted OR, 1.40 [95% CI, 1.38-1.42]) and prolonged length of hospital stay (>6 days) among both women with cesarean deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.13 [95% CI, 2.03-2.23]) and women with vaginal deliveries (adjusted OR, 2.60 [95% CI, 2.41-2.80]). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Findings suggest that women with epilepsy are at considerably heightened risk for many adverse outcomes during their delivery hospitalization, including a more than 10-fold increased risk of

  13. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  14. Study of patient satisfaction in a surgical unit of a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, P.H.; Gupta, Shakti

    2012-01-01

    Background The hospitals have evolved from being an isolated sanatorium to a place with five star facilities. Patients and their relatives coming to the hospital not only expect world-class treatment, but also other facilities to make their stay comfortable in the hospital. This change in expectation has come due to tremendous growth of media and its exposure, as well as commercialization and improvement in facilities. The aim of this study was to evaluate the level of patient/relatives satisfaction at tertiary care teaching hospital and feedback from them for improvement of the same. Methods The study was conducted by 1. Review of available national and international literature on the subject. 2. Carrying out survey amongst 50 patients and their relatives at one of the surgical unit by using structured questionnaire. 3. By analyzing the data using appropriate statistical methods. Results Eighty two percent people were satisfied with the service at admission counter while 81% were satisfied with room preparation at the time of admission. The nursing services satisfied 80% of people while 92% were satisfied with explanation about disease and treatment by doctor. The behavior of nurses, doctors and orderlies satisfied 92, 92 and 83% of people. The cleanliness of toilets satisfied only 49% while diet services satisfied 78% of people. Conclusion The five major satisfiers were behavior of doctors, explanation about disease and treatment, courtesy of staff at admission counter, behavior and cooperation of nurses. The five major dissatisfiers were cleanliness of toilets, quality of food, explanation about rules and regulation, behavior of orderlies and sanitary attendant and room preparedness. PMID:25983455

  15. Factors affecting mortality of hospitalized chest trauma patients in United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Predictors of mortality of chest trauma vary globally. We aimed to define factors affecting mortality of hospitalized chest trauma patients in Al-Ain City, United Arab Emirates. Methods The data of Al-Ain Hospital Trauma Registry were prospectively collected over a period of three years. Patients with chest trauma who were admitted for more than 24 hours in Al-Ain Hospital or who died after arrival to the hospital were included in the study. Univariate analysis was used to compare patients who died and those who survived. Gender, age, nationality, mechanism of injury, systolic blood pressure and GCS on arrival, the need for ventilatory support, presence of head injury, AIS for the chest and head, presence of injuries outside the chest, and ISS were studied. Significant factors were then entered into a backward stepwise likelihood ratio logistic regression model. Results 474 patients having a median (range) age of 35 (1–90) years were studied. 90% were males and 18% were UAE citizens. The main mechanism of injury was road traffic collisions (66%) followed by falls (23.4%). Penetrating trauma occurred in 4 patients (0.8%). 88 patients (18.6%) were admitted to the ICU. The median (range) ISS was 5 (1–43). 173 patients (36.5%) had isolated chest injury. Overall mortality rate was 7.2%. Mortality was significantly increased by low GCS (p < 0.0001), high ISS (p = 0.025), and low systolic blood pressure on arrival (p = 0.027). Conclusion Chest trauma is associated with a significant mortality in Al-Ain City. This was significantly related to the severity of head injury, injury severity score, and hypotension on arrival. PMID:23547845

  16. Pattern of Blood Stream Infections within Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Suez Canal University Hospital, Ismailia, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Kishk, Rania Mohammed; Mandour, Mohamed Fouad; Farghaly, Rasha Mohamed; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Nemr, Nader Attia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Blood stream infection (BSI) is a common problem of newborn in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Monitoring neonatal infections is increasingly regarded as an important contributor to safe and high-quality healthcare. It results in high mortality rate and serious complications. So, our aim was to determine the incidence and the pattern of BSIs in the NICU of Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt, and to determine its impact on hospitalization, mortality, and morbidity. Methods. This study was a prospective one in which all neonates admitted to the NICUs in Suez Canal University hospital between January, 2013 and June 2013 were enrolled. Blood stream infections were monitored prospectively. The health care associated infection rate, mortality rate, causative organism, and risk factors were studied. Results. A total of 317 neonates were admitted to the NICU with a mortality rate of 36.0%. During this study period, 115/317 (36.3%) developed clinical signs of sepsis and were confirmed as BSIs by blood culture in only 90 neonates with 97 isolates. The total mean length of stay was significantly longer among infected than noninfected neonates (34.5 ± 18.3 and 10.8 ± 9.9 days, resp., P value < 0.001). The overall mortality rates among infected and noninfected neonates were 38.9% and 34.8%, respectively, with a significant difference. Klebsiella spp. were the most common pathogen (27.8%) followed by Pseudomonas (21.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (15.4%). Conclusion. The rate of BSIs in NICU at Suez Canal University Hospital was relatively high with high mortality rate (36.0%). PMID:25389439

  17. Homicide rates among persons aged 10-24 years - United States, 1981-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-07-12

    Homicide disproportionately affects persons aged 10-24 years in the United States and consistently ranks in the top three leading causes of death in this age group, resulting in approximately 4,800 deaths and an estimated $9 billion in lost productivity and medical costs in 2010. To investigate trends in homicide among persons aged 10-24 years for the period 1981-2010, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System data on deaths caused by homicide of persons in this age group and examined trends by sex, age, race/ethnicity, and mechanism of injury. This report describes the results of that analysis, which indicated that homicide rates varied substantially during the study period, with a sharp rise from 1985 to 1993 followed by a decline that has slowed since 1999. During the period 2000-2010, rates declined for all groups, although the decline was significantly slower for males compared with females and for blacks compared with Hispanics and persons of other racial/ethnic groups. By mechanism of injury, the decline for firearm homicides from 2000 to 2010 was significantly slower than for nonfirearm homicides. The homicide rate among persons aged 10-24 years in 2010 was 7.5 per 100,000, the lowest in the 30-year study period. Primary prevention strategies remain critical, particularly among groups at increased risk for homicide.

  18. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-Related Hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011): Rates, Co-Occurring Illnesses, Suicidal Ideation/Self-Harm, and Hospital Charges.

    PubMed

    Haviland, Mark G; Banta, Jim E; Sonne, Janet L; Przekop, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-related hospitalizations in the United States (2002-2011). Over this period, there were an estimated 1,477,944 hospitalizations (915,591 women) with either a primary (reason for hospitalization) or secondary PTSD diagnosis. Population-based hospitalization rates rose from 2002 to 2011; women in the age range of 20 to 44 years had the highest rates and the steepest rise. Most of the hospitalizations for men and women younger than 45 years had been assigned a primary diagnosis of mental illness (including PTSD). Mood and substance use disorders were among the most commonly co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses with PTSD. Suicidal ideation/suicide attempts declined with increasing age. The strongest predictor of this criterion was mood disorder, and its importance as a predictor increased as people aged. Total inflation-adjusted charges for all PTSD-related hospitalizations were $34.9 billion, with 36% being for hospitalizations where a mental illness (including PTSD) was the primary diagnosis. PMID:26588079

  19. Borderline Personality Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder at Psychiatric Discharge Predict General Hospital Admission for Self-Harm.

    PubMed

    Mellesdal, Liv; Gjestad, Rolf; Johnsen, Erik; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Kroken, Rune A; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-12-01

    We investigated whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was predictor of suicidal behavior even when adjusting for comorbid borderline personality disorder (BPD) and other salient risk factors. To study this, we randomly selected 308 patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital because of suicide risk. Baseline interviews were performed within the first days of the stay. Information concerning the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals over the subsequent 6 months was retrieved through linkage with the regional hospital registers. A censored regression analysis of hospital admissions for self-harm indicated significant associations with both PTSD (β = .21, p < .001) and BPD (β = .27, p < .001). A structural model comprising two latent BPD factors, dysregulation and relationship problems, as well as PTSD and several other variables, demonstrated that PTSD was an important predictor of the number of self-harm admissions to general hospitals(B = 1.52, p < .01). Dysregulation predicted self-harm directly (B = 0.28, p < .05), and also through PTSD [corrected]. These results suggested that PTSD and related dysregulation problems could be important treatment targets for a reduction in the risk of severe self-harm in high-risk psychiatric patients.

  20. Falls Among Persons Aged ≥65 Years With and Without Severe Vision Impairment - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    Crews, John E; Chou, Chiu-Fung; Stevens, Judy A; Saaddine, Jinan B

    2016-05-06

    In 2014, an estimated 2.8 million persons aged ≥65 years in the United States reported severe vision impairment* defined as being blind or having severe difficulty seeing, even with eyeglasses. Good vision is important for maintaining balance as well as for identifying low-contrast hazards, estimating distances, and discerning spatial relationships. Conversely, having poor vision increases the risk for falls (1,2). Falls among older adults are common and can cause serious injuries, disabilities, and premature death (1,3). To date, no state-level investigations have examined the annual prevalence of falls among persons with and without severe vision impairment. CDC analyzed data from the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to estimate the state-specific annual prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years with and without self-reported severe vision impairment. Overall, 46.7% of persons with, and 27.7% of older adults without, self-reported severe vision impairment reported having fallen during the previous year. The state-specific annual prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years with severe vision impairment ranged from 30.8% (Hawaii) to 59.1% (California). In contrast, the prevalence of falls among persons aged ≥65 years without severe vision impairment ranged from 20.4% (Hawaii) to 32.4% (Alaska). Developing fall-prevention interventions intended for persons with severe vision impairment will help states manage the impact of vision impairment and falls on health care resources, and can inform state-specific fall prevention initiatives.

  1. Cluster of Ebola cases among Liberian and U.S. health care workers in an Ebola treatment unit and adjacent hospital -- Liberia, 2014.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Joseph D; Hunter, Jennifer C; Pillai, Satish K; Arwady, M Allison; Ayscue, Patrick; Matanock, Almea; Monroe, Ben; Schafer, Ilana J; Nyenswah, Tolbert G; De Cock, Kevin M

    2014-10-17

    The ongoing Ebola virus disease (Ebola) epidemic in West Africa, like previous Ebola outbreaks, has been characterized by amplification in health care settings and increased risk for health care workers (HCWs), who often do not have access to appropriate personal protective equipment. In many locations, Ebola treatment units (ETUs) have been established to optimize care of patients with Ebola while maintaining infection control procedures to prevent transmission of Ebola virus. These ETUs are considered essential to containment of the epidemic. In July 2014, CDC assisted the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare of Liberia in investigating a cluster of five Ebola cases among HCWs who became ill while working in an ETU, an adjacent general hospital, or both. No common source of exposure or chain of transmission was identified. However, multiple opportunities existed for transmission of Ebola virus to HCWs, including exposure to patients with undetected Ebola in the hospital, inadequate use of personal protective equipment during cleaning and disinfection of environmental surfaces in the hospital, and potential transmission from an ill HCW to another HCW. No evidence was found of a previously unrecognized mode of transmission. Prevention recommendations included reinforcement of existing infection control guidance for both ETUs and general medical care settings, including measures to prevent cross-transmission in co-located facilities. PMID:25321070

  2. Epidemiology of Death in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Five U.S. Teaching Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jeffrey P.; Sellers, Deborah E.; Meyer, Elaine C.; Lewis-Newby, Mithya; Truog, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the epidemiology of death in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) at 5 geographically diverse teaching hospitals across the United States. Design, Setting, and Patients In the PICUs of five teaching hospitals across the United States, we prospectively identified 192 consecutive patients who died prior to PICU discharge. Each site enrolled between 24 and 50 patients. Each PICU had similar organizational and staffing structures. Interventions None Measurements and Main Results The overall mortality rate was 2.39% (range 1.85% to 3.38%). 133 (70%) patients died following the withholding or withdrawal of life-sustaining treatments, 30 (16%) were diagnosed as brain dead, and 26 (14%) died following an unsuccessful resuscitation attempt. Fifty-seven percent of all deaths occurred within the first week of admission;these patients, who were more likely to have new onset illnesses or injuries, included the majority of those who died following unsuccessful CPR attempts or brain death diagnoses. Patients who died beyond one week length-of-stay in the PICU were more likely to have pre-existing diagnoses, to be technology dependent prior to admission, and to have died following the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment. Only 64% of the patients who died following the withholding or withdrawing of life support had a formal DNR order in place at the time of their death. Conclusions The mode of death in the PICU is proportionally similar to that reported over the past two decades, while the mortality rate has nearly halved. Death is largely characterized by two fairly distinct profiles that are associated with whether death occurs within or beyond one week length-of-stay. Decisions not to resuscitate are often made in the absence of a formal DNR order. These data have implications for future quality improvement initiatives, especially around palliative care, end-of-life decision making, and organ donation. PMID:24979486

  3. Appropriate use of personal protective equipment among healthcare workers in public sector hospitals and primary healthcare polyclinics during the SARS outbreak in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Chia, S; Koh, D; Fones, C; Qian, F; Ng, V; Tan, B; Wong, K; Chew, W; Tang, H; Ng, W; Muttakin, Z; Emmanuel, S; Fong, N; Koh, G; Lim, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: Singapore was affected by an outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) from 25 February to 31 May 2003, with 238 probable cases and 33 deaths. Aims: To study usage of personal protective equipment (PPE) among three groups of healthcare workers (HCWs: doctors, nurses, and administrative staff), to determine if the appropriate PPE were used by the different groups and to examine the factors that may determine inappropriate use. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey of 14 554 HCWs in nine healthcare settings, which included tertiary care hospitals, community hospitals, and polyclinics, was carried out in May–July 2003. Only doctors, nurses, and clerical staff were selected for subsequent analysis. Results: A total of 10 236 valid questionnaires were returned (70.3% response); 873 doctors, 4404 nurses, and 921 clerical staff were studied. A total of 32.5% of doctors, 48.7% of nurses, and 77.1% of the administrative staff agreed that paper and/or surgical masks were "useful in protecting from contracting SARS". Among this group, 23.6% of doctors and 42.3% of nurses reported working with SARS patients. The view that a paper and/or surgical mask was adequate protection against SARS was held by 33.3% of doctors and 55.9% of nurses working at the A&E unit, 30.5% of doctors and 49.4% of nurses from medical wards, and 27.5% of doctors and 37.1% of nurses from intensive care units. Factors which predicted for agreement that paper and/or surgical masks were protective against SARS, included HCW's job title, reported contact with SARS patients, area of work, and Impact Events Scale scores. Conclusion: A variety of factors determine appropriate use of personal protective equipment by HCWs in the face of a major SARS outbreak. PMID:15961624

  4. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. PMID:21159414

  5. Organizational Justice: Personality Traits or Emotional Intelligence? An Empirical Study in an Italian Hospital Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Palazzeschi, Letizia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of personality traits and emotional intelligence in relation to organizational justice. The Organizational Justice Scale, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised Short Form, and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory were administered to 384 Italian nurses. The emotional intelligence…

  6. Frequency of hospital acquired pneumonia and its microbiological etiology in medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Muhammad; Amjad, Alina; Haidri, Fakhir Raza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objectives were to assess the frequency of hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) in patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) and to determine the frequencies of different etiological organisms in these patients. Methods: This was descriptive cross sectional study, which was carried out in medical ICU of Shifa International Hospital Islamabad from January 2013 to January 2014. A total of 1866 patients were admitted in the department of medicine including medical ICU. They were evaluated for HAP and the causative organisms were cultured from these patients. Identification was carried out by standard biochemical profile of the organisms. Results: The total number of patients admitted in medical ICU for any reason were 346. HAP was diagnosed in 88 patients (25.4%). The average age of patients admitted in Medical ICU with HAP was 48 years with the range of 16 to 82 years. 56 were male and 32 females. 42 patients (47.7%) died in medical ICU with HAP. Microbiological analysis showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa were 27 (30.6%), Acinetobacter spp. were 12 (13.6%), Candida albicans were 12 (13.6%), Klebsiellapneumoniae were 9 (10.2%), Streptococcus spp. were 9 (10.2%), Escherichia coli were 5 (5.6%), Stenotrophomonas spp. were 4(4.5%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) were 4 (4.5%) others organisms 6 (6.8%). Conclusion: The frequency of HAP in Medical ICU of our hospital is 88 out of 346 (25.4%). The commonest organism identified was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.6%) followed by Acinetobacter and Candida albican (13.6% each).

  7. Frequency of hospital acquired pneumonia and its microbiological etiology in medical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Imran, Muhammad; Amjad, Alina; Haidri, Fakhir Raza

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objectives were to assess the frequency of hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP) in patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) and to determine the frequencies of different etiological organisms in these patients. Methods: This was descriptive cross sectional study, which was carried out in medical ICU of Shifa International Hospital Islamabad from January 2013 to January 2014. A total of 1866 patients were admitted in the department of medicine including medical ICU. They were evaluated for HAP and the causative organisms were cultured from these patients. Identification was carried out by standard biochemical profile of the organisms. Results: The total number of patients admitted in medical ICU for any reason were 346. HAP was diagnosed in 88 patients (25.4%). The average age of patients admitted in Medical ICU with HAP was 48 years with the range of 16 to 82 years. 56 were male and 32 females. 42 patients (47.7%) died in medical ICU with HAP. Microbiological analysis showed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa were 27 (30.6%), Acinetobacter spp. were 12 (13.6%), Candida albicans were 12 (13.6%), Klebsiellapneumoniae were 9 (10.2%), Streptococcus spp. were 9 (10.2%), Escherichia coli were 5 (5.6%), Stenotrophomonas spp. were 4(4.5%), Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) were 4 (4.5%) others organisms 6 (6.8%). Conclusion: The frequency of HAP in Medical ICU of our hospital is 88 out of 346 (25.4%). The commonest organism identified was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.6%) followed by Acinetobacter and Candida albican (13.6% each). PMID:27648021

  8. Non-fatal occupational injuries and illnesses treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, L

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To estimate the number and rate of occupational injuries and illnesses treated in hospital emergency departments and to characterize the nature, event, and source of injury and illness. Setting—Twenty four hour emergency departments in hospitals in the United States. Methods—Surveillance for occupational injuries and illnesses was conducted in a national probability based sample of hospital emergency departments through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). Worker demographics, nature of injury and disposition, and incident circumstances were abstracted from emergency department medical records, typically within 24–72 hours of treatment. Results—Approximately 3.6 million occupational injuries and illnesses were treated in emergency departments in 1998. Younger workers, particularly males, continue to have the highest rates of work related injuries. Together, lacerations, punctures, amputations, and avulsions represented one fourth of the emergency department treated injuries, mostly to hand and fingers. Sprains and strains, largely to the trunk, also accounted for one fourth of the injuries. The three leading injury events were contact with objects, bodily reactions and exertions, and falls. Conclusions—Despite apparent decreases in rates, youth continue to have a high burden of injury in the workplace. However, three fourths of all emergency department treated injuries occur to workers 20–44 years of age. Emergency department surveillance is particularly amenable to capture of young worker injuries and provides a wealth of injury details to guide prevention efforts—efforts that will likely reduce occupational injuries as these workers age. Emergency department surveillance also provides injury estimates with few demographic or employer constraints, other than the medical venue used. PMID:11565966

  9. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tanya R.; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98–1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00–1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  10. Profile of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm referred to the Vascular Unit, Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Zainal, A A; Yusha, A W

    1998-12-01

    A prospective collection of patients referred with a diagnosis of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) to the Vascular Unit, Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL) between February 1993 to July 1995 were analysed. There were a total of 124 patients, with a 85 per cent (%) male preponderance. Malays formed the largest ethnic group contributing about 60%. The median age of the patients was 69 years (range 49-84). Emergency referrals and admission accounted for 46.8% of patients. Hypertension and ischaemic heart disease were the two most common co-morbid medical conditions. The number of patients who underwent surgery was only 56 (45.2%). Of this total, 34 were done electively with an operative mortality of 8.8% (3 pts). The operative mortality for emergency surgery was 59.1%. AAA is relatively common in the older age group, especially in men and it should be actively looked for, as elective surgery can be offered with acceptable morbidity and mortality.

  11. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Tishler, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates. PMID:26604868

  12. The Sociology of the Deceased Harvard Medical Unit at Boston City Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2015-12-01

    Many graduates of the Harvard Medical Unit (HMU) at Boston City Hospital, in either the clinical training/residency program or the research program at the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, contributed in major ways to the HMU and constantly relived their HMU experiences. The HMU staff physicians, descending from founder and mentor physicians Francis W. Peabody, Soma Weiss, and George R. Minot, were dedicated to the teaching, development, and leadership of its clinical and research trainees, whose confidence and dedication to patient care as a result of their mentorship led many to lifelong achievements as clinicians, teachers, and mentors. Their experience also led to a lifelong love of the HMU (despite its loss), camaraderie, happiness, and intense friendships with their associates.

  13. E. coli outbreak in a neonate intensive care unit in a general hospital in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Casas, Erika Margarita; Suástegui-Urquijo, Zaydy; Arroyo-Escalante, Sara; Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Moncada-Barrón, David; Hernández-Delgado, Lorena; Méndez-Sánchez, José Luis; Delgado-Sapién, Gabriela; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Manjarrez-Hernández, Ángel; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, Juan; Hernández-Castro, Rigoberto

    2013-05-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The aim of this paper was to describe an outbreak of Escherichia coli among infants admitted to the NICU of the General Hospital "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez" in May of 2008. The isolated E. coli strains were identified using standard biochemical methods. The susceptibilities of these strains were analysed by determining their minimal inhibitory concentrations. Following this, their molecular relationships to each other were assessed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis and corroborated by serology. Twelve E. coli strains were isolated from blood, urine, or indwelling catheter samples from five cases of preterm infants within a 3-day period. Patients were admitted to the NICU of the general hospital and, during the outbreak, developed sepsis caused by E. coli. For four of the patients, the average age was 23 days, while one patient was a 3-month-old infant. Prior to sepsis, the infants had received assisted ventilation and hyperalimentation through a central venous catheter. Two profiles were observed by PFGE; profile A was identified as the outbreak's cause and an outcome of cross-infection, while profile B showed genetic differences but serologically it was identified as part of the same serotype. We conclude that E. coli colonised the patients through horizontal transmission. A focal source of the microorganism in this outbreak was not identified, but cross-transmission through handling was the most probable route.

  14. Cost-control issues within the hospital environment in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Freeman, R

    1993-01-01

    Health care in the United Kingdom is dominated by the National Health Service, which operates under a system in which care is delivered free at the point of need and is funded by taxation. Experimentation with a number of different models has occurred since 1980 and has culminated in recent National Health Service reforms characterized by the separation of purchaser and provider functions. An inescapable result of this is the formal definition of the relationship between need and service provision (contracts or performance arrangements), and the equally unavoidable costing of "patient episodes" or equivalent as a tool for estimating both supply and demand. This change has completely altered the way in which individual capital and revenue costs are viewed in the National Health Service. With regard to drugs, costs can now be seen as part of a patient's consumption of resources as opposed to a hospital budget heading. The new system acknowledges that higher drug costs can be incurred if the overall patient-episode cost is reduced as a result. Such a reduction in average patient costs might then lead to more contract work and a higher revenue for the hospital. Quality of care specifications by purchasers may also affect drug costs.

  15. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  16. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  17. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for...) Pensioners of nations allied with the United States in World War I and World War II, upon authorization...

  18. Direct stroke unit admission of intravenous tissue plasminogen activator: safety, clinical outcome, and hospital cost savings

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Anne W.; Coleman, Kisha C.; Palazzo, Paola; Shahripour, Reza Bavarsad; Alexandrov, Andrei V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the USA, stable intravenous tissue plasminogen activator (IV tPA) patients have traditionally been cared for in an intensive care unit (ICU). We examined the safety of using an acuity-adaptable stroke unit (SU) to manage IV tPA patients. Methods: We conducted an observational study of consecutive patients admitted to our acuity-adaptable SU over the first 3 years of operation. Safety was assessed by symptomatic intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) rates, systemic hemorrhage (SH) rates, tPA-related deaths, and transfers from SU to ICU; cost savings and length of stay (LOS) were determined. Results: We admitted 333 IV tPA patients, of which 302 were admitted directly to the SU. A total of 31 (10%) patients had concurrent systemic hemodynamic or pulmonary compromise warranting direct ICU admission. There were no differences in admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale scores between SU and ICU patients (9.0 versus 9.5, respectively). Overall sICH rate was 3.3% (n = 10) and SH rate was 2.9 (n = 9), with no difference between SU and ICU patients. No tPA-related deaths occurred, and no SU patients required transfer to the ICU. Estimated hospital cost savings were US$362,400 for ‘avoided’ ICU days, and hospital LOS decreased significantly (p = 0.001) from 9.8 ± 15.6 days (median 5) in year 1, to 5.2 ± 4.8 days (median 3) by year 3. Conclusions: IV tPA patients may be safely cared for in a SU when nurses undergo extensive education to ensure clinical competence. Use of the ICU solely for monitoring may constitute significant overuse of system resources at an expense that is not associated with additional safety benefit. PMID:27366237

  19. Is ophthalmology evidence based? A clinical audit of the emergency unit of a regional eye hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lai, T Y Y; Wong, V W Y; Leung, G M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the proportion of interventions that are evidence based in the acute care unit of a regional eye hospital. Methods: A prospective clinical audit was carried out at Hong Kong Eye Hospital in July 2002 to investigate the extent to which ophthalmic practices were evidence based. The major diagnosis and intervention provided were identified through chart review. A corresponding literature search using Medline and the Cochrane Library was performed to assess the degree to which each intervention was based on current, best evidence. Each diagnosis intervention pair was accordingly analysed and graded. The level of best, current evidence supporting each intervention was graded and analysed. Results: A total of 274 consecutive consultation episodes were examined. 22 cases were excluded since no diagnosis or intervention was made during the consultation. 108 (42.9%) patient interventions were found to be based on evidence from systematic reviews, meta-analyses, or randomised controlled trials (RCT). Evidence from prospective or retrospective observational studies supported the interventions in 86 (34.1%) patients. In 58 (23.0%) cases, no evidence or opposing evidence was found regarding the intervention. The proportion of evidence based on RCT or systematic reviews was higher for surgical interventions compared with non-surgical interventions (p=0.007). The proportion of interventions based on RCT or systematic reviews was higher for specialist ophthalmologists than trainee ophthalmologists (p=0.021). Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the majority of interventions in the ophthalmic unit were evidence based and comparable to the experience of other specialties. PMID:12642295

  20. Antibiogram of Medical Intensive Care Unit at Tertiary Care Hospital Setting of Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Qadeer, Aayesha; Akhtar, Aftab; Ain, Qurat Ul; Saadat, Shoab; Mansoor, Salman; Ishtiaq, Wasib; Ilyas, Abid; Khan, Ali Y; Ajam, Yousaf

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of micro-organisms causing sepsis as well as to determine the antibiotic susceptibility and resistance of microorganisms isolated in a medical intensive care unit. Materials and methods: This is a cross-sectional analysis of 802 patients from a medical intensive care unit (ICU) of Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan over a one-year period from August 2015 to August 2016. Specimens collected were from blood, urine, endotracheal secretions, catheter tips, tissue, pus swabs, cerebrospinal fluid, ascites, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and pleural fluid. All bacteria were identified by standard microbiological methods, and antibiotic sensitivity/resistance was performed using the disk diffusion technique, according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Data was collected using a critical care unit electronic database and data analysis was done by using  the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), version 20 (IBM SPSS Statistics, Armonk, NY). Results: Gram-negative bacteria were more frequent as compared to gram-positive bacteria. Most common bacterial isolates were Acinetobacter (15.3%), Escherichia coli (15.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (10.2%), whereas Enterococcus (7%) and methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (6.2%) were the two most common gram-positive bacteria. For Acinetobacter, colistin was the most effective antibiotic (3% resistance). For E.coli, colistin (0%), tigecycline (0%), amikacin (7%), and carbapenems (10%) showed low resistance. Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed low resistance to colistin (7%). For Klebsiella pneumoniae, low resistance was seen for tigecycline (0%) and minocycline (16%). Overall, ICU mortality was 31.3%, including miscellaneous cases. Conclusion: Gram-negative infections, especially by multidrug-resistant organisms, are on the rise in ICUs. Empirical antibiotics should be used according to the local

  1. Novel exposure units for at-home personalized testing of electromagnetic sensibility.

    PubMed

    Huss, Anke; Murbach, Manuel; van Moorselaar, Imke; Kuster, Niels; van Strien, Rob; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Slottje, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    Previous experimental studies on electromagnetic hypersensitivity have been criticized regarding inflexibility of choice of exposure and of study locations. We developed and tested novel portable exposure units that can generate different output levels of various extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF; 50 Hz field plus harmonics) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). Testing was done with a group of healthy volunteers (n = 25 for 5 ELF-MF and n = 25 for 5 RF-EMF signals) to assess if units were indeed able to produce double-blind exposure conditions. Results substantiated that double-blind conditions were met; on average participants scored 50.6% of conditions correct on the ELF-MF, and 50.0% on the RF-EMF unit, which corresponds to guessing probability. No cues as to exposure conditions were reported. We aim to use these units in a future experiment with subjects who wish to test their personal hypothesis of being able to sense or experience when being exposed to EMF. The new units allow for a high degree of flexibility regarding choice of applied electromagnetic signal, output power level and location (at home or another environment of subjects' choosing).

  2. Hospital payment based on diagnosis-related groups differs in Europe and holds lessons for the United States.

    PubMed

    Quentin, Wilm; Scheller-Kreinsen, David; Blümel, Miriam; Geissler, Alexander; Busse, Reinhard

    2013-04-01

    England, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden spend less as a share of gross domestic product on hospital care than the United States while delivering high-quality services. All five European countries have hospital payment systems based on diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) that classify patients of similar clinical characteristics and comparable costs. Inspired by Medicare's inpatient prospective payment system, which originated the use of DRGs, European DRG systems have implemented different design options and are generally more detailed than Medicare's system, to better distinguish among patients with less and more complex conditions. Incentives to treat more cases are often counterbalanced by volume ceilings in European DRG systems. European payments are usually broader in scope than those in the United States, including physician salaries and readmissions. These European systems, discussed in more detail in the article, suggest potential innovations for reforming DRG-based hospital payment in the United States.

