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Sample records for host cell mitochondria

  1. Anaplasma phagocytophilum Ats-1 Is Imported into Host Cell Mitochondria and Interferes with Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Hua; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Rudel, Thomas; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, infects human neutrophils and inhibits mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Bacterial factors involved in this process are unknown. In the present study, we screened a genomic DNA library of A. phagocytophilum for effectors of the type IV secretion system by a bacterial two-hybrid system, using A. phagocytophilum VirD4 as bait. A hypothetical protein was identified as a putative effector, hereby named Anaplasma translocated substrate 1 (Ats-1). Using triple immunofluorescence labeling and Western blot analysis of infected cells, including human neutrophils, we determined that Ats-1 is abundantly expressed by A. phagocytophilum, translocated across the inclusion membrane, localized in the host cell mitochondria, and cleaved. Ectopically expressed Ats-1 targeted mitochondria in an N-terminal 17 residue-dependent manner, localized in matrix or at the inner membrane, and was cleaved as native protein, which required residues 55–57. In vitro-translated Ats-1 was imported in a receptor-dependent manner into isolated mitochondria. Ats-1 inhibited etoposide-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria, PARP cleavage, and apoptosis in mammalian cells, as well as Bax-induced yeast apoptosis. Ats-1(55–57) had significantly reduced anti-apoptotic activity. Bax redistribution was inhibited in both etoposide-induced and Bax-induced apoptosis by Ats-1. Taken together, Ats-1 is the first example of a bacterial protein that traverses five membranes and prevents apoptosis at the mitochondria. PMID:20174550

  2. Vibrio cholerae Porin OmpU Induces Caspase-independent Programmed Cell Death upon Translocation to the Host Cell Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shelly; Prasad, G V R Krishna; Mukhopadhaya, Arunika

    2015-12-25

    Porins, a major class of outer membrane proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, primarily act as transport channels. OmpU is one of the major porins of human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae. In the present study, we show that V. cholerae OmpU has the ability to induce target cell death. Although OmpU-mediated cell death shows some characteristics of apoptosis, such as flipping of phosphatidylserine in the membrane as well as cell size shrinkage and increased cell granularity, it does not show the caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering pattern typical of apoptotic cells. Increased release of lactate dehydrogenase in OmpU-treated cells indicates that the OmpU-mediated cell death also has characteristics of necrosis. Further, we show that the mechanism of OmpU-mediated cell death involves major mitochondrial changes in the target cells. We observe that OmpU treatment leads to the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, resulting in the release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). AIF translocates to the host cell nucleus, implying that it has a crucial role in OmpU-mediated cell death. Finally, we observe that OmpU translocates to the target cell mitochondria, where it directly initiates mitochondrial changes leading to mitochondrial membrane permeability transition and AIF release. Partial blocking of AIF release by cyclosporine A in OmpU-treated cells further suggests that OmpU may be inducing the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. All of these results lead us to the conclusion that OmpU induces cell death in target cells in a programmed manner in which mitochondria play a central role.

  3. Mitochondria and cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Tait, Stephen W. G.; Green, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria have long been considered as crucial organelles, primarily for their roles in biosynthetic reactions such as ATP synthesis. However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that mitochondria are intimately involved in cell signalling pathways. Mitochondria perform various signalling functions, serving as platforms to initiate cell signalling, as well as acting as transducers and effectors in multiple processes. Here, we discuss the active roles that mitochondria have in cell death signalling, innate immunity and autophagy. Common themes of mitochondrial regulation emerge from these diverse but interconnected processes. These include: the outer mitochondrial membrane serving as a major signalling platform, and regulation of cell signalling through mitochondrial dynamics and by mitochondrial metabolites, including ATP and reactive oxygen species. Importantly, defects in mitochondrial control of cell signalling and in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis might underpin many diseases, in particular age-related pathologies. PMID:22448037

  4. Toxoplasma Effector MAF1 Mediates Recruitment of Host Mitochondria and Impacts the Host Response

    PubMed Central

    Pernas, Lena; Adomako-Ankomah, Yaw; Shastri, Anjali J.; Ewald, Sarah E.; Treeck, Moritz; Boyle, Jon P.; Boothroyd, John C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent information has revealed the functional diversity and importance of mitochondria in many cellular processes including orchestrating the innate immune response. Intriguingly, several infectious agents, such as Toxoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydia, have been reported to grow within vacuoles surrounded by host mitochondria. Although many hypotheses have been proposed for the existence of host mitochondrial association (HMA), the causes and biological consequences of HMA have remained unanswered. Here we show that HMA is present in type I and III strains of Toxoplasma but missing in type II strains, both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of F1 progeny from a type II×III cross revealed that HMA is a Mendelian trait that we could map. We use bioinformatics to select potential candidates and experimentally identify the polymorphic parasite protein involved, mitochondrial association factor 1 (MAF1). We show that introducing the type I (HMA+) MAF1 allele into type II (HMA−) parasites results in conversion to HMA+ and deletion of MAF1 in type I parasites results in a loss of HMA. We observe that the loss and gain of HMA are associated with alterations in the transcription of host cell immune genes and the in vivo cytokine response during murine infection. Lastly, we use exogenous expression of MAF1 to show that it binds host mitochondria and thus MAF1 is the parasite protein directly responsible for HMA. Our findings suggest that association with host mitochondria may represent a novel means by which Toxoplasma tachyzoites manipulate the host. The existence of naturally occurring HMA+ and HMA− strains of Toxoplasma, Legionella, and Chlamydia indicates the existence of evolutionary niches where HMA is either advantageous or disadvantageous, likely reflecting tradeoffs in metabolism, immune regulation, and other functions of mitochondria. PMID:24781109

