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Sample records for hospitalized schizophrenia patients

  1. Long term effects of smoking cessation in hospitalized schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Masatoshi; Kishida, Ikuko; Suda, Akira; Shiraishi, Yohko; Fujibayashi, Mami; Taguri, Masataka; Ishii, Chie; Ishii, Norio; Moritani, Toshio; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2017-03-07

    The prevalence of smoking in patients with schizophrenia is higher than that in the general population and is an important medical issue. Short-term smoking cessation tends to worsen psychiatric symptoms in patients with schizophrenia but decreases sympathetic nervous system activity and improves plasma cholesterol levels in healthy people. Few studies have assessed the long-term effects of smoking cessation in patients with schizophrenia. Subjects were 70 Japanese patients with schizophrenia (38 smokers, 32 non-smokers). We compared the following clinical parameters between the two groups at baseline (before smoking cessation) and in each group separately between baseline and at three years after smoking cessation: autonomic nervous system activity, plasma cholesterol levels, body weight, drug therapy, and Global Assessment of Functioning scores. We also compared the mean changes in clinical parameters throughout this study between the groups at both time points. Autonomic nervous system activity was assessed by power spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Parasympathetic nervous system activity and the doses of antiparkinsonian drugs in smokers were significantly higher than those in non-smokers at baseline. Smoking cessation was associated with significantly decreased sympathetic nervous system activity and decreased doses of antipsychotics and antiparkinsonian drugs at three years after smoking cessation. However, there was no significant difference in the mean change in clinical factors scores, except for Global Assessment of Functioning scores, between smokers and non-smokers at three years after smoking cessation. Our results suggest that smoking reduces both autonomic nervous system activity and the effectiveness of drug therapy with antipsychotics and antiparkinsonian drugs in patients with schizophrenia, but that both factors could be ameliorated over the long term by smoking cessation. Taken together with the findings of previous studies, smoking

  2. Hospitalization and cost after switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Boonlue, Tuanthon; Subongkot, Suphat; Dilokthornsakul, Piyameth; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Pattanaprateep, Oraluck; Suanchang, Orabhorn; Chaiyakunapruk, Nathorn

    2016-01-01

    Background Several clinical practice guidelines suggest using atypical over typical antipsychotics in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, cost-containment policy urged restricting usage of atypical antipsychotics and switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics. Objective This study aimed to evaluate clinical and economic impacts of switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics in schizophrenia patients in Thailand. Methods From October 2010 through September 2013, a retrospective cohort study was performed utilizing electronic database of two tertiary hospitals. Schizophrenia patients aged 18 years or older and being treated with atypical antipsychotics were included. Patients were classified as atypical antipsychotic switching group if they switched to typical antipsychotics after 180 days of continual atypical antipsychotics therapy. Outcomes were schizophrenia-related hospitalization and total health care cost. Logistic and Poisson regression were used to evaluate the risk of hospitalization, and generalized linear model with gamma distribution was used to determine the health care cost. All analyses were adjusted by employing propensity score and multivariable analyses. All cost estimates were adjusted according to 2013 consumer price index and converted to US$ at an exchange rate of 32.85 Thai bahts/US$. Results A total of 2,354 patients were included. Of them, 166 (7.1%) patients switched to typical antipsychotics. The adjusted odds ratio for schizophrenia-related hospitalization in atypical antipsychotic switching group was 1.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23–2.83). The adjusted incidence rate ratio was 2.44 (95% CI 1.57–3.79) for schizophrenia-related hospitalizations. The average total health care cost was lower in patients with antipsychotic switching (−$64; 95% CI −$459 to $332). Conclusion Switching from atypical to typical antipsychotics is associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia-related hospitalization

  3. Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Schizophrenia Referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shakeri, Jalal; Karimi, Kamyar; Farnia, Vahid; Golshani, Senobar; Alikhani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our study was conducted to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Methods The study population included all patients with schizophrenia who were referred to Farabi Hospital, Kermanshah, Iran, between March 2014 and March 2015. A total of 280 subjects who met the study criteria were selected according to the census sampling method. Results The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 30.4% (20.7% in men and 51.5% in women). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was greater in patients > 40 years than patients aged 20–40 years. There was a significant relationship between marital status and number of hospitalizations with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome. Conclusions Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia, healthcare professionals should take measures to identify the risk factors and timely treatment of affected patients, thereby improving the patient’s quality of life and reducing health costs. PMID:27403239

  4. Socio-environmental factors associated with diabetes mellitus among patients hospitalized with schizophrenia in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sado, Junya; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Noma, Norio; Saito, Makiko; Azuma, Hitoshi; Azuma, Tsukasa; Sobue, Tomotaka; Kitamura, Yuri

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to examine epidemiologically socio-environmental factors associated with diabetes mellitus among patients hospitalized with schizophrenia in Japan. This was a cross-sectional study from a single psychiatric hospital. Study patients were adults aged ≥20 years who were hospitalized with schizophrenia one or more times between January 2013 and December 2014. From electronic medical records or health insurance claims, we extracted schizophrenia patients with an F2 code according to ICD-10, and assessed the association of various factors with diabetes mellitus among these patients in a multivariable analysis. During the 2-year period, there were 1899 patients hospitalized with a psychiatric disorder one or more times. Of them, a total of 770 adults with schizophrenia (285 men and 485 women) were eligible for our analysis. The standardized prevalence ratio of diabetes mellitus was 2.0 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.6-2.5] among men and 3.0 (95 % CI 2.5-3.6) among women in this hospital. There were no socio-environmental factors associated with diabetes mellitus among men. Among women, factors such as a 730-day hospitalization [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.82: 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.52-9.64], and a medical protection/compulsory/discrimination hospitalization (adjusted OR 0.60, 95 % CI 0.36-0.99) were associated with diabetes mellitus. Compared with women living alone, those who were unmarried and lived together with someone had a significantly lower adjusted OR (0.41, 95 % CI 0.21-0.81). Socio-environmental factors such as length of hospitalization, type of hospitalization, and marital status and living arrangement were associated with diabetes mellitus among hospitalized women with schizophrenia.

  5. Predictors of relapse in the year after hospital discharge among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schennach, Rebecca; Obermeier, Michael; Meyer, Sebastian; Jäger, Markus; Schmauss, Max; Laux, Gerd; Pfeiffer, Herbert; Naber, Dieter; Schmidt, Lutz G; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Heuser, Isabella; Maier, Wolfgang; Lemke, Matthias R; Rüther, Eckart; Klingberg, Stefan; Gastpar, Markus; Seemüller, Florian; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Relapse and its predictors were examined among patients with schizophrenia in the year after hospital discharge. The sample included 200 patients with schizophrenia participating in a German multicenter study. Relapse was defined as a worsening of psychopathological symptoms or rehospitalization in the year after hospital discharge. Predictors examined were variables related to course of illness and to response and remission at discharge. Fifty-two percent of participants had a relapse. Patients whose symptoms were not in remission at discharge were more likely to have a relapse, as were those who had more severe symptoms and more side effects at discharge. Those who experienced a relapse were less likely to be taking a second-generation antipsychotic at discharge, less likely to have a positive attitude toward treatment adherence, and less likely to be employed. The high rate of relapse among patients with schizophrenia highlights the need to improve current treatment strategies.

  6. Disability in a Group of Long-stay Patients with Schizophrenia: Experience from a Mental Hospital.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Kalita Kamal; Kumar, Deuri Sailendra

    2012-01-01

    Recovery from schizophrenia is a complex concept. Remission of symptoms of psychotic illnesses is not necessarily linked to better functioning. Among various causes of disability, mental illnesses account for 12.3% of the global burden of diseases. Long-term hospitalization has been recognized as counterproductive and a contributory factor of disability associated with schizophrenia. Under various circumstances, many persons with mental illness are brought to mental hospitals but the measures taken for their rehabilitation and follow-up care is insufficient. In the present study we tried to find out the level of psychopathology and the associated disability in a group of patients with schizophrenia who have been staying in a mental health institution for more than 5 years due to lack of proper caregivers in the society or in their home. The study is conducted in a mental hospital of northeast India. Of the 40 patients staying for more than 5 years in the hospital, 28 fulfilled the criteria for inclusion. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHO DASII) were used for those patients. Analytical statistical methods were used subsequently. Male patients were significantly older and had prolonged duration of stay. But the level of psychopathology did not differ significantly between male and female patients. Under WHODASII, understanding and communication problems are more prominent in both the groups. Of late, there are very few cases that required prolonged stay in the hospital. Many patients are fairly functional and are considered suitable for care outside hospital premises. Prolonged hospital stay is associated with more disability. Shorter hospital stays with proper family support is an ideal way to counteract this issue. However, due to the inadequate mandate in the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1987 and lack of other supportive facilities, patientsoften tend to languish in the hospital for longer duration

  7. Effects of occupational therapy on hospitalized chronic schizophrenia patients with severe negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Eri; Yotsumoto, Kayano; Nakamae, Toshimichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2012-05-24

    The aim of this study was to determine whether occupational therapy (OT) can improve the interpersonal relationships and negative symptoms of hospitalized chronic schizophrenia patients with severe negative symptoms. Subjects were 38 patients with chronic schizophrenia. They were randomly divided into an OT group and a control group. Patients in the OT group participated in cooking activities once a week for 15 weeks, while patients in the control group did not. During this period, both groups had the usual treatment except for the cooking activities. In interviews, the patient was asked to place a chair toward the interviewer (a therapist). The angle and distance from the interviewer were taken as indicators of an ability to have interpersonal relationships. Negative symptoms were evaluated with the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS). Patients who received OT were able to sit at the smaller angle and shorter distance from the interviewer than before OT (p=0.015 and p=0.013, respectively). The total SANS score was lower after OT than before OT (p=0.033). In the control group, the distance from the interviewer also decreased during the experimental period (p=0.040) but the seating angle and the SANS scores did not change. The results suggest that OT can help to improve a relationship allowing the patient to face the therapist and that it might improve negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  8. [Patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia].

    PubMed

    Kutscher, S; Schiffer, B; Seifert, D

    2009-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the development of the number of patients with schizophrenia in detention (section 63 German Penal Code) in North Rhine-Westphalia and the characterization of these patients. Patients with schizophrenia are examined, by using a standardized questionnaire answered by the attending psychiatrist or psychologist (n = 531). During the last 12 years the number of patients with schizophrenia in forensic-psychiatric hospitals has increased three times, whereas the number of patients with other diagnoses heightened only twofold. The patients with schizophrenia showed high rates of psychiatric comorbidities (substance disorders 73.9 %, personality disorders 17.2 %), previous inpatient treatments (78.3 % with a mean of 7.5 stays) and previous convictions (63.4 %). Almost half of these convictions (46.6 %) were violent offences (e. g. assault, homicide). Possible explanations for this development are discussed.

  9. Factors associated with violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia prior to psychiatric emergency hospitalization: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Imai, Atsushi; Hayashi, Naoki; Shiina, Akihiro; Sakikawa, Noriko; Igarashi, Yoshito

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have examined a wide range of risk factors associated with violence among patients with schizophrenia. However, risk factors linked to different socio-cultural backgrounds remain unclear. The objectives were to investigate factors associated with violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia prior to emergency hospitalizations and to compare them with factors found in studies on other populations. We recruited 420 Japanese patients with schizophrenia who had committed violent acts immediately prior to emergency admission to a psychiatric hospital in Tokyo, during the period 1986 to 2005. Cases were compared with controls (non violent hospitalized patients with schizophrenia) matched for gender, age and admission year. All medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Inter-rater reliability tests of assessment were performed. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with violence. The symptoms of gross excitement, prior violence, auditory hallucinations, systematization of delusions, incoherence of speech, delusions of reference, TCO symptoms, living with others and long duration of illness were found to be associated with violence. In contrast, antisocial traits such as substance abuse and antisocial episodes were not recognized as significant violence-associated factors. Violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia was strongly associated with elements of schizophrenia itself, rather than antisocial traits. This study highlighted associated factors for violence among Japanese patients with schizophrenia which differ distinctly from associated factors in other countries. This result demonstrates that future studies assessing the risk of violence among patients with schizophrenia need to consider cultural and racial differences in cohorts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Previous hospital admissions and disease severity predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although not recommended in treatment guidelines, previous studies have shown a frequent use of more than one antipsychotic agent among patients with schizophrenia. The main aims of the present study were to explore the antipsychotic treatment regimen among patients with schizophrenia in a catchment area-based sample and to investigate clinical characteristics associated with antipsychotic combination treatment. Methods The study included 329 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia using antipsychotic medication. Patients were recruited from all psychiatric hospitals in Oslo. Diagnoses were obtained by use of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Additionally, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and number of hospitalisations and pharmacological treatment were assessed. Results Multiple hospital admissions, low GAF scores and high PANSS scores, were significantly associated with the prescription of combination treatment with two or more antipsychotics. The use of combination treatment increased significantly from the second hospital admission. Combination therapy was not significantly associated with age or gender. Regression models confirmed that an increasing number of hospital admission was the strongest predictor of the use of two or more antipsychotics. Conclusions Previous hospital admissions and disease severity measured by high PANSS scores and low GAF scores, predict the use of antipsychotic combination treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Future studies should further explore the use of antipsychotic drug treatment in clinical practice and partly based on such data establish more robust treatment guidelines for patients with persistently high symptom load. PMID:21812996

  11. The Role of Conformity in Relation to Cohesiveness and Intimacy in Day-Hospital Groups of Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Il Ho; Park, Sun Young; Choi, Sulkee; Lee, Soo Young

    2017-01-01

    Objective Conformity is defined as the act of adjusting one's behavior to match the social responses of others. Patients with schizophrenia often adjust their maladaptive behaviors by conforming in group treatment settings. This study aimed to examine whether the opinions of group members influence conformity of patients with schizophrenia who attend day-hospital programs. Methods Nineteen patients with schizophrenia from four different day-hospital programs and 23 healthy controls from four different social clubs completed the homographic meaning choice task under conditions of prior exposure to the pseudo-opinions of their group members, strangers, and unknown information sources. Group influences on conformity were observed when the level of group cohesiveness was high and the level of intimacy was low across participant groups. Results Controls did not exhibit a significant effect of group influence on conformity, whereas patients were significantly influenced by their group members when making conformity-based decisions despite significantly lower intimacy and cohesiveness levels. Conclusion These findings suggest that unlike controls, patients with schizophrenia tend to respond with conformity when influenced by the opinions of their affiliated group. In patients with schizophrenia group conformity may be used to select a more accurate decision and to enhance feelings of affiliation among them. PMID:28845174

  12. Relapse and hospitalization in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a comparative quantitative cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Ayano, Getnet; Duko, Bereket

    2017-01-01

    Background Relapse and hospital admission are common among, and carry a heavy burden in, patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of relapse and hospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Patients and methods A hospital-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2016. Systematic random sampling technique was used to recruit 521 (260 schizophrenia cases and 261 bipolar disorder cases) study participants. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained psychiatry professionals. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria and Structured Clinical Interview of DSM-IV (SCID) were used. Results The risk of relapse and hospitalizations was slightly higher in patients with bipolar disorder than in patients with schizophrenia. A majority of schizophrenic (213 [81.92%]) and bipolar (215 [82.37%]) patients had a history of hospital admission, and 228 (87.69%) schizophrenic and 230 (88.12%) bipolar patients had a history of relapse. Patients who had a history of hospitalizations also had co-occurring substance use disorders compared to those who had no history of hospitalizations for schizophrenia (81.5% vs 37.9%) and bipolar disorder (82.56% vs 38.2%), respectively. Similarly, those patients who had a history of relapse had high comorbid substance use disorders than those who had no history of relapse for both schizophrenia (87.88% vs 47.37%) and bipolar disorder (88.37% vs 47.19%), respectively. Conclusion It is vital that, in the local context, mental health professionals strengthen their therapeutic relationships with patients and their caregivers. This might enable patients and their caregivers to express their needs and concerns to them, as well as help to plan proper interventions for patients. Attention needs to be given to screening for

  13. Relapse and hospitalization in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia: a comparative quantitative cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Ayano, Getnet; Duko, Bereket

    2017-01-01

    Relapse and hospital admission are common among, and carry a heavy burden in, patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of relapse and hospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder at the St Amanuel Mental Specialized Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A hospital-based comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in June 2016. Systematic random sampling technique was used to recruit 521 (260 schizophrenia cases and 261 bipolar disorder cases) study participants. Face-to-face interviews were conducted by trained psychiatry professionals. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria and Structured Clinical Interview of DSM-IV (SCID) were used. The risk of relapse and hospitalizations was slightly higher in patients with bipolar disorder than in patients with schizophrenia. A majority of schizophrenic (213 [81.92%]) and bipolar (215 [82.37%]) patients had a history of hospital admission, and 228 (87.69%) schizophrenic and 230 (88.12%) bipolar patients had a history of relapse. Patients who had a history of hospitalizations also had co-occurring substance use disorders compared to those who had no history of hospitalizations for schizophrenia (81.5% vs 37.9%) and bipolar disorder (82.56% vs 38.2%), respectively. Similarly, those patients who had a history of relapse had high comorbid substance use disorders than those who had no history of relapse for both schizophrenia (87.88% vs 47.37%) and bipolar disorder (88.37% vs 47.19%), respectively. It is vital that, in the local context, mental health professionals strengthen their therapeutic relationships with patients and their caregivers. This might enable patients and their caregivers to express their needs and concerns to them, as well as help to plan proper interventions for patients. Attention needs to be given to screening for comorbid substance use disorders in patients with

  14. A comparison of quality-of-life in schizophrenia and affective disorder patients in a Nigerian tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Bamiso Makanjuola, A; Ademola Adeponle, B; Ayodele Obembe, O

    2007-03-01

    This study determined the degree of satisfaction with various aspects of life in patients with affective disorders and schizophrenia in a Nigerian tertiary hospital. We compared quality-of-life (QOL) at onset-of-illness (first episode) with QOL at time of study and identified sociodemographic and clinical variables that may predict QOL. All consenting patients with ICD-10 compatible diagnosis of schizophrenia (n = 100) and affective disorders (n = 35) receiving treatment in the study center during the study period were interviewed. The WHOQOL-Bref was used to assess respondents' subjective QOL, and a data-collection sheet assessed objective domains of QOL. Respondents with schizophrenia and affective disorders had a good outcome in terms of objective QOL scores. In both groups, however, the subjective ratings were poor as the illness progresses. We conclude that in Nigerian hospital cases, patients with schizophrenia andaffective disorders have a good outcome in terms of objective QOL scores, which are not in consonance with their subjective ratings. Marital status and employment status are predictive of QOL.

  15. Stigma and its correlates in patients with schizophrenia attending a general hospital psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Aakanksha; Mattoo, Surendra K.; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Very few studies from India have studied stigma experienced by patients with schizophrenia. Aim of the Study: To study stigma in patients with schizophrenia (in the form of internalized stigma, perceived stigma and social-participation-restriction stigma) and its relationship with specified demographic and clinical variables (demographic variables, clinical profile, level of psychopathology, knowledge about illness, and insight). Materials and Methods: Selected by purposive random sampling, 100 patients with schizophrenia in remission were evaluated on internalized stigma of mental illness scale (ISMIS), explanatory model interview catalog stigma scale, participation scale (P-scale), positive and negative syndrome scale for schizophrenia, global assessment of functioning scale, scale to assess unawareness of mental disorder, and knowledge of mental illness scale. Results: On ISMIS scale, 81% patients experienced alienation and 45% exhibited stigma resistance. Stereotype endorsement was seen in 26% patients, discrimination experience was faced by 21% patients, and only 16% patients had social withdrawal. Overall, 29% participants had internalized stigma when total ISMIS score was taken into consideration. On P-scale, 67% patients experienced significant restriction, with a majority reporting moderate to mild restriction. In terms of associations between stigma and sociodemographic variables, no consistent correlations emerged, except for those who were not on paid job, had higher participation restriction. Of the clinical variables, level of functioning was the only consistent predictor of stigma. While better knowledge about the disorder was associated with lower level of stigma, there was no association between stigma and insight. Conclusion: Significant proportion of patients with schizophrenia experience stigma and stigma is associated with lower level of functioning and better knowledge about illness is associated with lower level of stigma. PMID

  16. Stigma and its correlates in patients with schizophrenia attending a general hospital psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aakanksha; Mattoo, Surendra K; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Very few studies from India have studied stigma experienced by patients with schizophrenia. To study stigma in patients with schizophrenia (in the form of internalized stigma, perceived stigma and social-participation-restriction stigma) and its relationship with specified demographic and clinical variables (demographic variables, clinical profile, level of psychopathology, knowledge about illness, and insight). Selected by purposive random sampling, 100 patients with schizophrenia in remission were evaluated on internalized stigma of mental illness scale (ISMIS), explanatory model interview catalog stigma scale, participation scale (P-scale), positive and negative syndrome scale for schizophrenia, global assessment of functioning scale, scale to assess unawareness of mental disorder, and knowledge of mental illness scale. On ISMIS scale, 81% patients experienced alienation and 45% exhibited stigma resistance. Stereotype endorsement was seen in 26% patients, discrimination experience was faced by 21% patients, and only 16% patients had social withdrawal. Overall, 29% participants had internalized stigma when total ISMIS score was taken into consideration. On P-scale, 67% patients experienced significant restriction, with a majority reporting moderate to mild restriction. In terms of associations between stigma and sociodemographic variables, no consistent correlations emerged, except for those who were not on paid job, had higher participation restriction. Of the clinical variables, level of functioning was the only consistent predictor of stigma. While better knowledge about the disorder was associated with lower level of stigma, there was no association between stigma and insight. Significant proportion of patients with schizophrenia experience stigma and stigma is associated with lower level of functioning and better knowledge about illness is associated with lower level of stigma.

  17. The Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Medication Adherence and Hospitalization Rates in Nonadherent Patients with Multi-Episode Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Barkhof, Emile

    2013-01-01

    Background: Medication nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia presents a serious clinical problem. Research on interventions incorporating motivational interviewing (MI) to improve adherence have shown mixed results. Aims: Primary aim is to determine the effectiveness of a MI intervention on adherence and hospitalization rates in patients, with multi-episode schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, who have experienced a psychotic relapse following medication nonadherence. Secondary aim is to evaluate whether MI is more effective in specific subgroups. Methods: We performed a randomized controlled study including 114 patients who experienced a psychotic relapse due to medication nonadherence in the past year. Participants received an adapted form of MI or an active control intervention, health education (HE). Both interventions consisted of 5–8 sessions, which patients received in adjunction to the care as usual. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 6 and 12 months follow-up. Results: Our results show that MI did not improve medication adherence in previously nonadherent patients who experienced a psychotic relapse. Neither were there significant differences in hospitalization rates at follow-up between MI and HE (27% vs 40%, P = .187). However, MI resulted in reduced hospitalization rates for female patients (9% vs 63%, P = .041), non-cannabis users (20% vs 53%, P = .041), younger patients (14% vs 50%, P = .012), and patients with shorter illness duration (14% vs 42%, P = .040). Conclusions: Targeted use of MI may be of benefit for improving medication adherence in certain groups of patients, although this needs further examination. PMID:24072808

  18. Medication adherence and utilization in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder receiving aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are chronic debilitating disorders that are often treated with second-generation antipsychotic agents, such as aripiprazole, quetiapine, and ziprasidone. While patients who are hospitalized for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder often receive these agents at discharge, comparatively little information exists on subsequent patterns of pharmacotherapy. Methods Using a database linking hospital admission records to health insurance claims, we identified all patients hospitalized for schizophrenia (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 295.XX) or bipolar disorder (296.0, 296.1, 296.4-296.89) between January 1, 2001 and September 30, 2008 who received aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at discharge. Patients not continuously enrolled for 6 months before and after hospitalization (“pre-admission” and “follow-up”, respectively) were excluded. We examined patterns of use of these agents during follow-up, including adherence with treatment (using medication possession ratios [MPRs] and cumulative medication gaps [CMGs]) and therapy switching. Analyses were undertaken separately for patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively. Results We identified a total of 43 patients with schizophrenia, and 84 patients with bipolar disorder. During the 6-month period following hospitalization, patients with schizophrenia received an average of 101 therapy-days with the second-generation antipsychotic agent prescribed at discharge; for patients with bipolar disorder, the corresponding value was 68 therapy-days. Mean MPR at 6 months was 55.1% for schizophrenia patients, and 37.3% for those with bipolar disorder; approximately one-quarter of patients switched to another agent over this period. Conclusions Medication compliance is poor in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder who initiate treatment with aripiprazole, quetiapine, or ziprasidone at hospital discharge. PMID:22856540

  19. Changes in the utilization of psychiatric hospital facilities in Denmark by patients diagnosed with schizophrenia from 1970 through 2012: The advent of 'revolving door' patients.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, R M; Christensen, T; Vestergaard, C H

    2016-05-01

    The Danish psychiatric system has gone through several structural changes in the last four decades. The deinstitutionalization of the mental healthcare system was implemented in Denmark in the late 1970s with the intention of increasing out-patient treatment. One of the aims in the reorganization was to treat the patient in the local environment rather than during long-term hospitalization. This study focuses on the changes in the utilization of hospital facilities. Using register data from secondary healthcare treatment of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in Denmark 1970-2012, we analysed the development in the use of hospital facilities. Our major finding was a 220% increase between 1970 and 2012 in the total number of hospital admissions due to schizophrenia each year, while at the same time the number of annual schizophrenia bed days was reduced by 76%. Furthermore, the readmission rate within a year after discharge with a diagnosis of schizophrenia reached 70% in 2012 compared to 51% in 1970. Finally, the total bed occupancy continued to rise over the four decades and has exceeded 100% in several years since 1999. The findings indicate that the reorganization of the Danish mental healthcare system has created a problem of 'revolving door' schizophrenia patients' who since the 1970s have been increasingly hospitalized but for shorter periods. Possible explanations of the findings are premature discharge of patients with schizophrenia due to lack of beds or/and that community psychiatry has not been providing adequate relapse prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Platelet monamine oxidase in schizophrenia. An investigation in drug-free chronic hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Owen, F; Bourne, R; Crow, T J; Johnstone, E C; Bailey, A R; Hershon, H I

    1976-11-01

    Platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity was investigated in a series of 60 patients with chronic schizophrenic illnesses free from neuroleptic medication, and 70 normal controls. No significant differences in platelet MAO activity or in substrate preference were detected between patients and controls, using tryptamine and tyramine as substrates. Platelet MAO activity did not distinguish patients with positive symptoms from those with negative symptoms alone and did not show any relationship with severity of disease or with a number of clinical features. These findings suggest that low platelet MAO activity cannot be regarded as a genetic marker for schizophrenia. Important determinants of platelet MAO activity yet to be discovered may have contributed to the discrepancies in recent observations of platelet MAO activity in schizophrenia.

  1. Obesity in multiracial schizophrenia patients receiving outpatient treatment in a regional tertiary hospital in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Norlelawati, A T; Kartini, A; Ramli, M; Norsidah, K; Wan Azizi, W S; Tariq, A R

    2012-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. Obesity is an issue of concern among patients with schizophrenia as it is a co-morbid condition that is closely related to metabolic syndrome. The present study assessed the correlation of body mass index with antipsychotic use among multiracial schizophrenia outpatients. The study also compared the patients' body mass index with Malaysian Adult Nutrition Survey (MANS) data. METHODS. A total of 216 participants were recruited into a cross-sectional study conducted over 5 months, from December 2010 to April 2011. Body weight and height were measured using the standard methods. Demographic data and treatment variables were gathered through interview or review of the medical records. RESULTS. There were differences in mean body mass index between men and women (p = 0.02) and between Malay, Chinese and Indian races (p = 0.04). Stratified by sex, age, and race, the body mass index distributions of the patients were significantly different to those of the reference MANS population. The prevalence of obesity among patients was more than 2-fold greater than among the reference population in all variables. Although body mass index distribution was related to antipsychotic drugs (χ(2) = 33.42; p = 0.04), obesity could not be attributed to any specific drug. CONCLUSION. The prevalence of obesity among patients with schizophrenia was significantly greater than that in the healthy Malaysian population, and affects the 3 main races in Malaysia.

  2. A population-based longitudinal study of suicide risk in male schizophrenia patients: Proximity to hospital discharge and the moderating effect of premorbid IQ.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Mark; Kapara, Ori; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Fenchel, Daphna; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yoffe, Rinat; Ginat, Keren; Fruchter, Eyal; Davidson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death in schizophrenia. Identifying factors which increase the risk of suicide among schizophrenia patients might help focus prevention efforts. This study examined risk of suicide in male schizophrenia patients using population-based data, examining the timing of suicide in relation to the last hospital discharge, and the effect of premorbid IQ on risk of suicide. Data on 930,000 male adolescents from the Israeli military draft board were linked with data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry and vital statistics from the Israeli Ministry of Health. The relationship between premorbid IQ and risk for suicide was examined among 2881 males hospitalized with schizophrenia and compared to a control group of 566,726 males from the same cohort, who were not hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder, using survival analysis methods. Over a mean follow-up period of 9.9 years (SD=5.8, range: 0-22 years), 77/3806 males with schizophrenia died by suicide (a suicide rate of 204.4 per 100,000 person-years). Approximately 48% of the suicides occurred within a year of discharge from the last hospital admission for schizophrenia. Risk of suicide was higher in male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ (HR=4.45, 95% CI=1.37-14.43) compared to those with normal premorbid IQ. These data indicate that male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ are at particularly high risk of suicide, and the time of peak risk is during the first year after the last hospitalization discharge.

  3. Processes of in-hospital psychiatric care and subsequent criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia: a national population-based, follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Charlotte Gjørup; Olrik Wallenstein Jensen, Signe; Johnsen, Søren Paaske; Nordentoft, Merete; Mainz, Jan

    2013-09-01

    It is unknown whether evidence-based, in-hospital processes of care may influence the risk of criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia. Our study aimed to examine the association between guideline recommended in-hospital psychiatric care and criminal behaviour among patients with schizophrenia. Danish patients with schizophrenia (18 years or older) discharged from a psychiatric ward between January 2004 and March 2009 were identified using a national population-based schizophrenia registry (n = 10 757). Data for in-hospital care and patient characteristics were linked with data on criminal charges obtained from the Danish Crime Registry until November 2010. Twenty per cent (n = 2175) of patients were charged with a crime during follow-up (median = 428 days). Violent crimes accounted for 59% (n = 1282) of the criminal offences. The lowest risk of crime was found among patients receiving the most processes of in-hospital care (top quartile of received recommended care, compared with bottom quartiles, adjusted hazard ratio = 0.86, 95% CI 0.75 to 0.99). The individual processes of care associated with the lowest risk of criminal behaviour were antipsychotic treatment and staff contact with relatives. High-quality, in-hospital psychiatric care was associated with a lower risk of criminal behaviour after discharge among patients with schizophrenia.

  4. Prevalence of aggression in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia in China: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Song; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Chen, Qiongni; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Correll, Christoph U; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Lai, Kelly Y C; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Aggression is a major concern in psychiatric inpatient care. Variations in study designs, settings, populations and data collection methods render comparisons of the prevalence of aggressive behavior in high-risk settings difficult. We proposed to estimate the pooled prevalence of aggression among inpatients with schizophrenia in China. Reports on aggressive behaviour involving physical contact or risks of interpersonal violence, in schizophrenia in Chinese general psychiatric wards were retrieved by using computer-assisted searches and manual searches of the reference lists of the relevant literature. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis V2 software. Potential sources of heterogeneity were analyzed with Cochrane's Q analysis. The search yielded 19 eligible studies involving a total of 3,941 schizophrenia patients. The prevalence of aggressive behavior in psychiatric wards ranged between 15.3% and 53.2%. The pooled prevalence of aggression was 35.4% (95% CI: 29.7%, 41.4%). The most commonly reported significant risk factors for aggression were positive psychotic symptoms: hostility or suspiciousness, 78.9% (15 studies); delusions, 63.2% (12 studies); disorganized behavior, 26.3% (5 studies); and auditory hallucinations, 10.5% (2 studies); together with: past history of aggression, 42.1% (8 studies); and involuntary admission, 10.5% (2 studies). Aggressive behaviour is common in Chinese inpatients with schizophrenia. The prevalence figures indicate the need to identify reliable clinical and illness predictors for aggression in inpatient psychiatric wards and to test investigations aimed at reducing aggressive episodes and their adverse outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. mHealth for Schizophrenia: Patient Engagement With a Mobile Phone Intervention Following Hospital Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Emily A; Gottlieb, Jennifer D; Rotondi, Armando J; Brunette, Mary F; Achtyes, Eric D; Mueser, Kim T; Gingerich, Susan; Brenner, Christopher J; Begale, Mark; Mohr, David C; Schooler, Nina; Marcy, Patricia; Robinson, Delbert G; Kane, John M

    2016-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that use mobile phones as instruments for illness management are gaining popularity. Research examining mobile phone‒based mHealth programs for people with psychosis has shown that these approaches are feasible, acceptable, and clinically promising. However, most mHealth initiatives involving people with schizophrenia have spanned periods ranging from a few days to several weeks and have typically involved participants who were clinically stable. Objective Our aim was to evaluate the viability of extended mHealth interventions for people with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders following hospital discharge. Specifically, we set out to examine the following: (1) Can individuals be engaged with a mobile phone intervention program during this high-risk period?, (2) Are age, gender, racial background, or hospitalization history associated with their engagement or persistence in using a mobile phone intervention over time?, and (3) Does engagement differ by characteristics of the mHealth intervention itself (ie, pre-programmed vs on-demand functions)? Methods We examined mHealth intervention use and demographic and clinical predictors of engagement in 342 individuals with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders who were given the FOCUS mobile phone intervention as part of a technology-assisted relapse prevention program during the 6-month high-risk period following hospitalization. Results On average, participants engaged with FOCUS for 82% of the weeks they had the mobile phone. People who used FOCUS more often continued using it over longer periods: 44% used the intervention over 5-6 months, on average 4.3 days a week. Gender, race, age, and number of past psychiatric hospitalizations were associated with engagement. Females used FOCUS on average 0.4 more days a week than males. White participants engaged on average 0.7 days more a week than African-Americans and responded to prompts on 0.7 days more a week than Hispanic participants. Younger

  6. Adjunctive benzodiazepine treatment of hospitalized schizophrenia patients in Asia from 2001 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Tor, Phern-Chern; Ng, Tze Pin; Yong, Kian-Hui; Sim, Kang; Xiang, Yu-Tao; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Lee, Edwin Ho Ming; Fujii, Senta; Yang, Shu-Yu; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Ungvari, Gabor S; Si, Tianmei; He, Yan Ling; Chung, Eun Kee; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Trivedi, Jintendra; Udomratn, Pichet; Shinfuku, Naotaka; Kua, Ee Heok; Tan, Chay Hoon; Sartorius, Norman; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2011-07-01

    Benzodiazepines are commonly prescribed to patients with schizophrenia in many countries, but as little is known about such treatment in Asia, we evaluated their adjunctive use for 6761 in-patients diagnosed with schizophrenia in nine Asian countries using a cross-sectional study design in 2001, 2004 and 2008. Multivariate logistic regression and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to assess predictors of benzodiazepine use and dose, respectively. Overall, 54% of the patients received adjunctive benzodiazepines at an average daily dose equivalent to 30.3 mg diazepam, with minor changes over the years sampled. Benzodiazepine use was highest in Taiwan and Japan, lowest in Thailand and China, and was associated with fewer years ill, presence of delusions (OR 1.24), hallucinations (OR 1.22), disorganized speech (OR 1.17), social or occupational dysfunction (OR 1.16), and use of mood stabilizers (OR 3.15), antiparkinsonian (OR 1.79) or antidepressant drugs (OR 1.33), and lower doses of antipsychotics (all p=0.016 to <0.001). Benzodiazepine doses were highest in Taiwan and China, lowest in Korea and Singapore; higher doses were associated with being young, male, physically aggressive, receiving mood stabilizers, and having electroconvulsive treatment (all p=0.019 to <0.001). Benzodiazepine use was associated with neurological and systemic adverse effects. In conclusion, benzodiazepine use was common in Asian patients with schizophrenia. Predictors of benzodiazepine use and dose differed in this population. Critical clinical guidelines should be developed specifically for Asian countries to address sound practices in regard to use of benzodiazepines for psychotic disorders.

  7. Concurrent Oral Antipsychotic Drug Use Among Schizophrenia Patients Initiated on Long-Acting Injectable Antipsychotics Post-Hospital Discharge.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jalpa A; Pettit, Amy R; Stoddard, Jeffrey J; Zummo, Jacqueline; Marcus, Steven C

    2015-08-01

    Pharmacological treatment is central to effective management of schizophrenia. Prescribing clinicians have an increasing array of options from which to choose, and oral antipsychotic polypharmacy is common in routine clinical practice. Practice guidelines recommend long-acting injectable (LAI) formulations, typically viewed as monotherapeutic alternatives, for patients with established nonadherence. Yet there are limited data on the prevalence and nature of concurrent oral antipsychotic prescriptions in patients receiving LAIs. Our observational, claims-based study examined the frequency and duration of concurrent oral prescriptions in 340 Medicaid patients receiving LAI therapy. Specifically, we examined patients with a recent history of nonadherence and hospitalization for schizophrenia and included both first-generation antipsychotic depot medications (fluphenazine decanoate, haloperidol decanoate) and more recently available second-generation injectables (LAI risperidone, paliperidone palmitate). Of all patients initiated on LAIs, 75.9% had a concurrent oral antipsychotic prescription in the 6 months post-hospital discharge. Patients receiving concurrent prescriptions were frequently prescribed an oral formulation of their LAI agent, but many first-generation LAI users received a concurrent second-generation oral medication. The lowest rate of concurrent prescribing (58.8%) was found with paliperidone palmitate, whereas the highest rate was with LAI risperidone (88.9%). Overlap in oral and LAI prescriptions typically occurred for a substantial period of time (ie, >30 days) and for a notable percentage of the days covered by LAIs (often 50% or more). Our findings highlight the need to further examine such prescribing patterns, to probe the reasons for them, and to clarify the optimal roles of different antipsychotic treatments in clinical practice.

  8. Psychometric Properties of Self-Care Requisites Scale (SCRS-h) in Hospitalized Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Roldán-Merino, Juan; Miguel-Ruiz, Dolores; Lluch-Canut, Ma Teresa; Puig-Llobet, Montserrat; Feria-Raposo, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the community version of the Self-Care Requisites Scale so as to be able to use it in a hospital context and to validate the new version in patients with schizophrenia. An initial phase was conducted to develop the questionnaire by means of a panel of experts. The validation of the psychometric properties was conducted using a sample of 264 patients. The new version showed good internal consistency and stability over time. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that the theoretical model fit the self-care requisites proposed in Orem's nursing theory from which it was drawn. The new version is a valid and reliable instrument for use in clinical practice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Lack of cardinal symptoms of meningitis in a hospitalized patient with chronic schizophrenia: lessons to be learned.

    PubMed

    So, Ryuhei; Hirota, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hishimoto, Akitoyo; Correll, Christoph U

    2015-01-01

    There are prior reports describing a diagnostic delay in medical emergencies in patients with schizophrenia. To our knowledge, this is the first case report demonstrating the risk of diagnostic delay of acute meningitis due to reduced pain perception as well as other factors related to schizophrenia and its treatment. We report a case of meningitis in a patient suffering from chronic schizophrenia and poor treatment response despite high doses of antipsychotics. Potential difficulties and pitfalls when suspecting or diagnosing meningitis as a physical comorbidity in patients with schizophrenia are discussed. A 33-year-old man with chronic and treatment-resistant schizophrenia developed acute meningitis. The definite diagnosis was delayed because the cardinal symptoms other than fever were not clearly elicited by physical examination. The characteristic symptoms of meningitis were concealed by reduced pain perception, rigidity due to the administration of antipsychotics, disorganized thinking and potentially diminished communication with health care professionals as commonly seen in patients with schizophrenia. Meningitis should not be dismissed as a possibility in patients with fever of unknown origin just because a patient with schizophrenia does not present with cardinal features of meningitis other than fever. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hospitalization resource utilization and costs among Medicaid insured patients with schizophrenia with different treatment durations of long-acting injectable antipsychotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Bera, Rimal; Offord, Steve; Zubek, Donna; Lau, Gina; Lin, Jay; Karson, Craig

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the impact of using long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics for a longer treatment duration versus a short duration on health care resource utilization among Medicaid-insured schizophrenia patients. Schizophrenia patients 13 years or older initiating LAI antipsychotics were identified from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Medicaid database between July 1, 2005, and June 30, 2010. The study population was grouped into 2 study cohorts (longer-usage-duration cohort: ≥ 180 days of supply and short-usage-duration cohort: <180 days of supply). Hospitalization-related resource utilization and costs were determined during a variable follow-up period and compared at the unadjusted and adjusted levels. Of the 5694 patients identified, 2838 patients were treated with LAI antipsychotics for a mean duration of 604 (SD, 432) days (mean age, 38.91 years), and 2856 were treated for 86 (SD, 43) days (mean age, 39.96 days). Total hospital lengths of stay, all cause (6.56 [SD, 18.63] vs 4.93 [SD, 13.40] days, P < 0.001) and schizophrenia related (5.18 [SD, 14.96] vs 4.16 [SD, 11.94] days, P = 0.005), and the mean number of hospitalizations, all cause (0.79 [SD, 1.78] vs 0.61 [SD, 1.41], P < 0.001) and schizophrenia related (0.63 [SD, 1.55] vs 0.51 [SD, 1.26], P = 0.001), were lower for the longer-usage-duration cohort. Cox regression results showed that using LAI antipsychotics for a longer duration was correlated with longer time to the first hospitalization for any cause and for schizophrenia. After multivariate regression, longer usage duration of LAI antipsychotics was associated with a decreased number of hospitalizations (-0.15 per year, P < 0.001), a decreased hospital length of stay (-1.50 days, P < 0.001), and reduced hospital payment (-26%, P < 0.001). Patients who are treated with LAI antipsychotics for a longer versus shorter duration use hospital resources less.

  11. Cardiac risk factors and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia admitted to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Nebhinani, Naresh; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Basu, Debasish; Kulhara, Parmanand; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar; Malhotra, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors and metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: By consecutive sampling, 143 patients (of age ≥ 20 years), out of total 159 patients with schizophrenia admitted to the inpatient unit were evaluated for the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk as per Framingham (10-year all CHD events) function/risk equation and systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE) - 10-year cardiovascular mortality risk (CMR). Prevalence of MS was estimated by using the consensus definition. Results: Fifty-two (36.4%) patients fulfilled the criteria for MS. 10-year CHD risk was 1.65%, and 10-year CMR was 1.39%. Compared to females, males had higher Framingham score (1.96 ± 2.74 vs. 1.09 ± 0.41, U value 1987.5*, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients of schizophrenia have a high prevalence of MS and CVR factors. Hence, there is a need to screen the patient of schizophrenia for the same and manage the same as early as possible during the course of illness. PMID:25568478

  12. Socio-demographic correlates of treatment response among patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary hospital in South-East Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ezeme, Mark S; Uwakwe, Richard; Ndukuba, Appolos C; Igwe, Monday N; Odinka, Paul C; Amadi, Kennedy; Obayi, Nichodemus O

    2016-12-01

    Many patients with schizophrenia respond poorly to antipsychotic medication. Few studies have systematically examined the relationship of social and demographic characteristics of these patients to treatment response in our environment. To identify the social and demographic variables associated with treatment response in patients with schizophrenia. A total of 172 participants with a diagnosis of schizophrenia receiving antipsychotics took part in the study. Participants were consecutively recruited involving patients presenting for the first time, or relapsed patients who had stopped antipsychotics in the previous six months. Both in-patients and out-patients who met the inclusion criteria were studied. Socio-demographic interview schedule and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) were administered at the initial encounter and between 4 and 6 weeks, subsequently. Defining good treatment response as ≥ 20% reduction in PANSS score, 68% had a good response while 32% had poor response. Good response to treatment was associated with late age of onset of illness, satisfactory family relationship, acquisition of skilled occupation and being married. However, there was no association between treatment response and gender. Knowledge about these variables in relation to treatment response would improve mental health services as regards articulation of prognosis and psycho education.

  13. Electroencephalographic characteristics of Iranian schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Chaychi, Irman; Foroughipour, Mohsen; Haghir, Hossein; Talaei, Ali; Chaichi, Ashkan

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a prevalent psychiatric disease with heterogeneous causes that is diagnosed based on history and mental status examination. Applied electrophysiology is a non-invasive method to investigate the function of the involved brain areas. In a previously understudied population, we examined acute phase electroencephalography (EEG) records along with pertinent Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores for each patient. Sixty-four hospitalized patients diagnosed to have schizophrenia in Ebn-e-Sina Hospital were included in this study. PANSS and MMSE were completed and EEG tracings for every patient were recorded. Also, EEG tracings were recorded for 64 matched individuals of the control group. Although the predominant wave pattern in both patients and controls was alpha, theta waves were almost exclusively found in eight (12.5 %) patients with schizophrenia. Pathological waves in schizophrenia patients were exclusively found in the frontal brain region, while identified pathological waves in controls were limited to the temporal region. No specific EEG finding supported laterality in schizophrenia patients. PANSS and MMSE scores were significantly correlated with specific EEG parameters (all P values <0.04). Patients with schizophrenia demonstrate specific EEG patterns and show a clear correlation between EEG parameters and PANSS and MMSE scores. These characteristics are not observed in all patients, which imply that despite an acceptable specificity, they are not applicable for the majority of schizophrenia patients. Any deduction drawn based on EEG and scoring systems is in need of larger studies incorporating more patients and using better functional imaging techniques for the brain.

  14. The relationship between body mass index, the use of second-generation antipsychotics, and dental caries among hospitalized patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuan-Yu; Yang, Nan-Ping; Chou, Pesus; Chi, Lin-Yang; Chiu, Hsien-Jane

    2011-01-01

    Weight gain is common in schizophrenia due to use of the second-generation antipsychotic medicines (SGAs). Studies have also shown that body mass index (BMI) and the side effect of SGAs, such as anticholinergic activity, are related to the risk of dental caries. This study aims to investigate the relationship between BMI, the use of the SGAs, and the decayed, missing, and filled tooth index (DMFT) among hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. A cross-sectional survey of oral health was conducted in a psychiatric long-term care hospital in Taiwan in 2006. A total of 878 schizophrenic inpatients participated in this survey. The DMFT index was used to assess dental caries, the use of SGAs of subjects were recorded, and the BMI classification was done in accordance with Asian standard scales. Multiple regression models were used to measure the effects of SGAs or BMI on the DMFT index in each subject. Among the subjects with schizophrenia, DMFT is significantly related to independent variables such as age, length of stay, BMI, education, marital status, and grade of disability. Consequent multiple linear regression showed that being underweight (beta = 0.07, p = 0.041) and age were the most significant factors that influence the DMFT score. We found that the use of SGAs was not significantly associated with the DMFT index. After adjusting for age, being underweight is a significant factor associated with the increased risk of dental caries in hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Psychologists and dentists should pay more attention to the relation between BMI and dental caries in this population.

  15. Baseline characteristics and hospitalizations in patients with schizophrenia receiving olanzapine long-acting injection: an interim analysis from a non-interventional, prospective observational safety study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Meghan E; Andrews, Jeffrey S; Faries, Douglas E; Landry, John; Xu, Jenny; Detke, Holland C; Chhabra-Khanna, Rashna; McDonnell, David P

    2015-11-13

    Depot antipsychotics are a treatment option for medication nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia. Nonadherence can lead to increased relapse and hospitalization rates. This article reports hospitalization data before and after initiation of olanzapine long-acting injection (LAI), a depot antipsychotic. Data were assessed from an ongoing, multinational, prospective, observational post-authorisation safety study being conducted to evaluate post-injection delirium/sedation syndrome (PDSS), an adverse reaction that can occur following injection of olanzapine LAI. Eligible patients were aged ≥18 years, diagnosed with schizophrenia, were prescribed olanzapine LAI, and lived outside the United States. Psychiatric hospitalization and medication data were collected retrospectively for the 6-month period before study entry and prospectively throughout the study. Paired t-tests and McNemar's tests were used to assess changes in hospitalization incidence and duration. Stepwise Cox proportional hazards models assessed factors associated with hospitalizations. Analyses were based on data from the first 3 years of the continuously enrolling study (N = 668). The average duration of olanzapine LAI exposure for all patients was 0.768 years. Of the 529 patients who received at least 1 injection of olanzapine LAI and were not hospitalized at study entry, 8.1% had at least 1 subsequent psychiatric hospitalization with a mean duration of 2.0 days. Of the 288 patients who had a >6-month follow-up, 8.3% had at least 1 post-baseline psychiatric hospitalization with a mean duration of 2.3 days. The incidence of hospitalizations in the 6-month period after treatment was significantly lower than that in the 6-month period prior to treatment (8.3 vs 32.6%, respectively; P < 0.001). Furthermore, mean hospitalization duration decreased from 11.5 days in the 6-month period before treatment to 2.3 days in the 6-month period after treatment (P < 0.001). Psychiatric

  16. Regional supply of outreach service and length of stay in psychiatric hospital among patients with schizophrenia: National case mix data analysis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Niimura, Junko; Nakanishi, Miharu; Yamasaki, Syudo; Nishida, Atsushi

    2017-08-24

    Several clinical trials have demonstrated that linkage to an outreach service can prevent prolonged length of stay of patients at psychiatric hospitals. However, there has been no investigation of the association between length of stay in psychiatric hospital and regional supply of outreach services using national case mix data. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between length of stay in psychiatric hospital and regional supply of outreach services. We used data from the National Patient Survey in Japan, a nationally representative cross-sectional survey of inpatient care conducted every three years from 1996 to 2014. Data from 42,268 patients with schizophrenia who had been admitted to psychiatric hospitals were analyzed. After controlling for patient and regional characteristics, patients in regions with fewer number of visits for psychiatric nursing care at home had significantly longer length of stay in psychiatric hospitals. This finding implies that enhancement of the regional supply of outreach services would prevent prolonged length of stay in psychiatric hospitals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Patients with Schizophrenia and Social Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Arsova, Slavica; Barsova, Gabriela Kopacheva

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with schizophrenia have severe problems with personal and social relations which affect their quality of life. AIM: The aim of the paper was to monitor personal and social relations in patients with schizophrenia and to find out the differences regarding socio-demographic characteristics and ambulatory and day hospital treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The investigation included 120 subjects each with diagnosis F20 according to ICD 10 criteria; divided into two groups of 60 patients regarding their actual treatment (the first group received ambulatory care whereas those from the second group had a day hospital treatment). Patients were of different age and gender, receiving regular antipsychotic therapy. They were included in individual and group psychosocial therapeutic procedures during the day hospital treatment. The investigation utilised the following diagnostic instruments: standardised clinical interview and Personal and social performance scale (PSP scale), a non-standardized questionnaire of socio-demographic data, family support and existence of mental disorder in other family members. RESULTS: The results have shown better personal and social functioning in patients who had family support, in those who are employed, in those with no mental disorder in other family members and in patients on day hospital treatment against patients receiving ambulatory care. CONCLUSION: Day hospital treatment, family support and social support improve the ability for personal and social contacts of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27703560

  18. Efficacy and safety of once-monthly injection of paliperidone palmitate in hospitalized Asian patients with acute exacerbated schizophrenia: an open-label, prospective, noncomparative study

    PubMed Central

    Li, HuaFang; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Zhang, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This single-group, open-label, prospective, noncomparative, multicenter, Phase IV study explored the efficacy and tolerability of paliperidone palmitate (PP) in hospitalized patients with acute exacerbation of schizophrenia. Methods Asian patients of either sex, between 18 and 65 years of age, diagnosed with schizophrenia (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition) with acute exacerbations within the previous 4 weeks, were enrolled. Intramuscular PP was initiated at doses of 150 milligram equivalent (mg eq) (day 1) and 100 mg eq (day 8), followed by a monthly maintenance dose between 75 mg eq and 150 mg eq (days 36 and 64). Primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (last-observation-carried-forward) at week 13. Results Of the 212 enrolled patients, 152 (71.7%) completed the 13-week treatment; withdrawal of consent (24 [11.3%] patients) was the most common reason for study discontinuation. Mean (standard deviation) PANSS total score from baseline (90.0 [17.41]) improved significantly at day 4 (−6.1 [9.27]; 95% confidence interval: −7.38, −4.85; P<0.001) and week 13 endpoint (−23.9 [23.24]; 95% confidence interval: −27.10, −20.78; P<0.001). Similarly, the secondary endpoints (Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Physical and Social Performance, each PANSS subscale, and Marder factor scores) improved significantly from baseline to week 13 endpoint (P<0.001 for all). At week 13, 112/210 (53.3%) patients had a 40% improvement in the PANSS total score (responder rate), and 133/212 (62.7%) patients were ready for hospital discharge. Overall, 139 (65.6%) patients experienced at least one treatment-emergent adverse event (TEAE). Most common (>5%) TEAEs were hyperprolactinemia, constipation, nasopharyngitis, insomnia, increased weight, and tremor. Worsening of schizophrenia (3.3%) and sinus bradycardia (2.0%) were serious TEAEs; no deaths were

  19. Clinical characteristics of synthetic cannabinoid-induced psychosis in relation to schizophrenia: a single-center cross-sectional analysis of concurrently hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Merih; Inanc, Leman; Oruc, Gamze Akcay; Arpacioglu, Selim; Gulec, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate synthetic cannabinoid (SC)-induced psychosis in terms of patient profile and clinical characteristics with reference to concurrently hospitalized schizophrenic patients. Methods A total of 81 male patients diagnosed with psychotic disorder induced by the use of SCs (n=50; mean (standard deviation [SD]) age: 25.9 (5.5) years) or with schizophrenia (n=31, mean (SD) age: 42.9 (11.6) years) based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, diagnosis criteria who were concurrently hospitalized at Erenköy Mental and Neurological Diseases Training and Research Hospital were included in this cross-sectional study. Data on sociodemographic characteristics, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) were recorded in all the patients. Results Mean (SD) age at disease onset in SC-induced psychosis patients was 22.3 (5.6) years; 26.0% had suicidal ideation and 58.4% were hospitalized involuntarily. Marijuana was the most common first used substance (72.0%), and solitary use of SC was noted in 38.0% of patients. SC-induced psychosis patients had similar PANSS positive, BPRS, HRSD, and FAB scores and significantly lower PANSS negative scores (18.0 [6.5] vs 22.3 [6.0], P=0.004) than patients with schizophrenia, while they had similar HAM-A scores (17.8 [10.3] vs 21.6 [5.5], P=0.085) as young schizophrenics. Age at onset for SC (r=0.364, P=0.05) or substance (r=0.395, P=0.01) use was correlated positively with total FAB scores. Conclusion In conclusion, our findings revealed SC-induced psychosis to influence young individuals and be associated with remarkable rates of suicidal ideation and involuntary hospitalization as well as similar clinical picture with schizophrenia in terms of PANSS positive, BPRS, HRSD, HAM-A, and FAB scores. Younger age at

  20. Sleep in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Numerous electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies have reported neurophysiological and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients during wakefulness. However, these findings have been inconsistently replicated across different groups of patients, thus complicating the identification of underlying neuronal defects. Sleep minimizes possible waking-related confounds, including decreased motivation and presence of active symptoms. Additionally, the two main sleep rhythms, slow waves and spindles, reflect the intrinsic activity of corticothalamic circuits and are associated with cognitive activities, including learning and memory, occurring during wakefulness. In this review I will present the most relevant sleep findings in schizophrenia, with particular emphasis on several recent studies that have consistently reported sleep spindle deficits in patients with schizophrenia. I will then elaborate on how these findings may contribute to a better understanding of the neurobiology of schizophrenia as well as to the development of novel pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions to ameliorate the symptoms and cognitive impairments of schizophrenia patients. PMID:26430610

  1. Ethnicity and symptom expression in patients with acute schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Nadine; Newman, Jennifer; D'Antonio, Emily; McKelvey, Jennifer; Serper, Mark

    2011-02-28

    Chinese patients have been largely ignored in the literature examining ethnic differences in schizophrenia. This study examined demographics and symptom profiles of Euro-, African-, Chinese-American, and Latino inpatients with schizophrenia. Chinese-American patients had fewer symptoms, hospitalizations, and least amount of education compared to other groups. Cultural and clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficacy of a family intervention program for prevention of hospitalization in patients with schizophrenia. A naturalistic multicenter controlled and randomized study in Spain.

    PubMed

    Mayoral, Fermín; Berrozpe, Adela; de la Higuera, Jesús; Martinez-Jambrina, Juan José; de Dios Luna, Juan; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    According to most relevant guidelines, family psycho-educational interventions are considered to be one the most effective psychosocial treatments for people with schizophrenia. The main outcome measure in controlled and randomized studies has been prevention of relapses and admissions, and encouragement of compliance, although some questions remain about its applicability and results in clinical practice. The aim of study was to evaluate the efficacy and implementation of a single family psychoeducational intervention in 'real' conditions for people diagnosed with schizophrenia. A total of 88 families were randomized in two groups. The family intervention group received a 12 months psychoeducational treatment, and the other group followed normal standard treatment. Assessments were made at baseline, at 12 and at 18 months. The main outcome measure was hospitalization, and secondary outcome measures were clinical condition (BPRS-E) and social disability (DAS-II). A total of 71 patients finished the study (34 family intervention group and 37 control group). Patients who received family intervention reduced the risk of hospitalization by 40% (P = .4018; 95%CI: 0.1833-0.6204). Symptomatology improved significantly at 12 months (P = .4018; 95%CI: 0.1833-0.6204), but not at 18 months (P = .4018; 95%CI: 0.1833-0.6204). Social disability was significantly reduced in the family intervention group at 12 months and 18 months. Family psychoeducational intervention reduces hospitalization risk and improves clinical condition and social functioning of people with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  4. Corneal temperature in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Munitz, Hanan; Portuguese, Shirley; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Sigler, Mayanit; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Stryjer, Rafael; Hermesh, Haggai; Weizman, Abraham

    2005-12-01

    Most data imply that dopaminergic transmission is essential for proper hypothalamic-mediated core temperature regulation. Altered central dopaminergic transmission is suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Thus, hypothetically, schizophrenia patients might be at increased risk of developing thermoregulatory dysregulation manifested by alterations in core temperature, as well as in peripheral tissue, the temperature of which has been shown to correlate with core temperature (e.g. cornea). Previous small pilot studies of ours showed that schizophrenia patients may exhibit corneal temperature abnormalities. Hence, we assessed corneal temperature in a controlled sample of drug-free ( n =11) and medicated ( n =28) schizophrenia patients compared to healthy comparison subjects ( n =9), using a FLIR thermal imaging camera. Drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibited significantly higher corneal temperature compared to healthy subjects, typical antipsychotic drug (APD)-treated patients ( n =16) and atypical APD-treated patients ( n =12) (37.08+/-1.46 degrees C vs. 33.37+/-2.51 degrees C, 31.08+/-1.43 degrees C and 31.67+/-0.44 degrees C respectively, p <0.0001; p <0.001 vs. each group separately). The healthy comparison subjects and the atypical APD-treated patients exhibited comparable corneal temperatures and these two groups exhibited higher corneal temperatures compared to the typical APD-treated patients ( p <0.01 and p =0.051 respectively). In conclusion, this study indicates that drug-free schizophrenia patients exhibit substantially higher corneal temperature compared to healthy comparison subjects or medicated patients, and that APDs may decrease corneal temperature either to normal (atypical APD) or to subnormal (typical APD) values. The relevance of these phenomena to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, the biological mechanism underlying drug-induced corneal temperature alterations, the possible role of temperature-lowering drugs

  5. Evaluation of Dream Content among Patients with Schizophrenia, their Siblings, Patients with Psychiatric Diagnoses other than Schizophrenia, and Healthy Control

    PubMed Central

    Tahmasian, Masoud; Younesi, Golrokh; C Schwebel, David; Rezaei, Mansour; Rezaie, Leeba; Mohamadi, Mehrak; Ghanbari, Arezo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia is a chronic psychotic disorder with unknown etiology that causes cognitive impairment, affecting thinking, behavior, social function, sleep and dream content. This study considered the dream content of patients with schizophrenia, siblings of patients with schizophrenia, patients with psychiatric diagnoses other than schizophrenia, and a group of healthy controls. The aim of this study was to compare the dream content of patients with schizophrenia with dream content of individuals with other mental disorders, first degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and community controls. Method Seventy-two patients were selected and placed in 4 groups. The first group consisted of 18 inpatients with schizophrenia whose medications were stable for at least four weeks; the second group consisted of 16 nonpsychotic mentally ill inpatients; the third group consisted of 18 individuals who were siblings of patients with schizophrenia; and the fourth group consisted of 20 healthy individuals in the community with no family history of mental or somatic disorders. The four groups were matched by age and gender. A 14-item dream content questionnaire was administered for all the participants, and the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS) was also administered for the two groups of hospitalized patients. Results Results showed that there were significant differences in dream content among groups included friends acquaintances, females and colorful components. No significant differences were found between the positive and negative subscales of PANSS and any of the dream questionnaire subscales. Conclusion Our results suggest that there were a few changes in the dream content of the patients with schizophrenia compare to other groups. PMID:23056114

  6. Do patients think cannabis causes schizophrenia? - A qualitative study on the causal beliefs of cannabis using patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There has been a considerable amount of debate among the research community whether cannabis use may cause schizophrenia and whether cannabis use of patients with schizophrenia is associated with earlier and more frequent relapses. Considering that studies exploring patients' view on controversial topics have contributed to our understanding of important clinical issues, it is surprising how little these views have been explored to add to our understanding of the link between cannabis and psychosis. The present study was designed to elucidate whether patients with schizophrenia who use cannabis believe that its use has caused their schizophrenia and to explore these patients other beliefs and perceptions about the effects of the drug. Methods We recruited ten consecutive patients fulfilling criteria for paranoid schizophrenia and for a harmful use of/dependence from cannabis (ICD-10 F20.0 + F12.1 or F12.2) from the in- and outpatient clinic of the Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich. They were interviewed using qualitative methodology. Furthermore, information on amount, frequency, and effects of use was obtained. A grounded theory approach to data analysis was taken to evaluate findings. Results None of the patients described a causal link between the use of cannabis and their schizophrenia. Disease models included upbringing under difficult circumstances (5) or use of substances other than cannabis (e. g. hallucinogens, 3). Two patients gave other reasons. Four patients considered cannabis a therapeutic aid and reported that positive effects (reduction of anxiety and tension) prevailed over its possible disadvantages (exacerbation of positive symptoms). Conclusions Patients with schizophrenia did not establish a causal link between schizophrenia and the use of cannabis. We suggest that clinicians consider our findings in their work with patients suffering from these co-occurring disorders. Withholding treatment or excluding patients from certain

  7. Psychopathology, cognitive function, and social functioning of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Santosh, S; Dutta Roy, D; Kundu, P S

    2013-06-01

    OBJECTIVES. To explore the relationship between cognitive functions, social functioning, and psychopathology in schizophrenia. METHODS. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, according to the ICD-10 criteria, were enrolled from the Department of Psychiatry of 2 postgraduate hospitals in Kolkata, India. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, Schizophrenia Research Foundation India-Social Functioning Index, and a cognitive test battery were administered. RESULTS. Regarding the 100 patients recruited into the study, 4 subtests (self-care, occupational role, social role, and family role) of the social functioning were found to be significantly correlated with cognitive functions. Cognitive function battery performance scores were more inversely correlated with negative symptoms than with positive symptoms. CONCLUSION. Positive and negative symptoms along with verbal fluency were able to predict social functioning.