  3. Comparison of Patient Costs in Internal Medicine and Anaesthesiology Intensive Care Units in a Tertiary University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kara, İskender; Yıldırım, Fatma; Başak, Dilek Yumuş; Küçük, Hamit; Türkoğlu, Melda; Aygencel, Gülbin; Katı, İsmail; Karabıyık, Lale

    2015-01-01

    Objective The allocation of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) to health is limited, therefore it has made a need for professional management of health business. Hospital managers as well as employees are required to have sufficient knowledge about the hospital costs. Hospital facilities like intensive care units that require specialization and advanced technology have an important part in costs. For this purpose, cost analysis studies should be done in the general health business and special units separately. Methods In this study we aimed to compare the costs of anaesthesiology and internal medicine intensive care units (ICU) roughly. Results After approval of this study by Gazi University Faculty of Medicine Ethics Committee, the costs of 855 patients that were hospitalized, examined and treated for at least 24 hours in internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs between January 2012–August 2013 (20 months period) were taken and analyzed from chief staff of the Department of Information Technology, Gazi University Hospital. Conclusion At the end of the study, we observed clear differences between internal medicine and anaesthesiology ICUs arising from transactions and patient characteristics of units. We stated that these differences should be considered by Social Security Institution (SSI) for the reimbursement of the services. Further, we revealed that SSI payments do not meet the intensive care expenditure. PMID:27366486

  4. Effectiveness of Day Hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment for Patients with Severe Borderline Personality Disorder: A Matched Control Study.

    PubMed

    Bales, Dawn L; Timman, Reinier; Andrea, Helene; Busschbach, Jan J V; Verheul, Roel; Kamphuis, Jan H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends the body of evidence regarding the effectiveness of day hospital Mentalization-Based Treatment (MBT) by documenting the treatment outcome of a highly inclusive group of severe borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients, benchmarked by a carefully matched group who received other specialized psychotherapeutic treatments (OPT). Structured diagnostic interviews were conducted to assess diagnostic status at baseline. Baseline, 18-month treatment outcome and 36-month treatment outcome (after the maintenance phase) on psychiatric symptoms (Brief Symptom Inventory) and personality functioning (118-item Severity Indices of Personality Problems) were available for 29 BPD patients assigned to MBT, and an initial set of 175 BPD patients assigned to OPT. Propensity scores were used to determine the best matches for the MBT patients within the larger OPT group, yielding 29 MBT and 29 OPT patients for direct comparison. Treatment outcome was analysed using multilevel modelling. Pre to post effect sizes were consistently (very) large for MBT, with a Cohen's d of -1.06 and -1.42 for 18 and 36 months, respectively, for the reduction in psychiatric symptoms, and ds ranging from 0.81 to 2.08 for improvement in domains of personality functioning. OPT also yielded improvement across domains but generally of moderate magnitude. In conclusion, the present matched control study, executed by an independent research institute outside the UK, demonstrated the effectiveness of day hospital MBT in a highly inclusive and severe group of BPD patients, beyond the benchmark provided by a mix of specialized psychotherapy programmes. Interpretation of the (large) between condition effects warrants cautionary caveats given the non-randomized design, as well as variation in treatment dosages.

  5. United States Biological Survey: A compendium of its history, personalities, impacts, and conflicts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmidly, David J.; Tydeman, W. E.; Gardner, Alfred L.

    2016-01-01

    In 1885, a small three-person unit was created in the U.S. Department of Agriculture to gather and analyze information on bird migrations. Originally called the Section of Economic Ornithology, over the next 55 years this unit underwent three name changes and accumulated ever-increasing responsibilities for the nation’s faunal resources. Transferred to the Department of the Interior in 1939, this agency was merged with the Bureau of Fisheries in 1940 to create the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The following account details the chronology, directorship, and growth of the U.S. Bureau of Biological Survey up to its renovation as the FWS. This account also profiles some employees of the Biological Survey.

  6. Quality Service Analysis and Improvement of Pharmacy Unit of XYZ Hospital Using Value Stream Analysis Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonny; Nasution, Januar

    2013-06-01

    Value stream mapping is a tool which is needed to let the business leader of XYZ Hospital to see what is actually happening in its business process that have caused longer lead time for self-produced medicines in its pharmacy unit. This problem has triggered many complaints filed by patients. After deploying this tool, the team has come up with the fact that in processing the medicine, pharmacy unit does not have any storage and capsule packing tool and this condition has caused many wasting times in its process. Therefore, the team has proposed to the business leader to procure the required tools in order to shorten its process. This research has resulted in shortened lead time from 45 minutes to 30 minutes as required by the government through Indonesian health ministry with increased %VA (valued added activity) or Process Cycle Efficiency (PCE) from 66% to 68% (considered lean because it is upper than required 30%). This result has proved that the process effectiveness has been increase by the improvement.

  7. The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and Participation in Aotearoa New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarity, L.; Dew, K.

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of persons with disabilities in formal decision-making processes is thought to have a range of benefits. However, research suggests that participatory processes may fail to match normative ideals. This study examines the participation of persons with disabilities in the development of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of…

  8. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time. 51.42 Section 51.42 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.42 Persons born in the...

  9. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time. 51.42 Section 51.42 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.42 Persons born in the...

  10. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time. 51.42 Section 51.42 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.42 Persons born in the...

  11. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time. 51.42 Section 51.42 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.42 Persons born in the...

  12. 22 CFR 51.42 - Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Persons born in the United States applying for a passport for the first time. 51.42 Section 51.42 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE NATIONALITY AND PASSPORTS PASSPORTS Evidence of U.S. Citizenship or Nationality § 51.42 Persons born in the...

  13. The perceptions of the personal and professional factors influencing social workers in Saudi hospitals: a qualitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Yalli, Nadir; Albrithen, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    The perceptions of 10 social workers regarding the personal and professional characteristics influencing their practice at Saudi hospitals were examined using semi-structured interviews. A qualitative analysis employing a thematic approach informed by grounded theory was undertaken and produced three broad interrelated themes: "skills upgrading," "departmental support," and "personal experience in the workplace," which subsequently informed the development of the overarching theme of "personal and professional factors." The discussion illustrates social work practitioners are inhibited from effectively performing their roles. These include: (a) Deficiencies related to job training and professional skills updating where there is a lack of efficient and accessible inservice training programs, especially in relation to practical issues. Further, these perceptions relate to a lack of long-term educational opportunities that impact on individual practitioner's currency of skills, techniques and pedagogy enabling/disenabling him/her to excel at his/her job, (b) Obvious bureaucracy within the controlling hierarchy and difficulty with the dissemination of information between the social workers were perceived to detrimentally impact on a practitioner's ability to attend to one's work demands, and (c) Personal day to day work experiences, including counterproductive emotional feelings (high stress), increased dissatisfaction with the job, and ineffective communication within the workplace were seen as limiting the social workers' professional potential. This article will focus on how these themes were addressed in terms of qualitative interview data.

  14. Modeling Hospital-Acquired Pressure Ulcer Prevalence on Medical-Surgical Units: Nurse Workload, Expertise, and Clinical Processes of Care

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Carolyn; Donaldson, Nancy; Stotts, Nancy A; Fridman, Moshe; Brown, Diane Storer

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study modeled the predictive power of unit/patient characteristics, nurse workload, nurse expertise, and hospital-acquired pressure ulcer (HAPU) preventive clinical processes of care on unit-level prevalence of HAPUs. Data Sources Seven hundred and eighty-nine medical-surgical units (215 hospitals) in 2009. Study Design Using unit-level data, HAPUs were modeled with Poisson regression with zero-inflation (due to low prevalence of HAPUs) with significant covariates as predictors. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospitals submitted data on NQF endorsed ongoing performance measures to CALNOC registry. Principal Findings Fewer HAPUs were predicted by a combination of unit/patient characteristics (shorter length of stay, fewer patients at-risk, fewer male patients), RN workload (more hours of care, greater patient [bed] turnover), RN expertise (more years of experience, fewer contract staff hours), and processes of care (more risk assessment completed). Conclusions Unit/patient characteristics were potent HAPU predictors yet generally are not modifiable. RN workload, nurse expertise, and processes of care (risk assessment/interventions) are significant predictors that can be addressed to reduce HAPU. Support strategies may be needed for units where experienced full-time nurses are not available for HAPU prevention. Further research is warranted to test these finding in the context of higher HAPU prevalence. PMID:25290866

  15. Care in specialist medical and mental health unit compared with standard care for older people with cognitive impairment admitted to general hospital: randomised controlled trial (NIHR TEAM trial)

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Sarah E; Bradshaw, Lucy E; Kearney, Fiona C; Russell, Catherine; Whittamore, Kathy H; Foster, Pippa E R; Mamza, Jil; Gladman, John R F; Jones, Rob G; Lewis, Sarah A; Porock, Davina

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop and evaluate a best practice model of general hospital acute medical care for older people with cognitive impairment. Design Randomised controlled trial, adapted to take account of constraints imposed by a busy acute medical admission system. Setting Large acute general hospital in the United Kingdom. Participants 600 patients aged over 65 admitted for acute medical care, identified as “confused” on admission. Interventions Participants were randomised to a specialist medical and mental health unit, designed to deliver best practice care for people with delirium or dementia, or to standard care (acute geriatric or general medical wards). Features of the specialist unit included joint staffing by medical and mental health professionals; enhanced staff training in delirium, dementia, and person centred dementia care; provision of organised purposeful activity; environmental modification to meet the needs of those with cognitive impairment; delirium prevention; and a proactive and inclusive approach to family carers. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: number of days spent at home over the 90 days after randomisation. Secondary outcomes: structured non-participant observations to ascertain patients’ experiences; satisfaction of family carers with hospital care. When possible, outcome assessment was blind to allocation. Results There was no significant difference in days spent at home between the specialist unit and standard care groups (median 51 v 45 days, 95% confidence interval for difference −12 to 24; P=0.3). Median index hospital stay was 11 versus 11 days, mortality 22% versus 25% (−9% to 4%), readmission 32% versus 35% (−10% to 5%), and new admission to care home 20% versus 28% (−16% to 0) for the specialist unit and standard care groups, respectively. Patients returning home spent a median of 70.5 versus 71.0 days at home (−6.0 to 6.5). Patients on the specialist unit spent significantly more time with positive mood or

  16. Personality.

    PubMed

    Funder, D C

    2001-01-01

    Personality psychology is as active today as at any point in its history. The classic psychoanalytic and trait paradigms are active areas of research, the behaviorist paradigm has evolved into a new social-cognitive paradigm, and the humanistic paradigm is a basis of current work on cross-cultural psychology. Biology and evolutionary theory have also attained the status of new paradigms for personality. Three challenges for the next generation of research are to integrate these disparate approaches to personality (particularly the trait and social-cognitive paradigms), to remedy the imbalance in the person-situation-behavior triad by conceptualizing the basic properties of situations and behaviors, and to add to personality psychology's thin inventory of basic facts concerning the relations between personality and behavior.

  17. Risk Factors for Sporadic Cryptosporidiosis among Immunocompetent Persons in the United States from 1999 to 2001

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sharon L.; DeLong, Stephanie M.; Stenzel, Sara A.; Shiferaw, Beletshachew; Roberts, Jacquelin M.; Khalakdina, Asheena; Marcus, Ruthanne; Segler, Suzanne D.; Shah, Dipti D.; Thomas, Stephanie; Vugia, Duc J.; Zansky, Shelley M.; Dietz, Vance; Beach, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have evaluated the role of Cryptosporidium spp. in outbreaks of enteric illness, but few studies have evaluated sporadic cryptosporidiosis in the United States. To assess the risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis among immunocompetent persons, a matched case-control study was conducted in seven sites of the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) involving 282 persons with laboratory-identified cryptosporidiosis and 490 age-matched and geographically matched controls. Risk factors included international travel (odds ratio [OR] = 7.7; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 2.7 to 22.0), contact with cattle (OR = 3.5; 95% CI = 1.8 to 6.8), contact with persons >2 to 11 years of age with diarrhea (OR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.5 to 6.2), and freshwater swimming (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.049 to 3.5). Eating raw vegetables was protective (OR = 0.5; 95% CI = 0.3 to 0.7). This study underscores the need for ongoing public health education to prevent cryptosporidiosis, particularly among travelers, animal handlers, child caregivers, and swimmers, and the need for further assessment of the role of raw vegetables in cryptosporidiosis. PMID:15243043

  18. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-03-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation.

  19. Nonfatal bathroom injuries among persons aged ≥15 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    2011-06-10

    In 2008, approximately 21.8 million persons aged ≥15 years sustained nonfatal, unintentional injuries, resulting in approximately $67.3 billion in lifetime medical costs. Information about where injuries occur is limited, but bathrooms commonly are believed to be a particularly hazardous location. To investigate this assumption, CDC analyzed data from a nationally representative sample of emergency departments (EDs) to describe the incidence and circumstances of nonfatal injuries in bathrooms (in any setting) among persons aged ≥15 years in the United States. This report describes the results of that investigation, which found that, based on 3,339 cases documented in the 2008 National Electronic Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) database, an estimated 234,094 nonfatal bathroom injuries were treated in U.S. EDs. Injury rates increased with age, and most injuries (81.1%) were caused by falls. All persons, but especially older adults, should be aware of bathroom activities that are associated with a high risk for injury and of environmental modifications that might reduce that risk. PMID:21659980

  20. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States.

    PubMed

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G

    2014-12-30

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n=5363) and second-generation (n=4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n=24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States.

  1. Reduction of nutrients, microbes, and personal care products in domestic wastewater by a benchtop electrocoagulation unit

    PubMed Central

    Symonds, E. M.; Cook, M. M.; McQuaig, S. M.; Ulrich, R. M.; Schenck, R. O.; Lukasik, J. O.; Van Vleet, E. S.; Breitbart, M.

    2015-01-01

    To preserve environmental and human health, improved treatment processes are needed to reduce nutrients, microbes, and emerging chemical contaminants from domestic wastewater prior to discharge into the environment. Electrocoagulation (EC) treatment is increasingly used to treat industrial wastewater; however, this technology has not yet been thoroughly assessed for its potential to reduce concentrations of nutrients, a variety of microbial surrogates, and personal care products found in domestic wastewater. This investigation's objective was to determine the efficiency of a benchtop EC unit with aluminum sacrificial electrodes to reduce concentrations of the aforementioned biological and chemical pollutants from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. EC treatment resulted in significant reductions (p < 0.05, α = 0.05) in phosphate, all microbial surrogates, and several personal care products from raw and tertiary-treated domestic wastewater. When wastewater was augmented with microbial surrogates representing bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens to measure the extent of reduction, EC treatment resulted in up to 7-log10 reduction of microbial surrogates. Future pilot and full-scale investigations are needed to optimize EC treatment for the following: reducing nitrogen species, personal care products, and energy consumption; elucidating the mechanisms behind microbial reductions; and performing life cycle analyses to determine the appropriateness of implementation. PMID:25797885

  2. Task-contingent conscientiousness as a unit of personality at work.

    PubMed

    Minbashian, Amirali; Wood, Robert E; Beckmann, Nadin

    2010-09-01

    The present study examined the viability of incorporating task-contingent units into the study of personality at work, using conscientiousness as an illustrative example. We used experience-sampling data from 123 managers to show that (a) momentary conscientiousness at work is contingent on the difficulty and urgency demands of the tasks people are engaged in, (b) there are significant and stable differences between people in the extent to which their conscientiousness behaviors are contingent on task demands, and (c) individual differences in task-contingent conscientiousness are related to, though distinct from, individual differences in trait conscientiousness. We also provide evidence in relation to (a) need for cognition as a possible antecedent of task-contingent conscientiousness and (b) adaptive performance on a cognitive task as a possible consequence of it. We discuss the theoretical implications of our findings for the cognitive nature of personality and the way in which conscientiousness is expressed at work. Practical implications in relation to the predictive function of personality and applications that focus on behavioral change are also discussed. PMID:20718521

  3. Mood, anxiety, and personality disorders among first and second-generation immigrants to the United States

    PubMed Central

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Kagotho, Njeri; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    A careful examination of the multigenerational relationship between immigrant status and mental disorders can provide important information about the robustness and nature of the immigrant-mental health link. We examine immigrant status as a protective factor against mental illness, assess intergenerational effects, examine differences across race/ethnicity, and report the prevalence of mood, anxiety, and personality disorders of immigrants across major world regions. We employ data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) and compare first (n = 5,363) and second-generation (n = 4826) immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America to native-born Americans (n = 24,461) with respect to mental disorders. First-generation immigrants are significantly less likely than native-born Americans to be diagnosed with a mood, anxiety, or personality disorder, though the prevalence of mental health diagnoses increases among second generation immigrants. Similar results were observed for immigrants from major world regions as the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was lower among immigrants from Africa, Latin America, Europe, and Asia compared to native-born Americans. Findings provide evidence in support of the notion that the immigrant paradox may be extended to include mood, anxiety, and personality disorders in the United States. PMID:25223256

  4. Decreasing Mortality Among Patients Hospitalized With Cirrhosis in the United States From 2002 Through 2010

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Monica L.; Barritt, A. Sidney; Oman, Eric S.; Hayashi, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS It is not clear whether evidence-based recommendations for inpatient care of patients with cirrhosis are implemented widely or are effective in the community. We investigated changes in inpatient outcomes and associated features over time. METHODS By using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, National Inpatient Sample, we analyzed 781,515 hospitalizations of patients with cirrhosis from 2002 through 2010. We compared data with those from equal numbers of hospitalizations of patients without cirrhosis and patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), matched for age, sex, and year of discharge. The primary outcome was a change in discharge status over time. Factors associated with outcomes were analyzed by Poisson modeling. RESULTS The mortality of patients with and without cirrhosis, and patients with CHF, decreased over time. The absolute decrease was significantly greater for patients with cirrhosis (from 9.1% to 5.4%) than for patients without cirrhosis (from 2.6% to 2.1%) or patients with CHF (from 2.5% to 1.4%) (P < .01). However, relative decreases were similar for patients with cirrhosis (41%) and patients with CHF (44%). For patients with cirrhosis, the independent mortality risk ratio decreased steadily to 0.50 by 2010 (95% confidence interval, 0.48–0.52), despite patients’ increasing age and comorbidities. Hepatorenal syndrome, hepatocellular carcinoma, variceal bleeding, and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis were associated with a higher mortality rate, but the independent mortality risks for each decreased steadily. Sepsis was associated strongly with increased mortality, and the risk increased over time. CONCLUSIONS Among patients with cirrhosis in the United States, inpatient mortality decreased steadily from 2002 through 2010, despite increases in patient age and medical complexity. Improvements in cirrhosis care may have contributed to increases in patient survival beyond those attributable to general improvements in

  5. Predictors of Long-Term Mortality in Patients Hospitalized in an Intensive Cardiac Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Uscinska, Ewa; Sobkowicz, Bożena; Lisowska, Anna; Sawicki, Robert; Dabrowska, Milena; Szmitkowski, Maciej; Musial, Wlodzimierz J; Tycinska, Agnieszka M

    2016-01-01

    Patients admitted to an intensive cardiac care unit (ICCU) are a heterogeneous population with a high mortality rate. The aim of our study was to investigate which clinical, biochemical, and echocardiographic parameters routinely assessed may affect long-term mortality in a non-selected ICCU population.A total of 392 patients hospitalized between 2008-2011 (mean age, 70 ± 13.8 years, 43% women) were consecutively and prospectively assessed with the following admission diagnoses: 168 with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), 122 with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), and 102 with other acute cardiac disorders. Patients were treated according to the current European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines.During a mean 29.3 (± 18.9) months of observation, 152 (38.8%) patients died and 7.9% of the patients needed a red blood cell transfusion (RBC Tx). Patients who died were significantly older and had lower baseline levels of hemoglobin (Hb), serum iron concentration (SIC), total iron binding capacity (TIBC), cholesterol, and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), as well as lower eGFR values, and higher white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels (P < 0.05). Predictors of death in multivariate regression analysis were age, Hb, LVEF, WBC, and CRP. The most powerful factor was hospitalization for non-ACS. The risk of long-term mortality increased with decreasing levels of Hb (P < 0.001), SIC (P = 0.001), TIBC (P = 0.009), and the need for RBC Tx (P < 0.001), as well as the diagnosis of ADHF (P < 0.001) and the absence of ACS (P = 0.007).In ICCU patients, age, Hb, parameters of iron status, and LVEF are strong predictors of long-term mortality. Among the ICCU population, patients with ACS diagnosis have better survival. PMID:26673443

  6. Use of gloves and handwashing behaviour among health care workers in intensive care units. A multicentre investigation in four hospitals in Denmark and Norway.

    PubMed

    Zimakoff, J; Stormark, M; Larsen, S O

    1993-05-01

    Glove use and handwashing frequencies (HW) were observed in intensive care units (ICU) in two university hospitals in Denmark and two in Norway. The study included a total of 1632 patient procedures performed by 325 persons. Handwashing (HW) has become an important part of general barrier precautions. Earlier studies have shown that health care workers (HCW) far too often neglect to wash their hands after patient procedures when handwashing is strongly recommended. Despite earlier claims that increased glove use in hospitals would discourage handwashing, our results showed that HCW washed their hands more often after glove use (57%) than when gloves had not been used (40%). This significant difference in HW frequency was also noted when similar procedures were carried out by HCW with or without gloves. This might be a matter of personal discomfort after wearing gloves, but could also be due to differences in awareness of hygienic aspects of patient care. In the two countries gloves were used on average at 17% of the procedures, but were not used appropriately for dirty procedures. The results of this study indicate that more effective methods for the implementation of appropriate glove use and HW should be emphasized.

  7. Healthy hospital food initiatives in the United States: time to ban sugar sweetened beverages to reduce childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wojcicki, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    While childhood obesity is a global problem, the extent and severity of the problem in United States, has resulted in a number of new initiatives, including recent hospital initiatives to limit the sale of sweetened beverages and other high calorie drinks in hospital vending machines and cafeterias. These proposed policy changes are not unique to United States, but are more comprehensive in the number of proposed hospitals that they will impact. Meanwhile, however, it is advised, that these initiatives should focus on banning sugar sweetened beverages, including sodas, 100% fruit juice and sports drinks, from hospital cafeterias and vending machines instead of limiting their presence, so as to ensure the success of these programs in reducing the prevalence of childhood obesity. If US hospitals comprehensively remove sugar sweetened beverages from their cafeterias and vending machines, these programs could subsequently become a model for efforts to address childhood obesity in other areas of the world. Conclusion Hospitals should be a model for health care reform in their communities and removing sugar sweetened beverages is a necessary first step. PMID:23445326

  8. Burden of Hospital Acquired Infections and Antimicrobial Use in Vietnamese Adult Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, Mattias; Nadjm, Behzad; Dinh, Quynh-Dao; Nilsson, Lennart E.; Rydell, Ulf; Le, Tuyet Thi Diem; Trinh, Son Hong; Pham, Hung Minh; Tran, Cang Thanh; Doan, Hanh Thi Hong; Tran, Nguyen Thua; Le, Nhan Duc; Huynh, Nhuan Van; Tran, Thao Phuong; Tran, Bao Duc; Nguyen, Son Truong; Pham, Thao Thi Ngoc; Dang, Tam Quang; Nguyen, Chau Van Vinh; Lam, Yen Minh; Thwaites, Guy; Van Nguyen, Kinh; Hanberger, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Background Vietnam is a lower middle-income country with no national surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections (HAIs). We assessed the prevalence of hospital-acquired infections and antimicrobial use in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Vietnam. Methods Monthly repeated point prevalence surveys were systematically conducted to assess HAI prevalence and antimicrobial use in 15 adult ICUs across Vietnam. Adults admitted to participating ICUs before 08:00 a.m. on the survey day were included. Results Among 3287 patients enrolled, the HAI prevalence was 29.5% (965/3266 patients, 21 missing). Pneumonia accounted for 79.4% (804/1012) of HAIs Most HAIs (84.5% [855/1012]) were acquired in the survey hospital with 42.5% (363/855) acquired prior to ICU admission and 57.5% (492/855) developed during ICU admission. In multivariate analysis, the strongest risk factors for HAI acquired in ICU were: intubation (OR 2.76), urinary catheter (OR 2.12), no involvement of a family member in patient care (OR 1.94), and surgery after admission (OR 1.66). 726 bacterial isolates were cultured from 622/1012 HAIs, most frequently Acinetobacter baumannii (177/726 [24.4%]), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (100/726 [13.8%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (84/726 [11.6%]), with carbapenem resistance rates of 89.2%, 55.7%, and 14.9% respectively. Antimicrobials were prescribed for 84.8% (2787/3287) patients, with 73.7% of patients receiving two or more. The most common antimicrobial groups were third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and carbapenems (20.1%, 19.4%, and 14.1% of total antimicrobials, respectively). Conclusion A high prevalence of HAIs was observed, mainly caused by Gram-negative bacteria with high carbapenem resistance rates. This in combination with a high rate of antimicrobial use illustrates the urgent need to improve rational antimicrobial use and infection control efforts. PMID:26824228

  9. Personalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca Martin

    1996-01-01

    Describes how a typical high school in Huntington Beach, California, curbed disruptive student behavior by personalizing the school experience for "problem" students. Through mostly volunteer efforts, an adopt-a-kid program was initiated that matched kids' learning styles to adults' personality styles and resulted in fewer suspensions and numerous…

  10. Barriers to Employability of Persons with Handicaps: A Bi-National Study in the United States and Israel. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Edward; And Others

    A study compared the barriers to employment facing handicapped persons in Israel and the United States. Five vocational rehabilitation centers (two in the United States and three in Israel) were examined. Each was studied in terms of the type of center, population served, goals, nature and scope of services provided, sources of income, staff and…

  11. Multidisciplinary case management for patients at high risk of hospitalization: comparison of virtual ward models in the United kingdom, United States, and Canada.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Geraint; Wright, Lorraine; Vaithianathan, Rhema

    2012-10-01

    Virtual wards are a model for delivering multidisciplinary case management to people who are at high predicted risk of unplanned acute care hospitalization. First introduced in Croydon, England, in 2006, this concept has since been adopted and adapted by health care organizations in other parts of the United Kingdom and internationally. In this article, the authors review the model of virtual wards as originally described-with its twin pillars of (1) using a predictive model to identify people who are at high risk of future emergency hospitalization, and (2) offering these individuals a period of intensive, multidisciplinary preventive care at home using the systems, staffing, and daily routines of a hospital ward. The authors then describe how virtual wards have been modified and implemented in 6 sites in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada where they are subject to formal evaluation. Like hospital wards, virtual wards vary in terms of patient selection, ward configuration, staff composition, and ward processes. Policy makers and researchers should be aware of these differences when considering the evaluation results of studies investigating the cost-effectiveness of virtual wards.

  12. Medication huddles slash adverse drug events (ADE), promote safety culture across all hospital units, including the ED.

    PubMed

    2014-03-01

    To make a big dent in adverse drug events (ADE), Nationwide Children's Hospital devised medication huddles: a process that takes place after every reported ADE. A core huddle team meets with clinicians from the specific unit involved to discuss why the ADE occurred, and what can be done to prevent future events. In three years, the approach has reduced ADEs by 74%, and the rate of ADEs per 1,000 dispensed doses has decreased by 85%. * Administrators say a safety culture that encourages error reporting is key to making the process work. * To facilitate the huddle discussions, developers created a data collection tool that prompts huddle participants to describe the ADE, what factors were involved, and potential solutions. * While the medication huddles were first implemented in the hospital's critical care units, the process has since been expanded to include all areas of the hospital, including the ED. PMID:24640292

  13. The Implications of the National Minimum Wage for Training Practices and Skill Utilisation in the United Kingdom Hospitality Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Gill; Williams, Steve; Adam-Smith, Derek

    2003-01-01

    Two key issues thrown up by the 1999 introduction of the National Minimum Wage (NMW) in the United Kingdom are its likely impact on employers' training practices in low paying sectors of the economy and the implications for skills. Based on a study of the hospitality industry, this article assesses the limited significance of the differential,…

  14. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ..., or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States... intervening period, the cost of medical care and treatment has increased substantially. That increase...

  15. Health science libraries in the United States: III. Hospital health science libraries, 1969-1979.

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, S

    1983-01-01

    Health sciences libraries in hospitals were examined from longitudinal data collected in 1969, 1973, and 1979, to derive parameters for the universe and for resources, services, and manpower. The surveys show that during this period, the number of hospitals decreased whereas the number of libraries increased. Growth in the number of community hospital libraries was counterbalanced by changes in federal, psychiatric, tuberculosis, and chronic illness hospitals. PMID:6831083

  16. Does Influenza Vaccination Modify Influenza Severity? Data on Older Adults Hospitalized With Influenza During the 2012−2013 Season in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Carmen S.; Anderson, Evan J.; Baumbach, Joan; Bennett, Nancy; Bohm, Susan; Hill, Mary; Lindegren, Mary Lou; Lung, Krista; Meek, James; Mermel, Elizabeth; Miller, Lisa; Monroe, Maya L.; Morin, Craig; Oni, Oluwakemi; Reingold, Arthur; Schaffner, William; Thomas, Ann; Zansky, Shelley M.; Finelli, Lyn; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Some studies suggest that influenza vaccination might be protective against severe influenza outcomes in vaccinated persons who become infected. We used data from a large surveillance network to further investigate the effect of influenza vaccination on influenza severity in adults aged ≥50 years who were hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Methods. We analyzed influenza vaccination and influenza severity using Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) data for the 2012−2013 influenza season. Intensive care unit (ICU) admission, death, diagnosis of pneumonia, and hospital and ICU lengths of stay served as measures of disease severity. Data were analyzed by multivariable logistic regression, parametric survival models, and propensity score matching (PSM). Results. Overall, no differences in severity were observed in the multivariable logistic regression model. Using PSM, adults aged 50−64 years (but not other age groups) who were vaccinated against influenza had a shorter length of ICU stay than those who were unvaccinated (hazard ratio for discharge, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.12−3.01). Conclusions. Our findings show a modest effect of influenza vaccination on disease severity. Analysis of data from seasons with different predominant strains and higher estimates of vaccine effectiveness are needed. PMID:25821227

  17. A survey on oral care practices for ventilator-assisted patients in intensive care units in 3A hospitals of mainland China.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xing; Xie, Huixu; Zhang, Qi; Zhou, Xuedong; Shi, Zongdao

    2015-12-01

    Oral hygiene is a critical element of patient care, particularly among patients who need ventilator-assisted equipment. The objective of this study was to explore the current status of oral care practices, attitudes, education and knowledge among intensive care unit (ICU) nurses caring for ventilator-assisted patients in 3A hospitals in mainland China. To achieve this aim, an 18-item self-assessment questionnaire was mailed to head ICU nurses in 189 Grade 3A hospitals. Additional data were collected through in-person interviews at 38 ICUs throughout Sichuan, Shanxi, Jiangsu provinces, as well as Chongqing and Beijing. We found that most ICUs conducted oral examinations at patient admission, and that this care was largely provided by nurses. The most common oral care methods were foam swabs and mouth rinse containing antibiotics or disinfectants. Although the majority of ICUs provided continuing training for oral care, and most training was conducted by head nurses, the content and scope of training were not consistent among the hospitals in the study. The most popular sources of oral care knowledge were academic journals, Internet and professional books. Overall, it is clear that an evidence-based oral care standard manual is urgently needed for oral practice in ICUs in mainland China.