  5. Transferring isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Wei; Koob, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new method for introducing large numbers of isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells. Direct microinjection of mitochondria into typical mammalian cells has been found to be impractical due to the large size of mitochondria relative to microinjection needles. To circumvent this problem, we inject isolated mitochondria through appropriately sized microinjection needles into rodent oocytes or single-cell embryos, which are much larger than tissue culture cells, and then withdraw a ‘mitocytoplast’ cell fragment containing the injected mitochondria using a modified holding needle. These mitocytoplasts are then fused to recipient cells through viral-mediated membrane fusion and the injected mitochondria are transferred into the cytoplasm of the tissue culture cell. Since mouse oocytes contain large numbers of mouse mitochondria that repopulate recipient mouse cells along with the injected mitochondria, we used either gerbil single-cell embryos or rat oocytes to package injected mouse mitochondria. We found that the gerbil mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not maintained in recipient rho0 mouse cells and that rat mtDNA initially replicated but was soon completely replaced by the injected mouse mtDNA, and so with both procedures mouse cells homoplasmic for the mouse mtDNA in the injected mitochondria were obtained. PMID:22753025

  6. Mitochondria, endothelial cell function, and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoqiang; Luo, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Hou-Zao; Liu, De-Pei

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are perhaps the most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems in eukaryotic cells. The role of mitochondria goes beyond their capacity to create molecular fuel and includes the generation of reactive oxygen species, the regulation of calcium, and the activation of cell death. In endothelial cells, mitochondria have a profound impact on cellular function under both healthy and diseased conditions. In this review, we summarize the basic functions of mitochondria in endothelial cells and discuss the roles of mitochondria in endothelial dysfunction and vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular dysfunction, pulmonary artery hypertension, and hypertension. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in endothelial cells and vascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants and calorie restriction. PMID:24834056

  7. Microbiota-mitochondria inter-talk: consequence for microbiota-host interaction.

    PubMed

    Saint-Georges-Chaumet, Yann; Edeas, Marvin

    2016-02-01

    New discoveries in metagenomics and clinical research have highlighted the importance of the gut microbiota for human health through the regulation of the host immune response and energetic metabolism. The microbiota interacts with host cells in particular by intermingling with the mitochondrial activities. This mitochondria-microbiota cross-talk is intriguing because mitochondria share many common structural and functional features with the prokaryotic world. Several studies reported a correlation between microbiota quality and diversity and mitochondrial function. The mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role during the innate immune response and inflammation, and is often targeted by pathogenic bacteria. Data suggest that excessive mitochondrial ROS production may affect ROS signaling induced by the microbiota to regulate the gut epithelial barrier. Finally, the microbiota releases metabolites that can directly interfere with the mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP production. Short chain fatty acids have beneficial effects on mitochondrial activity. All these data suggest that the microbiota targets mitochondria to regulate its interaction with the host. Imbalance of this targeting may result in a pathogenic state as observed in numerous studies. The challenge to find new treatments will be to find strategies to modulate the quality and diversity of the microbiota rather than acting on microbiota metabolites and microbiota-related factors.

  8. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms. PMID:15033707

  9. Cell death in protists without mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Chose, Olivier; Sarde, Claude-Olivier; Noël, Christophe; Gerbod, Delphine; Jimenez, Juan-Carlos; Brenner, Catherine; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric; Roseto, Alberto

    2003-12-01

    Some protozoans, such as Trichomonad species, do not possess mitochondria. Most of the time, they harbor another type of membrane-bounded organelle, called hydrogenosome from its capacity to produce H(2). This is the case for the human parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Some other parasites, such as the protist Giardia lamblia, do not harbor any of these organelles. From this observation arises naturally a naive question: How do cells die when the mitochondrion, the cornerstone of apoptotic process, is absent? Data strongly suggest that the mitochondrion and the hydrogenosome arose from a common ancestral endosymbiont. But hydrogenosomes do not appear to directly substitute for mitochondria in apoptotic functions. Thus, it appears judicious to examine more closely the genome of unicellular cells, which do not harbor mitochondria, and search for new molecules that could participate in the apoptotic process in these microorganisms.

  10. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases. PMID:26134242

  11. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha; Renard, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases.