  8. Cancer in patients with schizophrenia: What is the next step?

    PubMed

    Chou, Frank H-C; Tsai, Kuan-Yi; Wu, Hung-Chi; Shen, Shih-Pei

    2016-11-01

    People with schizophrenia, who constitute approximately 0.3-1% of the general population, have a nearly 20% shorter life expectancy than the general population. The incidence of varied types of cancers in patients with schizophrenia is controversial. The majority of previous research has demonstrated that patients who have schizophrenia and cancer have early mortality compared to the general population with cancer. The causes of early mortality in patients with schizophrenia and cancer might be attributed to a lower cancer screening rate and lack of effective treatment, including: (i) patient factors, such as poor lifestyle, passive attitude toward treatment, or comorbidity; (ii) physician factors, such as physician bias, which may decrease the delivery of care for individuals with mental disorders; and (iii) hospital administration factors, such as stigma and discrimination. Additional studies on patients with schizophrenia and cancer are warranted and should include the following: a comprehensive review of previous studies; a focus on differentiating the specific types of cancer; and methods for improvement. To decrease the early mortality of patients with schizophrenia, the following measures are proposed: (i) enhance early detection and early treatment, such as increasing the cancer screening rate for patients with schizophrenia; (ii) provide effective, timely treatment and rehabilitation; (iii) improve patients' psychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment; (iv) promote healthy behavior in the general population and emphasize healthy lifestyles in vulnerable populations; and (v) remove the stigma of schizophrenia. To reduce disparities in physical health, public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this group of patients. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2016 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Burden on Caregivers of Patients with Schizophrenia and Related Factors

    PubMed Central

    YAZICI, Esra; KARABULUT, Ümit; YILDIZ, Mustafa; BASKAN TEKEŞ, Sinem; İNAN, Eda; ÇAKIR, Uğur; BOŞGELMEZ, Şükriye; TURGUT, Celaleddin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Caregivers of patients with schizophrenia are under the burden of continuous and difficult processes. Determination of the factors related to caregiver burden in schizophrenia may help find strategies to decrease the burden. This study aimed at investigating the factors associated with caregiver burden among relatives of patients with schizophrenia. Methods Eighty-eight caregivers of patients under treatment for schizophrenia for at least 1 year were included in the study. The Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview was used for the assessment of caregiver burden. Sociodemographical data, the level of knowledge about schizophrenia, clinical impression scale, and global assessment of functioning were used to evaluate the related factors. Results Caregiver burden was negatively correlated with income level and functionality of the patient and was positively correlated with the age of the caregiver, the daily time spent with the patient, and the number of hospitalizations of the patient (p<0.05). There was no significant correlation between the caregivers’ knowledge about schizophrenia and caregiver burden (p<0.05). Living in the same house with the patient was a positive predictor, whereas functionality and income level of the patient and education level of the caregiver were negative predictors (p<0.05). Conclusion This study highlighted the importance of setting targets for improving the functionality of patients in the design and implementation of rehabilitation and support programs for patients with schizophrenia. Additionally, providing higher income for patients, creating conditions for an independent life, and increasing incentives for younger caregivers with a higher educational level may help decrease caregiver burden. PMID:28360779

  10. Quality of Care and Outcomes of Heart Failure Among Patients With Schizophrenia in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Mette; Mainz, Jan; Egstrup, Kenneth; Johnsen, Søren P

    2017-09-15

    Research on the association between schizophrenia and the quality of care and clinical outcomes of heart failure (HF) remains sparse. This nationwide study compared the quality of care and clinical outcomes of HF among Danish patients with and without schizophrenia. In a population-based cohort study, we identified 36,718 patients with incident HF with hospital contacts, including 108 with schizophrenia, using Danish registries between 2004 and 2013. High quality of HF care was defined as receiving ≥ 80% guideline-recommended process-performance measures of care. Potential predictors of HF care among patients with schizophrenia included patient-specific factors (age, gender, Global Assessment of Functioning [GAF] score, alcohol or drug abuse, duration of schizophrenia); provider-specific factors (quality of schizophrenia care); and system-specific factors (patient-volume defined as hospital departments and clinics yearly average patient-volume of patients with incident HF). Clinical outcomes included 4-week all-cause readmission and 1-year all-cause mortality after a first-time hospital contact with incident HF. Results showed that compared with patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia, patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a lower chance of receiving high-quality HF care (relative risk 0.66, 95% confidence interval 0.48 to 0.91). A high GAF score was associated with a higher chance of receiving high-quality HF care among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia had a higher risk of 1-year mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 2.83, 95% confidence interval 1.59 to 5.04), but not a higher risk of readmission than patients with incident HF who have no schizophrenia. In conclusion, efforts are warranted to reduce the high mortality among patients with incident HF who have schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A longitudinal study of medication nonadherence and hospitalization risk in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Law, Michael R; Soumerai, Stephen B; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Adams, Alyce S

    2008-01-01

    Previous cross-sectional studies have suggested an association between medication nonadherence and hospitalization for individuals with schizophrenia. However, such analyses typically measure adherence averaged over long time periods. We investigated the temporal relationship between nonadherence and hospitalization risk using a daily measure of medication availability. Our observational cohort included 1191 patients with schizophrenia (ICD-9 criteria) enrolled in Maine and New Hampshire Medicaid programs who initiated atypical antipsychotic therapy between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003. Pharmacy claims were used to define days with gaps in medication availability. We tested the association of gaps in medication availability with all-cause, mental health, and schizophrenia-specific hospitalization using a Cox regression model. Compared to individuals with available medication, individuals in the first 10 days following a missed prescription refill had a hazard ratio of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.02 to 2.32) for mental health hospitalization and 1.77 (95% CI = 1.16 to 2.71) for schizophrenia hospitalization. Similarly, medication gaps of more than 30 days were associated with 50% increased hazard for all 3 hospitalization outcomes. Switching and augmenting therapy, previous hospitalization, and clinical severity measures were also associated with substantially increased hazard of hospitalization. Our findings indicate that patients may be at significantly increased risk for hospitalization as early as the first 10 days following a missed medication refill. Patients who switched or augmented medications or were previously hospitalized also demonstrated increased hospitalization risk. Clinicians and Medicaid programs should consider using pharmacy claims to monitor medication use and target adherence interventions to reduce relapses in this vulnerable population.

  12. Vergence Eye Movements in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Bolding, MS; Lahti, AC; White, D; Moore, C; Gurler, D; Gawne, TJ; Gamlin, PD

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that smooth pursuit eye movements are impaired in patients with schizophrenia. However, under normal viewing conditions, targets move not only in the frontoparallel plane but also in depth, and tracking them requires both smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements. Although previous studies in humans and non-human primates suggest that these two eye movement subsystems are relatively independent of one another, to our knowledge, there have been no prior studies of vergence tracking behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, we have investigated these eye movements in patients with schizophrenia and in healthy controls. We found that patients with schizophrenia exhibited substantially lower gains compared to healthy controls during vergence tracking at all tested speeds (e.g. 0.25 Hz vergence tracking mean gain of 0.59 vs. 0.86). Further, consistent with previous reports, patients with schizophrenia exhibited significantly lower gains than healthy controls during smooth pursuit at higher target speeds (e.g. 0.5 Hz smooth pursuit mean gain of 0.64 vs. 0.73). In addition, there was a modest (r≈0.5), but significant, correlation between smooth pursuit and vergence tracking performance in patients with schizophrenia. Our observations clearly demonstrate substantial vergence tracking deficits in patients with schizophrenia. In these patients, deficits for smooth pursuit and vergence tracking are partially correlated suggesting overlap in the central control of smooth pursuit and vergence eye movements. PMID:25088242

  13. The effects on helplessness and recovery of an empowerment program for hospitalized persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Park, Soon Ah; Sung, Kyung Mi

    2013-04-01

    The study aim was to evaluate the effects on helplessness and recovery of an empowering program for patients with chronic schizophrenia. A repeated-measure design with a control group was used. The subjects consisted of 46 patients with schizophrenia admitted in three psychiatric hospitals in South Korea. The experimental group (n = 23) received the empowering program twice a week for 60 min, with a total of 6 weeks. This finding revealed that the empowering program was effective on helplessness (F = 185.218, p <.001) and recovery (F = 159.402, p <.001, F = 34.154, p <.001) of hospitalized persons with schizophrenia. This study demonstrated that the empowering program can be a useful psychiatric nursing intervention. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Brain Morphometry using MRI in Schizophrenia Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanshina, I.; Pirogov, Yu.; Kupriyanov, D.; Orlova, V.

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been the focus of intense neuroimaging research. Although its fundamental pathobiology remains elusive, neuroimaging studies provide evidence of abnormalities of cerebral structure and function in patients with schizophrenia. We used morphometry as a quantitative method for estimation of volume of brain structures. Seventy eight right-handed subjects aged 18-45 years were exposed to MRI-examination. Patients were divided into 3 groups: patients with schizophrenia, their relatives and healthy controls. The volumes of interested structures (caudate nucleus, putamen, ventricles, frontal and temporal lobe) were measured using T2-weighted MR-images. Correlations between structural differences and functional deficit were evaluated.

  15. Brief screening for executive dysfunction in schizophrenia in a rehabilitation hospital.

    PubMed

    Power, Brian D; Dragović, Milan; Rock, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Few tools assessing neurocognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia are able to measure integrated executive functions in the context of the problem-solving demands of a patient's everyday world. The authors evaluated the BRIEF-A (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult version) Informant Report in 112 inpatients with chronic schizophrenia in a rehabilitation hospital. Factor analysis yielded a three-factor solution (Emotional Regulation, Problem-Solving, Orderliness). The BRIEF-A is psychometrically robust in this population and, in the absence of patient participation, provides an estimate of executive functions in a population that may otherwise be beyond the reach of formal neurocognitive testing.

  16. Seropositivity of toxoplasmosis in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    El-Sahn, Amel A; Shatat, Hanan Z; Ghitany, Engy M

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that infectious agents may contribute to some cases of schizophrenia. In animals, infections with Toxoplasma gondii can alter behavior and neurotransmitter function. In humans, acute infection can produce psychotic symptoms similar to those displayed by persons with schizophrenia. In the present study, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was employed to measure the level of Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in serum samples from 75 patients of schizophrenia and 85 matched controls. Percentage of positive sera for Toxoplasma IgG antibodies was significantly higher in schizophrenic cases than controls (80% vs. 52.9% respectively). Infection increased with age in both groups and no significant association was found with sex. No association was found with duration of illness or presence of family history of schizophrenia. Circumstantial evidence indicates that infection with Toxoplasma gondii may lead to some cases of schizophrenia.

  17. Negative symptom assessment of chronic schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Raskin, A; Pelchat, R; Sood, R; Alphs, L D; Levine, J

    1993-01-01

    A new scale for assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, the Negative Symptom Assessment (NSA), was administered to 101 male chronic, inpatient schizophrenia patients. Factor analysis of the NSA yielded seven factors, but most of the explained variance resided in Factor 1, Restricted Affect/Emotion. The factors that emerged from this study closely resembled NSA factors derived from an earlier study of outpatient schizophrenia patients, which indicates the factor structure of the NSA is robust. A constellation of variables reflecting long-term or chronic illness were significantly related to six of the seven factors. These results suggest that "institutionalism" may play a role in the evolution of some negative symptoms.

  18. Impaired Effort Allocation in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Treadway, Michael T.; Peterman, Joel S.; Zald, David H.; Park, Sohee

    2014-01-01

    A hallmark of negative symptoms in schizophrenia is reduced motivation and goal directed behavior. While preclinical models suggest that blunted striatal dopamine levels can result in reduced motivation and goal-directed behavior, this mechanism is inconsistent with evidence for enhanced striatal dopamine levels in schizophrenia. In seeking to reconcile this discrepancy, one possibility is that negative symptoms reflect a failure of striatal motivational systems to mobilize appropriately in response to reward–related information. In the present study, we used a laboratory effort-based decision-making task in a sample of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We found that patients and controls did not differ in the overall amount of effort expenditure, but patients made significantly less optimal choices in terms of maximizing rewards. These results provide further evidence for a selective deficit in the ability of schizophrenia patients to utilize environmental cues to guide reward-seeking behavior. PMID:25487699

  19. Social interaction and drug attitude effectiveness in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jui-Kang; Lin, Wen-Kuo; Lung, For-Wey

    2011-12-01

    This study aimed to explore the relationship between dosage of paliperidone and drug attitude, and also clarify the factors associated with drug attitude, using Intention-to-Treat (ITT) analysis. Three hundred thirty-one patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, who prescribed paliperidone between April 2008 and April 2009, from 10 hospitals in Taiwan were enrolled. By structural equation modeling, inpatient/outpatient status associated with occupation status, sex, and score on the Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGIS) Scale. The score on the Personal and Social Performance (PSP) Scale associated with occupation status, inpatient/outpatient status, and the score on the CGIS Scale. The scores on the DAI-10 associated with the score on the PSP Scale and age. Good drug attitude and medication adherence significantly related to good social interaction. We should enhance the drug attitude and medication adherence of patients with schizophrenia who have poor social interaction to improve the outcome of schizophrenia.

  20. Impaired Associative Inference in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Kristan; Kose, Samet; Williams, Lisa; Woolard, Austin; Heckers, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to learn, store, and retrieve information about relationships is impaired in schizophrenia. Here, we tested 38 control and 61 schizophrenia subjects for their ability to identify the novel pairing of stimuli, based on associations learned during training. Subjects were trained on 3 sets of paired associates: 30 face-house pairs (H-F1), 30 face-house pairs (H-F2, same house with new face), and 30 face-face pairs (F3-F4). After training, participants were tested on the 3 explicitly trained pair types, as well as 30 new face-face pairs (F1-F2), which could only be linked together via the same house during the H-F1/H-F2 training blocks. Of 99 subjects tested, 37 patients with schizophrenia and 36 age-matched healthy control subjects learned the premise pairs and performed the relational memory test. Healthy control subjects were significantly more accurate in identifying the inferential (F1-F2) pairs than the noninferential (F3-F4) pairs. In contrast, schizophrenia patients were equally accurate on inferential and noninferential pairs, providing evidence for a relational memory deficit in schizophrenia. However, the current version of the associative inference paradigm, suggested by the Cognitive Neuroscience Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia initiative, has limited feasibility, calling into question the generalizability of the findings for the larger schizophrenia population. PMID:21134974

  1. Relationship Suicide, Cognitive Functions, and Depression in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    KOCATÜRK, Bülent Kenan; EŞSİZOĞLU, Altan; AKSARAY, Gökay; AKARSU, Ferdane Özlem; MUSMUL, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to compare schizophrenic patients with and without a suicide attempt history in terms of sociodemographic and clinical features and cognitive functions and to determine the predictive factors for suicide attempt history. Methods In this study, we assessed and compared 70 patients with schizophrenia, 27 patients with a suicide attempt history, and 43 patients without a suicide attempt history. The cognitive functions of patients were assessed by the Stroop test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), and Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. In order to evaluate clinical symptoms, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) were used. Results In this study, the number of hospitalizations, PANSS general psychopathology subscale score, CDSS total score, suicide item score, and WCST total number of responses (WCST1) were significantly higher among the patients with a suicide attempt history. The WCST1 and CDSS total scores were predicted using the suicide attempt history. Conclusion Revealing the factors related to suicidal behavior in patients with schizophrenia contributes to the prevention of suicide. Studies with long-term follow-up and with a larger sample group are required for the investigation of relationship suicide, cognitive impairment, which is one of the core symptoms of schizophrenia, and depression.

  2. Hospitalization and Psychosis: Influences on the Course of Cognition and Everyday Functioning in People with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Philip D.; Loewenstein, David A.; Czaja, Sara J.

    2012-01-01

    Long term institutional stay has decreased markedly in people with schizophrenia, although there are still many individuals with a history of long-term institutional stay residing in the community. In addition, although the average duration of acute admissions for schizophrenia is also decreasing, there are indications that psychotic episodes leading to acute admissions are associated with risk for cognitive and functional declines and changes in brain structure. In this paper we review the literature on cognitive changes with aging and institutionalization in schizophrenia, reaching the conclusion that the reasons for chronic institutionalization in the current include largely include severe psychosis and aggressive behavior. Thus, these factors may be the operative factor in the age-related declines in cognition and functioning reported in this population. We also present evidence to suggest that these changes may be similar to those seen in younger patients who experience repeated psychotic episodes leading to hospitalization. Our conclusion is that there is minimal evidence that hospitalization, long or short, leads to cognitive and functional changes, but rather that the reason for these hospitalizations may underlie cognitive and functional declines. Prevention of relapse and discovering treatments to assist patients with resistant symptoms may reduce the risk of cognitive and functional decline across the lifespan in people with schizophrenia. PMID:23123218

  3. Electrodermically nonresponsive schizophrenia patients make more errors in the Stroop Color Word Test, indicating selective attention deficit.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Machado, Eleomar Ziglia; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira; Zuardi, Antonio Waldo

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated whether skin conductance responsivity is associated with selective attention assessed by the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT) in schizophrenia patients. The subjects (31 schizophrenia patients and 20 patients with other psychotic diagnoses) were selected from among inpatients of a general hospital psychiatric ward or day hospital attendees. They were matched with 31 healthy volunteers. The patients began experimental sessions immediately after remission of an acute episode. The three groups of participants were subdivided according to electrodermal responsivity into nonresponsive (NR) and responsive (R) groups. After the psychophysiological recording, the SCWT was applied. Results indicated that on the SCWT, the error interference of the NR schizophrenia group was significantly higher than that of all the other groups. Furthermore, the NR schizophrenia patients had significantly more negative symptoms than the R schizophrenia patients. These results suggest that there is a homogeneous subgroup of schizophrenia patients characterized by low neurovegetative responsiveness to external stimuli, predominance of negative symptoms, and selective attention deficit.

  4. Rapid Clozapine Titration in Patients with Treatment Refractory Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, Cana Aksoy; Özdemir, Armağan; Sağlam, Nazife Gamze Usta; Turan, Şenol; Poyraz, Burç Çağrı; Tomruk, Nesrin; Duran, Alaattin

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of rapid clozapine titration in patients with schizophrenia in hospital settings. We conducted a retrospective two-center cohort study to compare the safety and effectiveness of clozapine with different titration rates in treatment-refractory patients with schizophrenia. In the first center, clozapine was started at 25-50 mg followed by 50-100 mg as needed every 6 h on day 1, followed by increases of 50-100 mg/day. In the second center, titration was slower; clozapine initiated with 12.5-50 mg on day 1 followed by increases of 25-50 mg/day. The number of days between starting of clozapine until discharge was shorter in the rapid titration group (22.4 ± 8.72 vs 27.0 ± 10.5, p = 0.1). Number of days of total hospital stay were significantly shorter in the rapid titration group (29.6 ± 10.6 vs 41.2 ± 14.8, p = 0.002). Hypotension was more common in the rapid titration group and one patient had suspected myocarditis. Rapid clozapine titration appeared safe and effective. The length of stay following initiation of clozapine was shorter in the rapid-titration group, although this was not statistically significant. However starting clozapine earlier together with rapid titration has significantly shortened the length of hospital stay in patients with treatment refractory schizophrenia.

  5. Abnormal mechanisms of antisaccade generation in schizophrenia patients and unaffected biological relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seung Suk; Dionisio, Daphne P; Sponheim, Scott R

    2011-03-01

    Although errant saccadic eye movements may mark genetic factors in schizophrenia, little is known about abnormal brain activity that precedes saccades in individuals with genetic liability for schizophrenia. We investigated electrophysiological activity preceding prosaccades and antisaccades in schizophrenia patients, first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, and control subjects. Prior to antisaccades, patients had reduced potentials over lateral prefrontal cortex. Smaller potentials were associated with worse antisaccade performance. Relatives also exhibited reduced pre-saccadic potentials over lateral frontal cortex but additionally had reduced potentials over parietal cortex. Both patients and relatives tended toward increased activity over orbital frontal cortex prior to saccades. Results are consistent with lateral prefrontal dysfunction marking genetic liability for schizophrenia and underlying deficient saccadic control. Journal compilation © 2010 Society for Psychophysiological Research. No claim to original US government works.

  6. Phonetic measures of reduced tongue movement correlate with negative symptom severity in hospitalized patients with first-episode schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Covington, Michael A; Lunden, S L Anya; Cristofaro, Sarah L; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Bailey, C Thomas; Broussard, Beth; Fogarty, Robert; Johnson, Stephanie; Zhang, Shayi; Compton, Michael T

    2012-12-01

    Aprosody, or flattened speech intonation, is a recognized negative symptom of schizophrenia, though it has rarely been studied from a linguistic/phonological perspective. To bring the latest advances in computational linguistics to the phenomenology of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, a clinical first-episode psychosis research team joined with a phonetics/computational linguistics team to conduct a preliminary, proof-of-concept study. Video recordings from a semi-structured clinical research interview were available from 47 first-episode psychosis patients. Audio tracks of the video recordings were extracted, and after review of quality, 25 recordings were available for phonetic analysis. These files were de-noised and a trained phonologist extracted a 1-minute sample of each patient's speech. WaveSurfer 1.8.5 was used to create, from each speech sample, a file of formant values (F0, F1, F2, where F0 is the fundamental frequency and F1 and F2 are resonance bands indicating the moment-by-moment shape of the oral cavity). Variability in these phonetic indices was correlated with severity of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom scores using Pearson correlations. A measure of variability of tongue front-to-back position-the standard deviation of F2-was statistically significantly correlated with the severity of negative symptoms (r=-0.446, p=0.03). This study demonstrates a statistically significant and meaningful correlation between negative symptom severity and phonetically measured reductions in tongue movements during speech in a sample of first-episode patients just initiating treatment. Further studies of negative symptoms, applying computational linguistics methods, are warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. History of religious delusions and psychosocial functioning among Mexican patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Robles-García, Rebeca; López-Luna, Sonia; Páez, Francisco; Escamilla, Raúl; Camarena, Beatriz; Fresán, Ana

    2014-12-01

    The association between global functionality and religiosity among patients from developing and predominantly Catholic countries warrants attention. To compare religiosity and psychosocial functioning in Mexican schizophrenia patients with and without a history of religious delusions, seventy-four patients with paranoid schizophrenia were recruited. Patients with a history of religious delusions had more psychiatric hospitalizations and poorer psychosocial functioning compared with those without a history of religious delusions. No differences emerged between groups in the total scores of religiosity scales. A history of religious delusions rather than religiosity itself may have an influence on psychosocial functioning among Mexican patients with schizophrenia.

  8. Counterfactual Reasoning Deficits in Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Castellví, Pere; Caño, Agnès; Benejam, Bessy

    2016-01-01

    Background Counterfactual thinking is a specific type of conditional reasoning that enables the generation of mental simulations of alternatives to past factual events. Although it has been broadly studied in the general population, research on schizophrenia is still scarce. The aim of the current study was to further examine counterfactual reasoning in this illness. Methods Forty schizophrenia patients and 40 controls completed a series of tests that assessed the influence of the “causal order effect” on counterfactual thinking, and the ability to generate counterfactual thoughts and counterfactually derive inferences from a hypothetical situation. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as neurocognitive variables, were also examined. Results Compared to controls, the schizophrenia patients generated fewer counterfactual thoughts when faced with a simulated scenario. The pattern of response when assessing the causality effect of the order was also different between the groups, with the patients being more frequently unable to attribute any ordering of events than the control subjects. Additionally, the schizophrenia patients showed more difficulties when deriving normative counterfactual inferences from hypothetical social situations. None of the counterfactual reasoning measures was associated to any of the cognitive functions or clinical and socio-demographic variables assessed. Conclusions A global impairment in counterfactual thinking characterizes schizophrenia patients. Because of the potential impact of such deficits on psychosocial functioning, targeting counterfactual reasoning for improvement might be considered in future treatment approaches. PMID:26828931

  9. Phonetic Measures of Reduced Tongue Movement Correlate with Negative Symptom Severity in Hospitalized Patients with First-Episode Schizophrenia-Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Covington, Michael A.; Lunden, S.L. Anya; Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Bailey, C. Thomas; Broussard, Beth; Fogarty, Robert; Johnson, Stephanie; Zhang, Shayi; Compton, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Aprosody, or flattened speech intonation, is a recognized negative symptom of schizophrenia, though it has rarely been studied from a linguistic/phonological perspective. To bring the latest advances in computational linguistics to the phenomenology of schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders, a clinical first-episode psychosis research team joined with a phonetics/computational linguistics team to conduct a preliminary, proof-of-concept study. Methods Video recordings from a semi-structured clinical research interview were available from 47 first-episode psychosis patients. Audio tracks of the video recordings were extracted, and after review of quality, 25 recordings were available for phonetic analysis. These files were de-noised and a trained phonologist extracted a 1-minute sample of each patient’s speech. WaveSurfer 1.8.5 was used to create, from each speech sample, a file of formant values (F0, F1, F2, where F0 is the fundamental frequency and F1 and F2 are resonance bands indicating the moment-by-moment shape of the oral cavity). Variability in these phonetic indices was correlated with severity of Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative symptom scores using Pearson correlations. Results A measure of variability of tongue front-to-back position—the standard deviation of F2—was statistically significantly correlated with the severity of negative symptoms (r=−0.446, p=0.03). Conclusion This study demonstrates a statistically significant and meaningful correlation between negative symptom severity and phonetically measured reductions in tongue movements during speech in a sample of first-episode patients just initiating treatment. Further studies of negative symptoms, applying computational linguistics methods, are warranted. PMID:23102940

  10. A mentally retarded patient with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Rabia, K; Khoo, Em

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is one of the most incapacitating forms of mental disorder that runs a chronic and relapsing course. It typically starts in adolescence or early adulthood and can be life-long. It is more common in people with learning disabilities than in the general population. Its prodromal features include depression, anxiety, suspiciousness, social isolation and bizarre behaviour. It may result in significant functional, social and economic impairments. The care of patients with schizophrenia places a considerable burden on all carers including patient's family, health and social services. Treatment includes pharmacotherapy and psychosocial interventions. In this case report we describe a thirteen-year-old patient with schizophrenia who has a background history of mental retardation.

  11. [Associated factors to quality of life of patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Souza, Leonardo Araújo de; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire

    2006-03-01

    Treatment of individuals with schizophrenia in Brazil has been gradually shifting from an almost exclusively hospital-based approach to a community-based treatment. These patients have received treatments focused less on symptoms reduction, and more on social reintegration and improvement of their life conditions. Thus, it is necessary to evaluate the quality of life of these patients living in the community. A review of studies was carried out to describe the distribution of sociodemographic and clinical factors that may influence quality of life of individuals with schizophrenia. Twenty-five studies were selected, most of them from European countries. The majority of these studies was developed in the 90's. Almost all studies were cross-sectional, and most of them evaluated samples of individuals living in the community. Sociodemographic factors, other than monthly income, were not associated to quality of life. However, some studies found associations between quality of life and gender, age, marital status and educational level. Depressive and anxiety symptoms were related to worse quality of life in several studies. Such finding was also true for negative and positive symptoms of schizophrenia, but without an homogeneous pattern. Generally, studies were not consistent regarding association between sociodemographic and clinical factors and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia. These lack of homogeneity may be due to either disease-related issues or design aspects of these studies, not adequate for causal inference.

  12. Asenapine augmentation and treatment-resistant schizophrenia in the high-secure hospital setting

    PubMed Central

    Durge, Vijay; Sengupta, Samrat; Das, Mrigendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Asenapine is a novel, recently introduced antipsychotic drug. It has a unique receptor profile and it is licensed in the UK for the treatment of bipolar-affective disorder. However, there is some evidence for its effectiveness in schizophrenia and it is licensed for schizophrenia treatment in a number of countries. Significant numbers of patients within the high-secure hospital setting suffer from treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Many patients fail to respond to adequate antipsychotic trials, and require trials of augmentation with other medications. Methods: We report on our experience of using asenapine for augmentation of other antipsychotic medications in two male patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia and histories of interpersonal violence. The patients provided informed consent to participate in this case series. Data were collected from the patients’ clinical records, incident reports and hospital medical centre records. These records were used to derive primary and secondary outcome measures. These included time spent in seclusion, verbal and physical aggression, numbers of incidents and metabolic parameters. Symptoms were rated pre- and postaugmentation using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Clinical Global Impression rating scales. Results: Both patients showed an improvement after the addition of asenapine. These improvements were characterized by a reduction in global PANSS scores, in the PANSS excitability component, a reduction in scores of violence, overall incidents and reduction in seclusion hours. Conclusions: We found asenapine to be an effective augmentation agent with other antipsychotics in both patients. Clinical improvement was noted within weeks. The case-series nature and small sample size limited our ability to draw firm conclusions from our data. However, retrospective analysis has allowed us to take a naturalistic approach that this augmentation strategy may be advantageous on an

  13. Substance abuse and the risk of readmission of people with schizophrenia at Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bimerew, M S; Sonn, F C T; Kortenbout, W P

    2007-06-01

    Frequent readmissions of people with schizophrenia pose considerable pressure on the psychiatric service provision of Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital. The purpose of the study was to ascertain factors mainly contributing to the rate of readmissions of people with schizophrenia. Descriptive survey methods and qualitative focus group interviews were employed to conduct the study. Random sampling techniques were used to select 43 respondents of people with schizophrenia from 231 people with schizophrenia who were readmitted for two or more times in the last two years and who gained access during the time of the study. Structured interviews were used for respondents of people with schizophrenia. Fourteen (N=14) family members/caregivers were selected using purposive sampling methods for focus group discussions. Quantitative data was analyzed using the SPSS Version 11.00 program and the qualitative data was analyzed by generating themes and categories. The results suggest that alcohol and khat abuse were contributing factors for the rate of readmissions of people with schizophrenia into the Amanuel Psychiatric Hospital. It was found that communities contribute to the problems of substance abuse by providing and/or selling it to those mentally ill people. The study also revealed that patients use alcohol and khat in order to tolerate the severe side effects of the anti-psychotic drugs, to suppress hunger due to shortage of food and to avoid drowsiness. Raising community awareness, psycho-education, strengthening the capacities of caretakers and laws to prevent substance abuse, as well as campaigning to prevent people from abusing mentally ill sufferers, should be established.

  14. Perception of stigmatization in forensic patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Margetić, Branimir; Aukst-Margetic, Branka; Ivanec, Dragutin; Filipcić, Igor

    2008-11-01

    The literature about perceived stigmatization of forensic patients with schizophrenia is sparse. To examine relations between the perceived stigmatization of forensic patients with schizophrenia and the intensity of the symptoms, age, regular home visiting, kind of offence, perceived family support and duration of hospitalization. Sixty-two male forensic patients with schizophrenia were included. Perceived stigmatization was measured by the modified questions from the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II. Symptomatology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Perception of family support was assessed with a visual-analogue scale. Due to different characteristics of offences and possibilities for home visiting, patients were divided into groups of those who had committed violent and non-violent offences, and those with and without the possibility of regular home visiting. Symptoms have an impact on the perception of stigma. The kind of offence committed does not have a significant role in the perception of discrimination. Age was negatively correlated with the perception of stigma. Results might have significance for a better understanding of social relations between forensic patients and their environment and provide us with information about institutionalized forms of stigma. Results might have implications for the treatment and the quality of life of these patients.

  15. Resource utilization in patients with schizophrenia who initiated risperidone long-acting therapy: results from the Schizophrenia Outcomes Utilization Relapse and Clinical Evaluation (SOURCE)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a chronic mental health disorder associated with increased hospital admissions and excessive utilization of outpatient services and long-term care. This analysis examined health care resource utilization from a 24-month observational study of patients with schizophrenia initiated on risperidone long-acting therapy (RLAT). Methods Schizophrenia Outcomes Utilization Relapse and Clinical Evaluation (SOURCE) was a 24-month observational study designed to examine real-world treatment outcomes by prospectively following patients with schizophrenia initiated on RLAT. At baseline visit, prior hospitalization and ER visit dates were obtained for the previous 12 months and subsequent hospitalization visit dates were obtained at 3-month visits, if available. The health care resource utilization outcomes measures observed in this analysis were hospitalizations for any reason, psychiatric-related hospitalizations, and emergency room (ER) visits. Incidence density analysis was used to assess pre-event and postevent rates per person-year (PY). Results The primary medical resource utilization analysis included 435 patients who had a baseline visit, ≥1 postbaseline visits after RLAT initiation, and valid hospitalization dates. The number of hospitalizations and ER visits per PY declined significantly (p < .0001) after initiation with RLAT. A 41% decrease (difference of -0.29 hospitalizations per PY [95% CI: -0.39 to -0.18] from baseline) in hospitalizations for any reason, a 56% decrease (a difference of -0.35 hospitalizations per PY [95% CI: -0.44 to -0.26] from baseline) in psychiatric-related hospitalizations, and a 40% decrease (-0.26 hospitalizations per PY [95% CI: -0.44 to -0.10] from baseline) in ER visits were observed after the baseline period. The percentage of psychiatric-related hospitalizations decreased significantly after RLAT initiation, and patients had fewer inpatient hospitalizations and ER visits (all p < .0001). Conclusion The

  16. Impaired effort allocation in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Treadway, Michael T; Peterman, Joel S; Zald, David H; Park, Sohee

    2015-02-01

    A hallmark of negative symptoms in schizophrenia is reduced motivation and goal directed behavior. While preclinical models suggest that blunted striatal dopamine levels can produce such reductions, this mechanism is inconsistent with evidence for enhanced striatal dopamine levels in schizophrenia. In seeking to reconcile this discrepancy, one possibility is that negative symptoms reflect a failure of striatal motivational systems to mobilize appropriately in response to reward-related information. In the present study, we used a laboratory effort-based decision-making task in a sample of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls to examine allocation of effort in exchange for varying levels of monetary reward. We found that patients and controls did not differ in the overall amount of effort expenditure, but patients made significantly less optimal choices in terms of maximizing rewards. These results provide further evidence for a selective deficit in the ability of schizophrenia patients to utilize environmental cues to guide reward-seeking behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cerumen impaction in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Saana, Eskelinen; Eila, Sailas; Kaisla, Joutsenniemi; Matti, Holi; Jaana, Suvisaari

    2014-07-01

    Cerumen impaction may cause hearing loss and pain. We investigated the prevalence of cerumen impaction in a population of outpatients with schizophrenia spectrum psychoses and studied factors contributing to it. As a part of our study--"The Living Conditions and Physical Health of Outpatients with Schizophrenia"--we performed a thorough medical examination including otoscopy of the ear canal for patients treated in the community mental health center of one Finnish municipality. Out of a total of 61 patients, cerumen impaction was found in 12 (19.7%). In a logistic regression model, living in a group home (OR 13.7, 95% confidence interval 3.0-64.0, p=0.0008) significantly predicted cerumen impaction. Cerumen impaction was also associated with male gender and lower GAF scores. Cerumen impaction is common in patients with schizophrenia, and is associated with low level of functioning. Diagnosis and treatment of cerumen impaction among schizophrenia patients is essential in avoiding this easily treatable cause of hearing loss and its consequences such as difficulties in cognition and social interaction.

  18. Treatment of the special patient with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Robert R.; Kelly, Deanna L.

    2001-01-01

    Special patient populations with schizophrenia have received little attention. These populations include adolescents, the elderly, substance abusers, and patients who are considered treatment-resistant. Interest in these populations is rapidly growing, especially with regard to their treatment with second-generation antipsychotics. This article describes the treatment of special patient populations and summarizes the research that has been done in this field. PMID:22034474

  19. Sexual offending and antisocial sexual behavior among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phillips, S L; Heads, T C; Taylor, P J; Hill, G M

    1999-03-01

    A number of studies have indicated excessive offending behavior among people with schizophrenia; however, sexual offending has not been widely described. This study reports on a subgroup of 15 men with schizophrenia, diagnosed according to ICD-10 guidelines, in a secure hospital who had committed sexual offenses or shown antisocial sexual behavior. A comparison group comprised 55 male patients with schizophrenia and a history of violent behavior who were being treated in the same hospitals as the study group. In 12 of the 15 cases, the sexual offending/behavior postdated illness onset and occurred in the context of psychotic symptoms. Although 12 of the offenders were known to psychiatric services, contact was erratic and only 4 were taking medication. At assessment, those with sexual offenses or antisocial sexual behavior were twice as likely as the larger study sample to report unimpaired sexual interest. This may be of particular relevance in that the group also reported difficulty in forming close personal relationships. Illness-related factors appear to make an important contribution to sexual offending by this group of patients, highlighting the need for comprehensive and vigorous treatment.

  20. Multimodal Based Classification of Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Mustafa S; Houck, Jon M.; Vergara, Victor M.; Miller, Robyn L.; Calhoun, Vince

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is currently diagnosed by physicians through clinical assessment and their evaluation of patient’s self-reported experiences over the longitudinal course of the illness. There is great interest in identifying biologically based markers at the onset of illness, rather than relying on the evolution of symptoms across time. Functional network connectivity shows promise in providing individual subject predictive power. The majority of previous studies considered the analysis of functional connectivity during resting-state using only fMRI. However, exclusive reliance on fMRI to generate such networks, may limit inference on dysfunctional connectivity, which is hypothesized to underlie patient symptoms. In this work, we propose a framework for classification of schizophrenia patients and healthy control subjects based on using both fMRI and band limited envelope correlation metrics in MEG to interrogate functional network components in the resting state. Our results show that the combination of these two methods provide valuable information that captures fundamental characteristics of brain network connectivity in schizophrenia. Such information is useful for prediction of schizophrenia patients. Classification accuracy performance was improved significantly (up to ≈ 7%) relative to only the fMRI method and (up to ≈ 21%) relative to only the MEG method. PMID:26736831

  1. Caffeine consumption in a long-term psychiatric hospital: Tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use.

    PubMed

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Armas Barbazán, Carmen; López-Moriñigo, Javier D; Ramos-Ríos, Ramón; Gurpegui, Manuel; Martínez-Ortega, José M; Jurado, Dolores; Diaz, Francisco J; de Leon, Jose

    2015-05-01

    This study further explores the association between schizophrenia and caffeine use by combining two prior published Spanish samples (250 schizophrenia outpatients and 290 controls from the general population) with two Spanish long-term inpatient samples from the same hospital (145 with schizophrenia and 64 with other severe mental illnesses). The specific aims were to establish whether or not, after controlling for confounders including tobacco smoking, the association between schizophrenia and caffeine is consistent across schizophrenia samples and across different definitions of caffeine use. The frequency of caffeine use in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than that in non-schizophrenia inpatients (77%, 111/145 vs. 75%, 48/64) or controls but was significantly higher than in schizophrenia outpatients. The frequency of high caffeine users among caffeine users in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than in non-schizophrenia inpatients (45%, 50/111 vs. 52%, 25/48) or controls, but was significantly lower than in schizophrenia outpatients. Smoking was significantly associated with caffeine use across all samples and definitions. Between 2 and 3% of schizophrenia inpatients, schizophrenia outpatients and non-schizophrenia inpatients showed caffeinism (>700 mg/day in smokers). Several of these smoking patients with caffeinism were also taking other inducers, particularly omeprazole. The lack of consistent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use is surprising when compared with the very consistent association between tobacco smoking and caffeine use across all of our analyses (use and high use in users) and all our samples. The confounding effects of tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors of admission to a high-security hospital of people with intellectual disability with and without schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Doody, G A; Thomson, L D; Miller, P; Johnstone, E C

    2000-04-01

    Admission to secure hospital facilities is a rare outcome for people with intellectual disability with or without concomitant psychosis. The present study compares people with mild intellectual disability with and without schizophrenia resident in the Scottish and Northern Irish State Hospital, Carstairs, to matched mild intellectual disability controls, also with and without schizophrenia, in the community. It is hoped that this study may identify socio-demographic, clinical or historical predictors which may lead to admission to secure hospital facilities for people with mild intellectual disability. One hundred and eight subjects were identified from two previous studies which concerned State Hospital patients and patients with intellectual disability with and without schizophrenia. Four experimental groups were derived: (1) 14 individuals with comorbid intellectual disability and schizophrenia who had been resident in the State Hospital; (2) 34 comorbid community control subjects; (3) 33 individuals with intellectual disability and no psychosis who had been resident in the State Hospital; and (4) 27 community control subjects with mild intellectual disability. The four groups were compared on a range of socio-demographic, historical and clinical variables obtained from case records and subject interviews. Relative to community controls, people with intellectual disability and no psychosis in the State Hospital are likely to be single, to have a later age of first psychiatric hospital admission, and to have a history of previous suicide attempts, alcohol abuse or drug misuse. Subjects with comorbid intellectual disability and schizophrenia in the State Hospital are more likely to be male, to have an early age of first psychiatric admission, and to have no family history of either schizophrenia or intellectual disability. Strategies aimed at addressing suicidal behaviour, alcohol and drug misuse amongst people with intellectual disability may facilitate a

  3. NONVERBAL DELAYED RECOGNITION IN THE RELATIVES OF SCHIZOPHRENIA PATIENTS WITH OR WITHOUT SCHIZOPHRENIA SPECTRUM

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Olalla; Blaxton, Teresa; Adami, Helene; Arango, Celso; Thaker, Gunvant; Gold, James

    2009-01-01

    Background There is increased interest in the study of cognitive deficits as possible endophenotypic markers for schizophrenia. The main goal of this study was to determine how familiality and schizophrenia spectrum personality symptomatology are related to performance of auditory and visuospatial delayed recognition memory tasks. Methods The study sample consisted of 162 subjects divided into five groups. The groups included 39 patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder, first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, 22 with and 31 without schizophrenia spectrum personality traits, and healthy controls with no family history of psychosis, 22 with and 48 without schizophrenia spectrum traits. Auditory and visuospatial delayed recognition memory performance was assessed. Results Significant differences were observed between patients and healthy controls in both auditory [F1,79=7.358 p=.008] and visual [F1,47=34.67, p<.001] delayed recognition tasks. When comparing the four non-patient groups, auditory and visuospatial discriminability decreased as a function of familiality of schizophrenia (p<0.05). Deficits were more pronounced in relatives with schizophrenia spectrum traits [auditory d=0.7114; visual d = .0199]. Conclusions A biological relationship to schizophrenia increases the likelihood of impaired delayed recognition memory. Likewise, poorer performance is associated with schizophrenia spectrum phenotype only when combined with familiality. PMID:17916332

  4. Nonverbal delayed recognition in the relatives of schizophrenia patients with or without schizophrenia spectrum.

    PubMed

    Robles, Olalla; Blaxton, Teresa; Adami, Helene; Arango, Celso; Thaker, Gunvant; Gold, James

    2008-03-01

    There is increased interest in the study of cognitive deficits as possible endophenotypic markers for schizophrenia. The main goal of this study was to determine how familiality and schizophrenia spectrum personality symptomatology are related to performance of auditory and visuospatial delayed recognition memory tasks. The study sample consisted of 162 subjects divided into five groups. The groups included 39 patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizophreniform disorder; first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients, 22 with and 31 without schizophrenia spectrum personality traits; and healthy control subjects with no family history of psychosis, 22 with and 48 without schizophrenia spectrum traits. Auditory and visuospatial delayed recognition memory performance was assessed. Significant differences were observed between patients and healthy control subjects in both auditory [F(1,79) = 7.358 p = .008] and visual [F(1,47) = 34.67, p < .001] delayed recognition tasks. When comparing the four non-patient groups, auditory and visuospatial discriminability decreased as a function of familiality of schizophrenia (p < .05). Deficits were more pronounced in relatives with schizophrenia spectrum traits [auditory d = .7114; visual d = 1.0199]. A biological relationship to schizophrenia increases the likelihood of impaired delayed recognition memory. Likewise, poorer performance is associated with schizophrenia spectrum phenotype only when combined with familiality.

  5. Help-seeking Behaviors Among Caregivers of Schizophrenia and other Psychotic Patients: A Hospital-based Study in Two Geographically and Culturally Distinct Indian Cities

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Sujit Kumar; Pattanayak, Sanjay; Gupta, Chandra Shekhar; Pattanayak, Raman Deep

    2012-01-01

    Background: India is a country of several diversities and cultures, which may influence the help-seeking behavior of mentally ill patients and families. Only a few Indian studies have focused on help seeking, especially for severe mental disorders. Objective: The study aimed to describe and compare the help-seeking behaviors among caregivers of psychotic patients visiting psychiatric clinics at two distinct cities of India. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional exploratory study of key caregivers (N=50) of patients with a DSM-IV TR diagnosis of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, visiting psychiatric out-patient departments of VIMHANS, New Delhi, and CIMS, Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh. After due informed consent was taken, a semi-structured proforma was administered for socio-demographic profile, illness details, causative beliefs, and information on help seeking. Results: Supernatural forces were held responsible by 40% of the Bilaspur sample in contrast to 8% in New Delhi sample. Faith-healers were initial contacts for 56% and 64% of sample, respectively, at New Delhi and Bilaspur. Faith-healers followed by a psychiatrist formed the commonest pathway of care at both centers (32% and 36%, respectively). The sample at New Delhi spent significantly more money (median: $4000 vs. $10) and traveled greater distances (median: 35 km vs. 10 km) for faith-healers during the course of illness. Two-thirds of sample in New Delhi and one-third at Bilaspur were aware of the nearby psychiatrist at the time of initial help seeking; however, only 28% and 12%, respectively, chose psychiatrist as an initial contact. The New Delhi sample reported a fear of medication adverse effects and stigma as perceived disadvantages of psychiatric help. The median time lost at both the centers was 1 month, with a maximum of 8.4 years in New Delhi and 4.9 years in Bilaspur. Of the total, 16% caregivers at New Delhi and 32% at Bilaspur center reported an intention to continue with

  6. Time course of inhibition and facilitation in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Salo, Ruth; Henik, Avishai; Nordahl, Thomas E; Robertson, Lynn C

    2002-11-01

    Negative priming (NP) paradigms have been used extensively to understand the nature and time course of inhibitory deficits in patient populations. A majority of these studies have reported abnormal NP effects, with patients showing faster reaction times on NP sequences compared to the slowing displayed by controls. A Stroop NP task was employed to measure immediate (within-trial) attentional processing as well as the sustainment (between-trial) of these processes in 12 medicated schizophrenia inpatients and 13 matched controls. Two response stimulus intervals (RSIs) were presented (500 ms and 2000 ms). Within-trial Stroop effects (interference and facilitation) and between-trial priming effects (negative and positive priming) were measured. Clinical symptomatology and duration of illness were also examined. At short RSIs of 500 ms, chronically ill state hospital schizophrenia patients failed to exhibit NP. In contrast, the control subjects exhibited normal NP at the short RSI but this priming faded at the long 2000 ms RSI and was no longer significant. The facilitatory priming effects remained stable across time in both groups. These results suggest that schizophrenia patients are better able to inhibit irrelevant stimuli that are immediate, but the sustainment of inhibition across very short time intervals (500 ms) may fade compared to controls.

  7. Impact of short-term temperature variability on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia stratified by season of birth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Desheng; Zhang, Xulai; Xu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jian; Xie, Mingyu; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Shusi; Li, Kesheng; Yang, Huihui; Wen, Liying; Wang, Xu; Su, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature change between neighboring days (TCN) are important meteorological indicators closely associated with global climate change. However, up to date, there have been no studies addressing the impacts of both DTR and TCN on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia. We conducted a time-series analysis to assess the relationship between temperature variability and daily schizophrenia onset in Hefei, an inland city in southeast China. Daily meteorological data and emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia from 2005 to 2014 in Hefei were collected. After stratifying by season of birth, Poisson generalized linear regression combined with distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was used to examine the relationship between temperature variability and schizophrenia, adjusting for long-term trend and seasonality, mean temperature, and relative humidity. Our analysis revealed that extreme temperature variability may increase the risk for schizophrenia onset among patients born in spring, while no such association was found in patients born in summer and autumn. In patients born in spring, the relative risks of extremely high DTR comparing the 95th and 99th percentiles with the reference (50th, 10 °C) at 3-day lag were 1.078 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.025-1.135) and 1.159 (95 % CI 1.050-1.279), respectively. For TCN effects, only comparing 99th percentile with reference (50th, 0.7 °C) was significantly associated with emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) 1.111, 95 % CI 1.002-1.231). This study suggested that exposure to extreme temperature variability in short-term may trigger later days of schizophrenia onset for patients born in spring, which may have important implications for developing intervention strategies to prevent large temperature variability exposure.

  8. Impact of short-term temperature variability on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia stratified by season of birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Desheng; Zhang, Xulai; Xu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jian; Xie, Mingyu; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Shusi; Li, Kesheng; Yang, Huihui; Wen, Liying; Wang, Xu; Su, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature change between neighboring days (TCN) are important meteorological indicators closely associated with global climate change. However, up to date, there have been no studies addressing the impacts of both DTR and TCN on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia. We conducted a time-series analysis to assess the relationship between temperature variability and daily schizophrenia onset in Hefei, an inland city in southeast China. Daily meteorological data and emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia from 2005 to 2014 in Hefei were collected. After stratifying by season of birth, Poisson generalized linear regression combined with distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was used to examine the relationship between temperature variability and schizophrenia, adjusting for long-term trend and seasonality, mean temperature, and relative humidity. Our analysis revealed that extreme temperature variability may increase the risk for schizophrenia onset among patients born in spring, while no such association was found in patients born in summer and autumn. In patients born in spring, the relative risks of extremely high DTR comparing the 95th and 99th percentiles with the reference (50th, 10 °C) at 3-day lag were 1.078 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.025-1.135) and 1.159 (95 % CI 1.050-1.279), respectively. For TCN effects, only comparing 99th percentile with reference (50th, 0.7 °C) was significantly associated with emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) 1.111, 95 % CI 1.002-1.231). This study suggested that exposure to extreme temperature variability in short-term may trigger later days of schizophrenia onset for patients born in spring, which may have important implications for developing intervention strategies to prevent large temperature variability exposure.

  9. Impact of short-term temperature variability on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia stratified by season of birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Desheng; Zhang, Xulai; Xu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Jian; Xie, Mingyu; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Shusi; Li, Kesheng; Yang, Huihui; Wen, Liying; Wang, Xu; Su, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Diurnal temperature range (DTR) and temperature change between neighboring days (TCN) are important meteorological indicators closely associated with global climate change. However, up to date, there have been no studies addressing the impacts of both DTR and TCN on emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia. We conducted a time-series analysis to assess the relationship between temperature variability and daily schizophrenia onset in Hefei, an inland city in southeast China. Daily meteorological data and emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia from 2005 to 2014 in Hefei were collected. After stratifying by season of birth, Poisson generalized linear regression combined with distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM) was used to examine the relationship between temperature variability and schizophrenia, adjusting for long-term trend and seasonality, mean temperature, and relative humidity. Our analysis revealed that extreme temperature variability may increase the risk for schizophrenia onset among patients born in spring, while no such association was found in patients born in summer and autumn. In patients born in spring, the relative risks of extremely high DTR comparing the 95th and 99th percentiles with the reference (50th, 10 °C) at 3-day lag were 1.078 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.025-1.135) and 1.159 (95 % CI 1.050-1.279), respectively. For TCN effects, only comparing 99th percentile with reference (50th, 0.7 °C) was significantly associated with emergency hospital admissions for schizophrenia (relative risk (RR) 1.111, 95 % CI 1.002-1.231). This study suggested that exposure to extreme temperature variability in short-term may trigger later days of schizophrenia onset for patients born in spring, which may have important implications for developing intervention strategies to prevent large temperature variability exposure.

  10. Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Felmet, Kandi; Zisook, Sidney; Kasckow, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Background The treatment of older patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms poses many challenges for clinicians. Current classifications of depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia include: Major Depressive Episodes that occur in patients with schizophrenia and are not classified as schizoaffective disorder, Schizoaffective Disorder, and Schizophrenia with subsyndromal depression in which depressive symptoms do not meet criteria for Major Depression. Research indicates that the presence of any of these depressive symptoms negatively impacts the lives of patients suffering from schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review the literature related to older patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and co-occurring depressive symptoms, and to guide mental health professionals to better understand the diagnosis and treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Conclusions The treatment of elderly patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms includes first reassessing the diagnosis to make sure symptoms are not due to a comorbid condition, metabolic problems or medications. If these are ruled out, pharmacological agents in combination with psychosocial interventions are important treatments for older patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms. A careful assessment of each patient is needed in order to determine which antipsychotic would be optimal for their care; second-generation antipsychotics are the most commonly used antipsychotics. Augmentation with an antidepressant medication can be helpful for the elderly patient with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms. More research with pharmacologic and psychosocial interventions is needed, however, to better understand how to treat this population of elderly patients. PMID:21177241

  11. Patient education in schizophrenia: a review.

    PubMed

    Merinder, L B

    2000-08-01

    To identify and analyse methodology and results of studies of patient education in schizophrenia. A literature search was made in the databases Medline, Excerpta Medica, Psychlit and Cinahl. Most studies demonstrate that knowledge and compliance can be improved by educational interventions. Compliance seems to be most readily influenced by interventions including behavioural components. A few studies indicate that relapse and symptomatology can be influenced by educational interventions as well. No influence of the duration of interventions was found. Where educability is studied, age, medication and level of symptoms are potential predictors. Due to methodological limitations and insufficient reporting the results of available studies on patient education in schizophrenia are far from conclusive. The demonstration of the efficacy of patient education in improving knowledge and compliance is most consistent.

  12. RISPERIDONE IN INDIAN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, A.K.; Bashyam, V.S.P; Channabasavanna, S.M.; Dhavale, H.S.; Khan, M.A.M.; Khanna, Sumant; Pradhan, P.V.; Katiyar, M.; Rajkumar, R.; Niazi, Faiz R.; Jalali, R.K.; Gowrishankar, R.; Mishra, S.K.; Sood, O.P.

    1998-01-01

    Conventional antipsychotic agents are not effective against negative symptoms of schizophrenia and are also noted for their extrapyramidal side effects. Risperidone is a noval antipsychotic agent whose dual antagonism of dopamine and serotonin receptors is believed to underlie its efficacy against negative symptoms and the low incidence of extrapyramidal side effects. An open, non-comparative study of seven weeks duration was performed to evaluate risperidone in the treatment of schizophrenia in Indian patients. Previous antipsychotic therapy was discontinued for a week before risperidone therapy was initiated. At the end of six weeks of risperidone therapy, clinical improvement (≥ 20% reduction in total score on positive and negative syndrome scale for schizophrenia (PANSS;; was shown by 128 (87.7%) of the 146 evaluable patients. Statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) occurred in the total score of this scale and in the subscale scores for positive, negative and general psychopathology symptoms and in the clinical global impression severity score. The number of patients with adverse experiences were 108 (65.5%) at baseline and 120 (72.7%) at the end of risperidone therapy. Extrapyramidal symptoms, seen in 65 (39.4%) patients compared to 22 (13.3%) patients at baseline, were largely mild to moderate in intensity. PMID:21494480

  13. Association of Toxoplasma gondii infection with schizophrenia and its relationship with suicide attempts in these patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari-Lari, Maryam; Farashbandi, Hassan; Mohammadi, Fahimeh

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between schizophrenia and Toxoplasma gondii, and to assess the association of infection with suicide attempts and age of onset of schizophrenia in these patients. Case-control study Fars Province, southern Iran. Cases were individuals with psychiatric diagnosis of schizophrenia as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria. Controls were healthy blood donors, frequency-matched with patients according to age and sex. For the detection of IgG antibodies, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used. Data about demographic information in all subjects and duration of illness and history of suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia were collected using a brief questionnaire and hospital records. Chi-square test and multivariable logistic regression were used for statistical analyses. Among 99 cases, 42 individuals (42%) were positive for T. gondii antibody, vs. 41 (27%) among 152 controls (OR = 2, 95% CI: 1.2-3.4, P = 0.012). We compared the suicide attempts in patients with schizophrenia based on their T. gondii serologic status. There was a lower rate of suicide attempts in seropositive male patients than seronegative ones (OR = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-0.97, P = 0.04). Age of onset of schizophrenia did not differ between T. gondii-infected and non-infected patients. These findings may have implications for schizophrenia and suicide prevention programmes. However, clearly further studies are required to confirm them. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. [Risk factors related to homicide in Moroccan patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Kachouchi, A; Sebbani, M; Salim, S; Adali, I; Manoudi, F; Amine, M; Asri, F

    2017-09-01

    Persons with schizophrenia are thought to be at increased risk of committing violent crime - 4 to 6 times the level of general population individuals without this disorder. The relationship between schizophrenia and homicide is complex and cannot be reduced to a simple causal link. The objectives of this study were to describe the characteristics of homicide in Moroccan patients suffering from schizophrenia and to determine the correlated sociodemographic, clinical and toxic variables. The study included two groups of patients with a DSM IV diagnosis of schizophrenia who attended the "Ibn Nafis" university psychiatric hospital of Marrakech in Morocco. The first group was composed of 30 patients hospitalized for homicide in the forensic unit between 1 January 2005 and 31 August 2015. The second group included 90 patients without any criminal record. These two groups have been matched according to age and gender. Demographic, clinical and therapeutic variables were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Data analysis has objectified the following results: the mean of age in the first group was 37.03 (±9.09) and in the second group was 31.4 (±8.76). No significant differences were found between the two groups regarding the different sociodemographic variables and the age of onset of disease. Significant differences were found between the two groups regarding: personal antecedents of attempt of homicide (P=0.003), personal antecedents of attempt of suicide (P<0.001), a history of previous violence (P=0.005), untreated psychosis before the act (P<0.001), poor medication compliance and a low familial support (P<0.001), antisocial behavior (P<0.001) and addictive behavior (P=0.005). Several studies identified some possible predictor factors for violent behavior: poor compliance, lack of insight impulsivity and paranoid-hallucinatory symptoms, systematized delusions and addictive behavior seem to considerably increase the risk of turning to violence. Demographic

  15. Efficacy, safety, and impact on hospitalizations of paliperidone palmitate in recent-onset schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Si, Tianmei; Chiou, Chiun-Fang; Harris, Anthony WF; Kim, Chang Yoon; Jahagirdar, Padmashree; Ascher, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and impact on hospitalizations of long-acting injectable paliperidone palmitate (PP) treatment, in patients with recent-onset schizophrenia who had not responded satisfactorily to oral antipsychotics. Methods In this 18-month, open-label, Phase-IIIb study from Asia-Pacific region, patients (18–50 years) with recent-onset (≤5 years) schizophrenia unsatisfactorily treated with previous oral antipsychotics were initiated on PP 150 mg eq on day 1, 100 mg eq on day 8, followed by flexible once monthly maintenance doses of 50–150 mg eq. The number and duration of hospitalizations were compared using a mirror analysis method between two periods: retrospective (12 months before PP initiation) and prospective (12 and 18 months after PP treatment) periods. Results A total of 303 out of 521 (58%) patients (mean age, 28.7 years; 65.5% men, 92.5% Asian) completed the study. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score improved significantly from baseline to month 18 (mean [standard deviation, SD] change: −11.3 [21.38], P<0.0001, primary endpoint). Subgroup analysis revealed greater improvements among patients with worse disease severity at baseline: PANSS ≥70 versus <70 (mean [SD] change: −23.1 [24.62] vs −4.7 [15.98], P<0.0001 each). Secondary efficacy endpoints such as Clinical Global Impression of Schizophrenia (CGI-SCH), Medication Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ) scores showed significant improvements (P<0.0001) from baseline; 33.3% patients achieved symptom remission. In mirror analyses set (N=474), PP significantly (P<0.0001) reduced mean number of hospitalization days/person/year (12-month: 74.3 vs 19.7; 18-month: 74.3 vs 18.9) as well as percentage of patients requiring hospitalization in past 12 months (12-month: 39.7% vs 24.6%; 18-month: 39.7% vs 25%), and PP treatment increased the proportion of patients not requiring hospitalization (12-month: 60.3% vs 75.4%; 18-month: 60.3% vs 75%) from

  16. Smaller than expected cognitive deficits in schizophrenia patients from the population-representative ABC catchment cohort.

    PubMed

    Lennertz, Leonhard; An der Heiden, Wolfram; Kronacher, Regina; Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Maier, Wolfgang; Häfner, Heinz; Wagner, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Most neuropsychological studies on schizophrenia suffer from sample selection bias, with male and chronic patients being overrepresented. This probably leads to an overestimation of cognitive impairments. The present study aimed to provide a less biased estimate of cognitive functions in schizophrenia using a population-representative catchment area sample. Schizophrenia patients (N = 89) from the prospective Mannheim ABC cohort were assessed 14 years after disease onset and first diagnosis, using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. A healthy control group (N = 90) was carefully matched according to age, gender, and geographic region (city, rural surrounds). The present sample was representative for the initial ABC cohort. In the comprehensive neuropsychological assessment, the schizophrenia patients were only moderately impaired as compared to the healthy control group (d = 0.56 for a general cognitive index, d = 0.42 for verbal memory, d = 0.61 for executive functions, d = 0.69 for attention). Only 33 % of the schizophrenia patients scored one standard deviation unit below the healthy control group in the general cognitive index. Neuropsychological performance did not correlate with measures of the clinical course including age at onset, number of hospital admissions, and time in paid work. Thus, in this population-representative sample of schizophrenia patients, neuropsychological deficits were less pronounced than expected from meta-analyses. In agreement with other epidemiological studies, this suggests a less devastating picture of cognition in schizophrenia.

  17. Seropositivity and serointensity of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies and DNA among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Omar, Ainsah; Bakar, Osman Che; Adam, Nor Fatini; Osman, Hakim; Osman, Arina; Suleiman, Ahmad Hatim; Manaf, Mohd Rizal Abdul; Selamat, Mohd Ikhsan

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this cross sectional case control study was to examine the serofrequency and serointensity of Toxoplasma gondii (Tg) IgG, IgM, and DNA among patients with schizophrenia. A total of 101 patients with schizophrenia and 55 healthy controls from Sungai Buloh Hospital, Selangor, Malaysia and University Malaya Medical Center (UMMC) were included in this study. The diagnosis of schizophrenia was made based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). The presence of Tg infection was examined using both indirect (ELISA) and direct (quantitative real-time PCR) detection methods by measuring Tg IgG and IgM and DNA, respectively. The serofrequency of Tg IgG antibodies (51.5%, 52/101) and DNA (32.67%, 33/101) among patients with schizophrenia was significantly higher than IgG (18.2%, 10/55) and DNA (3.64%, 2/55) of the controls (IgG, P=0.000, OD=4.8, CI=2.2-10.5; DNA, P=0.000, OD=12.9, CI=2.17-10.51). However, the Tg IgM antibody between patients with schizophrenia and controls was not significant (P>0.005). There was no significant difference (P>0.005) in both serointensity of Tg IgG and DNA between patients with schizophrenia and controls. These findings have further demonstrated the strong association between the active Tg infection and schizophrenia.

  18. Burden of relatives and predictors of burden. Baseline results from the Munich 5-year-follow-up study on relatives of first hospitalized patients with schizophrenia or depression.

    PubMed

    Möller-Leimkühler, Anne Maria

    2005-08-01

    In the present study, part of the Munich 5-year follow-up study on key relatives of first-hospitalized schizophrenic and depressive patients, baseline results with respect to relatives' burden and predictors of burden are presented. Basing on a transactional stress model the following hypothesis was tested: the impact of the patients' illness on their relatives' stress outcome is moderated by the psychosocial resources of the relatives. Stress outcome was measured in terms of objective and subjective burden, well-being, self-rated symptoms and global satisfaction with life. Potential moderating variables included age and gender, generalized stress response and illness-related coping strategies, beliefs of control,perceived social support,personality factors, expressed emotion and life stressors. A total of 83 relatives, whose ill family members had been hospitalized in the Department of Psychiatry of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich for the first time, participated in the study. Findings did not entirely support the hypothesis. On the one hand, relatives' stress outcome was independent of the objective stressors (severity of the illness, kind of symptoms, level of psychosocial functioning at admission). On the other hand, burden was significantly associated with several psychosocial resources and dispositions of the relatives. Multivariate linear regression analyses indicated that expressed emotion, emotion-focused coping strategies and generalized negative stress response are the most relevant predictors of burden. It is argued that a multidimensional approach in burden assessment is necessary and has relevant implications for improving family intervention strategies.