  18. What impact do hospital and unit-based rules have upon patient and family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit?

    PubMed

    Baird, Jennifer; Davies, Betty; Hinds, Pamela S; Baggott, Christina; Rehm, Roberta S

    2015-01-01

    Patient and family-centered care (PFCC) is the foundation for pediatric healthcare. The existence of hospital rules can, however, impact the extent to which PFCC is delivered. This qualitative, grounded theory study identified the existence of explicit and implicit rules in a pediatric intensive care unit, all of which negatively affected the family's ability to receive care that was attentive to their needs. The rules also placed the registered nurse in the challenging position of serving as rule enforcer and facilitator of PFCC. Further work is needed to explore how to adapt the hospital environment to better meet families' needs.

  19. The impact of chaplaincy services in selected hospitals in the eastern United States.

    PubMed

    Parkum, K H

    1985-09-01

    Surveys a stratified sample of patients in six different hospitals and compares their perceptions of hospital chaplaincy and other pastoral care efforts with related hospital services. Reports the presence of a strong impact of pastoral care services and discusses these findings from the perspective of a theory of expressive and instrumental social orientations as explicated by the sociologist Talcott Parsons. PMID:10272816

  20. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  1. Etiology and outcomes for patients infected with HIV in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiang; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Yingxiu; Tian, Yunfei; Su, Wenjing; Li, Yanmei; Zhang, Wei; Han, Ning; Yang, Di; Zhao, Hongxin

    2015-03-01

    Although the National Free Antiretroviral Treatment Program (NFATP) has resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of AIDS-defining illnesses in China, severe complications in patients infected with HIV may require aggressive treatment and critical care support. The objective for this study was to investigate the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units in Ditan Hospital, China. The evaluation of the etiology and outcomes of patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units was conducted using the clinical data from 122 patients infected with HIV (129 occasions) admitted to the Beijing Ditan hospital from January 1, 2009, to October 1, 2013. Over the five-year study period, 129 occasions occurred for 122 patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units. Respiratory failure was the most common condition (53.4%) among the 129 occasions analyzed. This was followed by pneumothorax (12.4%), infectious shock (8.5%), neurological problems (8.5%), renal failure (7.8%), post-operative complications and trauma (5.4%), coronary heart disease (3.1%), adverse effects of HAART (3.1%), lymphoma (2.4%), and liver failure (0.8%). Mortality in intensive care units was 64.5% while in-hospital mortality was 65.9%. The strongest protective predictor for in-hospital mortality was earlier admission to an intensive care unit (OR = 0.050, CI = 0.020-0.126, P < 0.001). Respiratory failure was the most common condition in patients infected with HIV admitted to intensive care units, and the outcome for the patients was poor. Mortality was negatively associated with earlier admission to an intensive care unit, but was not associated with HAART. PMID:25154318

  2. Trends of Hospitalizations in the United States from 2000 to 2012 of Patients >60 Years With Aortic Valve Disease.

    PubMed

    Badheka, Apurva O; Singh, Vikas; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Nilay; Thakkar, Badal; Jhamnani, Sunny; Pant, Sadip; Chothani, Ankit; Macon, Conrad; Panaich, Sidakpal S; Patel, Jay; Manvar, Sohilkumar; Savani, Chirag; Bhatt, Parth; Panchal, Vinaykumar; Patel, Neil; Patel, Achint; Patel, Darshan; Lahewala, Sopan; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Mohamad, Tamam; Mangi, Abeel A; Cleman, Michael; Forrest, John K

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of valvular heart disease and, in particular, aortic stenosis. This has been driven in part by the development of innovative therapeutic options and by an aging patient population. We hypothesized an increase in the number of hospitalizations and the economic burden associated with aortic valve disease (AVD). Using Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2012, AVD-related hospitalizations were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification, code 424.1, as the principal discharge diagnosis. Overall AVD hospitalizations increased by 59% from 2000 to 2012. This increase was most significant in patients >80 years and those with higher burden of co-morbidities. The most frequent coexisting conditions were hypertension, heart failure, renal failure, anemia, and diabetes. Overall inhospital mortality of patients hospitalized for AVD was 3.8%, which significantly decreased from 4.5% in 2000 to 3.5% in 2012 (p <0.001). The largest decrease in mortality was seen in the subgroup of patients who had heart failure (62% reduction), higher burden of co-morbidities (58% reduction), and who were >80 years (53% reduction). There was a substantial increase in the cost of hospitalization in the last decade from $31,909 to $38,172 (p <0.001). The total annual cost for AVD hospitalization in the United States increased from $1.3 billion in 2001 to $2.1 billion in 2011 and is expected to increase to nearly 3 billion by 2020. The last decade has witnessed a significant increase in hospitalizations for AVD in the United States. The associated decrease in inhospital mortality and increase in the cost of hospitalization have considerably increased the economic burden on the public health system.

  3. [Generating health elicits illness? The contradictions of work performed in emergency care units of public hospitals].

    PubMed

    Rosado, Iana Vasconcelos Moreira; Russo, Gláucia Helena Araújo; Maia, Eulália Maria Chaves

    2015-10-01

    In general terms, health is influenced and generated by the interaction of biological, social, economic, political and cultural factors. From this standpoint, the scope of this paper was to analyze the relationship between working in emergency care units of public hospitals and the health/sickness of the professionals who work in them. It involved a quantitative and qualitative survey, in which 240 health professionals (doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, dentists, nutritionists, audiologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists) filled out a questionnaire. All the results acknowledged the importance of work to ensure favorable conditions for good health. However, they highlighted its deleterious physical and mental effects on workers, which included stress, lack of a healthy life-style, high blood pressure and musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and sleep disorders. It is therefore important to tackle this reality in order to enhance the health of professionals and, consequently, the quality of care provided to the user, since illnesses among health workers are strongly linked to the existing health model in society. PMID:26465845

  4. Drug incompatibilities in the adult intensive care unit of a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Marsilio, Naiane Roveda; da Silva, Daiandy; Bueno, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to identify the physical and chemical incompatibilities among the drugs administered intravenously to patients admitted to an adult intensive care unit. We also aimed to establish pharmaceutical guidelines for administering incompatible drugs. Methods This cross-sectional, prospective, and quantitative study was conducted from July to September 2015. Drug incompatibilities were identified based on an analysis of the patient prescriptions available in the hospital online management system. A pharmaceutical intervention was performed using the guidelines on the preparation and administration of incompatible drugs. Adherence to those guidelines was subsequently assessed among the nursing staff. Results A total of 100 prescriptions were analyzed; 68 were incompatible with the intravenous drugs prescribed. A total of 271 drug incompatibilities were found, averaging 4.0 ± 3.3 incompatibilities per prescription. The most commonly found drug incompatibilities were between midazolam and hydrocortisone (8.9%), between cefepime and midazolam (5.2%), and between hydrocortisone and vancomycin (5.2%). The drugs most commonly involved in incompatibilities were midazolam, hydrocortisone, and vancomycin. The most common incompatibilities occurred when a drug was administered via continuous infusion and another was administered intermittently (50%). Of the 68 prescriptions that led to pharmaceutical guidelines, 45 (66.2%) were fully adhered to by the nursing staff. Conclusion Patients under intensive care were subjected to a high rate of incompatibilities. Drug incompatibilities can be identified and eliminated by the pharmacist on the multidisciplinary team, thereby reducing undesirable effects among patients. PMID:27410410

  5. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). Materials and Methods: We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. Results: The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps Conclusion: Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended. PMID:26600701

  6. Perception of intensive care unit stressors in Malaysian Federal Territory hospitals.

    PubMed

    Soh, Kim Lam; Soh, Kim Geok; Ahmad, Zaiton; Abdul Raman, Rosna; Japar, Salimah

    2008-12-01

    The Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is a therapeutic place for monitoring critically ill patients. However, it is a stressful area for the patients and it is causing them great anxiety. Previous studies have identified three groups of stressors in ICU namely; physical, psychological and environmental. The aims of this study were to determine the ICU stressors as experienced by patients and to determine the level of stressors felt by patients in ICU. A cross sectional study was done on 70 patients from two tertiary hospitals in Malaysia. A face-to-face interview with structured questionnaire was used for patients. Data collection occurred from 15 December 2006 to 31 January 2007. The five major ICU stressors perceived by patients were pain, being stuck with needles, boredom, missing their spouses and being too hot/cold. The ICU physical stressors were the major items ranked by post ICU patients. The findings from this study provided a set of baseline information to the health care providers, particularly ICU nurses in Malaysia, with which to provide better care for the patients in ICU. PMID:19117504

  7. Patients' lived seclusion experience in acute psychiatric hospital in the United States: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Ezeobele, I E; Malecha, A T; Mock, A; Mackey-Godine, A; Hughes, M

    2014-05-01

    The findings revealed that the patients perceived seclusion as an intervention that is punitive and a means used by the staff to exert control. Patients perceived that staff incitements and lack of communication skills led to their being secluded. The findings provided recommendations and strategies for seclusion reduction that were based on the patients' first-hand seclusion experiences. This phenomenological study used Husserlian's philosophy to explore and describe the lived experiences of psychiatric patients who were secluded at a free-standing acute care hospital located in South-western United States (US). The study is crucial because very few studies have been conducted in this area in the US. The study examined a purposive sample of 20 patients, 3 days post-seclusion. Data were generated through face-to-face, semi-structured interviews incorporating open-ended questions and probes to facilitate discussion until saturation was reached. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and data analysed using Colaizzi's seven steps method. Results were described according to the themes and subthemes identified. Findings uncovered four themes: (1) alone in the world; (2) staff exert power and control; (3) resentment towards staff; and (4) time for meditation. The findings from this study illuminated the views surrounding patients' seclusion experience. It provided first-hand information on the patients' seclusion experience that might be helpful to the mental health professionals in the seclusion reduction process.

  8. Current status of intensive care units registered as critical care subspecialty training hospitals in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sang-Hyun; Jeong, Cheol-Won; Lee, Seong-Heon; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Koh, Younsuck

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of information on critical care in Korea. The aim of this study was to determine the current status of Korean intensive care units (ICUs), focusing on the organization, characteristics of admitted patients, and nurse and physician staffing. Critical care specialists in charge of all 105 critical care specialty training hospitals nationwide completed a questionnaire survey. Among the ICUs, 56.4% were located in or near the capital city. Only 38 ICUs (17.3%) had intensive care specialists with a 5-day work week. The average daytime nurse-to-patient ratio was 1:2.7. Elderly people ≥ 65 yr of age comprised 53% of the adult patients. The most common reasons for admission to adult ICUs were respiratory insufficiency and postoperative management. Nurse and physician staffing was insufficient for the appropriate critical care in many ICUs. Staffing was worse in areas outside the capital city. Much effort, including enhanced reimbursement of critical care costs, must be made to improve the quality of critical care at the national level.

  9. Treatment and diagnostic accuracy of neurosyphilis at Boston City Hospital's Neurological Unit, 1930-1979.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Diana; Vilensky, Joel A; Robertson, Wendy M; Berger, Joseph

    2012-03-15

    The twentieth century was marked with frequent advances in the treatment and diagnosis of neurosyphilis. Once considered one of the most serious human diseases, neurosyphilis was paramount to a death sentence often preceded by agonizing pain and/or diminishing mental capacities. Since the introduction of penicillin in 1943, however, the prevalence of neurosyphilis has declined dramatically and the prognosis of the few still affected has been greatly improved. We examined patient records from Boston City Hospital's (BCH) Neurologic Unit from 1930 to 1979 to obtain primary data on treatment modalities for neurosyphilis during this period, with particular attention to the use of malarial therapy. We also evaluated these same records to determine whether the "great imitator" moniker that was applied to neurosyphilis may have in part been due to systematic errors in diagnostic criteria and false positive tests. The BCH neurologists used all available treatment compounds, including arsenicals, bismuth, iodides, malaria, and typhoid. The data also suggest that the wide diversity of symptoms attributed to neurosyphilis was probably accurate. PMID:22129939

  10. Punishing the not guilty: hospitalization of persons acquitted by reason of insanity.

    PubMed

    German, J R; Singer, A C

    1977-01-01

    Some of the mystique surrounding persons acquitted of crimes on insanity grounds (NGIs) is being dispelled by arguing that they should be treated as are other mental patients in all phases of their contact institutions. The courts have moved along the road to equalization but still have a way to go. It is concluded that there is no basis for any differentiation between persons who are acquitted of crime by reason fo insanity and other civil patients with respect to commitment, treatment, and discharge. Any other approach sacrifices not only constitutional rights but also impairs the likelihood of rehabilitation and productive return to society for these patients who have been adjudge not guilty of their antisocial acts and from whom no punishment may be exacted.

  11. Person-environment interaction in a new secure forensic state psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Jon E; Kelly, Sean P; Margiotta, David T; Hegvik, Donna K; Vaher, Kairi A; Kaya, Rachel Tamiko

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the person-environment interaction effects of environmental design on ward climate, safety, job satisfaction, and treatment outcomes within a new high security forensic psychiatric facility. Participants included male and female adult psychiatric inpatients and staff members at different security stages. Data were collected once before and twice after the experimental group moved into the new building. The control group remained in the same facilities. Contrary to expectations, the new building had limited effects on the measured variables.

  12. Perceptions of personal risk about smoking and health among Bosnian refugees living in the United States.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jenine K; Karamehic-Muratovic, Ajlina; Herbers, Stephanie H; Moreland-Russell, Sarah; Cheskin, Robin; Lindberg, Kari A

    2012-06-01

    More than 60% of Bosnian refugees in the United States may be current smokers. Examining health beliefs can provide insight into smoking behaviors in this community. Four hundred ninety-nine Bosnians were interviewed about health beliefs and personal health risks related to smoking. ANOVA was used to compare current, former, and never smokers. General health beliefs were significantly different by smoking status with medium effect sizes (P < .001; η(2) = 0.04-0.06); current smokers were less likely to agree that smokers live shorter lives and that smokers are more likely to get heart disease. Significant differences with large effect sizes (P < .001; η(2) = 0.11-0.29) were found in perception of personal risk of lung cancer and heart disease among current, former, and never smokers. Current smokers perceived their own health risks as less severe than those of other smokers. High smoking rates and smokers' optimism related to health indicate that culturally tailored educational and cessation interventions are needed for Bosnian refugee communities.

  13. Hospital-acquired infection surveillance in a neurosurgical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Orsi, G B; Scorzolini, L; Franchi, C; Mondillo, V; Rosa, G; Venditti, M

    2006-09-01

    A prospective study on hospital-acquired infection (HAI) was undertaken in the eight-bed neurosurgical intensive care unit (NSICU) of a teaching hospital in Rome, Italy. All patients admitted for >48 h between January 2002 and December 2004 were included. The infection control team collected the following data from all patients: demographic characteristics, patient origin, diagnosis, severity score, underlying diseases, invasive procedures, HAI, isolated micro-organisms and antibiotic susceptibilities. Overall, 323 patients were included in the study. Mean age was 55.5 years (range 17-91), and mean American Society of Anesthesiologists' score was 2.88. Seventy (21.7%) patients developed 132 NSICU HAIs: 43 pneumonias, 40 bloodstream infections (BSIs), 30 urinary tract infections (UTIs), 10 cases of meningitis associated with an external ventricular drain (EVD) and nine surgical site infections (SSIs). The SSI rate was high (5.6%), but a reduction was achieved during the three-year period. There were 7.2 bloodstream infection episodes per 1000 days of device exposure; 11.00 pneumonias per 1000 days of mechanical ventilation and 4.5 UTIs per 1,000 days of urinary catheterisation. Among patients with an EVD, the SSI relative risk was 11.3 [95% confidence intervals (CI) 4.2-30.6; P<0.01]. Sixty-one (18.9%) patients died. Logistic regression analysis showed that mortality was significantly associated with infection [odds ratio (OR)=2.28; 95%CI 1.11-4.71; P=0.02] and age (OR=1.04; 95%CI 1.01-1.06; P=0.002). Candida spp. were the leading cause of UTIs (40.0%) and the third most common cause of BSIs (12.7%). Antibiotic-resistant pathogens included meticillin-resistant staphylococci (77.5%), carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (36.4%), and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (75.0%). Although the overall incidence of infection (21.7%) was within the range of published data, the associated mortality, the increasing severity of illness of

  14. 38 CFR 17.41 - Persons eligible for hospital observation and physical examination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Government insurance suits. (2) United States Civil Service Commission—annuitants or applicants for... Government insurance. (38 U.S.C. 1711(a)) (b) Claimants or beneficiaries referred to a diagnostic center for... Retirement Board—applicants for annuity under Public No. 162, 75th Congress. (5) Other Federal agencies....

  15. Prevalence of chronic hepatitis B among foreign-born persons living in the United States by country of origin.

    PubMed

    Kowdley, Kris V; Wang, Chia C; Welch, Sue; Roberts, Henry; Brosgart, Carol L

    2012-08-01

    Estimates of the prevalence of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) in the United States differ significantly, and the contribution of foreign-born (FB) persons has not been adequately described. The aim of this study was to estimate the number of FB persons in the United States living with CHB by their country of origin. We performed a systematic review for reports of HBsAg seroprevalence rates in 102 countries (covering PubMed from 1980 to July 2010). Data from 1,373 articles meeting inclusion criteria were extracted into country-specific databases. We identified 256 seroprevalence surveys in emigrants from 52 countries (including 689,078 persons) and 1,797 surveys in the general populations of 98 countries (including 17,861,035 persons). Surveys including individuals with lower or higher risk of CHB than the general population were excluded. Data were combined using meta-analytic methods to determine country-specific pooled CHB prevalence rates. Rates were multiplied by the number of FB living in the United States in 2009 by country of birth from the U.S. Census Bureau to yield the number of FB with CHB from each country. We estimate a total of 1.32 million (95% confidence interval: 1.04-1.61) FB in the United States living with CHB in 2009; 58% migrated from Asia and 11% migrated from Africa, where hepatitis B is highly endemic. Approximately 7% migrated from Central America, a region with lower CHB rates, but many more emigrants to the United States. This analysis suggests that the number of FB persons living with CHB in the United States may be significantly greater than previously reported. Assuming 300,000-600,000 U.S.-born persons with CHB, the total prevalence of CHB in the United States may be as high as 2.2 million.

  16. [The surveillance of nosocomial bacteremia in the Intensive Care Unit of the Hospital Pediátrico Docente Centro Habana].

    PubMed

    Pérez Monrás, M; Azahares Romero, L; Zuazo Silva, J L; Manresa, D

    1992-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out in order to assess nosocomial bacteremia in the Intensive Care Unit of the Centrohabana Teaching Pediatric Hospital, from January to May 1988. 66.7% of the bacteremia episodes diagnosed were of a nosocomial origin, mostly secondary. Nosocomial bacteremia rate was 15.5 per 100 admissions, with predominance in the age group under 1 year of age. Risk factors for acquiring nosocomial bacteremia were hospital stay longer than 72 hours, age under 1 year, tracheal intubation, deep venous catheterization and urinary catheterization. The most frequently associated microorganisms were Staphylococcus epidermis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PMID:1344683

  17. The rise of pathophysiologic research in the United States: the role of two Harvard hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tishler, Peter V

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiologic research, the major approach to understanding and treating disease, was created in the 20th century, and two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and Boston City Hospital, played a key role in its development. After the Flexner Report of 1910, medical students were assigned clinical clerkships in teaching hospitals. Rockefeller-trained Francis Weld Peabody, who was committed to investigative, pathophysiologic research, was a critical leader in these efforts. At the Brigham, Harvard medical students observed patients closely and asked provocative questions about their diseases. Additionally, physicians returned from World War I with questions concerning the pathophysiology of wartime injuries. At the Boston City Hospital's new Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Peabody fostered investigative question-based research by physicians. These physicians expanded pathophysiologic investigation from the 1920s. Post-war, Watson and Crick's formulation of the structure of DNA led shortly to modern molecular biology and new research approaches that are being furthered at the Boston Hospitals.

  18. The patients' library movement: an overview of early efforts in the United States to establish organized libraries for hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Panella, N M

    1996-01-01

    The patients' library movement in the United States, a dynamic, cohesive drive begun and sustained by librarians and physicians, strove to promote placement of organized libraries for patients in hospitals. It took shape in the early years of this century, evolving from its proponents' deeply held conviction that books and reading foster the rehabilitation of sick people. The American Library Association's World War I service to hospitalized military personnel dramatically reinforced the conviction; the post-World War I institution of public library extension services to general hospitals explicitly reflected it. Enormous energy was infused into the patients' library movement. Throughout the first half of this century, there were sustained efforts not only to establish organized libraries for hospitalized people but also to expand and systematically study bibliotherapy and to shape patients' librarianship as a professional specialty. The movement's achievements include the establishment of patients' library committees within national and international associations; impetus for development of academic programs to train patients' librarians; and publication, from 1944 through 1970, of successive sets of standards for hospital patients' libraries. The first of these remain the first standards written and issued by a professional library association for a hospital library.

  19. Comparing Safety Climate between Two Populations of Hospitals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Sara J; Hartmann, Christine W; Hanchate, Amresh; Zhao, Shibei; Meterko, Mark; Shokeen, Priti; Lin, Shoutzu; Gaba, David M; Rosen, Amy K

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare safety climate between diverse U.S. hospitals and Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals, and to explore the factors influencing climate in each setting. Data Sources Primary data from surveys of hospital personnel; secondary data from the American Hospital Association's 2004 Annual Survey of Hospitals. Study Design Cross-sectional study of 69 U.S. and 30 VA hospitals. Data Collection For each sample, hierarchical linear models used safety-climate scores as the dependent variable and respondent and facility characteristics as independent variables. Regression-based Oaxaca–Blinder decomposition examined differences in effects of model characteristics on safety climate between the U.S. and VA samples. Principal Findings The range in safety climate among U.S. and VA hospitals overlapped substantially. Characteristics of individuals influenced safety climate consistently across settings. Working in southern and urban facilities corresponded with worse safety climate among VA employees and better safety climate in the U.S. sample. Decomposition results predicted 1.4 percentage points better safety climate in U.S. than in VA hospitals: −0.77 attributable to sample-characteristic differences and 2.2 due to differential effects of sample characteristics. Conclusions Results suggest that safety climate is linked more to efforts of individual hospitals than to participation in a nationally integrated system or measured characteristics of workers and facilities. PMID:19619250

  20. Abrupt Decline in Tuberculosis among Foreign-Born Persons in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brian J.; Winston, Carla A.; Liu, Yecai; France, Anne Marie; Cain, Kevin P.

    2016-01-01

    While the number of reported tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States has declined over the past two decades, TB morbidity among foreign-born persons has remained persistently elevated. A recent unexpected decline in reported TB cases among foreign-born persons beginning in 2007 provided an opportunity to examine contributing factors and inform future TB control strategies. We investigated the relative influence of three factors on the decline: 1) changes in the size of the foreign-born population through immigration and emigration, 2) changes in distribution of country of origin among foreign-born persons, and 3) changes in the TB case rates among foreign-born subpopulations. Using data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the American Community Survey, we examined TB case counts, TB case rates, and population estimates, stratified by years since U.S. entry and country of origin. Regression modeling was used to assess statistically significant changes in trend. Among foreign-born recent entrants (<3 years since U.S. entry), we found a 39.5% decline (-1,013 cases) beginning in 2007 (P<0.05 compared to 2000–2007) and ending in 2011 (P<0.05 compared to 2011–2014). Among recent entrants from Mexico, 80.7% of the decline was attributable to a decrease in population, while the declines among recent entrants from the Philippines, India, Vietnam, and China were almost exclusively (95.5%–100%) the result of decreases in TB case rates. Among foreign-born non-recent entrants (≥3 years since U.S. entry), we found an 8.9% decline (-443 cases) that resulted entirely (100%) from a decrease in the TB case rate. Both recent and non-recent entrants contributed to the decline in TB cases; factors contributing to the decline among recent entrants varied by country of origin. Strategies that impact both recent and non-recent entrants (e.g., investment in overseas TB control) as well as those that focus on non-recent entrants (e.g., expanded targeted

  1. Abrupt Decline in Tuberculosis among Foreign-Born Persons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Baker, Brian J; Winston, Carla A; Liu, Yecai; France, Anne Marie; Cain, Kevin P

    2016-01-01

    While the number of reported tuberculosis (TB) cases in the United States has declined over the past two decades, TB morbidity among foreign-born persons has remained persistently elevated. A recent unexpected decline in reported TB cases among foreign-born persons beginning in 2007 provided an opportunity to examine contributing factors and inform future TB control strategies. We investigated the relative influence of three factors on the decline: 1) changes in the size of the foreign-born population through immigration and emigration, 2) changes in distribution of country of origin among foreign-born persons, and 3) changes in the TB case rates among foreign-born subpopulations. Using data from the U.S. National Tuberculosis Surveillance System and the American Community Survey, we examined TB case counts, TB case rates, and population estimates, stratified by years since U.S. entry and country of origin. Regression modeling was used to assess statistically significant changes in trend. Among foreign-born recent entrants (<3 years since U.S. entry), we found a 39.5% decline (-1,013 cases) beginning in 2007 (P<0.05 compared to 2000-2007) and ending in 2011 (P<0.05 compared to 2011-2014). Among recent entrants from Mexico, 80.7% of the decline was attributable to a decrease in population, while the declines among recent entrants from the Philippines, India, Vietnam, and China were almost exclusively (95.5%-100%) the result of decreases in TB case rates. Among foreign-born non-recent entrants (≥3 years since U.S. entry), we found an 8.9% decline (-443 cases) that resulted entirely (100%) from a decrease in the TB case rate. Both recent and non-recent entrants contributed to the decline in TB cases; factors contributing to the decline among recent entrants varied by country of origin. Strategies that impact both recent and non-recent entrants (e.g., investment in overseas TB control) as well as those that focus on non-recent entrants (e.g., expanded targeted

  2. [Stress level assessment of the nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-García, C; Ríos-Rísquez, M I; Martínez-Hurtado, R; Noguera-Villaescusa, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the work stress level among nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital and to analyse its relationship with the various sociodemographic and working variables of the studied sample. A study was designed using a quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional approach. The target population of the study was the nursing staff selected by non-random sampling. The instrument used was the Job Content Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 20. The mean, ranges and standard deviation for each of the variables were calculated. A bivariate analysis was also performed on the social and occupational variables of the sample. The participation rate was 80.90% (N=89). The mean of the Social support dimension was 3.13±0.397, for the Psychological demands at work dimension it was 3.10±0.384, with a mean of 2.96±0.436 being obtained for the Control over the work dimension. In the analysis of sociodemographic and work variables of the sample, only the professional category was significant, with nurses recording higher values in perception of job demands and control over their work compared to nursing assistants. In conclusion, there is a moderate perception of work stress in the analysed group of professionals. Among the sources of stress in the workplace was the low control in decision-making by practitioners, as well as the need to continually learn new things. On the other hand, the support received from colleagues is valued positively by the sample.

  3. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections in intensive care units at a university hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Keten, Derya; Aktas, Firdevs; Guzel Tunccan, Ozlem; Dizbay, Murat; Kalkanci, Ayse; Biter, Gülsah; Keten, Hamit Sirri

    2014-01-01

    In this study, urinary catheter utilization rates, the causative agents for catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) and their antimicrobial susceptibilities in intensive care units (ICUs) in 2009 were investigated at Gazi university hospital. We aimed to determine the causative agents and risk factors for CAUTIs, and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the pathogens; and also sensitivities of Candida spp. to antifungal agents with Microdilution and E-test. The most common etiological agents of CAUTIs were Candida spp. (34.7%). The most frequently isolated Candida spp. was C.albicans (52.4%). All C. albicans spp. were sensitive to fluconazole. Microdilution, used as a reference method to determine the sensitivity to antifungal agents, was compared with E test. E test was found to be sufficient to analyze sensitivity to amphotericin B, caspofungin, fluconazole and voriconazole, but inappropriate for itraconazole. E.coli and Klebsiella spp. were found to be causative agents for CAUTI in 20.6% and 9.9% of cases respectively. Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were isolated in 14% and 8.2% of the cases, respectively. All E.coli and Klebsiella strains were found sensitive to carbapenems. Carbapenem sensitivity was found in 47.1% and 30% of the cases infected with Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter strains, respectively. According to our results, fluconazole therapy seems to be an appropriate choice for the treatment of CAUTIs caused by C.albicans. Third and fourth generation cephalosporins should not be used for empirical treatment because of the high prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase production among E.coli and Klebsiella isolates.

  4. [Stress level assessment of the nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-García, C; Ríos-Rísquez, M I; Martínez-Hurtado, R; Noguera-Villaescusa, P

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the work stress level among nursing staff in the Intensive Care Unit of a university hospital and to analyse its relationship with the various sociodemographic and working variables of the studied sample. A study was designed using a quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional approach. The target population of the study was the nursing staff selected by non-random sampling. The instrument used was the Job Content Questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 20. The mean, ranges and standard deviation for each of the variables were calculated. A bivariate analysis was also performed on the social and occupational variables of the sample. The participation rate was 80.90% (N=89). The mean of the Social support dimension was 3.13±0.397, for the Psychological demands at work dimension it was 3.10±0.384, with a mean of 2.96±0.436 being obtained for the Control over the work dimension. In the analysis of sociodemographic and work variables of the sample, only the professional category was significant, with nurses recording higher values in perception of job demands and control over their work compared to nursing assistants. In conclusion, there is a moderate perception of work stress in the analysed group of professionals. Among the sources of stress in the workplace was the low control in decision-making by practitioners, as well as the need to continually learn new things. On the other hand, the support received from colleagues is valued positively by the sample. PMID:27267958

  5. Finding the Gaps: A Comparative Analysis of Disability Laws in the United States to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help the National Council on Disability (NCD), and others, better understand how the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, if ratified by the United States, might impact U.S. disability laws by examining the degree to which U.S. law is consistent with the CRPD. The paper endeavors to analyze the…

  6. Factors associated with hospitalization risk among community living middle aged and older persons: Results from the Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA).