  12. Iron targeting to mitochondria in erythroid cells.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P; Sheftel, A D; Zhang, A-S

    2002-08-01

    Immature erythroid cells have an exceptionally high capacity to synthesize haem that is, at least in part, the result of the unique control of iron metabolism in these cells. In erythroid cells the vast majority of Fe released from endosomes must cross both the outer and the inner mitochondrial membranes to reach ferrochelatase, which inserts Fe into protoporphyrin IX. Based on the fact that Fe is specifically targeted into erythroid mitochondria, we have proposed that a transient mitochondria-endosome interaction is involved in Fe transfer to ferrochelatase [Ponka (1997) Blood 89, 1-25]. In this study, we examined whether the inhibition of endosome mobility within erythroid cells would decrease the rate of (59)Fe incorporation into haem. We found that, in reticulocytes, the myosin light-chain kinase inhibitor, wortmannin, and the calmodulin antagonist, W-7, caused significant inhibition of (59)Fe incorporation from (59)Fe-transferrin-labelled endosomes into haem. These results, together with confocal microscopy studies using transferrin and mitochondria labelled by distinct fluorescent markers, suggest that, in erythroid cells, endosome mobility, and perhaps their contact with mitochondria, plays an important role in a highly efficient utilization of iron for haem synthesis.

  13. Mitochondria, cholesterol and cancer cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2016-12-01

    Given the role of mitochondria in oxygen consumption, metabolism and cell death regulation, alterations in mitochondrial function or dysregulation of cell death pathways contribute to the genesis and progression of cancer. Cancer cells exhibit an array of metabolic transformations induced by mutations leading to gain-of-function of oncogenes and loss-of-function of tumor suppressor genes that include increased glucose consumption, reduced mitochondrial respiration, increased reactive oxygen species generation and cell death resistance, all of which ensure cancer progression. Cholesterol metabolism is disturbed in cancer cells and supports uncontrolled cell growth. In particular, the accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria emerges as a molecular component that orchestrates some of these metabolic alterations in cancer cells by impairing mitochondrial function. As a consequence, mitochondrial cholesterol loading in cancer cells may contribute, in part, to the Warburg effect stimulating aerobic glycolysis to meet the energetic demand of proliferating cells, while protecting cancer cells against mitochondrial apoptosis due to changes in mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Further understanding the complexity in the metabolic alterations of cancer cells, mediated largely through alterations in mitochondrial function, may pave the way to identify more efficient strategies for cancer treatment involving the use of small molecules targeting mitochondria, cholesterol homeostasis/trafficking and specific metabolic pathways. PMID:27455839

  14. Resveratrol Modulates Mitochondria Dynamics in Replicative Senescent Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Han; Chang, Ko-Wei; Chen, Ying-Chieh; Chang, Chuang-Rung

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria form a reticulum network dynamically fuse and divide in the cell. The balance between mitochondria fusion and fission is correlated to the shape, activity and integrity of these pivotal organelles. Resveratrol is a polyphenol antioxidant that can extend life span in yeast and worm. This study examined mitochondria dynamics in replicative senescent yeast cells as well as the effects of resveratrol on mitochondria fusion and fission. Collecting cells by biotin-streptavidin sorting method revealed that majority of the replicative senescent cells bear fragmented mitochondrial network, indicating mitochondria dynamics favors fission. Resveratrol treatment resulted in a reduction in the ratio of senescent yeast cells with fragmented mitochondria. The readjustment of mitochondria dynamics induced by resveratrol likely derives from altered expression profiles of fusion and fission genes. Our results demonstrate that resveratrol serves not only as an antioxidant, but also a compound that can mitigate mitochondria fragmentation in replicative senescent yeast cells. PMID:25098588

  15. Mitochondria and Energetic Depression in Cell Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Seppet, Enn; Gruno, Marju; Peetsalu, Ants; Gizatullina, Zemfira; Nguyen, Huu Phuc; Vielhaber, Stefan; Wussling, Manfred H.P.; Trumbeckaite, Sonata; Arandarcikaite, Odeta; Jerzembeck, Doreen; Sonnabend, Maria; Jegorov, Katharina; Zierz, Stephan; Striggow, Frank; Gellerich, Frank N.

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of almost all diseases. Acquired or inherited mutations of the mitochondrial genome DNA may give rise to mitochondrial diseases. Another class of disorders, in which mitochondrial impairments are initiated by extramitochondrial factors, includes neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes resulting from typical pathological processes, such as hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, intoxications, and carcinogenesis. Both classes of diseases lead to cellular energetic depression (CED), which is characterized by decreased cytosolic phosphorylation potential that suppresses the cell’s ability to do work and control the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and its redox state. If progressing, CED leads to cell death, whose type is linked to the functional status of the mitochondria. In the case of limited deterioration, when some amounts of ATP can still be generated due to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria launch the apoptotic cell death program by release of cytochrome c. Following pronounced CED, cytoplasmic ATP levels fall below the thresholds required for processing the ATP-dependent apoptotic cascade and the cell dies from necrosis. Both types of death can be grouped together as a mitochondrial cell death (MCD). However, there exist multiple adaptive reactions aimed at protecting cells against CED. In this context, a metabolic shift characterized by suppression of OXPHOS combined with activation of aerobic glycolysis as the main pathway for ATP synthesis (Warburg effect) is of central importance. Whereas this type of adaptation is sufficiently effective to avoid CED and to control the cellular redox state, thereby ensuring the cell survival, it also favors the avoidance of apoptotic cell death. This scenario may underlie uncontrolled cellular proliferation and growth, eventually resulting in carcinogenesis. PMID:19564950