  19. Schizophrenia relapse, patient considerations, and potential role of lurasidone

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    When treating persons with schizophrenia, delaying time to relapse is a main goal. Antipsychotic medication has been the primary treatment approach, and there are a variety of different choices available. Lurasidone is a second-generation (atypical) antipsychotic agent that is approved for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar depression. Three long-term studies of lurasidone have examined time to relapse in persons with schizophrenia, including a classic placebo-controlled randomized withdrawal study and two 12-month active comparator studies (vs risperidone and vs quetiapine extended-release). Lurasidone 40–80 mg/d evidenced superiority over placebo (number needed to treat [NNT] vs placebo for relapse, 9). Lurasidone 40–160 mg/d was noninferior to quetiapine extended-release 200–800 mg/d on the outcome of relapse, and was superior on the outcome of avoidance of hospitalization (NNT 8) and the outcome of remission (NNT 7). Lurasidone demonstrated a lower risk for long-term weight gain than the active comparators. Demonstrated differences in tolerability profiles among the different choices of antipsychotics make it possible to attempt to match up an individual patient to the best choice for such patient based on past history of tolerability, comorbidities, and personal preferences, potentially improving adherence. PMID:27563237

  20. [Maintenance Treatment With Antipsychotics for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness and security of the antipsychotics available for the management of adult patients with schizophrenia in the maintenance phase. To develop recommendations of treatment for the maintenance phase of the disease. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. 18 studies were included to evaluate the effectiveness and / or safety of different antipsychotic drugs first and second generation. Overall, antipsychotics (AP) showed superiority over placebo in relapse rate over 12 months (RR 0.59 95% CI 0.42, 0.82) and hospitalization rate over 24 months of follow-up (RR 0.38 95% 0.27, 0.55); its use is associated with increased risk of treatment dropout (RR 0.53 95% CI 0.46, 0.61) and adverse events such as weight gain, dystonia, extrapyramidal symptoms and sedation. There was no difference in the outcome of re hospitalizations, comparisons on quality of life, negative symptoms or weight gain between AP first and second generation. Continuous or standard dose regimens appear to be superior to intermittent or low doses in reducing the risk of abandonment of treatment regimes. Adult patients diagnosed with schizophrenia should receive maintenance treatment with antipsychotics. The medication of choice will depend on the management of the acute phase, the patient's tolerance to it and the presentation of adverse events. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Comorbidities and risk factors among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Charles, Janice; Britt, Helena

    2015-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) are charged with maintaining a holistic approach to their patients' health. While most patients with schizophrenia attend public mental health services and/or non-government organisations supporting people with mental illness, 88.2% of people with a psychotic illness (the majority being schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder) had visited a GP in the previous year. For at least 30-40% of people living with schizophrenia in Australia, ongoing management is provided by their GP alone. Moreover, there is evidence that patients with schizophrenia value the help provided by GPs. Patients with schizophrenia have reduced life expectancy. Overseas research (primarily from the UK and US) has found that the poor physical health of patients with schizophrenia can be attributed to a number of factors such as modifiable lifestyle risk factors and side effects of medication, compounded by causes intrinsic to the illness such as mental stress and loss of initiative.

  2. [Face recognition in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Doi, Hirokazu; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that patients with schizophrenia show severe deficiencies in social communication skills. These deficiencies are believed to be partly derived from abnormalities in face recognition. However, the exact nature of these abnormalities exhibited by schizophrenic patients with respect to face recognition has yet to be clarified. In the present paper, we review the main findings on face recognition deficiencies in patients with schizophrenia, particularly focusing on abnormalities in the recognition of facial expression and gaze direction, which are the primary sources of information of others' mental states. The existing studies reveal that the abnormal recognition of facial expression and gaze direction in schizophrenic patients is attributable to impairments in both perceptual processing of visual stimuli, and cognitive-emotional responses to social information. Furthermore, schizophrenic patients show malfunctions in distributed neural regions, ranging from the fusiform gyrus recruited in the structural encoding of facial stimuli, to the amygdala which plays a primary role in the detection of the emotional significance of stimuli. These findings were obtained from research in patient groups with heterogeneous characteristics. Because previous studies have indicated that impairments in face recognition in schizophrenic patients might vary according to the types of symptoms, it is of primary importance to compare the nature of face recognition deficiencies and the impairments of underlying neural functions across sub-groups of patients.

  3. The Relationship between Cognitive Decline and Psychopathology in Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Moon-Doo; Seo, Hye-Jin; Yun, Hyunju; Jung, Young-Eun; Park, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Chang-In; Moon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seong-Chul; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The primary goals of the present study were to assess intellectual function in participants with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (BD) and to investigate the relationships between cognitive decline and the severity of each type of psychopathology. Methods The present study included 51 patients with schizophrenia and 42 with BD who were recruited from the psychiatry outpatient clinic of Jeju University Hospital between March 2011 and March 2014. The Korean Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (K-WAIS) was administered to each of the 93 participants, and they were categorized into two groups based on their current intelligence quotient (IQ) and their estimated premorbid IQ: severely impaired group (SIG) and mildly impaired group (MIG). The Minnesota Multiple Personality Inventory (MMPI) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used to assess psychopathology. Results The SIG schizophrenia participants exhibited significantly higher scores on the frequent (F) and schizophrenia (Sc) subscales of the MMPI, but significantly lower scores on the correction (K) and psychopathic deviate (Pd) subscales compared with the MIG schizophrenia participants. Furthermore, the BPRS scores were significantly higher in the SIG schizophrenia participants relative to the MIG schizophrenia participants. The SIG BD participants had significantly higher F, masculinity-femininity (Mf), paranoia (Pa), and Sc but significantly lower Pd scores compared with the MIG BD participants. Conclusion The present findings revealed a significant discrepancy between the estimated premorbid levels of cognitive function and current cognitive function in participants with schizophrenia or BD. Moreover, this discrepancy was correlated with severity of psychopathology in both groups. PMID:25912543

  4. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  5. [Determination of cadmium level in passive tobacco smokers schizophrenia patients].

    PubMed

    Kleszczewska, Ewa; Hejza, Jolanta; Kleszczewski, Tomasz

    2006-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a long-term illness which concerns 1.4% of human population. It has been known as periodical or continuous, emotional or social disorder and it could cause substantial mental disability often leading to suicidal behavior or various other life threatening situations. Schizophrenic patients can not be classified as a homogenous group. The differences are caused by various psychopathological symptoms, different course of illness and different reactions to neuroleptic drugs among patients. Often these differences as well as connections with patients characteristics and symptoms of illness suggest the common name to the illness as "schizophrenia group" which includes mental illness of various etiopatogenesis and different psychobiological basis. Schizophrenia patients belong to the group of highest level of dependency on nicotine. It has been found that dependency on nicotine in this group is 1.5-2 times higher than in general population. Modern pharmacology started in 1952 when chlorpromazine was given for the first time to the mentally ill patients in St. Anne hospital in Paris. This breakthrough allowed mentally ill patients keep on undertaking treatments outside the hospital. The possibility of getting significant improvement in treatment of incurable, until now, illness paved the way for changes in general opinion about mental illness, particularly schizophrenia. Derivate of phenothiazine have been the oldest and most frequently used psychotropic drugs in Poland. They belong to the most numerous group of heterocyclic organic compounds which contains an aromatic triple-ring complex with atoms of sulfur and nitrogen. Therapeutic monitoring of drugs started at the end of sixties. Necessity of individualization of drugs in order to keep effectiveness and safety on proper level was an immediate answer to differences in intensity of pharmacological reaction to the drugs dosages among patients. Therapeutic monitoring is a method which anticipates a

  6. Methamphetamine enhances the development of schizophrenia in first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Huabing; Lu, Qiong; Xiao, Enhua; Li, Qiuyun; He, Zhong; Mei, Xilong

    2014-02-01

    Although there is some evidence that methamphetamine (MA) abuse may play a causative role in the development of schizophrenia, studies directly linking these 2 are rare. In our study, the effect of MA abuse on the development of schizophrenia was investigated in 15 MA abusers who are offspring of patients with schizophrenia and 15 siblings of MA abusers without a history of drug abuse. Cognitive deficits and resting-state brain function were evaluated in all participants. Correlations between cognitive deficits and schizophrenia development were investigated. Significantly more cognitive impairments were observed in MA abusers, compared with their siblings without a history of drug use. Significant abnormalities in regional homogeneity (ReHo) signals were observed in resting brain in MA abusers. Decreased ReHo was found to be distributed over the bilateral cingulate gyrus, right Brodmann area 24, and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex. Seven MA abusers were diagnosed with schizophrenia, while 1 control sibling was diagnosed with schizophrenia during the 5-year follow-up. The cognitive scores correlated with the development of schizophrenia in MA abusers. Our study provides direct evidence for the causative role of MA use in the etiology of schizophrenia and highlights the role of MA-induced brain abnormalities in cognitive deficiency and development of schizophrenia.

  7. Long-term effect of prefrontal lobotomy on verbal fluency in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Stip, Emmanuel; Bigras, Marie-Josée; Mancini-Marïe, Adham; Cosset, Marie-Eve; Black, Deborah; Lecours, André-Roch

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated the long-term effects of bilateral prefrontal leukotomy on lexical abilities in schizophrenia subjects. we compared performances of leukotomized (LSP), non-leukotomized schizophrenia patients (NLSP) and normal controls, using a test of verbal fluency. Multiple case and triple comparison design were implemented. i.e., the performance of each LSP was compared to that of NLSP and that of a normal control. The sample consisted of four LSP, four NLSP, and four normal subjects. Subjects were matched in sex, age, handedness, and schooling. In Addition, schizophrenia groups were matched in diagnosis and years of hospitalization. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of generated words and errors produced by subjects were carried out. A deficiency in both groups of schizophrenia was observed, although a better performance in LSP patients was detected. Intact Lexical ability in LSP indicates its poor relation to the frontal lobe.

  8. Is dietary pattern of schizophrenia patients different from healthy subjects?

    PubMed Central

    Amani, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Background There are limited findings about dietary patterns and food preferences among patients suffering from schizophrenia. The main objective of this study was therefore to compare the nutritional pattern of schizophrenia patients with that of matched healthy subjects. Methods The dietary pattern of 30 hospitalized 16–67 years old schizophrenic patients (11 female) was compared with that of 30 healthy age and sex matched individuals as control group. Subjects' anthropometric measurements including weight, height and body mass index (BMI), semi-quantitative food frequency (FFQ), medical and food history questionnaires were also collected and FFQs were then scored using Food Guide Pyramid to obtain the dietary scores. Percent body fat (%BF) was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) method. Results Female patients had more %BF and lower dietary pattern scores than that of their controls (32 ± 3.6 vs 27.7 ± 4.6 percent and 43.2 ± 11.9 vs 54.5 ± 10.7 points; respectively, p < 0.05 for both). They also consumed less milk and dairy products, fresh vegetables, fruits, chicken, and nuts compared with the female controls (p < 0.03). However, these patients used to eat more full-fat cream and carbonated drinks (p < 0.05). Male patients had lower BMI (22 ± 4.7 vs 25.6 ± 4.4; p < 0.05) than their counterpart controls but there was no significant difference between their %BFs. Moreover, they used to have more full-fat cream, hydrogenated fats, less red meat and nuts compared with the male controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion Schizophrenia patients have poor nutritional patterns. In particular, female patients have more percent body fat and lower dietary pattern scores compared with their healthy controls. All patients used to consume more fats and sweet drinks frequently. The findings of this study suggest that schizophrenia patients need specific medical nutrition therapies through limiting dietary fats and sugars intakes and weight control. Whether

  9. Is dietary pattern of schizophrenia patients different from healthy subjects?

    PubMed

    Amani, Reza

    2007-05-02

    There are limited findings about dietary patterns and food preferences among patients suffering from schizophrenia. The main objective of this study was therefore to compare the nutritional pattern of schizophrenia patients with that of matched healthy subjects. The dietary pattern of 30 hospitalized 16-67 years old schizophrenic patients (11 female) was compared with that of 30 healthy age and sex matched individuals as control group. Subjects' anthropometric measurements including weight, height and body mass index (BMI), semi-quantitative food frequency (FFQ), medical and food history questionnaires were also collected and FFQs were then scored using Food Guide Pyramid to obtain the dietary scores. Percent body fat (%BF) was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) method. Female patients had more %BF and lower dietary pattern scores than that of their controls (32 +/- 3.6 vs 27.7 +/- 4.6 percent and 43.2 +/- 11.9 vs 54.5 +/- 10.7 points; respectively, p < 0.05 for both). They also consumed less milk and dairy products, fresh vegetables, fruits, chicken, and nuts compared with the female controls (p < 0.03). However, these patients used to eat more full-fat cream and carbonated drinks (p < 0.05). Male patients had lower BMI (22 +/- 4.7 vs 25.6 +/- 4.4; p < 0.05) than their counterpart controls but there was no significant difference between their %BFs. Moreover, they used to have more full-fat cream, hydrogenated fats, less red meat and nuts compared with the male controls (p < 0.05). Schizophrenia patients have poor nutritional patterns. In particular, female patients have more percent body fat and lower dietary pattern scores compared with their healthy controls. All patients used to consume more fats and sweet drinks frequently. The findings of this study suggest that schizophrenia patients need specific medical nutrition therapies through limiting dietary fats and sugars intakes and weight control. Whether obesity is the consequence of disease

  10. Association between the high-dose use of benzodiazepines and rehospitalization in patients with schizophrenia: a 2-year naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Takita, Yukika; Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Ono, Kotaro; Futenma, Kunihiro; Shimura, Akiyoshi; Murakoshi, Akiko; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Yuichi; Inoue, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background High-dose use of benzodiazepines (BZPs) reportedly causes adverse effects on cognitive function and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. However, effects of BZPs on the clinical course of schizophrenia have not been clarified. This study was set out to investigate the association between BZPs and rehospitalization of patients with schizophrenia. Methods In this retrospective study, patients with schizophrenia who were discharged from Tokyo Medical University Hospital between January 2009 and February 2012 were eligible as subjects. One hundred and eight patients who continued treatment for >2 years after hospital discharge were included in this study. Clinical characteristics, doses of prescribed medication such as BZPs and antipsychotics, and Global Assessment of Functioning scores at discharge were investigated. The primary outcome was rehospitalization of patients for any reason. Results In a total of 108 subjects with schizophrenia, 44 subjects (40.7%) experienced rehospitalization during the 2-year study period. A multivariate analysis by the Cox proportional hazards model revealed that low educational history (hazard ratio =2.43, P=0.032), younger onset age of schizophrenia (hazard ratio =2.10, P=0.021), and higher diazepam-equivalent dose (hazard ratio =6.53, P=0.011) were significantly associated with the time to rehospitalization after hospital discharge. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that high-dose use of BZPs at discharge in patients with schizophrenia might be associated with a shorter time to rehospitalization. PMID:28008260

  11. Performance of patients with schizophrenia on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST).

    PubMed Central

    Everett, J; Lavoie, K; Gagnon, J F; Gosselin, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To directly compare the performance of patients with schizophrenia and control subjects on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Specifically, we sought to verify if there are significant differences on the "classical" WCST measurements (perseverative errors and number of categories), as well as on more rarely reported scores, and assess the extent to which patients with schizophrenia can improve their performance with card-by-card instructions and continuous verbal reinforcement. DESIGN: Prospective cross-sectional study. SETTING: Psychiatry department in a university-affiliated hospital. PARTICIPANTS: 30 patients with schizophrenia, diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and 30 control subjects, matched to patients according to age and education. INTERVENTION: The WCST was administered according to the criteria of Heaton, and a subgroup of the patients with schizophrenia was given a retest after an explanation of the WCST and verbal reinforcements. RESULTS: Patients with schizophrenia succeeded on fewer categories (t = 23.3, p < 0.001), committed more perseverative errors (t = 15.6, p < 0.001), made more perseverative responses (t = 14.6, p < 0.001), needed more trials to succeed at the first category (t = 9.2, p < 0.003) and gave significantly lower conceptual level responses (t = 14.1, p < 0.001) than the controls. However, on retest, patients with schizophrenia committed significantly fewer perseverative errors (t = 5.1, p < 0.001) and showed higher conceptual level responses (t = -3.45, p < 0.003). CONCLUSION: Consistent with a hypothesis of frontal dysfunction in schizophrenia, patients with schizophrenia tend to show a perseverative deficit; however, some are able to partially overcome this deficit when given verbal reinforcement. PMID:11291529

  12. Risk Factors Associated with Psychiatric Hospitalization Among Iranian Schizophrenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Nader; Chimeh, Narges; Dehghani, Mohsen; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Taherkhani, Hamid; Abarashi, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric hospitalization of patients imposes heavy burdens on caregivers, but little is known about this issue in Iran. The present cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with psychiatric hospitalization of patients with schizophrenia who were the regular clients for the educational programs of The Iranian Society for Supporting Individuals with Schizophrenia (ISSIS) in Tehran, Iran. Methods: 231 male and female study subjects and 231 of their caregivers participated in the study. The study subjects were independently assessed in demographics, clinical and symptom-related characteristics and basic life skills domains. Their caregivers were assessed in domains of knowledge on schizophrenia, burden, social support, family function, and the patterns of relationships with their patients and the role of health and supportive services. Data were analyzed by performing logistic regression model. Results: Old age, low level of education, unemployment, greater severity of positive and negative symptoms, poor basic life skills among subjects, and objective family burden, inadequate knowledge on schizophrenia, low perceived social support and lack of medical insurance among caregivers were the most important factors associated with psychiatric hospitalization among the clients. Conclusions: Some factors originated in Iranian patients and their caregivers could cause patients’ pathways to psychiatric hospitalization. Although the study results did not establish causation, based on the findings, psychoeducational interventions may reduce schizophrenia referral and lower the rate of need to inpatient services in Iran. Declaration of interest: None. PMID:24644506

  13. Stigmatization of patients suffering from schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Marija Vucić; Peitl, Vjekoslav; Pavlović, Eduard; Proloscić, Josko; Petrić, Daniela

    2011-09-01

    For the general public, but also for healthcare professionals, schizophrenia is still one of those areas of medicine connected with feelings of unease, fear and prejudice. These feelings lead to stigmatization and discrimination which are unjust processes which put patients suffering from mental illnesses into undesirable and unequal positions. Aim of this research was to establish the extent of stigmatization of mentally ill patients among the population of healthcare professionals and future healthcare professionals and if they differ from general population. Results show that stigmatization of schizophrenic patients is high among all included populations. Although there were no statistical differences between groups regarding the assessment of schizophrenic patients, nurses employed in psychiatric wards exhibited a tendency towards higher acceptance of schizophrenic patients, as well as better understanding of that illness. This data emphasizes a growing need for continuous education of general population but also of healthcare professionals.

  14. Functional remission and employment among patients with schizophrenia in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Dahlan, Rahima; Midin, Marhani; Shah, Shamsul Azhar; Nik Jaafar, Nik Ruzyanei; Abdul Rahman, Fairuz Nazri; Baharudin, Azlin; Das, Srijit; Sidi, Hatta

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the rates of functional remission and employment as well as the factors associated with functional remission among patients with Schizophrenia, receiving community psychiatric service in an urban setting in Malaysia. From a total of 250 patients randomly selected, 155 fulfilled the study requirement and were assessed on their functional remission status using the Personal and Social Performance Scale. The relationships between functional remission and socio-demographic factors, clinical factors, social support, symptom remission and rates of hospitalization were examined. The results revealed that 74% (n=115) of the respondents had functional remission with only 20% (n=31) currently employed. Functional remission was found to be significantly associated with good social support (84.4% versus 36.4% p<0.001, OR=9.487 [95% CI=4.008-22.457]); shorter illness duration of less than 10 years (81.2% versus 66.7% p=0.038, OR=2.167 [95% CI=1.035-4.535]); good medication compliance (79.1% versus 50.0% p=0.002, OR=3.778 [95% CI=1.570-9.090]); hospital admissions of lower than 3 per year (80.5% versus 44.4% p<0.001 OR=5.150 [95% CI=2.145-12.365]) and; symptomatic remission (87.3% versus 37.4% p<0.001 [95% CI=0.070 (0.029-0.168]). A multiple regression analysis revealed only social support, lower hospitalization rate and symptom remission, as significant predictors of functional remission. A majority of patients with Schizophrenia in this study achieved functional remission, however, only a small percentage of them were employed. Functional remission was influenced by severity of illness and levels of social support in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [The Relationship between Violence and Clinical Features, Insight and Cognitive Functions in Patients with Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Köşger, Ferdi; Eşsizoğlu, Altan; Sönmez, İpek; Güleç, Gülcan; Genek, Müge; Akarsu, Özlem

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the predictive factors of violent behavior in schizophrenia and the relationship between violent behavior and insight and cognitive functions in this study. 68 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia were separated into two groups; with a history of violent behavior (n = 30) and without (n = 38). Both group swere administered the Positiveand Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, Schedule for Assessing the Three Components of Insight, California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT), Trail Making Test, Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, and Stroop Test. Male gender, the number of hospitalizations, incompliance with the treatment, alcohol and substance abuse, the number of suicide attempts, the mean score of PANSS positive symptoms, PANSS general symptoms and PANSS total were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia with a history of violent behavior, compared to non-violent group. Long delayed response subsection of CVLT mean score was lower in patients with violent behavior. Incompliance with the treatment (OR:5.927, p=0.041), alcohol and substance abuse (OR:21.089, p=0.000), and PANSS total score (OR:1.053, p=0.011)were identified as predictive factors of violent behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Lack of insight and executive function impairment are the core symptoms of schizophrenia and not seems to be associated with violent behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Impairment of memory may be associated with violent behavior in patients with schizophrenia. Incompliance with treatment, alcohol and substance abuse, and the severity of positive symptoms are important factors in predicting violence behavior in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Cannabis use and the course of schizophrenia: 10-year follow-up after first hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Daniel J.; Kotov, Roman; Guey, Lin T.; Bromet, Evelyn J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The authors examined the relationship between cannabis use and the course of illness in schizophrenia over 10 years following first psychiatric hospitalization. Method We assessed 229 patients with a schizophrenia-spectrum disorder five times: during the first admission, and 6 months, 2 years, 4 years, and 10 years later. Ratings of cannabis use and psychiatric symptoms (psychotic, negative, disorganized, and depressive) were made at each assessment. Results The lifetime rate of cannabis use was 66.2%, and survival analysis revealed that this usage was associated with an earlier onset of psychosis. The rates of current use ranged from 10% to 18% across assessments. Cannabis status was moderately stable, with concordance between waves ranging rtet = 0.48 – 0.78. Mixed-effects logistic regression revealed that changes in cannabis use were associated with changes in psychotic symptoms over time even after gender, age, socio-economic status, other drug use, antipsychotic medication use, and other symptoms were controlled. Structural equation modeling indicated that the association with psychotic symptoms was bi-directional. Conclusions Cannabis use is associated with an adverse course of psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia, and vice versa, even after taking into account other clinical, substance, and demographic variables. The specificity of this relationship suggests that clinical interventions to reduce cannabis use may be best targeted at individuals with prominent psychotic symptoms. PMID:20478874

  17. Medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Phan, Stephanie V

    Medication nonadherence is common among patients with schizophrenia and due to a variety of factors including lack of insight, psychopathology, substance use disorder, issues associated with treatment, stigma, fragmentation of care, cultural influences, and socioeconomic status. Among this population, nonadherence is problematic because it can lead to decompensation or exacerbation of symptoms, relapse, rehospitalization or greater use of emergency psychiatric services, functional decline, and increased risk of death. Psychoeducational approaches alone are ineffective, but in combination with behavioral interventions, appear to be effective. Involving the patient's support system, in addition to other interventions, can improve treatment adherence. Many medication-related factors, such as effectiveness and tolerability of antipsychotics, regimen complexity, and past medication trials impact appropriate medication use. Therefore, optimizing the patient's pharmacotherapeutic regimens can improve adherence. Additional factors favorably influencing adherence include involving the patient in their treatment, fostering a therapeutic alliance, implementing/using reminder systems, and addressing substance use disorder. Medication nonadherence arises from multiple reasons that vary between patients. Thus, the most effective strategies to improve adherence are multifactorial and may involve both psychoeducational and behavioral techniques, as well as previously listed approaches. Strategies should be targeted toward the patient and their support system, whenever possible, to further improve the chances of appropriate medication use. Recognizing that all patients with schizophrenia are at risk for medication nonadherence is important. No one technique has been shown to be most effective; therefore, the risk for nonadherence should continually be assessed and multiple strategies should be targeted to the patient (and caregiver) and repeatedly implemented throughout the course

  18. Stigma Resistance in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Sibitz, Ingrid; Unger, Annemarie; Woppmann, Andreas; Zidek, Thomas; Amering, Michaela

    2011-01-01

    Background: An individual's capacity to counteract the stigma of mental illness, stigma resistance (SR), is considered as playing a crucial role in fighting stigma. However, little is known about SR and its correlates in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Aim: Exploring SR in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Method: One hundred fifty-seven participants completed the “Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness” (ISMI) Scale including its subscale on SR. Measures of perceived devaluation and discrimination, depression, self-esteem, empowerment, quality of life, and demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Results: Two-thirds of all patients showed high SR. SR correlated positively with self-esteem, empowerment, and quality of life and negatively with stigma measures and depression. A social network with a sufficient number of friends, being single or married, in contrast to being separated, as well as receiving outpatient treatment, was associated with higher SR. Conclusions: SR is a new and promising concept. The development of stigma-resisting beliefs might help individuals in their hope of finding a fulfilling life and in their recovery from mental illness. PMID:19487336

  19. Stigma resistance in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sibitz, Ingrid; Unger, Annemarie; Woppmann, Andreas; Zidek, Thomas; Amering, Michaela

    2011-03-01

    An individual's capacity to counteract the stigma of mental illness, stigma resistance (SR), is considered as playing a crucial role in fighting stigma. However, little is known about SR and its correlates in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Exploring SR in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. One hundred fifty-seven participants completed the "Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness" (ISMI) Scale including its subscale on SR. Measures of perceived devaluation and discrimination, depression, self-esteem, empowerment, quality of life, and demographic and clinical variables were obtained. Two-thirds of all patients showed high SR. SR correlated positively with self-esteem, empowerment, and quality of life and negatively with stigma measures and depression. A social network with a sufficient number of friends, being single or married, in contrast to being separated, as well as receiving outpatient treatment, was associated with higher SR. SR is a new and promising concept. The development of stigma-resisting beliefs might help individuals in their hope of finding a fulfilling life and in their recovery from mental illness.

  20. [Prevention of tuberculosis in patients in psychiatric hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fisher, Iu Ia; Sheĭnman, V L; Gutorova, V A

    1991-01-01

    Mental hospital patients are at high risk of tuberculosis reactivation, especially those with posttuberculous changes in the lungs and progressive severe schizophrenia. Outbreaks of tuberculosis are 2.5 times more frequent in them than in alcohol abusers and other mental patients. In subjects with posttuberculous changes on the lungs preventive chemotherapy can cause a 6-fold decrease in the likelihood of process reactivation.

  1. Informal care of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Aranda-Reneo, Isaac; Oliva-Moreno, Juan; Vilaplana-Prieto, Cristina; Hidalgo-Vega, Álvaro; González-Domínguez, Almudena

    2013-09-01

    cared for non-dependent people. The results show a part of the high social cost of schizophrenia in Spain. At the same time, the study provides evidence that more severe levels of dependency are positively associated with more hours of informal care and higher caregiver burden. The results show that health or social care programs targeted at persons with autonomy limitations cannot overlook the importance of informal care, since doing so would lead to inefficiencies or inequities and reduce the well-being of citizens. Information on informal care should be incorporated in the design of health and social care policies geared toward improving equity and efficiency in the allocation of social resources. Longitudinal studies of patients diagnosed with schizophrenia would provide further information on the characteristics and impact of informal care.

  2. The prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiongzhen; Du, Xiangdong; Zhang, Yingyang; Yin, Guangzhong; Zhang, Guangya; Walss-Bass, Consuelo; Quevedo, João; Soares, Jair C; Xia, Haishen; Li, Xiaosi; Zheng, Yingjun; Ning, Yuping; Zhang, Xiang Yang

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a common comorbidity in schizophrenia. Few studies have addressed obesity in Chinese schizophrenia patients. The aims of this current study were to evaluate the prevalence, risk factors and clinical correlates of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia. A total of 206 patients were recruited from a hospital in Beijing. Their clinical and anthropometric data together with plasma glucose and lipid parameters were collected. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was rated for all patients. Overall, 43 (20.9%) patients were obese and 67 (32.5%) were overweight. The obese patients had significantly higher glucose levels, triglyceride levels than non-obese patients. Females and patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus had increased risk for obesity. Correlation analysis showed that BMI was associated with sex, education levels, negative symptoms, total PANSS score, triglyceride levels and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further stepwise regression analysis showed that sex, type 2 diabetes, education level, triglyceride and amount of smoking/day were significant predictors for obesity. Our study showed that the prevalence of obesity in Chinese patients with schizophrenia is higher than that in the general population. Some demographic and clinical variables are risk factors for obesity in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Blood Biomarkers Predict the Cognitive Effects of Aripiprazole in Patients with Acute Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hikaru; Yoshimura, Reiji; Katsuki, Asuka; Atake, Kiyokazu; Igata, Ryohei; Konishi, Yuki; Beppu, Hiroki; Tominaga, Hirotaka

    2017-03-06

    Aripiprazole has been reported to exert variable effects on cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated biological markers, clinical data, and psychiatric symptoms in order to identify factors that influence cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia undergoing aripiprazole treatment. We evaluated cognitive function in 51 patients with schizophrenia using Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS), as well as background information, psychiatric symptoms, plasma catecholamine metabolites-homovanillic acid (HVA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG)-, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Multivariate analyses were performed in order to identify factors independently associated with cognitive function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, number of hospitalizations, and MHPG levels were associated with verbal memory and learning. Total hospitalization period and MHPG levels were associated with working memory. Age at first hospitalization and education were associated with motor speed. The number of hospital admissions, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative subscale scores (PANSS-N), MHPG levels, BDNF levels, and Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS) scores were associated with verbal fluency. Homovanillic acid and MHPG levels, duration of illness, and PANSS-N scores were associated with attention and processing speed. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and MHPG levels were associated with executive function. These results suggest that treatment of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive dysfunction may be improved in patients treated with aripiprazole by controlling for these contributing factors.

  4. Blood Biomarkers Predict the Cognitive Effects of Aripiprazole in Patients with Acute Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Hikaru; Yoshimura, Reiji; Katsuki, Asuka; Atake, Kiyokazu; Igata, Ryohei; Konishi, Yuki; Beppu, Hiroki; Tominaga, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    Aripiprazole has been reported to exert variable effects on cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated biological markers, clinical data, and psychiatric symptoms in order to identify factors that influence cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia undergoing aripiprazole treatment. We evaluated cognitive function in 51 patients with schizophrenia using Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS), as well as background information, psychiatric symptoms, plasma catecholamine metabolites—homovanillic acid (HVA), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG)—, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Multivariate analyses were performed in order to identify factors independently associated with cognitive function. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels, number of hospitalizations, and MHPG levels were associated with verbal memory and learning. Total hospitalization period and MHPG levels were associated with working memory. Age at first hospitalization and education were associated with motor speed. The number of hospital admissions, Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale negative subscale scores (PANSS-N), MHPG levels, BDNF levels, and Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS) scores were associated with verbal fluency. Homovanillic acid and MHPG levels, duration of illness, and PANSS-N scores were associated with attention and processing speed. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and MHPG levels were associated with executive function. These results suggest that treatment of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive dysfunction may be improved in patients treated with aripiprazole by controlling for these contributing factors. PMID:28272307

  5. The relationship between risk of hospitalization for schizophrenia, SES, and cognitive functioning.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Shira; Fruchter, Eyal; Davidson, Michael; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yoffe, Rinat; Weiser, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Although most studies find low socioeconomic status (SES) to be associated with prevalence of schizophrenia, incidence studies do not generally support this, and some even report an inverse association. The objective of the current historical prospective study was to examine the relationship between SES, cognitive functioning, and risk of hospitalization for schizophrenia in a population-based sample of Israeli adolescents. Subjects were 811 487 adolescents, assessed by the Israeli military draft board for socio-demographic factors and cognitive functioning. Data on later hospitalization for schizophrenia were obtained from a population-based hospitalization registry. Findings indicated that when simply examining SES and schizophrenia, lower SES was associated with greater risk of hospitalization for schizophrenia (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 1.193, 95% CI = 1.091-1.303). When dividing the cohort into low, average, and high cognitive functioning, SES did not influence the risk for schizophrenia among individuals with high and average cognitive functioning, whereas among individuals with low cognitive functioning, high SES was found to slightly increase the risk for schizophrenia (HR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.03-1.42). One possible explanation for this finding might be that among individuals from low socioeconomic backgrounds, low IQ may reflect decreased opportunities related to SES, whereas among individuals from high SES backgrounds, low IQ might reflect risk for later psychopathology.

  6. Dental caries status of patients with schizophrenia in Seville, Spain: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Monsalve-Guil, L; Ortiz-Garcia, I; Jimenez-Guerra, A; Lopez-Lopez, J; Segura-Egea, J J

    2017-01-18

    The aim of this study was to assess the dental status (DMFT) in patients with schizophrenia compared with a control group. In this case-control study, 50 patients with schizophrenia attended in the Psychiatric Unit at the Virgen Macarena University Hospital of Seville were compared with 50 people (without systemic diseases and not taking psychotropic drugs) in a control group attended in the School of Dentistry of Seville. Decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) were assessed according to the World Health Organization WHO criteria. Patients with schizophrenia showed a decayed teeth (DT) score of 7.26 ± 5.69 compared with 6.50 ± 4.37 for patients the control group. These differences were significant and suggest that dental caries are most prevalent in patients with schizophrenia. People who smoked showed significantly higher DT scores in both groups. Among patients with schizophrenia, smokers scored 9.34 ± 5.42 compared with 4.38 ± 4.82 for non-smokers. Among the healthy controls, smokers scored 6.88 ± 4.85 compared with 6.12 ± 3.85 for non-smokers (p < 0.05). Patients with schizophrenia showed a missing teeth (MT) score of 9.10 ± 8.56 compared with 5.38 ± 5.14 in control patients. MT scores increased significantly with age and with smoking in both groups of patients (p < 0.05). Patients with schizophrenia showed a filled teeth (FT) score of 1.38 ± 2.70 compared with 2.34 ± 3.48 in control patients. FT differences in gender and smoking habits between patients with schizophrenia and healthy control subjects were statistically significant (p < 0.05). This data, along with the DT scores, suggests that patients with schizophrenia have extensive untreated dental disease. Patients with schizophrenia constitute a high risk population for dental health. This group showed a greater prevalence of decayed and missing teeth and more extensive treatment needs.

  7. Improving treatment adherence in your patients with schizophrenia: the STAY initiative.

    PubMed

    Cañas, Fernando; Alptekin, Koksal; Azorin, Jean Michel; Dubois, Vincent; Emsley, Robin; García, Antonio G; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M; Naber, Dieter; Olivares, José M; Papageorgiou, Georgios; Roca, Miquel

    2013-02-01

    Partial and non-adherence to medication is a common problem in schizophrenia, leading to an increased risk of relapse, increased likelihood of hospitalization and poorer long-term outcomes. In contrast, continuous medication in the treatment of schizophrenia is associated with positive outcomes, including improved clinical status, improved quality of life and functioning, and reduced risk of relapse and rehospitalization. Strategies aimed at improving medication adherence are therefore key for patients to achieve their treatment goals. In an attempt to address the issues of partial/non-adherence to antipsychotic medication in schizophrenia, a group of psychiatrists convened to discuss and develop a set of principles aimed at helping patients adhere to their medication. These principles were then refined and developed into the STAY (the Six principles to improve Treatment Adherence in Your patients) initiative following presentation to a wider group of psychiatrists from across Europe. This manuscript summarizes these principles and explains the rationale for their selection. These principles are: (1) recognizing that most patients with schizophrenia are at risk of partial/non-adherence at some time during the course of their illness; (2) the benefits of a good therapeutic alliance for identifying potential adherence issues; (3) tailored treatment plans to meet an individual's needs, including the most suitable route of delivery of antipsychotic medication; (4) involving family/key persons in care and psychoeducation of the patient, assuming the patient agrees to this; (5) ensuring optimal effectiveness of care; and (6) ensuring continuity in the care of patients with schizophrenia. The application of these six principles should help to raise awareness of and address poor patient adherence, as well as generally improving care of patients with schizophrenia. In turn, this should lead to improved overall clinical outcomes for patients receiving long-term treatment for

  8. Health care resource use and direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; He, Xiaoning; Liu, Li; Ye, Wenyu; Montgomery, William; Xue, Haibo; McCombs, Jeffery S

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the treatment costs of schizophrenia is scarce in People's Republic of China. The aims of this study were to quantify health care resource utilization and to estimate the direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People's Republic of China. Data were obtained from the Tianjin Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) database. Adult patients with ≥1 diagnosis of schizophrenia and 12-month continuous enrollment after the first schizophrenia diagnosis between 2008 and 2009 were included. Both schizophrenia-related, psychiatric-related, and all-cause related resource utilization and direct medical costs were estimated. A total of 2,125 patients were included with a mean age of 52.3 years, and 50.7% of the patients were female. The annual mean all-cause costs were $2,863 per patient with psychiatric-related and schizophrenia-related costs accounting for 84.1% and 62.0% respectively. The schizophrenia-related costs for hospitalized patients were eleven times greater than that of patients who were not hospitalized. For schizophrenia-related health services, 60.8% of patients experienced at least one hospitalization with a mean (median) length of stay of 112.1 (71) days and a mean cost of $1,904 per admission; 59.0% of patients experienced at least one outpatient visit with a mean (median) number of visits of 6.2 (4) and a mean cost of $42 per visit during the 12-month follow-up period. Non-medication treatment costs were the most important element (45.7%) of schizophrenia-related costs, followed by laboratory and diagnostic costs (19.9%), medication costs (15.4%), and bed fees (13.3%). The costs related to the treatment of patients with schizophrenia were considerable in Tianjin, People's Republic of China, driven mainly by schizophrenia-related hospitalizations. Efforts focusing on community-based treatment programs and appropriate choice of drug treatment have the potential to reduce the use of inpatient services and

  9. Clozapine prescription and quality of life in Chinese patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care.

    PubMed

    Hou, C-L; Cai, M-Y; Ma, X-R; Zang, Y; Jia, F-J; Lin, Y-Q; Chiu, H F K; Ungvari, G S; Ng, C H; Zhong, B-L; Cao, X-L; Li, Y; Shinfuku, N; Xiang, Y-T

    2015-09-01

    Clozapine is frequently used to treat schizophrenia in China. Maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by Chinese primary care physicians, but no study has investigated the frequency of its use prescribed by primary care physicians. This study described the frequency, demographic and clinical characteristics of clozapine treatment and its impact on insight and quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 623 patients with schizophrenia treated in 22 primary care services in Guangzhou, China in 2013 formed the study sample. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics including psychopathology, medication side effects and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection. The frequency of clozapine prescription was 35.6% with a mean daily dose of 127.7±88.2 mg. There were no significant differences between the patients with and without clozapine in either of the QOL domains after controlling the confounding factors. Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on clozapine had younger age of onset, more hospitalizations, more severe extrapyramidal side effects, but better insight and fewer prescriptions of first generation antipsychotics. Clozapine use was found to be common and associated with better insight in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. Further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of clozapine in primary care in China is warranted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Spatial compatibility and affordance compatibility in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kume, Yu; Sato, Fumiyasu; Hiraoka, Yuya; Suzuki, Shingo; Niyama, Yoshitsugu

    2016-12-01

    A deterioration in information-processing performance is commonly recognized in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Although the enhancement of cognitive skills in patients with schizophrenia is important, the types of external stimuli that influence performance have not received much attention. The aim of present study was to clarify the effects of spatial and affordance compatibility in patients with schizophrenia, compared with those in healthy people. The subjects (25 patients with schizophrenia and 25 healthy controls) participated in two experiment examining the effects of the spatial location of stimuli and the action-relevance of objects. The results showed that the effect of spatial compatibility was similar in both the patients and the controls, whereas the influence of action-relevant objects was not highlighted in either patients with chronic schizophrenia or healthy controls. These findings provide important evidence of a normal spatial compatibility effect in patients with chronic schizophrenia. However, further research examining the affordance compatibility effect is needed, taking into consideration the symptomatology and the severity of the social functioning level in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Wernicke's Encephalopathy in a Patient with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Rebecca A; Vu, Trung; Hunter, Alan J

    2006-01-01

    Clinically, we most often associate Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) with an alcohol abusing population. However, it is important to consider other causes of malnutrition and vitamin deficiency as risk factors for the development of this disorder. We present a case of a 51-year-old man with schizophrenia and malnutrition who presented with delirium, ophthalmoplegia, and seizures. He responded rapidly to the administration of IV thiamine. Because of the high rate of mortality and morbidity, WE should be high on the differential of any patient at risk for malnutrition or with ophthalmoplegia, regardless of alcohol history. This is particularly important in psychiatric patients where the syndrome may be masked and thus treatment delayed. PMID:16925799

  12. Race and Hospital Diagnoses of Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis of schizophrenia among African American clients is a longstanding and critical disparity in mental health services. Overdiagnosis of schizophrenia is detrimental because it increases the potential for treatment with the wrong medications. Inadequate assessment of mood disorders, co-occurring substance abuse, and…

  13. Race and Hospital Diagnoses of Schizophrenia and Mood Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Overdiagnosis or misdiagnosis of schizophrenia among African American clients is a longstanding and critical disparity in mental health services. Overdiagnosis of schizophrenia is detrimental because it increases the potential for treatment with the wrong medications. Inadequate assessment of mood disorders, co-occurring substance abuse, and…

  14. [Spontaneous speech prosody and discourse analysis in schizophrenia and Fronto Temporal Dementia (FTD) patients].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Angela; Felizzola Donado, Carlos Alberto; Matallana Eslava, Diana Lucía

    2015-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD) in their linguistic variants share some language characteristics such as the lexical access difficulties, disordered speech with disruptions, many pauses, interruptions and reformulations. For the schizophrenia patients it reflects a difficulty of affect expression, while for the FTD patients it reflects a linguistic issue. This study, through an analysis of a series of cases assessed Clinic both in memory and on the Mental Health Unit of HUSI-PUJ (Hospital Universitario San Ignacio), with additional language assessment (analysis speech and acoustic analysis), present distinctive features of the DFT in its linguistic variants and schizophrenia that will guide the specialist in finding early markers of a differential diagnosis. In patients with FTD language variants, in 100% of cases there is a difficulty understanding linguistic structure of complex type; and important speech fluency problems. In patients with schizophrenia, there are significant alterations in the expression of the suprasegmental elements of speech, as well as disruptions in discourse. We present how depth language assessment allows to reassess some of the rules for the speech and prosody analysis of patients with dementia and schizophrenia; we suggest how elements of speech are useful in guiding the diagnosis and correlate functional compromise in everyday psychiatrist's practice. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of Oxytocin on Neural Response to Facial Expressions in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Na Young; Park, Hye Yoon; Jung, Wi Hoon; Park, Jin Woo; Yun, Je-Yeon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Hyun Jung; Kim, So-Yeon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-07-01

    Impaired facial emotion recognition is a core deficit in schizophrenia. Oxytocin has been shown to improve social perception in patients with schizophrenia; however, the effect of oxytocin on the neural activity underlying facial emotion recognition has not been investigated. This study was aimed to assess the effect of a single dose of intranasal oxytocin on brain activity in patients with schizophrenia using an implicit facial emotion-recognition paradigm. Sixteen male patients with schizophrenia and 16 age-matched healthy male control subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial at Seoul National University Hospital. Delivery of a single dose of 40 IU intranasal oxytocin and the placebo was separated by 1 week. Drug conditions were compared by performing a region of interest (ROI) analysis of the bilateral amygdala on responses to the emotion recognition test. It was found that nasal spray decreased amygdala activity for fearful emotion and increased activity for happy faces. Further, oxytocin elicited differential effects between the patient and control groups. Intranasal oxytocin attenuated amygdala activity for emotional faces in patients with schizophrenia, whereas intranasal oxytocin significantly increased amygdala activity in healthy controls. Oxytocin-induced BOLD signal changes in amygdala in response to happy faces was related to attachment style in the control group. Our result provides new evidence of a modulatory effect of oxytocin on neural response to emotional faces for patients with schizophrenia. Future studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of long-term treatment with intranasal oxytocin on neural activity in patients with schizophrenia.

  16. Effects of Oxytocin on Neural Response to Facial Expressions in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Na Young; Park, Hye Yoon; Jung, Wi Hoon; Park, Jin Woo; Yun, Je-Yeon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kim, Sung Nyun; Han, Hyun Jung; Kim, So-Yeon; Kang, Do-Hyung; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2015-01-01

    Impaired facial emotion recognition is a core deficit in schizophrenia. Oxytocin has been shown to improve social perception in patients with schizophrenia; however, the effect of oxytocin on the neural activity underlying facial emotion recognition has not been investigated. This study was aimed to assess the effect of a single dose of intranasal oxytocin on brain activity in patients with schizophrenia using an implicit facial emotion-recognition paradigm. Sixteen male patients with schizophrenia and 16 age-matched healthy male control subjects participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial at Seoul National University Hospital. Delivery of a single dose of 40 IU intranasal oxytocin and the placebo was separated by 1 week. Drug conditions were compared by performing a region of interest (ROI) analysis of the bilateral amygdala on responses to the emotion recognition test. It was found that nasal spray decreased amygdala activity for fearful emotion and increased activity for happy faces. Further, oxytocin elicited differential effects between the patient and control groups. Intranasal oxytocin attenuated amygdala activity for emotional faces in patients with schizophrenia, whereas intranasal oxytocin significantly increased amygdala activity in healthy controls. Oxytocin-induced BOLD signal changes in amygdala in response to happy faces was related to attachment style in the control group. Our result provides new evidence of a modulatory effect of oxytocin on neural response to emotional faces for patients with schizophrenia. Future studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of long-term treatment with intranasal oxytocin on neural activity in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:25666311

  17. Craving in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis use disorders.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Thomas; Becker, Theresa; Thiel, Maria Chantal; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne

    2013-11-01

    Cannabis use is widespread among patients with schizophrenia despite its negative impact on the course of the disease. Craving is a considerable predictor for relapse in people with substance use disorders. Our investigation aimed to gain insight into the intensity and dimensions of cravings in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis use disorders (CUDs), compared with otherwise healthy people with CUDs (control subjects). We examined 51 patients with schizophrenia and CUDs and 51 control subjects by means of the Cannabis-Craving Screening questionnaire. We found greater overall intensity of craving and greater relief craving in patients with schizophrenia and CUDs. Reward craving was greater in the CUDs group. Relief craving was associated with symptoms of schizophrenia in patients with schizophrenia and CUDs. Our findings are in line with the view that aspects of self-medication or affect regulation may account (at least in part) for cannabis use in people with schizophrenia. A better understanding of the dimensions of craving may help to improve targeted therapeutic interventions that aim to reduce drug consumption in this difficult-to-treat patient group.

  18. Neural correlates of probabilistic category learning in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, Thomas W; Goldberg, Terry E; Callicott, Joseph H; Chen, Qiang; Apud, Jose A; Das, Sumitra; Zoltick, Brad J; Egan, Michael F; Meeter, Martijn; Myers, Catherine; Gluck, Mark A; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2009-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies of probabilistic category learning in healthy adults report activation of cortical-striatal circuitry. Based on previous findings of normal learning rate concurrent with an overall performance deficit in patients with schizophrenia, we hypothesized that relative to healthy adults, patients with schizophrenia would display preserved caudate nucleus and abnormal prefrontal cortex activation during probabilistic category learning. Forty patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic medication and 25 healthy participants were assessed on interleaved blocks of probabilistic category learning and control tasks while undergoing BOLD fMRI. In addition to the whole sample of patients with schizophrenia and healthy adults, a subset of patients and healthy adults matched for good learning was also compared. In the whole sample analysis, patients with schizophrenia displayed impaired performance in conjunction with normal learning rate relative to healthy adults. The matched comparison of patients and healthy adults classified as good learners revealed greater caudate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity in the healthy adults and greater activation in a more rostral region of the dorsolateral prefrontal, cingulate, parahippocampal and parietal cortex in patients. These results demonstrate that successful probabilistic category learning can occur in the absence of normal frontal-striatal function. Based on analyses of the patients and healthy adults matched on learning and performance, a minority of patients with schizophrenia achieve successful probabilistic category learning and performance levels through differential activation of a circumscribed neural network which suggests a compensatory mechanism in patients showing successful learning. PMID:19176832

  19. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment.

    PubMed

    Mihanović, Mate; Restek-Petrović, Branka; Bogović, Anamarija; Ivezić, Ena; Bodor, Davor; Požgain, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia, but the same was not observed for the patients in standard outpatient treatment. We hope that these findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on the functioning of patients and the development of more effective therapeutic methods aimed at improving the patients' quality of life.

  20. Resting EEG deficits in accused murderers with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schug, Robert A; Yang, Yaling; Raine, Adrian; Han, Chenbo; Liu, Jianghong; Li, Liejia

    2011-10-31

    Empirical evidence continues to suggest a biologically distinct violent subtype of schizophrenia. The present study examined whether murderers with schizophrenia would demonstrate resting EEG deficits distinguishing them from both non-violent schizophrenia patients and murderers without schizophrenia. Resting EEG data were collected from five diagnostic groups (normal controls, non-murderers with schizophrenia, murderers with schizophrenia, murderers without schizophrenia, and murderers with psychiatric conditions other than schizophrenia) at a brain hospital in Nanjing, China. Murderers with schizophrenia were characterized by increased left-hemispheric fast-wave EEG activity relative to non-violent schizophrenia patients, while non-violent schizophrenia patients instead demonstrated increased diffuse slow-wave activity compared to all other groups. Results are discussed within the framework of a proposed left-hemispheric over-processing hypothesis specific to violent individuals with schizophrenia, involving left hemispheric hyperarousal deficits, which may lead to a homicidally violent schizophrenia outcome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predictors of schizophrenia in patients with a first episode of psychosis.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Nicolas; Arranz, Belen; Salavert, Jose; Alvarez, Enrique; Corripio, Iluminada; Dueñas, Rosa Maria; Perez, Victor; San, Luis

    2010-01-30

    Early identification of schizophrenia in patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) may help to avoid inappropriate treatment and may enhance long-term outcome by addressing issues such as family network, treatment adherence and functional and symptomatic outcome. It was the aim of the study to determine baseline variables that significantly predicted a diagnosis of schizophrenia in patients with FEP. The sample consisted of 133 FEP patients hospitalized for at least 6 weeks, in whom a DSM-IV diagnosis was confirmed after 1 year follow-up. Patients were divided into two groups, those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia (Schizophrenia group, n=63; 47.8%), and those with other psychosis, who were grouped under Non-Schizophrenic Psychosis (NSP, n=70; 52.2%). Sociodemographic (marital status, educational level) and clinical variables were recorded for each patient. Substance use (alcohol, cannabis and cocaine) did not statistically differ between the two groups. Absence of characteristics defined as criteria for good prognosis, lack of > or = 20% improvement in the total Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score at 6 weeks, and a poor premorbid adjustment as determined by the Premorbid Adjustment Scale score significantly predicted the presence of schizophrenia. The regression model including these three variables achieved a predictive value of 76.3%, with a sensitivity of 74.6% and a specificity of 77.9%.

  2. Facial emotion recognition in patients with violent schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Demirbuga, Sedat; Sahin, Esat; Ozver, Ismail; Aliustaoglu, Suheyla; Kandemir, Eyup; Varkal, Mihriban D; Emul, Murat; Ince, Haluk

    2013-03-01

    People with schizophrenia are more likely considered to be violent than the general population. Besides some well described symptoms, patients with schizophrenia have problems in recognizing basic facial emotions which could underlie the misinterpretation of others' intentions that could lead to violent behaviors. We aimed to investigate the facial emotion recognition ability in violent or non-violent patients with schizophrenia. The severity in both groups was evaluated according to the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. A computer-based test included the photos of four male and four female models with happy, surprised, fearful, sad, angry, disgusted, and neutral facial expressions from Ekman & Friesen's series has been performed to groups. Totally, 41 outpatients with violent schizophrenia and 35 outpatients with non-violent schizophrenia participated in the study. The mean age of violent schizophrenia group was 41.50±7.56, and control group's mean age was 39.94±6.79years. There were no significant differences between groups among reaction time for each emotion while recognizing them (p>0.05). In addition, the accuracy rate of answers towards facial emotion recognition test for each emotion and the distribution misidentifications were not significantly different between groups (p>0.05). The facial emotion recognition in violent schizophrenia is lacking and we found that the facial emotion recognition ability in violent schizophrenia seems to be a trait feature of the illness. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Staff attitudes towards patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Vendsborg, Per; Bratbo, Johanne; Dannevang, Anders; Hagedorn-Møller, Julie; Kistrup, Kristen; Lindhardt, Anne; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-10-01

    Stigmatizing attitudes have been reported in international studies among staff in psychiatry. The authors wanted to investigate if this was the case in Denmark. A survey of attitudes among staff at two psychiatric units in Copenhagen was performed using the Mental Illness: Clinicians' Attitudes scales. The scales have 16 questions to which another four questions were added by the authors. A total of 548 staff members answered the questions (61 doctors and 487 other professionals). The majority of the respondents believed in the possibility of recovery for patients and only a minority associated a high degree of dangerousness with schizophrenia. The cause of the illness was mainly regarded as being biological, but all agreed to a bio-psycho-social aetiological approach. The majority of the respondents believed that the illness was chronic and agreed on the need for staff to also be aware of patients' somatic illness. The doctors did not question their role as "real doctors" or the scientific basis for psychiatry. The majority would not mind working with a colleague with schizophrenia, but about half would hesitate to disclose if they themselves were diagnosed with the illness. Being a woman working in community psychiatry with long experience and participation in a recovery educational programme was associated with less stigmatizing attitudes. The survey showed a relatively low level of stigmatizing attitudes. This runs counter to the results from international investigation. This trend could be interpreted both as a result of a shift towards a more recovery-oriented approach to treatment as well as a reflection of political correctness.

  4. Association between antipsychotic/antidepressant drug treatments and hospital admissions in schizophrenia assessed using a mental health case register

    PubMed Central

    Cardinal, Rudolf N; Savulich, George; Mann, Louisa M; Fernández-Egea, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Background: The impact of psychotropic drug choice upon admissions for schizophrenia is not well understood. Aims: To examine the association between antipsychotic/antidepressant use and time in hospital for patients with schizophrenia. Methods: We conducted an observational study, using 8 years’ admission records and electronically generated drug histories from an institution providing secondary mental health care in Cambridgeshire, UK, covering the period 2005–2012 inclusive. Patients with a coded ICD-10 diagnosis of schizophrenia were selected. The primary outcome measure was the time spent as an inpatient in a psychiatric unit. Antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs used by at least 5% of patients overall were examined for associations with admissions. Periods before and after drug commencement were compared for patients having pre-drug admissions, in mirror-image analyses correcting for overall admission rates. Drug use in one 6-month calendar period was used to predict admissions in the next period, across all patients, in a regression analysis accounting for the effects of all other drugs studied and for time. Results: In mirror-image analyses, sulpiride, aripiprazole, clozapine, and olanzapine were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. In regression analyses, sulpiride, mirtazapine, venlafaxine, and clozapine–aripiprazole and clozapine–amisulpride combinations were associated with fewer subsequent admission days. Conclusions: Use of these drugs was associated with fewer days in hospital. Causation is not implied and these findings require confirmation by randomized controlled trials. PMID:27336041

  5. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mihanović, Mate; Restek-Petrović, Branka; Bogović, Anamarija; Ivezić, Ena; Bodor, Davor; Požgain, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia, but the same was not observed for the patients in standard outpatient treatment. We hope that these findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on the functioning of patients and the development of more effective therapeutic methods aimed at improving the patients

  6. Tardive dyskinesia among Chinese and Malay patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chong, Siow-Ann; Mahendran, Rathi; Machin, David; Chua, Hong-Choon; Parker, Gordon; Kane, John

    2002-02-01

    The prevalence of tardive dyskinesia (TD) was studied with the Abnormal Involuntary Movements Scale in Chinese and Malay patients with schizophrenia who were hospitalized in a Singapore state psychiatric institute. We also studied the relationship of neuroleptic-induced extrapyramidal side effects to TD. By using established criteria, the rates of TD were 40.6% for Chinese and 29.0% for Malays, higher than previously reported for Chinese subjects. Older age and lower current neuroleptic dose were significantly associated with TD. Multivariate analysis, after controlling for other salient risk variables, did not show a significant difference in TD prevalence rates between the two races. We conclude that suggested differences in interethnic rates of TD among Chinese, Malays, and Westerners are unlikely to exist and that any variation in prevalence is more likely to be determined by differences in duration of exposure and dose levels of neuroleptic drugs.

  7. Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    Schizophrenia is a serious brain illness. People who have it may hear voices that aren't there. ... job or take care of themselves. Symptoms of schizophrenia usually start between ages 16 and 30. Men ...

  8. [The name in schizophrenia: a study of 60 patients].

    PubMed

    Rafrafi, Rim; Bram, Nesrine; Bergaoui, Haifa; Ben Romdhane, Imene; El Hechmi, Zouhaier

    2014-03-01

    Clinical aspects in schizophrenia suggest a unique relationship with the proper name. aim: Discuss the validity of the hypothesis that the non-transmission of the surname may be a vulnerability factor in schizophrenia. Descriptive cross-sectional study conducted among 60 patients with schizophrenia and their families. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview. results: Seven patients carried a different surname from their father (11.6% of participants). The disparity has only concerned the child with schizophrenia. Family characteristics (birth rank, desired character of pregnancy, family history of schizophrenia) and evolutif profile of the disease were comparable between patients with a family name according to the father and those with a different surname. It appears that patients with schizophrenia maintain a special relationship with the proper name, which could be involved in the genesis of schizophrenia. Our early hypothesis, supported by the psychoanalytic, transgenerational and behavioral theories, would be a plausible starting point for studies with a broader spectrum including witnesses of the general and psychiatric populations.

  9. Elevated neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Semiz, Murat; Yildirim, Osman; Canan, Fatih; Demir, Suleyman; Hasbek, Ekrem; Tuman, Taha Can; Kayka, Nefise; Tosun, Mehmet

    2014-09-01

    Inflammatory mechanisms are reported to play important roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is a simple and easily accessible indicator of the systemic inflammatory response. Our goal was to investigate whether NLR was higher in patients with schizophrenia than in healthy comparison subjects similar in age, sex, and body mass index. In this multicenter cross-sectional study, we analyzed 156 non-obese patients with schizophrenia and 89 healthy control subjects for complete blood count. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale was used to determine the severity of clinical pathology. The mean ± SD NLR of patients with schizophrenia was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (2.6 ± 1.1 vs. 1.9 ± 0.6, respectively, p < 0.001). NLR did not significantly correlate with severity and duration of schizophrenia (r = 0.065. p > 0.05). Our findings suggest that NLR levels are increased in physically healthy, non-obese, patients with schizophrenia when compared with physically and mentally healthy individuals. To our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrated the association between NLR and schizophrenia.

  10. Adherence to Antipsychotic Therapy: Association With Hospitalization and Medicare Spending Among Part D Enrollees With Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Pamela; Brandt, Nicole; Onukwugha, Eberechukwu; Perfetto, Eleanor; Powers, Christopher; Stuart, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    This study examined relationships among antipsychotic adherence, hospitalization, and hospital expenditures in a sample of 13,861 Medicare Part D enrollees with schizophrenia. Utilization and expenditure data were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Chronic Conditions Warehouse for 2011 and 2012. Adherence was measured with the proportion of days covered and stratified into four categories. Probit regressions and two-part generalized linear models were used to examine relationships between adherence in year 1 and outcomes in year 2. Adherence to antipsychotic therapy was associated with a significantly lower probability of psychiatric hospitalization and significantly lower psychiatric hospital expenditures, with the largest effect sizes observed for the most highly adherent beneficiaries. There was no relationship between antipsychotic adherence and hospitalizations or expenditures for nonpsychiatric conditions. Adherence to antipsychotics among Medicare Part D enrollees with schizophrenia was associated with significantly lower probability of psychiatric hospitalization and lower hospital expenditures.