    PubMed

    Hallgren, Jenny; Fransson, Eleonor I; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Reynolds, Chandra A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Dahl Aslan, Anna K

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to: (1) describe and compare individual characteristics of hospitalized and not hospitalized community living persons, and (2) to determine factors that are associated with hospitalization risk over time. We conducted a prospective study with a multifactorial approach based on the population-based longitudinal Swedish Adoption/Twin Study of Aging (SATSA). A total of 772 Swedes (mean age at baseline 69.7 years, range 46-103, 59.8% females) answered a postal questionnaire about physical and psychological health, personality and socioeconomic factors. During nine years of follow-up, information on hospitalizations and associated diagnoses were obtained from national registers. Results show that 484 persons (63%) had at least one hospital admission during the follow-up period. The most common causes of admission were cardiovascular diseases (25%) and tumors (22%). Cox proportional hazard regression models controlling for age, sex and dependency within twin pairs, showed that higher age (HR=1.02, p<0.001) and more support from relatives (HR=1.09, p=0.028) were associated with increased risk of hospitalization, while marital status (unmarried (HR=0.75, p=0.033) and widow/widower (HR=0.69, p<0.001)) and support from friends (HR=0.93, p=0.029) were associated with lower risk of hospitalization. Social factors were important for hospitalization risk even when medical factors were controlled for in the analyses. Number of diseases was not a risk in the final regression model. Hospitalization risk was also different for women and men and within different age groups. We believe that these results might be used in future interventions targeting health care utilization.

  7. Intra-unit patient transports: time, motion, and cost impact on hospital efficiency.

    PubMed

    Hendrich, Ann L; Lee, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    The costly and inefficient movement of patients within the hospital challenges health systems across the country as they strive to simultaneously contain rising costs and provide high-quality patient care. Solid evidence to support the improvement of hospital and patient care efficiency through the identification and suggested elimination of waste patterns within the transport process is presented.

  8. Differences in Hospital Managers', Unit Managers', and Health Care Workers' Perceptions of the Safety Climate for Respiratory Protection.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Kristina; Rogers, Bonnie M E; Brosseau, Lisa M; Payne, Julianne; Cooney, Jennifer; Joe, Lauren; Novak, Debra

    2016-07-01

    This article compares hospital managers' (HM), unit managers' (UM), and health care workers' (HCW) perceptions of respiratory protection safety climate in acute care hospitals. The article is based on survey responses from 215 HMs, 245 UMs, and 1,105 HCWs employed by 98 acute care hospitals in six states. Ten survey questions assessed five of the key dimensions of safety climate commonly identified in the literature: managerial commitment to safety, management feedback on safety procedures, coworkers' safety norms, worker involvement, and worker safety training. Clinically and statistically significant differences were found across the three respondent types. HCWs had less positive perceptions of management commitment, worker involvement, and safety training aspects of safety climate than HMs and UMs. UMs had more positive perceptions of management's supervision of HCWs' respiratory protection practices. Implications for practice improvements indicate the need for frontline HCWs' inclusion in efforts to reduce safety climate barriers and better support effective respiratory protection programs and daily health protection practices.

  9. Exploring the impacts of personal factors on self-leadership in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ugurluoglu, Ozgur; Saygılı, Meltem; Ozer, Ozlem; Santas, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Self-leadership may be defined as a self-effecting process that individuals experience by maintaining the motivation they require for fulfilling their roles and duties. The self-leadership process comprises three key strategies: behaviour-oriented strategies, natural reward strategies and constructive thought pattern strategies. What is intended herein is to inquire about the implementation of self-leadership within organisations and to examine the effects of such variables as age, gender, total terms of employment, marital status and education on self-leadership strategies. The primary data collection instrument was a survey distributed to 450 personnel working at a state hospital in Kırıkkale, Turkey, and feedback thereto was received from 308 (68.4%) of those surveyed. As a result of the findings taken from the analyses, age, total terms of employment and receipt of education in leadership affect the use of self-leadership strategies. Although age and total terms of employment display a negative-directional correlation with the self-leadership strategies, female employees and those who receive education in leadership are more inclined towards self-leadership strategies.

  10. The founding of Walter Reed General Hospital and the beginning of modern institutional army medical care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Adler, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    When Walter Reed United States Army General Hospital opened its doors in 1909, the Spanish-American War had been over for a decade, World War I was in the unforeseeable future, and army hospital admission rates were steadily decreasing. The story of the founding of Walter Reed, which remained one of the flagship military health institutions in the United States until its 2011 closure, is a story about the complexities of the turn of the twentieth century. Broad historical factors-heightened imperial ambitions, a drive to modernize the army and its medical services, and a growing acceptance of hospitals as ideal places for treatment-explain why the institution was so urgently fought for and ultimately won funding at the particular moment it did. The justifications put forth for the establishment of Walter Reed indicate that the provision of publicly funded medical care for soldiers has been predicated not only on a sense of humanitarian commitment to those who serve, but on principles of military efficiency, thrift, pragmatism, and international competition. On a more general level, the story of Walter Reed's founding demonstrates a Progressive Era shift in health services for U.S. soldiers-from temporary, makeshift hospitals to permanent institutions with expansive goals.

  11. Attitudes of Registered and Licensed Practical Nurses About the Importance of Families in Surgical Hospital Units: Findings From the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project.

    PubMed

    Blöndal, Katrin; Zoëga, Sigridur; Hafsteinsdottir, Jorunn E; Olafsdottir, Olof Asdis; Thorvardardottir, Audur B; Hafsteinsdottir, Sigrun A; Sveinsdóttir, Herdis

    2014-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes of registered nurses and licensed practical nurses about the importance of the family in surgical hospital units before (T1) and after (T2) implementation of a Family Systems Nursing educational intervention based on the Calgary Family Assessment and Intervention Models. This study was part of the Landspitali University Hospital Family Nursing Implementation Project and used a nonrandomized, quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent group before and after and without a control group. There were 181 participants at T1 and 130 at T2. No difference was found in nurses' attitudes as measured by the Families Importance in Nursing Care-Nurses' Attitudes (FINC-NA) questionnaire, before and after the educational intervention. Attitudes toward families were favorable at both times. Analysis of demographic variables showed that age, work experience, and workplace (inpatient vs. outpatient units) had an effect on the nurses' attitudes toward families. The influence of work experience on attitudes toward family care warrants further exploration.

  12. Measurement of personal exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.A.; Palausky, M.A.; Counts, R.W.

    1995-12-31

    A study of personal exposure of non-smokers to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) has been conducted in 16 cities in the United States. Individual participants wear one of two personal sampling pumps, one each at work and away-from-work. Samples of breathing zone air analyzed for both particle- and vapor-phase markers of ETS. In addition, prior- and post-exposure saliva samples are collected, in order that smoking status can be assessed through cotinine levels. The distribution of subjects among smoking and non-smoking workplaces and homes is such that ca. 54% of the participants worked and lived in non-smoking situations. A comparison of the demographic distribution of the sample population with that of the US non-smoking population indicates that the sample population is more female and of higher socioeconomic status. Subjects living and working with smokers are more highly exposed to ETS than those subjects who live and work in predominantly ETS-free environments. However, even the smoke exposures of subjects living and working in smoking venues are low relative to area concentrations of ETS reported in previous studies. It is clear that in general (not considering cell designation), ETS exposure is inversely correlated with household income. Additional data analysis has indicated that although participants perceive their greatest exposures to ETS to occur in the workplace, in fact, exposure to ETS when living with a smoker is demonstrably greater than that received in a smoking workplace, on an individual basis, correlation between salivary cotinine levels and ETS nicotine exposure was non-existent. However, there appears to be significant correlation between the two parameters when participants with measurable exposures are segregated into groups of 25.

  13. Impact of Age and Sex on Outcomes and Hospital Cost of Acute Asthma in the United States, 2011-2012

    PubMed Central

    Teague, W. Gerald; Koroukian, Siran M.; Schlitz, Nicholas K.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Busse, William B.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A.; Fitzpatrick, Anne M.; Israel, Elliot; Wenzel, Sally E.; Holguin, Fernando; Gaston, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Worldwide, asthma is a leading cause of morbidity, mortality and economic burden, with significant gender and racial disparities. However, little attention has been given to the independent role of age on lifetime asthma severity and hospitalization. We aimed to assess the effect of age, gender, race and ethnicity on indicators of asthma severity including asthma related hospitalization, mortality, hospital cost, and the rate of respiratory failure. Methods We analyzed the 2011 and 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project- National Inpatient Sample (NIS). We validated and extended those results using the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP; 2002–2011) database. Severe asthma was prospectively defined using the stringent American Thoracic Society (ATS) definition. Results Hospitalization for asthma was reported in 372,685 encounters in 2012 and 368,528 in 2011. The yearly aggregate cost exceeded $2 billion. There were distinct bimodal distributions for hospitalization age, with an initial peak at 5 years and a second at 50 years. Likewise, this bimodal age distribution of patients with severe asthma was identified using SARP. Males comprised the majority of individuals in the first peak, but women in the second. Aggregate hospital cost mirrored the bimodal peak distribution. The probability of respiratory failure increased with age until the age of 60, after which it continued to increase in men, but not in women. Conclusions Severe asthma is primarily a disease of young boys and middle age women. Greater understanding of the biology of lung aging and influence of sex hormones will allow us to plan for targeted interventions during these times in order to reduce the personal and societal burdens of asthma. PMID:27294365

  14. Seasonal Changes in Hospital Admissions for Pulmonary Embolism in Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo (from the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network).

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-15

    Although several studies have shown the relation between temperature/atmospheric pressure and pulmonary embolism (PE), their results are inconsistent. Furthermore, diurnal temperature range (DTR) and diurnal pressure range (DPR) were not fully evaluated for their associations with hospital admissions for PE. Study subjects comprised cases of 1,148 PE treated at institutions belonging to the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network from January 2005 to December 2012. Patient data were combined with a variety of daily local climate parameters obtained from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Every 1°C increase in the DTR at lag0 corresponded to an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (odds ratio [OR] 1.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003 to 1.070). In the cooler season (November to April), an increase of 1 hPa (barometric pressure) in the DPR at lag4 and lag5 was associated with an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (OR 1.042, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.077 and OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.914 to 0.992, respectively). An increase in the PE hospitalization rate was seen only in the cool season. Using a metropolitan database, we showed that DTR and DPR have different impacts on hospital admissions for PE. In conclusion, we found that an increase in the DTR increases the PE hospitalization rate, especially during the cooler season. The impact of DTR and DPR on PE incidence and related hospitalizations needs to be further evaluated.

  15. Seasonal Changes in Hospital Admissions for Pulmonary Embolism in Metropolitan Areas of Tokyo (from the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network).

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Ayano; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Obayashi, Toru; Takayama, Morimasa; Nagao, Ken

    2015-12-15

    Although several studies have shown the relation between temperature/atmospheric pressure and pulmonary embolism (PE), their results are inconsistent. Furthermore, diurnal temperature range (DTR) and diurnal pressure range (DPR) were not fully evaluated for their associations with hospital admissions for PE. Study subjects comprised cases of 1,148 PE treated at institutions belonging to the Tokyo Cardiovascular Care Unit Network from January 2005 to December 2012. Patient data were combined with a variety of daily local climate parameters obtained from the Japan Meteorological Agency. Every 1°C increase in the DTR at lag0 corresponded to an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (odds ratio [OR] 1.036, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.003 to 1.070). In the cooler season (November to April), an increase of 1 hPa (barometric pressure) in the DPR at lag4 and lag5 was associated with an increased relative risk of hospital admission for PE (OR 1.042, 95% CI 1.007 to 1.077 and OR 0.952, 95% CI 0.914 to 0.992, respectively). An increase in the PE hospitalization rate was seen only in the cool season. Using a metropolitan database, we showed that DTR and DPR have different impacts on hospital admissions for PE. In conclusion, we found that an increase in the DTR increases the PE hospitalization rate, especially during the cooler season. The impact of DTR and DPR on PE incidence and related hospitalizations needs to be further evaluated. PMID:26602077

  16. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use Among Persons With Chronic Kidney Disease in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Laura; Grubbs, Vanessa; Sarkar, Urmimala; Hsu, Chi-yuan; Hedgeman, Elizabeth; Robinson, Bruce; Saran, Rajiv; Geiss, Linda; Burrows, Nilka Ríos; Eberhardt, Mark; Powe, Neil

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Because avoidance of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is recommended for most individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD), we sought to characterize patterns of NSAID use among persons with CKD in the United States. METHODS A total of 12,065 adult (aged 20 years or older) participants in the cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2004) responded to a questionnaire regarding their use of over-the-counter and prescription NSAIDs. NSAIDs (excluding aspirin and acetaminophen) were defined by self-report. CKD was categorized as no CKD, mild CKD (stages 1 and 2; urinary albumin-creatinine ratio of ≥30 mg/g) and moderate to severe CKD (stages 3 and 4; estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15–59 mL/min/1.73 m2). Adjusted prevalence was calculated using multivariable logistic regression with appropriate population-based weighting. RESULTS Current use (nearly every day for 30 days or longer) of any NSAID was reported by 2.5%, 2.5%, and 5.0% of the US population with no, mild, and moderate to severe CKD, respectively; nearly all of the NSAIDs used were available over-the-counter. Among those with moderate to severe CKD who were currently using NSAIDs, 10.2% had a current NSAID prescription and 66.1% had used NSAIDs for 1 year or longer. Among those with CKD, disease awareness was not associated with reduced current NSAID use: (3.8% vs 3.9%, aware vs unaware; P=.979). CONCLUSIONS Physicians and other health care clinicians should be aware of use of NSAIDs among those with CKD in the United States and evaluate NSAID use in their CKD patients. PMID:21911761

  17. Lactose intolerance among severely malnourished children with diarrhoea admitted to the nutrition unit, Mulago hospital, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Lactose intolerance is a common complication of diarrhoea in infants with malnutrition and a cause of treatment failure. A combination of nutritional injury and infectious insults in severe protein energy malnutrition reduces the capacity of the intestinal mucosa to produce lactase enzyme necessary for the digestion of lactose. The standard management of severe malnutrition involves nutritional rehabilitation with lactose-based high energy formula milk. However, some of these children may be lactose intolerant, possibly contributing to the high rate of unfavorable treatment outcomes. This study was therefore designed to establish the prevalence of lactose intolerance and associated factors in this population. Methods A descriptive cross sectional study involving 196 severely malnourished children with diarrhoea aged 3-60 months was done in Mwanamugimu Nutrition Unit (MNU), Mulago hospital between October 2006 and February 2007. Results During the study period, 196 severely malnourished children with diarrhoea were recruited, 50 (25.5%) of whom had evidence of lactose intolerance (stool reducing substance ≥ 1 + [0.5%] and stool pH < 5.5) and it occurred more commonly in children with kwashiorkor 27/75 (36.0%) than marasmic-kwashiorkor 6/25 (24.0%) and marasmus 17/96 (17.7%). Oedematous malnutrition (p = 0.032), perianal skin erosion (p = 0.044), high mean stool frequency (p = < 0.001) and having ≥2 diarrhoea episodes in the previous 3 months (p = 0.007) were the independent predictors of lactose intolerance. Other factors that were significantly associated with lactose intolerance on bi-variate analysis included: young age of 3-12 months; lack of up to-date immunization; persistent diarrhoea; vomiting; dehydration, and abdominal distension. Exclusive breastfeeding for less than 4 months and worsening of diarrhoea on initiation of therapeutic milk were the other factors. Conclusions The prevalence of lactose intolerance in this study setting of 25

  18. Hospitalizations in pediatric patients with immune thrombocytopenia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Michael D.; Danese, Mark; Klaassen, Robert J.; Duryea, Jennifer; Eisen, Melissa; Bussel, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To examine utilization and outcomes in pediatric immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) hospitalizations, we used ICD-9 code 287.31 to identify hospitalizations in patients with ITP in the 2009 HCUP KID, an all-payer sample of pediatric hospitalizations from US community hospitals. Diagnosis and procedure codes were used to estimate rates of ITP-related procedures, comorbidity prevalence, costs, length of stay (LOS), and mortality. In 2009, there were an estimated 4499 hospitalizations in children aged 6 months–17 years with ITP; 43% in children aged 1–5 years; and 47% with emergency department encounters. The mean hospitalization cost was $5398, mean LOS 2.0 days, with 0.3% mortality (n = 13). With any bleeding (15.2%, including gastrointestinal 2.0%, hematuria 1.3%, intracranial hemorrhage [ICH] 0.6%), mean hospitalization cost was $7215, LOS 2.5 days, with 1.5% mortality. For ICH (0.6%, n = 27), mean cost was $40 209, LOS 8.5 days, with 21% mortality. With infections (14%, including upper respiratory 5.2%, viral 4.9%, bacterial 1.9%), the mean cost was $6928, LOS 2.9 days, with 0.9% mortality. Septic shock was reported in 0.3% of discharges. Utilization included immunoglobulin administration (37%) and splenectomies (2.3%). Factors associated with higher costs included age >6 years, ICH, hematuria, transfusion, splenectomy, and bone marrow diagnostics (p < 0.05). In conclusion, of the 4499 hospitalizations with ITP, mortality rates of 1.5%, 21%, and 0.9% were seen with any bleeding, ICH, and infection, respectively. Higher costs were associated with clinically significant bleeding and procedures. Future analyses may reveal effects of the implementation of more recent ITP guidelines and use of additional treatments. PMID:26941022

  19. Job satisfaction and turnover intent among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2016-08-01

    Feelings of job satisfaction and turnover intentions among social workers affect work quality for both social workers and the people for whom they provide services. Existing literature on job satisfaction among hospital social workers is limited, and is overly focused on issues of compensation. There is job satisfaction research with hospital nurses available for comparison. Other informative social work research on job satisfaction and turnover exists in mental health and generally, across settings. Research on turnover intent in social work is primarily from child welfare settings and may not generalize. The literature notes gaps and contradictions about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intent. Using a large national dataset of hospital social workers, this research clarifies and fills gaps regarding hospital social workers, and explores how Herzberg's theory of work can clarify the difference between sources of job dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. Findings include hospital social workers reporting high job satisfaction and that demographics do not contribute to the predictive models. The findings do support centralized social work departments and variety in the job functions of hospital social workers, and are consistent with the theoretical framework. PMID:27322030

  20. Job satisfaction and turnover intent among hospital social workers in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Greg L

    2016-08-01

    Feelings of job satisfaction and turnover intentions among social workers affect work quality for both social workers and the people for whom they provide services. Existing literature on job satisfaction among hospital social workers is limited, and is overly focused on issues of compensation. There is job satisfaction research with hospital nurses available for comparison. Other informative social work research on job satisfaction and turnover exists in mental health and generally, across settings. Research on turnover intent in social work is primarily from child welfare settings and may not generalize. The literature notes gaps and contradictions about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intent. Using a large national dataset of hospital social workers, this research clarifies and fills gaps regarding hospital social workers, and explores how Herzberg's theory of work can clarify the difference between sources of job dissatisfaction and job satisfaction. Findings include hospital social workers reporting high job satisfaction and that demographics do not contribute to the predictive models. The findings do support centralized social work departments and variety in the job functions of hospital social workers, and are consistent with the theoretical framework.

  1. Impact of the 2009 Influenza Pandemic on Pneumococcal Pneumonia Hospitalizations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Lone; Jordan, Richard; Steiner, Claudia; Miller, Mark; Viboud, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Grijalva and Griffin on pages 355–7.) Background. Infection with influenza virus increases the risk for developing pneumococcal disease. The A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in autumn 2009 provided a unique opportunity to evaluate this relationship. Methods. Using weekly age-, state-, and cause-specific hospitalizations from the US State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project 2003–2009, we quantified the increase in pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates above a seasonal baseline during the pandemic period. Results. We found a significant increase in pneumococcal hospitalizations from late August to mid-December 2009, which corresponded to the timing of highest pandemic influenza activity. Individuals aged 5–19 years, who have a low baseline level of pneumococcal disease, experienced the largest relative increase in pneumococcal hospitalizations (ratio, 1.6 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.4–1.7]), whereas the largest absolute increase was observed among individuals aged 40–64 years. In contrast, there was no excess disease in the elderly. Geographical variation in the timing of excess pneumococcal hospitalizations matched geographical patterns for the fall pandemic influenza wave. Conclusions. The 2009 influenza pandemic had a significant impact on the rate of pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations, with the magnitude of this effect varying between age groups and states, mirroring observed variations in influenza activity. PMID:22158564

  2. Access to Education in Africa: Responding to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chataika, Tsitsi; Mckenzie, Judith Anne; Swart, Estelle; Lyner-Cleophas, Marcia

    2012-01-01

    Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities mandates that disabled people should have full rights to education in inclusive settings. However, to ensure that educational polices and settings are designed to meet this criterion seems challenging to African countries that have ratified this Convention. This…

  3. An end to psychiatric detention? Implications of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brendan D

    2014-03-01

    The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities is a welcome articulation of the rights of the disabled. However, as its definition of disability appears to include mental illness, the UK appears to violate it by linking mental illness with detention. Clarity and, possibly, change are needed.

  4. Libraries in the United States and the International Year of Disabled Persons: Highlights of the Year--1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Phyllis I., Comp.

    In response to the United Nations' declaration of 1981 as the International Year of Disabled Persons (IYDP), the Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies (ASCLA) of the American Library Association (ALA) set up an IYDP committee to carry out the objectives of the year. This document, based on state library reports and other…

  5. A Cross-Cultural Investigation of Students' Preferences for Lecturers' Personalities in Britain, Malaysia and the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swami, Viren; Furnham, Adrian; Maakip, Ismail; Ahmad, Sharani; Hudani, Nurul; Voo, Peter S. K.; Christopher, Andrew N.; Garwood, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    This study examined students' preferences for lecturers' personalities on three continents. Two-hundred and 35 university students in Malaysia, 347 university students in Britain and 139 university students in the United States provided ratings of 30 desirable and undesirable lecturer trait characteristics, which were coded into an internally…

  6. 26 CFR 1.6038-2 - Information returns required of United States persons with respect to annual accounting periods...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... regards the outstanding stock of the corporation— (i) A description of each class of the corporation's stock, and (ii) The number of shares of each class outstanding at the beginning and end of the annual... of each class of the corporation's stock held by, each United States person who is a...

  7. Employment of persons with severe disabilities in large businesses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Levy, J M; Jessop, D J; Rimmerman, A; Levy, P H

    1991-01-01

    A mail survey of the largest businesses in the US, the Fortune 500 industrial and service corporations, examined the attitudes of personnel and human resource executives towards the employability of persons with severe disabilities and actual corporate practices regarding the employment of persons with disabilities. The 341 executives who responded are found to be favourable to the employment of persons with disabilities, especially if the executives work in corporations that have hired persons with disabilities within the past three years, and/or have had personally good contact with persons with disabilities in the past. Almost two-thirds of the corporations have a policy regarding hiring persons with disabilities; over one-half have hired such persons within the past three years; and over one-third have supported work programmes. PMID:1838362

  8. Employment of persons with severe disabilities in large businesses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Levy, J M; Jessop, D J; Rimmerman, A; Levy, P H

    1991-01-01

    A mail survey of the largest businesses in the US, the Fortune 500 industrial and service corporations, examined the attitudes of personnel and human resource executives towards the employability of persons with severe disabilities and actual corporate practices regarding the employment of persons with disabilities. The 341 executives who responded are found to be favourable to the employment of persons with disabilities, especially if the executives work in corporations that have hired persons with disabilities within the past three years, and/or have had personally good contact with persons with disabilities in the past. Almost two-thirds of the corporations have a policy regarding hiring persons with disabilities; over one-half have hired such persons within the past three years; and over one-third have supported work programmes.

  9. Harm reduction and decriminalization in the United States: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    DuPont, R L

    1996-12-01

    Harm reduction, an alternative to both drug legalization and drug prohibition, seeks to preserve prohibition by keeping the supply of drugs illegal while softening some of the harsh consequences of prohibition. Typical harm reduction proposals are needle exchanges for intravenous drug users to reduce the spread of HIV infection and the medical use of marijuana for a variety of illnesses including AIDS, glaucoma, multiple sclerosis, and cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. While attractive as a reasonable-sounding compromise, harm reduction carries a high price because it undermines the social signal of prohibition. This signal is a vital public health strategy, especially when it comes to primary prevention of use of alcohol and other drugs by youth. A personal experience with harm reduction, leading to rejection of this approach, is described. Harm reduction, enjoying a minor comeback in the United States, is a favored policy in much of Europe today. Harm reduction is not new, and it is a failure as a public health policy.

  10. Paranoid personality disorder in the United States: the role of race, illicit drug use, and income.

    PubMed

    Raza, Gina T; DeMarce, Josephine M; Lash, Steven J; Parker, Jefferson D

    2014-01-01

    Differential rates of schizophrenia and paranoia symptoms have been found for Black and White individuals. Paranoid personality disorder shares symptoms with schizophrenia, yet has received minimal attention with regard to potential racial differences. In a sample consisting of 180 substance use disorder treatment-seeking individuals, the association between the diagnosis of paranoid personality disorder and the variables of race, cannabis use disorder, and income were examined. Results extended previous findings to paranoid personality disorder, supporting the hypothesis that Black individuals would be diagnosed with higher rates of paranoid personality disorder. Cannabis use disorder status and income did not predict paranoid personality disorder diagnoses. PMID:25176118

  11. Paranoid personality disorder in the United States: the role of race, illicit drug use, and income.

    PubMed

    Raza, Gina T; DeMarce, Josephine M; Lash, Steven J; Parker, Jefferson D

    2014-01-01

    Differential rates of schizophrenia and paranoia symptoms have been found for Black and White individuals. Paranoid personality disorder shares symptoms with schizophrenia, yet has received minimal attention with regard to potential racial differences. In a sample consisting of 180 substance use disorder treatment-seeking individuals, the association between the diagnosis of paranoid personality disorder and the variables of race, cannabis use disorder, and income were examined. Results extended previous findings to paranoid personality disorder, supporting the hypothesis that Black individuals would be diagnosed with higher rates of paranoid personality disorder. Cannabis use disorder status and income did not predict paranoid personality disorder diagnoses.

  12. Hospitalization cost after spine surgery in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a predictive model of hospitalization costs after spine surgery. Several initiatives have been put in place to minimize healthcare expenditures but there are limited data on the magnitude of the contribution of procedure-specific drivers of cost. We performed a retrospective cohort study involving 672,591 patients who underwent spine surgery and were registered in the National Inpatient Sample from 2005-2010. The cohort underwent 1:1 randomization to create derivation and validation subsamples. Regression techniques were used for the creation of a parsimonious predictive model of total hospitalization cost after spine surgery. Included were 356,783 patients (53.1%) who underwent fusions, and 315,808 (46.9%) non-fusion surgeries. The median hospitalization cost was $14,202 (interquartile range $4772-23,632). Common drivers of cost identified in the multivariate analysis included the length of stay, number of admission diagnoses and procedures, hospital size and region, patient income, fusion surgery, acute renal failure, sex, and coagulopathy. The model was validated in an independent cohort and demonstrated a final coefficient of determination that was very similar to the initial model. The predicted and observed values in the validation cohort demonstrated good correlations. This national study quantified the magnitude of significant drivers of hospitalization cost after spine surgery. We developed a predictive model that can be utilized as an adjunct in the cost containment debate and the creation of data driven policies.

  13. Impact of hospitalization in an intensive care unit on range of motion of critically ill patients: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Nepomuceno, Balbino Rivail Ventura; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Gomes Neto, Mansueto

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the joint range of motion of critically ill patients during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. Methods This work was a prospective longitudinal study conducted in a critical care unit of a public hospital in the city of Salvador (BA) from September to November 2010. The main variable evaluated was the passive joint range of motion. A goniometer was used to measure the elbows, knees and ankles at the time of admission and at discharge. All patients admitted in the period were included other than patients with length of stay <72 hours and patients with reduced joint range of motion on admission. Results The sample consisted of 22 subjects with a mean age of 53.5±17.6 years, duration of stay in the intensive care unit of 13.0±6.0 days and time on mechanical ventilation of 12.0±6.3 days. The APACHE II score was 28.5±7.3, and the majority of patients had functional independence at admission with a prior Barthel index of 88.8±19. The losses of joint range of motion were 11.1±2.1°, 11.0±2.2°, 8.4±1.7°, 9.2±1.6°, 5.8±0.9° and 5.1±1.0°, for the right and left elbows, knees and ankles, respectively (p<0.001). Conclusion There was a tendency towards decreased range of motion of large joints such as the ankle, knee and elbow during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. PMID:24770691

  14. A comparison of studies from the United States and western Europe on psychiatric hospitalization referrals for youths exhibiting suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Safer, D J

    1996-09-01

    A comprehensive literature review that rates of adolescent suicide-behavior based referrals from emergency rooms (ER) to psychiatric impatient facilities in the United States (U.S.) and in Western Europe (WE). Also compared on both sides of the Atlantic were the characteristics of suicidal youths seen at the ER and those admitted to psychiatric hospital units. The major findings were as follows. (1) Youths at both geographical locations who were seen at the ERs for suicidal behavior were very similar with respect to age and gender. (2) A median of 39% of youths seen in U.S. ERs for suicidal behavior were referred for inpatient psychiatric treatment; in WE, the median was 12%. (3) In the U.S., suicidal youths referred from the ER to psychiatric inpatient care were predominantly female (2.5:1) and mainly midadolescent in age (median age = 15). (4) In WE, the majority of those suicidal youths referred for psychiatric hospitalization were male (1:1.2) and in their late adolescent years (median age = 17). Thus, far fewer but more at risk youths presenting with suicidal behavior were admitted to psychiatric hospitals in WE than in the U.S. Presumably this is due largely to cross-Atlantic differences in malpractice patterns, academic perspectives, and medical care financing. PMID:8899134

  15. Internet and technology transfer in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the survey-2000 measuring technology transfer and, specifically, Internet usage. The purpose of the survey was to measure the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. The depth of the survey includes e-commerce for both business-to-business and customers. These results are compared with responses to the same questions in survey-1997. Changes in response are noted and discussed. This information will provide benchmarks for hospitals to plan their network technology position and to set goals. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discuss the survey design and provide a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals. (1) Thefirst article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2)

  16. Implications of design on infection prevention and control practice in a novel hospital unit: the Medical Ward of the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    VanSteelandt, Amanda; Conly, John; Ghali, William; Mather, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The physical design of hospital wards is associated with transmission of pathogenic organisms and hospital-acquired infections. A novel hospital unit, the Medical Ward of the 21st Century (W21C), optimizes features for infection prevention and control practices. Ethnographic research on the W21C versus conventional hospital wards examined the experiential and behavioural elements of the different designs. Three recurring themes emerged regarding the design features on the W21C and included visual cues, 'having a place for things', and less sharing of spaces and materials. Observational data of healthcare worker practices demonstrated significantly higher compliance with hand hygiene opportunities on the W21C compared with older hospital units. These findings suggest how the physical design of a hospital ward may enhance infection prevention and control practices.