  16. Hepatitis C virus, mitochondria and auto/mitophagy: exploiting a host defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Vitalba; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Pazienza, Valerio; Andriulli, Angelo; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2014-03-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major reason for liver transplantation and the main cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in a great number of countries. As for the other viruses, this pathogen interferes in more than one process and in more than one way with host cell biology. A mounting body of evidence points, in particular, toward the drastic alterations of mitochondrial physiology and functions that virus is able to induce, albeit the mechanisms have partly remained elusive. Role of the mitochondria in immunity and in quality control systems, as autophagy, as well as the strategies that HCV has evolved to evade and even to manipulate mitochondrial surveillance for its benefit, highlights the importance of deepening the mechanisms that modulate this virus-mitochondrion interaction, not only to intensify our knowledge of the HCV infection pathogenesis but also to design efficient antiviral strategies.

  17. Evaluation of respiration of mitochondria in cancer cells exposed to mitochondria-targeted agents.

    PubMed

    Kluckova, Katarina; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bajzikova, Martina; Rohlena, Jakub; Neuzil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Respiration is one of the major functions of mitochondria, whereby these vital organelles use oxygen to produce energy. Many agents that may be of potential clinical relevance act by targeting mitochondria, where they may suppress mitochondrial respiration. It is therefore important to evaluate this process and understand how this is modulated by small molecules. Here, we describe the general methodology to assess respiration in cultured cells, followed by the evaluation of the effect of one anticancer agent targeted to mitochondria on this process, and also how to assess this in tumor tissue.

  18. Localization of Mitochondria in Living Cells with Rhodamine 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lincoln V.; Walsh, Marcia L.; Chen, Lan Bo

    1980-02-01

    The laser dye rhodamine 123 is shown to be a specific probe for the localization of mitochondria in living cells. By virtue of its selectivity for mitochondria and its fluorescent properties, the detectability of mitochondria stained with rhodamine 123 is significantly improved over that provided by conventional light microscopic techniques. With the use of rhodamine 123, it is possible to detect alterations in mitochondrial distribution following transformation by Rous sarcoma virus and changes in the shape and organization of mitochondria induced by colchicine treatment.

  19. Magnetomitotransfer: An efficient way for direct mitochondria transfer into cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Macheiner, Tanja; Fengler, Vera Heike Ingeborg; Agreiter, Marlene; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank; Kolb, Dagmar; Huppertz, Berthold; Ackbar, Richard; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    In the course of mitochondrial diseases standard care mostly focuses on treatment of symptoms, while therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring mitochondrial function are currently still in development. The transfer of healthy or modified mitochondria into host cells would open up the possibilities of new cell therapies. Therefore, in this study, a novel method of mitochondrial transfer is proposed by anti-TOM22 magnetic bead-labeled mitochondria with the assistance of a magnetic plate. In comparison to the passive transfer method, the magnetomitotransfer method was more efficient at transferring mitochondria into cells (78–92% vs 0–17% over 3 days). This transfer was also more rapid, with a high ratio of magnetomitotransferred cells and high density of transferred mitochondria within the first day of culture. Importantly, transferred mitochondria appeared to be functional as they strongly enhanced respiration in magnetomitotransferred cells. The novel method of magnetomitotransfer may offer potential for therapeutic approaches for treatment of a variety of mitochondria-associated pathologies, e.g. various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27767193

  20. Cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria in plants.

    PubMed

    Gurdon, Csanad; Svab, Zora; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Maliga, Pal

    2016-03-22

    We report cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria through a graft junction. Mitochondrial movement was discovered in an experiment designed to select for chloroplast transfer from Nicotiana sylvestris into Nicotiana tabacum cells. The alloplasmic N. tabacum line we used carries Nicotiana undulata cytoplasmic genomes, and its flowers are male sterile due to the foreign mitochondrial genome. Thus, rare mitochondrial DNA transfer from N. sylvestris to N. tabacum could be recognized by restoration of fertile flower anatomy. Analyses of the mitochondrial genomes revealed extensive recombination, tentatively linking male sterility to orf293, a mitochondrial gene causing homeotic conversion of anthers into petals. Demonstrating cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria reconstructs the evolutionary process of horizontal mitochondrial DNA transfer and enables modification of the mitochondrial genome by DNA transmitted from a sexually incompatible species. Conversion of anthers into petals is a visual marker that can be useful for mitochondrial transformation. PMID:26951647

  1. Cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria in plants

    PubMed Central

    Gurdon, Csanad; Svab, Zora; Feng, Yaping; Kumar, Dibyendu; Maliga, Pal

    2016-01-01

    We report cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria through a graft junction. Mitochondrial movement was discovered in an experiment designed to select for chloroplast transfer from Nicotiana sylvestris into Nicotiana tabacum cells. The alloplasmic N. tabacum line we used carries Nicotiana undulata cytoplasmic genomes, and its flowers are male sterile due to the foreign mitochondrial genome. Thus, rare mitochondrial DNA transfer from N. sylvestris to N. tabacum could be recognized by restoration of fertile flower anatomy. Analyses of the mitochondrial genomes revealed extensive recombination, tentatively linking male sterility to orf293, a mitochondrial gene causing homeotic conversion of anthers into petals. Demonstrating cell-to-cell movement of mitochondria reconstructs the evolutionary process of horizontal mitochondrial DNA transfer and enables modification of the mitochondrial genome by DNA transmitted from a sexually incompatible species. Conversion of anthers into petals is a visual marker that can be useful for mitochondrial transformation. PMID:26951647