  11. Schizophrenia patients' and psychiatrists' perspectives on ethical aspects of symptom re-emergence during psychopharmacological research participation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Nguyen, Khanh P; Geppert, Cynthia M A; Rogers, Melinda K; Roberts, Brian B

    2003-12-01

    Study designs involving medication-free intervals have become the subject of controversy in the current dialogue on the ethics of serious mental-illness research. Schizophrenia patients ( n=59; response rate 75%; 48% inpatients) and psychiatrists ( n=70; response rate 83%) responded to ten questions about a hypothetical scenario in which a schizophrenia study participant experienced the re-emergence of serious symptoms during the "wash-out" phase of a psychopharmacological trial. Patients provided their personal views, and psychiatrists gave their personal views and made predictions as to how schizophrenia patients in general would respond. Schizophrenia patients and psychiatrists judged the hypothetical protocol as moderately harmful. Both expressed relatively low likelihood of willingness to participate in the study, given this potential outcome. Schizophrenia patients and psychiatrists found the decision fairly easy. Psychiatrists underestimated the level of harm and overestimated the difficulty of the decision as perceived by schizophrenia patients. Schizophrenia patients acknowledged that the offer of money and request by their doctor or family would increase the likelihood of their participation, and psychiatrists accurately predicted these responses. In hypothetical decisions about the symptomatic study participant, 38% of patients and 39% of psychiatrists said they would allow him to leave the hospital. A majority of both groups (63% and 52%, respectively) indicated that medication should be given despite the study participant's objection. Psychiatrists incorrectly predicted this response, expecting instead that most schizophrenia patients would support the discharge request and few would support involuntary administration of medication. Patients and psychiatrists offered similar reasons for participation decisions but differed in their strategies for handling the situation. These findings suggest potential strengths of decisionally capable schizophrenia

  12. Relationship between xerostomia and psychotropic drugs in patients with schizophrenia: evaluation using an oral moisture meter.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, A; Miyachi, H; Tanaka, K; Chikazu, D; Miyaoka, H

    2016-12-01

    Patients with schizophrenia are most commonly treated with antipsychotic medications, often with the addition of anxiolytics. This study used an oral moisture meter to evaluate xerostomia in patients with schizophrenia taking typical and atypical antipsychotics, anxiolytics and non-psychotropic medications. Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia according to ICD-10 criteria in the Department of Psychiatry, Kitasato University East, and affiliated hospitals were studied. All patients were on psychotropic medications. Patients with diseases associated with xerostomia, such as Sjögren's syndrome I, were excluded. A total of 127 patients were enrolled. Mean oral moisture was 27·81 ± 2·27% (normal, ≥30·0%). A significant association was observed between objective oral moisture and the subjective sense of dry mouth. Multivariate analysis revealed a negative correlation between the number of antipsychotics and, especially, anxiolytics, and the degree of oral moisture. Drug dosages themselves were not significantly correlated with dry mouth. These findings suggest that objective oral moisture measurements show decreased moisture in patients on these medications and that the degree of moisture shows a greater negative correlation with the number, as opposed to the dosages, of psychotropic drugs administered. When patients with schizophrenia visit a dental clinic, it is important for the dentist to accurately assess the degree of oral moisture and to determine the medications being taken. Based on these findings of the association of polypharmacy with xerostomia, dentists are encouraged to inform the psychiatrist of the need to actively manage patients' xerostomia. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Crowding Deficits in the Visual Periphery of Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraehenmann, Rainer; Vollenweider, Franz X.; Seifritz, Erich; Kometer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that basic visual information processing is impaired in schizophrenia. However, deficits in peripheral vision remain largely unexplored. Here we hypothesized that sensory processing of information in the visual periphery would be impaired in schizophrenia patients and, as a result, crowding – the breakdown in target recognition that occurs in cluttered visual environments – would be stronger. Therefore, we assessed visual crowding in the peripheral vision of schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Subjects were asked to identify a target letter that was surrounded by distracter letters of similar appearance. Targets and distracters were displayed at 8° and 10° of visual angle from the fixation point (eccentricity), and target-distracter spacing was 2°, 3°, 4°, 5°, 6°, 7° or 8° of visual angle. Eccentricity and target-distracter spacing were randomly varied. Accuracy was defined as the proportion of correctly identified targets. Critical spacing was defined as the spacing at which target identification accuracy began to deteriorate, and was assessed at viewing eccentricities of 8° and 10°. Schizophrenia patients were less accurate and showed a larger critical spacing than healthy individuals. These results indicate that crowding is stronger and sensory processing of information in the visual periphery is impaired in schizophrenia. This is in line with previous reports of preferential magnocellular dysfunction in schizophrenia. Thus, deficits in peripheral vision may account for perceptual alterations and contribute to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:23049884

  14. Drug Addiction in Patients With Chronic Schizophrenia and Its Relation With Psychopathology and Impulsiveness.

    PubMed

    Shokrgozar, Somayeh; Ahmadi, Reza; Yousefnezhad, Azadeh; Roshandelrad, Mahbobeh; Khosravi, Termeh; Ellahi, Masuomeh; Pakdaman, Mahdiyeh; Eskandari, Ameneh

    2015-03-26

    Using drugs is a common affliction in patients with Schizophrenia affecting their increasing death rate. They have to tolerate longer treatment time and staying in hospital and they further show more violence and their living quality decreases. It also seems that this factor is among the influential factors of unsuccessful results in treating these patients. Despite all this, there is little data about drug consumption, psychopathology and demographic information in patients with chronic schizophrenia in Iran. This paper reviews the relation between drug consumption and the mentioned qualities in patients afflicted by chronic Schizophrenia. In this cross-sectional study, 100 patients with Schizophrenia were interviewed based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic parameters and according to a psychiatrist´s views. The severity of psychopathology was evaluated, using PANSS, (SCID-I) DSM-IV and BARRAT. The results show that in patients with chronic schizophrenia, there is a meaningful relation between cigarette consumption and education, gender, family background and BARRAT. It also has a direct correlation with Attention and Motor. Drug consumption has a meaningful relation with gender and Motor (p<0.05). But it has no relation with BARRAT. Of the variables having a relation with correlation, cigarette and treatment period factors have a predicting effect for drug consumption. According to the results, drug and cigarette consumption is high among patients with Chronic Schizophrenia. Common cigarette consumption and its relation with impulsiveness increase, and death rate are the reasons which make us take the needed steps to have these patients quit smoking.

  15. Motivation and Social Cognition in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fervaha, Gagan; Siddiqui, Ishraq; Foussias, George; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2015-07-01

    Social cognition, referring to one's ability to perceive and process social cues, is an important domain in schizophrenia. Numerous studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia have poorer performance on tests assessing social cognition relative to healthy comparison participants. However, whether variables such as motivation are related to performance on these tests in patients with schizophrenia is unclear. One thousand three-hundred and seventy-eight patients with schizophrenia completed the Facial Emotion Discrimination Task as a measure of emotional processing, a key facet of social cognition. Level of motivation was also evaluated in these patients using a derived measure from the Quality of Life Scale. The relationship between motivation and task performance was examined using bivariate correlations and logistic regression modeling, controlling for the impact of age and overall severity of psychopathology, the latter evaluated using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Motivation was positively related to performance on the social cognition test, and this relationship remained significant after controlling for potential confounding variables such as age and illness severity. Social cognition was also related to functioning, and the relationship was mediated by level of motivation. The present study found a significant relationship between motivation and performance on a test of social cognition in a large sample of patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that amotivation undermines task performance, or alternatively that poor social cognitive ability impedes motivation. Future studies evaluating social cognition in patients with schizophrenia should concurrently assess for variables such as effort and motivation.

  16. Missing link in community psychiatry: When a patient with schizophrenia was expelled from her home.

    PubMed

    Chen, I-Ming; Wu, Kevin Chien-Chang; Chien, Yi-Ling; Chen, Yu-Hsiang; Lee, Sung-Tai

    2015-06-01

    Treatment and disposition of homeless patients with schizophrenia represent a great challenge in clinical practice. We report a case of this special population, and discuss the development of homelessness, the difficulty in disposition, their utilization of health services, and possible applications of mandatory community treatment in this group of patients. A 51-year-old homeless female was brought to an emergency department for left femur fracture caused by an assault. She was diagnosed with schizophrenia about 20 years ago but received little help from mental health services over the decades. During hospitalization, her psychotic symptoms were only partially responsive to treatment. Her family refused to handle caretaking duties. The social welfare system was mobilized for long-term disposition. Homeless patients with schizophrenia are characterized by family disruption, poor adherence to health care, and multiple emergency visits and hospitalization. We hope this article can provide information about the current mental health policy to medical personnel. It is possible that earlier intervention and better outcome can be achieved by utilizing mandatory community treatment in the future, as well as preventing patients with schizophrenia from losing shelters. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Suicidal behavior in the older patient with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kasckow, John; Montross, Lori; Prunty, Laurie; Fox, Lauren; Zisook, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about treating elderly suicidal patients with schizophrenia. The purpose of this article is to review the literature dealing with this population and to discuss what is required to advance this field. Most available studies from middle-aged and older individuals suggest that risk factors include hopelessness, lower quality of life, past traumatic events, depressive symptoms, lifetime suicidal ideation and past attempts; it is not clear whether these findings are generalizable to geriatric populations. Although little treatment research has been performed in older suicidal patients with schizophrenia, an integrated psychosocial and pharmacologic approach is recommended. In addition, one recent study augmented antipsychotic treatment with an SSRI (i.e., citalopram) in a sample of middle-aged and older individuals with schizophrenia with subsyndromal depression; in that study, serotonin selective reuptake inhibitor augmentation reduced depressive symptoms and suicidal ideation. More research is required to better understand suicidal behavior in older patients with schizophrenia. PMID:22028735

  18. Education and employment levels among Jamaican patients newly diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Bertilee; Curtis-Downes, Desdemona; Gibson, Roger C

    2013-05-01

    Comparisons between persons with bipolar disorder and those with schizophrenia are not well researched in the Caribbean. To compare the educational and occupational attainments in Jamaicans diagnosed with these two disorders. Data on diagnosis, educational level, type of employment and other basic socio-demographic variables were collected from Jamaican hospital patients who were newly diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Fisher's exact and χ2 tests, as well as binary logistic regression, were used to explore how these characteristics varied according to diagnosis. Statistical significance was taken at p < .05. Schizophrenia was associated with significantly lower educational attainment than bipolar disorder (p = .022 for educational level attained; p = .026 for completion of secondary school). The majority (87.1%) of the 93 patients included in the analysis had no specific marketable job skills. However, the proportion of persons with bipolar disorder who had such skills was three times the corresponding proportion of persons with schizophrenia. The low educational achievement among persons with schizophrenia makes education a potentially important area for interventions targeted at this group. Because gross deficiencies in job skills were common to both patient groups, improvement in job skill levels is an important goal for persons with either of these disorders.

  19. Self-disorders and the schizophrenia spectrum: a study of 100 first hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Nordgaard, Julie; Parnas, Josef

    2014-11-01

    Self-disorders (SD) have been described as a core feature of schizophrenia both in classical and recent psychopathological literature. However, the specificity of SD for the schizophrenia spectrum disorders has never been demonstrated in a diagnostically heterogeneous sample, nor has the concurrent validity of SD been examined. (1) To examine the specificity of Examination of Anomalous Self-Experiences (EASE) measured SD to the schizophrenia spectrum disorder in first contact inpatients, (2) to explore the internal consistency and factorial structure of the EASE, (3) to assess the concurrent validity of SD by exploring correlations between SD and the canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia, (4) to explore relations of SD to intelligence, sociodemographic, and extrinsic illness characteristics. A total of 100 consecutive first admission patients underwent a comprehensive psychopathological examination and an assessment of SD with the EASE scale. The diagnostic distribution of the EASE scores was tested with ANOVA, whereas the relations between the EASE scores and other symptomatic dimensions of schizophrenia were tested with Spearman's rho. A potential factorial structure and the internal consistency of the EASE scale were also examined. SD aggregated significantly in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, with no differences between schizophrenia and schizotypal disorders. EASE scores correlated moderately with canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia. Factor analysis of the EASE disclosed only one factor and the internal consistency of the EASE was excellent. SD aggregate selectively in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, with similar levels in schizophrenia and schizotypy. The study lends validity to the view of SD as an experiential vulnerability phenotype of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  20. Self-disorders and the Schizophrenia Spectrum: A Study of 100 First Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Nordgaard, Julie; Parnas, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Self-disorders (SD) have been described as a core feature of schizophrenia both in classical and recent psychopathological literature. However, the specificity of SD for the schizophrenia spectrum disorders has never been demonstrated in a diagnostically heterogeneous sample, nor has the concurrent validity of SD been examined. Aim: (1) To examine the specificity of Examination of Anomalous Self-Experiences (EASE) measured SD to the schizophrenia spectrum disorder in first contact inpatients, (2) to explore the internal consistency and factorial structure of the EASE, (3) to assess the concurrent validity of SD by exploring correlations between SD and the canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia, (4) to explore relations of SD to intelligence, sociodemographic, and extrinsic illness characteristics. Methods: A total of 100 consecutive first admission patients underwent a comprehensive psychopathological examination and an assessment of SD with the EASE scale. The diagnostic distribution of the EASE scores was tested with ANOVA, whereas the relations between the EASE scores and other symptomatic dimensions of schizophrenia were tested with Spearman’s rho. A potential factorial structure and the internal consistency of the EASE scale were also examined. Results: SD aggregated significantly in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, with no differences between schizophrenia and schizotypal disorders. EASE scores correlated moderately with canonical psychopathological dimensions of schizophrenia. Factor analysis of the EASE disclosed only one factor and the internal consistency of the EASE was excellent. Conclusions: SD aggregate selectively in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, with similar levels in schizophrenia and schizotypy. The study lends validity to the view of SD as an experiential vulnerability phenotype of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders. PMID:24476579

  1. Photophilic and photophobic behaviour in patients with schizophrenia and depression.

    PubMed

    Gerbaldo, H; Thaker, G

    1991-11-01

    The authors interviewed 32 patients (25 with an RDC diagnosis of schizophrenia and seven with schizoaffective disorder) consecutively admitted to a psychiatric outpatient clinic. Ten patients had a history of photophilic behaviour with sun-gazing, while 20 patients showed no unusual behaviour related to light. Two patients who had depressive symptoms at the time of interview had a history of photophobic behaviour. Sixteen patients and 12 controls were tested for their threshold for discomfort of high intensity light; the thresholds were significantly higher in the patients with schizophrenia (especially in those with history of sun gazing). The implications of these findings for clinical practice and research are discussed.

  2. Prognostic impact of nutritional risk assessment in patients with chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Tsun; Chang, Tien-Hao; Wu, Bo-Jian

    2017-04-22

    Protein-energy wasting is associated with poor outcome in various clinical settings. However, the prevalence of malnutrition and the prognostic impact of nutritional status are poorly understood in institutionalized patients with chronic schizophrenia. This study aimed to assess the predictive ability of the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index and Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index for long-term outcomes in patients with chronic schizophrenia. All measurements, including nutritional scores, were performed at baseline after the enrollment of 542 (64.6% men, mean age 53.8±9.7years) patients with chronic schizophrenia. The median follow-up period was 408days. The endpoints were falls and infection-related hospitalizations. At study completion, 34 patients suffered falls and 40 patients were admitted to hospitals due to infection. Both indices showed significant association with infectious complications, whereas only the Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index was significantly associated with falls. The adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of low Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index were 2.38 (1.16-4.86) for falls and 1.99 (1.05-3.76) for infectious complications. The Onodera's Prognostic Nutritional Index is more appropriate than the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index in identifying patients with chronic schizophrenia who are at risk for malnutrition and nutrition-related morbidity. Further studies are needed to explore whether early detection of patients with schizophrenia who are at risk for malnutrition could lead to the reduction of morbidity and mortality with the aid of appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Conscious and unconscious performance monitoring: Evidence from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Charles, Lucie; Gaillard, Raphaël; Amado, Isabelle; Krebs, Marie-Odile; Bendjemaa, Narjes; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    The ability to detect our own errors is an essential component of action monitoring. Using a masking paradigm in normal adults, we recently discovered that some error-detection processes can proceed without awareness, while other markers of performance monitoring such as the Error-Related Negativity (ERN) are tightly linked to conscious perception. Interestingly, research on cognitive deficit in schizophrenia has shown that the ERN is altered in these patients. In the present study, we therefore tested if the error detection impairment in schizophrenia is specific to conscious perception or is also found under non-conscious conditions, probing whether these performance monitoring processes are truly distinct. Thirteen patients with schizophrenia and thirteen age-matched healthy control subjects performed a speeded number comparison task on masked stimuli while EEG and MEG signals were recorded. Conscious perception and error-detection were assessed on a trial-by-trial basis using subjective reports of visibility and confidence. We found that patients with schizophrenia presented altered cingulate error-detection responses in conscious trials, as reflected by a decreased ERN. By contrast, on unconscious trials, both controls and schizophrenia patients performed above chance in evaluating the likelihood of having made an error. This dissociation confirms the existence of two distinct performance monitoring systems, and suggests that conscious metacognition in schizophrenia is specifically altered while non-conscious performance monitoring remains preserved.

  4. Theory of mind in patients with schizophrenia: is mentalizing delayed?

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anya; Koelkebeck, Katja; Brandt, Matthias; Wee, Melissa; Kueppers, Kerstin Annika; Kugel, Harald; Kohl, Waldemar; Bauer, Jochen; Ohrmann, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    Functional imaging studies have used numerous neurocognitive designs to investigate brain activation during theory of mind (ToM) tasks in patients with schizophrenia. The majority of studies asks participants to retrospectively attribute mental states to others. We used a novel animated task to investigate implicit mentalizing online. Because behavioral studies have revealed slower ToM performance reaction times in patients with schizophrenia, we hypothesized that time would influence functional MRI (fMRI) activation patterns also. We applied the "Moving Shapes" paradigm, which involves two interacting triangles, to a functional MRI block design and investigated the neural activation patterns of 15 patients with schizophrenia and 14 healthy controls. We additionally analyzed the first and second halves of each video separately to assess time-related differences. Overall, patients with schizophrenia showed increased activation in the inferior and middle frontal gyri, the superior temporal gyrus, the precuneus and the cerebellum compared with controls during ToM versus non-ToM videos. Most importantly, patients with schizophrenia had predominantly increased activation in ToM-related brain areas during the second half of the ToM paradigm, whereas the activation in areas of the ToM-network in healthy controls occurred during the first half of the presentation. Our results confirm recent findings of significantly stronger neural activations that encompass the fronto-temporo-parietal cerebral areas in patients with schizophrenia compared with controls during ToM tasks. The observation of slower cognitive processing in patients with schizophrenia during mentalizing might explain some of the contradictory imaging findings in these patients and have implications for cognitive remediation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Elevated homocysteine level in siblings of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Geller, Vadim; Friger, Michael; Sela, Ben-Ami; Levine, Joseph

    2013-12-30

    Increased homocysteine plasma levels were reported in patients with schizophrenia and Levine et al. (2002) suggested that such increase characterizes mainly males. In the following study we examined whether such increased levels also characterize male siblings of schizophrenia patients. Forty-four pairs of schizophrenia patients and their corresponding healthy male siblings were recruited and sampled for homocysteine. We also had age-matched controls for each of the sibling. The median homocysteine plasma level for patients was 13.0 µMol/L and 11.7 µMol/L for their male siblings compared with a median of 10.9 µMol/L for the siblings' controls. There was no significant difference between homocysteine plasma level in patients and their siblings. Significant difference was found for homocysteine plasma level between the siblings' group and their matched controls. A partial correlation of Ln plasma homocysteine level between patients and their siblings was found to be close to a zero correlation of -0.089, p=0.57 for the whole study group and -0.15, p=0.38 in the male-male patient-sibling pairs. Our results show that elevated homocysteine plasma level may characterize schizophrenia patients' male siblings, a finding that seems to agree with previous studies suggesting elevated homocysteine level as a risk factor for developing schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... but research has not yet definitively determined whether cannabis directly causes schizophrenia. Drug abuse can increase rates of other medical illnesses (such as hepatitis, heart disease, and infectious ...

  7. Functional hemispheric lateralization for language in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alary, Mathieu; Delcroix, Nicolas; Leroux, Elise; Razafimandimby, Annick; Brazo, Perrine; Delamillieure, Pascal; Dollfus, Sonia

    2013-09-01

    It is widely reported that patients with schizophrenia exhibit decreased hemispheric lateralization. However, no study has evaluated relationships between the hemispheric anatomical and functional asymmetry in language areas. The present study aimed to determine whether decreased leftward hemispheric lateralization could be related to asymmetry of the grey matter volume in patients with schizophrenia. This investigation was the first to use a functional index of laterality to analyze the global functional network specifically involved in the language task. Twenty-seven right-handed patients with schizophrenia and 54 right-handed control subjects underwent a session of a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a speech listening paradigm. Functional laterality indices (FLI) were calculated (Wilke, M. and Lidzba, K., 2007. LI-tool: a new toolbox to assess lateralization in functional MR-data. J Neurosci Methods. 163, 128-136). The indices of asymmetry in the volume of grey matter (GVAIs) were computed from the functional language network. Patients with schizophrenia exhibited significantly decreased leftward hemispheric lateralization. There was a positive correlation between GVAIs and FLIs in healthy subjects, while no such correlation was seen in patients with schizophrenia. This study reports for the first time a significant relationship between the anatomical and functional asymmetry in healthy subjects, but not in patients with schizophrenia. While decreased leftward functional lateralization for language was observed in patients with schizophrenia compared to the control group, this functional abnormality was not related to asymmetry in the volume of grey matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Refractive errors and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caspi, Asaf; Vishne, Tali; Reichenberg, Abraham; Weiser, Mark; Dishon, Ayelet; Lubin, Gadi; Shmushkevitz, Motti; Mandel, Yossi; Noy, Shlomo; Davidson, Michael

    2009-02-01

    Refractive errors (myopia, hyperopia and amblyopia), like schizophrenia, have a strong genetic cause, and dopamine has been proposed as a potential mediator in their pathophysiology. The present study explored the association between refractive errors in adolescence and schizophrenia, and the potential familiality of this association. The Israeli Draft Board carries a mandatory standardized visual accuracy assessment. 678,674 males consecutively assessed by the Draft Board and found to be psychiatrically healthy at age 17 were followed for psychiatric hospitalization with schizophrenia using the Israeli National Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry. Sib-ships were also identified within the cohort. There was a negative association between refractive errors and later hospitalization for schizophrenia. Future male schizophrenia patients were two times less likely to have refractive errors compared with never-hospitalized individuals, controlling for intelligence, years of education and socioeconomic status [adjusted Hazard Ratio=.55; 95% confidence interval .35-.85]. The non-schizophrenic male siblings of schizophrenia patients also had lower prevalence of refractive errors compared to never-hospitalized individuals. Presence of refractive errors in adolescence is related to lower risk for schizophrenia. The familiality of this association suggests that refractive errors may be associated with the genetic liability to schizophrenia.

  9. Prevalence and determinants of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis of Indian studies.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Suhas; Ashok, Abhishekh Hulegar; Kumar, Chennaveerachari Naveen; Thirthalli, Jagadish

    2016-08-01

    Several authors have studied prevalence of metabolic syndrome (Met-S) in schizophrenia patients. Studies conducted in Indian scenario have shown conflicting results. Community based studies reported extremely low prevalence of metabolic syndrome in contrast to hospital based studies reporting higher rates. In this systematic review we summarize results of studies conducted in India and discuss possible reasons for these discrepancies. Literature search was conducted with keywords metabolic, schizophrenia and India in PubMed, Google Scholar, and Science Direct database. Studies assessing prevalence of metabolic syndrome using IDF or NCEP-ATP III criteria, conducted in hospital and community setting were included. Fourteen studies conducted in hospital setting and two studies conducted in community were included for analysis. Pooled prevalence of Met-S in patients with schizophrenia was 29.83%. Pooled prevalence in community based studies was 10.81% significantly lower than in hospital based studies 33.05%. Overall meta-analysis of studies with case control design showed an OR 3.03 for prevalence in cases compared to controls. Except in one study conducted in a rural community, all other studies reported higher prevalence of Met-S in schizophrenia patients compared to controls. Drug-naïve patients had a pooled prevalence of 11.86%. In India, prevalence rates of Met-S in schizophrenia patients are comparable to the rates reported in western studies. Community based studies highlight a significantly lower prevalence compared to hospital studies. More community based studies will enhance our understanding of prevalence and determinants of Met-S in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Antipsychotic polypharmacy and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China.

    PubMed

    Hou, Cai-Lan; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zang, Yu; Jia, Fu-Jun; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Chiu, Helen F K; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Zhong, Bao-Liang; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Li, Yan; Cai, Mei-Ying; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-01-01

    In China, maintenance treatment for clinically stable patients with schizophrenia is usually provided by primary care physicians, but their prescribing patterns have not been studied. This study examined the frequency as well as demographic and clinical correlates of antipsychotic polypharmacy (APP) and its impact on quality of life (QOL) in patients with schizophrenia treated in primary care in China. A total of 623 community-dwelling patients from 18 randomly selected primary care services were interviewed. Patients' socio-demographic and clinical characteristics, including number of hospitalizations, antipsychotic drug-induced side effects, and QOL were recorded using a standardized protocol and data collection procedure. The rate of APP prescription was 31% (193/623). Of the patients on APP, 89.6% received 2 antipsychotics, 10.4% received 3 or more antipsychotics. Clozapine (35.6%) was the most commonly prescribed second generation antipsychotic (SGA), while perphenazine (17.8%) was the most commonly prescribed first generation antipsychotic (FGA). Multiple logistic regression analyses revealed that patients on APP were more likely to receive SGAs and anticholinergics, had fewer hospitalizations, younger age of onset, and higher doses of antipsychotics. There were no significant differences between the two groups in any of the QOL domains. Approximately a third of Chinese patients with schizophrenia in primary care receive APP. Further examination of the rationale and appropriateness of APP and its alternatives is warranted.

  11. Physiological characteristics of patients with schizophrenia prematurely dying from circulatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pao-Huan; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Kuo, Chian-Jue; Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Huang, Shou-Hung; Chen, Chiao-Chicy

    2016-09-01

    Patients with schizophrenia before reaching geriatric age are at high risk of circulatory mortality. However, investigations are lacking on the characteristics of physiological measurement among these at-risk patients. In this study, we followed acutely inpatients with schizophrenia disorder for cause of death through record linkage to the Death Certification System in Taiwan. Cases of patients who died because of circulatory morbidity (ICD-9 401-443) before turning 65 years old were used. Each schizophrenia case was then matched with two mentally healthy controls for the age and sex, and date of laboratory examination. Clinical data of all subjects were obtained by reviewing medical records. Totally, 81 patients with schizophrenia who died from circulatory diseases at mean ages of 48.0 ± 10.7 years were investigated. The mean age at the final acute psychiatric hospitalization was 43.0 ± 10.9 years. Multivariate analysis showed that elevated fasting serum glucose levels (95% confidence interval [CI] for odds ratio (OR) = 1.00-1.03), blood leukocyte counts (95% CI for odds ratio (OR) = 1.07-1.55), and heart rates on electrocardiogram (95% CI for OR = 1.04-1.10) in the final psychiatric hospitalization collectively provided the predictive validity for premature circulatory death. Systemic inflammatory activation and autonomic nervous system dysfunction along with dysregulation of glucose metabolism rather than lipids could be the physiological characteristics of schizophrenia patients at risk of premature circulatory mortality. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. The use of electroconvulsive therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Diana; Brandt-Christensen, Mette; Ockelmann, Hans Henrik; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2012-04-01

    In Denmark, over 2500 people are in psychiatric treatment in forensic mental health services at any one time, most suffering from schizophrenia. Many of them have illnesses that are resistant to medication. There is evidence of the effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) for schizophrenia, but not explicitly for this complex forensic group. The aim of this study was to describe the outcome of using ECT as augmentation therapy in a cohort of forensic psychiatric patients with schizophrenia who were failing to respond to antipsychotic medication. In one university-based psychiatric clinic, data were extracted from the medical records of all patients treated with ECT during a 6-year period. Fifty-nine of these patients were diagnosed within the schizophrenia spectrum and eight were in specialist forensic hospital services. The mean duration of illness for the forensic cohort was 16 years (range 3-33 years), with the index episode having lasted a mean of 34 months (3 weeks to 8 years) in spite of treatment with at least two antipsychotic drugs. Psychotic symptoms were accompanied by seriously assaultive behaviour in all cases. All but one of these patients had an excellent or good symptomatic and behavioural response to ECT. Half (four) went on to maintenance ECT. No adverse effects were documented. ECT is rarely used in specialist secure services, but should not be forgotten as a treatment that may enable medication-resistant, assaultive psychotic patients to progress safely out to the community. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Etiology of cardiovascular disease in patients with schizophrenia: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Emul, Murat; Kalelioglu, Tevfik

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are important problems among patients with schizophrenia. A wide spectrum of reasons, ranging from genes to the environment, are held responsible for causing the cardiovascular risk factors that may lead to shortening the life expectancy of patients with schizophrenia. Here, we have summarized the etiologic issues related with the cardiovascular risk factors in schizophrenia. First, we focused on heritable factors associated with cardiovascular disease and schizophrenia by mentioning studies about genetics-epigenetics, in the first-episode or drug-naïve patients. In this context, the association and candidate gene studies about metabolic disturbances in schizophrenia are reviewed, and the lack of the effects of epigenetic/posttranscriptional factors such as microRNAs is mentioned. Increased rates of type 2 diabetes mellitus and disrupted metabolic parameters in schizophrenia are forcing clinicians to struggle with metabolic syndrome parameters and related issues, which are also the underlying causes for the risk of having cardiometabolic and cardiovascular etiology. Second, we summarized the findings of metabolic syndrome-related entities and discussed the influence of the illness itself, antipsychotic drug treatment, and the possible disadvantageous lifestyle on the occurrence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) or diabetes mellitus. Third, we emphasized on the risk factors of sudden cardiac death in patients with schizophrenia. We reviewed the findings on the arrhythmias such as QT prolongation, which is a risk factor for Torsade de Pointes and sudden cardiac death or P-wave prolongation that is a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. For example, the use of antipsychotics is an important reason for the prolongation of QT and some other cardiac autonomic dysfunctions. Additionally, we discussed relatively rare issues such as myocarditis and cardiomyopathy, which are important for prognosis in schizophrenia that may have originated

  14. Superior mentalizing abilities of female patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Abu-Akel, Ahmad; Bo, Sune

    2013-12-30

    Mentalizing abilities are severely disrupted in patients with schizophrenia, but gender-related differences in this domain are virtually unexplored. Given the importance of these abilities in understanding psychopathology, social functioning and outcome, this study aimed to examine the mentalizing abilities of male and female patients with schizophrenia. The cognitive and affective mentalizing abilities of self and other of clinically stable male and female patients with schizophrenia were analyzed using the abbreviated version of the Metacognitive Assessment Scale (MAS-A). Compared to their male counterparts, the female patients demonstrated superior overall mentalizing abilities. This advantage was also evident when mentalizing about the Self or the Other. When examining cognitive versus affective mentalizing, women were significantly better in their ability to attribute and understand the affective mental states of others. These differences were unrelated to intelligence or psychopathology. The superior mentalizing abilities of female patients extend gender-related differences in schizophrenia to include social cognition. This suggests that our current knowledge of socio-cognitive abilities in schizophrenia is generalizable to male but not to female patients. The findings also provide important insights to understanding how etiological differences affect social cognition. Awareness to such differences has important implications for diagnosis and clinical treatment.

  15. [Inbreeding, endogamy and exogamy among relatives of schizophrenia patients].

    PubMed

    Abaskuliev, A A; Skoblo, G V

    1975-01-01

    An increased frequency of consanguineous marriages among the parents of schizophrenic patients in comparison with the control group of exogenous-somatic patients (infections, trauma) was found. Endogamy among the parents of schizophrenic patients and the control group was practically the same. The data obtained indicate a certain, but not the leading, role of inbreeding in the etiology of schizophrenia.

  16. Relationship between first treatment contact and supernatural beliefs in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Grover, S; Nebhinani, N; Chakrabarti, S; Shah, R; Avasthi, A

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE. To explore the relationship between attribution of symptoms to supernatural beliefs and first treatment contact in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia attending a tertiary care hospital located in North India. METHODS. A total of 122 caregivers (aged ≥ 18 years, staying with patient ≥ 1 year and involved in patients' care) of consecutive patients with diagnosis of schizophrenia (according to the ICD-10) were evaluated for their supernatural beliefs and first treatment contact. RESULTS. The first treatment contact was a government or private psychiatrist in slightly more than half (53.3%) of the patients, while it was faith healers in 23.8% of the patients. Around three quarters (74.6%) of the caregivers attributed patients' symptoms to ≥ 1 supernatural belief (like sorcery / witchcraft, ghosts, spirit intrusion, divine wrath, planetary influences, evil spirits, and bad deeds in previous life) and more than half (57.4%) of the caregivers attributed patients' symptoms to > 1 supernatural belief. It was observed that those who contacted faith healers for their patients' treatment had significantly higher attribution of the symptoms to supernatural causes. CONCLUSIONS. Supernatural beliefs were common in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia and the majority attributed their patients' symptoms to these beliefs. It signifies an urgent need for mental health literacy in India.

  17. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  18. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  19. How patients with schizophrenia use the internet: qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Schrank, Beate; Sibitz, Ingrid; Unger, Annemarie; Amering, Michaela

    2010-12-19

    The Internet is an important source of health information for people with psychiatric conditions. Little is known about the way patients with schizophrenia use the Internet when it comes to issues related to their illness. Data on their specific needs, difficulties, and the consequences related to Internet use are lacking. Our objective was to investigate the nature and subjective consequences of health-related Internet use among patients with schizophrenia. In all, 26 individual semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed qualitatively in groups of 4 until theoretical saturation was achieved. Study results suggest that the Internet is an influential source of illness-related information for patients with schizophrenia. Many aspects of their behavior around the Internet resemble those of individuals not afflicted by mental illness. Importantly, problems specific to patients with schizophrenia were stimulus overflow, an inability to deal with the abundance of information, difficulties with concentration, lack of energy, paranoid ideas, symptom provocation, and the need to distance themselves from illness-related topics as part of the recovery process. Internet information was subjectively perceived as having the potential to significantly change patients' attitudes toward medication and their relationships with doctors. These findings provide insight into how individuals with schizophrenia handle illness-related Internet information. The data could contribute to the continuous development of Internet-based interventions and offer novel approaches to optimizing traditional treatment options.

  20. Aberrant network connectivity during error processing in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Voegler, Rolf; Becker, Michael P.I.; Nitsch, Alexander; Miltner, Wolfgang H.R.; Straube, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuroimaging methods have pointed to deficits in the interaction of large-scale brain networks in patients with schizophrenia. Abnormal connectivity of the right anterior insula (AI), a central hub of the salience network, is frequently reported and may underlie patients’ deficits in adaptive salience processing and cognitive control. While most previous studies used resting state approaches, we examined right AI interactions in a task-based fMRI study. Methods Patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls performed an adaptive version of the Eriksen Flanker task that was specifically designed to ensure a comparable number of errors between groups. Results We included 27 patients with schizophrenia and 27 healthy controls in our study. The between-groups comparison replicated the classic finding of reduced activation in the midcingulate cortex (MCC) in patients with schizophrenia during the commission of errors while controlling for confounding factors, such as task performance and error frequency, which have been neglected in many previous studies. Subsequent psychophysiological interaction analysis revealed aberrant functional connectivity (FC) between the right AI and regions in the inferior frontal gyrus and temporoparietal junction. Additionally, FC between the MCC and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was reduced. Limitations As we examined a sample of medicated patients, effects of antipsychotic medication may have influenced our results. Conclusion Overall, it appears that schizophrenia is associated with impairment of networks associated with detection of errors, refocusing of attention, superordinate guiding of cognitive control and their respective coordination. PMID:26836622

  1. Voice identity recognition failure in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Alba-Ferrara, Lucy; Weis, Susanne; Damjanovic, Ljubica; Rowett, Matthew; Hausmann, Markus

    2012-09-01

    Cognitive models propose that auditory verbal hallucinations arise through inner speech misidentification. However, such models cannot explain why the voices in hallucinations often have identities different from the hearer. This study investigated whether a general voice identity recognition difficulty might be present in schizophrenia and related to auditory verbal hallucinations. Twenty-five schizophrenia patients and 13 healthy controls were tested on recognition of famous voices. Signal detection theory was used to calculate perceptual sensitivity and response criterion measures. Schizophrenia patients obtained fewer hits and had lower perceptual sensitivity to detect famous voices than healthy controls did. There were no differences between groups in false alarm rate or response criterion. A symptom-based analysis demonstrated that especially those patients with auditory verbal hallucinations performed poorly in the task. The results indicate that patients with hallucinations are impaired at voice identity recognition because of decreased sensitivity, which may result in inner speech misidentification.

  2. Quality of life of key caregivers of schizophrenia patients and association with kinship.

    PubMed

    Margetić, Branka Aukst; Jakovljević, Miro; Furjan, Zvjezdana; Margetić, Branimir; Marsanić, Vlatka Boricević

    2013-12-01

    Reports on the quality of life (QOL) of family caregivers of schizophrenia patients are uncommon. Relations of different degree of kinship to caregivers' QOL are unexplored, but may be relevant. The purpose of this study was to assess the subjective QOL of caregivers of stable outpatients with diagnosis of schizophrenia compared with controls, and to assess factors associated with QOL in this population. Responses of 138 schizophrenia outpatient' family caregivers to the Quality of Life, Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire (QLESQSF) were compared with those of a sex- and age-matched control group. Patients were assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and data were collected for kinship relationship and hospitalization. Group of caregivers had significantly lower QOL compared with controls (t=11.347; df=271; p=0.0001). Caregivers' QOL correlated significantly with their age and differed according to the degree of kinship and marriage status. ANCOVA, with age as covariate, performed to asses the differences in QOL according to kinship, showed that parents and own children had significantly lower QOL than patients' siblings who were also caregivers. QOL of the schizophrenia patients' caregivers is lower in comparisons to controls. It depends on the degree of kinship and caregivers' age. Parents and own children have lower QOL than siblings. Psycho-educational intervention programmes should target specific needs of the family as a whole, depending also on their age and kinship relationship.

  3. Increased corneal temperature in drug-free male schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Portuguese, Shirley; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Sigler, Maianit; Hermesh, Haggai; Munitz, Hanan; Weizman, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients may exhibit altered body temperature. We hypothesized that drug-free patients may have a higher corneal temperature than normal subjects. The corneal temperature of seven remitted drug-free schizophrenia outpatients and seven healthy volunteers was evaluated with a flir thermal imaging camera. A significantly higher corneal temperature was observed in the patient group (34.60+/-1.89 vs. 33.05+/-0.58 degrees C; P=0.005) and it correlated with their BPRS score (r=0.82; P=0.024). The relevance of these preliminary findings merit further investigation.

  4. Neurocognitive Vulnerability: Suicidal and Homicidal Behaviours in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Richard-Devantoy, Stéphane; Orsat, Manuel; Dumais, Alexandre; Turecki, Gustavo; Jollant, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    Objective Schizophrenia is associated with an increase in the risk of both homicide and suicide. The objectives of this study were to systematically review all published articles that examined the relation between neurocognitive deficits and suicidal or homicidal behaviours in schizophrenia, and to identify vulnerabilities in suicidal and homicidal behaviour that may share a common pathway in schizophrenia. Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed using MEDLINE to include all studies published up to August 31, 2012. Results: Among the 1760 studies, 7 neuropsychological and 12 brain imaging studies met the selection criteria and were included in the final analysis. The neuropsychological and functional neuroimaging studies were inconclusive. The structural imaging studies reported various alterations in patients with schizophrenia and a history of homicidal behaviour, including: reduced inferior frontal and temporal cortices, increased mediodorsal white matter, and increased amygdala volumes. Patients with a history of suicidal acts showed volumetric reductions in left orbitofrontal and superior temporal cortices, while right amygdala volume was increased, though, these findings have rarely been replicated. Finally, no study has directly compared neurocognitive markers of suicidal and homicidal risk. Conclusion: These results suggest that brain alterations, in addition to those associated with schizophrenia, may predispose some patients to a higher risk of homicide or suicide in particular circumstances. Moreover, some of these alterations may be shared between homicidal and suicidal patients. However, owing to several limitations, including the small number of available studies, no firm conclusions can be drawn and further investigations are necessary. PMID:24444320

  5. How Patients With Schizophrenia Use the Internet: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Sibitz, Ingrid; Unger, Annemarie; Amering, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    Background The Internet is an important source of health information for people with psychiatric conditions. Little is known about the way patients with schizophrenia use the Internet when it comes to issues related to their illness. Data on their specific needs, difficulties, and the consequences related to Internet use are lacking. Objective Our objective was to investigate the nature and subjective consequences of health-related Internet use among patients with schizophrenia. Methods In all, 26 individual semistructured interviews were conducted and analyzed qualitatively in groups of 4 until theoretical saturation was achieved. Results Study results suggest that the Internet is an influential source of illness-related information for patients with schizophrenia. Many aspects of their behavior around the Internet resemble those of individuals not afflicted by mental illness. Importantly, problems specific to patients with schizophrenia were stimulus overflow, an inability to deal with the abundance of information, difficulties with concentration, lack of energy, paranoid ideas, symptom provocation, and the need to distance themselves from illness-related topics as part of the recovery process. Internet information was subjectively perceived as having the potential to significantly change patients’ attitudes toward medication and their relationships with doctors. Conclusions These findings provide insight into how individuals with schizophrenia handle illness-related Internet information. The data could contribute to the continuous development of Internet-based interventions and offer novel approaches to optimizing traditional treatment options. PMID:21169176

  6. [Health related quality of life and disease burden of patients with schizophrenia in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Péntek, Márta; Harangozó, Judit; Egerházi, Anikó; Kelemen, Oguz; Gulácsi, László; Baji, Petra; Máttyássy, Adrienn; Erdélyi, Rita; Lehoczky, Szilvia; Orlewska, Ewa; Vártokné Hevér, Noémi; Ferencz, Akos; Brodszky, Valentin

    2012-01-01

    According to the international literature disease burden of schizophrenia is substantial, however data from Eastern Central Europe is scarce. Our aim was to assess the quality of life and costs of patients with schizophrenia in Hungary. A cross sectional questionnaire survey was performed in 3 hospital based psychiatry centres involving patients with schizophrenia. Demographics, disease severity (Clinical Global Impression, CGI), functional ability (Global Assessment of Functioning, GAF) and general health status (EQ-5D) was assessed. Health care utilisation and aids were surveyed for the past 12 months. Costing was performed from the societal perspective and human capital approach was applied. Altogether 78 patients (female 43.6%) were involved with a mean age of 44.2 (SD=13.1) years, disease duration was >10 years at 49 (62.8%) cases, 66 (84.6%) patients were disability pensioners. Distribution between CGI 3-4-5-6 levels were 12 (16%), 33 (43%), 21 (28%), 10 (13%) patients, respectively, mean GAF was 52.6 (SD=13.9). The average EQ-5D score was 0.64 (SD=0.3) and it was significantly worse than the age-matched general population's score in Hungary (p < 0.01). Mean yearly cost was 13 878 Euros/patient (conversion 1 Euro=280.6 HUF), the rate of direct medical,direct non-medical and indirect costs was 28.5%, 5.4% and 66.1%, respectively. Among direct costs hospitalisation and drug costs were dominant. Total cost correlates with disease severity (CGI). Schizophrenia leads to notable deterioration in health related quality of life and induce high costs to society, mainly due to the productivity loss of the patients. Nevertheless disease related costs in Hungary are lower than in economically more developed European countries. Our study offers basic data about disease burden of schizophrenia in Hungary to support clinical and health policy decision making.

  7. Increased rare duplication burden genomewide in patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Martin, A K; Mowry, B

    2016-02-01

    A significant number of patients with schizophrenia fail to respond to antipsychotic medication. Although several studies have investigated associated patient characteristics, the emerging findings from genetic studies offer further scope for study. In 612 schizophrenia patients with detailed clinical information, common genetic variants indexed by polygenic risk scores, and rare variants indexed by deletion and duplication burden genomewide, we explored potential genetic predictors alongside other established risk factors for treatment resistance. Clinical outcomes of treatment resistance were also calculated using lifetime measures of positive, negative/disorganized and mood symptoms as well as number of hospitalizations and suicide attempts. Logistic regression models identified a significant relationship between treatment resistance and total duplication burden genomewide, years of formal schooling and age at onset. Clinically, treatment-resistant patients were characterized by greater negative/disorganized and positive symptoms and greater number of hospitalizations. Taken together, these findings suggest genetic information, specifically the genomewide burden of rare copy number variants, may increase our understanding and clinical management of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia.

  8. Attitudes toward Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Patients with Schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Ishioka, Masamichi; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Tsuruga, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Furukori, Hanako; Kudo, Shuhei; Tomita, Tetsu; Nakagami, Taku; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the use of placebo in clinical trials of schizophrenia patients is controversial because of medical and ethical concerns, placebo-controlled clinical trials are commonly used in the licensing of new drugs. Aims The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials among patients with schizophrenia in Japan. Method Using a cross-sectional design, we recruited patients (n = 251) aged 47.7±13.2 (mean±SD) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were admitted to six psychiatric hospitals from December 2013 to March 2014. We employed a 14-item questionnaire specifically developed to survey patients' attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials. Results The results indicated that 33% of the patients would be willing to participate in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Expectations for improvement of disease, a guarantee of hospital treatment continuation, and encouragement by family or friends were associated with the willingness to participate in such trials, whereas a belief of additional time required for medical examinations was associated with non-participation. Conclusions Fewer than half of the respondents stated that they would be willing to participate in placebo-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, interpreting the results from placebo-controlled clinical trials could be negatively affected by selection bias. PMID:26600382

  9. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Background Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. Methods An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Results Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Conclusion Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8. PMID:25285009

  10. Early prediction of blonanserin response in Japanese patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Taro; Matsuda, Yuki; Fujita, Kiyoshi; Iwata, Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Blonanserin is a second-generation antipsychotic used for the treatment of schizophrenia in Japan and Korea. The present study aimed to examine early prediction of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia. An 8-week, prospective, single-arm, flexible-dose clinical trial of blonanserin in patients with schizophrenia was conducted under real-world conditions. The inclusion criteria were antipsychotic naïve, and first-episode schizophrenia patients or schizophrenia patients with no consumption of any antipsychotic medication for more than 4 weeks before enrollment in this study. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and predictive power were calculated for the response status at week 4 to predict the subsequent response at week 8. Thirty-seven patients were recruited (56.8% of them had first-episode schizophrenia), and 28 (75.7%) completed the trial. At week 8, blonanserin was associated with a significant improvement in the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score (P<0.0001) and in positive (P<0.0001), negative (P<0.0001), and general subscale scores (P<0.0001). In terms of percentage improvement of PANSS total scores from baseline to week 8, 64.9% of patients showed a ≥20% reduction in the PANSS total score and 48.6% showed a ≥30% reduction. However, 8.1% of patients experienced at least one adverse event. Using the 20% reduction in the PANSS total score at week 4 as a definition of an early response, the negative predictive values for later responses (ie, reductions of ≥30 and ≥40 in the PANSS total scores) were 88.9% and 94.1%, respectively. The specificities were 80.0% and 51.6%, respectively. Our results suggest that the blonanserin response at week 4 could predict the later response at week 8.

  11. Coping strategies in Aymara caregivers of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Ferrer-García, Marta; Miranda-Castillo, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Deinstitutionalization has forced families of patients with schizophrenia to take responsibility of informal care, without having the tools to exert their role properly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the coping strategies of caregivers of patients with schizophrenia, belonging to the Aymara ethnic group, (aborigines who are located on the highlands of Northern Chile). The studied sample comprised 45 caregivers of patients with schizophrenia users of the Mental Health Service of Arica, Chile. The results from the Family Coping Questionnaire (FCQ) show that both, Aymara and non-Aymara caregivers use the same coping strategies except for spiritual help which is more likely to be used by Aymara. This strategy might be related with the worldview they possess, thus the relation with the deities has a meaningful importance in the way of explaining and coping with different phenomena.

  12. 'Patient satisfaction' in hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Skarstein, Jon; Dahl, Alv A; Laading, Jacob; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-01-01

    Predictors of 'patient satisfaction' with hospitalization at a specialized cancer hospital in Norway are examined in this study. Two weeks after their last hospitalization, 2021 consecutive cancer patients were invited to rate their satisfaction with hospitalization, quality of life, anxiety and depression. Compliance rate was 72% (n = 1453). Cut-off levels separating dissatisfied from satisfied patients were defined. It was found that 92% of the patients were satisfied with their stay in hospital, independent of cancer type and number of previous admissions. Performance of nurses and physicians, level of information perceived, outcome of health status, reception at the hospital and anxiety independently predicted 'patient satisfaction'. The model explained 35% of the variance with an area under the curve of 0.76 of the Receiver Operator Curve. Cancer patients' satisfaction with their hospital stay was high, and predicted by four independently predictive variables related to the performance of caregivers. These suggest areas for further improvement in the healthcare service.

  13. Impaired coherence of life narratives of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Allé, Mélissa C; Potheegadoo, Jevita; Köber, Christin; Schneider, Priscille; Coutelle, Romain; Habermas, Tilmann; Danion, Jean-Marie; Berna, Fabrice

    2015-08-10

    Self-narratives of patients have received increasing interest in schizophrenia since they offer unique material to study patients' subjective experience related to their illness, in particular the alteration of self that accompanies schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated the life narratives and the ability to integrate and bind memories of personal events into a coherent narrative in 27 patients with schizophrenia and 26 controls. Four aspects of life narratives were analyzed: coherence with cultural concept of biography, temporal coherence, causal-motivational coherence and thematic coherence. Results showed that in patients cultural biographical knowledge is preserved, whereas temporal coherence is partially impaired. Furthermore, causal-motivational and thematic coherence are significantly impaired: patients have difficulties explaining how events have modeled their identity, and integrating different events along thematic lines. Impairment of global causal-motivational and thematic coherence was significantly correlated with patients' executive dysfunction, suggesting that cognitive impairment observed in patients could affect their ability to construct a coherent narrative of their life by binding important events to their self. This study provides new understanding of the cognitive deficits underlying self-disorders in patients with schizophrenia. Our findings suggest the potential usefulness of developing new therapeutic interventions to improve autobiographical reasoning skills.

  14. Déjà vu experiences in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Takuya; Adachi, Naoto; Takekawa, Yoshikazu; Akanuma, Nozomi; Ito, Masumi; Matsubara, Ryouji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Kimura, Michihiro; Arai, Heii

    2006-01-01

    To investigate whether déjà vu experiences are psychopathologic phenomena, we studied the frequency and characteristics of déjà vu experiences in patients with schizophrenia. One hundred thirteen patients with schizophrenia and 386 nonclinical control subjects were evaluated with the Inventory of Déjà vu Experiences Assessment. The frequency and features of déjà vu experiences were compared between the 2 groups. The patients with schizophrenia had déjà vu experiences less frequently (53.1%) than did the nonclinical subjects (76.2%). The frequency of déjà vu experiences did not correlate significantly with age at evaluation or education level among the patients with schizophrenia. Most characteristics of déjà vu experiences of the patients were comparable with those of the control subjects. However, the experiences of the patients tended to be longer and more monotonous. The patients often felt alert, oppressed, and disturbed by the experiences. They appeared to have the experiences under unpleasant mental or physical states. Their déjà vu experiences are not primarily different in nature from those of the nonclinical subjects. The decreased frequency of the experiences in the patients may suggest déjà vu experiences as nonpathologic phenomena.

  15. Brain activation induced by psychological stress in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Castro, M N; Villarreal, M F; Bolotinsky, N; Papávero, E; Goldschmidt, M G; Costanzo, E Y; Drucaroff, L; Wainsztein, A; de Achával, D; Pahissa, J; Bär, K-J; Nemeroff, C B; Guinjoan, S M

    2015-10-01

    Environmental influences are critical for the expression of genes putatively related to the behavioral and cognitive phenotypes of schizophrenia. Among such factors, psychosocial stress has been proposed to play a major role in the expression of symptoms. However, it is unsettled how stress interacts with pathophysiological pathways to produce the disease. We studied 21 patients with schizophrenia and 21 healthy controls aged 18 to 50years with 3T-fMRI, in which a period of 6min of resting state acquisition was followed by a block design, with three blocks of 1-min control-task, 1-min stress-task and 1-min rest after-task. Self-report of stress and PANSS were measured. Limbic structures were activated in schizophrenia patients by simple tasks and remained active during, and shortly after stress. In controls, stress-related brain activation was more time-focused, and restricted to the stressful task itself. Negative symptom severity was inversely related to activation of anterior cingulum and orbitofrontal cortex. Results might represent the neurobiological aspect of hyper-reactivity to normal stressful situations previously described in schizophrenia, thus providing evidence on the involvement of limbic areas in the response to stress in schizophrenia. Patients present a pattern of persistent limbic activation probably contributing to hypervigilance and subsequent psychotic thought distortions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Can renaming schizophrenia reduce negative attitudes toward patients in Turkey?

    PubMed

    Aker, Servet; Böke, Ömer; Oğuz, Gülay

    2016-06-01

    To determine the perception of the term schizophrenia among university students. This cross-sectional study was performed in April 2015 with students from Canik Başarı University (Samsun/Turkey). A patient history was first established. We then investigated to what extent students agreed with 10 statements based on that patient history. Three separate questionnaire forms (versions A, B and C), differing only in terms of the diagnosis in the patient in the history, were prepared. The three diagnoses were 'Schizophrenia' (version A), 'A psychiatric disease by the name of Bleuler's syndrome' (version B) and 'Brain tumor' (version C). The questionnaires were administered in a class environment. In all, 771 students participated. Statistically significant differences between the forms were determined in only two statements ('A.'s disease will represent a problem in A.'s future career' and 'A. will in all probability have problems with the law in the future'). While no difference was determined between versions A and B at two-way comparisons, a statistically significant difference was observed between versions A and B and version C. No difference was determined between students' attitudes toward a diagnosis of 'schizophrenia' and one of 'a psychiatric disease known as Bleuler's syndrome'. The focus in preventing stigmatization of schizophrenia should not concentrate on a name change alone. Changing the name schizophrenia may be of no use unless public ignorance and fear of psychiatric diseases can also be overcome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive predictors of quality of life in schizophrenia patients receiving conventional neuroleptics.

    PubMed

    Sota, Teresa L; Heinrichs, R Walter

    2004-01-01

    We sought to evaluate demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive predictors of self-rated life quality and hospitalization in schizophrenia patients without the potentially cognition-enhancing influence of newer generation neuroleptic medication. A sample of 55 atypical neuroleptic-naive schizophrenia patients was assessed at index and 3 years later. Index neurocognitive measures included general intellectual ability (IQ), executive ability (Wisconsin Card Sorting Test [WCST]), verbal memory (California Verbal Learning Test [CVLT]), and manual dexterity (Purdue Pegboard). These measures, along with demographic (age, sex, education) and clinical (symptoms, prior hospitalizations) variables, were entered into regression equations to predict life quality (Sickness Impact Profile [SIP]) at follow-up, as well as rehospitalization during the 3-year period. Stability data were also analyzed. Demographic and cognitive data predicted subjective quality of life, but not rehospitalization. Changes in memory over time rather than performance levels related to life quality at follow-up. Rehospitalization was related only to demographic data and previous hospital admissions. The findings support the predictive value of selected aspects of neurocognition in relation to a subjective outcome domain in schizophrenia.

  18. Psychotropic prescribing in seriously violent men with schizophrenia or personality disorder in a UK high security hospital.

    PubMed

    Stone-Brown, Keir; Naji, Mahmood; Francioni, Alex; Myers, Kyle; Samarendra, Harsh; Mushtaq-Chaudhry, Haseeb; Heslop, Stephen; Sengupta, Samrat; Ross, Callum C; Larkin, Fintan; Das, Mrigendra

    2016-02-01

    To analyze antipsychotic prescribing patterns in a UK high security hospital (HSH) that treats seriously violent men with either schizophrenia or personality disorder and examine how different groups consented to treatment and prescribing for metabolic conditions. We hypothesized that there would be high prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy, and high-dose antipsychotic and clozapine prescribing. HSHs treat seriously violent, mentally disordered offenders, and the extant literature on prescribing patterns in forensic settings is sparse. Prescribing and clinical data on all 189 patients in a UK HSH were collected from the hospital's databases. Data were analyzed using SPSS. The population was split into the following groups: schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD-only), personality disorder (PD-only), and comorbid schizophrenia spectrum disorder and PD. The majority (93.7%) of all patients were prescribed at least one antipsychotic, and (27.5%) were on clozapine. Polypharmacy was prevalent in 22.2% and high-dose antipsychotic in 27.5%. Patients on clozapine were more likely to be prescribed antidiabetic, statins, or antihypertensive medication. Patients in the PD-only group were more likely to be deemed to have the capacity to consent to treatment and be prescribed clozapine in contrast to the SSD-only group. Rates of clozapine and high-dose antipsychotic prescribing were higher than in other psychiatric settings, while polypharmacy prescribing rates were lower. Higher clozapine prescribing rates may be a function of a treatment-resistant and aggressive population. A higher proportion of PD-only patients consented to treatment and received clozapine compared with in-house SSD-only as well as other psychiatric settings. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  19. Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Woolley, J D; Chuang, B; Lam, O; Lai, W; O'Donovan, A; Rankin, K P; Mathalon, D H; Vinogradov, S

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia have functionally significant deficits in automatic and controlled social cognition, but no currently available pharmacologic treatments reduce these deficits. The neuropeptide oxytocin has multiple prosocial effects when administered intranasally in humans and there is growing interest in its therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. We administered 40 IU of oxytocin and saline placebo intranasally to 29 male subjects with schizophrenia and 31 age-matched, healthy controls in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Social cognition was assessed with The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on automatic social cognition (the ability to rapidly interpret and understand emotional cues from the voice, face, and body); controlled social cognition (the ability to comprehend indirectly expressed emotions, thoughts, and intentions through complex deliberations over longer time periods); and a control task (the ability to comprehend truthful dialog and perform general task procedures) in individuals with and without schizophrenia using mixed factorial analysis of variance models. Patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in automatic and controlled social cognition compared to healthy controls, and administration of oxytocin significantly improved their controlled, but not automatic, social cognition, F(1, 58)=8.75; p=0.004. Conversely, oxytocin administration had limited effects on social cognition in healthy participants. Patients and controls performed equally well and there were no effects of oxytocin administration on the control task. Intact social cognitive abilities are associated with better functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. Our data highlight the potentially complex effects of oxytocin on some but not all aspects of social cognition, and support the exploration of

  20. Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, J.D.; Chuang, B.; Lam, O.; Lai, W.; O’Donovan, A.; Rankin, K.P.; Mathalon, D.H.; Vinogradov, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Individuals with schizophrenia have functionally significant deficits in automatic and controlled social cognition, but no currently available pharmacologic treatments reduce these deficits. The neuropeptide oxytocin has multiple prosocial effects when administered intranasally in humans and there is growing interest in its therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. Methods We administered 40 IU of oxytocin and saline placebo intranasally to 29 male subjects with schizophrenia and 31 age-matched, healthy controls in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Social cognition was assessed with The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on automatic social cognition (the ability to rapidly interpret and understand emotional cues from the voice, face, and body); controlled social cognition (the ability to comprehend indirectly expressed emotions, thoughts, and intentions through complex deliberations over longer time periods); and a control task (the ability to comprehend truthful dialog and perform general task procedures) in individuals with and without schizophrenia using mixed factorial analysis of variance models. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in automatic and controlled social cognition compared to healthy controls, and administration of oxytocin significantly improved their controlled, but not automatic, social cognition, F(1, 58) = 8.75; p = 0.004. Conversely, oxytocin administration had limited effects on social cognition in healthy participants. Patients and controls performed equally well and there were no effects of oxytocin administration on the control task. Discussion Intact social cognitive abilities are associated with better functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. Our data highlight the potentially complex effects of oxytocin on some but not all aspects of

  1. Adherence challenges and long-acting injectable antipsychotic treatment in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kirk Morton, N; Zubek, Donna

    2013-03-01

    Medication nonadherence has been associated with persistence of psychotic symptoms, relapse, and hospitalization in patients with schizophrenia. Patients with untreated psychosis are significantly less likely to achieve remission, whereas antipsychotic drug adherence has been associated with recovery. As such, adherence to antipsychotic drug treatment is a key issue for nurses and treatment team members caring for patients who typically are on chronic, progressive disease course. Long-acting injectable (LAI) anti-psychotic drugs, developed to improve adherence and provide and alternative antipsychotic drug treatment fro schizophrenia, have been associated with improved treatment outcomes including reduction of relapse rates approximately 30% and reduction in hospitalizations. However, LAI antipsychotic drugs remain underutilized in the United States despite a growing body of literature supporting positive outcomes of LAI versus oral antipsychotic drugs. Mental health nurses are in a key position to support improved adherence inpatients with schizophrenia through use of practical educational strategies that help patients, family members, and health care providers better understand and manage treatment.

  2. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among patients with Schizophrenia in Palestine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of the most dangerous cardiac risk factors and is associated with high mortality. Ethnic differences in metabolic syndrome (MS) criteria and prevalence rates have been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MS prevalence among patients with schizophrenia in Palestine. Methods We recruited 250 patients with schizophrenia from 4 psychiatric primary healthcare centers in Northern Palestine. The MS prevalence was assessed based on National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III Adapted criteria. Results The overall MS prevalence was 43.6%, with 39% in male and 55.9% in female patients. On average, the study patients had 2.3 ± 1.3 metabolic abnormalities. Univariate analysis showed that MS was significantly higher with older age, female gender, longer duration of the illness, smoking, abdominal obesity, high systolic and diastolic blood pressure, high triglycerides, low HDL-C, and high fasting plasma glucose. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that only systolic blood pressure, high triglycerides, high fasting plasma glucose, and low HDL-C were significant predictors of MS in schizophrenic patients. Conclusions MS is common among Arab patients with schizophrenia. Patients with schizophrenia should receive regular monitoring and adequate treatment of cardio-metabolic risk factors. PMID:23270504

  3. Emotion recognition and oxytocin in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Averbeck, B. B.; Bobin, T.; Evans, S.; Shergill, S. S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies have suggested that patients with schizophrenia are impaired at recognizing emotions. Recently, it has been shown that the neuropeptide oxytocin can have beneficial effects on social behaviors. Method To examine emotion recognition deficits in patients and see whether oxytocin could improve these deficits, we carried out two experiments. In the first experiment we recruited 30 patients with schizophrenia and 29 age- and IQ-matched control subjects, and gave them an emotion recognition task. Following this, we carried out a second experiment in which we recruited 21 patients with schizophrenia for a double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study of the effects of oxytocin on the same emotion recognition task. Results In the first experiment we found that patients with schizophrenia had a deficit relative to controls in recognizing emotions. In the second experiment we found that administration of oxytocin improved the ability of patients to recognize emotions. The improvement was consistent and occurred for most emotions, and was present whether patients were identifying morphed or non-morphed faces. Conclusions These data add to a growing literature showing beneficial effects of oxytocin on social–behavioral tasks, as well as clinical symptoms. PMID:21835090

  4. Theory of mind impairments in patients with deficit schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Csukly, Gábor; Polgár, Patrícia; Tombor, László; Benkovits, Judit; Réthelyi, János

    2014-02-01

    The deficit syndrome, a subgroup within schizophrenia, is characterized by enduring, idiopathic negative symptoms. Theory of mind (ToM), a domain of social cognition, is the ability of attributing mental states to ourselves and other people. ToM impairments have not been investigated earlier in deficit schizophrenia. The aim of the present study was to examine ToM differences between patients with deficit (SZ-D) and non-deficit schizophrenia (SZ-ND). Gender differences were also investigated, and based on the literature a better ToM performance was expected in female patients. The participants were 28 patients with SZ-ND, 30 patients with SZ-D, and 29 healthy control volunteers. The "Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test" was used to asses ToM deficits. Control subjects outperformed both patient groups, while there were no significant differences between the two schizophrenia subgroups. In female subjects, both controls and patients with SZ-ND performed significantly better than the SZ-D subgroup. In male subjects, controls performed significantly better than both patient groups. The "diminished emotional range" and the "curbing of interest" items of the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome showed significant negative relationship with the ToM score. Our main finding is that female subjects with SZ-ND performed significantly better than female subjects with SZ-D. © 2014.

  5. Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Treatment Support Discuss Schizophrenia is a serious mental illness that interferes with a person’s ability to think ... 741741 Take Our Poll In general, people with mental illness are portrayed fairly in TV and movies. Strongly ...

  6. Schizophrenia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this condition need to stay on antipsychotics for life. SUPPORT PROGRAMS AND THERAPIES Support therapy may be helpful for many people with schizophrenia. Behavioral techniques, such as social skills training, can help the person function better ...

  7. The impact of medical insurance policies on the hospitalization services utilization of people with schizophrenia: A case study in Changsha, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yi; Xiong, Xianjun; Xue, Qiuji; Yao, Lan; Luo, Fei; Xiang, Li

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of two medical insurers' policies on the hospitalization of people with schizophrenia and the economic burden they faced during a period of rapid health services reform in China. A comparative analysis was made of Urban Employee-Basic Medical Insurance (UE-BMI) and Urban Residents-Basic Medical Insurance (UR-BMI) policies on the medical management of schizophrenics, and was compared with hospitalization expenses, insurer reimbursement data and other information collected from the HMO (health maintenance organization) and social insurance agencies on the care of people with schizophrenia in Changsha in 2010. In-depth interviews were also conducted with relevant managers. Compared with inpatients covered by UR-BMI, the inpatients of UE-BMI were admitted to higher level medical institutions and were prescribed expensive second generation antipsychotics (SGA) medicines. Nevertheless, the hospitalization service utilization and cost of inpatients' hospitalization under UE-BMI were far less than that of inpatients under UR-BMI. The insurance level difference between two medical insurance schemes influences the treatment regimens and benefits received by patients. Furthermore, the integration of schizophrenia management into the outpatient services pooling fund for special diseases(OS-PFSD) can appropriately reduce hospitalization utilization, which, together with the payment way reform and the prescription of reasonable medications, can significantly reduce the overall hospitalization cost for patients.