  17. Spectrum of healthcare delivery from hospital to home in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Glanville, R

    1996-01-01

    Technological, economic and demographic levers for change are radically modifying patterns of health care delivery and the subsequent built environment that houses the service. In particular the nature of the hospital is changing to a smaller more acute facility. This paper sets out some recent analyses of where service delivery might be located on the spectrum of hospital to home in the UK and identifies some of the alternative patterns of delivery currently being pursued. The underlying imperative for change is economic but could be an opportunity for innovation in health building design.

  18. Hospital Website Rankings in the United States: Expanding Benchmarks and Standards for Effective Consumer Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Ford, Eric W; McAlearney, Ann Scheck; Menachemi, Nir

    2014-01-01

    Background Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) increased the roles hospitals and health systems play in care delivery and led to a wave of consolidation of medical groups and hospitals. As such, the traditional patient interaction with an independent medical provider is becoming far less common, replaced by frequent interactions with integrated medical groups and health systems. It is thus increasingly important for these organizations to have an effective social media presence. Moreover, in the age of the informed consumer, patients desire a readily accessible, electronic interface to initiate contact, making a well-designed website and social media strategy critical features of the modern health care organization. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the Web presence of hospitals and their health systems on five dimensions: accessibility, content, marketing, technology, and usability. In addition, an overall ranking was calculated to identify the top 100 hospital and health system websites. Methods A total of 2407 unique Web domains covering 2785 hospital facilities or their parent organizations were identified and matched against the 2009 American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey. This is a four-fold improvement in prior research and represents what the authors believe to be a census assessment of the online presence of US hospitals and their health systems. Each of the five dimensions was investigated with an automated content analysis using a suite of tools. Scores on the dimensions are reported on a range from 0 to 10, with a higher score on any given dimension representing better comparative performance. Rankings on each dimension and an average ranking are provided for the top 100 hospitals. Results The mean score on the usability dimension, meant to rate overall website quality, was 5.16 (SD 1.43), with the highest score of 8 shared by only 5 hospitals. Mean scores on other dimensions were between 4.43 (SD 2

  19. Evidence of person-to-person transmission within a family cluster of novel coronavirus infections, United Kingdom, February 2013.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In February 2013, novel coronavirus (nCoV) infection was diagnosed in an adult male in the United Kingdom with severe respiratory illness, who had travelled to Pakistan and Saudi Arabia 10 days before symptom onset. Contact tracing identified two secondary cases among family members without recent travel: one developed severe respiratory illness and died, the other an influenza-like illness. No other severe cases were identified or nCoV detected in respiratory samples among 135 contacts followed for 10 days. PMID:23517868

  20. Personal Health Record Use in the United States: Forecasting Future Adoption Levels

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-01-01

    Background Personal health records (PHRs) offer a tremendous opportunity to generate consumer support in pursing the triple aim of reducing costs, increasing access, and improving care quality. Moreover, surveys in the United States indicate that consumers want Web-based access to their medical records. However, concerns that consumers’ low health information literacy levels and physicians’ resistance to sharing notes will limit PHRs’ utility to a relatively small portion of the population have reduced both the product innovation and policy imperatives. Objective The purpose of our study was 3-fold: first, to report on US consumers’ current level of PHR activity; second, to describe the roles of imitation and innovation influence factors in determining PHR adoption rates; and third, to forecast future PHR diffusion uptake among US consumers under 3 scenarios. Methods We used secondary data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) of US citizens for the survey years 2008, 2011, and 2013. Applying technology diffusion theory and Bass modeling, we evaluated 3 future PHR adoption scenarios by varying the introduction dates. Results All models displayed the characteristic diffusion S-curve indicating that the PHR technology is likely to achieve significant market penetration ahead of meaningful use goals. The best-performing model indicates that PHR adoption will exceed 75% by 2020. Therefore, the meaningful use program targets for PHR adoption are below the rates likely to occur without an intervention. Conclusions The promise of improved care quality and cost savings through better consumer engagement prompted the US Institute of Medicine to call for universal PHR adoption in 1999. The PHR products available as of 2014 are likely to meet and exceed meaningful use stage 3 targets before 2020 without any incentive. Therefore, more ambitious uptake and functionality availability should be incorporated into future goals. PMID:27030105

  1. Performance of Bedside Diagnostic Ultrasound in an Ebola Isolation Unit: The Emory University Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Courtney C.; Kraft, Colleen S.; Vanairsdale, Sharon; Kandiah, Prem; Klopman, Matthew A.; Ribner, Bruce S.; Tridandapani, Srini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Individuals with Ebola virus disease, a contagious and potentially lethal infection, are now being treated in specialized units in the United States. We describe Emory University's initial experience, current operating procedures, and ongoing planning with diagnostic ultrasound in the isolation unit. CONCLUSION Ultrasound use has been limited to date. Future planning considerations include deciding what types of ultrasound studies will be performed, which personnel will acquire the images, and which ultrasound machine will be used. PMID:25730332

  2. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed toward the good order and happiness of the United... eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen must...) Has resided continuously within the United States,......

  3. International Symposium on Ion Therapy: Planning the First Hospital-Based Heavy Ion Therapy Center in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Aaron; Pompos, Arnold; Story, Michael; Jiang, Steve; Timmerman, Robert; Choy, Hak

    2015-01-01

    Investigation into the use of heavy ions for therapeutic purposes was initially pioneered at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the 1970s [1, 2]. More recently, however, significant advances in determining the safety and efficacy of using heavy ions in the hospital setting have been reported in Japan and Germany [3, 4]. These promising results have helped to resurrect interest in the establishment of hospital-based heavy ion therapy in the United States. In line with these efforts, world experts in the field of heavy ion therapy were invited to attend the first annual International Symposium on Ion Therapy, which was held at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, from November 12 to 14, 2014. A brief overview of the results and discussions that took place during the symposium are presented in this article. PMID:27110586

  4. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way

    PubMed Central

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R. S.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  5. Chicken pox outbreak in the Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital: Lessons learnt the hard way.

    PubMed

    Sarit, Sharma; Shruti, Sharma; Deepinder, Chhina; Chhina, R S

    2015-12-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes 2 clinically and epidemiologically distinct forms of diseases. Chickenpox (varicella) is the disease that results from primary infection with the VZV. Herpes zoster (HZ) results from the reactivation of VZV latently infecting the dorsal root ganglia. We are reporting an outbreak of varicella infection among the health care workers (HCWs) in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital. We found transmission of varicella among eight HCWs of pulmonary ICU. They had a history of contact with a patient having HZ infection. Investigation of the outbreak was conducted as per guidelines. Better dissemination of information on disease transmission, isolation of infected patients inside the hospital, and adequate protection (including vaccination) for susceptible employees are important to prevent such outbreaks. PMID:26816447

  6. Art Therapy on a Hospital Burn Unit: A Step towards Healing and Recovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russel, Johanna

    1995-01-01

    Describes how art therapy can benefit patients hospitalized due to severe burns, who suffer psychological as well as physical trauma. Outlines the psychological phases, identifies how burn patients typically experience their healing process, and discusses how art therapy can assist the patient at each stage of the recovery process. (JPS)

  7. Accessing Inpatient Rehabilitation after Acute Severe Stroke: Age, Mobility, Prestroke Function and Hospital Unit Are Associated with Discharge to Inpatient Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Hill, Keith D.; Brock, Kim; Bernhardt, Julie; Churilov, Leonid

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the variables associated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation following acute severe stroke and to determine whether hospital unit contributed to access. Five acute hospitals in Victoria, Australia participated in this study. Patients were eligible for inclusion if they had suffered an acute severe…

  8. 26 CFR 1.6046A-1 - Return requirement for United States persons who acquire or dispose of an interest in a foreign...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stock. US has acquired an indirect interest of 60% in FP. See sections 6038(e)(3)(C) and 267(c)(1... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Return requirement for United States persons... § 1.6046A-1 Return requirement for United States persons who acquire or dispose of an interest in...

  9. A comparison of outcomes among hospital survivors with and without severe comorbidity admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; McConigley, R; Leslie, G D; Dobbs, G J; Phillips, M; Davies, H; Aoun, S

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of patients with severe comorbidity discharged from Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This project aimed to determine the effects of an ICU stay for patients with severe comorbidity by comparing 1) quality of life (QOL), 2) the symptom profile of hospital survivors and 3) health service use after hospital discharge for patients admitted to ICU with and without severe comorbidity. A case-control study was used. Patients with severe comorbidity were matched to a contemporaneous cohort of ICU patients by age and severity of illness. Assessment tools were the Medical Outcome Study 36-item short-form and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaires for QOL and the Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom distress. A proportional odds assumption was performed using an ordinal regression model. The difference in QOL outcome was the dependent variable for each pair. Health service use after discharge from ICU was monitored with patient diaries. Patients aged 18+ years admitted to an ICU in a metropolitan teaching hospital between 2011 and 2012 were included. We recruited 30 cases and 30 controls. QOL improved over the six months after hospital discharge for patients with and without severe comorbidity (P <0.01) within the groups but there was no difference found between the groups (P >0.3). There was no difference in symptoms or health service use between patients with and without severe comorbidity. ICU admission for people with severe comorbidity can be appropriate to stabilise the patient's condition and is likely to be followed by some overall improvement over the six months after hospital discharge. PMID:25735690

  10. A comparison of outcomes among hospital survivors with and without severe comorbidity admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; McConigley, R; Leslie, G D; Dobbs, G J; Phillips, M; Davies, H; Aoun, S

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of patients with severe comorbidity discharged from Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This project aimed to determine the effects of an ICU stay for patients with severe comorbidity by comparing 1) quality of life (QOL), 2) the symptom profile of hospital survivors and 3) health service use after hospital discharge for patients admitted to ICU with and without severe comorbidity. A case-control study was used. Patients with severe comorbidity were matched to a contemporaneous cohort of ICU patients by age and severity of illness. Assessment tools were the Medical Outcome Study 36-item short-form and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaires for QOL and the Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom distress. A proportional odds assumption was performed using an ordinal regression model. The difference in QOL outcome was the dependent variable for each pair. Health service use after discharge from ICU was monitored with patient diaries. Patients aged 18+ years admitted to an ICU in a metropolitan teaching hospital between 2011 and 2012 were included. We recruited 30 cases and 30 controls. QOL improved over the six months after hospital discharge for patients with and without severe comorbidity (P <0.01) within the groups but there was no difference found between the groups (P >0.3). There was no difference in symptoms or health service use between patients with and without severe comorbidity. ICU admission for people with severe comorbidity can be appropriate to stabilise the patient's condition and is likely to be followed by some overall improvement over the six months after hospital discharge.

  11. Physician documentation of nonspecific EKG changes predicts hospital admission among observation unit chest pain patients.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Troy; Bledsoe, Joseph; Bossart, Philip

    2009-03-01

    Our emergency department (ED) observation unit specifically excludes patients with "significant" electrocardiogram (EKG) findings, but patients may be admitted with "nonspecific" EKG findings. We evaluated whether physician documentation of nonspecific findings predicted eventual admission to an inpatient unit from the observation unit. We reviewed the charts of all chest pain patients admitted to our ED observation unit over a 14-month period. We recorded patients as having documented nonspecific EKG findings if the ED physician stated in the chart that the patient had nonspecific ST segment, T-wave, or Q-wave findings. We recorded baseline characteristics and admission rates among patients. Results were analyzed with chi2 statistics. Five hundred thirty-one chest pain patients were admitted to the observation unit during the study period, and 79 patients (14.9%) had documented nonspecific EKG findings. Patients (22.8%) with documented nonspecific EKG findings were admitted to an inpatient unit from the observation unit, compared with 14.2% of patients without documented nonspecific EKG findings (P = 0.041). Patients with documented nonspecific EKG changes also had higher rates of positive stress testing (17.5% vs. 10.5%, P = 0.103) and stent placement (5.1% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.309), although these were not statistically significant. Patients with documented nonspecific EKG findings were admitted to an inpatient unit from the observation unit at higher rates than those without these findings. Physicians may wish to use the ED EKG more effectively in screening patients for admission to the ED observation unit.

  12. A 3 year audit of infected pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug users managed surgically in the Vascular Unit, Hospital Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Zainal, A A; Yusha, A W

    1998-12-01

    This is a study of 54 intravenous drug user's (IVDUs) with infected pseudoaneurysms undergoing ligation and debridement at the Vascular Unit, Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL) from February 1993 to February 1996. The median age was 37 years with a male preponderance (53:1). Chinese form the largest ethnic group with 57.4% of the cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common organism cultured. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive cases numbered 21 (38.9%). Four of the patients had to have an above-knee amputation after surgery. Simple ligation and debridement of all necrotic tissue is an acceptable mode of therapy in these patients with low amputation rates.

  13. Intranet usage and potential in acute care hospitals in the United States: survey-2000.

    PubMed

    Hatcher, M

    2001-12-01

    This paper provides the results of the Survey-2000 measuring Intranet and its potential in health care. The survey measured the levels of Internet and Intranet existence and usage in acute care hospitals. Business-to-business electronic commerce and electronic commerce for customers were measured. Since the Intranet was not studied in survey-1997, no comparisons could be made. Therefore the results were presented and discussed. The Intranet data were compared with the Internet data and statistically significant differences were presented and analyzed. This information will assist hospitals to plan Internet and Intranet technology. This is the third of three articles based upon the results of the Survey-2000. Readers are referred to prior articles by the author, which discusses the survey design and provides a tutorial on technology transfer in acute care hospitals.(1) The first article based upon the survey results discusses technology transfer, system design approaches, user involvement, and decision-making purposes. (2) The second article based upon the survey results discusses distribution of Internet usage and rating of Internet usage applied to specific applications. Homepages, advertising, and electronic commerce are discussed from an Internet perspective. PMID:11708394

  14. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis types of Candida albicans isolates from an intensive care unit in a Tunisian hospital.

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, Nadia; Kallel, Kalthoum; Bouchami, Ons; Bouchakoua, Myriam; Kaouech, Amira; Belhadj, Slah; Ben Lakhal, Slah; Ben Hassen, Assia; Chaker, Emna

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most important cause of fungal infections in intensive care units. The aim of this work was to compare the profiles of C. albicans in order to specify their genetic polymorphism and to determine the origin of these infections. Thirty-five C. albicans strains were collected from different clinical samples of 12 patients and three health-workers in an intensive care unit (ICU) in Rabta hospital of Tunisia, between August 2007 and April 2008. After digestion with BssHII, the isolates were typed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). The PFGE profiles were analyzed using a visual method, which showed three PFGE types (A, B and C) and the dendrogram generated three clusters (clusters I to III). An average similarity coefficient of 0.83, suggests that isolates are related.

  15. Control of infection with multiple antibiotic resistant bacteria in a hospital renal unit: the value of plasmid characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, C. S.; Barrett, S. P.; Threlfall, E. J.; Cheasty, T.

    1995-01-01

    An outbreak of infections due to multiple antibiotic-resistant bacteria took place over a period of approximately 18 months in a renal unit. Strains of Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Citrobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp. were involved, and a variety of antibiotic resistances was encountered. Closely related plasmids encoding resistance to aztreonam, ceftazidime and piperacillin, possibly derived from an archetypal plasmid of 105 kb were found in the majority of isolates examined. After limiting the use of aztreonam the incidence of new patient isolates of multiple-resistant organisms was greatly reduced. This study demonstrated how molecular studies can contribute to the control of an outbreak situation in a hospital unit by providing an impetus to reduce the use of specific antibiotics. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7641839

  16. Physician Assistant and Advance Practice Nurse Care in Hospital Outpatient Departments: United States, 2008-2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  17. 8 CFR 319.1 - Persons living in marital union with United States citizen spouse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably... eligible for naturalization under section 319(a) of the Act, the spouse of a United States citizen must...) Has resided continuously within the United States, as defined......

  18. Illicit substance use among persons admitted to probation polyclinic of a regional mental hospital in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Telo, Selda; Kaman, Dilara; Korkmaz, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the illicit substance use trends by gender and year in Eastern Turkey, Elazığ. Methods: This is a retrospective study designed to assess the drug use prevalence in persons who admitted to the Probation Policlinic of Elazig Mental Health Hospital between January 2011 and December 2014 in Eastern Turkey, Elazığ. Laboratory screening tests for drugs were studied using the cloned enzyme donor immunoassay technique in urine. Results: The study consisted of 10267 males (95.3%) and 510 females (4.7%), with a mean age of 30.42±10.83 years. Overall prevalence was 32.1% for cannabis, 3.8% for opiate, 0.35% for cocaine and 1.2% for polydrug usage. The prevalence of cannabis was significantly higher in males (32.7%, p=0.000). The prevalence of cannabis use was the lowest in the age group of 50-59 while it was significantly higher in the age groups of 20-29 and 30-39 (p=0.000). The prevalence of opiate use showed a significant difference among the years (p=0.000). There was a significant difference in the prevalence of cocaine use among the years (p=0.02). The prevalence of polysubstance use showed a significant difference among years (p=0.000). Conclusion: Cannabis was the most common illicit drug in the east of the Turkey. Further studies are required for comparing the results of various regions of the country and developing early interventions and treatment facilities. PMID:27381538

  19. Prevalence of Hyponatremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients With Brain Injury in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti Hospital in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chitsazian, Zahra; Zamani, Batool; Mohagheghfar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common disorder in patients with brain injury. It can result in acute and chronic complications providing this electrolytic disorder is not diagnosed and treated in due time. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hyponatremia in 95 brain injury patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) in Kashan Shahid-Veheshti hospital. Patients and Methods This trans-sectional study was conducted on brain injury patients (brain traumas, brain hemorrhage, meningitis and brain tumors) during their six-month stay in the ICU in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital. Data were analyzed after excluding cases of pseudohyponatremia. Results Ninety-five patients with brain injury (69.5% male and 30.5% female ( had a mean age of 42.85 ± 22.59 years, while the hyponatremic patients had a mean age of 48.37 ± 24.03 years. Prevalence and occurrence of hyponatremia were 31.6% and 9.29 ± 6.8 days, respectively. This study revealed no meaningful differences between age, sex, underlying disease and the prevalence of hyponatremia. Conclusions Our study showed an elevated frequency of hyponatremia in patients with brain injuries in ICU which demands the effective approaches for an accurate and timely diagnosis of this electrolyte disorder. PMID:24396801

  20. Healthcare-associated vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium infections in the Mansoura University Hospitals intensive care units, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Moemen, Dalia; Tawfeek, Doaa; Badawy, Wafaa

    2015-01-01

    Vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VREF) ia an emerging and challenging nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to determine the prevalence, risk factors and clonal relationships between different VREF isolates in the intensive care units (ICUs) of the university hospitals in our geographic location. This prospective study was conducted from July, 2012 until September, 2013 on 781 patients who were admitted to the ICUs of the Mansoura University Hospitals (MUHs), and fulfilled the healthcare-associated infection (HAI) criteria. Susceptibility testing was determined using the disk diffusion method. The clonal relationships were evaluated with pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Out of 52 E. faecium isolates, 12 (23.1%) were vancomycin resistant. The significant risk factors for the VREF infections were: transfer to the ICU from a ward, renal failure, an extended ICU stay and use of third-generation cephalosporins, gentamicin, or ciprofloxacin. PFGE with the 12 isolates showed 9 different patterns; 3 belonged to the same pulsotype and another 2 carried a second pulsotypes. The similar pulsotypes isolates were isolated from ICUs of one hospital (EICUs); however, all of the isolates from the other ICUs had different patterns. Infection control policy, in conjunction with antibiotic stewardship, is important to combat VREF transmission in these high-risk patients.

  1. [Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibilities and VISA-VRSA rates among MRSA strains isolated from hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals in seven provinces of Turkey].

    PubMed

    Cesur, Salih; Irmak, Hasan; Simşek, Hüsniye; Cöplü, Nilay; Kılıç, Hasan; Arslan, Uğur; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Baysan, Betil Ozhak; Gülay, Zeynep; Hoşoğlu, Salih; Berktaş, Mustafa; Gencer, Serap; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan; Esen, Berrin; Karabiber, Nihal; Aydın, Faruk; Yalçın, Ata Nevzat

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether vancomycin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) and vancomycin intermediate susceptible S.aureus (VISA) strains were present among methicillin-resistant S.aureus (MRSA) strains isolated from patients hospitalised at intensive care units (ICU) of hospitals located at different regions of Turkey and to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of teicoplanin, linezolid, tigecycline, quinupristin-dalfopristin and daptomycin, which are alternative drugs for the treatment of MRSA infections. A total of 260 MRSA clinical strains (isolated from 113 lower respiratory tract, 90 blood, 24 wound, 17 catheter, 13 nasal swabs, two urine and one CSF sample) were collected from nine health-care centers in eight provinces [Ankara (n= 52), Konya (n= 49), Antalya (n= 40), Istanbul (n= 7), Izmir (37), Diyarbakir (n= 15), Van (n= 12), Trabzon (n= 48)] selected as representatives of the seven different geographical regions of Turkey. Methicillin resistance was determined by cefoxitin disk diffusion in the hospitals where the strains were isolated and confirmed by oxacillin salt agar screening at the Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency. Screening for VISA and VRSA was conducted using the agar screening test and E-test. Susceptibility of the MRSA strains to other antibiotics was also determined by E-test method. None of the 260 MRSA strains were determined to be VRSA or VISA. All were susceptible to teicoplanin and linezolid, and susceptibility rates to daptomycin, tigecycline and quinupristin-dalfopristin were 99.6%, 96.9%, and 95%, respectively. Absence of VISA and VRSA among the MRSA strains surveyed currently seemed hopeful, however, continuous surveillance is necessary. In order to prevent the development of VISA and VRSA strains the use of linezolid, tigecycline, quinupristin-dalfopristin and daptomycin should be encouraged as alternative agents of treatment of MRSA infections.

  2. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  3. Effect on birth outcomes of a formalised approach to care in hospital labour assessment units: international, randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Stremler, Robyn; Willan, Andrew R; Weston, Julie A; Lowe, Nancy K; Simpson, Kathleen R; Fraser, William D; Gafni, Amiram

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if a complex nursing and midwifery intervention in hospital labour assessment units would increase the likelihood of spontaneous vaginal birth and improve other maternal and neonatal outcomes. Design Multicentre, randomised controlled trial with prognostic stratification by hospital. Setting 20 North American and UK hospitals. Participants 5002 nulliparous women experiencing contractions but not in active labour; 2501 were allocated to structured care and 2501 to usual care. Interventions Usual nursing or midwifery care or a minimum of one hour of care by a nurse or midwife trained in structured care, consisting of a formalised approach to assessment of and interventions for maternal emotional state, pain, and fetal position. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was spontaneous vaginal birth. Other outcomes included intrapartum interventions, women’s views of their care, and indicators of maternal and fetal health during hospital stay and 6-8 weeks after discharge. Results Outcome data were obtained for 4996 women. The rate of spontaneous vaginal birth was 64.0% (n=1597) in the structured care group and 61.3% (n=1533) in the usual care group (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 0.96 to 1.27). Fewer women allocated to structured care (n=403, 19.5%) rated staff helpfulness as less than very helpful than those allocated to usual care (n=544, 26.4%); odds ratio 0.67, 98.75% confidence interval 0.50 to 0.85. Fewer women allocated to structured care (n=233, 11.3%) were disappointed with the amount of attention received from staff than those allocated to usual care (n=407, 19.7%); odds ratio 0.51, 98.75% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.70. None of the other results met prespecified levels of statistical significance. Conclusion A structured approach to care in hospital labour assessment units increased satisfaction with care and was suggestive of a modest increase in the likelihood of spontaneous vaginal birth. Further study to strengthen the

  4. The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom: a socioecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Gosling, Samuel D; Potter, Jeff

    2013-07-01

    In recent years the topic of entrepreneurship has become a major focus in the social sciences, with renewed interest in the links between personality and entrepreneurship. Taking a socioecological perspective to psychology, which emphasizes the role of social habitats and their interactions with mind and behavior, we investigated regional variation in and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone Big Five profile. Specifically, we analyzed personality data collected from over half a million U.S. residents (N = 619,397) as well as public archival data on state-level entrepreneurial activity (i.e., business-creation and self-employment rates). Results revealed that an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile is regionally clustered. This geographical distribution corresponds to the pattern that can be observed when mapping entrepreneurial activity across the United States. Indeed, the state-level correlation (N = 51) between an entrepreneurial personality structure and entrepreneurial activity was positive in direction, substantial in magnitude, and robust even when controlling for regional economic prosperity. These correlations persisted at the level of U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (N = 15) and were replicated in independent German (N = 19,842; 14 regions) and British (N = 15,617; 12 regions) samples. In contrast to these profile-based analyses, an analysis linking the individual Big Five dimensions to regional measures of entrepreneurial activity did not yield consistent findings. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for interdisciplinary theory development and practical applications. PMID:23586410

  5. The regional distribution and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile in the United States, Germany, and the United Kingdom: a socioecological perspective.

    PubMed

    Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Gosling, Samuel D; Potter, Jeff

    2013-07-01

    In recent years the topic of entrepreneurship has become a major focus in the social sciences, with renewed interest in the links between personality and entrepreneurship. Taking a socioecological perspective to psychology, which emphasizes the role of social habitats and their interactions with mind and behavior, we investigated regional variation in and correlates of an entrepreneurship-prone Big Five profile. Specifically, we analyzed personality data collected from over half a million U.S. residents (N = 619,397) as well as public archival data on state-level entrepreneurial activity (i.e., business-creation and self-employment rates). Results revealed that an entrepreneurship-prone personality profile is regionally clustered. This geographical distribution corresponds to the pattern that can be observed when mapping entrepreneurial activity across the United States. Indeed, the state-level correlation (N = 51) between an entrepreneurial personality structure and entrepreneurial activity was positive in direction, substantial in magnitude, and robust even when controlling for regional economic prosperity. These correlations persisted at the level of U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (N = 15) and were replicated in independent German (N = 19,842; 14 regions) and British (N = 15,617; 12 regions) samples. In contrast to these profile-based analyses, an analysis linking the individual Big Five dimensions to regional measures of entrepreneurial activity did not yield consistent findings. Discussion focuses on the implications of these findings for interdisciplinary theory development and practical applications.

  6. Hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated disease in the intensive care unit setting: epidemiology, clinical course and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre R; Edmond, Michael B; Wenzel, Richard P; Bearman, Gonzalo ML

    2007-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile-associated disease (CDAD) is a serious nosocomial infection, however few studies have assessed CDAD outcome in the intensive care unit (ICU). We evaluated the epidemiology, clinical course and outcome of hospital-acquired CDAD in the critical care setting. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 58 adults with a positive C. difficile cytotoxin assay result occurring in intensive care units. Results Sixty-two percent of patients had concurrent infections, 50% of which were bloodstream infections. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials prior to CDAD were anti-anaerobic agents (60.3%). Septic shock occurred in 32.8% of CDAD patients. The in-hospital mortality was 27.6%. Univariate analysis revealed that SOFA score, at least one organ failure and age were predictors of mortality. Charlson score ≥3, gender, concurrent infection, and number of days with diarrhea before a positive C. difficile toxin assay were not significant predictors of mortality on univariate analysis. Independent predictors for death were SOFA score at infection onset (per 1-point increment, OR 1.40; CI95 1.13–1.75) and age (per 1-year increment, OR 1.10; CI95 1.02–1.19). Conclusion In ICU patients with CDAD, advanced age and increased severity of illness at the onset of infection, as measured by the SOFA score, are independent predictors of death. PMID:17517130

  7. The north Indian dengue outbreak 2006: a retrospective analysis of intensive care unit admissions in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Chandralekha; Gupta, Pratyush; Trikha, Anjan

    2008-02-01

    Dengue fever (DF), dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) have emerged as public health problems of international concern. During a dengue outbreak in north India in October 2006, more than 10000 patients presented to hospital with fever. We retrospectively analysed the presenting features, treatment given and the outcome of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS): a tertiary care hospital in New Delhi. A total of 72 critically ill patients were referred for admission to the ICU. The common symptoms were fever (100%), myalgia (40%) and gastrointestinal bleed. Menorrhagia and haematuria were seen as the sole presenting features in many females. Treatment consisted of bed rest, oxygen therapy, intensive monitoring, antipyretics, platelet transfusions, hydration and electrolyte correction. On average, six units of platelets were required per patient. The average duration of stay in the ICU was 3 d. There were eight deaths. Adequate hydration and platelet replacement with transfusions, especially apheresis platelets to a target level above 60000 platelets/mm3, were effective means of combating the disease.

  8. 31 CFR 538.407 - Facilitation by a United States person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... planning; decision making; designing, ordering or transporting goods; and financial, insurance, and other.... (c) No U.S. person may change its policies or operating procedures, or those of a foreign...

  9. Reexamining personal, social, and cultural influences on compliance behavior in the United States, Poland, and Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua; Hui, Natalie H H; Bond, Michael Harris; Sit, Alfred Y F; Wong, Sowan; Chow, Venus S Y; Lun, Vivian Miu-Chi; Law, Rita W M

    2006-04-01

    Researchers have extended the literature on strategies of gaining compliance with a request to incorporate cultural variations into the analytic framework. In the present investigation, the authors sought to go beyond previous studies of the factors increasing compliance rates by reexamining how researchers conceptualize and measure personal, social, and cultural influences on compliance behavior in the United States, Poland, and Hong Kong. The authors found that different levels of compliance were affected by culture, principles of influence, and the individual's personal orientation of idiocentrism/allocentrism (I/A). In the present study, the authors extended previous cross-cultural work by decomposing the I/A into 2 separate individual difference variables: normative perceptions and evaluative perceptions. The interaction of person and situation on compliance showed the power of situational demands and the strength of different aspects of personal collectivism. Different patterns of compliance at the culture level revealed the importance of culture in shaping this behavioral tendency. Thus, the authors' integration of personal, social, and cultural influences provided an interactive model to help researchers explain compliance more comprehensively.

  10. Regulation, reimbursement, and the long road of implementation of personalized medicine--a perspective from the United States.

    PubMed

    Frueh, Felix W

    2013-01-01

    There is undisputed evidence that personalized medicine, that is, a more precise assessment of which medical intervention might best serve an individual patient on the basis of novel technology, such as molecular profiling, can have a significant impact on clinical outcomes. The field, however, is still new, and the demonstration of improved effectiveness compared with standard of care comes at a cost. How can we be sure that personalized medicine indeed provides a measurable clinical benefit, that we will be able to afford it, and that we can provide adequate access? The risk-benefit evaluation that accompanies each medical decision requires not only good clinical data but also an assessment of cost and infrastructure needed to provide access to technology. Several examples from the last decade illustrate which types of personalized medicines and diagnostic tests are easily being taken up in clinical practice and which types are more difficult to introduce. And as regulators and payers in the United States and elsewhere are taking on personalized medicine, an interesting convergence can be observed: better, more complete information for both approval and coverage decisions could be gained from a coordination of regulatory and reimbursement questions. Health economics and outcomes research (HEOR) emerges as an approach that can satisfy both needs. Although HEOR represents a well-established approach to demonstrate the effectiveness of interventions in many areas of medical practice, few HEOR studies exist in the field of personalized medicine today. It is reasonable to expect that this will change over the next few years.