  2. Licensed to Kill: Mitochondria, Chloroplasts, and Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Van Aken, Olivier; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is crucial in plant organogenesis and survival. In this review the involvement of mitochondria and chloroplasts in PCD execution is critically assessed. Recent findings support a central role for mitochondria in PCD, with newly identified components of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (mETC), FOF1 ATP synthase, cardiolipins, and ATPase AtOM66. While chloroplasts received less attention, their contribution to PCD is well supported, suggesting that they possibly contribute by producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of light or even contribute through cytochrome f release. Finally we discuss two working models where mitochondria and chloroplasts could cooperatively execute PCD: mitochondria initiate the commitment steps and recruit chloroplasts for swift execution or, alternatively, mitochondria and chloroplasts could operate in parallel.

  3. miRNAs in mtDNA-less cell mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, N; Peng, Y; Tan, Z; Ciraolo, G; Wang, D; Li, R

    2015-01-01

    The novel regulation mechanism in mtDNA-less cells was investigated. Very low mtDNA copy in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was identified. But no 13 mitochondria-specific proteins were translated in 206 ρ° cells. Their mitochondrial respiration complexes V, III and II were 86.5, 29.4 and 49.6% of 143B cells, respectively. Complexes I and IV completely lack in 206 ρ° cells. Non-mitochondrial respiration to generate ATP in 206 ρ° cells was discovered. The expression levels of some mitochondrial RNAs including 12S rRNA, COX1, COX2, COX3, ND4 and ND5 were low. However, ND1, ND3 and Cyto b were not expressed in 206 ρ° cells. Unequal transcription of mitochondrial RNAs indicated the post-transcriptional cleavage and processing mechanisms in the regulation of mitochondrial gene expression in 206 ρ° cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may modulate these mitochondrial RNA expression in these cells. RNA-induced silencing complex indeed within 206 ρ° cell mitochondria indicated miRNAs in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miRNA profile in mtDNA-less 206 ρ° cells was studied by next-generation sequencing of small RNAs. Several mitochondria-enriched miRNAs such as miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p were identified in 206 ρ° cell mitochondria. miR-181c-5p and miR-146a-5p had 23 and 19 potential targets on mitochondrial RNAs respectively, and these two miRNAs had multiple targets on mitochondria-associated messenger RNAs encoded by nuclear genes. These data provided the first direct evidence that miRNAs were imported into mitochondria and regulated mitochondrial RNA expressions. PMID:27551440

  4. Late acquisition of mitochondria by a host with chimaeric prokaryotic ancestry.

    PubMed

    Pittis, Alexandros A; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-03-01

    The origin of eukaryotes stands as a major conundrum in biology. Current evidence indicates that the last eukaryotic common ancestor already possessed many eukaryotic hallmarks, including a complex subcellular organization. In addition, the lack of evolutionary intermediates challenges the elucidation of the relative order of emergence of eukaryotic traits. Mitochondria are ubiquitous organelles derived from an alphaproteobacterial endosymbiont. Different hypotheses disagree on whether mitochondria were acquired early or late during eukaryogenesis. Similarly, the nature and complexity of the receiving host are debated, with models ranging from a simple prokaryotic host to an already complex proto-eukaryote. Most competing scenarios can be roughly grouped into either mito-early, which consider the driving force of eukaryogenesis to be mitochondrial endosymbiosis into a simple host, or mito-late, which postulate that a significant complexity predated mitochondrial endosymbiosis. Here we provide evidence for late mitochondrial endosymbiosis. We use phylogenomics to directly test whether proto-mitochondrial proteins were acquired earlier or later than other proteins of the last eukaryotic common ancestor. We find that last eukaryotic common ancestor protein families of alphaproteobacterial ancestry and of mitochondrial localization show the shortest phylogenetic distances to their closest prokaryotic relatives, compared with proteins of different prokaryotic origin or cellular localization. Altogether, our results shed new light on a long-standing question and provide compelling support for the late acquisition of mitochondria into a host that already had a proteome of chimaeric phylogenetic origin. We argue that mitochondrial endosymbiosis was one of the ultimate steps in eukaryogenesis and that it provided the definitive selective advantage to mitochondria-bearing eukaryotes over less complex forms.