  8. Remission and Recovery in Schizophrenia: Practitioner and Patient Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Larry; Schmutte, Timothy; Dinzeo, Thomas; Andres-Hyman, Raquel

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains a complex, dynamic, multi-dimensional, and poorly understood condition. Although the concept of heterogeneity in outcome has conceptually overturned the post Kraepelinian legacy of progressive deterioration, a number of factors appear to contribute to perpetuating a pessimistic attitude toward outcome within the field. These include the limited access people with schizophrenia have to effective interventions and the phenomenon of the “clinician's illusion,” which refers to the tendency of practitioners to assume that patients remain seriously ill when outside of the clinical care settings in which they are typically seen. Longitudinal studies, however, continue to point to a large number of people who experience improvements in their condition over time. Pressure from patients and their families, who experience periods of symptomatic relief and enhanced functioning first-hand, has led to the introduction of such concepts as “remission” and being “in” recovery with schizophrenia, in addition to the conventional notion of recovering “from” schizophrenia. These developments are consistent with recent policy initiatives by the U.S. and other governments around the world and aim to re-orient research and clinical practice from a traditional focus on effecting cure to exploring ways to encourage and assist people with schizophrenia to live meaningful lives in the face of an enduring illness. PMID:17984297

  9. [Group psychoeducational intervention in relatives of patients suffering from schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Palli, A; Kalantzi-Azizi, A; Ploumpidis, D N; Kontoangelos, K; Economou, M

    2015-01-01

    The present research paper aims at assessing the effectiveness of a psychoeducational intervention in relatives' groups of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. It examines the possible influence of the intervention on family members as well as on the course of the patient illness. Of a total of 131 relatives, 83 consisted the experimental group and 48 the control group. The relatives of the experimental group were divided into 5 groups and attended 18 psychoeducational sessions. Their patients as well s the patients and the relatives of the control group attended no specific intervention and continued their routine care. The psychoeducational intervention included education about the illness, communication skills training and training in problem-solving. It combined educational and psychotherapeutic techniques. The psychometric tools administered were: The Family Burden Scale, The Family Rituals Scale, The General Health Questionnaire GHQ-28, the Center for Epidemiological studies - Depression Scale (CES-D), the Opinions about Mental Illness Scale OMI, two scales concerning the knowledge about the illness, two questionnaires concerning expectations and feedback about the group process and questionnaires regarding sociodemographic characteristics of the sample and information about the illness. The number of hospitalizations of patients (n=91) during the research year was investigated. An interaction between group and measurement was found. While patient hospitalizations of both research groups did not differ significantly at the year before the study with X2=0.54, p=0.46), they differed when measured a year after the intervention, where patients in the intervention group had statistically significant fewer hospitalizations compared to the patients in the control group (x2=4.58, significant at p=0.032). As to the "compliance" in the medication, two statistical tests were conducted, taking into consideration that "compliance" by patients starting

  10. Exploring the presence of narcolepsy in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sansa, Gemma; Gavaldà, Alba; Gaig, Carles; Monreal, José; Ercilla, Guadalupe; Casamitjana, Roser; Ribera, Gisela; Iranzo, Alex; Santamaria, Joan

    2016-06-01

    There are several case reports of patients with narcolepsy and schizophrenia, but a systematic examination of the association of both disorders has not been done. The aim of this work is to assess the frequency of narcolepsy with cataplexy in a large consecutive series of adult patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder. We screened 366 consecutive patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder with a sleep questionnaire and the Epworth Sleepines scale (ESS) exploring narcoleptiform symptoms. Those who screened positive were assessed by a sleep specialist, and offered an HLA determination. CSF hypocretin-1 determination was proposed to those who were HLA DQB1*06:02 positive. On the screening questionnaire, 17 patients had an ESS score ≥11 without cataplexy, 15 had cataplexy-like symptoms with an ESS score < 11, and four had an ESS score ≥11 plus cataplexy-like symptoms. Of those, 24 patients were evaluated by a sleep specialist. Five of these 24 were HLA DQB1*06:02 positive, and three of these five subjects underwent lumbar puncture showing normal hypocretin-1 levels. Our results suggest that narcolepsy with cataplexy is not an unrecognized disease in adult patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder.

  11. Platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Peitl, Vjekoslav; Vidrih, Branka; Karlović, Zoran; Getaldić, Biserka; Peitl, Milena; Karlović, Dalibor

    2016-05-30

    Depressive symptoms seem to be frequent in schizophrenia, but so far they have received less attention than other symptom domains. Impaired serotonergic neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathogenesis of depression and schizophrenia. The objectives of this study were to investigate platelet serotonin concentrations in schizophrenic patients with and without depressive symptoms, and to investigate the association between platelet serotonin concentrations and symptoms of schizophrenia, mostly depressive symptoms. A total of 364 patients were included in the study, 237 of which had significant depressive symptoms. Significant depressive symptoms were defined by the cut-off score of 7 or more on Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDSS). Platelet serotonin concentrations were assessed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Prevalence of depression in patients with schizophrenia was 65.1%. Schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms showed lower platelet serotonin concentrations (mean±SD; 490.6±401.2) compared to schizophrenic patients without depressive symptoms (mean±SD; 660.9±471.5). An inverse correlation was established between platelet serotonin concentration and depressive symptoms, with more severe symptoms being associated with lower platelet serotonin concentrations. Depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may be associated with reduced concentrations of platelet serotonin.

  12. Impaired coherence of life narratives of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Allé, Mélissa C.; Potheegadoo, Jevita; Köber, Christin; Schneider, Priscille; Coutelle, Romain; Habermas, Tilmann; Danion, Jean-Marie; Berna, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    Self-narratives of patients have received increasing interest in schizophrenia since they offer unique material to study patients’ subjective experience related to their illness, in particular the alteration of self that accompanies schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated the life narratives and the ability to integrate and bind memories of personal events into a coherent narrative in 27 patients with schizophrenia and 26 controls. Four aspects of life narratives were analyzed: coherence with cultural concept of biography, temporal coherence, causal-motivational coherence and thematic coherence. Results showed that in patients cultural biographical knowledge is preserved, whereas temporal coherence is partially impaired. Furthermore, causal-motivational and thematic coherence are significantly impaired: patients have difficulties explaining how events have modeled their identity, and integrating different events along thematic lines. Impairment of global causal-motivational and thematic coherence was significantly correlated with patients’ executive dysfunction, suggesting that cognitive impairment observed in patients could affect their ability to construct a coherent narrative of their life by binding important events to their self. This study provides new understanding of the cognitive deficits underlying self-disorders in patients with schizophrenia. Our findings suggest the potential usefulness of developing new therapeutic interventions to improve autobiographical reasoning skills. PMID:26255756

  13. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  14. Object versus spatial visual mental imagery in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Aleman, André; de Haan, Edward H F; Kahn, René S

    2005-01-01

    Recent research has revealed a larger impairment of object perceptual discrimination than of spatial perceptual discrimination in patients with schizophrenia. It has been suggested that mental imagery may share processing systems with perception. We investigated whether patients with schizophrenia would show greater impairment regarding object imagery than spatial imagery. Forty-four patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy control subjects were tested on a task of object visual mental imagery and on a task of spatial visual mental imagery. Both tasks included a condition in which no imagery was needed for adequate performance, but which was in other respects identical to the imagery condition. This allowed us to adjust for nonspecific differences in individual performance. The results revealed a significant difference between patients and controls on the object imagery task (F(1,63) = 11.8, p = 0.001) but not on the spatial imagery task (F(1,63) = 0.14, p = 0.71). To test for a differential effect, we conducted a 2 (patients v. controls) small ha, Cyrillic 2 (object task v. spatial task) analysis of variance. The interaction term was statistically significant (F(1,62) = 5.2, p = 0.026). Our findings suggest a differential dysfunction of systems mediating object and spatial visual mental imagery in schizophrenia.

  15. Reduced reward-related probability learning in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Alpaslan; Simsek, Fatma; Gonul, Ali Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Although it is known that individuals with schizophrenia demonstrate marked impairment in reinforcement learning, the details of this impairment are not known. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that reward-related probability learning is altered in schizophrenia patients. Twenty-five clinically stable schizophrenia patients and 25 age- and gender-matched controls participated in the study. A simple gambling paradigm was used in which five different cues were associated with different reward probabilities (50%, 67%, and 100%). Participants were asked to make their best guess about the reward probability of each cue. Compared with controls, patients had significant impairment in learning contingencies on the basis of reward-related feedback. The correlation analyses revealed that the impairment of patients partially correlated with the severity of negative symptoms as measured on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale but that it was not related to antipsychotic dose. In conclusion, the present study showed that the schizophrenia patients had impaired reward-based learning and that this was independent from their medication status.

  16. Evaluation of physical fitness parameters in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ozbulut, Omer; Genc, Abdurrahman; Bagcioglu, Erman; Coskun, Kerem Senol; Acar, Tolgahan; Alkoc, Ozan Alper; Karabacak, Hatice; Sener, Umit; Ucok, Kagan

    2013-12-30

    The aims of this study were to compare aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacities, pulmonary functions, body composition and fat distribution parameters in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls and to investigate the associations among these parameters. Sixty (30 male, 30 female) patients with schizophrenia and 60 (30 male, 30 female) healthy controls were included in the study. Maximal aerobic capacity was estimated with the Astrand submaximal exercise protocol, and anaerobic performance was determined with a Wingate test. Body composition was established with a bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Pulmonary function tests, skinfold thickness and body circumference measurements were also carried out. Maximal aerobic capacity, maximal anaerobic power, anaerobic capacity and pulmonary function tests (forced vital capacity and maximal voluntary ventilation) were found to be lower in male and female schizophrenic groups as compared to the controls. Body fat percentage, waist and abdomen circumferences, and waist to hip ratio were found to be higher in female schizophrenic patients than in controls. We suggest that maximal aerobic capacity, maximal anaerobic power, and anaerobic capacity are poor in the schizophrenia patients as compared to healthy controls. Low cardiorespiratory fitness is related to reduced pulmonary function and impaired body composition in schizophrenia patients.

  17. Modifications of blood platelet proteins of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative damage to lipids in plasma, blood platelets and neurons in patients with schizophrenia was described. The aim of our present study was to evaluate oxidative/nitrative modifications of blood platelets proteins by measurement the level of biomarkers of oxidative stress such as carbonyl groups, thiol groups and 3-nitrotyrosine in proteins in patients with schizophrenia and compare with a control group. Levels of carbonyl groups and 3-nitrotyrosine residues in platelet proteins were measured by ELISA and competition ELISA, respectively. The method with 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitro-benzoic acid) has been used to analyse thiol groups in platelet proteins. We demonstrated for the first time in platelet proteins from patients with schizophrenia a statistically significant increase of the level of biomarkers of oxidative/nitrative stress such as carbonyl groups or 3-nitrotyrosine; in schizophrenic patients the amount of thiol groups in platelet proteins was lower than in platelets from healthy subjects. Our results strongly indicate that in patients with schizophrenia reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species induce not only peroxidation of lipids, but also may stimulate oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins. The consequence of these modifications may be the alteration of platelet protein structure and function.

  18. Object versus spatial visual mental imagery in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, André; de Haan, Edward H.F.; Kahn, René S.

    2005-01-01

    Objective Recent research has revealed a larger impairment of object perceptual discrimination than of spatial perceptual discrimination in patients with schizophrenia. It has been suggested that mental imagery may share processing systems with perception. We investigated whether patients with schizophrenia would show greater impairment regarding object imagery than spatial imagery. Methods Forty-four patients with schizophrenia and 20 healthy control subjects were tested on a task of object visual mental imagery and on a task of spatial visual mental imagery. Both tasks included a condition in which no imagery was needed for adequate performance, but which was in other respects identical to the imagery condition. This allowed us to adjust for nonspecific differences in individual performance. Results The results revealed a significant difference between patients and controls on the object imagery task (F1,63 = 11.8, p = 0.001) but not on the spatial imagery task (F1,63 = 0.14, p = 0.71). To test for a differential effect, we conducted a 2 (patients v. controls) х 2 (object task v. spatial task) analysis of variance. The interaction term was statistically significant (F1,62 = 5.2, p = 0.026). Conclusions Our findings suggest a differential dysfunction of systems mediating object and spatial visual mental imagery in schizophrenia. PMID:15644999

  19. Aberrant Effective Connectivity in Schizophrenia Patients during Appetitive Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Diaconescu, Andreea Oliviana; Jensen, Jimmy; Wang, Hongye; Willeit, Matthäus; Menon, Mahesh; Kapur, Shitij; McIntosh, Anthony R.

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that schizophrenia involves dysfunction in brain connectivity at a neural level, and a dysfunction in reward processing at a behavioral level. The purpose of the present study was to link these two levels of analyses by examining effective connectivity patterns between brain regions mediating reward learning in patients with schizophrenia and healthy, age-matched controls. To this aim, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and galvanic skin recordings (GSR) while patients and controls performed an appetitive conditioning experiment with visual cues as the conditioned (CS) stimuli, and monetary reward as the appetitive unconditioned stimulus (US). Based on explicit stimulus contingency ratings, conditioning occurred in both groups; however, based on implicit, physiological GSR measures, patients failed to show differences between CS+ and CS− conditions. Healthy controls exhibited increased blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) activity across striatal, hippocampal, and prefrontal regions and increased effective connectivity from the ventral striatum to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC BA 11) in the CS+ compared to the CS− condition. Compared to controls, patients showed increased BOLD activity across a similar network of brain regions, and increased effective connectivity from the striatum to hippocampus and prefrontal regions in the CS− compared to the CS+ condition. The findings of increased BOLD activity and effective connectivity in response to the CS− in patients with schizophrenia offer insight into the aberrant assignment of motivational salience to non-reinforced stimuli during conditioning that is thought to accompany schizophrenia. PMID:21267430

  20. Comprehension of metaphors in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Mossaheb, Nilufar; Aschauer, Harald N; Stoettner, Susanne; Schmoeger, Michaela; Pils, Nicole; Raab, Monika; Willinger, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    Metaphors, mainly proverbs and idiomatic expressions of ordinary life are commonly used as a model for concretism. Previous studies have shown impaired metaphor comprehension in patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders compared to either psychiatric or non-psychiatric control subject. The aim of this study was to detect possible quantitative differences in figurative processing between patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and healthy controls. In order to analyse possible dissociations of different aspects of figurative speech, a range of metaphor tasks was used to distinguish between recognition of familiar metaphors, paraphrasing the meaning of the latter and generating novel metaphors: we used a standard proverb test for conventional metaphors consisting of a multiple-choice and a paraphrasing task, and the Metaphoric Triads Test for the assessment of novel metaphors. We included 40 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and 43 healthy control subjects. Our results showed that patients had impaired figurative speech processing regarding novel and conventional metaphors. Associations with cognitive functions were detected. Performance on the paraphrasing task was associated with the severity of negative symptoms. We conclude that patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders do exhibit impairments in the recognition and paraphrasing of conventional and the generation of novel metaphors and that some cognitive domains as well the extent of negative symptoms might be associated with these deficits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-term outcomes in patients with schizophrenia treated with risperidone long-acting injection or oral antipsychotics in Spain: results from the electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR).

    PubMed

    Olivares, J M; Rodriguez-Morales, A; Diels, J; Povey, M; Jacobs, A; Zhao, Z; Lam, A; Villalobos Vega, J C; Cuéllar, J Alonso; de Castro, F J Alberca; Quintero, C Morillo-Velarde; Martíin, J F Román; Domínguez, P Tabares; Ojeda, J L Prados; Cortés, S Sanz; Cala, F I Mata; Marín, C Gutiérrez; Castro, L Moyano; Duaso, M A Haza; Albarracín, J Requena; Vergara, G Narbona; Benítez, A Fernández; Cleries, F Mayoral; Pérez-Brian, J M García-Herrera; Aragón, A Bordallo; Navarro, J C Rodríguez; Biedma, J A Algarra; de Pedro, R Bravo; González, J F Delgado; López, M E Jaén; Moreno, H Díaz; López, J A Soto; Rodríguez, E Ojeda; de Hoyos, C Martínez; Sacristán, M Pardilla; Martín, M D Molina; Ballesteros, E Martín; Rodríguez, P A Sopelana; Menéndez, L Fernández; Rivas, R Santos; del Pino Cuadrado, P; Lauffer, J Correas; Solano, J J Rodríguez; Martínez, J M Fernández; Solano, F García; Rodríguez, P García-Lamberde; Rodríguez, J A Romero; Cano, T Rodríguez; Fortacin, M Ducaju; Lobeiras, J M Blanco; Sampedro, J M Piñeiro; Bravo, A Pérez; Pellicer, A Fernández; López, M D Alonso; Liste, J Fraga; Fernández, M Riobo; Losada, A Casas; Mendez, R Vazquez-Noguerol; Romero, S Agra; Blanco, J J Blanco; Bonaselt, I Tortajada; Mahia, M C García; del Valle, E Ferrer Gómez; Yañez, P Quiroga; Camarasa, M Gelabert; Alonso, J A Barbado; Mendez, G Florez; Feliz, F Doce; Lamela, M A López; Piñero, M Vega; Alvarado, P Fuentes; Gómez, I López; Martín, P Fadon; Gómez, J L Santos; López, A García; Jiménez, A Rodríguez; Nafs, A Escudero; Barquero, N Casas; Ortiz, R Fernández-Villamor; Noguera, J L Velez; Carrasco, P Ruiz; Muñoz, J Martín; Palma, M Masegoza; Hortelano, C Marín; Bonome, L Sánchez; Sevilla, J Sánchez; Juan, J M Mongil San; Ramos, J M García; Muñoz, J L Vallejo; Guisasola, J Elorza; Vazquez, L Santamaria; Guerras, F Campo; Nebot, F J Arrufat; Fernández, F J Baron; Nicolau, A L Palomo; Subirats, R Catala; Kidias, M Messays; Navarro, V Fabregat; García, B Frades; del Rosal, F Mejias; de Vicente Muñoz, T; Ballester, J Año; Lieb, P Malabia; Martel, A Delgado; Bea, E Roca; Joaquim, I Grau; Enjuanes, F Boatas; Piñol, M Bañuelos; Carbonell, E Fontova I; Muñoz, R Martín; Giribets, C Argila; Sans, L Albages; Blanco, A Serrano; Felipe, M Arcega; Muñoz, P González; Villanueva, A Pons; Arroyo, M Bernardo; Borri, R Coronas; Fallada, S Miret; Merola, M Celma; Rodon, E Parellada; Palmes, J R Pigem; Martínez, E Pérez; Catala, J Matarredona; Coca, A Sandoval; Ferrandiz, F Pascual; Paya, E Ferrandiz; Caballero, G Iturri; Bonet, A Franco; Figueras, J Fluvia; Pagador, P Moreno; Garibo, M Medina; Camo, V Pérez; Carrillo, C Sanz; Valero, C Pelegrin; Rebollo, F J Caro; García Campayo, J; Sala Ayma, J M Sala; Roig, M Martínez; de Uña Mateos, M A; Bertolin, R García; García, A Martín; Mazo, F Jiménez; Velasco, J L Galvez; Pérez, L Santa Maria; Casado, C Jiménez; Barba, J J Mancheño; Diaz, M Conde; Rubio, J P Alcon; Mandoli, A Soler; Herrero, A Uson; Martínez, A Rodríguez; Serrano, P Salgado; Rodríguez, E Nieto; Montesinos, J Segui; Macia, J Ferragud; Mateos Marcos, A Mateos; Soto, J V Pérez-Fuster; Dumont, M Verdaguer; Pagan, J Parra; Martínez, V Balanza; Santiuste de Pablos, M; Delgado, C Espinosa; Quiles, M D Martínez; López, F J Manzanera; Navarro, P Pozo; Torres, A Micol; Ingles, F J Martínez; Arias-Camison, J M Salmeron; Manzano, J C López; Peña, R Villanueva; Guitarte, G Petersen; Fontecilla, H Blasco; Romero, J Barjau; Gil, R Sanz; Lozano, J Marín; Adanez, L Donaire; Zarranz Herrera-Oria, I; Jiménez, J Pérez; Vaz, F Carrato; García, O Sanz; Anton, C Contreras; Casula, R Reixach; Hernandez, M C Natividad; Escabias, F Teba; Torresano, J Rodríguez; Pérez-Villamil, A Huidobro; Estevez, L; Figuero, M Aragües; Muñoz de Morales, A; Calvin, J L Rodríguez; Criado, M Delgado; Rodríguez, V Molina; Ambrosolio, E Balbo; Madera, P M Holgado; Alfaro, G Ponce; Vidal, M M Rojas; Valtuille, A García; Ruiz, O; Cabornero, G Lucas; Echevarria Martínez de Bujo, M; Mallen, M J Maicas; Puigros, J Santandreu; Martorell, A Liñana; Forteza, A Clar; Arrebola, E Rodríguez; Rodríguez de la Torre, M; Saiz, C G Anton; Bardolet I Casas, C; Linde, E Rodríguez; De Arce Cordon, R; Molina, E M Padial; Carazo, F J Ruiz; Romero, J J Muro; Cano, D Vico; Dorado, M Soria; Velazquez, S Campos; Sánchez, A J Rodríguez; Leon, S Ocio; Sánchez, K Pachas; Benitez, M Henry; Zugarramurai, A Intxausti; Contreras, M A; De la Varga González, M; Marín, P Barreiro; Robina, F Gómez; García, M Sánchez; Pérez, F J Otero; Bros, P Cubero; Gómez, A Carrillo; de Dios Molina Martín, J; Perera, J L Carrasco; Averbach, M C; Perera, J L Carrasco; Palancares, E Goenaga; Gallego de Dios, M T; Rojo, C Fernández; Iglesias, S Sánchez; Merino, M I Rubio; Mestre, N Prieto; Urdaniz, A Pérez; Sánchez, J M Martínez; Seco, R Gordo; Muñoz, J Franco; Agut, M Mateos; Lozano, M L Blanco; Herguedas, F Martín; Pena, A Torcal; García, J Vicente; Martínez, A Varona; Sanz Granado, O Sanz; Fernández, M A Medina; Canseco, J M Moran; López, P A Megia; Martín, M A Franco; Barrio, J A Espina; Ubago, J Giner; Bennassar, M Roca; Díez, J M Olivares; Fleta, J L Hernandez; Fortes, F Porras; López, C Arango; Medina, O; Alvarez, D Figuera; Roca, J M Peña; Valladolid, G Rubio; Tavera, J A Furquet; García-Castrillon Sales, J A; Llordes, I Batalla; Melgarejo, C Anchuistegui; Cañas de la Paz, F; Callol, V Vallés; García, M Bousoño; García, J Bobes; Leal, F J Vaz; Corrales, E Cáceres; Iglesias, E Sánchez; Gómez, M A Carreiras; Serrano, G García; Chillarón, E G Román; Aguado, F J Samino; Castillo, J J Molina; González, A González; Vázquez, J Gallardo; Peralvarez, M Bolivar; Diaz, M Rios; Mesa, M Ybarzabal; Artiles, F J Acosta; Chao, M Ajoy; Mesa, M Ybarzabal; del Rosario Santana, P; Escudero, M A García; Berenguer, M Molla; Llacer, J M Bonete; Berna, J A Juan; Ortiz, J Barragán; Pardell, L Tost; Hernández-Alvarez de Sotomayor, C; Méndez, M R Cejas; Garate, R Cabrera; Múgica, B Díaz; González, M Caballero; Domingo, J Pujol; Navarro, C Sáez; Vera, G Selva; Cuquerella, M A; Monzo, J Lonjedo; Boada, P Cervera; Pérez, M F Martín; Parrado, E Carrasco; Sánchez, J J Yañez; Fernández, J Calvo

    2009-06-01

    The electronic Schizophrenia Treatment Adherence Registry (e-STAR) is a prospective, observational study of patients with schizophrenia designed to evaluate long-term treatment outcomes in routine clinical practice. Parameters were assessed at baseline and at 3 month intervals for 2 years in patients initiated on risperidone long-acting injection (RLAI) (n=1345) or a new oral antipsychotic (AP) (n=277; 35.7% and 36.5% on risperidone and olanzapine, respectively) in Spain. Hospitalization prior to therapy was assessed by a retrospective chart review. At 24 months, treatment retention (81.8% for RLAI versus 63.4% for oral APs, p<0.0001) and reduction in Clinical Global Impression Severity scores (-1.14 for RLAI versus -0.94 for APs, p=0.0165) were significantly higher with RLAI. Compared to the pre-switch period, RLAI patients had greater reductions in the number (reduction of 0.37 stays per patient versus 0.2, p<0.05) and days (18.74 versus 13.02, p<0.01) of hospitalizations at 24 months than oral AP patients. This 2 year, prospective, observational study showed that, compared to oral antipsychotics, RLAI was associated with better treatment retention, greater improvement in clinical symptoms and functioning, and greater reduction in hospital stays and days in hospital in patients with schizophrenia. Improved treatment adherence, increased efficacy and reduced hospitalization with RLAI offer the opportunity of substantial therapeutic improvement in schizophrenia.

  2. Assessing patient-rated vs. clinician-rated adherence to the therapy in treatment resistant schizophrenia, schizophrenia responders, and non-schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Iasevoli, Felice; Fagiolini, Andrea; Formato, Maria Vittoria; Prinzivalli, Emiliano; Giordano, Sara; Balletta, Raffaele; De Luca, Vincenzo; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    The present study evaluated consistency, reliability, and determinants of two real-world measures of adherence to prescription in 57 schizophrenia and 61 non-schizophrenia patients. Treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS) was additionally diagnosed in 28 of the schizophrenia patients. Patients were screened for clinical severity, cognitive functioning, and adherence by 10-item Drug Attitude Inventory (DAI-10) or Adherence-to-Therapy (AtT), a clinician-rated tool developed by our group. DAI-10 and AtT scores showed a significant correlation (p=0.039; ρ=0.21; df=103). Compared to the DAI-10 scale, a higher number of variables were associated with AtT. In schizophrenia and TRS patients, substance abuse was the only significant predictor of lower DAI-10 score (p=0.027, F=5.2, R(2)=0.07, and p=0.06, F=8.9, R(2)=0.23, respectively). Lower AtT score was significantly associated with first-generation antipsychotic use (p=0.001, RR: 2.00 [1.40-2.87]), positive symptoms (p=0.02, RR: 1.63 [1.05-2.53]), impaired verbal fluency (p=0.01, RR: 1.88 [0.81-4.32]) or problem solving (p=0.01, RR: 2.14 [0.92-4.98]). AtT, but not DAI-10, score correlated with the score on the Personal and Social Performance scale (p=0.02, F=5.86, R(2)=0.08). Overall, AtT score was predicted by pharmacological, psychopathological, and cognitive factors, and predictive of psychosocial functioning. Therefore, AtT measure may represent a convenient and practical tool to evaluate schizophrenia patients' adherence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Occipital γ response to auditory stimulation in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Basar-Eroglu, Canan; Mathes, Birgit; Brand, Andreas; Schmiedt-Fehr, Christina

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated changes in gamma oscillations during auditory sensory processing (auditory-evoked gamma responses, AEGR) and target detection (auditory event-related gamma responses, AERGR) in healthy controls (n=10) and patients with schizophrenia (n=10) using both single-trial and averaged time-frequency data analysis. The results show that single-trial gamma responses in patients were altered in magnitude and topographic pattern for both the AEGR and the AERGR experimental conditions, whereas no differences were found for the averaged evoked gamma response. At the single-trial level, auditory stimuli elicited higher gamma responses at both anterior and occipital sites in patients with schizophrenia compared to controls. Furthermore, in patients with schizophrenia target detection compared to passive listening to stimuli was related to increased single-trial gamma power at frontal sites. In controls enhancement of the gamma response was only apparent for the averaged gamma response, with a distribution largely restricted to anterior sites. The differences in oscillatory activity between healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia were not reflected in the behavioral measure (i.e., counting targets). We conclude that gamma activity triggered by auditory stimuli in schizophrenic patients might have less selectivity in timing and alterations in topography and may show changes in amplitude modulation with task demands. The present study may indicate that in patients with schizophrenia neuronal information is not adequately transferred, possibly due to an over-excitability of neuronal networks and excessive pruning of local connections in association cortex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Costs of treating patients with schizophrenia who have illness-related crisis events.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Baojin; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Faries, Douglas E; Peng, Xiaomei; Salkever, David; Slade, Eric P

    2008-08-26

    Relatively little is known about the relationship between psychosocial crises and treatment costs for persons with schizophrenia. This naturalistic prospective study assessed the association of recent crises with mental health treatment costs among persons receiving treatment for schizophrenia. Data were drawn from a large multi-site, non-interventional study of schizophrenia patients in the United States, conducted between 1997 and 2003. Participants were treated at mental health treatment systems, including the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, community mental health centers, community and state hospitals, and university health care service systems. Total costs over a 1-year period for mental health services and component costs (psychiatric hospitalizations, antipsychotic medications, other psychotropic medications, day treatment, emergency psychiatric services, psychosocial/rehabilitation group therapy, individual therapy, medication management, and case management) were calculated for 1557 patients with complete medical information. Direct mental health treatment costs for patients who had experienced 1 or more of 5 recent crisis events were compared to propensity-matched samples of persons who had not experienced a crisis event. The 5 non-mutually exclusive crisis event subgroups were: suicide attempt in the past 4 weeks (n = 18), psychiatric hospitalization in the past 6 months (n = 240), arrest in the past 6 months (n = 56), violent behaviors in the past 4 weeks (n = 62), and diagnosis of a co-occurring substance use disorder (n = 413). Across all 5 categories of crisis events, patients who had a recent crisis had higher average annual mental health treatment costs than patients in propensity-score matched comparison samples. Average annual mental health treatment costs were significantly higher for persons who attempted suicide ($46,024), followed by persons with psychiatric hospitalization in the past 6 months ($37,329), persons with prior

  5. Costs of treating patients with schizophrenia who have illness-related crisis events

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Baojin; Ascher-Svanum, Haya; Faries, Douglas E; Peng, Xiaomei; Salkever, David; Slade, Eric P

    2008-01-01

    Background Relatively little is known about the relationship between psychosocial crises and treatment costs for persons with schizophrenia. This naturalistic prospective study assessed the association of recent crises with mental health treatment costs among persons receiving treatment for schizophrenia. Methods Data were drawn from a large multi-site, non-interventional study of schizophrenia patients in the United States, conducted between 1997 and 2003. Participants were treated at mental health treatment systems, including the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals, community mental health centers, community and state hospitals, and university health care service systems. Total costs over a 1-year period for mental health services and component costs (psychiatric hospitalizations, antipsychotic medications, other psychotropic medications, day treatment, emergency psychiatric services, psychosocial/rehabilitation group therapy, individual therapy, medication management, and case management) were calculated for 1557 patients with complete medical information. Direct mental health treatment costs for patients who had experienced 1 or more of 5 recent crisis events were compared to propensity-matched samples of persons who had not experienced a crisis event. The 5 non-mutually exclusive crisis event subgroups were: suicide attempt in the past 4 weeks (n = 18), psychiatric hospitalization in the past 6 months (n = 240), arrest in the past 6 months (n = 56), violent behaviors in the past 4 weeks (n = 62), and diagnosis of a co-occurring substance use disorder (n = 413). Results Across all 5 categories of crisis events, patients who had a recent crisis had higher average annual mental health treatment costs than patients in propensity-score matched comparison samples. Average annual mental health treatment costs were significantly higher for persons who attempted suicide ($46,024), followed by persons with psychiatric hospitalization in the past 6 months ($37

  6. The clinical utility of lurasidone in schizophrenia: patient considerations.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Lurasidone is a novel antipsychotic agent approved for the treatment of schizophrenia in a number of countries including the United Kingdom, other European countries, the United States, and Canada. In addition to full antagonist activity at the dopamine D2 (Ki, 1 nM) and serotonin 5-HT2A (Ki, 0.5 nM) receptors, the pharmacodynamic profile of lurasidone is notable for its high affinity for serotonin 5-HT7 receptors (0.5 nM) and its partial agonist activity at 5-HT1A receptors (Ki, 6.4 nM). Long-term treatment of schizophrenia with lurasidone has been shown to reduce the risk of relapse in patients with schizophrenia. Lurasidone appears to be associated with minimal effects on body weight, and low risk for clinically meaningful alterations in glucose, lipids, or electrocardiography parameters. Evidence from two randomized trials also suggests improvement in functional capacity and cognitive functioning in people with schizophrenia. A significant evidence base supports the use of lurasidone as a promising agent for the treatment of schizophrenia.

  7. Investigational drugs for anxiety in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Garay, Ricardo P; Samalin, Ludovic; Hameg, Ahcène; Llorca, Pierre-Michel

    2015-04-01

    Anxiety is a frequent symptom of schizophrenia, which is highly associated with an increased risk of relapse and suicide. The effect of antipsychotics on this clinical dimension is not specific and the common practice of prescribing benzodiazepines remains unsatisfactory. The authors review recent well-designed clinical trials for anxiety in patients with schizophrenia. The content includes information derived from trial databases, regulatory authorities and scientific literature. Anxiety in schizophrenia has severe consequences and specific clinical features, which require a specific therapy, beyond benzodiazepines. In these past 2 years, two compounds (the anticonvulsant/anxiolytic pregabalin and the atypical antipsychotic quetiapine) were on Phase III/IV clinical trials for schizophrenia, with comorbid anxiety as a primary outcome measure. Potential for success is high, given their strong rationale and the clinical experience with both drugs. Anxiety (as a symptom) was a secondary outcome measure in trials for schizophrenia involving seven other compounds (lurasidone, amisulpride, bitopertin, oxytocin, famotidine, cannabidiol and the L-theanine and pregnenolone combination). Primary completion date is expected in the next 2 years. In spite of ancient positive results and a strong rationale, aripiprazole and related compounds were not in recent clinical trials. The authors believe that these compounds deserve more attention.

  8. Family intervention and health care costs for kansas medicaid patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Christenson, Jacob D; Crane, D Russell; Bell, Katherine M; Beer, Andrew R; Hillin, Harvey H

    2014-07-01

    Despite a number of studies investigating the effect of pharmacotherapy on treatment costs for schizophrenia patients, there has been little attention given to the effect of family intervention. In this study, data from the Kansas Medicaid system were used to analyze healthcare costs for 164 schizophrenia patients who had participated in family intervention. Structural equation modeling was used to test two competing views of the role of family intervention in treatment. The results showed that a model including direct and indirect effects of family intervention provided a better fit to the data. Family intervention had a significant indirect effect on general medical costs (through other psychological treatment) that showed a savings of $586 for each unit increase in the provision of these services. In addition, the total indirect effects for family intervention showed a $580 savings for general medical costs and $796 for hospitalization costs (for each unit increase). © 2013 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  9. The metabolic syndrome and risk of coronary artery disease in patients with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a chronic mental institute.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Wang, Hung-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Shian; Shen, Feng-Chih; Lin, Pao-Yen; Wu, Ching-Kuan

    2014-11-01

    The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome (MS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) has been found to be high in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Current evidence shows that CAD is underdiagnosed in this group. Our study evaluated the prevalence of MS and the risk of CAD in patients with chronic schizophrenia in a chronic care mental hospital in southern Taiwan. We included all patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. We collected all laboratory, physical examination, psychiatric interview, and chart review data. We also evaluated the risk of CAD in these patients using the Framingham point system. There was no significant age difference in the MS prevalence rate in these patients. The young patients with schizophrenia in our study tended to have a higher prevalence of MS than the general population. In addition, female patients had a higher prevalence rate of MS than males. Based on the Framingham point system, we found the 10-year risk of CAD to be higher among the patients with schizophrenia than in the general population. Our study highlights the importance of the high risk of MS in both younger and older patients with schizophrenia, without a significant relationship to the use of antipsychotics. More complete cohort studies are needed to confirm these findings. Psychiatrists may want to establish more specific and detailed clinical guidelines for patients with chronic schizophrenia with comorbid physical diseases, especially MS and CAD.

  10. Deletion of PLCB1 gene in schizophrenia-affected patients.

    PubMed

    Lo Vasco, Vincenza Rita; Cardinale, Giuseppina; Polonia, Patrizia

    2012-04-01

    A prevalence of 1% in the general population and approximately 50% concordance rate in monozygotic twins was reported for schizophrenia, suggesting that genetic predisposition affecting neurodevelopmental processes might combine with environmental risk factors. A multitude of pathways seems to be involved in the aetiology and/or pathogenesis of schizophrenia, including dopaminergic, serotoninergic, muscarinic and glutamatergic signalling. The phosphoinositide signal transduction system and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes seem to represent a point of convergence in these networking pathways during the development of selected brain regions. The existence of a susceptibility locus on the short arm of chromosome 20 moved us to analyse PLCB1, the gene codifying for PI-PLC β1 enzyme, which maps on 20p12. By using interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization methodology, we found deletions of PLCB1 in orbito-frontal cortex samples of schizophrenia-affected patients.

  11. Deletion of PLCB1 gene in schizophrenia-affected patients

    PubMed Central

    Vasco, Vincenza Rita Lo; Cardinale, Giuseppina; Polonia, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A prevalence of 1% in the general population and approximately 50% concordance rate in monozygotic twins was reported for schizophrenia, suggesting that genetic predisposition affecting neurodevelopmental processes might combine with environmental risk factors. A multitude of pathways seems to be involved in the aetiology and/or pathogenesis of schizophrenia, including dopaminergic, serotoninergic, muscarinic and glutamatergic signalling. The phosphoinositide signal transduction system and related phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) enzymes seem to represent a point of convergence in these networking pathways during the development of selected brain regions. The existence of a susceptibility locus on the short arm of chromosome 20 moved us to analyse PLCB1, the gene codifying for PI-PLC β1 enzyme, which maps on 20p12. By using interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization methodology, we found deletions of PLCB1 in orbito-frontal cortex samples of schizophrenia-affected patients. PMID:22507702

  12. Qualitative Evaluation of Divergent Thinking in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Mizuno, Masafumi; Kashima, Haruo

    2005-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show deficits across a broad spectrum of neurocognitive domains. In particular, deficits in verbal fluency are common. Verbal fluency tests are neuropsychological tests that assess frontal lobe function or executive function but also assess divergent thinking. However, few studies have considered the impairment of verbal fluency from the viewpoint of divergent thinking. To consider the structure of divergent thinking, not only verbal assessments but also non-verbal assessments are indispensable. We administered several fluency tests, the idea fluency test, the design fluency test, and word (letter and category) fluency tests to 26 patients with schizophrenia and 26 healthy control subjects to evaluate divergent thinking in both groups and assessed their responses qualitatively. An acceptable minimal level of intelligence was maintained in the patient group. Although attention and executive functioning were relatively preserved in the subjects with schizophrenia, they demonstrated significant deficits in divergent thinking and had particular difficulty in producing ideas and designs requiring concept flexibility, a conversion of viewpoint, originality, or novelty. Research on deficits in divergent thinking in patients with schizophrenia may contribute to the development of cognitive and behavioral rehabilitation programs. PMID:16518012

  13. Qualitative evaluation of divergent thinking in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takahiro; Mizuno, Masafumi; Kashima, Haruo

    2005-01-01

    Patients with schizophrenia show deficits across a broad spectrum of neurocognitive domains. In particular, deficits in verbal fluency are common. Verbal fluency tests are neuropsychological tests that assess frontal lobe function or executive function but also assess divergent thinking. However, few studies have considered the impairment of verbal fluency from the viewpoint of divergent thinking. To consider the structure of divergent thinking, not only verbal assessments but also non-verbal assessments are indispensable. We administered several fluency tests, the idea fluency test, the design fluency test, and word (letter and category) fluency tests to 26 patients with schizophrenia and 26 healthy control subjects to evaluate divergent thinking in both groups and assessed their responses qualitatively. An acceptable minimal level of intelligence was maintained in the patient group. Although attention and executive functioning were relatively preserved in the subjects with schizophrenia, they demonstrated significant deficits in divergent thinking and had particular difficulty in producing ideas and designs requiring concept flexibility, a conversion of viewpoint, originality, or novelty. Research on deficits in divergent thinking in patients with schizophrenia may contribute to the development of cognitive and behavioral rehabilitation programs.

  14. Altered structural connectivity and trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Suk; Han, Kiwan; Lee, Seung-Koo; Seok, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2014-09-05

    This study tested association between anhedonia scores and white matter integrity in order to investigate the neural basis of trait anhedonia in schizophrenia. A total of 31 patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls underwent diffusion weighted imaging and scoring of trait anhedonia using the Physical Anhedonia Scale. Using tract-based spatial statistics, we found that fractional anisotropy values of some white matter regions were differently correlated with Physical Anhedonia Scale scores between the two groups. The white matter regions that were more significantly correlated with trait anhedonia in patients than in controls included the left side of the cingulum, splenium of the corpus callosum, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, superior longitudinal fasciculus I and II, anterior thalamic radiation, and optic radiation. Of these regions, fractional anisotropy values in the cingulum and superior longitudinal fasciculus II were positively correlated with trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia. These findings suggest that alterations in structural connectivity within large-scale brain networks, including the default mode and central executive networks, may contribute to the development of trait anhedonia in patients with schizophrenia.

  15. [Types of Care for Adult Patients Diagnosed With Acute and Maintenance Phase Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Oviedo Lugo, Gabriel Fernando; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Castro Díaz, Sergio Mario; García Valencia, Jenny; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Ávila-Guerra, Mauricio

    2014-01-01

    To assist the clinician in making decisions about the types of care available for adults with schizophrenia. To determine which are the modalities of treatment associated with better outcomes in adults with schizophrenia. A clinical practice guideline was elaborated under the parameters of the Methodological Guide of the Ministerio de Salud y Protección Social to identify, synthesize and evaluate the evidence and make recommendations about the treatment and follow-up of adult patients with schizophrenia. The evidence of NICE guide 82 was adopted and updated. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. Patients who were in Assertive community treatment had a lower risk of new hospitalizations. For the intensive case management, the results favored this intervention in the outcomes: medium term readmissions, social functioning and satisfaction with services. The crisis resolution teams was associated with better outcomes on outcomes of readmissions, social functioning and service satisfaction in comparison with standard care. The use of different modalities of care leads to the need of a comprehensive approach to patients to reduce the overall disability associated with the disease. Evidence shows overall benefit for most outcomes studied without encountering hazards for health of patients. This evaluation is recommended to use the professional ways of providing health services that are community-based and have a multidisciplinary group. It is not recommended the modality "day hospital" during the acute phase of schizophrenia in adults. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of electroconvulsive therapy for Asian patients with schizophrenia (2001-2009): Trends and correlates.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu-Tao; Ungvari, Gabor S; Correll, Christoph U; Chiu, Helen F K; Lai, Kelly Y C; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Si, Tian-Mei; Lee, Edwin H M; He, Yan-Ling; Yang, Shu-Yu; Chong, Mian-Yoon; Kua, Ee-Heok; Fujii, Senta; Sim, Kang; Yong, Michael K H; Trivedi, Jitendra K; Chung, Eun-Kee; Udomratn, Pichet; Chee, Kok-Yoon; Sartorius, Norman; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Shinfuku, Naotaka

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) use in Asian inpatients with schizophrenia. This study examined trends of ECT use for schizophrenia patients in Asia between 2001 and 2009 and its independent demographic and clinical correlates. Data on 6761 hospitalized schizophrenia patients (2001 = 2399, 2004 = 2136, and 2009 = 2226) in nine Asian countries and territories were collected by either chart review or interviews during a 1-month period. Patients' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, prescriptions of psychotropic drugs and ECT use were recorded using a standardized protocol and data-collection procedure. The frequency of ECT was 3.3% in the whole sample; rising from 1.8% in 2001 to 3.3% in 2004 and 4.9% in 2009 (P < 0.0001). However, this increased trend was driven solely by increased ECT use in China (P < 0.0001), and the inclusion of India in the 2009 survey. There were wide inter-country variations: 2001, 0% (Hong Kong, Korea) to 5.9% (China); 2004, 0% (Singapore) to 11.1% (China); 2009, 0% (Hong Kong) to 13.8% (India) and 15.2% (China). Multiple logistic regression analysis of the whole sample revealed that patients receiving ECT were less likely in the 35-64-year age group, had shorter length of current hospitalization and fewer negative symptoms, and were more likely to receive second-generation antipsychotic medications compared to those who were not treated with ECT (R(2)  = 0.264, P < 0.001). ECT use for schizophrenia has increased over the past decade in China, being low/relatively stable in other Asian countries/regions. Reasons for substantial variations in ECT frequency in Asia require further study. © 2015 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2015 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  17. Measuring quality of life in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Awad, A G; Voruganti, L N; Heslegrave, R J

    1997-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic disabling illness that affects about 1% of the population. It is a heterogenous disorder with variable aetiological, prognostic and treatment response patterns. Its course is generally long term, with acute psychotic exacerbations that may require hospitalisation. The cornerstone of clinical management is the use of antipsychotic (neuroleptic) medications. Although these are effective, they can cause adverse effects that may impact negatively on the functional status of the individual. Early studies of quality of life in schizophrenia were mainly concerned with the development of techniques to identify patients' needs in the community. Difficulties encountered in these studies included: lack of agreement on definition of quality of life; lack of appropriate integrative conceptual models; concerns about reliability of patients' self-reports about their quality of life; and the lack of standardised quality-of-life measures appropriate for schizophrenia. A number of disease-specific or generic scales have subsequently been used for measurement of quality of life in schizophrenia. The list of disease-specific scales is extensive; unfortunately, many of them were used only in a single study or their psychometric properties were not specified. Generic scales can be applied across various types and severity of illness, as well as in different health interventions across demographic and cultural groups. Medication costs in schizophrenia represent only a small fraction of the total cost of the illness. However, pharmacoeconomic studies have attracted much interest as a result of the high cost of newly introduced medications and of concern about the limitations of antipsychotic medications, particularly their adverse effects, as exemplified by the reintroduction of clozapine for the treatment of refractory schizophrenia. Few studies have combined quality-of-life measures with cost analysis in schizophrenia; a number of these have methodological

  18. Prevalence and associated factors of comorbid skin diseases in patients with schizophrenia: a clinical survey and national health database study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bai-Yao; Wu, Bo-Jian; Lee, Shin-Min; Sun, Hsiao-Ju; Chang, Yun-Ting; Lin, Ming-Wei

    2014-01-01

    To examine the epidemiology of and possible risk factors for skin diseases in patients with schizophrenia. All of 337 patients with schizophrenia were recruited from the therapeutic community of a psychiatric hospital and underwent a detailed skin examination. The National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) was used to compare the prevalence of skin diseases between patients with schizophrenia and those without. In the clinical survey, fungal infection (61.4%) and dermatitis (46.9%) were the most common skin diseases. Clozapine users had a lower risk of fungal infection than those on typical antipsychotics [odds ratio (OR)=0.49, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.30-0.81]. Obese patients were more likely to have fungal infections than those without (OR=1.93, 95% CI=1.20-3.09), and those with diabetes had an increased risk of bacterial infection than those without (OR=2.0, 95% CI=1.06-3.75). NHIRD revealed that the overall prevalence of skin diseases, including infections, dermatitis, hyperkeratosis, pilosebaceous disease, androgenic alopecia, xerosis and stasis, were higher in patients with schizophrenia than in those without (75.1% vs. 72.6%, P=.01). The prevalence of skin diseases is high in patients with schizophrenia, for whom proper skin care is necessary to improve their life quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential effects of childhood trauma and cannabis use disorders in patients suffering from schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Baudin, G; Godin, O; Lajnef, M; Aouizerate, B; Berna, F; Brunel, L; Capdevielle, D; Chereau, I; Dorey, J M; Dubertret, C; Dubreucq, J; Faget, C; Fond, G; Gabayet, F; Laouamri, H; Lancon, C; Le Strat, Y; Tronche, A M; Misdrahi, D; Rey, R; Passerieux, C; Schandrin, A; Urbach, M; Vidalhet, P; Llorca, P M; Schürhoff, F

    2016-08-01

    Childhood trauma (CT) and cannabis use are both environmental and modifier risk factors for schizophrenia. However, little is known about how they interact in schizophrenia. We examined the main effect of each of these two environmental factors on the clinical expression of the disease using a large set of variables, and we tested whether and how cannabis and CT interact to influence the course and the presentation of the illness. A sample of 366 patients who met the DSM-IV-TR criteria for schizophrenia was recruited through the FACE-SCZ (Fondamental Advanced Centre of Expertise - Schizophrenia) network. Patients completed a large standardized clinical evaluation including Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders-I (SCID-I), Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS), Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS), Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF), Short-Quality of Life-18 (S-QoL-18), and Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS). We assessed CT with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and cannabis status with SCID-I. CT significantly predicted the number of hospitalizations, GAF, and S-QoL-18 scores, as well as the PANSS total, positive, excitement, and emotional distress scores. Cannabis use disorders significantly predicted age of onset, and MARS. There was no significant interaction between CT and cannabis use disorders. However, we found evidence of a correlation between these two risk factors. CT and cannabis both have differential deleterious effects on clinical and functional outcomes in patients with schizophrenia. Our results highlight the need to systematically assess the presence of these risk factors and adopt suitable therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Risperidone versus olanzapine among patients with schizophrenia participating in supported employment: Eighteen-month outcomes.

    PubMed

    Noordsy, Douglas L; Glynn, Shirley M; Sugar, Catherine A; O'Keefe, Christopher D; Marder, Stephen R

    2017-09-08

    This study compares the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine versus risperidone among patients with schizophrenia who are established in outpatient psychiatric care and entering supported employment. A multicenter, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted among 107 outpatients with schizophrenia, who were cross-titrated to flexible dose risperidone or olanzapine over 2 weeks. Clinical endpoints included time to hospitalization and persistence on assigned medication. Weight, laboratory tests, psychopathology, neurologic side effects, social adjustment and role functioning were assessed at 3-6 month intervals. Data were analyzed first by randomized treatment, and then reassessed controlling for prior medication treatment. The proportion of patients on assigned medication at 18 months was 30.9% for risperidone and 37.3% for olanzapine. Mean doses were 6.4 ± 3.2 mg daily for risperidone, and 17.0 ± 5.0 mg daily for olanzapine. The groups did not differ significantly in time to medication discontinuation, first hospitalization or first employment. There were few differences in psychopathology, laboratory, or neurological assessments between groups at 18 months. Patients randomized to olanzapine gained modestly more weight. Controlling for pre-randomization medication suggested improvement in some aspects of psychopathology from switching medications; however, switching from olanzapine to risperidone was associated with more hospitalizations. Risperidone and olanzapine have similar efficacy and tolerability in patients with schizophrenia who are participating in supported employment. Randomization to olanzapine was associated with more weight gain, but randomization from olanzapine to risperidone appeared to be associated with a greater likelihood of hospitalization. Careful monitoring of metabolic effects and participation in supported employment may have contributed to minimal weight gain and metabolic effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  1. No Evidence for Prolonged Visible Persistence in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grimsen, Cathleen; Brand, Andreas; Fahle, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Temporal visual processing is strongly deteriorated in patients with schizophrenia. For example, the interval required between a visual stimulus and a subsequent mask has to be much longer in schizophrenic patients than in healthy controls. We investigated whether this deficit in temporal resolution is accompanied by prolonged visual persistence and/or deficient temporal precision (temporal asynchrony perception). Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated visual persistence in three experiments. In the first, measuring temporal processing by so-called backward masking, prolonged visible persistence is supposed to decrease performance. In the second experiment, requiring temporal integration, prolonged persistence is supposed to improve performance. In the third experiment, we investigated asynchrony detection, as another measure of temporal resolution. Eighteen patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy controls participated. Asynchrony detection was intact in the patients. However, patients' performance was inferior compared to healthy controls in the first two experiments. Hence, temporal processing in schizophrenic patients is indeed significantly impaired but this impairment is not caused by prolonged temporal integration. Conclusions/Significance Our results argue against a generally prolonged visual persistence in patients with schizophrenia. Together with the preserved ability of patients, to detect temporal asynchronies in permanently presented stimuli, the results indicate a more specific deficit in temporal processing of schizophrenic patients. PMID:23536838

  2. Do strict formularies replicate failure for patients with schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Dana P; Dirani, Riad; Fastenau, John; Conrad, Ryan M

    2014-03-01

    We measure the impact of Medicaid formulary restrictions (FRs) on the rate at which patients who previously failed a drug therapy for schizophrenia are returned to that therapy. We collect drug-level information on FRs in state Medicaid programs and examine claims of noninstitutionalized Medicaid enrollees with schizophrenia. A difference-in-differences technique is used to compute the change in the probability of adverse outcomes before and after a state adopts an FR. This change is compared with the change in failure probabilities in states with no FRs. Regardless of FRs, patients tend to resume the same drug after an adverse medical event. In 2005, 69% of inpatient mental health-related admissions resulted in patients resuming the same therapy within 6 months of the event, and 63% of patients resumed the same drug after a mental health-related emergency department admission. In states where FRs limit access to all atypicals, the likelihood of a patient resuming the same atypical after having ceased treatment for at least 30 days increases by 20.1% relative to patients in states without restrictions. Additionally, patients in states that impose FRs on all atypicals are 11.6% more likely to discontinue all treatments. FR may increase the likelihood that patients will return to failed treatments or cease treatment altogether. Although formularies are designed to reduce drug spending, an unintended consequence may be an increase in the use of other services needed to treat patients with schizophrenia.

  3. Factor structure of the Bern Psychopathology Scale in a sample of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Lang, Fabian U; Stierlin, Annabel S; Stegmayer, Katharina; Walther, Sebastian; Becker, Thomas; Jäger, Markus

    2015-10-01

    The Bern Psychopathology Scale (BPS) is based on a system-specific approach to classifying the psychopathological symptom pattern of schizophrenia. It consists of subscales for three domains (language, affect and motor behaviour) that are hypothesized to be related to specific brain circuits. The aim of the study was to examine the factor structure of the BPS in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. One hundred and forty-nine inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were recruited at the Department of Psychiatry II, Ulm University, Germany (n=100) and at the University Hospital of Psychiatry, Bern, Switzerland (n=49). Psychopathology was assessed with the BPS. The VARCLUS procedure of SAS(®) (a type of oblique component analysis) was used for statistical analysis. Six clusters were identified (inhibited language, inhibited motor behaviour, inhibited affect, disinhibited affect, disinhibited language/motor behaviour, inhibited language/motor behaviour) which explained 40.13% of the total variance of the data. A binary division of attributes into an inhibited and disinhibited cluster was appropriate, although an overlap was found between the language and motor behaviour domains. There was a clear distinction between qualitative and quantitative symptoms. The results argue for the validity of the BPS in identifying subsyndromes of schizophrenia spectrum disorders according to a dimensional approach. Future research should address the longitudinal assessment of dimensional psychopathological symptoms and elucidate the underlying neurobiological processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Is nonverbal communication disrupted in interactions involving patients with schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G T; McCabe, Rosemarie

    2013-09-01

    Nonverbal communication is a critical feature of successful social interaction and interpersonal rapport. Social exclusion is a feature of schizophrenia. This experimental study investigated if the undisclosed presence of a patient with schizophrenia in interaction changes nonverbal communication (ie, speaker gesture and listener nodding). 3D motion-capture techniques recorded 20 patient (1 patient, 2 healthy participants) and 20 control (3 healthy participants) interactions. Participants rated their experience of rapport with each interacting partner. Patients' symptoms, social cognition, and executive functioning were assessed. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) Compared to controls, patients display less speaking gestures and listener nods. (2) Patients' increased symptom severity and poorer social cognition are associated with patients' reduced gesture and nods. (3) Patients' partners compensate for patients' reduced nonverbal behavior by gesturing more when speaking and nodding more when listening. (4) Patients' reduced nonverbal behavior, increased symptom severity, and poorer social cognition are associated with others experiencing poorer rapport with the patient. Patients gestured less when speaking. Patients with more negative symptoms nodded less as listeners, while their partners appeared to compensate by gesturing more as speakers. Patients with more negative symptoms also gestured more when speaking, which, alongside increased negative symptoms and poorer social cognition, was associated with others experiencing poorer patient rapport. Patients' symptoms are associated with the nonverbal behavior of patients and their partners. Patients' increased negative symptoms and gesture use are associated with poorer interpersonal rapport. This study provides specific evidence about how negative symptoms impact patients' social interactions.

  5. Opinions of French patients with schizophrenia regarding injectable medication

    PubMed Central

    Caroli, François; Raymondet, Philippe; Izard, Isabelle; Plas, Joel; Gall, Bérengère; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of patient-reported outcomes to assess the care of individuals with schizophrenia is increasing. We describe a survey (questionnaire) that evaluates patient opinions on long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication. Methods: Psychiatrists throughout France selected consenting patients with schizophrenia who had received at least three months’ treatment with a long-acting injectable antipsychotic (either typical or atypical) as outpatients to be interviewed by professional interviewers. Results: A total of 206 patients were interviewed at 19 sites. Ninety-five percent of the patients had been treated with more than one form of dosage; for these individuals, injections were the favored dosage form, being preferred by 47% (compared with 35%, 7%, and 1% expressing a preference for oral tablets, drinkable solutions, and orally disintegrating tablets, respectively, whilst 10% of patients did not express a preference). Over two-thirds of the interviewees (67%) said they felt better having received an injectable treatment than they felt before, and over half the patients (51%) considered injectable therapy to be more effective than other medication. In addition, the majority of the sample (70%) felt better supported in their illness by virtue of regular contact with the doctor or nurse who administered their injection. Patients also reported that injectable treatment could impact positively on their plans and aspirations, with the most frequent consideration for the future relating to finding a job (49% of the sample). Conclusion: In this survey, patients with schizophrenia had favorable opinions on injectable medication. Ultimately, positive experiences associated with the treatment of schizophrenia in patients receiving long-acting injectable medication may influence the prescription of such therapy by health care providers. PMID:21573047

  6. Attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Yasui-Furukori, Norio; Yamazaki, Manabu; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Mori, Takao; Sugai, Takuro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Yutaro; Minami, Yoshitake; Ozeki, Yuji; Okamoto, Kurefu; Sagae, Toyoaki; Someya, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a growing concern among patients with schizophrenia because metabolic abnormalities are widely regarded as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and premature death. The current study assessed attitudes toward metabolic adverse events among patients with schizophrenia. Methods A brief questionnaire was constructed to investigate patient recognition of the following broad areas: dietary habits, lifestyle, self-monitoring, knowledge, and medical practice. Between January 2012 and June 2013, questionnaires were sent to patients associated with 520 outpatient facilities and 247 inpatient facilities belonging to the Japan Psychiatric Hospital Association. All of the participants (n=22,072; inpatients =15,170, outpatients =6,902) were diagnosed with schizophrenia based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, or the International Classification of Diseases, tenth revision. Results Approximately 55.0% (8,069/14,669) of inpatients and 44.8% of outpatients (2,978/6,649) reported that they did not exercise at all. Although 60.9% (4,116/6,760) of outpatients reported that they felt obese, only 35.6% (5,261/14,794) of inpatients felt obese. More than half of the inpatients (51.2%; 7,514/14,690) and outpatients (60.8%; 4,086/6,721) hoped to receive regular blood tests to prevent weight gain and diseases such as diabetes. Conclusion Although more than half of patients hoped to prevent weight gain and diabetes, only a minority of patients were mindful of eating balanced meals and having physical exercise. Educational efforts and the promotion of the best pharmacotherapy and monitoring practices are needed for patients with schizophrenia. PMID:26966364

  7. Pitch and Duration Mismatch Negativity and Premorbid Intellect in the First Hospitalized Schizophrenia Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Salisbury, Dean F; Polizzotto, Nicola R; Nestor, Paul G; Haigh, Sarah M; Koehler, Justine; McCarley, Robert W

    2017-03-01

    Mismatch negativity (MMN) is a robustly abnormal brainwave in chronically ill schizophrenia that has generated interest as a disease presence biomarker. Reports of MMN reduction in first-episode schizophrenia have been equivocal, raising uncertainty about its reduction at first psychotic break. Here we tested 29 schizophrenia-spectrum participants under 1 year from their first hospitalization for psychosis and 40 age-, gender-, parental socioeconomic status-, and Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales III Information-matched healthy controls on both pitch and duration MMN. Participants performed a visual checkerboard tracking task while standard (1kHz, 50ms, 80%), pitch-deviant (1.2kHz, 50ms, 10%) and duration-deviant (1kHz, 100ms, 10%) tones were presented over headphones (75 dB) and EEG was recorded. Independent component analysis was used to remove eye movements and visual stimulus processing activity. Groups did not differ in pitch MMN or duration MMN amplitudes. Smaller pitch and duration MMN amplitudes were associated with lower estimates of premorbid intellect in all participants and independently with greater positive symptoms in first hospitalized schizophrenia. Overall MMN reduction was not present in these relatively high functioning individuals at the first episode of schizophrenia, and therefore is not a good disease presence biomarker for this sample. Future research is warranted to determine the degree of MMN reduction at the first episode of psychosis across a greater range of cognitive impairment, the utility of MMN as an indicator of risk or diagnosis, and its role for understanding pathophysiological mechanisms in emerging psychosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Educational Costs to Hospitalized Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martz, E. Wayne; Ptakowski, Richard

    1978-01-01

    One of the less obvious costs of educational programs is the increased volume of work-ups and treatment for hospitalized patients that are ordered by residents. In a hospital with both private teaching and private nonteaching floors, a comparison shows that service charges on teaching floors are 60 percent higher than on nonteaching floors.…

  9. A Nation-Wide Study on the Percentage of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Patients Who Earn Minimum Wage or Above.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael; Kapara, Ori; Goldberg, Shira; Yoffe, Rinat; Noy, Shlomo; Weiser, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Although it is undisputable that patients with severe mental illness have impaired ability to work, the extent of this is unclear. This is a nation-wide, cross-sectional survey of patients who have been hospitalized with severe mental illness earning minimum wage or above. Data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry were linked with nation-wide data from the National Insurance Institute (the equivalent of US Social Security) on personal income. Hospitalization data were obtained on all consecutive admissions to any psychiatric hospital in the country between 1990-2008 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, other nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder (N = 35 673). Earning minimum wage or more was defined as earning at least 1000 USD/month, which was equivalent to minimum wage in Israel in December 2010. The percentages of patients with only 1 admission who were earning minimum wage or above in December 2010 were as follows: 10.6% of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia; 21.6% of patients with a diagnosis of nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 24.2% of patients with bipolar disorder. The percentages of patients with multiple admissions who were earning minimum wage or above were as follows: 5.8% of patients with schizophrenia; 11.2% of patients with nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 19.9% of patients with bipolar disorder. Despite potential confounders, the results indicate that patients with schizophrenia, nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder have a poor employment outcome, even if they have only been admitted once. These results emphasize the importance of improving interventions to re-integrate these individuals into the work force. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Nation-Wide Study on the Percentage of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder Patients Who Earn Minimum Wage or Above

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael; Kapara, Ori; Goldberg, Shira; Yoffe, Rinat; Noy, Shlomo; Weiser, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Although it is undisputable that patients with severe mental illness have impaired ability to work, the extent of this is unclear. This is a nation-wide, cross-sectional survey of patients who have been hospitalized with severe mental illness earning minimum wage or above. Method: Data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry were linked with nation-wide data from the National Insurance Institute (the equivalent of US Social Security) on personal income. Hospitalization data were obtained on all consecutive admissions to any psychiatric hospital in the country between 1990–2008 with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, other nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder (N = 35 673). Earning minimum wage or more was defined as earning at least 1000 USD/month, which was equivalent to minimum wage in Israel in December 2010. Results: The percentages of patients with only 1 admission who were earning minimum wage or above in December 2010 were as follows: 10.6% of patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia; 21.6% of patients with a diagnosis of nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 24.2% of patients with bipolar disorder. The percentages of patients with multiple admissions who were earning minimum wage or above were as follows: 5.8% of patients with schizophrenia; 11.2% of patients with nonaffective psychotic disorders; and 19.9% of patients with bipolar disorder. Conclusions: Despite potential confounders, the results indicate that patients with schizophrenia, nonaffective psychotic disorders, or bipolar disorder have a poor employment outcome, even if they have only been admitted once. These results emphasize the importance of improving interventions to re-integrate these individuals into the work force. PMID:25796051

  11. Improving medication compliance of a patient with schizophrenia through collaborative behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Heinssen, Robert K

    2002-03-01

    Introduction by the column editors: Numerous factors influence a patient's decision to accept or reject prescribed medications, including the patient's personal values, environmental conditions, and the quality of the patient-physician relationship (1). Guidelines for evaluating and managing noncompliance with medication regimens by patients with schizophrenia take this multidimensional perspective into account, emphasizing functional assessment of nonadherence behaviors and individualized behavior-change strategies to secure and maintain the patient's cooperation (2). Moreover, a collaborative approach to planning pharmacotherapy is required to ensure medication compliance, with a particular emphasis on linking the positive effects of medications with the patient's personal goals and desires for better functioning and quality of life (3). The following case study illustrates the application of principles for enhancing medication compliance in the treatment of a woman diagnosed as having schizophrenia, paranoid type. Strategies presented by Dr. Heinssen include collaborative treatment contracts, analysis of adherence behaviors, and techniques for boosting medication cues and reinforcers in the patient's home. The therapy described was provided in the Life Skills partial hospitalization and psychiatric rehabilitation program, a multidisciplinary, multilevel outpatient service of the now-closed Chestnut Lodge Hospital in Rockville, Maryland. The program integrated medical, social-learning, and cognitive-behavioral interventions for psychosis within a psychiatric rehabilitation framework.