  11. A prospective observational study assessing the outcome of Sepsis in intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital, Peshawar

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Arslan Rahat; Hussain, Arshad; Ali, Iftikhar; Samad, Abdul; Ali Shah, Syed Tajammul; Yousef, Muhammad; Khan, Tahir Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The current study aims to explore the factors associated with outcome among patients with severe sepsis and septic shock admitted to the intensive care unit, Northwest General Hospital and Research Centre, Peshawar, Pakistan. Methods: A prospective observational study was carried out at intensive care unit of our hospital from February 2014 to October 2015. Data was collected using a structured format and statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 20®. Regression model was applied to identify the factors contributing to the outcome of severe sepsis and septic shock. P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Majority of the patients meeting the criteria of this study were male 147 (54.9%) with a mean age of 54.8. The most common source of sepsis was lung infections (42.2%) followed by urinary tract infections (18.7%), soft tissue infections (6.3%) abdominal infections (6%) and in 6.3% patients the source remained unknown. Further analysis has revealed that increase in number of days of hospitalization was observed to be slightly associated with the outcome of the treatment (1.086 [1.002 – 1.178], 0.046). Moreover, the risk of mortality was the higher among the patients with septic shock 22.161[10.055 – 48.840], and having respiratory, kidney and central nervous system complications. Overall it is seen that septic shock alone was found responsible to cause death among 32.0% of the patients (Model 1: R2 0.32, p=0.000), and upon involvement of the organ complications the risk of mortality was observed to 42.0%. Conclusion: Chances of recovery were poor among the patients with septic shock. Moreover, those patients having respiratory and urinary tract infection are least likely to survive. PMID:27375715

  12. Hospitalization for total hip replacement among inpatients aged 45 and over: United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Wolford, Monica L; Palso, Kathleen; Bercovitz, Anita

    2015-02-01

     Total hip replacement, in which both the head of the femur and its socket are replaced, is done to restore movement to hips damaged by osteoarthritis, late-stage degenerative bone and cartilage disease, or other injuries and disease (1). The number of total hip replacements is expected to increase over the next few decades (2). National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) data show trends and estimates of the number and rate of total hip replacements and average length of stay among inpatients aged 45 and over. PMID:25714040

  13. Hospital Admission for Schizophrenia and Discharge Against Medical Advice in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Hospital discharge against medical advice may leave a patient at risk for adverse health outcomes and/or readmission, yet little is known regarding its occurrence, especially among patients with mental illness. The objective of this study was to discern the prevalence of, and predictive factors for, being discharged against medical advice among hospitalized patients with a primary diagnosis of schizophrenia. Method: The 2004 US Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to discern demographic predictors, length of stay, and costs for discharge against medical advice relative to discharge with medical approval. Inpatient discharges from US community hospitals for patients of all ages with The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification diagnostic codes 295.0–295.9 were included. Conditional logistic regression was used to discern factors predictive of discharge against medical advice, and least squares mean analysis was used to examine differences in length of stay and mean cost per day relative to discharge with medical approval. Least squares means were adjusted for age (continuous), sex, race, region, payer, hospital setting, and bed size. Results: Within the study population, 1.6% of patients admitted for schizophrenia were discharged against medical advice (n = 3,382/210,722). Patients discharged against medical advice were significantly more likely to be younger (OR = 0.985, 95% CI, 0.982–0.987) and male (OR = 1.421, 95% CI, 1.321–1.529). Race was not a significant factor. Mean ± SE length of stay for discharge against medical advice was 5.0 ± 0.24 days, as compared to 8.7 ± 0.06 days for patients discharged with medical approval (P < .0001). Mean cost per day was significantly higher for discharge against medical advice ($1,886.02 ± 49.67 vs $1,565.79 ± 13.42, P < .0001). Conclusions: Although the percentage of patients discharged against medical advice was small, the

  14. Bortezomib Inpatient Prescribing Practices in Free-Standing Children's Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    DiNofia, Amanda M; Salazar, Elizabeth; Seif, Alix E; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung Vera; Bagatell, Rochelle; Fisher, Brian T; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This study is a pharmacoepidemiologic description of pediatric bortezomib use. Exposure was identified through billing codes in patients admitted to US children's hospitals that participated with the Pediatric Health Information System between 2004 and 2013. Associated information on underlying diseases, demographics, institutional use, mortality, and physician type was collected. Exposure to bortezomib was identified in 314 patients. Hematologist/Oncologists prescribed half of the bortezomib used. Use increased during the study period. Inpatient volume was positively correlated with bortezomib utilization. Bortezomib use in pediatrics is increasing for a variety of diseases. Variation in use exists across institutions. Further studies are needed to characterize bortezomib's efficacy in pediatric diseases.

  15. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  16. Career Education Program: Geneva Area City Schools. [Grade 3 Units: Money and Banking, Weather, The Hospital Emergency Room, and Let's Go to Town].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    Four curriculum units for the third grade level focus on: (1) weather station jobs and the weather prediction system; (2) hospital emergency room workers and the room's function; (3) bank workers and the banking industry; and (4) various urban workers. Behavioral objectives linking the units focus on increasing students' awareness of and…

  17. Design and evaluation of electronic briefs of neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani hospital, Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Mirnia, Kayvan; Samad Soltani, Taha; Rezaei, Mnouchehr; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Piri, Zakieh

    2014-09-01

    More than 9 million neonatal deaths are reported through out the world each year happening in the early weeks of life most of which relate to developing countries. Thus it is very important to present a better way to keep the infants healthy which could be possible by accessing accurate information at any time required during hospitalization of infants. Therefore the required data should be collected, stored and analyzed before which is best possible by using computer. The main objective of this research is enabling researchers and clinicians quick access to the data of the babies admitted in NICU. This study involves the stage of developing a system design and its implementation following the evaluation of the electronic records which is done in a query form. By defining the neccessary terminology and designing a data model, the database and user interface are developed by using a programing language and data base tools. Finally, the system has been evaluated by user satisfaction showing to be about 85% As a result we suggest the hospitals take serious in buying the suitable technology for the NICU ward along with teaching the staffs how to work with it.

  18. Design and Evaluation of Electronic Briefs of Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Taleghani Hospital, Tabriz, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mirnia, Kayvan; Soltani, Taha Samad; Rezaei, Manouchehr; Heidarzadeh, Mohammad; Piri, Zakieh

    2014-01-01

    More than 9 million neonatal deaths are reported through out the world each year happening in the early weeks of life most of which relate to developing countries. Thus it is very important to present a better way to keep the infants healthy which could be possible by accessing accurate information at any time required during hospitalization of infants. Therefore the required data should be collected, stored and analyzed before which is best possible by using computer. The main objective of this research is enabling researchers and clinicians quick access to the data of the babies admitted in NICU. This study involves the stage of developing a system design and its implementation following the evaluation of the electronic records which is done in a query form. By defining the neccessar terminology and designing a data model, the database and user interface are developed by using a programing language and data base tools. Finaly, the system has been evaluated by user satisfaction showing to be about 85% As a result we suggest the hospitals take serious in buying the suitable technology for the NICU ward along with teaching the staffs how to work with it. PMID:25168989

  19. The Conventional and Unconventional about Disability Conventions: A Reflective Analysis of United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umeasiegbu, Veronica I.; Bishop, Malachy; Mpofu, Elias

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an analysis of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) in relation to prior United Nations conventions on disability and U.S. disability policy law with a view to identifying the conventional and also the incremental advances of the CRPD. Previous United Nations conventions related to…

  20. [Staff-patient meetings at the psychiatric unit of a university hospital center].

    PubMed

    Gelin, E; Havet, J M; Wargny-Citti, E; Lesage, V; Pascalis, G

    1987-10-01

    Staff/patients meetings have been held for 10 years within a mental teaching hospital for adults. The meeting was initiated by a clinical psychologist still in charge of it. The patients have developed the following themes: (i) entrance conditions, (ii) everyday life information, (iii) inconveniences, (iv) mental illness, (v) the exclusion process. The least severely affected patients will exclude the other ones on ground of insanity. Yet all patients consider themselves banned from society, and even feel rejected by the stall at times. The meeting is meant as a regular talk scène. Individual or collective conflicts arising between the patients can be settled there. Patient passivity may also be counteracted. Staff seminar should work up clearly the data provided by the meeting.

  1. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be......

  2. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be......

  3. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be......

  4. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be......

  5. 8 CFR 319.2 - Person whose United States citizen spouse is employed abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and favorably disposed... for naturalization under section 319(b) of the Act, the alien spouse of a United States citizen must... the time of examination on the application for naturalization, be......

  6. Application of the Beers Criteria to Alternate Level of Care Patients in Hospital Inpatient Units

    PubMed Central

    Slaney, Heather; MacAulay, Stacey; Irvine-Meek, Janice; Murray, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Beers criteria were developed to help in identifying potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) for elderly patients. These medications are often associated with adverse events and limited effectiveness in older adults. Patients awaiting an alternate level of care (ALC patients) are those who no longer require acute care hospital services and are waiting for placement elsewhere. They are often elderly, have complex medication regimens, and are at high risk of adverse events. At the time of this study no studies had applied the Beers criteria to ALC patients in Canadian hospitals. Objectives: To determine the proportion of ALC patients receiving PIMs and the proportion experiencing selected PIM-related adverse events. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ALC patients 65 years of age or older was performed to identify PIMs and the occurrence of selected adverse events (specifically central nervous system [CNS] events, falls, bradycardia, hypoglycemia, seizures, insomnia, gastrointestinal bleeding, and urinary tract infections). A logistic regression model with a random intercept for each patient was constructed to estimate odds ratios and probabilities of adverse events. Results: Fifty-two ALC patients were included in the study. Of these, 48 (92%) were taking a PIM. Of the 922 adverse events evaluated, 407 (44.1%) were associated with a regularly scheduled PIM. Among patients who were taking regularly scheduled PIMs, there was a significantly increased probability of an adverse CNS event and of a fall (p < 0.001 for both). The most common PIM medication classes were first-generation antihistamines (24 [46%] of the 52 patients), antipsychotics (21 patients [40%]), short-acting benzodiazepines (15 patients [29%]), and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics (14 patients [27%]). Conclusions: A high proportion of ALC patients were taking PIMs and experienced an adverse event that may have been related to these drugs. These findings suggest that the ALC

  7. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured. PMID:26986128

  8. Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression Among Foreign-Born HIV-Infected Persons Receiving Medical Care in the United States: A Complex Sample, Cross-Sectional Survey.

    PubMed

    Myers, Tanya R; Lin, Xia; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    Immigrants to the United States are more likely to be diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection compared with native-born persons. Navigating access to healthcare in the United States can be challenging for foreign-born persons, and HIV treatment outcomes may be suboptimal for these persons. We compared characteristics of and assessed disparities in clinical outcomes of foreign-born persons in care for HIV in the United States. The Medical Monitoring Project is a complex sample, cross-sectional survey designed to be nationally representative of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Using data from 2009, 2010, and 2011, we conducted descriptive analyses and multivariable logistic regression to assess associations between foreign-born status and antiretroviral therapy (ART) prescription, and between foreign-born status and viral suppression. In all, 13.4% of HIV-infected persons were self-identified as foreign-born; the most common regions of birth were Central America and Mexico (45.4%) and the Caribbean (16.0%). Nearly 90% of foreign-born persons were diagnosed with HIV after entry into the United States. Compared with US-born persons, foreign-born persons were more likely to be younger, Hispanic, less educated, and uninsured. The prevalence of ART prescription (prevalence ratio 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.02) was not significantly different between foreign-born and US-born persons. A higher percentage of foreign-born persons achieved viral suppression compared with US-born persons (prevalence ratio 1.05; 95% confidence interval 1.00-1.09). No major disparities in ART prescription and viral suppression were found between foreign-born and US-born HIV-infected persons receiving medical care, despite higher percentages being uninsured.

  9. Return migration to region of birth among retirement-age persons in the United States.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A

    1990-05-01

    This study addresses some of the methodological difficulties one encounters in assessing the question of whether older persons display an increasing tendency to return to their state of birth after reaching retirement age. It reanalyzes previously studied data on the question and concludes that there is no indication that elderly people are more prone than nonelderly to "return home" to their native state.

  10. Money Income of Households, Families, and Persons in the United States: 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Current Population Reports, 1986

    1986-01-01

    This statistical compilation looks at personal income at three levels: household, family, and individual. Within each of these categories, income figures for 1984 and 1983 are related to selected characteristics such as type of residence, geographic region, race, educational level, age, size of household or family, and number of wage earners in…

  11. Emergency Department Visits by Persons Aged 65 and Over: United States, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... made by persons aged 65 and over, and did the visit rate increase with age? In 2009– ... adults were made by nursing home residents, and did this percentage vary by age? In 2009–2010, ...

  12. Legal and economic challenges to personal autonomy: a view from the United States of America.

    PubMed

    Maher, V F; Ford, J W

    1992-01-01

    Steadily and surely, commonly accepted notions of individual rights and the place of the individual in society are subject to increasing scrutiny. This article critically analyses legal and economic parameters which directly affect both personal autonomy and the role of government, interpreted through its higher level state and federal judiciary, on the public.

  13. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  15. Design of an Innovative Information System for the Intensive Care Unit in a Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tsoromokos, Dimitrios; Tsaloukidis, Nikolaos; Dermatis, Zacharias; Gozadinos, Filippos; Lazakidou, Athina

    2016-01-01

    The health sector is increasingly focused on the use of Communication Technology (ICT) Information and Communication. New technologies which introduced in health, should lead to lower cost of procedures, saving employees' working time and immediate and secure data storages for easy future search or meta-analysis. The DPP4ICU application which presented in this document, allows at the Intensive Care Unit's nurses (ICU) to enter directly the handwritten accountability, in the Organization Information System. Through this application is accelerated the proper completion of a document and is improved data quality. The application provides the ability to authorized users to exchange information with an automated manner. PMID:27350492

  16. Design of an Innovative Information System for the Intensive Care Unit in a Public Hospital.

    PubMed

    Tsoromokos, Dimitrios; Tsaloukidis, Nikolaos; Dermatis, Zacharias; Gozadinos, Filippos; Lazakidou, Athina

    2016-01-01

    The health sector is increasingly focused on the use of Communication Technology (ICT) Information and Communication. New technologies which introduced in health, should lead to lower cost of procedures, saving employees' working time and immediate and secure data storages for easy future search or meta-analysis. The DPP4ICU application which presented in this document, allows at the Intensive Care Unit's nurses (ICU) to enter directly the handwritten accountability, in the Organization Information System. Through this application is accelerated the proper completion of a document and is improved data quality. The application provides the ability to authorized users to exchange information with an automated manner.

  17. Sources of work-related acute fatigue in United States hospital nurses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Daraiseh, Nancy M; Davis, Kermit G; Pan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    This study identified the nursing work activities that could be the primary sources of work-related acute fatigue in US hospital nurses. Continuous recording of working heart rate and random observations of nursing activities were applied to collect data from eight nurses during two consecutive 12 h day shifts. Using descriptive statistics and random-effect analysis of variance, the contributions of individual nursing work activities to acute fatigue were compared based on the activity frequencies and nurses' corresponding heart rate elevations. Of 860 observed nursing-related work activities, manual patient-handling, bedside-care, care-coordinating, and walking/standing activities accounted for 5%, 16%, 38%, and 41%, respectively. After controlling for the differences of participant and shift, the percentage of working heart rate to maximal heart rate of manual patient-handling (64.3%), bedside-care (59.7%), and walking/standing (57.4%) activities were significantly higher than that of care-coordinating activities (52.3%, F[3, 38.0]  = 7.5, P < 0.001). These findings suggest that bedside care and walking/standing, other than manual patient handling, contributed most to the level of acute fatigue.

  18. Attribution of foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths to food commodities by using outbreak data, United States, 1998-2008.

    PubMed

    Painter, John A; Hoekstra, Robert M; Ayers, Tracy; Tauxe, Robert V; Braden, Christopher R; Angulo, Frederick J; Griffin, Patricia M

    2013-03-01

    Each year, >9 million foodborne illnesses are estimated to be caused by major pathogens acquired in the United States. Preventing these illnesses is challenging because resources are limited and linking individual illnesses to a particular food is rarely possible except during an outbreak. We developed a method of attributing illnesses to food commodities that uses data from outbreaks associated with both simple and complex foods. Using data from outbreak-associated illnesses for 1998-2008, we estimated annual US foodborne illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths attributable to each of 17 food commodities. We attributed 46% of illnesses to produce and found that more deaths were attributed to poultry than to any other commodity. To the extent that these estimates reflect the commodities causing all foodborne illness, they indicate that efforts are particularly needed to prevent contamination of produce and poultry. Methods to incorporate data from other sources are needed to improve attribution estimates for some commodities and agents.

  19. Care of severe head injury patients in the Sarawak General Hospital: intensive care unit versus general ward.

    PubMed

    Sim, S K; Lim, S L; Lee, H K; Liew, D; Wong, A

    2011-06-01

    Intensive care for severe head injury patients is very important in the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury. However, in a resources constraint environment and limited availability of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds in the hospitals, not all severe head injury patients will receive ICU care. This prospective study is aimed to evaluate the outcome of severe head injured patients who received ICU and general ward care in Sarawak General Hospital (SGH) over a 6-month period. A total of thirty five severe head injury patients were admitted. Twenty three patients (65.7%) were ventilated in general ward whereas twelve patients (34.3%) were ventilated in ICU. Overall one month mortality in this study was 25.7%. Patients who received ICU care had a lower one month mortality than those who received general ward care (16.7% vs 30.4%), although it was not statistically different. Multivariate analysis revealed only GCS on admission (OR 0.731; 95% CI 0.460 to 0.877; P=0.042) as the independent predictive factor for one month mortality in this study.

  20. Knowing versus doing: education and training needs of staff in a chronic care hospital unit for individuals with dementia.

    PubMed

    Marx, Katherine A; Stanley, Ian H; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Moody, Jennifer; Alonzi, Dana; Hansen, Bryan R; Gitlin, Laura N

    2014-12-01

    Hospital clinical staff routinely confront challenging behaviors in patients with dementia with limited training in prevention and management. The authors of the current article conducted a survey of staff on a chronic care hospital unit concerning knowledge about dementia, perceived educational needs, and the care environment. The overall mean score for a 27-item knowledge scale was 24.08 (SD = 2.61), reflecting high level of disease knowledge. However, staff indicated a need for more information and skills, specifically for managing behaviors nonpharmacologically (92.3%), enhancing patient safety (89.7%), coping with care challenges (84.2%), and involving patients in activities (81.6%). Although most staff (i.e., nurses [80%] and therapists [86.4%]) believed their care contributed a great deal to patient well-being, approximately 75% reported frustration and being overwhelmed by dementia care. Most reported being hit, bitten, or physically hurt by patients (66.7%), as well as disrespected by families (53.8%). Findings suggest that staff have foundational knowledge but lack the "how-to" or hands-on skills necessary to implement nonpharmacological behavioral management approaches and communicate with families.

  1. Incidence, Clinical Outcome and Risk Factors of Intensive Care Unit Infections in the Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH), Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Iwuafor, Anthony A.; Ogunsola, Folasade T.; Oladele, Rita O.; Oduyebo, Oyin O.; Desalu, Ibironke; Egwuatu, Chukwudi C.; Nnachi, Agwu U.; Akujobi, Comfort N.; Ita, Ita O.; Ogban, Godwin I.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infections are common complications in critically ill patients with associated significant morbidity and mortality. Aim This study determined the prevalence, risk factors, clinical outcome and microbiological profile of hospital-acquired infections in the intensive care unit of a Nigerian tertiary hospital. Materials and Methods This was a prospective cohort study, patients were recruited and followed up between September 2011 and July 2012 until they were either discharged from the ICU or died. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of isolates was done using CLSI guidelines. Results Seventy-one patients were recruited with a 45% healthcare associated infection rate representing an incidence rate of 79/1000 patient-days in the intensive care unit. Bloodstream infections (BSI) 49.0% (22/71) and urinary tract infections (UTI) 35.6% (16/71) were the most common infections with incidence rates of 162.9/1000 patient-days and 161.6/1000 patient-days respectively. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common cause of BSIs, responsible for 18.2% of cases, while Candida spp. was the commonest cause of urinary tract infections, contributing 25.0% of cases. Eighty percent (8/10) of the Staphylococcus isolates were methicillin-resistant. Gram-negative multidrug bacteria accounted for 57.1% of organisms isolated though they were not ESBL-producing. Use of antibiotics (OR = 2.98; p = 0.03) and surgery (OR = 3.15, p< 0.05) in the month preceding ICU admission as well as urethral catheterization (OR = 5.38; p<0.05) and endotracheal intubation (OR = 5.78; p< 0.05) were risk factors for infection. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that healthcare associated infections is a significant risk factor for ICU-mortality and morbidity even after adjusting for APACHE II score. PMID:27776162

  2. Characterization of nasal and blood culture isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from patients in United States Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tenover, Fred C; Tickler, Isabella A; Goering, Richard V; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Mediavilla, José R; Persing, David H

    2012-03-01

    A total of 299 nares and 194 blood isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), each recovered from a unique patient, were collected from 23 U.S. hospitals from May 2009 to March 2010. All isolates underwent spa and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element (SCCmec) typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing; a subset of 84 isolates was typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) using SmaI. Seventy-six spa types were observed among the isolates. Overall, for nasal isolates, spa type t002-SCCmec type II (USA100) was the most common strain type (37% of isolates), while among blood isolates, spa type t008-SCCmec type IV (USA300) was the most common (39%). However, the proportion of all USA100 and USA300 isolates varied by United States census region. Nasal isolates were more resistant to tobramycin and clindamycin than blood isolates (55.9% and 48.8% of isolates versus 36.6% and 39.7%, respectively; for both, P < 0.05). The USA300 isolates were largely resistant to fluoroquinolones. High-level mupirocin resistance was low among all spa types (<5%). SCCmec types III and VIII, which are rare in the United States, were observed along with several unusual PFGE types, including CMRSA9, EMRSA15, and the PFGE profile associated with sequence type 239 (ST239) isolates. Typing data from this convenience sample suggest that in U.S. hospitalized patients, USA100 isolates of multiple spa types, while still common in the nares, have been replaced by USA300 isolates as the predominant MRSA strain type in positive blood cultures.

  3. Expectations and needs of persons with family members in an intensive care unit as opposed to a general ward.

    PubMed

    Foss, K R; Tenholder, M F

    1993-04-01

    The positive effect of family support on the outcome from serious illness that requires intensive care has been recognized by clinicians for decades. We have all seen that family visitation and an intensive care environment more similar to that of a general ward (sunlight, radio, television) can benefit patients with psychosis related to intensive care. The severity of illness of the individual patient exerts a powerful stress on the family unit, but it has been difficult to measure this effect. We used a 40-question family needs survey with a degree of importance scale to compare the intensive care unit (ICU) with the general ward in terms of impact on the family. Five needs were found to discriminate these two environments. The family members of patients in an ICU considered it very important (1) for staff to give directions on what to do at the bedside, (2) to receive more support from their own family unit, (3) to have a place to be alone as a family unit in the hospital, (4) to be informed in advance of any transfer plan, and (5) to have flexibility in the time allowed for visitation. Family members are willing to accept decreased visitation time if the physicians and nurses can equate this decrease with the complexity of care in the ICU. The results of this survey have helped us modify and individualize our approach based on family expectations especially when patients are transferred from the general ward to the ICU or from the ICU to the ward.

  4. Blood carbon monoxide levels in persons 3 to 74 years of age: United States, 1976-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, E.P.; Drizd, T.A.

    1982-03-17

    This report presents national estimates of the distribution of carbon monoxide levels in the blood of persons ages 3 to 74 years in the United States by age, smoking status, race, urbanization status of residence, annual family income, and season of the year. These findings will be described and analyzed further in a report in the Vital and Health Statistics series (in preparation). In this report the relative contributions of the four principal sources of carbon monoxide (smoking, ambient or outdoor exposures, occupational exposures, and indoor exposures) to COHb levels are examined. Of these, smoking is the most significant and widespread, although in special circumstances each of the other contributors assumes some importance.

  5. [Urgent stroke care in hospitals with a stroke unit. Quick Project].

    PubMed

    Masjuán, Jaime; Álvarez-Sabín, José; Arias-Rivas, Susana; Blanco, Miguel; de Felipe, Alicia; Escudero-Martínez, Irene; Fuentes, Blanca; Gállego-Culleré, Jaime; Moniche-Álvarez, Francisco; Muñoz, Lucía; Pérez de la Ossa-Herrero, Natalia; Sahuquillo, Patricia; Santamarina, Estevo; Sanz, Borja; Tembl, José I; Zandio, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Introduccion. El ictus es una emergencia medica dependiente del tiempo. La rapidez en su reconocimiento y en la atencion que reciben los pacientes es clave en el pronostico. Objetivos. Analizar los tiempos de actuacion medica, evaluar posibles areas de mejora y estudiar la dotacion de recursos de los centros. Pacientes y metodos. Registro prospectivo de pacientes atendidos en ocho unidades de ictus experimentadas españolas con sospecha de ictus y activacion del codigo ictus. Se recogieron los tiempos inicio-puerta, puerta-tomografia computarizada (TC), puerta-aguja, TC-aguja e inicio-aguja. Tambien se recogieron el metodo de trasporte al hospital, el tipo de ictus y las terapias de reperfusion. En cuanto a la dotacion estructural de los centros, se recogieron la ratio de enfermeria, la monitorizacion de camas, la disponibilidad de TC multimodal y resonancia magnetica, y la realizacion de cursos de informacion o formacion. Resultados. Se incluyeron 197 pacientes, de los cuales fueron validos 181 (151 infartos y 30 hemorragias cerebrales). Las medianas (p25-p75) en minutos fueron: inicio-puerta, 104 (70-188); puerta-TC, 27 (19-41); TC-aguja, 30 (21-43); puerta-aguja, 64 (49-83); e inicio-aguja, 156 (129-202). Se aplicaron terapias de reperfusion en 68 pacientes (el 45% de los infartos cerebrales), de los cuales el 81% fueron trombolisis intravenosas; el 7%, tratamientos endovasculares; y el 12%, una combinacion de ambos. Los recursos de los centros estuvieron de acuerdo con lo recomendado por las guias clinicas. Hubo un bajo porcentaje de pacientes estudiados con resonancia magnetica. Conclusion. El porcentaje de pacientes tratados con trombolisis fue muy elevado y los tiempos de los circuitos intrahospitalarios, aunque buenos, tienen margen de mejora.

  6. Is there a weekend effect in hip fracture patients presenting to a United Kingdom teaching hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, John Abraham; Vindlacheruvu, Madhavi; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare mortality and time-to-surgery of patients admitted with hip fracture to our teaching hospital on weekdays vs weekends. METHODS Data was prospectively collected and retrospectively analysed for 816 hip fracture patients. Multivariate logistic regression was carried out on 3 binary outcomes (time-to-surgery < 36 h; 30-d mortality; 120-d mortality), using the explanatory variables time-of-admission; age; gender; American Society of Anesthesiologist (ASA) grade; abbreviated mental test score (AMTS); fracture type; accommodation admitted from; walking ability outdoors; accompaniment outdoors and season. RESULTS Baseline characteristics were not statistically different between those admitted on weekdays vs weekends. Weekend admission was not associated with an increased time-to-surgery (P = 0.975), 30-d mortality (P = 0.842) or 120-d mortality (P = 0.425). Gender (P = 0.028), ASA grade (P < 0.001), AMTS (P = 0.041) and accompaniment outdoors (P = 0.033) were significant co-variates for 30-d mortality. Furthermore, age (P < 0.001), gender (P = 0.011), ASA grade (P < 0.001), AMTS (P < 0.001) and accompaniment outdoors (P = 0.033) all significantly influenced mortality at 120 d. ASA (P < 0.001) and season (P = 0.014) had significant effect on the odds of undergoing surgery in under 36 h. CONCLUSION Weekend admission was not associated with increased time-to-surgery or mortality in hip fracture patients. Demographic factors affect mortality in accordance with previous published reports. PMID:27795950

  7. Personal History of Prostate Cancer and Increased Risk of Incident Melanoma in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Ma, Jing; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Han, Jiali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Steroid hormones, particularly androgens, play a major role in prostatic carcinogenesis. Personal history of severe acne, a surrogate for higher androgen activity, has been associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), and one recent study indicated that severe teenage acne was a novel risk factor for melanoma. These findings suggest a possible relationship between PCa and risk of melanoma. We prospectively evaluated this association among US men. Methods A total of 42,372 participants in the Health Professionals' Follow-Up Study (HPFS; 1986 to 2010) were included. Biennially self-reported PCa diagnosis was confirmed using pathology reports. Diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) was self-reported biennially, and diagnosis of melanoma was pathologically confirmed. We sought to confirm the association in 18,603 participants from the Physicians' Health Study (PHS; 1982 to 1998). Results We identified 539 melanomas in the HPFS. Personal history of PCa was associated with an increased risk of melanoma (multivariate-adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.83; 95% CI, 1.32 to 2.54). Although we also detected a marginally increased risk of NMSC associated with PCa (HR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.995 to 1.16), the difference in the magnitude of the association between melanoma and NMSC was significant (P for heterogeneity = .002). We did not find an altered risk of melanoma associated with personal history of other cancers. The association between PCa and risk of incident melanoma was confirmed in the PHS (HR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.12 to 4.21). Conclusion Personal history of PCa is associated with an increased risk of melanoma, which may not be entirely a result of greater medical scrutiny. PMID:24190118

  8. Regulatory, policy and quality update for venous thromboembolism and stroke in United States hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mahan, Charles E

    2012-10-01

    Stroke and venous thromboembolism (VTE) have a large impact on the United States (US) healthcare system. It is estimated that up to 1.7million new and recurrent stroke and VTE events are occurring in the US on an annual basis with the combined cost approaching over $200billion per year. A significant amount of stroke and VTE are preventable from appropriate antithrombotic use in at-risk patients and the Center for Medicaid and Medicare Services, the Joint Commission, the National Quality Forum and other key quality and regulatory entities have prioritized minimizing the impact of morbidity, mortality and avoidable costs related to these diseases. This review provides a brief history, overview, and update for the development of quality measures, quality systems, and regulatory and policy changes as related to stroke and VTE within the US healthcare system. PMID:22841661

  9. The underlying theories of health care reform in the United States--strategy implications for hospitals.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Daniel B; Militello, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The United State Health Reform (Affordable Care Act) presents health provides with the goals that should be achieved in the reformed health care environment and rationale for those goals. Developing strategies to implement the act's policies by any health care organization must take into account the underlying theories of the act: managed change though payment design and funds flow. Market place competition. To execute strategy effective internal organizational management is a must and can be facilitated through a strong alignment between mission and opperating factors. The mission must relate to the organization's markets. Markets are best addressed through a local perspective where the ACA goals can be applied within a specific community or culture. The systems approach brings as many participants in the system to define their mutual success as it relates to reform. PMID:22235723

  10. Risk factors associated with calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Chika C; Lefebvre, Sandra L; Pearl, David L; Yang, Mingyin; Wang, Mansen; Blois, Shauna L; Lund, Elizabeth M; Dewey, Cate E

    2014-08-01

    Calcium oxalate urolithiasis results from the formation of aggregates of calcium salts in the urinary tract. Difficulties associated with effectively treating calcium oxalate urolithiasis and the proportional increase in the prevalence of calcium oxalate uroliths relative to other urolith types over the last 2 decades has increased the concern of clinicians about this disease. To determine factors associated with the development of calcium oxalate urolithiasis in dogs evaluated at general care veterinary hospitals in the United States, a retrospective case-control study was performed. A national electronic database of medical records of all dogs evaluated between October 1, 2007 and December 31, 2010 at 787 general care veterinary hospitals in the United States was reviewed. Dogs were selected as cases at the first-time diagnosis of a laboratory-confirmed urolith comprised of at least 70% calcium oxalate (n=452). Two sets of control dogs with no history of urolithiasis diagnosis were randomly selected after the medical records of all remaining dogs were reviewed: urinalysis examination was a requirement in the selection of one set (n=1808) but was not required in the other set (n=1808). Historical information extracted included urolith composition, dog's diet, age, sex, neuter status, breed size category, hospital location, date of diagnosis, and urinalysis results. Multivariable analysis showed that the odds of first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were significantly (P<0.05) greater for dogs<7 years, males (OR: 7.77, 95% CI: 4.93-12.26), neutered (OR: 2.58, 1.44-4.63), toy- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.15, 1.90-5.22), small- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 3.05, 1.83-5.08), large- vs. medium-sized breeds (OR: 0.05, 0.01-0.19), and those with a diagnosis of cystitis within the previous year (OR: 6.49, 4.14-10.16). Urinary factors significantly associated with first-time diagnosis of calcium oxalate urolithiasis were acidic vs. basic pH (OR: 1.94, 1

  11. Agreement between insurance claim and self-reported hospital and emergency room utilization data among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Marks, Andrea S; Lee, David W; Slezak, Julie; Berger, Jan; Patel, Hitesh; Johnson, Kenneth E

    2003-01-01

    As part of a retrospective evaluation of a diabetes management program, the agreement between self-reported and insurance claim data on hospitalization and emergency room utilization was examined. Data agreement on hospitalization or emergency room visits between the two collection modes was evaluated through the use of simple agreement proportions and the kappa agreement statistic. A total of 1,230 participant responses were studied. The proportions of patients with hospitalization or emergency room visits were indistinguishable between the self-reported and medical claims data, and kappa statistics also indicated good-to-excellent agreement between data sets. The percentages of participants whose self-reported hospitalization and emergency room utilization exactly matched data derived from insurance claims were high (89.1% and 87.2%, respectively). Furthermore, the kappa statistics of agreement for the number of hospitalizations (0.6366) and emergency room visits (0.5390) indicate good agreement between self-reported and insurance claim data. The results of this study suggest either self-reported or insurance claims data can be used to evaluate the impact of health care interventions on hospital or emergency room utilization.