  5. Late acquisition of mitochondria by a host with chimeric prokaryotic ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Pittis, Alexandros A.; Gabaldón, Toni

    2016-01-01

    The origin of eukaryotes stands as a major conundrum in biology1. Current evidence indicates that the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA) already possessed many eukaryotic hallmarks, including a complex subcellular organization1–3. In addition, the lack of evolutionary intermediates challenges the elucidation of the relative order of emergence of eukaryotic traits. Mitochondria are ubiquitous organelles derived from an alpha-proteobacterial endosymbiont4. Different hypotheses disagree on whether mitochondria were acquired early or late during eukaryogenesis5. Similarly, the nature and complexity of the receiving host are debated, with models ranging from a simple prokaryotic host to an already complex proto-eukaryote1,3,6,7. Most competing scenarios can be roughly grouped into either mito-early, which consider the driving force of eukaryogenesis to be mitochondrial endosymbiosis into a simple host, or mito-late, which postulate that a significant complexity predated mitochondrial endosymbiosis3. Here we provide evidence for late mitochondrial endosymbiosis. We used phylogenomics to directly test whether proto-mitochondrial proteins were acquired earlier or later than other LECA proteins. We found that LECA protein families of alpha-proteobacterial ancestry and of mitochondrial localization show the shortest phylogenetic distances to their closest prokaryotic relatives, when compared to proteins of different prokaryotic origin or cellular localization. Altogether, our results shed new light on a long-standing question and provide compelling support for the late acquisition of mitochondria into a host that already had a proteome of chimeric phylogenetic origin. We argue that mitochondrial endosymbiosis was one of the ultimate steps in eukaryogenesis and that it provided the definitive selective advantage to mitochondria-bearing eukaryotes over less complex forms. PMID:26840490

  6. [Protomitohondria of Liver Cells, Their Similarities and Differences between Mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Begunova, E A; Vekshin, N L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we continue the study of a number of properties of protomitochondria--small young mitochondrial organelles in the animal cells. Protomitochondria were obtained by filtration of total suspension of mitochondria of rat liver through Millipore filters. Protomitochondria contain an active respiratory chain as evidenced by the high rate of oxygen consumption during succinate and NADH oxidation. A shunt succinate:tetrazolium-reductase activity of protomitochondria was lower and NADH-tetrazolium-reductase activity was higher than that in mitochondria. Electrophoresis and gel filtration found no qualitative differences between protomitochondria, 0.25-0.45 μm in diameter, and mitochondria in major protein composition, but some quantitative differences in several bands were found. Perhaps, these differences reflect the process of intracellular maturation of protomitochondria to mitochondria. The data obtained are important for understanding the mitochondriogenesis in the animal cells. PMID:26841504

  7. Mitochondria. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of mitochondrial preprotein translocase.

    PubMed

    Harbauer, Angelika B; Opalińska, Magdalena; Gerbeth, Carolin; Herman, Josip S; Rao, Sanjana; Schönfisch, Birgit; Guiard, Bernard; Schmidt, Oliver; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Meisinger, Chris

    2014-11-28

    Mitochondria play central roles in cellular energy conversion, metabolism, and apoptosis. Mitochondria import more than 1000 different proteins from the cytosol. It is unknown if the mitochondrial protein import machinery is connected to the cell division cycle. We found that the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1 stimulated assembly of the main mitochondrial entry gate, the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM), in mitosis. The molecular mechanism involved phosphorylation of the cytosolic precursor of Tom6 by cyclin Clb3-activated Cdk1, leading to enhanced import of Tom6 into mitochondria. Tom6 phosphorylation promoted assembly of the protein import channel Tom40 and import of fusion proteins, thus stimulating the respiratory activity of mitochondria in mitosis. Tom6 phosphorylation provides a direct means for regulating mitochondrial biogenesis and activity in a cell cycle-specific manner.

  8. Construction of photoenergetic mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Kiyotaka Y.; Wada, Takeyoshi; Kino, Kuniki; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    The proton motive force (PMF) is bio-energetically important for various cellular reactions to occur. We developed PMF-photogenerating mitochondria in cultured mammalian cells. An archaebacterial rhodopsin, delta-rhodopsin, which is a light-driven proton pump derived from Haloterrigena turkmenica, was expressed in the mitochondria of CHO-K1 cells. The constructed stable CHO-K1 cell lines showed suppression of cell death induced by rotenone, a pesticide that inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity involved in PMF generation through the electron transport chain. Delta-rhodopsin was also introduced into the mitochondria of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The constructed stable SH-SY5Y cell lines showed suppression of dopaminergic neuronal cell death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), an inducer of Parkinson's disease models, which acts through inhibition of complex I activity. These results suggest that the light-activated proton pump functioned as a PMF generator in the mitochondria of mammalian cells, and suppressed cell death induced by inhibition of respiratory PMF generation. PMID:23567447

  9. Targeting Mitochondria with Avocatin B Induces Selective Leukemia Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eric A; Angka, Leonard; Rota, Sarah-Grace; Hanlon, Thomas; Mitchell, Andrew; Hurren, Rose; Wang, Xiao Ming; Gronda, Marcela; Boyaci, Ezel; Bojko, Barbara; Minden, Mark; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Datti, Alessandro; Wrana, Jeffery L; Edginton, Andrea; Pawliszyn, Janusz; Joseph, Jamie W; Quadrilatero, Joe; Schimmer, Aaron D; Spagnuolo, Paul A