  12. Rumination and autobiographical memory impairment in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ricarte, J J; Hernández, J V; Latorre, J M; Danion, J M; Berna, F

    2014-12-01

    Although patients with schizophrenia exhibit autobiographical memory impairment, which is considered to be a limiting factor in their daily life, the mechanisms underlying such impairment have been rarely studied. In the current study, we investigate whether rumination and, in particular, brooding, which is a form of maladaptive repetitive thinking, may be linked to the difficulty that patients with schizophrenia experience when attempting to access specific autobiographical memories. Our results indicate that patients reported less specific autobiographical memories compared to control participants. Patients also displayed a higher level of brooding and had more depressive symptoms. According to the CaR-FA-X model (Williams et al., 2007), depression and brooding were associated with memory specificity in control participants. In contrast, neither depression nor brooding was correlated with memory specificity in patients. These results suggest that depression and rumination may not be directly related to patients' difficulty to recall specific memories and that other factors, such as metacognitive deficits, must first be considered when seeking interventions aimed to improve autobiographical memory in patients with schizophrenia.

  13. Handedness and schizotypy in nonpsychotic relatives of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tsuang, Hui-Chun; Liu, Chih-Min; Hwang, Tzung J.; Hsieh, Ming H.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Chen, Wei J.

    2010-01-01

    Existing studies have found the relationship between handedness and schizotypy to be inconsistent and had limited generalizability since only highly homogeneous groups have been investigated. This study aimed to examine the relation between handedness and the four schizotypal factors identified from a previous confirmatory factor analysis in a population of high familial loading for schizophrenia. Study subjects consisted of nonpsychotic first-degree relatives (850 parents and 334 siblings) of sib-pairs who were co-affected with schizophrenia. All participants were interviewed with the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies, which contains a section of the modified Structured Interview for Schizotypy, and the Annett handedness questionnaire. Both categorical and continuous indicators for handedness were examined. Non-right handed siblings of schizophrenia patients displayed more positive schizotypal features than their right handed counterparts when the two-way Annett's handedness classification was adopted. No association was found when handedness was treated as continuous. The relationship between handedness and schizotypy was insignificant for parents probably due to the strong social pressure against left-handedness. We concluded that categorical non-right handedness was associated with positive schizotypy in nonpsychotic siblings of schizophrenia patients. The results indicate that an atypical cerebral lateralization underlying non-right handedness may be also a contributing factor to positive schizotypy. PMID:21308606

  14. The Effect of Cognitive Remediation Therapy on Social Skills in Institutionalized Elderly Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Abolfathi Momtaz, Yadollah; Ameneh Motallebi, Seyedeh; Boosepasi, Shahnaz

    2017-05-22

    There is limited scientific investigations on cognitive remediation in elderly patients with schizophrenia. The present study was aimed to examine the efficacy of cognitive remediation therapy on social skills in institutionalized elderly patients with schizophrenia. The study employed a randomized clinical trial. A total of 60 institutionalized elderly patients with schizophrenia from Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran were selected and randomly allocated into two equal groups (control and intervention). The intervention group attended to cognitive remediation therapy for 8 weeks. The Evaluation of Living Skills Scale for psychiatric patients was used for data collection. The Chi Square, independent and paired t-tests using SPSS, version 22, were employed to analyze the data. The mean age of 60 elderly patients participated in the study was 65.25 ± 4.19 years. No significant differences were found between two groups at baseline. However, independents t-tests showed significant differences between the intervention and the control group in social skills after implementation of intervention. Additionally, the results of paired t-tests revealed significant improvements in intervention group on communication skills (t=5.50, p<0.001), behavioral problems with others (t=5.44, p<0.001), and self-care (t=4.70, p<0.001). No significant differences were observed from pretest to post test in control group. The results of the present study may support the efficacy of cognitive remediation therapy on social skills of elderly patients with schizophrenia. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. ["Schizophrenia versus cannabis", a novel psychoeducational workshop designed with patients].

    PubMed

    Fouillet, Christelle; Simon, Morgane; Kular, Sonia

    A therapeutic workshop involving patients with schizophrenia and consumers of cannabis was created within the Lavallois adult psychiatry department. The collaboration between two nurses and a psychologist enabled new working tools to be designed and implemented with a pilot group of four patients, informed and aware of their condition, and admitting their use of cannabis. This article provides an initial assessment of this rewarding scheme. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Clonazepam improves dopamine supersensitivity in a schizophrenia patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Fukai, Mina; Hirosawa, Tetsu; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Kaneda, Reizo; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Minabe, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine supersensitivity is an important consideration for assessing treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The emergence of dopamine supersensitivity might be related to upregulation of dopamine D2 receptor, which engenders tolerance to antipsychotics, rebound psychosis, and tardive dyskinesia (TD). A 24-year-old man with a history of treatment-resistant schizophrenia was hospitalized for treatment of bone fracture sustained during a suicide attempt. After the operation, his clinical symptoms implied malignant catatonia. The patient discontinued antipsychotics without rebound psychosis under clonazepam treatment. His psychotic symptoms were controlled further with 24 mg/day aripiprazole without relapse or worsening. Clonazepam might be an effective option for the management of dopamine supersensitivity psychosis (DSP). PMID:28348731

  17. The influence of social cognition on ego disturbances in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schimansky, Jenny; Rössler, Wulf; Haker, Helene

    2012-01-01

    Subjects experiencing ego disturbances can be classified as a distinct subgroup of schizophrenia patients. These symptoms imply a disturbance in the ego-world boundary, which in turn implies aberrations in the perception, processing and understanding of social information. This paper provides a comparison of a group of schizophrenia patients and a group of healthy controls on a range of social-cognitive tasks. Furthermore, it analyzes the relationship between ego disturbances and social-cognitive as well as clinical variables in the schizophrenia subsample. Two groups - 40 schizophrenia patients and 39 healthy subjects - were compared. In the source monitoring task, subjects performed simple computer mouse movements and evaluated the partially manipulated visual feedback as either self- or other-generated. In a second step, participants indicated the confidence of their decision on a 4-point rating scale. In an emotion-recognition task, subjects had to identify 6 basic emotions in the prosody of spoken sentences. In the 'reading-the-mind-in-the-eyes' test, subjects had to infer mental states from pictures that depicted others' eyes. In an attribution task, subjects were presented with descriptions of social events and asked to attribute the cause of the event either to a person, an object or a situation. Additionally, all subjects were tested for cognitive functioning levels. The schizophrenia patient group performed significantly worse on all social-cognitive tasks than the healthy control group. Correlation analysis showed that ego disturbances were related to deficits in person attribution and lower levels of confidence in the source monitoring task. Also, ego disturbances were related to higher PANSS positive scores and a higher number of hospitalizations. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that social-cognitive variables explained 48.0% of the variance in the ego-disturbance score and represented the best predictors for ego disturbances. One particular

  18. Treatment with Ziprasidone for schizophrenia patients with OCD.

    PubMed

    Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Fostick, Leah; Cwikel-Hamzany, Shlomit; Balaban, Evgenya; Zohar, Joseph

    2014-09-01

    Comorbidity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been observed in about 15% of schizophrenic patients and has been associated with poor prognosis. Therefore, there is a need for specific treatment options for these patients (schizo-obsessive, ScOCD). This is an open, prospective study, aiming to test the efficacy of Ziprasidone (80-200mg/d) in ScOCD patients and comparing the response to the treatment between stable schizophrenic (N=16) and stable ScOCD (N=29) patients. Treatment effect with Ziprasidone was different in schizophrenic patients when stratified based on OCD comorbidity. Overall, the effect on OCD symptoms (as measured by the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, YBOCS) was found to be bimodal-either no response or exacerbation (for 45% of the patients, n=13) or significant improvement of symptoms (55%, n=16). Those who improved in OCD symptoms, improved also in negative and general schizophrenia symptoms, while ScOCD-unimproved group worsened in all symptoms. Whereas schizophrenic patients without OCD responded in a modest Gaussian distribution, they improved in schizophrenia negative symptoms and in general anxiety. This data suggests that schizo-obsessive disorder is a distinct and complex condition with more than one underlying pathogenesis. Definition of these ScOCD subgroups defined by their response to Ziprasidone might contribute to personalized medicine within the OCD-schizophrenia spectrum. Moreover, this finding suggests that ScOCD may be considered as a special schizophrenic subtype and its inclusion in schizophrenia treatment studies need to be further explored due to its divergent response. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. A clinical and demographic comparison between a forensic and a general sample of female patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Steffen; Blumenauer, Katrin; Osterheider, Michael; Eisenbarth, Hedwig

    2013-12-30

    Diagnoses of psychiatric diseases do not include criminal behavior. In schizophrenia, a non-negligible subgroup is incarcerated for capital and other crimes. Most studies that compared offender and non-offender patients with schizophrenia have only focused on male patients. With this study, we compared demographic and disease-related characteristics between 35 female incarcerated forensic patients (fSZ) and 35 female inpatients with schizophrenia (SZ). Basic clinical documentation and basic forensic clinical documentation revealed significant clinical and demographic differences between the two groups. Compared to SZ, fSZ were more severely clinically impaired, showing higher rates of comorbid alcohol and substance disorder, more suicide attempts, had more previous hospitalizations, and were younger at disease onset. Regarding demographic variables, fSZ showed a higher rate of unemployment and homelessness and had to rely more often on housing and legal guardianships compared to SZ. These results suggest that female forensic patients with schizophrenia are more severely affected by clinical and non-clinical variables requiring an adapted intervention program. These results may also indicate two developmental trajectories for criminal and non-criminal schizophrenia in females.

  20. Impact of sociodemographic and clinical factors on subjective quality of life in schizophrenia patients in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yu-Tao; Weng, Yong-Zhen; Leung, Chi-Ming; Tang, Wai-Kwong; Ungvari, Gabor S

    2007-10-01

    The impact of sociodemographic and clinical factors on subjective quality of life (SQOL) in Chinese schizophrenia outpatients was explored. Randomly selected subjects with schizophrenia (N = 273) were assessed with respect to their sociodemographic, clinical characteristics, and SQOL. Compared with the Chinese general population, patients had significantly lower scores in the physical and social SQOL domains. Multiple regression analyses revealed that depressive symptoms inversely predicted all SQOL domains; positive symptoms negatively predicted psychological, social, and environmental SQOL domains whereas educational level, extrapyramidal side effects, anxiety, history of suicide attempts, employment status, monthly income, number of hospitalization, and length of illness all significantly contributed to 1 or 2 SQOL domains.

  1. Prevalence of Substance Use in Patients Diagnosed with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    TEKİN ULUDAĞ, Yasemin; GÜLEÇ, Gülcan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse among schizophrenic patients is a growing clinical concern. Substance use disorders and their effects on the course of schizophrenia have made the identification and treatment of schizophrenic patients a high priority. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of substance use, preferred types of substances, sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features of schizophrenia, and substance use impact in schizophrenic patients. Methods Hundred patients who were consecutively admitted to the psychiatry clinic and were diagnosed with schizophrenia according to the DSM-IV criteria were enrolled in this study. Individual interviews were conducted during the patients. In order to evaluate substance abuse disorder (SAD) as per DSM-IV criteria, the substance use disorder section of the structured clinical interview for DSM disorders-II (SCID-II) form was used. In addition, the following were applied to schizophren-ic patients: sociodemographic data form, medical history form, Brief Disability Questionnaire (BDQ), UKU Side Effect Rating Scale (UKUSERS), Insight Rating Scale (IRS), Alcohol Use Dis-orders Identification Test (AUDIT), Fagerstrom Nicotine Dependence Test (FNDT), Global As-sessment of Functioning Scale (GAF), Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS), Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS), and Calgary Depression Scale (CDS). Results Schizophrenia and alcohol and drug use were more common in males, and younger age was found to have no association with substance use. Unemployment, low education levels, rural survival rates, age at disease onset, the doctor first age of the applicant, the first inpatient years, legal issues, harm caused by others and suicidal behavior, SAPS, SANS, CDS received from their scores significant difference was detected. Schizophrenic patients with substance use had higher side effects of drugs, disability, and psychopathology scores than schizophrenic patients without

  2. Patient education about schizophrenia: initial expectations and later satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ascher-Svanum, H; Rochford, S; Cisco, D; Claveaux, A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated patients' expectations prior to participation in an education program about coping with schizophrenia, and their evaluations of the program upon its completion. Adult inpatients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorders (N = 123) responded anonymously to a preintervention expectation measured and a postintervention evaluation questionnaire. Results point to high expectations of this illness self-management education program, and a high level of satisfaction upon its completion, with a self-fulfilling prophecy effect, in which those with high expectations later reported greater satisfaction. Patients perceived, however, a differential level of helpfulness of the program's nine content areas, and rated learning about diagnosis and medication management as most helpful. Content areas that were rated less helpful included prevalence of schizophrenia, its psychosocial rehabilitation, and use of community resources. Implications for clinical practice in patient education are identified and discussed.

  3. [Integrated management of patients with schizophrenia: beyond psychotropic drugs].

    PubMed

    Taborda Zapata, Eliana; Montoya Gonzalez, Laura Elisa; Gómez Sierra, Natalia María; Arteaga Morales, Laura María; Correa Rico, Oscar Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex disease with severe functional repercussions; therefore it merits treatment which goes beyond drugs. It requires an approach that considers a diathesis-stress process that includes rehabilitation, psychotherapeutic strategies for persistent cognitive, negative and psychotic symptoms, psychoeducation of patient and communities, community adaptation strategies, such as the introduction to the work force, and the community model, such as a change in the asylum paradigm. It is necessary to establish private and public initiatives for the integrated care of schizophrenia in the country, advocating the well-being of those with the disease. The integrated management of schizophrenic patients requires a global view of the patient and his/her disease, and its development is essential. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. The effectiveness of discharge planning on the knowledge, clinical symptoms and hospitalisation frequency of persons with schizophrenia: a longitudinal study in two hospitals in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Khaleghparast, Shiva; Ghanbari, Behrooz; Kahani, Shamsoddin; Malakouti, Kazem; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Sudhinaraset, May

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of discharge planning on the knowledge, clinical symptoms and frequency of hospitalisation of persons with schizophrenia. Discharge planning is associated with decreases in the duration of hospitalisation, readmission to hospitals and decreases in medical costs. Yet, there is little known about the effectiveness of discharge planning among persons with schizophrenia in Iran. Longitudinal clinical trial. In this longitudinal clinical trial, 46 persons with schizophrenia admitted to psychiatric hospitals were selected and classified into either intervention or control groups. For the intervention group, the discharge planning was designed using the nursing process model. The intervention was implemented across six sessions in the hospital and six sessions in patient's home (up to three months after discharge). Friedman test, independent t-tests, chi-squared test, Mann-Whitney U-test and Mc-Nemar's test were used to analyse demographic characteristics, knowledge scores, clinical symptoms and the frequency of hospitalisation. The intervention group demonstrated improved clinical symptoms between the time of discharge and three months after discharge and had higher knowledge levels compared with the control group. In addition, the frequency of patients' hospitalisation preintervention and three months postintervention was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group, while no such differences were found among the control group during this same time period. This study suggests that there are a number of advantages to discharge planning including an increase in the knowledge of patients, a decline in clinical symptoms and a reduction in the frequency of admission to hospitals. Due to high frequency of relapse, rehospitalisation and high remedial costs of persons with schizophrenia, it is important to consider discharge planning as a therapeutic approach for patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. No association of Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 variation with prefrontal function in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Prata, D P; Mechelli, A; Picchioni, M; Fu, C H Y; Kane, F; Kalidindi, S; McDonald, C; Kravariti, E; Toulopoulou, T; Bramon, E; Walshe, M; Murray, R; Collier, D A; McGuire, P K

    2011-04-01

    The Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene has been implicated in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder by linkage and genetic association studies. Altered prefrontal cortical function is a pathophysiological feature of both disorders, and we have recently shown that variation in DISC1 modulates prefrontal activation in healthy volunteers. Our goal was to examine the influence of the DISC1 polymorphism Cys704Ser on prefrontal function in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. From 2004 to 2008, patients with schizophrenia (N = 44), patients with bipolar disorder (N = 35) and healthy volunteers (N = 53) were studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a verbal fluency task. The effect of Cys704Ser on cortical activation was compared between groups as Cys704 carriers vs. Ser704 homozygotes. In contrast to the significant effect on prefrontal activation we had previously found in healthy subjects, no significant effect of Cys704Ser was detected in this or any other region in either the schizophrenia or bipolar groups. When controls were compared with patients with schizophrenia, there was a diagnosis by genotype interaction in the left middle/superior frontal gyrus [family-wise error (FWE) P = 0.002]. In this region, Ser704/ser704 controls activated more than Cys704 carriers, and there was a trend in the opposite direction in schizophrenia patients. In contrast to its effect in healthy subjects, variation in DISC1 Cys704Ser704 genotype was not associated with altered prefrontal activation in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. The absence of an effect in patients may reflect interactions of the effects of DISC1 genotype with the effects of other genes associated with these disorders, and/or with the effects of the disorders on brain function.

  6. Definitions and drivers of relapse in patients with schizophrenia: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Relapse in patients with schizophrenia has devastating repercussions, including worsening symptoms, impaired functioning, cognitive deterioration and reduced quality of life. This progressive decline exacerbates the burden of illness on patients and their families. Relapse prevention is identified as a key therapeutic aim; however, the absence of widely accepted relapse definition criteria considerably hampers achieving this goal. We conducted a literature review in order to investigate the reporting of relapses and the validity of hospitalization as a proxy for relapse in patients with schizophrenia. The primary aim was to assess the range and validity of methods used to define relapse in observational or naturalistic settings. The secondary aim was to capture information on factors that predicted or influenced the risk of relapse. A structured search of the PubMed database identified articles that discussed relapse, and hospitalization as a proxy of relapse, in patients with schizophrenia. National and international guidelines were also reviewed. Of the 150 publications and guidelines identified, 87 defined relapse and 62% of these discussed hospitalization. Where hospitalization was discussed, this was as a proxy for, or a component of, relapse in the majority of cases. However, hospitalization duration and type varied and were not always well defined. Scales were used to define relapse in 53 instances; 10 different scales were used and multiple scales often appeared within the same definition. There were 95 references to factors that may drive relapse, including non-adherence to antipsychotic medication (21/95), stress/depression (11/95) and substance abuse (9/95). Twenty-five publications discussed the potential of antipsychotic therapy to reduce relapse rates—continuous antipsychotic therapy was associated with reduced frequency and duration of hospitalization. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as psychoeducation and cognitive behavioural therapy

  7. Successfully breaking a 20-year cycle of hospitalizations with recovery-oriented cognitive therapy for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Grant, Paul M; Reisweber, Jarrod; Luther, Lauren; Brinen, Aaron P; Beck, Aaron T

    2014-05-01

    Individuals with severe and persistent schizophrenia can present challenges (e.g., difficulties sustaining motivation and conducting information processing tasks) to the implementation of recovery-oriented care. We present a successful application of recovery-oriented cognitive therapy (CT-R), a fusion of the spirit and principles of the recovery movement with the evidence base and know-how of cognitive therapy, that helped an individual with schizophrenia move along her recovery path by overcoming specific obstacles, including a 20-year cycle of hospitalizations (five per year), daily phone calls to local authorities, threatening and berating "voices," the belief that she would be killed at any moment, and social isolation. Building on strengths, treatment included collaboratively identifying meaningful personal goals that were broken down into successfully accomplishable tasks (e.g., making coffee) that disconfirmed negative beliefs and replaced the phone calling. At the end of treatment and at a 6-month follow-up, the phone calls had ceased, psychosocial functioning and neurocognitive performance had increased, and avolition and positive symptoms had decreased. She was not hospitalized once in 24 months. Results suggest that individuals with schizophrenia have untapped potential for recovery that can be mobilized through individualized, goal-focused psychosocial interventions.

  8. A survey of the tardive dyskinesia induced by antipsychotic drugs in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hemmati, Sahel; Astaneh, Ali Nazeri; Solemani, Farin; Vameghi, Roshanak; Sajedi, Firouzeh; Tabibi, Naser

    2010-01-01

    Tardive Dyskinesia (TD), is one of the important problems of the patients with schizophrenia. The emergence of these side effects depends on so many factors such as the patients' age and the duration of antipsychotic treatment. By discovering new drugs (Atypical), there has been an outstanding decrease in the emergence of these side effects. The present study investigates the symptoms of TD in the Patients with schizophrenia who were under treatments for more than 6 months. The sample of this study was 200 Patients with schizophrenia of four wards in Razi hospital (two acute and two chronic wards) who were hospitalized in the winter of 2006 and were qualified for this study. The subjects were 101 males and 99 females who were younger than 60 and had received antipsychotic drugs for at least 6 months. After psychiatric interview and filling the demographic questionnaire by the patients, the required information about the drugs and the intensity of the symptoms was acquired. Then clinical and physical examinations of tardive dyskinesia were done. Next, the tardive dyskinesia disorders' check list (AIMS) was used. Findings of this cross-sectional, descriptive study were analyzed by SPSS. There was a high ratio of 95% between TD and the age factor (P=0.05). There was no relationship between symptoms frequency and duration of treatment (P=0.68). Facial muscles and oral zones were mostly involved in T.D disorder (72%). No significant difference was observed between nine fold symptoms of T.D in patients who were using traditional drugs and those who were using the new ones (typical and atypical). Findings showed that in the intensity of the symptoms, gender does not play a major role.

  9. USING COMPUTATIONAL PATIENTS TO EVALUATE ILLNESS MECHANISMS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Ralph E.; Grasemann, Uli; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Quinlan, Donald; Lane, Douglas; Miikkulainen, Risto

    2011-01-01

    Background Various malfunctions involving working memory, semantics, prediction error, and dopamine neuromodulation have been hypothesized to cause disorganized speech and delusions in schizophrenia. Computational models may provide insights into why some mechanisms are unlikely, suggest alternative mechanisms, and tie together explanations of seemingly disparate symptoms and experimental findings. Methods Eight corresponding illness mechanisms were simulated in DISCERN, an artificial neural network model of narrative understanding and recall. For this study, DISCERN learned sets of “autobiographical” and “impersonal” crime stories with associated emotion-coding. In addition, 20 healthy controls and 37 patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder matched for age, gender and parental education were studied using a delayed story-recall task. A goodness-of-fit analysis was performed to determine the mechanism best reproducing narrative breakdown profiles generated by healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia. Evidence of delusion-like narratives was sought in simulations best matching the narrative breakdown profile of patients. Results All mechanisms were equivalent in matching the narrative breakdown profile of healthy controls. However, exaggerated prediction-error signaling during consolidation of episodic memories, termed hyperlearning, was statistically superior to other mechanisms in matching the narrative breakdown profile of patients. These simulations also systematically confused “autobiographical” agents with “impersonal” crime story agents to model fixed, self-referential delusions. Conclusions Findings suggest that exaggerated prediction-error signaling in schizophrenia intermingles and corrupts narrative memories when incorporated into long-term storage, thereby disrupting narrative language and producing fixed delusional narratives. If further validated by clinical studies, these computational patients could provide a

  10. Effects of paliperidone extended release on hostility among Thai patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Jariyavilas, Apichat; Thavichachart, Nuntika; Kongsakon, Ronnachai; Chantakarn, Sunanta; Arunpongpaisal, Suwanna; Chantarasak, Vasu; Jaroensook, Piyadit; Kittiwattanagul, Khanogwan; Nerapusee, Osot

    2017-01-01

    Objective This open-label prospective study investigated the effects of paliperidone extended release (ER) on hostility in Thai patients with schizophrenia. Background Patients diagnosed with schizophrenia may be hostile or exhibit aggressive behavior, which can occasion their admission to psychiatric hospital. Antipsychotic medications are often used to treat hostility and aggression in such patients. Paliperidone ER is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, there are no data available for paliperidone ER with regard to its efficacy on hostility and aggression among Thai patients. This study was a part of the PERFEcT study, a 6-month, open-label, multicenter, multicountry, prospective trial to explore the safety, efficacy, and functionality of paliperidone ER tablets. The current study included only the data obtained from Thai participants. Materials and methods Flexible dosing of paliperidone ER in a range of 3–12 mg/day was used, allowing investigators to adjust the dosage of each subject individually. The 199 Thai patients had a stable Clinical Global Impression – severity score before enrollment. Demographic data were collected at enrollment, and assessments took place at 1, 2, 3, and 6 months postbaseline. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Personal and Social Performance (PSP) scale were used to evaluate efficacy. In this analysis, we report the findings for the specific PANSS factor P7 (hostility) and the PSP subscale disturbing and aggressive behavior. Data were analyzed using paired t-test method to investigate changes in mean PANSS and PSP total and subscale scores. The significance level was set at P<0.05. Results From a total of 199 Thai patients, 148 patients (74.4%) participated in all visits. There was a significant reduction in mean scores for all total PANSS measures from 1 month onward compared with baseline, as well as ongoing significant reductions in scores from visit to visit. There was

  11. Family history in patients with schizophrenia and depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Babinkostova, Z; Stefanovski, B

    2011-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia and they can occur during any phase of the disorder. Some authors report an association between depression in schizophrenic patients and a positive family history of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients and to compare their family history with that in patients with depressive disorder. The examined group consisted of 50 patients with schizophrenic disorder, both inpatients and outpatients treated at the University Psychiatry Clinic who had prominent depressive symptoms (total score>7 on 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale). The control group consisted of 50 patients with depressive disorder. Differential diagnosis was established on the basis of ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Patients were evaluated with PANSS, 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) and a questionnaire for demographic and clinical data. The clinical depression seen in patients with schizophrenia differed significantly from that in patients with depressive disorder. Depressive symptomatology was significantly more frequently reported in a family history of schizophrenic patients with depressive symptoms than in patients with depressive disorder. Schizophrenic patients with prominent depressive symptoms have significantly more frequently a positive family history of depression compared to patients with depressive disorder.

  12. Cardiovascular Pharmacogenomics and Cognitive Function in Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kristen M; Kraal, A Zarina; Flowers, Stephanie A; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2017-09-01

    The authors sought to examine the impact of multiple risk alleles for cognitive dysfunction and cardiovascular disease risk on cognitive function and to determine if these relationships varied by cognitive reserve (CR) or concomitant medication use in patients with schizophrenia. They conducted a cross-sectional study in ambulatory mental health centers. A total of 122 adults with a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis who were maintained on a stable antipsychotic regimen for at least 6 months before study enrollment were included. Patients were divided into three CR groups based on years of formal education: no high school completion or equivalent (low-education group [18 patients]), completion of high school or equivalent (moderate-education group [36 patients], or any degree of post-high school education (high-education group [68 patients]). The following pharmacogenomic variants were genotyped for each patient: AGT M268T (rs699), ACE insertion/deletion (or ACE I/D, rs1799752), and APOE ε2, ε3, and ε4 (rs429358 and rs7412). Risk allele carrier status (identified per gene as AGT M268 T carriers, ACE D carriers, and APOE ε4 carriers) was not significantly different among CR groups. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) scale was used to assess cognitive function. The mean ± SD patient age was 43.9 ± 11.6 years. Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension and hyperlipidemia diagnoses, and use of antihypertensive and lipid-lowering agents, did not significantly differ among CR groups. Mixed modeling revealed that risk allele carrier status was significantly associated with lower verbal memory scores for ACE D and APOE ε4 carriers, but AGT T carrier status was significantly associated with higher verbal memory scores (p=0.0188, p=0.0055, and p=0.0058, respectively). These results were only significant in the low-education group. In addition, medication-gene interactions were not significant predictors of BACS scores. ACE D and APOE ε4

  13. Quality of life in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Miranda-Castillo, Claudia

    2009-09-11

    A couple of decades ago, hospitals or psychiatric institutions were in charge of caring for patients with schizophrenia; however, nowadays this role is performed by one or more patient's relatives. Evidence shows that informal caregivers experience negative changes in their quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study is to review the main factors associated with the QOL of caregivers of people with schizophrenia. A search through databases from journals published last decade between 1998 and 2008 was performed. In accordance with the inclusion criteria, titles and abstracts of citations obtained from the search were examined independently by two authors and irrelevant articles discarded. The full text of those studies considered relevant by either reviewer were obtained and assessed independently. Where differences of opinion rose they were resolved by discussion. Out of the 258 references, 37 were included in the review. Studies which assessed factors associated with caregivers of people with schizophrenia's quality of life were included and the information summarized. Evidence suggest that physical, emotional and economic distress affect negatively caregiver's QOL as a result of a number of unfulfilled needs such as, restoration of patient functioning in family and social roles, economic burden, lack of spare time, among other factors. Decreased QOL may be associated with caregivers' burden, lack of social support, course of the disease and family relationships problems. In addition, in developing countries, QOL is affected by caregivers' economic burden. High quality research is needed in order to identify factors associated with QOL over time and testing the efficacy of interventions aiming to improve QOL in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Quality of life in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Miranda-Castillo, Claudia

    2009-01-01

    Background A couple of decades ago, hospitals or psychiatric institutions were in charge of caring for patients with schizophrenia; however, nowadays this role is performed by one or more patient's relatives. Evidence shows that informal caregivers experience negative changes in their quality of life (QOL). The aim of this study is to review the main factors associated with the QOL of caregivers of people with schizophrenia. Methods A search through databases from journals published last decade between 1998 and 2008 was performed. In accordance with the inclusion criteria, titles and abstracts of citations obtained from the search were examined independently by two authors and irrelevant articles discarded. The full text of those studies considered relevant by either reviewer were obtained and assessed independently. Where differences of opinion rose they were resolved by discussion. Out of the 258 references, 37 were included in the review. Studies which assessed factors associated with caregivers of people with schizophrenia's quality of life were included and the information summarized. Results Evidence suggest that physical, emotional and economic distress affect negatively caregiver's QOL as a result of a number of unfulfilled needs such as, restoration of patient functioning in family and social roles, economic burden, lack of spare time, among other factors. Conclusion Decreased QOL may be associated with caregivers' burden, lack of social support, course of the disease and family relationships problems. In addition, in developing countries, QOL is affected by caregivers' economic burden. High quality research is needed in order to identify factors associated with QOL over time and testing the efficacy of interventions aiming to improve QOL in caregivers of patients with schizophrenia. PMID:19747384

  15. What do psychotic experiences mean to Chinese schizophrenia patients?

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Ma, Xiquan; Zhao, Xudong

    2012-12-01

    In this study we explored the perceptions of Chinese patients with schizophrenia about their treatment, mental state, social relationships, and daily life throughout the psychotic episodes. A purposive sample of 16 schizophrenia patients with heterogeneous demographic backgrounds was recruited. We collected data through face-to-face semistructured interviews. We conducted a qualitative data analysis and identified three central themes inductively: (a) negative experiences, (b) sense of powerlessness, and (c) ambivalent therapeutic relationship. Several subthemes were derived under each central theme. The participants' narratives revealed a complex picture of disadvantage and difficulties throughout their psychotic episodes and rehabilitation processes. The themes identified are explored in detail, and their links with existing research and potential clinical implications are considered.

  16. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia 2.

    PubMed

    Daradkeh, T K; Al Habeeb, T

    2005-01-01

    We studied quality of life in 211 patients with schizophrenia from 2 outpatient clinics in Irbid, Jordan and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, using the self-reporting questionnaire SRQ-24 and the modified version of the schizophrenia quality of life scale. Sex, marital status, employment, education, nonpsychotic symptoms and psychotic symptoms were examined. Approximately 27% had good quality of life, 19.4% thought their general health was excellent or very good and about 30% said they had achieved their expectations. There was no significant relationship between sex and marital status and quality of life but employment and education were significantly related. Patients with less severe psychotic and non-psychotic symptoms were also found to have better quality of life.

  17. Tactics and technologies to manage nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Glazer, William M; Byerly, Mathew J

    2008-08-01

    The occurrence of treatment nonadherence among patients with schizophrenia is clinically significant. However, studies show that clinicians do not make systematic efforts to identify and monitor it over time. This paper reviews the various tactics for identifying and monitoring adherence behavior. A comprehensive review of published studies comparing typical and atypical antipsychotics in terms of medication adherence yields mixed results at best. Changing forces in the delivery of health care in the United States will promote efforts to improve the recognition of nonadherence in patients with schizophrenia and develop strategies and tactics to decrease the current rates of nonadherence. Such tactics are described in this paper, and emerging best practices are identified. Ultimately, if nonadherence rates are to decrease, it will be necessary to align the incentives of the treater and the treated.

  18. Psychosocial functioning of individuals with schizophrenia in community housing facilities and the psychiatric hospital in Zurich.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Matthias; Briner, David; Kawohl, Wolfram; Seifritz, Erich; Baumgartner-Nietlisbach, Gabriela

    2015-12-15

    Individuals with severe mental illness frequently have difficulties in obtaining and maintaining adequate accommodation. If they are not willing or able to adapt to requirements of traditional supported housing institutions they may live in sheltered and emergency accommodation. Adequate mental health services are rarely available in these facilities. The aim of the present study was to evaluate mental health, functional and social status of individuals living in community sheltered housing facilities. A cross-sectional survey of n=338 individuals in sheltered housing compared to a sample of patients at intake in acute inpatient psychiatry (n=619) concerning clinical and social variables was carried out in the catchment area of Zurich. Matched subsamples of individuals with schizophrenia (n=168) were compared concerning functioning and impairments on the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Individuals with schizophrenia in sheltered housing (25% of the residents) have significantly more problems concerning substance use, physical illness, psychopathological symptoms other than psychosis and depression, and relationships, daily activities and occupation than patients with schizophrenia at intake on an acute psychiatric ward. Community sheltered accommodation although conceptualized to prevent homelessness in the general population de facto serve as housing facilities for individuals with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness.

  19. Scurvy in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Raynaud-Simon, A; Cohen-Bittan, J; Gouronnec, A; Pautas, E; Senet, P; Verny, M; Boddaert, J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically screen hospitalized elderly patients for clinical symptoms of scurvy and to confirm the diagnosis with biological measures. Geriatric acute care ward. Scurvy symptoms (one or more among perifollicular hyperkeratosis, petechiae or bruises, haemorrhagic features caused by venous puncture, severe gingivitis). We compared associated diseases, nutritional status, need for assistance for feeding, serum albumin, transthyretin, B9 and B12 vitamins, iron status and Serum Ascorbic Acid Level (SAAL) and outcome (in-hospital mortality) between scurvy and scurvy free patients. 18 patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy group) were identified out of 145 consecutive patients (12%). They were compared to 23 consecutive control patients with no clinical symptoms of scurvy (scurvy-free group). SAAL was significantly lower (1.09 +/- 1.06 vs 4.87 +/- 4.2 mg x L-1, p < .001) and vitamin C deficiency more frequent (94 vs 30 %, p < .001) in the scurvy group. Moreover, in scurvy group, coronary heart disease (39 vs 9 %, p=.028), need for assistance for feeding (56 vs 13 %, p=.006) and in-hospital deaths (44 vs 9 %, p=.012) were more frequent. Ninety-four percent of patients with clinical symptoms of scurvy had vitamin C deficiency. Our results suggest that in hospitalized elderly patients, clinical symptoms allow scurvy diagnosis. Scurvy could be a frequent disease in elderly patients admitted to acute geriatric ward.

  20. Relative risk of probabilistic category learning deficits in patients with schizophrenia and their siblings

    PubMed Central

    Weickert, Thomas W.; Goldberg, Terry E.; Egan, Michael F.; Apud, Jose A.; Meeter, Martijn; Myers, Catherine E.; Gluck, Mark A; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Background While patients with schizophrenia display an overall probabilistic category learning performance deficit, the extent to which this deficit occurs in unaffected siblings of patients with schizophrenia is unknown. There are also discrepant findings regarding probabilistic category learning acquisition rate and performance in patients with schizophrenia. Methods A probabilistic category learning test was administered to 108 patients with schizophrenia, 82 unaffected siblings, and 121 healthy participants. Results Patients with schizophrenia displayed significant differences from their unaffected siblings and healthy participants with respect to probabilistic category learning acquisition rates. Although siblings on the whole failed to differ from healthy participants on strategy and quantitative indices of overall performance and learning acquisition, application of a revised learning criterion enabling classification into good and poor learners based on individual learning curves revealed significant differences between percentages of sibling and healthy poor learners: healthy (13.2%), siblings (34.1%), patients (48.1%), yielding a moderate relative risk. Conclusions These results clarify previous discrepant findings pertaining to probabilistic category learning acquisition rate in schizophrenia and provide the first evidence for the relative risk of probabilistic category learning abnormalities in unaffected siblings of patients with schizophrenia, supporting genetic underpinnings of probabilistic category learning deficits in schizophrenia. These findings also raise questions regarding the contribution of antipsychotic medication to the probabilistic category learning deficit in schizophrenia. The distinction between good and poor learning may be used to inform genetic studies designed to detect schizophrenia risk alleles. PMID:20172502

  1. Minor physical anomalies are more common in schizophrenia patients with the history of homicide.

    PubMed

    Tényi, Tamás; Halmai, Tamás; Antal, Albert; Benke, Bálint; Jeges, Sára; Tényi, Dalma; Tóth, Ákos Levente; Csábi, Györgyi

    2015-02-28

    Minor physical anomalies may be external markers of abnormal brain development, so the more common appearance of these signs in homicidal schizophrenia might suggest the possibility of a more seriously aberrant neurodevelopment in this subgroup. The aim of the present study was to investigate the rate and topological profile of minor physical anomalies in patients with schizophrenia with the history of committed or attempted homicide comparing them to patients with schizophrenia without homicide in their history and to normal control subjects. Using a list of 57 minor physical anomalies, 44 patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia were examined with the history of committed or attempted homicide, as a comparison 22 patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia without the history of any kind of homicide and violence and 21 normal control subjects were examined. Minor physical anomalies are more common in homicidal schizophrenia patients compared to non-homicidal schizophrenia patients and normal controls, which could support a stronger neurodevelopmental component of etiology in this subgroup of schizophrenia. The higher rate of minor physical anomalies found predominantly in the head and mouth regions in homicidal schizophrenia patients might suggest the possibility of a more seriously aberrant brain development in the case of homicidal schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relative risk of probabilistic category learning deficits in patients with schizophrenia and their siblings.

    PubMed

    Weickert, Thomas W; Goldberg, Terry E; Egan, Michael F; Apud, Jose A; Meeter, Martijn; Myers, Catherine E; Gluck, Mark A; Weinberger, Daniel R

    2010-05-15

    Although patients with schizophrenia display an overall probabilistic category learning performance deficit, the extent to which this deficit occurs in unaffected siblings of patients with schizophrenia is unknown. There are also discrepant findings regarding probabilistic category learning acquisition rate and performance in patients with schizophrenia. A probabilistic category learning test was administered to 108 patients with schizophrenia, 82 unaffected siblings, and 121 healthy participants. Patients with schizophrenia displayed significant differences from their unaffected siblings and healthy participants with respect to probabilistic category learning acquisition rates. Although siblings on the whole failed to differ from healthy participants on strategy and quantitative indexes of overall performance and learning acquisition, application of a revised learning criterion enabling classification into good and poor learners on the basis of individual learning curves revealed significant differences between percentages of sibling and healthy poor learners: healthy (13.2%), siblings (34.1%), patients (48.1%), yielding a moderate relative risk. These results clarify previous discrepant findings pertaining to probabilistic category learning acquisition rate in schizophrenia and provide the first evidence for the relative risk of probabilistic category learning abnormalities in unaffected siblings of patients with schizophrenia, supporting genetic underpinnings of probabilistic category learning deficits in schizophrenia. These findings also raise questions regarding the contribution of antipsychotic medication to the probabilistic category learning deficit in schizophrenia. The distinction between good and poor learning might be used to inform genetic studies designed to detect schizophrenia risk alleles. Copyright 2010 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  3. Burden of care in families of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Caqueo-Urízar, Alejandra; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José

    2006-05-01

    Family caregivers of persons with schizophrenia and other disorders experience high levels of burden. Most studies of family burden in schizophrenia have taken place in developed countries. The current study examined family burden and its correlates in a medium income country in South America. Forty-one relatives of patients with schizophrenia who were attending a public mental health outpatient service in the province of Arica, Chile, were assessed on Spanish versions of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Scale. All caregivers show a very high degree of burden, especially mothers, older, with low educational level, without an employment and who are taking care of younger patients. As developing country, Chile has a few national social welfare and community rehabilitation programs for relatives of psychiatric patients, especially in this part of the country. This significantly influences the high level of burden experienced by these caregivers. These results suggest a close monitoring of carer's mental health and the provision of a family intervention and psycho-social support.

  4. Is Nonverbal Communication Disrupted in Interactions Involving Patients With Schizophrenia?

    PubMed Central

    Lavelle, Mary; Healey, Patrick G.T.; McCabe, Rosemarie

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nonverbal communication is a critical feature of successful social interaction and interpersonal rapport. Social exclusion is a feature of schizophrenia. This experimental study investigated if the undisclosed presence of a patient with schizophrenia in interaction changes nonverbal communication (ie, speaker gesture and listener nodding). Method: 3D motion-capture techniques recorded 20 patient (1 patient, 2 healthy participants) and 20 control (3 healthy participants) interactions. Participants rated their experience of rapport with each interacting partner. Patients’ symptoms, social cognition, and executive functioning were assessed. Four hypotheses were tested: (1) Compared to controls, patients display less speaking gestures and listener nods. (2) Patients’ increased symptom severity and poorer social cognition are associated with patients’ reduced gesture and nods. (3) Patients’ partners compensate for patients’ reduced nonverbal behavior by gesturing more when speaking and nodding more when listening. (4) Patients’ reduced nonverbal behavior, increased symptom severity, and poorer social cognition are associated with others experiencing poorer rapport with the patient. Results: Patients gestured less when speaking. Patients with more negative symptoms nodded less as listeners, while their partners appeared to compensate by gesturing more as speakers. Patients with more negative symptoms also gestured more when speaking, which, alongside increased negative symptoms and poorer social cognition, was associated with others experiencing poorer patient rapport. Conclusions: Patients’ symptoms are associated with the nonverbal behavior of patients and their partners. Patients’ increased negative symptoms and gesture use are associated with poorer interpersonal rapport. This study provides specific evidence about how negative symptoms impact patients’ social interactions. PMID:22941744

  5. Nutritional Alert in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Brieux, Humberto Fernán Mandirola; Kaminker, Diego; Campos, Fernando; Guillen, Sebastian; Alejandris, Javier; Luna, Daniel; Baum, Analia; de Quirós, Fernán Gonzalez Bernaldo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study is to assess a nutritional risk alert using an Informatics System in hospitalized patients versus the conventional methodology. We studied 400 medical patients at the Belgrano Hospital Critical Care Unit. We considered two groups of 200 patients. In the first the group (Control Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed in a traditional way. In the second group (Alarm Group), nutritional risk was diagnosed with an alert system. The alert was triggered when a patient showed low levels of, at least, two of the following variables: albumin, cholesterol, triglyceride, lymphocyte or low body mass index (BMI). Nutritional risk was detected in 20.3% of the Control Group patients while, in the Alert Group, nutritional risk was detected in 34.3% of the patients; the difference between the two groups was significant (p<0.001), with a sensitivity rate of 99% and a specificity rate of 98%. Malnutrition is more easily detected when using an alert system.

  6. Hospitalizations in elderly glioblastoma patients.

    PubMed

    Moroney, Claire; Perry, James R; Tsang, Derek S; Bilodeau, Denise; Mueller, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Myrehaug, Sten; Sahgal, Arjun; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Tsao, May N

    2017-08-11

    Elderly glioblastoma (GB) patients are at risk of hospitalizations due to the morbidity of the disease and possible treatment toxicity. In this observational cohort study, 255 newly diagnosed GB patients age 65 years and older were included. Survival, emergency room visits and admissions to an acute care hospital were determined. Mean and median total health care costs were calculated. Risk factors for Emergency room visits and acute care hospital admissions were determined. Median overall survival was 6 months. The majority of patients (68%) had at least one visit to the emergency department and 77% had at least one admission to acute care. The mean and median total costs (hospital, ambulatory, physician billing, other health care costs) per patient were $162,479.78 (CAN) and $125,511.00 (CAN), respectively. Treatment with radiation or treatment with radio-chemotherapy was associated with a relative risk (RR) of 2.31 (95% CI: 1.44-3.7; P=0.0005) and 2.19 (95% CI: 1.28-3.74; P=0.004), respectively for emergency department visits as compared to patients who were managed with comfort measures only. Patients with a baseline ECOG 0 had a RR of 1.71 (95% CI: 1.06-2.77; P=0.0289) and patients with baseline ECOG 1 had a RR of 1.49 (0.98-2.26; P=0.0623) for hospital admission as compared to patients with ECOG 4. A large proportion of elderly GB patients (particularly those with good baseline performance status who underwent active treatment) presented to the emergency department and had at least one admission to acute care.

  7. Differences in audiovisual integration, as measured by McGurk phenomenon, among adult and adolescent patients with schizophrenia and age-matched healthy control groups.

    PubMed

    Pearl, Doron; Yodashkin-Porat, Dorit; Katz, Nachum; Valevski, Avi; Aizenberg, Dov; Sigler, Maayanit; Weizman, Abraham; Kikinzon, Leonid

    2009-01-01

    McGurk effect is a perceptual phenomenon that reflects the integration of visual and auditory information during speech perception. Using McGurk effect, the authors examined the audiovisual integration in adolescents and adults with schizophrenia as compared with healthy volunteers. Thirty hospitalized patients with schizophrenia and 20 age-matched healthy controls were examined for perception of ambiguous audiovisual stimuli. The mean of McGurk-positive responses was significantly lower in adolescent patients with schizophrenia than in healthy adolescents (3.13 +/- 2.09 vs 5.60 +/- 0.7, respectively; t = 3.591, P = .001). The McGurk-positive responses were significantly higher in healthy adolescents than in healthy adults (5.60 +/- 0.7 vs 3.60 +/- 1.43, respectively; t = 3.974, P = .001). No significant difference in McGurk-positive responses was found between adults with schizophrenia and healthy adult individuals, or between adolescent and adults with schizophrenia. Duration of schizophrenia, soft sign status, type of symptoms, and type of antipsychotic medication showed no influence on the audiovisual integration ability. (I) Age effect: It seems that the audiovisual integrative function increases from childhood to adolescence and decreases from adolescence to early adulthood. (II) Schizophrenia: Audiovisual integration is poor in adolescent and adult patients with schizophrenia. Thus, it seems that schizophrenia is associated with early and persistent impairment in the development of the audiovisual integration ability. (III) Reliance on visual cue stimuli: Although several previous investigations concluded that patients with schizophrenia rely less on visual cue stimuli than healthy controls, our data suggest that this is true only for specific types of visual cue stimuli.

  8. The impact of side-effects of antipsychotic agents on life satisfaction of schizophrenia patients: a naturalistic study.

    PubMed

    Ritsner, Michael; Ponizovsky, Alexander; Endicott, Jean; Nechamkin, Yakov; Rauchverger, Boris; Silver, Henry; Modai, Ilan

    2002-02-01

    This study compared the impact of side-effects of antipsychotic treatment, clinical and psychosocial factors on the subjective quality of life (QOL) of hospitalized patients. We surveyed 161 patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia stabilized on conventional and atypical antipsychotic drugs using standardized measures of adverse events, psychopathology, psychosocial variables, and perceived QOL. We found that patients with adverse events reported less satisfaction with life domains of subjective feelings and general activities than asymptomatic patients. Patients treated with conventional and novel antipsychotic agents had comparable QOL ratings. Multiple regression analysis showed total variance in QOL ratings as follows: psychosocial factors, 20.9%; clinical symptoms and associated distress, 10.1%; adverse effects, 3.2%. Thus, medication side-effects influence subjective quality of life of schizophrenia inpatients significantly less than other clinical and psychosocial factors. Patient's subjective response to these events rather than their number is more predictive of QOL.

  9. Comparison of quality of life for people with schizophrenia and mental health of caregivers beteen commn-based and hospital-based services.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Dong-Sheng; Lung, For-Wey; Chang, Yong-Yuan

    2004-09-01

    This study is a comparison of the quality of life and family stress levels in community-based and hospital-based services for people with schizophrenia. Fiscal considerations of the health insurance industry in Taiwan require the evaluation of a community support program versus the traditional, hospital-centered program for reform of mental health policy concerning schizophrenia. The study involved 52 schizophrenic patients, 27 in a community-based program and 25 in a hospital-based treatment model, and was conducted from January to December 2001 in the psychiatric department of a general teaching hospital in southern Taiwan. Outcomes were determined using the World Health Organization quality of life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF, Taiwan version), Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS), General Health Questionnaire (Chinese version), rate of loss to follow-up, job conditions, and social function. Comparisons of quality of life and caregiver mental health between the two groups were accomplished using descriptive analysis, independent sample t test, and the generalized estimating equation-I. No significant differences between the two groups were found in quality of life or family mental stress according to the General Health Questionnaire after controlling for sex, age, disease duration, full IQ, and total BPRS score. Long disease duration predicted a hospital setting, while a high IQ was predictive of a community setting. We found no decrease in quality of life for schizophrenic patients in a hospital-based program and no increase in family mental stress among the community-based group. To improve patients' quality of life and the mental health of caregivers in both services, it is important to ameliorate severe symptoms associated with schizophrenia.

  10. Different facets of schizophrenia illustrated by the analysis of the homes of three patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Murawiec, Sławomir; Britmann, Jonathan; Krysta, Krzysztof

    2013-09-01

    Diagnosis and observation of patients' behaviour during outpatient visits or hospitalisations strips the diagnostic process of the opportunity to consider their places of residence as their natural environment. In this way, patients present their symptoms and problems outside of the context of their daily life. Community-based psychiatric care, on the other hand, provides a chance to include, in the diagnostic process the environment created by a patient in their home. This image of a patient's external reality can reflect a certain mental reality. Such elements as furniture and other objects, their number, quality, distribution may reflect the inner mental world of the objects featuring in a person's mind. In some cases, this can become a valuable contribution to a diagnostic process. A description of three patients, all treated for schizophrenia, has been presented in this paper in order to explore this possible relationship. The first individual, "Patient N" lives in a flat in a state of extreme depletion of elements. "Patient N" suffers from chronic schizophrenia with severe negative symptoms. The second individual, "Patient D", has been also diagnosed with schizophrenia. Yet his home is filled with a huge number of elements, writings on the wall, things, figurines and objects of symbolic meaning. A closer examination of his psychopathological symptoms (fantastic, colourful, bizarre content) and history of his illness (unstable diagnosis of schizophrenia), and unpredictable response to antipsychotics may indicate a dissociative type of schizophrenia. Finally, "Patient K's" main living space is dominated by cats that live with him. Patient K was exposed to physical violence as a child and to him cats represent safe, non-threatening objects. He has been also treated for paranoid schizophrenia. The differences between these patients' personal histories and the courses of their illnesses are clearly manifested in the way they create their immediate environment.

  11. [A Case of Advanced Esophageal Cancer Patient with Schizophrenia Successfully Treated with Chemoradiation Therapy with S-1 and CDDP].

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Yusuke; Okumura, Hiroshi; Uchikado, Yasuto; Megumi, Koichi; Urata, Masakazu; Kawagoe, Kousuke; Satake, Souichi; Kita, Yoshiaki; Uenosono, Yoshikazu; Arigami, Takaaki; Mori, Shinichiro; Baba, Kenji; Ishigami, Sumiya; Owaki, Tetsuhiro; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2015-11-01

    A 67-year-old man who was hospitalized at a mental hospital because of schizophrenia was admitted to our hospital with a complaint of dysphagia and vomiting. He was found to have advanced cancer in the middle thoracic esophagus. With the cooperation of a radiologist, a psychiatrist, and a nurse, we successfully performed chemoradiation therapy with S-1 and CDDP. The patient had adverse events of esophagitis and anuria during chemoradiation therapy. However, such adverse events were well controlled through the cooperation with a palliative care team and a urologist. Finally, we were able to enforce chemoradiation therapy with S-1 and CDDP without interruption.

  12. Healthcare cost reductions associated with the use of LAI formulations of antipsychotic medications versus oral among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jay; Wong, Bruce; Offord, Steve; Mirski, Dario

    2013-07-01

    Real-world medication adherence and healthcare costs of patients with schizophrenia initiating long-acting injectable (LAI) vs. oral antipsychotics were compared. Patients with schizophrenia initiating LAI or oral antipsychotics (index event) were identified from MarketScan Commercial and Medicare claims databases and their medication possession ratios (MPR), pre- and post-index costs for inpatient/outpatient care were compared. Of 3,004 patients, 394 initiated LAI antipsychotics and 2,610 oral antipsychotics. Post-index, the mean MPR was greater for the LAI cohort (0.67 ± 0.34 vs. 0.56 ± 0.35; p < 0.001). Schizophrenia-related hospital costs for LAI users were reduced during the follow-up period in comparison to the pre-index period, but were increased for patients using oral antipsychotics (-$5,981 ± $16,554 vs. 758 ± 14,328, p < 0.001). The change in costs of outpatient care also favored LAI medications ($134 ± 8,280 vs. 658 ± 3,260, p = 0.023). Drug costs of LAI antipsychotics were higher ($4,132 ± 4,533 vs. 2,562 ± 2,714, p < 0.001). Schizophrenia patients initiating LAI antipsychotics incur less healthcare costs in comparison to patients initiating oral antipsychotics.

  13. Level of serum thioredoxin and correlation with neurocognitive functions in patients with schizophrenia using clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed

    Bas, Alper; Gultekin, Gozde; Incir, Said; Bas, Tuba Ocek; Emul, Murat; Duran, Alaatin

    2017-01-01

    Thioredoxin is a serum antioxidant that has been investigated in the etiology of schizophrenia. The aim of this study is investigating the relationship between serum thioredoxin levels and cognitive functions in acute psychotic episode and remission state patients with schizophrenia; and examining whether there were differences between patients using clozapine and other atypical antipsychotics; including risperidone, olanzapine and amisulpride. This research was performed in schizophrenia patients hospitalized with acute psychotic episode (n=57), reevaluated patients after the initiation of treatment (mean 16 weeks) (n=46), and healthy controls (n=41). Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Clinic Global Impressions Scale, Neuropsychologic test battery to assess cognitive performance, and serum thioredoxin levels measured by ELISA were used in this research. Serum thioredoxin levels were highest in acute psychotic episode, lower in the remission state and the lowest in healthy controls. Significant correlation has been established between serum thioredoxin levels and Trail Making Test-A performance in remission state patients. In conclusion, serum thioredoxin levels were increased in acute psychotic episode and decreased in remission state, and its relationship with attention is worth to consider in schizophrenia patients.

  14. Partial compliance in schizophrenia and the impact on patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Llorca, Pierre-Michel

    2008-11-30

    This review evaluates the impact of partial compliance on treatment outcomes in schizophrenia and discusses strategies that may be implemented to enhance compliance. As such, a search of English language articles evaluating compliance in schizophrenia was performed using Medline and EMBASE, with no time limits. Abstracts and posters presented at key psychiatry congresses were also reviewed. Results demonstrated that partial compliance with antipsychotic medication is a significant barrier to achieving optimal outcomes in schizophrenia. The problem increases with the duration of treatment, and is difficult to monitor. The impact of partial compliance is significant, leading to increases in psychotic symptoms, the risk of relapse and rehospitalization, and even suicide. Compliance is a complex phenomenon, influenced by aspects of the illness itself such as cognitive impairment and patients' health beliefs. The patient's environment and therapeutic alliance also influence medication compliance. Behavioural and pharmacological measures should be used together to improve compliance. While atypical antipsychotics have demonstrated improvements in psychotic symptoms, insight and cognition, these may not be enough to ensure compliance with oral daily medication. Long-acting risperidone may therefore bring together the benefits of the atypical antipsychotics with the long-acting injection delivery system required to build a platform for improved outcomes.

  15. Psychodynamic day treatment programme for patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders: Dynamics and predictors of therapeutic change.

    PubMed

    Pec, Ondrej; Bob, Petr; Pec, Jan; Hrubcova, Adela

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to test whether a psychodynamically based group psychotherapeutic programme might improve symptoms, social functions, or quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and to investigate factors that might predict clinical improvement or dropouts from the programme. A quantitative prospective cohort study. We have investigated 81 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who participated in a 9-month psychodynamically based psychotherapeutic day programme. The patients were assessed at the beginning and end of the programme, and then at 1-year follow-up. The assessment included psychotic manifestations (HoNOS), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), demographic data, and daily doses of medication. 21 patients dropped out from the programme, and 46 patients succeeded in undergoing follow-up assessment. The psychotic manifestations (self-rating version of HoNOS) and quality of life measured with WHOQOL-BREF (domains of social relationships and environment) were significantly improved at the end of the programme and at follow-up. However, the manifestations on the version for external evaluators of HoNOS were improved only at follow-up. Years of psychiatric treatment, number of hospitalizations or suicide attempts, and experience of relationships with a partner were negatively related to clinical improvement, whereas symptom severity, current working, or study activities were related positively. The results show that a group psychodynamic programme may improve the clinical status and quality of life of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. This type of programme is more beneficial for patients with higher pre-treatment symptom severity and the presence of working or study activities. A psychodynamically based group programme improves the clinical status and quality of life in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Data indicate that changes on the subjective level are detectable by the end of the

  16. Abnormal contextual modulation of visual contour detection in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Schallmo, Michael-Paul; Sponheim, Scott R; Olman, Cheryl A

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients demonstrate perceptual deficits consistent with broad dysfunction in visual context processing. These include poor integration of segments forming visual contours, and reduced visual contrast effects (e.g. weaker orientation-dependent surround suppression, ODSS). Background image context can influence contour perception, as stimuli near the contour affect detection accuracy. Because of ODSS, this contextual modulation depends on the relative orientation between the contour and flanking elements, with parallel flankers impairing contour perception. However in schizophrenia, the impact of abnormal ODSS during contour perception is not clear. It is also unknown whether deficient contour perception marks genetic liability for schizophrenia, or is strictly associated with clinical expression of this disorder. We examined contour detection in 25 adults with schizophrenia, 13 unaffected first-degree biological relatives of schizophrenia patients, and 28 healthy controls. Subjects performed a psychophysics experiment designed to quantify the effect of flanker orientation during contour detection. Overall, patients with schizophrenia showed poorer contour detection performance than relatives or controls. Parallel flankers suppressed and orthogonal flankers enhanced contour detection performance for all groups, but parallel suppression was relatively weaker for schizophrenia patients than healthy controls. Relatives of patients showed equivalent performance with controls. Computational modeling suggested that abnormal contextual modulation in schizophrenia may be explained by suppression that is more broadly tuned for orientation. Abnormal flanker suppression in schizophrenia is consistent with weaker ODSS and/or broader orientation tuning. This work provides the first evidence that such perceptual abnormalities may not be associated with a genetic liability for schizophrenia.

  17. Eye movements of patients with schizophrenia in a natural environment.

    PubMed

    Dowiasch, Stefan; Backasch, Bianca; Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Leube, Dirk; Kircher, Tilo; Bremmer, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Alterations of eye movements in schizophrenia patients have been widely described for laboratory settings. For example, gain during smooth tracking is reduced, and fixation patterns differ between patients and healthy controls. The question remains, whether such results are related to the specifics of the experimental environment, or whether they transfer to natural settings. Twenty ICD-10 diagnosed schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy age-matched controls participated in the study, each performing four different oculomotor tasks corresponding to natural everyday behavior in an indoor environment: (I) fixating stationary targets, (II) sitting in a hallway with free gaze, (III) walking down the hallway, and (IV) visually tracking a target on the floor while walking straight-ahead. In all conditions, eye movements were continuously recorded binocularly by a mobile lightweight eye tracker (EyeSeeCam). When patients looked at predefined targets, they showed more fixations with reduced durations than controls. The opposite was true when participants were sitting in a hallway with free gaze. During visual tracking, patients showed a significantly greater root-mean-square error (representing the mean deviation from optimal) of retinal target velocity. Different from previous results on smooth-pursuit eye movements obtained in laboratory settings, no such difference was found for velocity gain. Taken together, we have identified significant differences in fundamental oculomotor parameters between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls during natural behavior in a real environment. Moreover, our data provide evidence that in natural settings, patients overcome some impairments, which might be present only in laboratory studies, by as of now unknown compensatory mechanisms or strategies.

  18. Risk factors for sudden cardiac death among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ping-Yi; Hung, Galen Chin-Lun; Jhong, Jia-Rong; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chen, Chiao-Chicy; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2015-10-01

    Patients with schizophrenia suffer from excessive premature mortality, and sudden cardiac death (SCD) is receiving growing attention as a potential cause. The present study investigated the incidence of SCD and its risk factors in a large schizophrenia cohort. We enrolled a consecutive series of 8264 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia (according to DSM-III-R and DSM-IV criteria) who were admitted to a psychiatric center in northern Taiwan from January 1, 1985 through December 31, 2008. By linking with national mortality database, 64 cases of SCD were identified. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for SCD was estimated. The cases were matched with controls randomly selected using risk-set sampling in a 1:2 ratio. A standardized chart review process was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical characteristics and the prescribed drugs for each study subject. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis was used to identify correlates of SCD at the index admission and the latest admission. The SMR for SCD was 4.5. For the clinical profiles at the index admission, physical disease (adjusted risk ratio [aRR]=2.91, P<.01) and aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.99, P<.01) were associated with the risk of SCD. Regarding the latest admission, electrocardiographic abnormalities (aRR=5.46, P<.05) and administration of first-generation antipsychotics (aRR=5.13, P<.01) elevated the risk for SCD. Consistently, aggressive behaviors (aRR=3.26, P<.05) were associated with increased risk as well. Apart from cardiovascular profiles and antipsychotics, physical aggression is a crucial risk factor that deserves ongoing work for clarifying the mechanisms mediating SCD in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Model of Management (Mo.Ma) for the patient with schizophrenia: crisis control, maintenance, relapse prevention, and recovery with long-acting injectable antipsychotics (LAIs).