  12. [The functional planning of a enteral nutrition unit for home care at a hospital in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Ribeiro Salomon, Ana Lúcia; Carvalho Garbi Novaes, Maria Rita

    2013-11-01

    Introducción: Con el objeto de garantizar la calidad del producto ofrecido a los clientes en sus domicilios, las unidades hospitalarias necesitan adecuar sus áreas físicas para poder desarrollar todas las actividades especializadas que conlleva la nutrición enteral. Objetivo: Proporcionar una planificación funcional y las herramientas para la reorganización del espacio físico de una unidad de nutrición enteral, describiendo el proceso de preparación, la descripción de sus características y funciones laborales. Métodos. Estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y documental, proporcionando las herramientas para la planificación funcional y de gestión de calidad en una unidad de preparación de la nutrición enteral en un hospital público del Distrito Federal, Brasil. Los datos fueron recolectados en el período comprendido entre los años 2000 y 2010. Resultados. A través de la creación de un programa de nutrición enteral en el Departamento de Salud Pública del Distrito Federal y según lo dispuesto por la legislación nacional, se efectuó un plan de alta complejidad respecto de la nutrición enteral en atención al perfil demográfico y epidemiológico de la población. Este trabajo consiste en una propuesta de implementación de terapia nutricional dentro de un plan de alta complejidad, y de acuerdo a lo prescrito por la legislación del Ministerio de Salud Brasileño. El número de pacientes atendidos por esta modalidad terapéutica se ha ido incrementando, por consiguiente se hace necesario garantizar la calidad del servicio, por medio de la organización de los espacios funcionales. Conclusión. Por medio de la planificación funcional de un Laboratorio de Nutrición Enteral, se puede garantizar la asistencia nutricional especializada y de calidad, a la población hospitalaria o domiciliaria, tomando las precauciones necesarias en la manipulación de las fórmulas enterales.

  13. The Effect of Prosthetic Ankle Units on Roll-Over Shape Characteristics During Walking in Persons with Bilateral Transtibial Amputations

    PubMed Central

    Gard, Steven A.; Su, Po-Fu; Lipschutz, Robert D.; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Some important functions of walking are adversely affected or eliminated in prosthesis users due to reduced or absent ankle motion. The purpose of this retrospective data analysis was to determine the effect of prosthetic ankle units on the characteristics of the ankle-foot roll-over shape in persons with bilateral transtibial amputations. Seventeen subjects were fitted with Endolite Multiflex Ankles to provide ankle plantar/dorsiflexion during the stance phase of gait. Two quantitative gait analyses were performed as subjects walked with (1) Seattle Lightfoot II feet (baseline condition) and (2) with the prosthetic ankle units added. Roll-over shape radii and effective foot length ratio were calculated and compared for the two prosthetic configurations. When subjects walked with the ankle units, ankle motion increased (p<0.001), peak ankle plantarflexion moment during stance decreased slightly, and ankle-foot roll-over shape radii were significantly less (p<0.001) compared to the baseline condition. The effective foot length ratio of the roll-over shape was found to increase with walking speed (p<0.001), but it was not significantly affected by the prosthetic ankle units (p=0.066). Prosthetists and manufacturers are encouraged to consider the effect of combining prosthetic components on the overall characteristics of the prosthesis and the functions they impart to the user. PMID:22234709

  14. Person Response Functions and the Definition of Units in the Social Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhard, George, Jr.; Perkins, Aminah F.

    2011-01-01

    Humphry (this issue) has written a thought-provoking piece on the interpretation of item discrimination parameters as scale units in item response theory. One of the key features of his work is the description of an item response theory (IRT) model that he calls the logistic measurement function that combines aspects of two traditions in IRT that…

  15. Choices & Careers; Free to Choose: Being a Special Person - Unit for Adults. Leaders Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finley, Cathaleen; Thompson, Marian

    This leaders' guide is for use in group sessions or individual meetings with parents of girls participating in the Choices & Careers: Free to Choose program. It is based upon units the girls study, including "The Outside You,""Your Money,""Food and You,""Alcoholism,""Coping with Parents," and "Life Span Planning." Each section of the document…

  16. Preschool Education in China and the United States: A Personal Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pang, Yanhui; Richey, Dean

    2007-01-01

    In this article the preschool education in China and the United States are compared, based on the factors that influence the preschool education in each country as well as the characteristics of the preschool education in each culture. The preschool education in both countries has its strengths and weaknesses, which result from their respective…

  17. Directory of Agencies Serving Blind Persons in the United States. Fifteenth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Foundation for the Blind, New York, NY.

    The directory lists agencies serving the blind in the United States. Services are presented for each state and are categorized as either statewide services (primarily under governmental auspices) or local services. Statewide services are further organized according to type: aid to the blind, educational services, library services, vocational…

  18. Quality Implementation in Health Physics Unit, Cosenza Hospital. Accreditation Program as Quality Improvement instrument.

    PubMed

    Loizzo, M; Siciliano, R

    2016-01-01

    Achieving high levels of quality in healthcare, which could be measurable, is increasingly important at present and is dictated by the radical changes of the welfare system imposed today by the well known economic constraints. However, even in the ongoing legislation, the practices concerning the verification and review of the quality of health care has had a major impact in the galaxy of Health. On the one hand, the citizen is developing an awareness of the possibilities of choice (Empowerment) between a plurality of providers of healthcare services, on the other hand providers themselves are obliged, within the logic of a global market, to retrain their offers to respond satisfactorily to the needs of citizens. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate how the adoption of Operational Procedures, following the granting of a certificate of accreditation to the Unit of Medical Physics, has changed the approach to the work on the part of health workers, in the direction of a dynamic quality improvement. PMID:27479767

  19. Intensive care unit environmental cleaning: an evaluation in sixteen hospitals using a novel assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Carling, P C; Von Beheren, S; Kim, P; Woods, C

    2008-01-01

    Despite isolation precautions and enhanced hand hygiene product use, the transmission of healthcare-associated pathogens remains a major problem. Recent studies have confirmed that microbial contamination of the environment in intensive care units (ICUs) can lead to colonisation and infection of patients. Although environmental disinfectants have been used to minimise the spread of microbial pathogens, suboptimal cleaning may limit the effectiveness of such activities. In order to evaluate the thoroughness of cleaning near-patient surfaces, a transparent, easily cleanable and environmentally stable solution was developed that fluoresces when exposed to UV light. The solution was used to mark a standardised group of frequently touched objects in ICU patient rooms following discharge cleaning. These sites were then evaluated after at least two patients had occupied the room and at least two terminal cleanings had been completed. Evaluation of 2320 objects in 197 patient areas disclosed that 57.1% of the standardised sites were cleaned following discharge of the room's occupant in the 16 ICUs studied. Although high rates of cleaning (>80%) were found for toilet seats, sinks and tray tables, consistently low rates of cleaning (<30%) were documented for several objects at high risk of becoming contaminated with nosocomial pathogens, including bedpan cleaners, toilet area handholds, doorknobs and light switches.

  20. Skin disorders in the neonatal intensive care unit of a central hospital.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Lígia; Rocha, Gustavo; Morais, Paulo; Mota, Alberto; Magina, Sofia; Lisboa, Carmen; Guimarães, Hercília

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous abnormalities in the newborn are usually benign and transitory. However, they may sometimes be extremely distressing both for parents and the medical staff, presenting with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to access the clinical features of different skin disorders in a series of newborns, at a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in the Northern Region of Portugal, and review some of the most impressive cases. Between January 1997 and December 2010, 27 patients were found to have an important cutaneous condition that required admission to the NICU. The most frequent presentations were vesicles and pustules (n=8; 29.6%), followed by erythroderma (n=7; 25.9%), atrophic (n=5; 18.5%) and vascular lesions (n=4; 14.8%). Four (14.8%) patients died in the neonatal period, and further 4 afterwards. Genetic studies, when available, revealed three chromosomal disorders and 6 gene mutations. Overall, skin disorders were not a leading cause of NICU admission (0.43%), but were associated with significant morbidity and mortality.

  1. Possible stressors in a neonatal intensive care unit at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jordão, Kamila Reis; Pinto, Lauriane de Assis Proença; Machado, Lucimer Rocha; Costa, Laetitia Braga Vasconcellos de Lima; Trajano, Eduardo Tavares Lima

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate possible stressors to which newborns are exposed in the neonatal intensive care unit. Methods The levels of continuous noise were checked by a decibel meter positioned near the ear of the newborn, brightness was observed by a light meter positioned in the incubator in front of the newborn's eyes, and temperature was checked through the incubator display. The evaluations were performed in three periods of the day, with ten measurements taken at one-minute intervals during each shift for the subsequent statistical analysis. Results All shifts showed noise above acceptable levels. Morning (p < 0.001), afternoon (p < 0.05) and night (p < 0.001) showed a significant increase compared to the control. The brightness significantly exceeded the normal range (p < 0.01) in the morning. We observed that only one of the incubators was within the normal temperature limits. Conclusion The noise, brightness and temperature intensities were not in accordance with regulatory standards and thus might be possible stressors to newborns. PMID:27626948

  2. Liver surgery in Italy. Criteria to identify the hospital units and the tertiary referral centers entitled to perform it.

    PubMed

    Torzilli, Guido; Viganò, Luca; Giuliante, Felice; Pinna, Antonio Daniele

    2016-06-01

    During the last decades, liver surgery had an extraordinary evolution and diffusion thanks to a drastic reduction of operative mortality and morbidity rates. A debate is ongoing about the need for centralization of liver resections in tertiary referral centers. Robust evidences showed that complex surgical procedures have lower mortality rates when performed in high-volume centers. The present expert group reviewed the literature data and proposed guidelines to identify surgical units that should be entitled to perform liver surgery in Italy. Three separate types of requirements were identified. First, the hospital requirements that include the following criteria: (1) a hospital of 1st level according to the Italian law; (2) the presence of a dedicated hepatobiliary or hepatobiliopancreatic unit or a team dedicated to liver surgery into a general surgery unit; (3) the mandatory presence of oncology, hepatology, radiology, interventional radiology, digestive endoscopy, intensive care, and pathology units; (4) the availability of a liver transplant team into the hospital or into another hospital within an established partnership; (5) a periodic multidisciplinary meeting. Second, the volume requirements: the unit has to perform more than 20 liver resections per year for malignant liver diseases with a 90-day mortality rate < 3 %. Finally, the organization requirements: the presence of specific diagnostic-therapeutic flowcharts for liver diseases. PMID:27294278

  3. The roles of users personal characteristics and organisational support in the attitude towards using ERP systems in a Spanish public hospital.

    PubMed

    Escobar-Rodriguez, Tomas; Bartual-Sopena, Lourdes

    2013-01-01

    Enterprise resources planning (ERP) systems enable central and integrative control over all processes throughout an organisation by ensuring one data entry point and the use of a common database. T his paper analyses the attitude of healthcare personnel towards the use of an ERP system in a Spanish public hospital, identifying influencing factors. This research is based on a regression analysis of latent variables using the optimisation technique of partial least squares. We propose a research model including possible relationships among different constructs using the technology acceptance model. Our results show that the personal characteristics of potential users are key factors in explaining attitude towards using ERP systems.

  4. Detection of Oxacillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from the Neonatal and Pediatric Units of a Brazilian Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Valéria Cataneli; Martins, André; de Souza Rugolo, Lígia Maria Suppo; de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine, by phenotypic and genotypic methods, oxacillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from pediatric and neonatal intensive care unit patients seen at the University Hospital of the Botucatu School of Medicine. Methods: A total of 100 S. aureus strains isolated from the following materials were studied: 25 blood cultures, 21 secretions, 12 catheters, 3 cannulae and one chest drain from 62 patients in the neonatal unit, and 36 blood cultures, one pleural fluid sample and one peritoneal fluid sample from 38 patients in the pediatric unit. Resistance of the S. aureus isolates to oxacillin was evaluated by the disk diffusion method with oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg), agar screening test using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 6 μg/ml oxacillin and 4% NaCl, and detection of the mecA gene by PCR. In addition, the isolates were tested for β-lactamase production using disks impregnated with Nitrocefin and hyperproduction of β-lactamase using amoxicillin (20 μg) and clavulanic acid (10 μg) disks. Results: Among the 100 S. aureus strains included in the study, 18.0% were resistant to oxacillin, with 16.1% MRSA being detected in the neonatal unit and 21.0% in the pediatric unit. The oxacillin (1 μg) and cefoxitin (30 μg) disk diffusion methods presented 94.4% and 100% sensitivity, respectively, and 98.8% specificity. The screening test showed 100% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity. All isolates produced β-lactamase and one of these strains was considered to be a hyperproducer. Conclusions: The 30 μg cefoxitin disk diffusion method presented the best result when compared to the 1 μg oxacillin disk. The sensitivity of the agar screening test was similar to that of the cefoxitin disk diffusion method and higher than that of the oxacillin disk diffusion method. We observed variations in the percentage of oxacillin-resistant isolates during the study period, with a decline over the last years which might be

  5. Trends in hospital use for mechanical neck and back problems in Ontario and the United States: discretionary care in different health care systems

    PubMed Central

    Lavis, J N; Malter, A; Anderson, G M; Taylor, V M; Deyo, R A; Bombardier, C; Axcell, T; Kreuter, W

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and compare trends in hospital admission rates for mechanical neck and back problems between 1982 and 1992 in Ontario and the United States. DESIGN: A descriptive analysis of hospital admissions, with data for Ontario extracted from the Canadian Institute for Health Information database and data for the US extracted from the National Hospital Discharge Survey. SETTING: All acute care hospitals in Ontario and a probability sample of acute care hospitals in the US. PATIENTS: Adults aged 20 years or more who were admitted to an acute care hospital for mechanical neck or back problems in 1982, 1987 or 1992. Mechanical neck and back problems were defined using an algorithm developed by the study team. OUTCOME MEASURE: Hospital admission rate per 100,000 adults. RESULTS: Between 1982 and 1992 the hospital admission rate for medically treated cases decreased by 52% in Ontario and by 75% in the US. Over the same period the admission rate for surgically treated cases increased by 14% and by 35% respectively. By 1992 the admission rate for medically treated cases in the US was 23% higher than that in Ontario, whereas the rate for surgically treated cases was 164% higher. CONCLUSIONS: The hospital-based medical or surgical treatment of mechanical neck and back problems provides an example of discretionary care. The higher admission rates for surgery in the US may reflect a larger supply of surgical specialists and imaging units. Further work is needed to confirm these findings for other types of discretionary care and to compare the appropriateness of care and clinical outcomes for discretionary care in these 2 jurisdictions. PMID:9475907

  6. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P < 0.001). The highest incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU.

  7. Ethical issues recognized by critical care nurses in the intensive care units of a tertiary hospital during two separate periods.

    PubMed

    Park, Dong Won; Moon, Jae Young; Ku, Eun Yong; Kim, Sun Jong; Koo, Young-Mo; Kim, Ock-Joo; Lee, Soon Haeng; Jo, Min-Woo; Lim, Chae-Man; Armstrong, John David; Koh, Younsuck

    2015-04-01

    This research aimed to investigate the changes in ethical issues in everyday clinical practice recognized by critical care nurses during two observation periods. We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained by prospective questionnaire surveys of nurses in the intensive care units (ICU) of a tertiary university-affiliated hospital in Seoul, Korea. Data were collected prospectively during two different periods, February 2002-January 2003 (Period 1) and August 2011-July 2012 (Period 2). Significantly fewer cases with ethical issues were reported in Period 2 than in Period 1 (89 cases [2.1%] of 4,291 ICU admissions vs. 51 [0.5%] of 9,302 ICU admissions, respectively; P < 0.001). The highest incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in both Periods occurred in MICU. The major source of ethical issues in Periods 1 and 2 was behavior-related. Among behaviorrelated issues, inappropriate healthcare professional behavior was predominant in both periods and mainly involved resident physicians. Ethical issue numbers regarding end-oflife (EOL) care significantly decreased in the proportion with respect to ethical issues during Period 2 (P = 0.044). In conclusion, the decreased incidence of cases with identified ethical issues in Period 2 might be associated with ethical enhancement related with EOL and improvements in the ICU care environment of the studied hospital. However, behaviorrelated issues involving resident physicians represent a considerable proportion of ethical issues encountered by critical care nurses. A systemic approach to solve behavior-related issues of resident physicians seems to be required to enhance an ethical environment in the studied ICU. PMID:25829820

  8. Characterization of Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care products in hospital effluent and waste water influent/effluent by direct-injection LC-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Tiago S; Murphy, Mark; Mendola, Nicholas; Wong, Virginia; Carlson, Doreen; Waring, Linda

    2015-06-15

    Two USEPA Regional Laboratories developed direct-injection LC/MS/MS methods to measure Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) in water matrices. Combined, the laboratories were prepared to analyze 185 PPCPs (with 74 overlapping) belonging to more than 20 therapeutical categories with reporting limits at low part-per-trillion. In partnership with Suffolk County in NY, the laboratories conducted PPCP analysis on 72 samples belonging to 4 Water Systems (WS). Samples were collected at different stages of the WS (hospital effluents, WWTP influents/effluents) to assess PPCP relevance in hospital discharges, impact on WWTP performance and potential ecological risk posed by analytes not eliminated during treatment. Major findings include: a) acceptable accuracy between the two laboratories for most overlapping PPCPs with better agreement for higher concentrations; b) the measurement of PPCPs throughout all investigated WS with total PPCP concentrations ranging between 324 and 965 μg L(-1) for hospital effluent, 259 and 573 μg L(-1) for WWTP influent and 19 and 118 μg L(-1) for WWTP effluent; c) the variable contribution of hospital effluents to the PPCP loads into the WWTP influents (contribution ranging between 1% (WS-2) and 59% (WS-3); d) the PPCP load reduction after treatment for all WS reaching more than 95% for WS using activated sludge processes (WS-2 and WS-4), with inflow above 6500 m(3) d(-1), and having a lower percentage of hospital effluent in the WWTP influent; e) the relevance of four therapeutical categories for the PPCP load in WWTP effluents (analgesics, antidiabetics, antiepileptics and psychoanaleptics); and f) the risk quotients calculated using screening-level Predicted Non Effect Concentration indicate that WWTP effluents contain 33 PPCPs with potential medium to high ecological risk. To our knowledge no other monitoring investigation published in the scientific literature uses direct-injection methods to cover as many PPCPs and

  9. Hospitalizations of Infants and Young Children with Down Syndrome: Evidence from Inpatient Person-Records from a Statewide Administrative Database

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, S. A.; Urbano, R. C.; Hodapp, R. M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Although individuals with Down syndrome are increasingly living into the adult years, infants and young children with the syndrome continue to be at increased risk for health problems. Using linked, statewide administrative hospital discharge records of all infants with Down syndrome born over a 3-year period, this study "follows…

  10. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Incidence, Risk Factors and Outcome in Paediatric Intensive Care Units at Cairo University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Galal, Yasmine S.; Ibrahiem, Sally K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a major cause of hospital morbidity, mortality and increased health care costs. Although the epidemiology, pathogenesis and outcome of VAP are well described in adults; few data exist regarding VAP in paediatric patients, especially in developing countries. Aim To determine the incidence, risk factors and outcome of VAP in two Paediatric Intensive Care Units (PICUs) at Cairo University Hospital. Materials and Methods A total of 427 patients who received Mechanical Ventilation (MV) were included in this prospective study during the period from September 2014 till September 2015. Patients were observed daily till VAP occurrence, discharge from the unit or death, whichever came first. Demographic, clinical characteristics, laboratory results, radiographic and microbiological reports were recorded for all patients. Results Nearly 31% patients developed VAP among the entire cohort. The incidence density was 21.3 per 1000 ventilator days. The most frequently isolated organisms from VAP patients were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (47.7%), Acinetobacter (18.2%) and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (14.4%). VAP patients were significantly younger than non-VAP ones. The incidence of VAP in comatose patients and those with MOSF was significantly higher. Prior antibiotic use for > 48 h before MV, supine body positioning and reintubation were significantly associated with VAP. On multiple logistic regression analysis, MOSF; prior antibiotic use > 48h; reintubation; coma; and age remained independent predictors of VAP. Mortality rate among the VAP group was significantly higher compared to the non-VAP one (68.2% vs. 48.5%, p<0.001). Survival curve analysis showed a shorter median survival time in VAP patients. Conclusion Identification of risk factors and outcome of VAP in PICUs may help in reducing the incidence and improving patients’ outcomes. The incidence of VAP in this study was relatively high. The most

  11. Electrodeless electrohydrodynamic drop-on-demand encapsulation of drugs into porous polymer films for fabrication of personalized dosage units.

    PubMed

    Elele, Ezinwa; Shen, Yueyang; Susarla, Ramana; Khusid, Boris; Keyvan, Golshid; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2012-07-01

    Noncontact drop-on-demand (DOD) dosing is a promising strategy for manufacturing of personalized dosage units. However, current DOD methods developed for printing chemically and thermally stable, low-viscosity inks are of limited use for pharmaceuticals due to fundamentally different functional requirements. To overcome their deficiency, we developed a novel electrohydrodynamic (EHD) DOD (Appl, Phys, Lett. 97, 233501, 2010) that operates on fluids of up to 30 Pa·s in viscosity over a wide range of droplet sizes and provides a precise control over the droplet volume. We now evaluate the EHD DOD as a method for fabrication of dosage units by printing drug solutions on porous polymer films prepared by freeze-drying. Experiments were carried out on ibuprofen and griseofulvin, as model poorly water-soluble drugs, polyethylene glycol 400, as a drug carrier, and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose films. The similarities between drug release profiles from different dosage units were assessed by model-independent difference, f(1) , and similarity, f(2) , factors. The results presented show that EHD DOD offers a powerful tool for the evolving field of small-scale pharmaceutical technologies for tailoring medicines to individual patient's needs by printing a vast array of predefined amounts of therapeutics arranged in a specific pattern on a porous film.

  12. Comprehensive Geriatric Care in a Day Hospital: A Demonstration of the British Model in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morishita, Lynne; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed 273 medical records and interviewed 42 referring physicians to examine effectiveness of geriatric day hospital (GDH). Found that GDH provided intensive outpatient care, geriatric assessment, rehabilitation, and alternative to hospitalization: 21 percent of physician-referred patients would have been hospitalized without GDH, 7 percent…

  13. A study of prospective surveillance for inhibitors among persons with haemophilia in the United States.

    PubMed

    Soucie, J M; Miller, C H; Kelly, F M; Payne, A B; Creary, M; Bockenstedt, P L; Kempton, C L; Manco-Johnson, M J; Neff, A T

    2014-03-01

    Inhibitors are a rare but serious complication of treatment of patients with haemophilia. Phase III clinical trials enrol too few patients to adequately assess new product inhibitor risk. This project explores the feasibility of using a public health surveillance system to conduct national surveillance for inhibitors. Staff at 17 U.S. haemophilia treatment centres (HTC) enrolled patients with haemophilia A and B into this prospective study. HTC staff provided detailed historic data on product use and inhibitors at baseline, and postenrolment patients provided monthly detailed infusion logs. A central laboratory performed inhibitor tests on blood specimens that were collected at baseline, annually, prior to any planned product switch or when clinically indicated. The central laboratory also performed genotyping of all enrolled patients. From January 2006 through June 2012, 1163 patients were enrolled and followed up for 3329 person-years. A total of 3048 inhibitor tests were performed and 23 new factor VIII inhibitors were identified, 61% of which were not clinically apparent. Infusion logs were submitted for 113,205 exposure days. Genotyping revealed 431 distinct mutations causing haemophilia, 151 of which had not previously been reported elsewhere in the world. This study provided critical information about the practical issues that must be addressed to successfully implement national inhibitor surveillance. Centralized testing with routine monitoring and confirmation of locally identified inhibitors will provide valid and representative data with which to evaluate inhibitor incidence and prevalence, monitor trends in occurrence rates and identify potential inhibitor outbreaks associated with products.

  14. Potential for widespread electrification of personal vehicle travel in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Needell, Zachary A.; McNerney, James; Chang, Michael T.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2016-09-01

    Electric vehicles can contribute to climate change mitigation if coupled with decarbonized electricity, but only if vehicle range matches travellers’ needs. Evaluating electric vehicle range against a population’s needs is challenging because detailed driving behaviour must be taken into account. Here we develop a model to combine information from coarse-grained but expansive travel surveys with high-resolution GPS data to estimate the energy requirements of personal vehicle trips across the US. We find that the energy requirements of 87% of vehicle-days could be met by an existing, affordable electric vehicle. This percentage is markedly similar across diverse cities, even when per capita gasoline consumption differs significantly. We also find that for the highest-energy days, other vehicle technologies are likely to be needed even as batteries improve and charging infrastructure expands. Car sharing or other means to serve this small number of high-energy days could play an important role in the electrification and decarbonization of transportation.

  15. Money income of households, families, and persons in the United States: 1986.

    PubMed

    Welniak, E J

    1988-06-01

    This report presents income data for households, families, and persons in the US for 1986. The data were compiled from information collected in the March 1987 Current Population Survey of 60,500 households. Median household income in 1986 was $24,900, 3.4% higher than in 1985 after adjusting for a 1.9% increase in consumer prices between 1985 and 1986. For the 4th consecutive year, median family income moved ahead of inflation. In 1986, the median income for families was $29,460, 4.2% higher than the 1985 median after adjusting for inflation. Since 1982, when the last economic recession ended, real median family income rose a total of 10.7%. The median earnings of both men and women working year-round, full-time increased significantly in real terms between 1985 and 1986. In 1986, per capita income was $11,670, up 4% from 1985 in real terms. Per capita incomes for Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics were $12,350, $7,210, and $7,000 respectively, all higher than in 1985 in real terms. Between 1970 and 1980, real per capita income rose 15.5% while real median family income showed no significant change.

  16. An analysis of admissions from 155 United States hospitals to determine the influence of weather on stroke incidence.

    PubMed

    Cowperthwaite, Matthew C; Burnett, Mark G

    2011-05-01

    Weather is the most frequently proposed factor driving apparent seasonal trends in stroke admissions. Here, we present the largest study of the association between weather and ischemic stroke in the USA to date. We consider admissions to 155 United States hospitals in 20 states during the five-year period from 2004 to 2008. The data set included 196,439 stroke admissions, which were classified as ischemic (n=98,930), hemorrhagic (n=18,960), or transient ischemic attack (n=78,549). Variations in stroke admissions were tested to determine if they tracked seasonal and transient weather patterns over the same time period. Using autocorrelation analyses, no significant seasonal changes in stroke admissions were observed over the study period. Using time-series analyses, no significant association was observed between any weather variable and any stroke subtype over the five-year study. This study suggests that seasonal associations between weather and stroke are highly confounded, and an association between weather and stroke is virtually non-existent. Therefore, previous studies reporting an association between specific weather patterns and stroke should be interpreted with caution.