    2015-06-15

    Treatment regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) continue to offer weak clinical outcomes. Through a high-throughput cell-based screen, we identified avocatin B, a lipid derived from avocado fruit, as a novel compound with cytotoxic activity in AML. Avocatin B reduced human primary AML cell viability without effect on normal peripheral blood stem cells. Functional stem cell assays demonstrated selectivity toward AML progenitor and stem cells without effects on normal hematopoietic stem cells. Mechanistic investigations indicated that cytotoxicity relied on mitochondrial localization, as cells lacking functional mitochondria or CPT1, the enzyme that facilitates mitochondria lipid transport, were insensitive to avocatin B. Furthermore, avocatin B inhibited fatty acid oxidation and decreased NADPH levels, resulting in ROS-dependent leukemia cell death characterized by the release of mitochondrial proteins, apoptosis-inducing factor, and cytochrome c. This study reveals a novel strategy for selective leukemia cell eradication based on a specific difference in mitochondrial function. PMID:26077472

  10. Mutation of mitochondria genome: trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 80 years ago, scientist Otto Warburg originated a hypothesis that the cause of cancer is primarily a defect in energy metabolism. Following studies showed that mitochondria impact carcinogenesis to remodel somatic cells to cancer cells through modifying the genome, through maintenance the tumorigenic phenotype, and through apoptosis. And the Endosymbiotic Theory explains the origin of mitochondria and eukaryotes, on the other hands, the mitochondria also can fall back. Compared to chromosome genomes, the mitochondria genomes were not restricted by introns so they were mutated(fall back) easy. The result is that mitochondria lose function and internal environment of somatic cell become acid and evoked chromosome genomes to mutate, in the end somatic cells become cancer cells. It is the trigger of somatic cell transforming to cancer cell that mitochondria genome happen mutation and lose function. PMID:20181100

  11. Abnormal apocrine secretory cell mitochondria in a Huntington disease patient.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulos, Christos; LeWitt, Peter; Hashimoto, Ken

    2012-12-15

    Over two decades, a 42-year old woman experienced the gradual onset of choreic involuntary movements, dystonia, and tics. Decreased caudate nucleus metabolism on 2-deoxyglucose PET scan and a heterozygous 49-CAG repeat expansion within the HTT gene established the diagnosis of HD, although no other family history was known. An axillary skin biopsy revealed a distinctive abnormality of mitochondria limited to the apocrine secretory cells on electron microscopy. All mitochondria were transformed into rounded structures with disrupted cristae and prominent myelin figures; many were enlarged up to 4 times the normal. Cytoplasm of apocrine secretory cells showed an abundance of lipid vacuoles, empty vesicles, and dense bodies. Biopsied skeletal muscle histology (light microscopy) was normal, as was a mitochondrial metabolism study. Biopsies from other HD patients have shown similar mitochondrial changes in cerebral neurons, muscle, fibroblasts, and lymphoblasts, adding to evidence for a systemic disturbance of mitochondria in HD.

  12. MitoCeption as a new tool to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell mitochondria on cancer cell metabolism and function

    PubMed Central

    Caicedo, Andrés; Fritz, Vanessa; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Ayala, Mickaël; Dennemont, Indira; Abdellaoui, Naoill; de Fraipont, Florence; Moisan, Anaïck; Prouteau, Claire Angebault; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Jorgensen, Christian; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial activity is central to tissue homeostasis. Mitochondria dysfunction constitutes a hallmark of many genetic diseases and plays a key role in tumor progression. The essential role of mitochondria, added to their recently documented capacity to transfer from cell to cell, obviously contributes to their current interest. However, determining the proper role of mitochondria in defined biological contexts was hampered by the lack of suitable experimental tools. We designed a protocol (MitoCeption) to directly and quantitatively transfer mitochondria, isolated from cell type A, to recipient cell type B. We validated and quantified the effective mitochondria transfer by imaging, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mitochondrial DNA analysis. We show that the transfer of minute amounts of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) mitochondria to cancer cells, a process otherwise occurring naturally in coculture, results in cancer cell enhanced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity and favors cancer cell proliferation and invasion. The MitoCeption technique, which can be applied to different cell systems, will therefore be a method of choice to analyze the metabolic modifications induced by exogenous mitochondria in host cells. PMID:25766410

  13. Poxvirus host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian Ingo; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Poxviruses are characterized by their large size, complex composition, and cytoplasmic life cycle. They produce two types of infectious particles: mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both MVs and EVs of vaccinia virus, the model poxvirus, take advantage of host cell endocytosis for internalization: they activate macropinocytosis-the most suitable form of endocytosis for large particles. Although largely dependent on the same cellular machinery, MV and EV entry differs with regard to the mechanisms used to trigger macropinocytosis and to undergo fusion. While EVs have to shed an additional membrane to expose the fusion complex, MV fusion requires the inactivation of fusion inhibitory proteins absent in EVs. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of poxvirus MV and EV cell entry. PMID:22440962

  14. Light-dependent intracellular positioning of mitochondria in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Sayeedul; Niwa, Yasuo; Takagi, Shingo

    2009-06-01

    Mitochondria, the power house of the cell, are one of the most dynamic cell organelles. Although there are several reports on actin- or microtubule-dependent movement of mitochondria in plant cells, intracellular positioning and motility of mitochondria under different light conditions remain open questions. Mitochondria were visualized in living Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells using green fluorescent protein fused to a mitochondrion-targeting signal. In darkness, mitochondria were distributed randomly in palisade cells. In contrast, mitochondria accumulated along the periclinal walls, similar to the accumulation response of chloroplasts, when treated with weak blue light (470 nm, 4 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). Under strong blue light (100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)), mitochondria occupied the anticlinal positions similar to the avoidance response of chloroplasts and nuclei. While strong red light (660 nm, 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) induced the accumulation of mitochondria along the inner periclinal walls, green light exhibited little effect on the distribution of mitochondria. In addition, the mode of movement of individual mitochondria along the outer periclinal walls under different light conditions was precisely analyzed by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. A gradual increase in the number of static mitochondria located in the vicinity of chloroplasts with a time period of blue light illumination clearly demonstrated the accumulation response of mitochondria. Light-induced co-localization of mitochondria with chloroplasts strongly suggested their mutual metabolic interactions. This is the first characterization of the light-dependent redistribution of mitochondria in plant cells.