    PubMed

    Brugnoli, Roberto; Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco S; De Filippis, Sergio; Carrus, Dario; Ballerini, Andrea; Francomano, Antonio; Ducci, Giuseppe; Del Casale, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disease that affects approximately 1% of the population with a relevant chronic impact on social and occupational functioning and daily activities. People with schizophrenia are 2-2.5 times more likely to die early than the general population. Non-adherence to antipsychotic medications, both in chronic and first episode schizophrenia, is one of the most important risk factors for relapse and hospitalization, that consequently contributes to increased costs due to psychiatric hospitalization. Atypical long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics can improve treatment adherence and decrease re-hospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia since its onset. The primary goals in the management of schizophrenia are directed not only at symptom reduction in the short and long term, but also at maintaining physical and mental functioning, improving quality of life, and promoting patient recovery. To propose a scientific evidence-based integrated model that provides an algorithm for recovery of patients with schizophrenia and to investigate the effectiveness and safety of antipsychotics LAI in the treatment, maintenance, relapse prevention, and recovery of schizophrenia. After an accurate literature review we identified, collected and analyzed the crucial points in taking care schizophrenia patients, through which we defined the steps described in the model of management and the choice of the better treatment option. Results. In the management model we propose, the choice of a second generation long acting antipsychotic, could allow from the earliest stages of illness better patient management, especially for young individuals with schizophrenia onset, a better recovery and significant reductions of relapse and health care costs. LAI formulations of antipsychotics are valuable, because they help patients to remain adherent to their medication through regular contact with healthcare professionals and to prevent covert non-adherence. The

  20. Cognitive task performance and symptoms contribute to personality abnormalities in first hospitalized schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gurrera, Ronald J; McCarley, Robert W; Salisbury, Dean

    2014-08-01

    Chronic schizophrenia patients have personality abnormalities and cognitive deficits that are associated with poor clinical, social, and vocational outcomes. Very few studies have examined relationships between personality and cognitive function, and chronic illness effects may have confounded those studies. In this study personality traits in clinically stable first episode schizophrenia patients (21M, 9F) and psychiatrically healthy controls (38M, 24F) were measured with the NEO-FFI, a self-report measure of neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. All subjects completed the Information, Digit Span, Vocabulary, and Digit Symbol subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale; and Trails A and B. Standard statistical techniques were used to quantify relationships between personality and symptom levels and/or task performance, and relative contributions of diagnosis and task performance to personality variance. Patients showed elevated mean neuroticism and openness, and reduced mean extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. Task performance and negative symptoms contributed significantly and uniquely to most personality dimensions in patients. Task performance accounted for significant amounts of personality variance even after accounting for diagnosis, and it also contributed to personality variance in controls. These results suggest that cognitive deficits and negative symptoms contribute to consistently observed personality abnormalities in this disorder, and that the contribution of neuropsychological performance to personality variance may be independent of diagnostic classification. Personality abnormalities in schizophrenia may stem from the neurocognitive deficits associated with this disorder, and add to their adverse effects on social and vocational functioning.

  1. COGNITIVE TASK PERFORMANCE AND SYMPTOMS CONTRIBUTE TO PERSONALITY ABNORMALITIES IN FIRST HOSPITALIZED SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Gurrera, Ronald J.; McCarley, Robert W.; Salisbury, Dean

    2014-01-01

    Chronic schizophrenia patients have personality abnormalities and cognitive deficits that are associated with poor clinical, social, and vocational outcomes. Very few studies have examined relationships between personality and cognitive function, and chronic illness effects may have confounded those studies. In this study personality traits in clinically stable first episode schizophrenia patients (21M, 9F) and psychiatrically healthy controls (38M, 24F) were measured with the NEO-FFI, a self-report measure of neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. All subjects completed the Information, Digit Span, Vocabulary, and Digit Symbol subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale; and Trails A and B. Standard statistical techniques were used to quantify relationships between personality and symptom levels and/or task performance, and relative contributions of diagnosis and task performance to personality variance. Patients showed elevated mean neuroticism and openness, and reduced mean extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. Task performance and negative symptoms contributed significantly and uniquely to most personality dimensions in patients. Task performance accounted for significant amounts of personality variance even after accounting for diagnosis, and it also contributed to personality variance in controls. These results suggest that cognitive deficits and negative symptoms contribute to consistently observed personality abnormalities in this disorder, and that the contribution of neuropsychological performance to personality variance may be independent of diagnostic classification. Personality abnormalities in schizophrenia may stem from the neurocognitive deficits associated with this disorder, and add to their adverse effects on social and vocational functioning. PMID:24750960

  2. [COMT Val158Met polymorphism and schizophrenia in a series of Spanish patients].

    PubMed

    Díez-Martín, Justo; Hoenicka, Janet; Martínez, Isabel; Aragüés, María; Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Rubio, Gabriel; Palomo, Tomás

    2007-01-20

    Catecol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) enzyme plays a significant role in the regulation of the dopaminergic system in the prefrontal cortex. Several studies have assessed the association between modifications of the COMT activity and schizophrenia, but without consistent results. COMT gene contains a single nucleotide functional polymorphism which produces the change of a valine for a methionine at position 158. The effect of this aminoacid change is a modification of COMT enzymatic activity: valine-COMT displays a significantly higher capacity of postsynaptic dopamine degradation than methionine-COMT. The objective of this study is to carry out a genetic association study of the functional polymorphism Val158Met in a sample of Spanish schizophrenic patients and healthy controls. This is a case-control study made up of 177 patients and 141 healthy controls. All patients -115 males and 62 females, with ages between 27 and 49 years; mean (standard deviation) of 38 (10.7) years- were being treated in the outpatient Psychiatric Clinic of the Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, and fulfilled the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition) criteria for schizophrenia (n = 162) or schizoaffective disorder (n = 15). Control subjects -92 males and 49 females, with ages between 26 and 47 years; mean of 36 (9.4) years- were free from medical and psychiatric disorders. Genotype identification was done by means of human genetic molecular techniques coupled to ADN polymerase chain reaction and single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism. No statisticaly significant differences were found in the allele frequencies for this polymorphism between patient and control samples. Nevertheless, in genotype analysis and when a model of recessive inheritance (Val/Val vs Val/Met and Met/Met) was assumed, a possible tendency towards statistical significance was observed. Our results do not allow to confirm the possible

  3. [Standard treatment of schizophrenia and legality of personnel equipment in psychiatric hospitals (German Psych-PV): possibilities and limitations].

    PubMed

    Wölfle, M; Onnen, V; Vollmer, E; Steinert, T

    1999-09-01

    Comprehensive insight regarding better treatment and social reintegration of patients with schizophrenia has been gained over the past decade. Implementation of this knowledge into everyday's practice should be a major aim prior to the research on new variants of rehabilitative measures. To which extent this takes place has been poorly discussed until now. Our comprehensive treatment program includes psychoeducation for patients and relatives, cognitive training, social skills training, additional psychoeducation for patients with dual diagnosis and a variety of a traditional group therapies like work therapy. An intensive cooperation is practised with complementary psycho-social services. In n = 89 consecutive admissions lasting at least 2 weeks we examined which patients were reached by these treatment offers. 84% of the patients participated in group therapies, where they passed 6.9 hours weekly on average. Most patients were reached by occupation therapy (62%), followed by physical therapy (54%), unspecific conversation group (54%), psychoeducation (35%), cognitive training (30%), work therapy (26%) and social skills training (7%). The PANSS Positive Scale at admission was negatively correlated with participation in group therapies. The implementation of a variety of psychotherapeutic offers for psychotic patients adequate to the state of the art can be achieved under conditions of standard hospital care in Germany (Psych-PV-law). Required organizational measures therefore are programs offered for patients of several wards in union and participation of employees in education. However, even by such efforts a considerable part of patients is not reached. Strategies to improve treatment results should consider these problems.

  4. Automatic affective processing impairments in patients with deficit syndrome schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Gregory P; Allen, Daniel N; Duke, Lisa A; Ross, Sylvia A; Schwartz, Jason

    2008-07-01

    Affective impairments were examined in patients with and without deficit syndrome schizophrenia. Two Emotional Stroop tasks designed to measure automatic processing of emotional information were administered to deficit (n=15) and non-deficit syndrome (n=26) schizophrenia patients classified according to the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome, and matched non-patient control subjects (n=22). In comparison to non-deficit patients and controls, deficit syndrome patients demonstrated a lack of attention bias for positive information, and an elevated attentional lingering effect for negative information. These findings suggest that positive information fails to automatically capture attention of deficit syndrome patients, and that when negative information captures attention, it produces difficulty in disengagement Attentional abnormalities were significantly correlated with negative symptoms, such that more severe symptoms were associated with less attention bias for positive emotion and a greater lingering effect for negative information. Results are generally consistent with a mood-congruent processing abnormality and suggest that impaired automatic processing may be core to diminished emotional experience symptoms exhibited in deficit syndrome patients.

  5. Patient education methods to support quality of life and functional ability among patients with schizophrenia: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, Anneli; Välimäki, Maritta; Kuosmanen, Lauri; Katajisto, Jouko; Koivunen, Marita; Hätönen, Heli; Patel, Anita; Knapp, Martin

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effectiveness of patient education methods on quality of life and functional impairment of patients with schizophrenia. A multicentre, randomized controlled trial was carried out in two psychiatric hospitals in Finland from March 2005 to October 2007. A total of 311 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, schizotypal disorder or delusional disorder were randomly allocated to computer-based patient education (n = 100), conventional education with standard leaflets (n = 106) and standard treatment (n = 105). Participants were followed up 12 months later. Primary outcome was quality of life (Q-LES-Q-SF) and secondary outcome was functional disability (SDS). Analysis was performed by intention-to-treat. This study is registered, number ISRCTN74919979. Patients' global quality of life improved and functional disability decreased significantly in all education groups over the follow-up time. There were no significant differences between groups in these outcomes. In light of the findings there is no evidence to support a particular education method as the best way to improve patients' quality of life or improve functional ability. On the other hand, no intervention was found to be harmful. Thus computer-based patient education may be a suitable alternative for some patients. While information technology will be more widely used in societies, computer-based intervention may be beneficial for some patients with serious mental disorders.

  6. [Psychosocial Interventions in Acute and Maintenance Treatment of Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Ahunca Velásquez, Luisa Fernanda; García Valencia, Jenny; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Palacio Acosta, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the psychosocial strategies designed to improve the outcomes in adults with schizophrenia in both, acute and stable phase of the disorder. This evidence is used to propose recommendation in the guidelines of integral attention for the diagnosis, treatment and psychosocial rehabilitation of adults with schizophrenia. A guideline for clinical practice was developed using the methodological framework of the Ministerio de la Protección Social to collect evidence and grading recommendations. A search, evaluation and synthesis of evidence were carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The psychoeducation and family intervention showed higher efficacy, compared with the usual treatment, to prevent relapses and hospital readmissions, to reduce family burden and to improve adherence to treatment. The social skill training was effective to improve symptoms, social functioning and quality of life. However, the quality of evidence was low. There was not enough evidence about the efficacy of occupational therapy, but considering patients preferences and its wide clinical utilization, the GDG suggested its inclusion. Psychoeducation, family intervention and social skill training are recommended to be offered for the treatment of schizophrenia. Furthermore, occupational therapy is suggested for inpatients and outpatients with the disorder. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. [Psychotherapeutic Interventions in Acute and Maintenance Treatment of Adult Patients Diagnosed With Schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    García Valencia, Jenny; Ahunca Velásquez, Luisa Fernanda; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana; Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Jaramillo González, Luis Eduardo; Palacio Acosta, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of the psychotherapeutic strategies designed to improve the outcomes in adults with schizophrenia in both, acute and stable phase of disease. This evidence is used to propose recommendation in the guidelines of integral attention for the diagnosis, treatment and psychosocial rehabilitation of adults with schizophrenia. A guideline for clinical practice was developed using the methodological framework of the Ministerio de la Protección Social to collect evidence and grading recommendations. A search, evaluation and synthesis of evidence were carried out. The evidence was presented to the Guideline Developing Group and recommendations, employing the GRADE system, were produced. The cognitive behavioral therapy showed higher efficacy, compared with the usual treatment, to reduce positive symptoms, prevent relapses and hospital readmissions and to improve the occupational stats. However, the quality of evidence was low. There was not enough evidence about the efficacy of adherence, psychodynamic and support therapy. Psychotherapeutic management must be offered to the patients with schizophrenia according to their needs and clinical characteristics. Among the different psychotherapeutic modalities, cognitive behavioral therapy is recommended. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of life of community-based chronic schizophrenia patients in Penang, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, A R; Baba, Ismail; Chin, Low Heng; Hoe, Quah Soon

    2003-10-01

    This is a study of the quality of life (QOL) of 174 community-based chronic schizophrenia patients in Penang, Malaysia. The study samples were selected from the Out Patient Department, Department of Psychiatry, Penang General Hospital, Malaysia. The data was collected through personal interviews with the respondents. A questionnaire prepared by the research team was used to collect data on background characteristics. Lehman's (1988) Quality of Life Interview was used to collect data on patients' QOL. Equal number of males and females participated in the study. The interviews on QOL indicated problems in the areas of life in general, place of living, daily activities, social relations, finance, work and general health. The results also revealed that community-based schizophrenia patients had acute poverty and experienced social isolation, discrimination and exploitation in the workplace. Implications of these results on the implementation process of National Mental Health Policy in Malaysia are discussed. The research paper also discusses the negative impacts of limited rehabilitation facilities available in the community and its implications on the QOL of severely mentally ill patients. The need for immediate research attention on QOL of such patients in the South-east Asian region has been highlighted.

  9. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  10. Are There Gender-Specific Risk Factors for Suicidal Activity among Patients with Schizophrenia and Depression?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Kalman J.; Harrow, Martin; Faull, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    Are there gender-specific risk factors for suicidal activity among patients with schizophrenia and depression? A total of 74 schizophrenia patients (51 men, 23 women) and 77 unipolar nonpsychotic depressed patients (26 men, 51 women) from the Chicago Follow-up Study were studied prospectively at 2 years posthospitalization and again at 7.5 years.…

  11. Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activation Is Related to Learning Potential on the WCST in Schizophrenia Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Anya; Wilmsmeier, Andreas; Wiedl, Karl H.; Bauer, Jochen; Kueppers, Kerstin; Koelkebeck, Katja; Kohl, Waldemar; Kugel, Harald; Arolt, Volker; Ohrmann, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The remediation of executive function in patients with schizophrenia is important in rehabilitation because these skills affect the patient's capacity to function in the community. There is evidence that instructional techniques can improve deficits in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in some schizophrenia patients. We used a standard…

  12. Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activation Is Related to Learning Potential on the WCST in Schizophrenia Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Anya; Wilmsmeier, Andreas; Wiedl, Karl H.; Bauer, Jochen; Kueppers, Kerstin; Koelkebeck, Katja; Kohl, Waldemar; Kugel, Harald; Arolt, Volker; Ohrmann, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    The remediation of executive function in patients with schizophrenia is important in rehabilitation because these skills affect the patient's capacity to function in the community. There is evidence that instructional techniques can improve deficits in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) in some schizophrenia patients. We used a standard…

  13. Structural differences in hippocampal subfields among schizophrenia patients, major depressive disorder patients, and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Sato, Noriko; Hidese, Shinsuke; Teraishi, Toshiya; Maikusa, Norihide; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Hattori, Kotaro; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2017-01-30

    Many MRI studies have reported a volume reduction of the hippocampus in psychiatric diseases. However, disease-related volume differences in hippocampus subfields remain unclear. Here we compared the volumes of hippocampus subfields in patients with schizophrenia, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), and healthy subjects as controls. T2-weighted images were acquired in 20 patients with schizophrenia, 36 with MDD, and 35 healthy volunteers by 3-Tesla MRI. Hippocampal subfields were segmented using an automatic algorithm, Automatic Segmentation of Hippocampal Subfields (ASHS). Schizophrenia patients exhibited significant volume reductions in the cornu ammonis (CA)1 compared to the controls, and in the dentate gyrus compared to the controls and MDD patients without medication, whereas there was no significant difference between the MDD patients and controls. There was a nominal negative correlation between the perirhinal cortex volume and depression severity in the MDD patients without medication, whereas there were negative correlations between CA2 volume and both negative symptoms and the duration of illness in the schizophrenia patients. We identified differing volume reductions in hippocampal subfields and varying correlations between disease severity and subfield volumes depending on diagnosis, suggesting that volume differences in hippocampus subfields may provide important information regarding the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and MDD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of clinical outcomes with orodispersible versus standard oral olanzapine tablets in nonadherent patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Novick, Diego; Montgomery, William; Treuer, Tamas; Koyanagi, Ai; Aguado, Jaume; Kraemer, Susanne; Haro, Josep Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Medication nonadherence is common in the treatment of patients with severe mental illness and is a frequent cause of relapse. Different formulations have been developed in an effort to improve medication adherence. The aim of this study was to explore whether there are differential clinical outcomes between two different formulations of olanzapine (orodispersible tablets [ODTs] vs standard oral tablets [SOT]) for the treatment of nonadherent patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Methods Data for this analysis were from an observational study conducted in Europe (N=903). Adult schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients in outpatient settings who initiated or changed to either olanzapine ODT or SOT according to physician decision within the last 45 days were eligible for enrollment. The follow-up period was 1 year. Of the 903 participants, 266 nonadherent patients (Medication Adherence Rating Scale score 0–4 at baseline) were included in the analysis. Clinical outcomes of interest were: 1) hospitalization and 2) relapse identified by the participating psychiatrist or hospitalization. An adjusted logistic regression model was fitted. Results Patients taking ODT had more severe illness at baseline (P<0.001) as assessed with the Clinical Global Impression with mean (standard deviation [SD]) scores of ODT 4.63 (1.03) and SOT 4 (1.16). In the regression models adjusted for potential confounders, patients taking ODT had significantly lower odds for hospitalization (odds ratio =0.355; 95% confidence interval =0.13–0.974) and relapse or hospitalization (odds ratio =0.368; 95% confidence interval =0.183–0.739), respectively. Conclusion Nonadherent patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder treated with the orodispersible formulation were less likely to be hospitalized or suffer relapse compared to those patients taking the standard oral coated tablets. PMID:28652711

  15. Psychological Distress and Violence Towards Parents of Patients with Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Masako; Solomon, Phyllis; Yokoyama, Keiko

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between violence and psychological distress experienced by parents of patients with schizophrenia. Questionnaire data from 379 parents were analyzed. A total of 151 parents (39.8%) had not experienced violence in the past year, whereas 96 (25.3%) and 132 (34.8%) had experienced psychological violence only or physical violence, respectively. A total of 216 (57.0%) of parents reported being psychologically distressed. Multiple logistic regression revealed that the risk of psychological distress significantly increased with the experience of psychological and physical violence, lower household income, greater family stigma, and the increasing age of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fatal thromboembolism following physical restraint in a patient with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Rossana; Lazzaro, Antonella; Catanese, Miriam; Mandarelli, Gabriele; Ferracuti, Stefano

    2012-05-01

    Fatal thromboembolism during physical restraint in patients suffering from psychotic disorders is a very rare occurrence. In the case we present here, the criteria used in forensic pathology for the age determination of venous thrombi are applied to a case of pulmonary embolism in a patient suffering from schizophrenia who died after physical restraint. The possible association between conventional antipsychotic drugs and deep venous thrombosis, followed by pulmonary embolism, in a man with no predisposing risk factors, as well as the question concerning the appropriateness of medical care, are discussed.

  17. Delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Inouye, S K

    1998-11-01

    Delirium is a common, serious problem for hospitalized older patients. Recognition of delirium poses challenges requiring cognitive assessment and knowledge of the clinical course. Delirium often is of multiple causes and is associated with a poor long-term prognosis. Nonpharmacologic approaches for delirium management are recommended; pharmacologic management should be reserved for patients who pose a danger to themselves or others. Importantly, delirium and its complications may be preventable through a targeted risk factor approach.

  18. Serum Glutathione in Patients with Schizophrenia in Dynamics of Antipsychotic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, S A; Smirnova, L P; Shchigoreva, Yu G; Semke, A V; Bokhan, N A

    2015-12-01

    Serum concentrations of oxidized and reduced glutathione were measured in 73 patients with schizophrenia at admission and in dynamics of therapy with traditional and atypical antipsychotic drugs. The level of reduced glutathione in patients with schizophrenia with manifest clinical symptoms was lower than in normal subjects. Atypical neuroleptics produced virtually no effects on the glutathione system, while therapy with typical antipsychotics led to further decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, thus aggravating the imbalance of metabolic processes typical of schizophrenia.

  19. Patients with schizophrenia selectively impaired in temporal order judgments.

    PubMed

    Capa, Rémi L; Duval, Céline Z; Blaison, Dorine; Giersch, Anne

    2014-06-01

    The ability to order events in time plays a pervasive role in cognitive functions, but has only rarely been explored in patients with schizophrenia. Results we obtained recently suggested that patients have difficulties following events over time. However, this impairment concerned implicit responses at very short asynchronies, and it is not known whether it generalizes to subjective temporal order judgments. Here, we make a direct comparison between temporal order judgments and simultaneity/asynchrony discrimination in the same patients. Two squares were displayed on the screen either simultaneously or with an asynchrony of 24 to 96ms. In one session 20 patients and 20 controls made a temporal order judgment and in the other they discriminated between simultaneous and asynchronous stimuli. Controls recorded similar performances in the two tasks at asynchronies above 50ms, whereas patients displayed a sizeable impairment in temporal order judgment selectively. This impairment occurred in the easiest conditions, with the largest SOAs (Stimulus Onset Asynchronies) and only in the temporal order judgment. The results are the first evidence that patients with schizophrenia have a selective difficulty determining temporal order, even for asynchronies producing a clear perception of asynchrony. This impairment may mediate difficulties engaging oneself in everyday life events.

  20. Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Michael J; Sawa, Akira; Mortensen, Preben B

    2016-01-01

    Summary Schizophrenia is a complex, heterogeneous behavioural and cognitive syndrome whose origins appear to lie in genetic and/or environmental disruption of brain development. Dysfunction of dopaminergic neurotransmission appears to contribute to the genesis of psychotic symptoms but the evidence also points to a more widespread and variable involvement of brain areas and circuits. There is emerging evidence that disturbances of synaptic function might underlie abnormalities of neuronal connectivity possibly involving interneurons, but the precise nature, location and timing of these events is uncertain. Current treatment consists largely in the administration of antipsychotic drugs combined with psychological therapies, social support and rehabilitation, but there is a pressing need for more effective treatments and for services to be delivered more effectively. Progress in understanding the disorder has been great in recent years with advances in genomics, epidemiology and neuroscience, and the opportunities for further scientific advance are great: but so are the challenges. PMID:26777917

  1. Impaired integration of disambiguating evidence in delusional schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Sanford, N; Veckenstedt, R; Moritz, S; Balzan, R P; Woodward, T S

    2014-10-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that a cognitive bias against disconfirmatory evidence (BADE) is associated with delusions. However, small samples of delusional patients, reliance on difference scores and choice of comparison groups may have hampered the reliability of these results. In the present study we aimed to improve on this methodology with a recent version of the BADE task, and compare larger groups of schizophrenia patients with/without delusions to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients, a population with persistent and possibly bizarre beliefs without psychosis. A component analysis was used to identify cognitive operations underlying the BADE task, and how they differ across four groups of participants: (1) high-delusional schizophrenia, (2) low-delusional schizophrenia, (3) OCD patients and (4) non-psychiatric controls. As in past studies, two components emerged and were labelled 'evidence integration' (the degree to which disambiguating information has been integrated) and 'conservatism' (reduced willingness to provide high plausibility ratings when justified), and only evidence integration differed between severely delusional patients and the other groups, reflecting delusional subjects giving higher ratings for disconfirmed interpretations and lower ratings for confirmed interpretations. These data support the finding that a reduced willingness to adjust beliefs when confronted with disconfirming evidence may be a cognitive underpinning of delusions specifically, rather than obsessive beliefs or other aspects of psychosis such as hallucinations, and illustrates a cognitive process that may underlie maintenance of delusions in the face of counter-evidence. This supports the possibility of the BADE operation being a useful target in cognitive-based therapies for delusions.

  2. Patients' expectations of hospital chaplains.

    PubMed

    Piderman, Katherine M; Marek, Dean V; Jenkins, Sarah M; Johnson, Mary E; Buryska, James F; Mueller, Paul S

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate patients' expectations of hospital chaplains. From April 6, 2006, through April 25, 2006, we surveyed by mail 1500 consecutive medical and surgical patients within 3 weeks of their discharge from the hospital. The survey included questions related to demographics, duration and area of hospitalization, awareness of chaplain availability, expectations regarding chaplain visits, and reasons for wanting to see a chaplain. Measured characteristics were summarized by calculating means and SDs for continuous variables and proportions for categorical variables. Proportions were statistically compared via Fisher exact tests or Monte Carlo estimates. Surveys were returned by 535 of the 1500 patients to whom they were sent. Most of those who returned surveys had been hospitalized for less than 1 week (398/514 [77.4%]) and were male (265/510 [52.0%]), married (396/528 [75.0%]), 56 years or older (382/532 [71.8%]), or affiliated with either the Lutheran (177 [33.3%]) or Catholic (133 [25.0%]) churches. Most (78.9%) were aware of the availability of chaplains, and 62.3% would have appreciated chaplain visitation at least every few days. More than half (52.9%) reported that they were visited, and 86.4% reported that this visit was important to them. The primary reason selected for wanting to see a chaplain was "to be reminded of God's care and presence." Items related to ritual, prayer, and pastoral support were also highly endorsed. Some results were dependent on sex, age, religious affiliation, or duration of stay. Hospitalized patients value visitation by chaplains and appreciate both religious and supportive interventions. Opportunities for patient care, education, and research are apparent.

  3. Significant Effect of Valproate Augmentation Therapy in Patients With Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ping-Tao; Chen, Yen-Wen; Chung, Weilun; Tu, Kun-Yu; Wang, Hung-Yu; Wu, Ching-Kuan; Lin, Pao-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Valproate is an anticonvulsant, which is also widely used for treating psychiatric disorders. Some clinical trials have demonstrated benefits of valproate augmentation therapy in schizophrenia. Previous meta-analysis showed inconsistent findings because of limited literature at that time. The aim of this study is to update the newer published data by conducting a meta-analysis of clinical efficacy of valproate augmentation therapy in patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Data sources include electronic research through platform of PubMed. Study eligibility criteria, participants, and interventions were as follows: the inclusion criteria included articles discussing comparisons of the treatment effect in schizophrenic patients treated with antipsychotic augmented with valproate and antipsychotics with/without placebo; articles on clinical trials in humans. The exclusion criteria were case reports or series and nonclinical trials. We compared the effect between antipsychotic treatment with valproate augmentation and antipsychotic monotherapy. Data from clinical trials were pooled by random-effects model, and possible confounding variables were examined through meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Data from 11 articles including 889 patients were included into current meta-analysis. We found patients treated with antipsychotics with valproate augmentation showed significantly more improvement in total psychopathology than those treated with antipsychotics only (P = 0.02). Results from open trials, but not from randomized controlled trials (P = 0.20), showed significant improvement (P = 0.01). In addition, the significance only persisted in the studies conducted with a shorter treatment duration (P < 0.001) rather than longer treatment duration (P = 0.23). There is no difference in the dropout rate between valproate augmentation and antipsychotic treatment only (P = 0.14). We could not perform a detailed meta

  4. Dose–response effects for depression and Schizophrenia management on hospital utilization in Illinois Medicaid: a multivariate regression analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of schizophrenia and depression in the United States is far higher among Medicaid recipients than in the general population. Individuals suffering from mental illness, including schizophrenia and depression, also have higher rates of emergency department utilization, which is costly and may not generate the positive health outcomes desired. Disease management programs strive to help individuals suffering from chronic illnesses better manage their condition(s) and seek health care in the appropriate settings. The objective of this manuscript is to estimate a dose–response impact on hospital inpatient and emergency room utilizations for any reason by Medicaid recipients with depression or schizophrenia who received disease management contacts. Methods Multivariate regression analysis of panel data taken from administrative claims was conducted to test the hypothesis that increased contacts lower the likelihood of all-cause inpatient admissions and emergency room visits. Subjects included 6,274 members of Illinois’ non-institutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind or disabled population diagnosed with depression or schizophrenia. The statistical measure is the odds ratio. The odds ratio association is between the monthly utilization indicators and the number of contacts (doses) a member had for each particular disease management intervention. Results Higher numbers of intervention contacts for Medicaid recipients diagnosed with depression or schizophrenia were associated with statistically significant reductions in all-cause inpatient admissions and emergency room utilizations. Conclusions There is a high correlation between depression and schizophrenia disease management contacts and lowered all-cause hospital inpatient and emergency room utilizations. PMID:24989717

  5. Dose-response effects for depression and Schizophrenia management on hospital utilization in Illinois Medicaid: a multivariate regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Gregory D; Donnelly, Shawn; Warnick, Kathleen; Medina, Wendie; Miller, Mary

    2014-07-03

    The prevalence of schizophrenia and depression in the United States is far higher among Medicaid recipients than in the general population. Individuals suffering from mental illness, including schizophrenia and depression, also have higher rates of emergency department utilization, which is costly and may not generate the positive health outcomes desired. Disease management programs strive to help individuals suffering from chronic illnesses better manage their condition(s) and seek health care in the appropriate settings. The objective of this manuscript is to estimate a dose-response impact on hospital inpatient and emergency room utilizations for any reason by Medicaid recipients with depression or schizophrenia who received disease management contacts. Multivariate regression analysis of panel data taken from administrative claims was conducted to test the hypothesis that increased contacts lower the likelihood of all-cause inpatient admissions and emergency room visits. Subjects included 6,274 members of Illinois' non-institutionalized Medicaid-only aged, blind or disabled population diagnosed with depression or schizophrenia. The statistical measure is the odds ratio. The odds ratio association is between the monthly utilization indicators and the number of contacts (doses) a member had for each particular disease management intervention. Higher numbers of intervention contacts for Medicaid recipients diagnosed with depression or schizophrenia were associated with statistically significant reductions in all-cause inpatient admissions and emergency room utilizations. There is a high correlation between depression and schizophrenia disease management contacts and lowered all-cause hospital inpatient and emergency room utilizations.

  6. Association between Medication Adherence and Duration of Outpatient Treatment in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kikuyama, Hiroki; Ohta, Munehiro; Kanazawa, Tetsufumi; Okamura, Takehiko; Yoneda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Medication adherence is important in the treatment of schizophrenia, and critical periods during treatment may be associated with relapse. However, the relationship between adherence and duration of outpatient treatment (DOT) remains unclear. The authors aimed to clarify the relationship between adherence and DOT at a psychiatric hospital in Japan. Methods For outpatients with schizophrenia who regularly visit Shin-Abuyama hospital, the authors conducted a single questionnaire survey (five questions covering gender, age, DOT, medication shortages, and residual medication) over one month period. Participants were divided into two groups whether DOT were from more than one year to within five years or not. Mantel-Haenszel analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed on the data regarding the medication adherence. Results Effective answers were received for 328 patients. The residual medication rate was significantly higher among those receiving outpatient treatment from more than one year to within five years than five years than those receiving outpatient treatment for more than five years or less than one year (p=0.016). Conclusion This survey suggests that there are critical periods during which patients are most prone to poor adherence. Because poor adherence increases the risk of relapse, specific measures must be taken to improve adherence during these periods. PMID:27482242

  7. Perception of service satisfaction and quality of life of patients living with schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Afe, Taiwo Opekitan; Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat; Ogunsemi, Olawale

    2016-01-01

    To assess service-satisfaction and quality of life among patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary psychiatric healthcare facility in Lagos, Nigeria. Cross-sectional survey of 101 (out of 120) patients diagnosed with schizophrenia attending the outpatient clinic of the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis (SCID), Charleston Psychiatric Out-patient Scale (CPOSS), and the World-Health Organisation Quality of Life -Bref scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was used in assessing diagnosis, patient satisfaction and subjective quality of life respectively. The ages of the patient ranged from 19-81. Males (49.5%) and females (50.5%) had almost equal distribution. Mean duration of attendance was 8.7years ± 8.50. Service satisfaction ranged between 25-60 on the CPOSS. Areas that had higher mean scores on CPOSS were with items (1) Helpfulness of the records clerk (3.70±1.1), (7) Helpfulness of services received (3.69±1.0). Subjective quality of life was high (3.65±1.8), satisfaction with health was also high (3.40±1.1). Service satisfaction correlated with Quality of life at P < 0.00.

  8. Perception of service satisfaction and quality of life of patients living with schizophrenia in Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Afe, Taiwo Opekitan; Bello-Mojeed, Mashudat; Ogunsemi, Olawale

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess service-satisfaction and quality of life among patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary psychiatric healthcare facility in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 101 (out of 120) patients diagnosed with schizophrenia attending the outpatient clinic of the Federal Neuro-Psychiatric Hospital Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV diagnosis (SCID), Charleston Psychiatric Out-patient Scale (CPOSS), and the World-Health Organisation Quality of Life –Bref scale (WHOQOL-BREF) was used in assessing diagnosis, patient satisfaction and subjective quality of life respectively. Results: The ages of the patient ranged from 19-81. Males (49.5%) and females (50.5%) had almost equal distribution. Mean duration of attendance was 8.7years ± 8.50. Service satisfaction ranged between 25-60 on the CPOSS. Areas that had higher mean scores on CPOSS were with items (1) Helpfulness of the records clerk (3.70±1.1), (7) Helpfulness of services received (3.69±1.0). Subjective quality of life was high (3.65±1.8), satisfaction with health was also high (3.40±1.1). Service satisfaction correlated with Quality of life at P < 0.00. PMID:27114651

  9. Lower corneal temperature in neuroleptic-treated vs. drug-free schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Shiloh, Roni; Bodinger, Liron; Katz, Nachum; Sigler, Maianit; Stryjer, Rafael; Hermesh, Haggai; Munitz, Hanan; Weizman, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) can decrease core body temperature in schizophrenia patients. Core temperature may correlate with corneal temperature and thus, we hypothesized that neuroleptic-treated schizophrenia patients would display lower corneal temperature compared with drug-free patients. Corneal temperature of 12 typical APD-treated and 9 drug-free male schizophrenia patients was assessed using a FLIR thermal imaging camera. The APD-treated patients exhibited substantially and significantly lower corneal temperature compared with the drug-free patients (31.57 +/- 0.98 degrees C vs. 34.55 +/- 1.65 degrees C; p < 0.0001). Our results suggest that APDs may decrease corneal/core temperature in schizophrenia patients. The relevance of this finding to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia or to the antipsychotic effect of neuroleptics merit further investigation.

  10. Grey matter, an endophenotype for schizophrenia? A voxel-based morphometry study in siblings of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M; Swart, Marte; de Haan, Lieuwe; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-05-01

    Grey matter, both volume and concentration, has been proposed as an endophenotype for schizophrenia given a number of reports of grey matter abnormalities in relatives of patients with schizophrenia. However, previous studies on grey matter abnormalities in relatives have produced inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine grey matter differences between controls and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and to examine whether the age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms of selected individuals could explain the previously reported inconsistencies. We compared the grey matter volume and grey matter concentration of healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls matched for age, sex and education using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we selected subsamples based on age (< 30 yr), genetic loading and subclinical psychotic symptoms to examine whether this would lead to different results. We included 89 siblings and 69 controls in our study. The results showed that siblings and controls did not differ significantly on grey matter volume or concentration. Furthermore, specifically selecting participants based on age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms did not alter these findings. The main limitation was that subdividing the sample resulted in smaller samples for the subanalyses. Furthermore, we used MRI data from 2 different scanner sites. These results indicate that grey matter measured through VBM might not be a suitable endophenotype for schizophrenia.

  11. Grey matter, an endophenotype for schizophrenia? A voxel-based morphometry study in siblings of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    van der Velde, Jorien; Gromann, Paula M.; Swart, Marte; de Haan, Lieuwe; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Krabbendam, Lydia; Aleman, André

    2015-01-01

    Background Grey matter, both volume and concentration, has been proposed as an endophenotype for schizophrenia given a number of reports of grey matter abnormalities in relatives of patients with schizophrenia. However, previous studies on grey matter abnormalities in relatives have produced inconsistent results. The aim of the present study was to examine grey matter differences between controls and siblings of patients with schizophrenia and to examine whether the age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms of selected individuals could explain the previously reported inconsistencies. Methods We compared the grey matter volume and grey matter concentration of healthy siblings of patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls matched for age, sex and education using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we selected subsamples based on age (< 30 yr), genetic loading and subclinical psychotic symptoms to examine whether this would lead to different results. Results We included 89 siblings and 69 controls in our study. The results showed that siblings and controls did not differ significantly on grey matter volume or concentration. Furthermore, specifically selecting participants based on age, genetic loading or subclinical psychotic symptoms did not alter these findings. Limitations The main limitation was that subdividing the sample resulted in smaller samples for the subanalyses. Furthermore, we used MRI data from 2 different scanner sites. Conclusion These results indicate that grey matter measured through VBM might not be a suitable endophenotype for schizophrenia. PMID:25768029

  12. Determinants of subjective health-related quality of life (HRQoL) for patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Yeh; Ma, Mi-Chia; Yang, Tsung-Tsair

    2014-04-01

    To identify the determinants of schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels, five types of factors (i.e., sociodemographic, clinical, psychopathological, neurocognitive, and psychosocial factors) were simultaneously investigated in the same cross-sectional sample. A total of 120 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia but not spectrum conditions were recruited by convenience sampling. Subjective HRQoL levels were measured using the disease-specific S-QoL-C. After sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, psychopathological data were self-rated with the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) and were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) by professionally trained raters. Two neurocognitive assessments were conducted by licensed occupational therapists (OTs). Psychosocial factors were assessed using self-reports measures, including the, General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and Social Impact Scale (SIS). All measures were administered in random order. OTs, PANSS raters, and participants were blinded to score computation, and multiple hierarchical regression with the stepwise method was conducted. The S-QoL-C scores were most strongly affected by psychosocial factors and the psychopathological factors, followed by clinical and sociodemographic factors. Total scores on the BDI-II had the largest contributions to S-QoL-C index scores and seven of eight S-QoL-C subscales. In addition, the GSES, RSES, and SIS showed effects across the S-QoL-C subscales. The BDI-II, GSES, and RSES all influenced the S-QoL-C index scores, in addition to the number of hospitalizations. Psychosocial factors and psychopathological factors measured by the BDI-II had the greatest impact on schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels. Psychiatric treatment programs focusing on psychosocial status and depressive symptoms can improve schizophrenia-specific HRQoL levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Concomitant NSAID use during antipsychotic treatment and risk of 2-year relapse - a population-based study of 16,253 incident patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Ole; Petersen, Liselotte; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Mors, Ole; Gasse, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    Clinical trials have indicated antipsychotic effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) among incident patients with schizophrenia. We aimed to study, in a population-based setting, whether concomitant use of NSAIDs or paracetamol, changed 2-year relapse risk for schizophrenia. We identified all incident patients with schizophrenia in Denmark diagnosed 1996-2012 initiating antipsychotic treatment within the year after diagnosis. We calculated concomitant treatment intervals for antipsychotic and NSAID or paracetamol use. Hazard rate ratios (HRR) were estimated using Cox regression adjusted for important covariates. 2-year relapse, i.e. (re)-hospitalizations with schizophrenia. Among 16,235 incident patients with schizophrenia using antipsychotics, 1480 (9.1%) used NSAIDs and 767 (4.7%) paracetamol. Concomitant use of NSAIDs was associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia relapse (HRR = 1.21; 95%-CI = 1.11-1.31), particularly associated with acetylsalicylic acid and diclofenac. Concomitant use of paracetamol was not associated with schizophrenia relapse (HRR = 0.97; 95%-CI = 0.87-1.08). Subgroup analyses showed that individuals with somatic comorbidity and NSAID use had an increased relapse-risk, except for individuals with a prior hospital diagnosis for musculoskeletal disease and NSAID use who had a decreased relapse-risk (HRR = 0.82; 95%-CI = 0.71-0.94). The increased relapse risk associated with concomitant NSAID use among incident patients with schizophrenia may indicate a potential impact of underlying somatic comorbidity.

  14. Investigation of Anti-Toxocara and Anti-Toxoplasma Antibodies in Patients with Schizophrenia Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Khademvatan, Shahram; Khajeddin, Niloufar; Izadi, Sakineh; Yousefi, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between Toxoplasma gondii and Toxocara spp. infections in patients with schizophrenia disorder. Method. A total of 100 patients with schizophrenia disorder and 95 healthy individuals participated in the study. Participants were tested for the presence of anti-T. gondii and anti-Toxocara spp. antibodies by ELISA and Western blotting. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and Fisher9s exact test. Results. There were no differences in T. gondii IgG seroprevalence between patients with schizophrenia and healthy individuals (P = 0.1), but there were differences in seroprevalence between males and females with schizophrenia (P = 0.009). In contrast, Toxocara spp. IgG seroprevalence was greater in patients with schizophrenia disorder than in healthy individuals (P = 0.02), but there were no differences in seroprevalence between men and women with schizophrenia (P = 0.5). Finally, there were no differences in seroprevalence of T. gondii or Toxocara spp. IgG among different subtypes of schizophrenia, various age groups, residential area, or clinical course of treatment (P > 0.05). Conclusion. The present study suggests that patients with schizophrenia disorder are at elevated risk of Toxocara spp. infection. Moreover, contamination with T. gondii is a risk factor for schizophrenia in women. PMID:24834353

  15. Comparing violence in schizophrenia patients with and without comorbid substance-use disorders to community controls.

    PubMed

    Short, T; Thomas, S; Mullen, P; Ogloff, J R P

    2013-10-01

    This study examined crime and violence in patients with schizophrenia with and without comorbid substance-use disorders. A case-linkage design was used to compare patterns of violence and offending between 4168 schizophrenia patients drawn from a state-wide public mental health register, both with and without comorbid substance-use disorders, and a randomly selected community control group who had never been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia patients were significantly more likely than controls to be guilty of violent and non-violent offences, and to have been involved in family violence. Even schizophrenia patients without comorbid substance-use disorders had a significantly elevated risk of violence; this group were more than twice as likely as controls to have a violent conviction. The elevation of violence risk in schizophrenia patients was higher in females (OR = 8.59) than males (OR = 2.25). The increased risk of violent offending in schizophrenia cannot be solely attributed to the effects of comorbid substance misuse, although comorbidity certainly heightens the likelihood of criminality. In addition to offending, people with schizophrenia are more likely than community controls to come to the attention of police via their involvement in family violence incidents. Schizophrenia is a particularly strong risk factor for violence in females. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [Quality of life of patient with schizophrenia treated by conventional and atypical neuroleptics].

    PubMed

    Zaghdoudi, Lilia; Homri, W; Belaid, S; Ben Bechir, M; Labbane, Raja

    2009-09-01

    the quality of life of patients suffering from schizophrenia was extensively studied but it seems that impact on quality of life of neuroleptics, particularly atypical antipsychotic treatment was not clearly elucidated. In this study we have compared the impact on quality of life of atypical antipsychotic versus classic neuroleptics. We have enrolled, prospectively, all patients with schizophrenia as confirmed by DSM-IV TR. These patients intakes antipsychotics for unless 6 months. We excluded patients with acute schizophrenia, mental deficiency and severe organic disease. Evaluation of clinical features is based on the PANSS scale (Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale). The quality of life is evaluated using the MOS-SF36 scale (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form). Extra pyramidal symptoms were evaluated by the Chouinard scale. We have enrolled 65 patients; 35 under classic neuroleptics and 30 under atypical antipsychotics. Clinical features were similar in the two groups. Patients with atypical antipsychotics were less hospitalized (2.4 +/- 3.2 vs. 4.5 +/- 4.2; p = 0.02) and needing less anti cholinergic treatment (26.6% vs. 88.6%; p < 0.0001). Adverse effects were more common with classic neuroleptics (Pakinsonism score: 6.1 +/- 7 vs. 10.8 +/- 8.6; P = 0.01); global clinical dyskinesia 1.22 +/- 0.8 vs. 1.90 +/- 1.7; p = 0.04; global clinical judgement of parkinsonism (2.41 +/- 2.1 vs. 3.72 +/- 2.4; p = 0.02). Quality of life was better in patients with atypical antipsychotics on the basis of vitality (76.7 +/- 27.8 vs. 62 +/- 29.6; p = 0.04) and social function (53.3 +/- 33 vs. 36.9 +/- 27.5; p = 0.03) we found a negative correlation between adverse effects and quality of life in patients with classic neuroleptics. Quality of life of patients suffering from schizophrenia with atypical antipsychotics is better than in those with classic neuroleptics and this may be due to the frequency of adverse effects particularly extra pyramidal symptoms.

  17. Improving functional outcomes for schizophrenia patients in the Netherlands using Cognitive Adaptation Training as a nursing intervention - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Quee, Piotr J; Stiekema, Annemarie P M; Wigman, Johanna T W; Schneider, Harald; van der Meer, Lisette; Maples, Natalie J; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Velligan, Dawn I; Bruggeman, Richard

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive Adaptation Training (CAT) improves functional outcomes in schizophrenia outpatients living in the United States. The effectiveness of CAT for patients living outside the US as well as for long-term hospitalized patients remains to be determined. In addition, it has not yet been studied whether CAT can be successful if patients receive the treatment from psychiatric nurses. This pilot study investigated the effectiveness and feasibility of CAT as a nursing intervention in the Netherlands. Thirty schizophrenia patients (long-term hospitalized patients: 63%) participated in this study. Sixteen patients received treatment as usual (TAU)+CAT, and fourteen patients received TAU. Patients in CAT participated in the treatment for eight months, consisting of weekly home-visits by a psychiatric nurse, supervised by a psychologist. After eight months, CAT interventions were integrated in the usual treatment. Outcome measures were the Multnomah Community Ability Scale (MCAS), the Social and Occupational Functioning Scale (SOFAS), and the Negative Symptom Assessment-Motivation subscale (NSA-M). For inpatients, work-related activities were also tracked for 16 months after baseline. Patients receiving TAU+CAT had better scores on the MCAS (trend), compared to TAU patients. Moreover, inpatients' work-related activities increased in TAU+CAT, relative to TAU inpatients, reaching significance after ten months. Improvements on the SOFAS and NSA-M were not significant. These results indicate that CAT as a nursing intervention may improve outcomes in patients with schizophrenia living in the Netherlands, including long-term hospitalized patients. However, since the current study was designed for exploratory purposes, larger randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm our results and to investigate the long-term effects of CAT as a nursing intervention systematically.

  18. Comparative Study of Neurological Soft Signs in Patients with Schizophrenia or Obsessive-compulsive Disorder, and Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, R; Soni, A; Tyagi, A; Mehta, S; Gupta, S

    2015-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder compared with patients with schizophrenia and a control group in the Indian setting. The secondary objective was to find any correlation between age at onset and neurological soft signs scores, as well as that between severity of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms (total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score) and neurological soft signs scores. This was a cross-sectional hospital-based study of 135 individuals (45 patients with schizophrenia, 45 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder who were attending the psychiatric outpatient department of Sawai Man Singh Medical College, Jaipur, India, and 45 matched healthy controls) from 20 June 2013 to 22 December 2014. After applying strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, the participants completed the study instruments (Cambridge Neurological Inventory [Part 2] and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale). Their socio-demographic data were also recorded. The neurological soft signs total score and domain scores (motor coordination, sensory integration, and disinhibition) were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia (p < 0.05) than in the obsessive-compulsive disorder group or the control group. The obsessive-compulsive disorder group did not significantly differ from the control group in terms of neurological soft signs scores. No correlation was found between neurological soft signs scores and age at onset as well as that between neurological soft signs scores and total Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale score. Neurological soft signs assessed by the Cambridge Neurological Inventory and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, which discriminate patients with schizophrenia from controls, appear to be relatively specific to schizophrenia. Further studies are required to explore neurological soft signs in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

  19. Olfactory Hedonic Judgment in Patients With Deficit Syndrome Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Gregory P.; Allen, Daniel N.; Ross, Sylvia A.; Duke, Lisa A.; Schwartz, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Olfactory perception was examined in deficit syndrome (DS) and nondeficit syndrome (ND) schizophrenia patients. Participants included 22 controls (CN) and 41 patients with schizophrenia who were divided into DS (n = 15) and ND (n = 26) subtypes using the Schedule for the Deficit Syndrome (SDS). Olfactory perception for pleasant and unpleasant odors was assessed using the Brief Smell Identification Test. Participants were instructed to identifying each smell as well as provide hedonic judgment ratings of each smell on a 7-point scale (1 = extremely pleasant, 4 = neutral, and 7 = extremely unpleasant). Results indicated that when compared with the ND patients, the DS patients rated pleasant smells as being significantly less pleasant, although no difference between the groups was present for unpleasant smells, and both ND and DS groups significantly differed from CN on rating and identifying pleasant and unpleasant items. Additionally, lower smell identification accuracy was negatively correlated with SDS symptom severity, and valence ratings for pleasant odors were positively correlated with SDS diminished emotional range. Findings suggest that the DS is characterized by a unique pattern of olfactory valence judgment that is characterized by abnormalities in processing positively valenced stimuli. PMID:19223658

  20. Retrospective Study of Japanese Patients with Schizophrenia Treated with Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    Tanioka, Tetsuya; Fuji, Syoko; Kataoka, Mika; King, Beth; Tomotake, Masahito; Yasuhara, Yuko; Locsin, Rozzano; Sekido, Keiko; Mifune, Kazushi

    2012-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate changes in clinical indicators which influence the quality of life (QOL) of patients with schizophrenia treated by antipsychotic therapy before and after switching to aripiprazole. Methods. A retrospective chart review of 27 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and who were switched from one antipsychotic to aripiprazole was performed. Clinical indicators about the daily dosage of antipsychotics and antiparkinsonian drugs, psychiatric condition, and glucose/lipid metabolism, clinical evaluation by nursing observation were used to measure the responsiveness of subjects to aripiprazole. Results. Of the 27 subjects, 14 responded to the switch to aripiprazole with significant improvement of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) score (P = 0.04), significant decrease in dosage of antipsychotics in 71% of patients (P = 0.03), and tendency toward reduction in dosage of antiparkinsonian drugs (P = 0.07) and body mass index (BMI) (P = 0.06). However, 8 of 27 subjects had a significant increase in lipid levels after switching to aripiprazole (P = 0.01). Conclusion. QOL for subjects who responded to the switch to aripiprazole improved as indicated by lower doses of antipsychotic and antiparkinson medications, improvement in BPRS score, and a decrease in BMI. Results indicate little influence on patient's QOL. PMID:22970386

  1. Increased pentane and carbon disulfide in the breath of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M; Sabas, M; Greenberg, J

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the concentrations of pentane (a marker of lipid peroxidation) and other volatile organic compounds in the breath of patients with schizophrenia. METHODS--Volatile organic compounds were assayed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) in 88 subjects--25 with acute schizophrenic psychosis, 26 with psychiatric disorders other than schizophrenia, and 37 normal volunteers. RESULTS--The mean alveolar gradients of pentane and carbon disulfide (CS2) were significantly higher in the patients with schizophrenia than in the control groups. CONCLUSIONS--Schizophrenia may be accompanied by accelerated lipid peroxidation in cell membranes, as well as increased manufacture of CS2, a known neurotoxin. PMID:8227439

  2. Effective treatment of coprophagia in a patient with schizophrenia with the novel atypical antipsychotic drug perospirone.

    PubMed

    Harada, K I; Yamamoto, K; Saito, T

    2006-05-01

    Here we report on a patient with schizophrenia who suffered from medication-refractory coprophagia. Although there were few cases in which psychotropic medication was effective against coprophagia, we encountered a patient with schizophrenia in whom coprophagia rapidly disappeared after treatment with perospirone, a novel atypical antipsychotic drug of the serotonin-dopamine antagonist (SDA) type. Perospirone has a uniquely high affinity for serotonin-1A receptors, and it could be speculated that perospirone, as a serotonin-1A receptor agonist combined with SDA, may have greater efficacy for treatment-refractory symptoms of schizophrenia. Thus, perospirone is an agent with possible efficacy for medication-refractory schizophrenia.

  3. Sensation-seeking, social anhedonia, and impulsivity in substance use disorder patients with and without schizophrenia and in non-abusing schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; Rizkallah, Elie; Pampoulova, Tania; Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Lipp, Olivier; Stip, Emmanuel; Potvin, Stéphane

    2012-12-30

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) are common in patients with schizophrenia and this comorbidity is associated with a poorer prognosis, relative to non-abusing patients. One hypothesis that has been advanced in the literature is that dual diagnosis (DD) patients may have a different personality profile than non-abusing schizophrenia patients. The present case-control study aimed to characterize levels of personality traits (sensation-seeking, social anhedonia, and impulsivity) in substance abuse/dependence patients with (DD group; n=31) and without schizophrenia (SUD group; n=39), relative to non-abusing schizophrenia patients (SCZ group; n=23), and healthy controls (n=25). Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsivity Scale. Sensation-seeking was assessed using the Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale. Social anhedonia was assessed with the Chapman Social Anhedonia Scale. We found that sensation-seeking was significantly higher in DD and SUD, relative to SCZ patients. We found that social anhedonia was significantly elevated in DD and SCZ, relative to healthy controls. We found that impulsivity was significantly higher in DD, SCZ and SUD patients, compared to healthy controls. The results suggest that sensation-seeking is prominent in substance abuse/dependence (irrespective of schizophrenia), social anhedonia is prominent in schizophrenia (irrespective of substance abuse/dependence), and impulsivity is prominent in all three populations.

  4. Global and Temporal Cortical Folding in Patients with Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penttila, Jani; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Burke, Lisa; Corrigall, Richard; Frangou, Sophia; Cachia, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the temporal lobes and alterations in cortical folding in adult on-set schizophrenia are studied using magnetic resonance T1 images of 51 patients. The study showed that patients with early on-set schizophrenia had lower global sulcal indices in both hemispheres and the left collateral sulcus has a lower sulcal index irrespective…

  5. [The influence of epileptic predisposition on clinical features of schizophrenia in patients after delirium tremens].

    PubMed

    Dvirskiĭ, A A

    2001-01-01

    153 patients with schizophrenia in combination with alcoholic delirium were examined. Latent epilepsy has been found in 36 patients (23.5%). The basis of the epileptic seizures during alcoholic delirium was hereditary epileptic predisposition. Frequency of the progredient course was high while that of the favourable--recurrent course of schizophrenia was low in these cases.

  6. Global and Temporal Cortical Folding in Patients with Early-Onset Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penttila, Jani; Paillere-Martinot, Marie-Laure; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mangin, Jean-Francois; Burke, Lisa; Corrigall, Richard; Frangou, Sophia; Cachia, Arnaud

    2008-01-01

    Disturbances in the temporal lobes and alterations in cortical folding in adult on-set schizophrenia are studied using magnetic resonance T1 images of 51 patients. The study showed that patients with early on-set schizophrenia had lower global sulcal indices in both hemispheres and the left collateral sulcus has a lower sulcal index irrespective…

  7. Benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine-like drugs, and typical antipsychotics impair manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Daimei; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hattori, Kotaro; Ota, Miho; Matsuo, Junko; Kinoshita, Yukiko; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Arima, Kunimasa; Amano, Naoji; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Impaired dexterity is a major psychomotor deficit reported in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, the Purdue pegboard test was used to compare the manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We also examined the influence of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and benzodiazepine-like drugs on manual dexterity. Subjects were 93 patients with schizophrenia and 93 healthy controls, matched for sex and age distributions. Control subjects scored significantly higher on all scores of Purdue pegboard than patients with schizophrenia. Age, PANSS negative symptom scale, typical antipsychotic dose, and use of benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs were negatively correlated with the pegboard scores in patients with schizophrenia. The present results indicate that patients with schizophrenia have impaired gross and fine fingertip dexterity compared to healthy controls. The use of typical antipsychotics and benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs, but not atypical antipsychotics, had significant negative impact on dexterity in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatrists should be aware that some psychotropic medications may enhance the disability caused by the impairment of dexterity in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. High prevalence of childhood trauma in patients with schizophrenia spectrum and affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Sara; Andreassen, Ole A; Aas, Monica; Røssberg, Jan I; Mork, Erlend; Steen, Nils E; Barrett, Elizabeth A; Lagerberg, Trine V; Peleikis, Dawn; Agartz, Ingrid; Melle, Ingrid; Lorentzen, Steinar

    2013-02-01

    Childhood trauma (CT) is a major risk factor for various psychiatric disorders. We wanted to determine the prevalence of CT in a catchment area-based sample of schizophrenia spectrum and affective disorder (including bipolar disorder and depressive episodes with psychotic features) and to explore potential differences in types of CT between the diagnostic groups. Three hundred five patients were recruited consecutively from psychiatric units at 3 major hospitals in Oslo, Norway, diagnosed with Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Traumatic childhood events were assessed with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Eighty-two percent of the patients had experienced one or more CT events, the most frequent subtype of trauma being emotional neglect. The schizophrenia spectrum group reported significantly more physical abuse and physical neglect than the affective group. A high prevalence of CT in patients with severe mental disorder was detected. This reminds us of the importance of exploring this issue when we treat such patients. The mechanisms behind these differences are unclear. Further research is needed to study potential associations between CT and the clinical picture of the disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Motive-oriented therapeutic relationship building for patients diagnosed with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Westermann, Stefan; Cavelti, Marialuisa; Heibach, Eva; Caspar, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Treatment options for patients with schizophrenia demand further improvement. One way to achieve this improvement is the translation of findings from basic research into new specific interventions. Beyond that, addressing the therapy relationship has the potential to enhance both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments. This paper introduces motive-oriented therapeutic relationship (MOTR) building for schizophrenia. MOTR enables therapists to proactively adapt to their patient’s needs and to prevent problematic behaviors. For example, a patient might consider medication as helpful in principle, but the rejection of medication might be one of his few remaining means for his acceptable motive to stay autonomous despite hospitalization. A therapist who is motive-oriented proactively offers many degrees of freedom to this patient in order to satisfy his need for autonomy and to weaken the motivational basis for not taking medication. MOTR makes use of findings from basic and psychotherapy research and is generic in this respect, but at the same time guides therapeutic action precisely and flexibly in a patient oriented way. PMID:26388804

  10. A prospective study on the pattern of medication use for schizophrenia in the outpatient pharmacy department, Hospital Tengku Ampuan Rahimah, Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ponto, T; Ismail, N I; Abdul Majeed, A B; Marmaya, N H; Zakaria, Z A

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric disorder and pharmacotherapy plays a major role in its management. The 1950s and early 1960s saw milestones in the introduction of psychotropic drugs in clinical practice. A review of drug prescriptions in different settings provides an insight into the pattern of drug use, identifies drug-related problems and may be used to compare recommended guidelines with actual practice. This effort led to the evaluation of the drug prescribing pattern of antipsychotics in patients attending the psychiatric clinic at a government hospital. The data from 371 antipsychotic medication prescriptions that included 200 prescriptions for schizophrenia were collected during one month (1rst-31rst August 2008) at the outpatient pharmacy department. The mean age of patients was 35.0 years (SD = 1.131), with a male to female ratio of 2:1. The most widely used oral antipsychotic was haloperidol (16.3%) while the most common depot preparation prescribed was zuclopenthixol decanoate (8.8%). The daily dose of the average antipsychotic prescribed in this clinic was 342.06 mg equivalent of chlorpromazine. There was no relation between the doses received and ethnicity of the patient (Malay, Chinese or Indian). However, there was a significant relationship between the prescribed dose and patient age (P < 0.042). Nearly 32% of the schizophrenia patients were prescribed with atypical antipsychotics such as olanzapine (10.8%), risperidone (10.0%), quetiapine (7.6%) and clozapine (3.2%). Monotherapy was given to 73.0% of the schizophrenia patients. The majority of patients also received antidepressants. To conclude, this study gave evidence that physicians had a strong preference for monotherapy with conventional antipsychotic drugs while the use of atypical drugs was less prevalent.

  11. Higher prevalence of dementia in patients with schizophrenia: A nationwide population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ku, Hyemin; Lee, Eui-Kyung; Lee, Kyoung-Uk; Lee, Min-Young; Kwon, Jin-Won

    2016-06-01

    This study investigates the prevalence of dementia in patients with and without schizophrenia, with a particular focus on age-specific and sex-specific differences. We conducted a population-based study using the National Health Insurance claims database from 2010 to 2013. Using a 10:1 matching ratio, 248,919 patients without schizophrenia and 26,591 patients with schizophrenia were identified based on the ICD-10 code. Patients with dementia were extracted by diagnosis or use of anti-dementia drugs. Conditional logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the association between schizophrenia and dementia. The prevalence of dementia was significantly higher in schizophrenia patients compared with that in matched non-schizophrenia patients (9.9% versus 2.2%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for Charlson comorbidity index and underlying comorbidities, conditional logistic regression showed that schizophrenia was associated with dementia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 4.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-5.1). When stratified by sex, the AOR was 5.6 (95% CI, 5.0-6.2) among women and 4.0 (95% CI, 3.6-4.5) among men. Moreover, the association between dementia and schizophrenia was strong in elderly patients. The AOR of dementia prevalence was 6.6 (95% CI, 6.1-7.2) in patients aged ≥65 years and 3.4 (95% CI, 3.0-3.8) in patients aged <65 years. Schizophrenia patients were more likely to have dementia compared with non-schizophrenia patients. This association seems greater in higher prevalence groups such as women and patients aged ≥65 years. Further investigation on the mechanism is required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Spiritual care in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Hojjatollah; Abedi, Heidar Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spiritual needs are among an individual's essential needs in all places and times. With his physical and spiritual dimensions and the mutual effect of these two dimensions, human has spiritual needs as well. These needs are an intrinsic need throughout the life; therefore, they will remain as a major element of holistic nursing care. One of the greatest challenges for nurses is to satisfy the patients’ spiritual needs. METHODS: This is a qualitative study with hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Data were collected from 16 patients hospitalized in internal medicine-surgery wards and 6 nurses in the respective wards. Data were generated by open-ended interview and analyzed using Diekelmann's seven-stage method. Rigorousness of findings was confirmed by use of this method as well as team interpretation, and referring to the text and participants. RESULTS: In final interpretation of the findings, totally 10 sub-themes, three themes including formation of mutual relation with patient, encouraging the patient, and providing the necessary conditions for patient's connection with God, and one constitutive pattern, namely spiritual need of hospitalized patients. CONCLUSIONS: Spiritual needs are those needs whose satisfaction causes the person's spiritual growth and make the person a social, hopeful individual who always thanks God. They include the need for communication with others, communication with God, and being hopeful. In this study, the three obtained themes are the spiritual needs whose satisfaction is possible in nursing system. Considering these spiritual aspects accelerates patient's treatment. PMID:22039390

  13. Observations on Hospitalized Dengue Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    DENGUE PATIENTS IN MANILA Carman. R. Min oto* be" S. Siqpo Ommon D. Leus** Curds G. Ibyes* INTRODUCION to the Hospital of Infant Jesus between October...31, 1983 and March 31, 1984: Criteria for the diagnosis of dengue Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) has been recognized infection were based on the...titer of later sample < 1:640. DHF epidemic.4𔃿 Since that time, there have only been a few- was differentiated from dengue fever (DF), and DHF was

  14. Factors discriminating employment status following in-patient evaluation among persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lipskaya-Velikovsky, Lena; Kotler, Moshe; Jarus, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Employment is a key element in recovery from schizophrenia. Yet 60%-80% of people with schizophrenia are not involved in work occupations. Factors influencing employment were explored mostly in community settings, while the recovery process begins already during hospitalization. The aim of the study was to investigate parameters that can distinguish during hospitalization between people with schizophrenia who will work in competitive employment, in sheltered employment or will not work after discharge. The research followed 104 participants from acute hospitalization to the community, six months after discharge, to obtain employment related data. The participants' cognitive abilities, schizophrenia symptoms, and functional capacity were evaluated during hospitalization. In addition, demography and illness related factors were collected. The results indicate that persons with different employment statuses varied in several parameters during hospitalization. However, the most effective discriminant model includes negative symptoms, functional capacity measure and the number of hospitalizations. The study suggests that people with different employment statuses have unique characteristics already during hospitalization. In the future, appropriate rehabilitation programs may be suggested to each group based on these characteristics to promote employment among people with schizophrenia and contribute to recovery.