  17. Postnatal demoralisation among women admitted to a hospital mother-baby unit: validation of a psychometric measure.

    PubMed

    Bobevski, I; Rowe, H; Clarke, D M; McKenzie, D P; Fisher, J

    2015-12-01

    Demoralisation is a psychological state characterised by experiences of distress and sadness, helplessness, subjective incompetence and hopelessness, in the context of a stressful situation. Experiences of demoralisation may be particularly relevant to women who have recently given birth, who can feel incompetent, isolated and helpless. The psychometric properties of the Demoralisation Scale among women in the postnatal period participating in a clinical program were examined. Women admitted with their infants to a hospital mother-baby unit in Australia for five nights were recruited consecutively (N = 209) and assessed at admission and discharge. The Demoralisation Scale was perceived as relevant and exhibited high reliability, acceptable construct validity and good sensitivity to change. The mean demoralisation score was high (M = 30.9, SD = 15.5) and associated with negative experiences of motherhood and functional impairment, independent of depression and anxiety symptoms. Mean demoralisation decreased significantly after program completion (M = 18.4, SD = 12.4). More participants showed a significant improvement in demoralisation (57.5 %) than in depression (34.8 %) and anxiety (9.8 %) symptoms. Demoralisation can provide a useful framework for understanding and measuring the experiences of women participating in postnatal clinical programs and in directing treatment towards helping women to acquire the necessary caregiving skills and increasing parental efficacy. The Demoralisation Scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing intervention effects. PMID:25520260

  18. Airway accidents in critical care unit: A 3-year retrospective study in a Public Teaching Hospital of Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Sugata; Singh, Shipti Shradha; Chaudhuri, Arunima; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Choudhury, Sourav Das

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although tracheal tubes are essential devices to control and protect airway in a critical care unit (CCU), they are not free from complications. Aims: To document the incidence and nature of airway accidents in the CCU of a government teaching hospital in Eastern India. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all airway accidents in a 5-bedded (medical and surgical) CCU. The number, types, timing, and severity of airway accidents were analyzed. Results: The total accident rate was 19 in 233 intubated and/or tracheostomized patients over 1657 tube days (TDs) during 3 years. Fourteen occurred in 232 endotracheally intubated patients over 1075 endotracheal tube (ETT) days, and five occurred in 44 tracheostomized patients over 580 tracheostomy TDs. Fifteen accidents were due to blocked tubes. Rest four were unplanned extubations (UEs), all being accidental extubations. All blockages occurred during night shifts and all UEs during day shifts. Five accidents were mild, the rest moderate. No major accident led to cardiorespiratory arrest or death. All blockages occurred after 7th day of intubation. The outcome of accidents were more favorable in tracheostomy group compared to ETT group (P = 0.001). Conclusions: The prevalence of airway accidents was 8.2 accidents per 100 patients. Blockages were the most common accidents followed by UEs. Ten out of the 15 blockages and all 4 UEs were in endotracheally intubated patients. Tracheostomized patients had 5 blockages and no UEs. PMID:27076709

  19. Vancomycin resistant enterococci in urine cultures: Antibiotic susceptibility trends over a decade at a tertiary hospital in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Toner, Liam; Papa, Nathan; Aliyu, Sani H.; Dev, Harveer; Al-Hayek, Samih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Enterococci are a common cause of urinary tract infection and vancomycin-resistant strains are more difficult to treat. The purpose of this surveillance program was to assess the prevalence of and determine the risk factors for vancomycin resistance in adults among urinary isolates of Enterococcus sp. and to detail the antibiotic susceptibility profile, which can be used to guide empirical treatment. Materials and Methods From 2005 to 2014 we retrospectively reviewed 5,528 positive Enterococcus sp. urine cultures recorded in a computerized laboratory results database at a tertiary teaching hospital in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Results Of these cultures, 542 (9.8%) were vancomycin resistant. No longitudinal trend was observed in the proportion of vancomycin-resistant strains over the course of the study. We observed emerging resistance to nitrofurantoin with rates climbing from near zero to 40%. Ampicillin resistance fluctuated between 50% and 90%. Low resistance was observed for linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Female sex and inpatient status were identified as risk factors for vancomycin resistance. Conclusions The incidence of vancomycin resistance among urinary isolates was stable over the last decade. Although resistance to nitrofurantoin has increased, it still serves as an appropriate first choice in uncomplicated urinary tract infection caused by vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. PMID:26981595

  20. United States - The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society: Working with patients, carers and hospital professionals to improve awareness, treatment and patient choice.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    By working locally with patients and carers from diagnosis and treatment through to aftercare, helping professionals to improve their knowledge and awareness about blood cancers and best practice treatment, while also advocating at the national level, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS) is working to strengthen coordination between patients, carers and professionals along the whole care pathway. By helping patients to become more engaged and empowered to make informed choices, improve treatment for blood cancers through education, LLS is working to enhance patient-centred care in a largely privatized and fragmented health services system in the United States. By providing web-based resources and a free national helpline, alongside a face to face local support network, LLS is helping patients to learn more about their condition, treatment choices and the care pathways they can access. Free professional development and education seminars are also offered to nurses, oncologists and social workers in hospitals, highlighting new approaches to treatment and care with a patient-centred approach.

  1. Antibiotic consumption pattern in the neonatal special care unit before and after implementation of the hospital's antibiotic policy.

    PubMed

    Nitsch-Osuch, A; Kurpas, D; Kuchar, E; Zycińska, K; Zielonka, T; Wardyn, K

    2015-01-01

    Current and detailed knowledge of antibiotic use is essential in order to implement strategies for reducing the overuse of antibiotics. The objective of our study was to determine the effectiveness of the implementation of the hospital antibiotic policy (HAP) by assessing antibiotic consumption in the Special Neonatal Care Unit (SNCU) in Warsaw, Poland, before and after this intervention. Antibiotic use was calculated in daily defined doses (DDDs) per 100 patient-days and DDDs per 100 admissions. The antibiotics were ranked by volume of DDDs and the number of antibiotics, which accounted for 90 % and 100 % of the total volume, respectively: DU90% and DU100% (where DU stands for drug use). Total antibiotic consumption increased slightly after the introduction of the HAP: the total DDDS was 707.87 and 753.12 in 2011 and 2012, while the number of DDDs/100 admissions was 352.17 and 369.12 in 2011 and 2012, respectively. After the introduction of the HAP, an increase in ampicillin and aminoglycoside use was observed, along with a reduction in the DU100% and DU90% rates (15 vs. 9 and 4 vs. 3, respectively). The introduction of the HAP resulted in changes in antibiotic consumption patterns, but the general antibiotic consumption density remained the same.

  2. Airborne fungi and bacteria in indoor and outdoor environment of the Pediatric Unit of Edirne Government Hospital.

    PubMed

    Okten, Suzan; Asan, Ahmet

    2012-03-01

    This study was performed between January 2004 and December 2004 in 13 stations in the Pediatric Unit of Edirne Government Hospital in order to determine the outdoor and indoor airborne microfungal and bacterial contents. The results of air samplings revealed that 1,376 microfungal and 2,429 bacterial colonies in total were isolated. The isolated microfungal specimens were identified and 65 species from 16 genera were determined. Among these, the most frequent genus was Cladosporium with 462 colonies (33.58%) followed by Alternaria with 310 (22.53%) and Penicillium with 280 (20.35%) colonies. The isolated bacterial samples were grouped based on their Gram-staining properties. The most frequent ones were Gram (+) cocci with 1,527 colonies (62.87%) followed by Gram (+) bacilli with 828 colonies (34.09%) and Gram (-) bacilli with 74 colonies (3.05%). Staphylococcus, Bacillus, Corynebacterium, and Microccus appeared to be the common genera isolated for all months. Statistical analyses were performed in order to see if there existed a relationship between meteorological conditions and the microfungal and bacterial species and their concentrations.

  3. The path to modernity: a personal testimony to the restructuring of the Department of Dermatology, Vargas Hospital, Caracas, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Kerdel-Vegas, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In the late 1950s and early1960s, there was a concerted effort to modernize teaching, training, and patient care in the Vargas Hospital of Caracas, Venezuela. The above included the development of research in the frame of postgraduate training. This effort was to be helped by USA funds and institutions but could only be achieved by the work of Venezuelans, sharing a vision of progress. Dermatology spearheaded this initiative, and the fruit of this was the exponential development of Venezuelan Dermatology and the creation of the National Institute of Dermatology on the grounds of the Vargas Hospital. The purpose of this contribution is to review these events that happened more than half a century ago from my own perspective. I sincerely hope that these lines could serve as an inspiration to the younger generations that toil today under less-than-favorable conditions.

  4. Perceived Participation, Experiences from Persons with Spinal Cord Injury in Their Transition Period from Hospital to Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van de Velde, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that participation should be achieved at the end of the rehabilitation process. However, there is a lack of consensus on the definition, the conceptualization and the measurement of participation. This study aims to add to the existing body of knowledge of participation by exploring the "person perceived participation" in…

  5. A culture gap in the United States: Implications for policy on limiting access to firearms for suicidal persons.

    PubMed

    Marino, Elizabeth; Wolsko, Christopher; Keys, Susan G; Pennavaria, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a critical public health problem worldwide. In the United States (US), firearm ownership is common, and firearms account for the majority of deaths by suicide. While suicide prevention strategies may include limiting access to firearms, the contentious nature of gun regulations in the US, particularly among members of rural communities, often gives rise to constitutional concerns and political polarization that could inhibit suicidal persons from seeking the help they need. We examine potential outcomes of public health strategies in the US that encourage limiting access to firearms for populations who both value firearm ownership and are vulnerable to suicide. Based on preliminary results from a firearm safety study, we argue that attempts to limit access to firearms among those at risk of suicide will only succeed when the most affected cultural groups are engaged in collaborative discussions. PMID:27638246

  6. A culture gap in the United States: Implications for policy on limiting access to firearms for suicidal persons.

    PubMed

    Marino, Elizabeth; Wolsko, Christopher; Keys, Susan G; Pennavaria, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a critical public health problem worldwide. In the United States (US), firearm ownership is common, and firearms account for the majority of deaths by suicide. While suicide prevention strategies may include limiting access to firearms, the contentious nature of gun regulations in the US, particularly among members of rural communities, often gives rise to constitutional concerns and political polarization that could inhibit suicidal persons from seeking the help they need. We examine potential outcomes of public health strategies in the US that encourage limiting access to firearms for populations who both value firearm ownership and are vulnerable to suicide. Based on preliminary results from a firearm safety study, we argue that attempts to limit access to firearms among those at risk of suicide will only succeed when the most affected cultural groups are engaged in collaborative discussions.

  7. A Study of Prospective Surveillance for Inhibitors among Persons with Haemophilia in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Soucie, J. Michael; Miller, Connie H.; Kelly, Fiona M.; Payne, Amanda B.; Creary, Melissa; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Kempton, Christine L.; Manco-Johnson, Marilyn J.; Neff, Anne T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitors are a rare but serious complication of treatment of patients with haemophilia. Phase III clinical trials enroll too few patients to adequately assess new product inhibitor risk. Aim This project explores the feasibility of using a public health surveillance system to conduct national surveillance for inhibitors. Methods Staff at 17 U.S. haemophilia treatment centers (HTC) enrolled patients with haemophilia A and B into this prospective study. HTC staff provided detailed historic data on product use and inhibitors at baseline, and post-enrollment patients provided monthly detailed infusion logs. A central laboratory performed inhibitor tests on blood specimens that were collected at baseline, annually, prior to any planned product switch or when clinically indicated. The central laboratory also performed genotyping of all enrolled patients. Results From January 2006 through June 2012, 1163 patients were enrolled and followed for 3,329 person years. A total of 3,048 inhibitor tests were performed and 23 new factor VIII inhibitors were identified, 61%% of which were not clinically apparent. Infusion logs were submitted for 113,205 exposure days. Genotyping revealed 431 distinct mutations causing haemophilia, 151 of which had not previously been reported elsewhere in the world. Conclusion This study provided critical information about the practical issues that must be addressed to successfully implement national inhibitor surveillance. Centralized testing with routine monitoring and confirmation of locally identified inhibitors will provide valid and representative data with which to evaluate inhibitor incidence and prevalence, monitor trends in occurrence rates, and identify potential inhibitor outbreaks associated with products. PMID:24261612

  8. The prevalence of informal caregiving to persons with AIDS in the United States: caregiver characteristics and their implications.

    PubMed

    Turner, H A; Catania, J A; Gagnon, J

    1994-06-01

    Based on U.S. national (N = 2673) and central cities (N = 8263) probability samples, this paper: (1) presents estimates of the proportion of the United States population that has provided informal care to persons with AIDS; (2) identifies socio-demographic characteristics of 'typical' AIDS caregivers in the U.S.; and (3) discusses social, economic and health-related implications of informal caregiving to persons with AIDS. Results indicate that 5.0% of all adults age 18-75 living within central cities and 3.2% of the entire adult U.S. population have provided care to a friend, relative or lover with AIDS. Although caregivers are distributed throughout different age and ethnic groups, the majority of caregivers are younger (< 40 years) and white. Males, gay and bisexual men in particular are over-represented among central cities caregivers. Data on the types of caregiving tasks performed show that 64.4% of all caregivers within central cities perform domestic types of caregiving tasks, while 27.7% are involved in personal care of AIDS patients. Caregivers are more likely than non-caregivers to have been tested for HIV, and among the tested, caregivers are more likely to have tested positive. While informal caregiving reduces costs to the formal medical sector, costs to the caregivers themselves should be considered. Physical and emotional stress, as well as reduced opportunity for social and economic development, represent potential outcomes of caregiving. Socio-demographic characteristics of AIDS caregivers, such as their typically young age, suggest that these caregivers may be at particular risk for detrimental consequences.

  9. Hospitalizations for Alcohol and Drug Overdoses in Young Adults Ages 18–24 in the United States, 1999–2008: Results From the Nationwide Inpatient Sample

    PubMed Central

    White, Aaron M.; Hingson, Ralph W.; Pan, I-jen; yi, Hsiao-ye

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Recent reports indicate an increase in rates of hospitalizations for drug overdoses in the United States. The role of alcohol in hospitalizations for drug overdoses remains unclear. Excessive consumption of alcohol and drugs is prevalent in young adults ages 18–24. The present study explores rates and costs of inpatient hospital stays for alcohol overdoses, drug overdoses, and their co-occurrence in young adults ages 18–24 and changes in these rates between 1999 and 2008. Method: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were used to estimate numbers, rates, and costs of inpatient hospital stays stemming from alcohol overdoses (and their subcategories, alcohol poisonings and excessive consumption of alcohol), drug overdoses (and their subcategories, drug poisonings and nondependent abuse of drugs), and their co-occurrence in 18- to 24-year-olds. Results: Hospitalization rates for alcohol overdoses alone increased 25% from 1999 to 2008, reaching 29,412 cases in 2008 at a cost of $266 million. Hospitalization rates for drug overdoses alone increased 55%, totaling 113,907 cases in 2008 at a cost of $737 million. Hospitalization rates for combined alcohol and drug overdoses increased 76%, with 29,202 cases in 2008 at a cost of $198 million. Conclusions: Rates of hospitalizations for alcohol overdoses, drug overdoses, and their combination all increased from 1999 to 2008 among 18- to 24-year-olds. The cost of such hospitalizations now exceeds $1.2 billion annually. The steepest increase occurred among cases of combined alcohol and drug overdoses. Stronger efforts are needed to educate medical practitioners and the public about the risk of overdoses, particularly when alcohol is combined with other drugs. PMID:21906505

  10. Clinical and neuroimaging features of severely brain-injured patients treated in a neurosurgical unit compared with patients treated in peripheral non-neurosurgical hospitals.

    PubMed

    Visca, A; Faccani, G; Massaro, F; Bosio, D; Ducati, A; Cogoni, M; Kraus, J; Servadei, F

    2006-04-01

    Most European TBI patients are managed in peripheral hospitals without benefit of guidelines for transfer of such patients to neurosurgical units as needed. This report compares clinical features and outcomes in two series of severe TBI patients: those admitted to a neurosurgical centre or to a general hospital, all in the Piedmont Region of Italy. Of 630 patients with a GCS of 3-8, 351 were admitted to a centralized neurosurgical unit, and 279 were admitted and treated at a peripheral hospital. All patients had a CT scan read by a neurosurgeon on duty and were classified using the Marshall criteria as having a diffuse injury or non-surgical mass lesions. Outcomes were assessed between 6 months and 6 years using either the GOS Extended or the GOS. Independent variables were age, sex, GCS score and Marshall classification. All the examined factors were significantly different between the two groups (p<0.001). For patients admitted to the neurosurgical centre, age, Marshall classification of the CT and GCS were predictors of a favourable outcome, while for patients treated in general hospitals, Marshall classification of the CT, gender and age were predictors of a favourable outcome. Patients admitted to neurosurgical centres are different from those treated in general hospitals not having these specialized facilities and personnel. The absence of guidelines for the transfer of these patients for more advanced care are lacking and should be the focus of new studies on patient referral.

  11. Hospitals, finance, and health system reform in Britain and the United States, c. 1910-1950: historical revisionism and cross-national comparison.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Comparative histories of health system development have been variously influenced by the theoretical approaches of historical institutionalism, political pluralism, and labor mobilization. Britain and the United States have figured significantly in this literature because of their very different trajectories. This article explores the implications of recent research on hospital history in the two countries for existing historiographies, particularly the coming of the National Health Service in Britain. It argues that the two hospital systems initially developed in broadly similar ways, despite the very different outcomes in the 1940s. Thus, applying the conceptual tools used to explain the U.S. trajectory can deepen appreciation of events in Britain. Attention focuses particularly on working-class hospital contributory schemes and their implications for finance, governance, and participation; these are then compared with Blue Cross and U.S. hospital prepayment. While acknowledging the importance of path dependence in shaping attitudes of British bureaucrats toward these schemes, analysis emphasizes their failure in pressure group politics, in contrast to the United States. In both countries labor was also crucial, in the United States sustaining employment-based prepayment and in Britain broadly supporting system reform.

  12. Mechanical ventilation in patients in the intensive care unit of a general university hospital in southern Brazil: an epidemiological study

    PubMed Central

    Fialkow, Léa; Farenzena, Maurício; Wawrzeniak, Iuri Christmann; Brauner, Janete Salles; Vieira, Sílvia Regina Rios; Vigo, Alvaro; Bozzetti, Mary Clarisse

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the characteristics, the frequency and the mortality rates of patients needing mechanical ventilation and to identify the risk factors associated with mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) of a general university hospital in southern Brazil. METHOD: Prospective cohort study in patients admitted to the ICU who needed mechanical ventilation for at least 24 hours between March 2004 and April 2007. RESULTS: A total of 1,115 patients admitted to the ICU needed mechanical ventilation. The mortality rate was 51%. The mean age (± standard deviation) was 57±18 years, and the mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score was 22.6±8.3. The variables independently associated with mortality were (i) conditions present at the beginning of mechanical ventilation, age (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.001); the APACHE II score (hazard ratio: 1.01; p<0.005); acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.38; p=0.009), sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.33; p=0.003), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (hazard ratio: 0.58; p=0.042), and pneumonia (hazard ratio: 0.78; p=0.013) as causes of mechanical ventilation; and renal (hazard ratio: 1.29; p=0.011) and neurological (hazard ratio: 1.25; p=0.024) failure, and (ii) conditions occurring during the course of mechanical ventilation, acute lung injuri/acute respiratory distress syndrome (hazard ratio: 1.31; p<0.010); sepsis (hazard ratio: 1.53; p<0.001); and renal (hazard ratio: 1.75; p<0.001), cardiovascular (hazard ratio: 1.32; p≤0.009), and hepatic (hazard ratio: 1.67; p≤0.001) failure. CONCLUSIONS: This large cohort study provides a comprehensive profile of mechanical ventilation patients in South America. The mortality rate of patients who required mechanical ventilation was higher, which may have been related to the severity of illness of the patients admitted to our ICU. Risk factors for hospital mortality included conditions present at the start of mechanical

  13. Circumstances and Contributing Causes of Fall Deaths among Persons Aged 65 and Older: United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Judy A.; Rudd, Rose A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine whether the increasing fall death rate among people aged 65 and older is due in part to temporal changes in recording the underlying cause of death. DESIGN Analyses of multiple cause of death data using the online Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Wide-ranging ON-line Data for Epidemiologic Research system, which uses the National Center for Health Statistics’ Multiple Cause of Death data set. SETTING United States, 1999 to 2010. PARTICIPANTS People aged 65 and older with a fall listed on their death record as the underlying or a contributing cause of death. MEASUREMENTS Circumstances and contributing causes off all deaths—records listing International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, codes W00 to W19 as the underlying cause of death—and underlying causes for records with falls as a contributing cause were examined. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to assess trends in the proportion of fall and fall-associated deaths to total deaths for 1999 to 2010. RESULTS In 2010, there were 21,649 fall deaths and 5,402 fall-associated deaths among people aged 65 and older; 48.7% of fall deaths involved a head injury. Approximately half the fall death records included diseases of the circulatory system as contributing causes. From 1999 to 2010, there was a trend toward more-specific reporting of falls circumstances, although total deaths remained unchanged. The proportion of fall deaths to total deaths increased 114.3%, and that of fall-associated deaths to total deaths increased 43.1%. CONCLUSION The reasons behind the increasing older adult fall death rate deserve further investigation. Possible contributing factors include changing trends in underlying chronic diseases and better reporting of falls as the underlying cause of death. PMID:24617970

  14. Health care-associated infections surveillance in an intensive care unit of a university hospital in China, 2010-2014: Findings of International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Tao, Xiu-Bin; Li, Yan; Hu, Qiang; Qian, Li-Hua; Wu, Qun; Ruan, Jing-Jing; Cai, Dong-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Using a standardized methodology by the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System, a continuous health care-associated infections (HAIs) surveillance was conducted in our mixed intensive care unit at a Chinese teaching hospital. During the study period (2010-2014), 4,013 patients were hospitalized for 32,924 bed days and acquired 427 HAIs (482 HAI events), with an overall rate of 10.64% and 14.640 HAIs per 1,000 bed days. Ventilator-associated pneumonia was the most common device-associated health care-acquired infection, with an incidence rate of 19.561 per 1,000 mechanical ventilator days.

  15. National Trends in Pulmonary Embolism Hospitalization Rates and Outcomes for Adults Aged ≥65 Years in the United States (1999 to 2010).

    PubMed

    Minges, Karl E; Bikdeli, Behnood; Wang, Yun; Kim, Nancy; Curtis, Jeptha P; Desai, Mayur M; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about national trends of pulmonary embolism (PE) hospitalizations and outcomes in older adults in the context of recent diagnostic and therapeutic advances. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of 100% Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries hospitalized from 1999 to 2010 with a principal discharge diagnosis code for PE. The adjusted PE hospitalization rate increased from 129/100,000 person-years in 1999 to 302/100,000 person-years in 2010, a relative increase of 134% (p <0.001). Black patients had the highest rate of increase (174 to 548/100,000 person-years) among all age, gender, and race categories. The mean (standard deviation) length of hospital stay decreased from 7.6 (5.7) days in 1999 to 5.8 (4.4) days in 2010, and the proportion of patients discharged to home decreased from 51.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.5 to 51.6) to 44.1% (95% CI 43.7 to 44.6), whereas more patients were discharged with home health care and to skilled nursing facilities. The in-hospital mortality rate decreased from 8.3% (95% CI 8.0 to 8.6) in 1999 to 4.4% (95% CI 4.2 to 4.5) in 2010, as did adjusted 30-day (from 12.3% [95% CI 11.9 to 12.6] to 9.1% [95% CI 8.5 to 9.7]) and 6-month mortality rates (from 23.0% [95% CI 22.5 to 23.4] to 19.6% [95% CI 18.8 to 20.5]). There were no significant racial differences in mortality rates by 2010. There was no change in the adjusted 30-day all-cause readmission rate from 1999 to 2010. In conclusion, PE hospitalization rates increased substantially from 1999 to 2010, with a higher rate for black patients. All mortality rates decreased but remained high. The increase in hospitalization rates and continued high mortality and readmission rates confirm the significant burden of PE for older adults. PMID:26409636

  16. [Historical exploration of Acapulco hospitals, Guerrero, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Fajardo-Ortiz, Guillermo; Salcedo-Alvarez, Rey Arturo

    2006-01-01

    This study attempts to recount the history of the main hospitals of the port of Acapulco from colonial times until the end of the 20th century. The Augustine friars began hospital care at the end of the first part of the 16th century. Later, Bernardino Alvarez (1514?-1584), with the support of the Spanish crown, founded the first formal hospital in Acapulco called Hospital de Nuestra Señora de la Consolación (Our Lady of Consolation Hospital). During the 16th and 17th centuries, the sick were attended by friars, and by the end of the 19th century there were physicians and surgeons. From the end of the Independence War until the end of the 19th century, the port did not have any true hospital. The first degreed physicians and surgeons arrived and resided in Acapulco in 1920. In 1938, the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital) began providing services. It was replaced by the Hospital General de Acapulco (General Hospital of Acapulco). At the fourth decade of the past century the Cruz Roja (Red Cross) was created. In 1957 the hospital services of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS, Mexican Institute of Social Security), which was founded in 1963, was inaugurated with the Unidad Medico/Social (Medical and Social Unit) of the IMSS in Acapulco. This began the journey of modernity in Acapulco. In 1992, Hospital Regional Vicente Guerrero (Regional Hospital Vicente Guerrero) of the IMSS, initiated its services. In 1960, medical services for civil workers and their families were housed in the Hospital Civil Morelos (Morelos Civil Hospital). Shortly afterwards, the Instituto de Seguridad y Servicios Sociales para los Trabajadores del Estado (ISSSTE, Security and Social Services Institute for State Employees) had their own hospital. During the 20th century, Acapulco has added other hospital services to care for members of the navy and armed forces, as well as for those persons with financial resources for private care.

  17. Antimicrobial agents’ utilization and cost pattern in an Intensive Care Unit of a Teaching Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Nikhilesh; Nagendra Nayak, I. M.; Advaitha, M. V.; Thaikattil, Noble J.; Kantanavar, Kiran A.; Anand, Sanjit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: High utilization and inappropriate usage of antimicrobial agents (AMAs) in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) increases resistant organisms, morbidity, mortality, and treatment cost. Prescription audit and active feedback are a proven method to check the irrational prescription. Measuring drug utilization in DDD/100 bed-days is proposed by the WHO to analyze and compare the utilization of drugs. Data of AMAs utilization are required for planning an antibiotic policy and for follow-up of intervention strategies. Hence, in this study, we proposed to evaluate the utilization pattern and cost analysis of AMA used in the ICU. Methodology: A prospective observational study was conducted for 1 year from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014, and the data were obtained from the ICU of a tertiary care hospital. The demographic data, disease data, relevant investigation, the utilization of different classes of AMAs (WHO-ATC classification) as well as individual drugs and their costs were recorded. Results: One thousand eight hundred and sixty-two prescriptions of AMAs were recorded during the study period with an average of 1.73 ± 0.04 prescriptions/patient. About 80.4% patients were prescribed AMAs during admission. Ceftriaxone (22.77%) was the most commonly prescribed AMA followed by piperacillin/tazobactam (15.79%), metronidazole (12%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (6.44%), and azithromycin (4.34%). Ceftriaxone, piperacillin/tazobactam, metronidazole, and linezolid were the five maximally utilized AMAs with 38.52, 19.22, 14.34, 8.76, and 8.16 DDD/100 bed-days respectively. An average cost of AMAs used per patient was 2213 Indian rupees (INR). Conclusion: A high utilization of AMAs and a high cost of treatment were noticed which was comparable to other published data, though an increased use of newer AMAs such as linezolid, clindamycin, meropenem, colistin was noticed. PMID:27275075

  18. Intensive Care Unit (ICU) - Managed Elderly Hospitalizations with Dementia in Texas, 2001-2010: A Population-Level Analysis.

    PubMed

    Oud, Lavi

    2016-10-20

    BACKGROUND The demand for critical care services among elderly with dementia outpaces that of their non-dementia elderly counterparts. However, there are scarce data on the corresponding attributes among ICU-managed patients with dementia. MATERIAL AND METHODS We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to examine temporal trends of the demographics, burden of comorbidities, measures of severity of illness, use of healthcare resources, and short-term outcomes among hospitalizations aged 65 years or older with a reported diagnosis of dementia, who were admitted to ICU (D-ICU hospitalizations) between 2001 and 2010. Average annual percent changes (AAPC) were derived. RESULTS D-ICU hospitalizations (n=276,056) had increasing mean (SD) Charlson comorbidity index [1.7 (1.5) vs. 2.6 (1.9)], with reported organ failure (OF) nearly doubling from 25% to 48.5%, between 2001–2001 and 2009–2010, respectively. Use of life support interventions was infrequent, but rose in parallel with corresponding changes in respiratory and renal failure. Median total hospital charges increased from $26,442 to $36,380 between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010. Routine home discharge declined (–5.2%/year [–6.2%– –4.1%]) with corresponding rising use of home health services (+7.2%/year [4.4–10%]). Rates of discharge to another hospital or a nursing facility remained unchanged, together accounting for 60.4% of discharges of hospital survivors in 2010. Transfers to a long-term acute care hospital increased 9.2%/year (6.9–11.5%). Hospital mortality (7.5%) remained unchanged. CONCLUSIONS Elderly D-ICU hospitalizations have increasing comorbidity burden, with rising severity of illness, and increasing use of health care resources. Though the majority survived hospitalization, most D-ICU hospitalizations were discharged to another facility.

  19. The role of a critical time intervention on the experience of continuity of care among persons with severe mental illness after hospital discharge.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Andrew; Herman, Daniel B

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the impact of critical time intervention (CTI) on self-reported indicators of quality of continuity of care (COC) after discharge from inpatient psychiatric treatment with data from a randomized controlled trial that assessed the effectiveness of the intervention in reducing recurrent homelessness. Postdischarge COC outcome measures among previously homeless persons with severe mental illness randomly assigned to receive usual services only (n = 73) or 9 months of CTI in addition to usual services (n = 77) were compared. Those assigned to CTI had greater perceived access to care than the usual services group did, with this impact extending beyond the point at which the intervention ended. A time-limited care coordination intervention provided immediately after hospital discharge may improve COC, but further studies are needed to substantiate an effect of CTI on long-term continuity outcomes.

  20. Student-Led Services in a Hospital Aged Care Temporary Stay Unit: Sustaining Student Placement Capacity and Physiotherapy Service Provisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicole, Madelyn; Fairbrother, Michele; Nagarajan, Srivalli Vilapakkam; Blackford, Julia; Sheepway, Lyndal; Penman, Merrolee; McAllister, Lindy

    2015-01-01

    Through a collaborative university-hospital partnership, a student-led service model (SLS-model) was implemented to increase student placement capacity within a physiotherapy department of a 150 bed Sydney hospital. This study investigates the perceived barriers and enablers to increasing student placement capacity through student-led services…