  15. Neuropsychological correlates of P50 sensory gating in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Morla, Eva María; Santos, José Luis; Aparicio, Ana; García-Jiménez, María Ángeles; Soria, Carmen; Arango, Celso

    2013-01-01

    Impaired inhibition of P50 cerebral evoked response is one of the best validated endophenotypes in schizophrenia. There are controversial data on the relationship between P50 evoked potential deficit and measures of cognitive function in schizophrenia. A comprehensive clinical and neurocognitive assessment plus an evaluation of P50 sensory gating was performed in 160 schizophrenia patients and 64 controls. Neurocognitive scores from each cognitive domain were converted to demographically-adjusted T-scores (age, gender, and years of education) for all study participants. The relationship between P50 and neurocognitive variables was assessed via parametric and nonparametric correlations and categorical strategies: we compared neuropsychological test scores in patients and controls in the lowest P50 quartile vs. the highest. Controls had better performance than schizophrenia patients in all cognitive domains. Schizophrenia patients had significantly higher P50 ratios than controls, and no significant correlation was found between P50 gating measures and neuropsychological test scores in schizophrenia patients or healthy controls. Moreover, no differences in neurocognitive performance were found between subjects in the lowest P50 ratio quartile vs. the highest in healthy controls or patients with schizophrenia. We concluded that there is no evidence of an association between P50 ratio and cognitive measures in schizophrenia patients, and this seems to be also the case in healthy controls. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Theory of mind reasoning in schizophrenia patients and non-psychotic relatives.

    PubMed

    Cassetta, Briana; Goghari, Vina

    2014-08-15

    Research consistently demonstrates that schizophrenia patients have theory of mind (ToM) impairments. Additionally, there is some evidence that family members of schizophrenia patients also demonstrate impairments in ToM, suggesting a genetic vulnerability for the disorder. This study assessed ToM abilities (i.e., sarcasm comprehension) in schizophrenia patients and their first-degree biological relatives during video-taped social interactions, to be representative of real-world interactions and to assess for disease-specific and/or genetic liability effects. Additionally, we assessed whether ToM abilities predicted social and global functioning in schizophrenia patients, and whether symptoms were associated with ToM deficits. Schizophrenia patients demonstrated impairments in sarcasm comprehension compared to controls and relatives, whereas relatives showed intact comprehension. Symptoms of schizophrenia significantly predicted worse ToM abilities. Furthermore, in schizophrenia patients, impaired ToM reasoning predicted worse social and global functioning. Given schizophrenia patients demonstrated impairments in ToM reasoning in a task that resembles real-life interactions, this might be a key area for remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Measuring quality of life in patients with schizophrenia: an update.

    PubMed

    Awad, A George; Voruganti, Lakshmi N P

    2012-03-01

    In 1997, we published a review in PharmacoEconomics about quality of life (QOL) measurement in patients with schizophrenia. The objective of this article is to provide an update, as well as to revisit the development of the construct of QOL and its measurement as applied to schizophrenia. Since our previous article, there has been significant growth in the number of publications about QOL in schizophrenia. Unfortunately, alongside this significant increase in research interest, a number of concerns have also risen about the limitations and lack of impact the concept of QOL has on clinical care and health-policy decision making. A number of concerns previously outlined (such as lack of consensus on a uniform definition of QOL) continue to be an issue. However, we believe that a uniform definition may not be possible, and instead, it may be preferable to have several definitions, which may enrich the concept and broaden its usefulness. Some of the scales we reviewed in 1997 continue to be in use, while others are now rarely or never used. New scales with better psychometrics have been introduced, but most are without theoretical or conceptual foundation. On the other hand, the field of scaling in general has been changing over the past few years and is moving towards a new approach for scale development, based on item response theory, item banks and computer adaptive testing. Unfortunately, this has not extended to QOL in schizophrenia. There continues to be a dearth of theoretical and conceptual models for QOL in schizophrenia, which seems to create the perception that the construct lacks a good theoretical and scientific foundation. One of the major gaps identified in this review is the recognized lack of impact of QOL measurements on clinical management or policy decision making. The majority of publications continue to focus on measurement rather than what to do with the data. The lack of strategies to integrate QOL data in clinical care, as well as the failure

  18. Cure or curse? Ambivalent attitudes towards neuroleptic medication in schizophrenia and non-schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Moritz, Steffen; Peters, Maarten J V; Karow, Anne; Deljkovic, Azra; Tonn, Peter; Naber, Dieter

    2009-10-30

    Neuroleptic non-compliance remains a serious challenge for the treatment of psychosis. Non-compliance is predominantly attributed to side effects, lack of illness insight, reduced well-being or poor therapeutic alliance. However, other still neglected factors may also play a role. Further, little is known about whether psychiatric patients without psychosis who are increasingly prescribed neuroleptics differ in terms of medication compliance or about reasons for non-compliance by psychosis patients. As direct questioning is notoriously prone to social desirability biases, we conducted an anonymous survey. After a strict selection process blind to results, 95 psychiatric patients were retained for the final analyses (69 participants with a presumed diagnosis of schizophrenia psychosis, 26 without psychosis). Self-reported neuroleptic non-compliance was more prevalent in psychosis patients than non-psychosis patients. Apart from side effects and illness insight, main reasons for non-compliance in both groups were forgetfulness, distrust in therapist, and no subjective need for treatment. Other notable reasons were stigma and advice of relatives/acquaintances against neuroleptic medication. Gain from illness was a reason for non-compliance in 11-18% of the psychosis patients. Only 9% of all patients reported no side effects and full compliance and at the same time acknowledged that neuroleptics worked well for them. While pills were preferred over depot injections by the majority of patients, depot was judged as an alternative by a substantial subgroup. Although many patients acknowledge the need and benefits of neuroleptic medication, non-compliance was the norm rather than the exception in our samples.

  19. Cure or Curse? Ambivalent Attitudes Towards Neuroleptic Medication in Schizophrenia and Non-Schizophrenia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Maarten J.V.; Karow, Anne; Deljkovic, Azra; Tonn, Peter; Naber, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Neuroleptic non-compliance remains a serious challenge for the treatment of psychosis. Non-compliance is predominantly attributed to side effects, lack of illness insight, reduced well-being or poor therapeutic alliance. However, other still neglected factors may also play a role. Further, little is known about whether psychiatric patients without psychosis who are increasingly prescribed neuroleptics differ in terms of medication compliance or about reasons for non-compliance by psychosis patients. As direct questioning is notoriously prone to social desirability biases, we conducted an anonymous survey. After a strict selection process blind to results, 95 psychiatric patients were retained for the final analyses (69 participants with a presumed diagnosis of schizophrenia psychosis, 26 without psychosis). Self-reported neuroleptic non-compliance was more prevalent in psychosis patients than non-psychosis patients. Apart from side effects and illness insight, main reasons for non-compliance in both groups were forgetfulness, distrust in therapist, and no subjective need for treatment. Other notable reasons were stigma and advice of relatives/acquaintances against neuroleptic medication. Gain from illness was a reason for non-compliance in 11-18% of the psychosis patients. Only 9% of all patients reported no side effects and full compliance and at the same time acknowledged that neuroleptics worked well for them. While pills were preferred over depot injections by the majority of patients, depot was judged as an alternative by a substantial subgroup. Although many patients acknowledge the need and benefits of neuroleptic medication, non-compliance was the norm rather than the exception in our samples. PMID:25478082

  20. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: a study in a large clinical sample of patients using a novel automated method.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi; Jayatilleke, Nishamali; Broadbent, Matthew; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Foskett, Nadia; Gorrell, Genevieve; Hayes, Richard D; Jackson, Richard; Johnston, Caroline; Shetty, Hitesh; Roberts, Angus; McGuire, Philip; Stewart, Robert

    2015-09-07

    To identify negative symptoms in the clinical records of a large sample of patients with schizophrenia using natural language processing and assess their relationship with clinical outcomes. Observational study using an anonymised electronic health record case register. South London and Maudsley NHS Trust (SLaM), a large provider of inpatient and community mental healthcare in the UK. 7678 patients with schizophrenia receiving care during 2011. Hospital admission, readmission and duration of admission. 10 different negative symptoms were ascertained with precision statistics above 0.80. 41% of patients had 2 or more negative symptoms. Negative symptoms were associated with younger age, male gender and single marital status, and with increased likelihood of hospital admission (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.39), longer duration of admission (β-coefficient 20.5 days, 7.6-33.5), and increased likelihood of readmission following discharge (OR 1.58, 1.28 to 1.95). Negative symptoms were common and associated with adverse clinical outcomes, consistent with evidence that these symptoms account for much of the disability associated with schizophrenia. Natural language processing provides a means of conducting research in large representative samples of patients, using data recorded during routine clinical practice. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Negative symptoms in schizophrenia: a study in a large clinical sample of patients using a novel automated method

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Jayatilleke, Nishamali; Broadbent, Matthew; Chang, Chin-Kuo; Foskett, Nadia; Gorrell, Genevieve; Hayes, Richard D; Jackson, Richard; Johnston, Caroline; Shetty, Hitesh; Roberts, Angus; McGuire, Philip; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify negative symptoms in the clinical records of a large sample of patients with schizophrenia using natural language processing and assess their relationship with clinical outcomes. Design Observational study using an anonymised electronic health record case register. Setting South London and Maudsley NHS Trust (SLaM), a large provider of inpatient and community mental healthcare in the UK. Participants 7678 patients with schizophrenia receiving care during 2011. Main outcome measures Hospital admission, readmission and duration of admission. Results 10 different negative symptoms were ascertained with precision statistics above 0.80. 41% of patients had 2 or more negative symptoms. Negative symptoms were associated with younger age, male gender and single marital status, and with increased likelihood of hospital admission (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.39), longer duration of admission (β-coefficient 20.5 days, 7.6–33.5), and increased likelihood of readmission following discharge (OR 1.58, 1.28 to 1.95). Conclusions Negative symptoms were common and associated with adverse clinical outcomes, consistent with evidence that these symptoms account for much of the disability associated with schizophrenia. Natural language processing provides a means of conducting research in large representative samples of patients, using data recorded during routine clinical practice. PMID:26346872

  2. Symptomatic remission and patient quality of life in an observational study of schizophrenia: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Haro, Josep M; Novick, Diego; Perrin, Elena; Bertsch, Jordan; Knapp, Martin

    2014-12-15

    This analysis aimed to examine the association between remission and quality of life (QOL) in schizophrenia. In post-hoc analyses of the 3-year, prospective, observational Schizophrenia Outpatients Health Outcomes (SOHO) study, we compared the QOL of patients who achieved symptomatic and clinical remission with those who did not, and the factors associated. Symptomatic remission was defined as achieving a score of ≤3 on the Clinical Global Impression-Schizophrenia (CGI-SCH) scale, maintained for 6 months and without hospitalization. QOL was patient self-rated using the European-QOL. Of the 6516 patients analyzed, 38% were in symptomatic remission 12 months post-baseline and 52% at 36 months. Functional remission remained fairly constant from 12 months to 36 months (22.4% at both time points). At all visits from 12 to 36 months, patient QOL and social functioning were significantly higher for patients in symptomatic remission. QOL was higher in patients in functional remission. Patients with maintained symptomatic remission over the 3-year follow-up had a much greater improvement in QOL than patients with no symptomatic remission or symptomatic remission for part of the period. Factors associated with a better QOL also included paid employment, socially active, a higher CGI-SCH cognitive score, good compliance, and a better baseline QOL. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Toxoplasma Infection in Schizophrenia Patients: A Comparative Study with Control Group

    PubMed Central

    Alipour, A; Shojaee, S; Mohebali, M; Tehranidoost, M; Abdi Masoleh, F; Keshavarz, H

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a serious, chronic, and often debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder. Its causes are still poorly understood. Besides genetic and non-genetic (environmental) factors are thought to be important as the cause of the structural and functional deficits that characterize schizophrenia. This study aimed to compare Toxoplasma gondii infection between schizophrenia patients and non-schizophrenia individuals as control group. Methods A case-control study was designed in Tehran, Iran during 2009-2010. Sixty-two patients with schizophrenia and 62 non-schizophrenia volunteers were selected. To ascertain a possible relationship between T. gondii infection and schizophrenia, anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies were detected by indirect-ELISA. Data were statistically analyzed by chi- square at a confidence level of 99%. Results The sero-positivity rate among patients with schizophrenia (67.7%) was significantly higher than control group (37.1) (P <0. 01). Conclusion A significant correlation between Toxoplasma infection and schizophrenia might be expected. PMID:22347285

  4. Mass spectrum analysis of serum biomarker proteins from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Wang, Jie; Yu, Yaqin; Shi, Jieping; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Bin; Yu, Qiong

    2014-05-01

    Diagnosis of schizophrenia does not have a clear objective test at present, so we aimed to identify the potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by comparison of serum protein profiling between first-episode schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. The combination of a magnetic bead separation system with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) was used to analyze the serum protein spectra of 286 first-episode patients with schizophrenia, 41 chronic disease patients and 304 healthy controls. FlexAnlysis 3.0 and ClinProTools(TM) 2.1 software was used to establish a diagnostic model for schizophrenia. The results demonstrated that 10 fragmented peptides demonstrated an optimal discriminatory performance. Among these fragmented peptides, the peptide with m/z 1206.58 was identified as a fragment of fibrinopeptide A. Receiver operating characteristic analysis for m/z 1206.58 showed that the area under the curve was 0.981 for schizophrenia vs healthy controls, and 0.999 for schizophrenia vs other chronic disease controls. From our result, we consider that the analysis of serum protein spectrum using the magnetic bead separation system and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS is an objective diagnostic tool. We conclude that fibrinopeptide A has the potential to be a biomarker for diagnosis of schizophrenia. This protein may also help to elucidate schizophrenia disease pathogenesis.

  5. Alterations in plasma vascular endothelial growth factor levels in patients with schizophrenia before and after treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bun-Hee; Hong, Jin-Pyo; Hwang, Jung-A; Ham, Byung-Joo; Na, Kyoung-Sae; Kim, Won-Joong; Trigo, Jose; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2015-07-30

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenetic factor, is a known neurotrophic factor. In this study, we examined plasma levels of VEGF in 50 patients with schizophrenia (SPR) and 50 healthy control subjects. We also explored any changes in plasma VEGF levels after 6-week treatment with antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia. All subjects with schizophrenia were either medication-naïve or medication-free for at least 4 weeks before assessment. Plasma VEGF levels in all subjects were significantly correlated with smoking duration, which was considered to be a significant covariate. Pre-treatment plasma VEGF levels in patients with schizophrenia were significantly lower than those in healthy controls. Post-treatment VEGF levels were significantly increased in patients with schizophrenia. Plasma VEGF levels in patients with schizophrenia did not exhibit significant correlation with the total or subscale scores of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) either at baseline or at the end of the 6-week treatment. In conclusion, our findings reveal that plasma VEGF levels before treatment were lower in patients with schizophrenia and that their VEGF levels increased after treatment. Thus, VEGF may have a neuroprotective role in the improvement of schizophrenia or in the treatment effects of antipsychotics.

  6. Combined visual and motor disorganization in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Giersch, Anne; Wilquin, Hélène; Capa, Rémi L; Delevoye-Turrell, Yvonne N

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are difficult to relate to clinical symptoms in schizophrenia, partly due to insufficient knowledge on how cognitive impairments interact with one another. Here, we devised a new sequential pointing task requiring both visual organization and motor sequencing. Six circles were presented simultaneously on a touch screen around a fixation point. Participants pointed with the finger each circle one after the other, in synchrony with auditory tones. We used an alternating rhythmic 300/600 ms pattern so that participants performed pairs of taps separated by short intervals of 300 ms. Visual organization was manipulated by using line-segments that grouped the circles two by two, yielding three pairs of connected circles, and three pairs of unconnected circles that belonged to different pairs. This led to three experimental conditions. In the "congruent condition," the pairs of taps had to be executed on circles grouped by connecters. In the "non congruent condition," they were to be executed on the unconnected circles that belonged to different pairs. In a neutral condition, there were no connecters. Twenty two patients with schizophrenia with mild symptoms and 22 control participants performed a series of 30 taps in each condition. Tap pairs were counted as errors when the produced rhythm was inverted (expected rhythm 600/300 = 2; inversed rhythm <1). Error rates in patients with a high level of clinical disorganization were significantly higher in the non-congruent condition than in the two other conditions, contrary to controls and the remaining patients. The tap-tone asynchrony increased in the presence of connecters in both patient groups, but not in the controls. Patients appeared not to integrate the visual organization during the planning phase of action, leading to a large difficulty during motor execution, especially in those patients revealing difficulties in visual organization. Visual motor tapping tasks may help detect those subgroups

  7. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  8. Chronic hospitalized and household maintained consumers; characteristics and differences among referees to the Iranian society supporting individuals with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Nader; Malakouti, Seyed Kazem; Chimeh, Narges; Rezvanifar, Shirin; Mohseni, Mostfa; Mansouri, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Providing treatment and educational services for consumers and their caregivers is more effective if those services are implemented based on their characteristics and differences. To partly address this objective, the present study aimed to describe and compare characteristics and differences of chronic hospitalized and household maintained consumers and their caregivers who were regular users of educational and rehabilitation programs of the Iranian Society Supporting Individuals with Schizophrenia (ISSIS) in Tehran, Iran. Two hundred and thirty one consumers were evaluated based on demographics, and clinical and symptom-related characteristics. Their caregivers (n = 231) were independently evaluated based on their knowledge on schizophrenia, family function, burden, and availability of social services and support for them. Data were analyzed by performing independent sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U. The study findings revealed hospitalized consumers were older, had longer length of illness, greater severity of positive and negative symptoms and lower efficacy in basic life skills in comparison with household maintained consumers. The caregivers of the hospitalized consumers had greater objective and subjective burdens and lower knowledge on schizophrenia in comparison with caregivers of household maintained consumers. While household maintained consumers had more access to medical insurance, their caregivers had more access to the supportive organizations, more availability of substitute caregiver and assistant caregiver compared with caregivers of hospitalized consumers. Our findings suggest the need to promote specific interventions and treatment programs for Iranian consumers and their caregivers based on their characteristics and differences due to schizophrenia. None.

  9. Insights to the schizophrenia continuum: A systematic review of saccadic eye movements in schizotypy and biological relatives of schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Myles, Jessica B; Rossell, Susan L; Phillipou, Andrea; Thomas, Elizabeth; Gurvich, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    Myles, J.B., S. Rossell, A. Phillipou, Thomas, E and C. Gurvich. A systematic review of saccadic eye movements across the schizophrenia continuum: Characterisation, pathophysiology and genetic associations. NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV 21(1) XXX-XXX, 2015. One of the cognitive hallmarks of schizophrenia is impaired eye movements, particularly for the antisaccade task. Less saccade research has been conducted in relation to the broader schizophrenia continuum, that is, people with high schizotypy or first-degree relatives of people with schizophrenia. This systematic review sought to identify, collate and appraise prosaccade, antisaccade and memory-guided saccade studies involving behavioural, neuroimaging and genetic data published between 1980 and September 2016 in individuals with high schizotypy and first-degree relatives. A systematic literature search was conducted, using Ovid MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed and SCOPUS databases. Of 913 references screened, 18 schizotypy, 29 family studies and two schizotypy and relatives articles studies were eligible for inclusion. Antisaccade error rate was the most consistent deficit found for high schizotypy. Relatives had intermediate antisaccade error rates between patients and healthy controls. Results from the limited genetic and neuroimaging studies echoed schizophrenia findings. Confounds were also identified. It was concluded that future research is required to refine the saccade endophenotype and to expand genetic and neuroimaging research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Serologic and molecular characteristics of hepatitis B virus infection in vaccinated schizophrenia patients in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiying; Yu, Lugang; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhu, Huijuan; Li, Yinghui; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xinxin; Dong, Chen

    2016-04-28

    Previous studies have indicated that the patients with psychiatric illness were at higher risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. However, the efficacy of hepatitis B vaccine in schizophrenia patients remains unclear. Between June 2014 and January 2015, 415 schizophrenia patients and 3,038 controls who had been routinely immunized as infants were recruited in the present study. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), HBsAb, and HBV DNA were detected with commercial methods according to the manufacturer's protocol. A 600-bp region of the S gene (region nt236-nt835) was amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The genotypes of isolated HBV were identified using phylogenetic analysis by the neighbor-joining algorithm in the software MEGA version 4.1. The seroprevalence of HBsAg in schizophrenia patients was 6.75%, which was significantly higher than 3.32% measured in controls. HBsAg prevalence was 7.94% in male schizophrenia patients and 5.47% in female schizophrenia patients, while it was only 4.04% in males and 2.08% in females in the control group. The HBsAb seroprevalence rate was 58.31% in schizophrenia patients and 59.94% in non-schizophrenia controls. Moreover, one HBV strain in the schizophrenia group presented I126S vaccine escape mutation (5.88%), while three HBV isolates showed Q129H, M133L, and G145R vaccine escape mutations in the control group (6.81%). Schizophrenia patients are at higher risk for HBV infection, even those who had received routine immunization. Therefore, a booster HB vaccination targeted at schizophrenia patients should be considered in the future.

  11. Creative thinking deficits in patients with schizophrenia: neurocognitive correlates.

    PubMed

    Jaracz, Jan; Patrzała, Amelia; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate selected measures of creativity in schizophrenic patients and their relationship with neurocognitive executive functions Forty-three inpatients with paranoid schizophrenia who were in symptomatic remission (a total of 60) and 45 healthy control participants were included. Creativity was assessed using the Barron-Welsh Art Scale (BWAS) and the inventiveness part of the Berlin Intelligence Structure Test (BIS). Executive functions were measured by means of the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Schizophrenic patients gave responses on the BWAS, had lower total score on the BIS and in the figural test, and performed worse on all domains of the WCST compared with control subjects. Their lower scores on the BIS correlated with lower scores on the WCST. Our results indicate that remitted schizophrenic patients perform worse on selected measures of creativity than healthy subjects and that executive dysfunctions may partially explain these deficits.

  12. Treatment of Hypochondriasis in Two Schizophrenia Patients Using Clozapine.

    PubMed

    Tundo, Antonio; Proietti, Luca; de Filippis, Rocco

    2017-01-01

    Hypochondriasis (HYPO), an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder, is frequent in patients with schizophrenia (SCH) (20%), especially among those treated with clozapine (36.7%). Treatment options for OCS/OCD in patients under clozapine (CLZ) include combining clozapine with amisulpride/aripiprazole or a mood stabilizer, augmenting clozapine with a serotoninergic reuptake inhibitor, adding cognitive behavioural therapy, and gradually reducing dosage. No treatments have been proposed for HYPO in patients using clozapine so we examine these options in 2 cases and report the results. Among treatments delivered, only dosage reduction adequately worked. We recommend caution when thinking about escalating treatment and suggest trying it only when alternative interventions were not successful and weighing risk and benefits of this therapeutic strategy. Further research is needed to confirm the hypothesis that CLZ treatment induces hypochondriac symptoms, to investigate the prevalence of the phenomenon, and, mostly, to identify possible treatment strategies.

  13. Treatment of Hypochondriasis in Two Schizophrenia Patients Using Clozapine

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Hypochondriasis (HYPO), an obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorder, is frequent in patients with schizophrenia (SCH) (20%), especially among those treated with clozapine (36.7%). Treatment options for OCS/OCD in patients under clozapine (CLZ) include combining clozapine with amisulpride/aripiprazole or a mood stabilizer, augmenting clozapine with a serotoninergic reuptake inhibitor, adding cognitive behavioural therapy, and gradually reducing dosage. No treatments have been proposed for HYPO in patients using clozapine so we examine these options in 2 cases and report the results. Among treatments delivered, only dosage reduction adequately worked. We recommend caution when thinking about escalating treatment and suggest trying it only when alternative interventions were not successful and weighing risk and benefits of this therapeutic strategy. Further research is needed to confirm the hypothesis that CLZ treatment induces hypochondriac symptoms, to investigate the prevalence of the phenomenon, and, mostly, to identify possible treatment strategies. PMID:28642831

  14. [Satisfaction of hospitalized patients in a hospital in Apurimac, Peru].

    PubMed

    Sihuin-Tapia, Elsa Yudy; Gómez-Quispe, Oscar Elisban; Ibáñez-Quispe, Vladimiro

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the satisfaction of hospitalized patients in the Sub-regional Hospital of Andahuaylas, 175 patients were surveyed using the Servqual multidimensional model. The estimate of variables associated with the satisfaction of the hospitalized patients was performed by using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. We found 25.0% satisfaction. Lower levels of satisfaction were associated with having a secondary level education (aOR: 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01 to 0.64) and with having been hospitalized in the surgery department (aOR 0.14, CI: 95%: 0.04 to 0.53). It was concluded that there was a low level of satisfaction with the quality of care received by hospitalized patients and this was associated with the level of education and type of hospital department.

  15. Validation of the Persian version of the brief assessment of cognition in schizophrenia in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Parvaresh, Nooshin; Eslami Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Sadeghi, Mohammad M; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Keefe, Richard S E

    2014-02-01

    The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) is designed for assessment of cognitive function in patients with schizophrenia. Versions of the BACS in English and other languages have been shown to be as sensitive to cognitive dysfunction as a standard test battery, with the advantage of brief administration and scoring time. The present study aimed to test the concurrent validity of the Persian version of the BACS (Persian-BACS). A group of 50 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and a group of 50 healthy controls received the Persian-BACS in a first session, and in a second session a standard neurocognitive battery. Cronbach's alpha for the Persian-BACS was 0.74. All the Persian-BACS subscales were significantly correlated with the corresponding standard neurocognitive subscales and the Pearson correlation of the composite scores from the two instruments was 0.71. Moreover, a one-factor solution was found that accounted for 67.9% of the variance. Finally, the Persian-BACS demonstrated high ability to discriminate patients with schizophrenia from healthy controls. Good psychometric properties of the Persian-BACS suggest that it is a useful tool for assessing cognition in schizophrenic patients with Persian as their primary language. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  16. Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple electroconvulsive therapy sessions: characteristics, indications, and results

    PubMed Central

    Iancu, Iulian; Pick, Nimrod; Seener-Lorsh, Orit; Dannon, Pinhas

    2015-01-01

    Background While electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been used for many years, there is insufficient research regarding the indications for continuation/maintenance (C/M)-ECT, its safety and efficacy, and the characteristics of patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who receive multiple ECT sessions. The aims of this study were to characterize a series of patients who received 30 ECT sessions or more, to describe treatment regimens in actual practice, and to examine the results of C/M-ECT in terms of safety and efficacy, especially the effect on aggression and functioning. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 20 consecutive patients (mean age 64.6 years) with schizophrenia (n=16) or schizoaffective disorder (n=4) who received at least 30 ECT sessions at our ECT unit, and also interviewed the treating physician and filled out the Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Global Assessment of Functioning, and the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised. Results Patients received a mean of 91.3 ECT sessions at a mean interval of 2.6 weeks. All had been hospitalized for most or all of the previous 3 years. There were no major adverse effects, and cognitive side effects were relatively minimal (cognitive deficit present for several hours after treatment). We found that ECT significantly reduced scores on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised subscales for verbal aggression and self-harm, and improved Global Assessment of Functioning scores. There were reductions in total aggression scores, subscale scores for harm to objects and to others, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scores, these were not statistically significant. Conclusion C/M-ECT is safe and effective for chronically hospitalized patients. It improves general functioning and reduces verbal aggression and self-harm. More research using other aggression tools is needed to determine its effects and to reproduce our findings in prospective and controlled studies. PMID

  17. Is there change in intelligence quotient in chronically ill schizophrenia patients? A longitudinal study in twins discordant for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hedman, A M; van Haren, N E M; van Baal, G C M; Brans, R G H; Hijman, R; Kahn, R S; Hulshoff Pol, H E

    2012-12-01

    Intellectual deficits are commonly found in schizophrenia patients. These intellectual deficits have been found to be heritable. However, whether the intellectual deficits change over time and, if so, whether the change is related with an increased genetic risk for the disease are not known. We investigated change of intelligence quotient (IQ) in a twin sample of chronically ill schizophrenia patients, the discordant co-twins and healthy controls during a follow-up period of 5 years. A total of 52 twins completed two IQ assessments: nine patients [three monozygotic (MZ) and six dizygotic (DZ)], 10 unaffected co-twins (three MZ and seven DZ) and 33 healthy control twins (21 MZ and 12 DZ). A significant interaction effect over time was found between IQ measurement and illness (F=4.22, df=1, p<0.05), indicating that change in IQ over time is significantly different between the groups. A stable course in IQ over time was found in the patients with schizophrenia (mean IQ from 109.78 at baseline to 108.44 at follow-up) relative to both the healthy control twins who showed a small increase (from 114.61 at baseline to 119.18 at follow-up) (t=2.06, p<0.05) and the unaffected co-twins (from 111.60 to 117.60, t=-2.32, p<0.05). IQ change in the unaffected co-twins of schizophrenia patients was comparable with that in healthy control twins (t=-0.49, p=0.63). Patients with schizophrenia in the chronic phase of the disease, but not the discordant co-twins, show a lack of increase in IQ, which is probably due to environmental (non-genetic) factors related to the disease.

  18. Normal cognitive conflict resolution in psychosis patients with and without schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Smid, Henderikus G O M; Bruggeman, Richard; Martens, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is thought to be associated with impairments of executive functions, among which conflict control functions play an important role. The available evidence, however, suggests that conflict control is intact in schizophrenia, despite being based on methods that have successfully unveiled conflict control problems in other disorders. Differences between schizophrenia patients and healthy controls in stimulus perception, selective attention, alertness, processing speed and reaction time variability may have been previously overlooked. By controlling for these potential confounders, the present experiments were aimed to be more rigorous tests of the hypothesis that psychosis and schizophrenia are associated with impairments of conflict control. To that end, 27 healthy controls and 53 recent-onset psychosis patients with (n = 27) and without schizophrenia (n = 26) with comparable age, intelligence, and education level, performed three iconic conflict control tasks: the Simon task, the Eriksen flanker task, and the Stroop task, all equipped with neutral trials, and analyzed for various potential confounders. They further performed a battery of standard neuropsychological tests. Schizophrenia patients showed no increased conflict effects in any of the 3 tasks for any alternative measures used. Nonschizophrenia patients only showed abnormally increased response competition in the Simon task. All patients nevertheless demonstrated impaired control of attention and verbal memory. These findings indicate that the type of conflict control engaged by conflict tasks is intact in recent-onset schizophrenia, suggesting that a major component of executive function is spared in schizophrenia. We discuss these findings in terms of proactive and reactive control. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved.

  19. Serum trace element differences between Schizophrenia patients and controls in the Han Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lei; Chen, Tianlu; Yang, Jinglei; Zhou, Kejun; Yan, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenzhong; Sun, Liya; Li, Linlin; Qin, Shengying; Wang, Peng; Yang, Ping; Cui, Donghong; Burmeister, Margit; He, Lin; Jia, Wei; Wan, Chunling

    2015-10-12

    Little is known about the trace element profile differences between Schizophrenia patients and healthy controls; previous studies about the association of certain elements with Schizophrenia have obtained conflicting results. To identify these differences in the Han Chinese population, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantify the levels of 35 elements in the sera of 111 Schizophrenia patients and 110 healthy participants, which consisted of a training (61/61 for cases/controls included) and a test group including remaining participants. An orthogonal projection to latent structures model was constructed from the training group (R(2)Y = 0.465, Q(2)cum = 0.343) had a sensitivity of 76.0% and a specificity of 71.4% in the test group. Single element analysis indicated that the concentrations of cesium, zinc, and selenium were significantly reduced in patients with Schizophrenia in both the training and test groups. The meta-analysis including 522 cases and 360 controls supported that Zinc was significantly associated with Schizophrenia (standardized mean difference [SMD], -0.81; 95% confidence intervals [CI], -1.46 to -0.16, P = 0.01) in the random-effect model. Information theory analysis indicated that Zinc could play roles independently in Schizophrenia. These results suggest clear element profile differences between patients with Schizophrenia and healthy controls, and reduced Zn level is confirmed in the Schizophrenia patients.

  20. Serum trace element differences between Schizophrenia patients and controls in the Han Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lei; Chen, Tianlu; Yang, Jinglei; Zhou, Kejun; Yan, Xiaomei; Chen, Wenzhong; Sun, Liya; Li, Linlin; Qin, Shengying; Wang, Peng; Yang, Ping; Cui, Donghong; Burmeister, Margit; He, Lin; Jia, Wei; Wan, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the trace element profile differences between Schizophrenia patients and healthy controls; previous studies about the association of certain elements with Schizophrenia have obtained conflicting results. To identify these differences in the Han Chinese population, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantify the levels of 35 elements in the sera of 111 Schizophrenia patients and 110 healthy participants, which consisted of a training (61/61 for cases/controls included) and a test group including remaining participants. An orthogonal projection to latent structures model was constructed from the training group (R2Y = 0.465, Q2cum = 0.343) had a sensitivity of 76.0% and a specificity of 71.4% in the test group. Single element analysis indicated that the concentrations of cesium, zinc, and selenium were significantly reduced in patients with Schizophrenia in both the training and test groups. The meta-analysis including 522 cases and 360 controls supported that Zinc was significantly associated with Schizophrenia (standardized mean difference [SMD], −0.81; 95% confidence intervals [CI], −1.46 to −0.16, P = 0.01) in the random-effect model. Information theory analysis indicated that Zinc could play roles independently in Schizophrenia. These results suggest clear element profile differences between patients with Schizophrenia and healthy controls, and reduced Zn level is confirmed in the Schizophrenia patients. PMID:26456296

  1. Hospitalization of hospice patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cintron, Alexie; Hamel, Mary B; Davis, Roger B; Burns, Risa B; Phillips, Russell S; McCarthy, Ellen P

    2003-10-01

    To identify factors associated with hospitalization of elderly hospice patients with cancer and to describe their hospital experiences. Retrospective analysis of the last year of life. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Medicare beneficiaries dying of lung or colorectal cancer between 1988 and 1998 who enrolled in hospice. Hospitalization after hospice entry. For hospitalized patients, we describe admission diagnoses, aggressiveness of care, and in-hospital death. Of the 23608 patients, 1423 (6.0%) were hospitalized after hospice enrollment. Hospitalization declined over time by 7.0% per year of hospice enrollment. Factors associated with higher hospitalization rates were younger age, male gender, black race/ethnicity, local cancer stage at diagnosis, and hospice enrollment within 4 months of cancer diagnosis. The most common reasons for hospital admission were lung cancer, metastatic disease, bone fracture, pneumonia, and volume depletion. Of the 1423 patients hospitalized, 34.6% received aggressive care and 35.8% died in the hospital. The rates of hospitalization for elderly hospice patients with lung or colorectal cancer appear to be declining. However, patients who are hospitalized undergo aggressive care and often die in the hospital rather than at home. This aggressive care may be consistent with changes in patients' care preferences, but could also reflect the current culture of acute care hospitals, which focuses on curative treatment and is ill-equipped to provide palliative care.

  2. Schizophrenia, culture and neuropsychology: sensory deficits, language impairments and social functioning in Chinese-speaking schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Chen, S; Chen, C-M; Khan, F; Forchelli, G; Javitt, D C

    2012-07-01

    While 20% of schizophrenia patients worldwide speak tonal languages (e.g. Mandarin), studies are limited to Western-language patients. Western-language patients show tonal deficits that are related to impaired emotional processing of speech. However, language processing is minimally affected. In contrast, in Mandarin, syllables are voiced in one of four tones, with word meaning varying accordingly. We hypothesized that Mandarin-speaking schizophrenia patients would show impairments in underlying basic auditory processing that, unlike in Western groups, would relate to deficits in word recognition and social outcomes. Altogether, 22 Mandarin-speaking schizophrenia patients and 44 matched healthy participants were recruited from New York City. The auditory tasks were: (1) tone matching; (2) distorted tunes; (3) Chinese word discrimination; (4) Chinese word identification. Social outcomes were measured by marital status, employment and most recent employment status. Patients showed deficits in tone-matching, distorted tunes, word discrimination and word identification versus controls (all p<0.0001). Impairments in tone-matching across groups correlated with both word identification (p<0.0001) and discrimination (p<0.0001). On social outcomes, tonally impaired patients had 'lower-status' jobs overall when compared with tonally intact patients (p<0.005) and controls (p<0.0001). Our study is the first to investigate an interaction between neuropsychology and language among Mandarin-speaking schizophrenia patients. As predicted, patients were highly impaired in both tone and auditory word processing, with these two measures significantly correlated. Tonally impaired patients showed significantly worse employment-status function than tonally intact patients, suggesting a link between sensory impairment and employment status outcome. While neuropsychological deficits appear similar cross-culturally, their consequences may be language- and culture-dependent.

  3. A patient with schizophrenia presenting with post-lobotomy catatonia treated with olanzapine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Ryo; Kitazawa, Maiko; Ishibiki, Yoshiro; Narumi, Kenji; Ichimiya, Yosuke

    2017-05-01

    A 79-year-old Japanese woman with schizophrenia was hospitalized because of idiopathic duodenal stenosis. Three days after discontinuing ingestion, including the administration of psychotropic drugs, the patient demonstrated incoherent behaviour and strong general muscle tension, and was unable to engage in conversation. Computed tomography indicated bilateral regions of low density in the frontal lobes, subsequent to which she was diagnosed with post-lobotomy catatonia. Administration of olanzapine (10 mg/day) improved the patient's condition within a short period. Previous studies have demonstrated an association between the dysfunction of frontal circuits and catatonia; therefore, the observed catatonic episode might relate to the disconnection of nerve fibres in the prefrontal lobes induced by her lobotomy. Olanzapine was likely effective in treating catatonia because of its reported efficacy in improving frontal lobe function. © 2016 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2016 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  4. Association of polymorphism in the promoter of the melatonin receptor 1A gene with schizophrenia and with insomnia symptoms in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Hae Jeong; Park, Jin Kyung; Kim, Su Kang; Cho, Ah-Rang; Kim, Jong Woo; Yim, Sung-Vin; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2011-10-01

    Schizophrenia patients commonly have sleep disturbances. In this study, we investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region of the melatonin receptor genes (MTNR1A and MTNR1B) were associated with schizophrenia and with sleep problems such as insomnia and hypersomnia in schizophrenia patients. We genotyped two promoter SNPs [rs2119882 (-184T/C) of MTNR1A and rs4753426 (-1193C/T) of MTNR1B] using direct sequencing in 289 schizophrenia patients and 505 control subjects. We found that rs2119882 of MTNR1A was associated with schizophrenia in recessive model [CC vs. TT/TC, p = 0.013, odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12-2.55]. Interestingly, in an analysis of clinical phenotypes, we found that rs2119882 of MTNR1A was also associated with insomnia symptoms of schizophrenia (recessive model, p = 0.010, OR = 2.24, 95% CI = 1.21-4.14), but not with hypersomnia symptoms as determined using the Operational Criteria checklist. However, rs4753426 of MTNR1B was not associated with either schizophrenia or clinical phenotypes. Our results suggest that MTNR1A may be a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia and may be associated with insomnia symptoms exhibited in schizophrenia patients.

  5. Validation of the Persian version of the Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS) in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Mazhari, Shahrzad; Ghafaree-Nejad, Ali R; Soleymani-Zade, Somayeh; Keefe, Richard S E

    2017-06-01

    The Schizophrenia Cognition Rating Scale (SCoRS) is an interview-based assessment of cognition that involves interviews with patients and informants. The SCoRS has shown good reliability, validity, and sensitivity to cognitive impairment in schizophrenia, with the advantage of brief administration and scoring time. The present study aimed to test the concurrent validity of the Persian version of the SCoRS. A group of 35 patients with schizophrenia and a group of 35 healthy controls received the Persian-SCoRS in the first session, and a standardized performance-based cognitive battery, the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS), in the second session.Our results indicated that the Persian version of the SCoRS was sensitive to cognitive impairment in the patients. The Persian SCoRS global rating was significantly associated with the composite score generated from the Persian version of the BACS and predicted functional outcomes as measured by Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) and World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHO QOL). A Persian version of the SCoRS, an interview based measure of cognition that included informants, is related to cognitive performance and global functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Spanish validation of the Brief Assessment in Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Segarra, N; Bernardo, M; Gutierrez, F; Justicia, A; Fernadez-Egea, E; Allas, M; Safont, G; Contreras, F; Gascon, J; Soler-Insa, P A; Menchon, J M; Junque, C; Keefe, R S E

    2011-03-01

    Neurocognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia and is closely associated with functional outcome. The importance of cognitive assessment is broadly accepted today, and an easy-to-use, internationality validated cognitive assessment tool is needed by researchers and in daily clinical practice. The Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS) has been validated in English, French, Japanese and Italian. It is as sensitive to cognitive dysfunction as a standard test battery, with the advantage of requiring less than 35minutes to complete. In our study, we tested the psychometric characteristics of a Spanish version of the BACS in 117 patients with schizophrenia-spectrum disorders and 36 healthy controls. All BACS cognitive subtests discriminated between patients and controls (P<.001), and the concurrent validity between the BACS and a traditional neuropsychological test battery was similar to that reported in other languages. We conclude that the BACS can facilitate the comparison of the cognitive performance of patients with schizophrenia in many different countries.

  7. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a…

  8. Mortality of Geriatric and Younger Patients with Schizophrenia in the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ran, Mao-Sheng; Chan, Cecilia Lai-Wan; Chen, Eric Yu-Hai; Tang, Cui-Ping; Lin, Fu-Rong; Li, Li; Li, Si-Gan; Mao, Wen-Jun; Hu, Shi-Hui; Schwab, Gerhard; Conwell, Yeates

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in mortality among non-institutionalized geriatric and younger patients with schizophrenia. In this study long-term mortality and suicidal behavior of all the geriatric (age greater than or equal to 65 years), middle-age (age 41-64 years), and young (age 15-40 years) subjects with schizophrenia living in a…

  9. A family affair: brain abnormalities in siblings of patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke; Gogtay, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder that has a strong genetic basis. Converging evidence suggests that schizophrenia is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder, with earlier onset cases resulting in more profound brain abnormalities. Siblings of patients with schizophrenia provide an invaluable resource for differentiating between trait and state markers, thus highlighting possible endophenotypes for ongoing research. However, findings from sibling studies have not been systematically put together in a coherent story across the broader age span. We review here the cortical grey matter abnormalities in siblings of patients with schizophrenia from childhood to adulthood, by reviewing sibling studies from both childhood-onset schizophrenia, and the more common adult-onset schizophrenia. When reviewed together, studies suggest that siblings of patients with schizophrenia display significant brain abnormalities that highlight both similarities and differences between the adult and childhood populations, with shared developmental risk patterns, and segregating trajectories. Based on current research it appears that the cortical grey matter abnormalities in siblings are likely to be an age-dependent endophenotype, which normalize by the typical age of onset of schizophrenia unless there has been more genetic or symptom burdening. With increased genetic burdening (e.g. discordant twins of patients) the grey matter abnormalities in (twin) siblings are progressive in adulthood. This synthesis of the literature clarifies the importance of brain plasticity in the pathophysiology of the illness, indicating that probands may lack protective factors critical for healthy development. PMID:23698280

  10. Neurocognitive functioning in parents of schizophrenia patients: Attentional and executive performance vary with genetic loading.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Rauschenbach, Svenja; Lennertz, Leonhard; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Petrovsky, Nadine; Ettinger, Ulrich; Pukrop, Ralf; Dreher, Jan; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Maier, Wolfgang; Wagner, Michael

    2015-12-30

    Neuropsychological deficits are candidate endophenotypes of schizophrenia which can assist to explain the neurocognitive impact of genetic risk variants. The identification of endophenotypes is often based on the familiality of these phenotypes. Several studies demonstrate neuropsychological deficits in unaffected biological relatives of schizophrenia patients without differentiating between genetic and non-genetic factors underlying these deficits. We assessed N=129 unaffected biological parents of schizophrenia patients, N=28 schizophrenia patients (paranoid subtype), and N=143 controls without a family history of schizophrenia with an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Direct comparison of N=22 parents with an ancestral history of schizophrenia (more likely carriers, MLC) and N=17 of their spouses without such a history (less likely carriers, LLC) allowed the separation of genetic and non-genetic aspects in cognition. Overall, parents showed significant deficits in neuropsychological tasks from all cognitive domains with medium effect sizes. Direct comparisons of MLC- and LLC-parents showed that attentional and executive tasks were most strongly affected by genetic loading. To conclude, unaffected parents of schizophrenia patients showed modest yet significant impairments in attention, memory, and executive functioning. In particular, attentional and executive impairments varied most strongly with genetic loading for schizophrenia, prioritising these dysfunctions for genotype-endophenotype analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-Term Effect of Prefrontal Lobotomy on Verbal Fluency in Patients with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Bigras, Marie-Josee.; Mancini-Marie, Adham; Cosset, Marie-Eve.; Black, Deborah; Lecours, Andre-Roch

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the long-term effects of bilateral prefrontal leukotomy on lexical abilities in schizophrenia subjects. Method: We compared performances of leukotomized (LSP), non-leukotomized schizophrenia patients (NLSP) and normal controls, using a test of verbal fluency. Multiple case and triple comparison design were…

  12. Long-Term Effect of Prefrontal Lobotomy on Verbal Fluency in Patients with Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stip, Emmanuel; Bigras, Marie-Josee.; Mancini-Marie, Adham; Cosset, Marie-Eve.; Black, Deborah; Lecours, Andre-Roch

    2004-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the long-term effects of bilateral prefrontal leukotomy on lexical abilities in schizophrenia subjects. Method: We compared performances of leukotomized (LSP), non-leukotomized schizophrenia patients (NLSP) and normal controls, using a test of verbal fluency. Multiple case and triple comparison design were…

  13. Affective prosody perception in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Hoertnagl, Christine M; Yalcin-Siedentopf, Nursen; Baumgartner, Susanne; Biedermann, Falko; Deisenhammer, Eberhard A; Hausmann, Armand; Kaufmann, Alexandra; Kemmler, Georg; Mühlbacher, Moritz; Rauch, Anna-Sophia; Fleischhacker, Wolfgang W; Hofer, Alex

    2014-09-01

    Affect perception has frequently been shown to be impaired in patients suffering from schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (BD), but it remains unclear whether these impairments exist during symptomatic remission and whether the two disorders differ from each other in this regard. Most previous studies have investigated facial affect recognition, but not the ability to decode mental states from emotional tone of voice, i.e. affective prosody perception (APP). Accordingly, the present study directly compared APP in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia or BD and healthy control subjects and investigated its relationship with residual symptomatology in patients. Patients with schizophrenia and BD showed comparable APP impairments despite being symptomatically remitted. In comparison to healthy control subjects, overall APP deficits were found in BD but not in schizophrenia patients. Both patient groups were particularly impaired in the identification of anger and confounded it with neutral prosody. In addition, schizophrenia patients frequently confused sadness with happiness, anger, or fright. There was an inverse association between the degree of residual positive symptoms and the ability to correctly recognize happiness in schizophrenia patients. Overall, these data indicate that impairments in APP represent an enduring deficit and a trait marker of both schizophrenia and BD and that the level of impairment is comparable between disorders.

  14. Resistin as an inflammatory marker in patients with schizophrenia treated with clozapine.

    PubMed

    Klemettilä, Jari-Pekka; Kampman, Olli; Seppälä, Niko; Viikki, Merja; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Leinonen, Esa

    2017-02-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with excess cardiovascular comorbidity and mortality related to lifestyle factors, such as lack of physical activity, poor diet, and smoking. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome is increased among patients with schizophrenia, with the highest rates among patients on clozapine treatment. Smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, airway inflammation and obstruction, and adipose tissue and inflammatory marker activation are related in systemic inflammation. Low-grade inflammation is also associated with schizophrenia. Adipokine resistin is a biomarker involving several acute and chronic inflammatory states. However, the inflammatory role of resistin is so far inconclusive and studies in schizophrenia are scanty. The aim of the present study was to explore the role of serum resistin as an inflammatory marker in patients with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment. Associations between serum levels of resistin and some other selected cytokines/adipokines (adiponectin, leptin, adipsin, IL-6, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, hs-CRP) and metabolic markers in 190 patients with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment were studied using a cross-sectional study design. Among male patients especially, smokers had higher levels of resistin than non-smokers, and among smokers resistin levels were associated with IL-1Ra and hs-CRP levels. In the whole patient group levels of resistin associated with levels of IL-1Ra, and among male patients with low HDL-cholesterol. Resistin is a biomarker of systemic inflammation associated with smoking among patients with schizophrenia on clozapine treatment. Resistin might have a role as a marker of cardiovascular comorbidity.

  15. Hospital-Readmission Risk - Isolating Hospital Effects from Patient Effects.

    PubMed

    Krumholz, Harlan M; Wang, Kun; Lin, Zhenqiu; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Horwitz, Leora I; Ross, Joseph S; Drye, Elizabeth E; Bernheim, Susannah M; Normand, Sharon-Lise T

    2017-09-14

    To isolate hospital effects on risk-standardized hospital-readmission rates, we examined readmission outcomes among patients who had multiple admissions for a similar diagnosis at more than one hospital within a given year. We divided the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services hospital-wide readmission measure cohort from July 2014 through June 2015 into two random samples. All the patients in the cohort were Medicare recipients who were at least 65 years of age. We used the first sample to calculate the risk-standardized readmission rate within 30 days for each hospital, and we classified hospitals into performance quartiles, with a lower readmission rate indicating better performance (performance-classification sample). The study sample (identified from the second sample) included patients who had two admissions for similar diagnoses at different hospitals that occurred more than 1 month and less than 1 year apart, and we compared the observed readmission rates among patients who had been admitted to hospitals in different performance quartiles. In the performance-classification sample, the median risk-standardized readmission rate was 15.5% (interquartile range, 15.3 to 15.8). The study sample included 37,508 patients who had two admissions for similar diagnoses at a total of 4272 different hospitals. The observed readmission rate was consistently higher among patients admitted to hospitals in a worse-performing quartile than among those admitted to hospitals in a better-performing quartile, but the only significant difference was observed when the patients were admitted to hospitals in which one was in the best-performing quartile and the other was in the worst-performing quartile (absolute difference in readmission rate, 2.0 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 0.4 to 3.5; P=0.001). When the same patients were admitted with similar diagnoses to hospitals in the best-performing quartile as compared with the worst-performing quartile of hospital

  16. Sexual dysfunctions in schizophrenia: Professionals and patients perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Tharoor, Hema; Kaliappan, Anandhalakshmi; Gopal, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sexual dysfunction (SD) is not commonly reported by persons with schizophrenia unless an enquiry is made by a doctor or staff during routine clinical visits. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine reporting of drug-induced sexual side-effects and the attitude of the treating team in clarifying or detecting this issue. Results: A vast majority of professionals (73.2%) did not enquire about SDs in routine clinical setting and admitted that they lack expertise based on the Attitude Survey Questionnaire. More than one-third of the patients (35.3%) attributed sexual side-effects to medications. Many patients (91.7%) reported good to fair tolerance to sexual side-effects according to the Psychotropic Related Sexual Dysfunction Questionnaire. Conclusion: The treating team plays a crucial role. Sexual side-effects are often under-reported and need to be addressed by the treating physician. PMID:25657463

  17. Restricted attention to social cues in schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolaides, Alexandra; Miess, Susanne; Auvera, Isabella; Müller, Ralf; Klosterkötter, Joachim; Ruhrmann, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Deficits of psychosocial functioning are a robust finding in schizophrenia. Research on social cognition may open a new avenue for the development of effective interventions. As a correlate of social perceptive information processing deficits, schizophrenia patients (SZP) show deviant gaze behavior (GB) while viewing emotional faces. As understanding of a social environment requires gathering complex social information, our study aimed at investigating the gaze behavior of SZP related to social interactions and its impact on the level of social and role functioning. GB of 32 SZP and 37 healthy control individuals (HCI) was investigated with a high-resolution eye tracker during an unguided viewing of 12 complex pictures of social interaction scenes. Regarding whole pictures, SZP showed a shorter scanpath length, fewer fixations and a shorter mean distance between fixations. Furthermore, SZP exhibited fewer and shorter fixations on faces, but not on the socially informative bodies nor on the background, suggesting a cue-specific abnormality. Logistic regression with bootstrapping yielded a model including two GB parameters; a subsequent ROC curve analysis indicated an excellent ability of group discrimination (AUC .85). Face-related GB aberrations correlated with lower social and role functioning and with delusional thinking, but not with negative symptoms. Training of spontaneous integration of face-related social information seems promising to enable a holistic perception of social information, which may in turn improve social and role functioning. The observed ability to discriminate SZP from HCI warrants further research on the predictive validity of GB in psychosis risk prediction.

  18. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-07-01

    Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis.

  19. A comparative study of cognitive deficits in patients with delusional disorder and paranoid schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Nehra, Ritu; Bhateja, Gaurav; Kulhara, Parmanand; Kumar, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Background: Very few studies have evaluated the neurocognitive functions of patients with persistent delusional disorder. Aim: To study the neurocognitive profile of patients with delusional disorder and compare it with those of patients with paranoid schizophrenia and healthy control subjects. Materials and Methods: Attention concentration, executive functions, memory, and IQ were assessed in 20 patients with delusional disorder and were compared with 20 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls. All three groups were matched on age, sex, and level of education. The two patient groups were also matched on duration of illness. Results: In general, patients with delusional disorder performed worst than healthy controls and patients with paranoid schizophrenia performed in between the other two groups. Compared with healthy controls, both patients with delusional disorder and patients with paranoid schizophrenia were significantly impaired on different tests of attention and visual learning and memory. Compared with patients with paranoid schizophrenia, patients with delusional disorder had more impairment different tests of attention, visual learning and memory, verbal working memory, and executive functions. Conclusion: Patients with delusional disorder exhibit cognitive dysfunctions that are very similar to schizophrenia, but are more severe in intensity. The resemblance of cognitive profiles suggests that the two disorders may have similar etiological basis. PMID:23271865

  20. Profiling of experiential pleasure, emotional regulation and emotion expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying-Min; Ni, Ke; Yang, Zhuo-Ya; Li, Ying; Cai, Xin-Lu; Xie, Dong-Jie; Zhang, Rui-Ting; Zhou, Fu-Chun; Li, Wen-Xiu; Lui, Simon S Y; Shum, David H K; Cheung, Eric F C; Chan, Raymond C K

    2017-08-28

    Emotion deficits may be the basis of negative symptoms in schizophrenia patients and they are prevalent in these patients. However, inconsistent findings about emotion deficits in schizophrenia suggest that there may be subtypes. The present study aimed to examine and profile experiential pleasure, emotional regulation and expression in patients with schizophrenia. A set of checklists specifically capturing experiential pleasure, emotional regulation, emotion expression, depressive symptoms and anhedonia were administered to 146 in-patients with schizophrenia and 73 demographically-matched healthy controls. Psychiatric symptoms and negative symptoms were also evaluated by a trained psychiatrist for patients with schizophrenia. Two-stage cluster analysis and discriminant function analysis were used to analyze the profile of these measures in patients with schizophrenia. We found a three-cluster solution. Cluster 1 (n=41) was characterized by a deficit in experiential pleasure and emotional regulation, Cluster 2 (n=47) was characterized by a general deficit in experiential pleasure, emotional regulation and emotion expression, and Cluster 3 (n=57) was characterized by a deficit in emotion expression. Results of a discriminant function analysis indicated that the three groups were reasonably discrete. The present findings suggest that schizophrenia patients can be classified into three subtypes based on experiential pleasure, emotional regulation and emotion expression, which are characterized by distinct clinical representations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mean kurtosis alterations of cerebral white matter in patients with schizophrenia revealed by diffusion kurtosis imaging.

    PubMed

    Narita, Hisashi; Tha, Khin K; Hashimoto, Naoki; Hamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Shin; Shirato, Hiroki; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2016-11-03

    Diffusion kurtosis imaging can provide a better understanding of microstructural white matter (WM) changes where crossing fibers exist, compared with conventional diffusion tensor imaging. Here, we aimed to examine the differences of mean kurtosis (MK) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values between patients with schizophrenia and control subjects using voxel-based analysis (VBA). Additionally, we examined the correlation between these values and severity of clinical symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. MK and FA values were acquired with a 3.0T scanner from 31 patients with schizophrenia and 31 age-, handedness-, and sex-matched healthy controls. VBA was used to compare the MK and FA maps of the patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We also performed a correlation analysis between the MK and FA values of the regions with significant differences and the positive and negative syndrome scale scores in patients with schizophrenia. Compared to FA values, voxels with MK decrease were more widespread across bilateral cerebral the WM of patients with schizophrenia. The MK values of left superior longitudinal fasciculus were significantly negatively correlated with the severity of positive symptoms (r=-0.451, P=0.011). There was no significant correlation between MK and FA values and other clinical variables. The diffusion kurtosis indices are suitable for evaluating altered WM structures in the human brain as they may detect white matter alterations of crossing fibers alterations of WM in schizophrenia and assess the clinical state of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of panic attacks on quality of life among patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ulaş, Halis; Polat, Selma; Akdede, Berna Binnur; Alptekin, Köksal

    2010-10-01

    Schizophrenia patients had decreased levels of quality of life compared to normal population. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of panic attacks on quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Eighty-eight patients with schizophrenia and 85 healthy subjects were included in the study. World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument-Short Form (WHOQOL-Bref) was given to patients and healthy subjects to assess quality of life. Panic module of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) was administered to patients for diagnosis of panic attacks and panic disorder. Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) for symptom severity and Calgary Depression Scale (CDS) for depressive symptoms were administered to the patients. Patients with schizophrenia demonstrated significantly lower scores compared to healthy controls in all domains of WHOQOL-Bref. Twenty-five patients (28.4%) with schizophrenia had panic attacks (PA) and 10 patients (11.4%) met criteria for panic disorder (PD). Schizophrenia patients with PA had significantly lower scores on psychological domain of WHOQOL-Bref compared to the patients without PA. Schizophrenic patients with panic attacks had higher CDS scores than patients without PA. In the multivariate regression analyses the variance in psychological domain of WHOQOL-Bref was explained by depression rather than panic attack. In patients with schizophrenia comorbid panic attacks may have a negative impact on quality of life, which is associated with depression significantly. Panic attacks and depressive symptomatology must be examined comprehensively in order to improve quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [The actual image of male patients with paranoid schizophrenia in perception of the patients themselves and their parents].

    PubMed

    Chuchra, Maria

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to answer following questions: Does the self-image of male schizophrenics differ from the image their parents have? Do parents judge their sons more negatively or more positively than they themselves do? Are opinions of the mothers and fathers different or consistent? 30 unmarried male patients with paranoid schizophrenia (diagnosis based on ICD-10) were included in the study. All subjects lived with their parental families. In all cases, families were complete. Subjects were aged 18-23 (x = 23.23). The mean time of duration of disease was 2.37 (range 0.5-5 years) and the mean hospitalization number was 1.7 (range 1-4). All subjects had completed primary education. 3 subjects graduated from university and the rest of them continued education in vocational or secondary schools as well as universities. The study was carried out during the last week before discharge from the hospital. The Adjective Check List (ACL) of Gough and Heilbrun was used in the study. Subjects filled out the questionnaire in accordance with instructions "I am" and parents in accordance with the instruction "My son is". Three different types of present images of patients were obtained: patient self-image, the image their mother and their fathers have and they were compared using ANOVA. Comparison of actual self-images of male schizophrenics with present images of schizophrenics their mothers have revealed 26 statistically significant differences, and with present images of schizophrenics their fathers have revealed 23 statistically significant differences. The differences between images of schizophrenics obtained from their mothers and their fathers were statistically significant in 2 cases only. Self-opinion of the males diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia is more positive than the opinion their mothers and fathers have of them. Self-images of the males diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and images their mothers have are different. Mothers have a more negative

  4. Co-morbid anxiety disorders in patients with schizophrenia in a tertiary institution in South East Nigeria: prevalence and correlates.

    PubMed

    Aguocha, Chinyere; Aguocha, Kelechi; Uwakwe, Richard; Onyeama, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Anxiety disorders occur commonly in schizophrenia but are often overlooked by psychiatrists. Their presence may compound the challenges faced by these patients and may contribute to poor outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of anxiety disorders among the participants with schizophrenia, and the association between this co-morbidity and disability. A total of 367 participants were recruited from the out-patient department of Federal neuropsychiatric hospital Enugu, Nigeria. Socio-demographic questionnaire, schedules for clinical assessment in neuropsychiatry, positive and negative syndrome scale and the 12-item version of the World Health Organization disability assessment schedule were administered. A total of 189 females (51.5%) and 178 (48.5%) males were studied. A lifetime prevalence of 12.3% was reported for anxiety disorder. Anxiety disorder was more likely in females (ϰ(2)=4.93, p<0.03). Specific prevalence for anxiety disorder in schizophrenia was generalized anxiety disorder 6.3%, obsessive compulsive disorder 3.3%, and phobic anxiety disorder 2.7%. Anxiety disorder was associated with increased disability (t=3.50, p<0.001) and psychopathology (t=3.40, p<0.001) among the participants studied. Phobias were associated with prescription of low doses of antipsychotics (ϰ(2)=4.08, p<0.04). There was a low rate of identification of anxiety disorder in routine clinical practice (k=0.08, p<0.001). Co-morbid anxiety disorders are common in schizophrenia and they are associated with increased disability and psychopathology. The results emphasize the need to screen for anxiety disorders in patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with borderline personality disorder are similar to those in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Slotema, C W; Daalman, K; Blom, J D; Diederen, K M; Hoek, H W; Sommer, I E C

    2012-09-01

    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are frequently claimed to be brief, less severe and qualitatively different from those in schizophrenia, hence the term 'pseudohallucinations'. AVH in BPD may be more similar to those experienced by healthy individuals, who experience AVH in a lower frequency and with a more positive content than AVH in schizophrenia. In this study the phenomenology of AVH in BPD patients was compared to that in schizophrenia and to AVH experienced by non-patients. In a cross-sectional setting, the phenomenological characteristics of AVH in 38 BPD patients were compared to those in 51 patients with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder and to AVH of 66 non-patients, using the Psychotic Symptom Rating Scales (PSYRATS). BPD patients experienced AVH for a mean duration of 18 years, with a mean frequency of at least daily lasting several minutes or more. The ensuing distress was high. No differences in the phenomenological characteristics of AVH were revealed among patients diagnosed with BPD and those with schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder, except for 'disruption of life', which was higher in the latter group. Compared to non-patients experiencing AVH, BPD patients had higher scores on almost all items. AVH in BPD patients are phenomenologically similar to those in schizophrenia, and different from those in healthy individuals. As AVH in patients with BPD fulfil the criteria of hallucinations proper, we prefer the term AVH over 'pseudohallucinations', so as to prevent trivialization and to promote adequate diagnosis and treatment.