  15. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  16. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  17. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R; Mascareñas, José L

    2016-01-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential. PMID:27600651

  18. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients.

  19. Mitochondria in human pluripotent stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    TeSlaa, Tara; Setoguchi, Kiyoko; Teitell, Michael A

    2016-04-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have great potential in regenerative medicine because they can differentiate into any cell type in the body. Genome integrity is vital for human development and for high fidelity passage of genetic information across generations through the germ line. To ensure genome stability, hPSCs maintain a lower rate of mutation than somatic cells and undergo rapid apoptosis in response to DNA damage and additional cell stresses. Furthermore, cellular metabolism and the cell cycle are also differentially regulated between cells in pluripotent and differentiated states and can aid in protecting hPSCs against DNA damage and damaged cell propagation. Despite these safeguards, clinical use of hPSC derivatives could be compromised by tumorigenic potential and possible malignant transformation from failed to differentiate cells. Since hPSCs and mature cells differentially respond to cell stress, it may be possible to specifically target undifferentiated cells for rapid apoptosis in mixed cell populations to enable safer use of hPSC-differentiated cells in patients. PMID:26828436

  20. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    PubMed

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  1. Energy transfer in "parasitic" cancer metabolism: mitochondria are the powerhouse and Achilles' heel of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Tykocinski, Mark L; Nagajyothi, Fnu; Machado, Fabiana S; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2011-12-15

    It is now widely recognized that the tumor microenvironment promotes cancer cell growth and metastasis via changes in cytokine secretion and extracellular matrix remodeling. However, the role of tumor stromal cells in providing energy for epithelial cancer cell growth is a newly emerging paradigm. For example, we and others have recently proposed that tumor growth and metastasis is related to an energy imbalance. Host cells produce energy-rich nutrients via catabolism (through autophagy, mitophagy, and aerobic glycolysis), which are then transferred to cancer cells to fuel anabolic tumor growth. Stromal cell-derived L-lactate is taken up by cancer cells and is used for mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to produce ATP efficiently. However, "parasitic" energy transfer may be a more generalized mechanism in cancer biology than previously appreciated. Two recent papers in Science and Nature Medicine now show that lipolysis in host tissues also fuels tumor growth. These studies demonstrate that free fatty acids produced by host cell lipolysis are re-used via beta-oxidation (beta-OX) in cancer cell mitochondria. Thus, stromal catabolites (such as lactate, ketones, glutamine and free fatty acids) promote tumor growth by acting as high-energy onco-metabolites. As such, host catabolism, via autophagy, mitophagy and lipolysis, may explain the pathogenesis of cancer-associated cachexia and provides exciting new druggable targets for novel therapeutic interventions. Taken together, these findings also suggest that tumor cells promote their own growth and survival by behaving as a "parasitic organism." Hence, we propose the term "Parasitic Cancer Metabolism" to describe this type of metabolic coupling in tumors. Targeting tumor cell mitochondria (OXPHOS and beta-OX) would effectively uncouple tumor cells from their hosts, leading to their acute starvation. In this context, we discuss new evidence that high-energy onco-metabolites (produced by the stroma) can

  2. Red blood cell extrudes nucleus and mitochondria against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Cheng, Jian; Xu, Fei; Chen, Yang-Er; Du, Jun-Bo; Yuan, Ming; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Xiao-Chao; Yuan, Shu

    2011-07-01

    Mammal red blood cells (erythrocytes) contain neither nucleus nor mitochondria. Traditional theory suggests that the presence of a nucleus would prevent big nucleated erythrocytes to squeeze through these small capillaries. However, nucleus is too small to hinder erythrocyte deformation. And, there is no sound reason to abandon mitochondria for the living cells. Here, we found that mammal erythrocyte reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels kept stable under diabetes, ischemia reperfusion, and malaria conditions or in vitro sugar/heme treatments, whereas bird erythrocyte ROS levels increased dramatically in these circumstances. Nuclear and mitochondrial extrusion may help mammal erythrocytes to better adapt to high-sugar and high-heme conditions by limiting ROS generation. PMID:21698761

  3. Mitochondria, calcium and cell death: A deadly triad in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Celsi, Fulvio; Pizzo, Paola; Brini, Marisa; Leo, Sara; Fotino, Carmen; Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation is a tightly controlled process, in turn regulating functions as diverse as aerobic metabolism and induction of cell death. The link between Ca2+ (dys)regulation, mitochondria and cellular derangement is particularly evident in neurodegenerative disorders, in which genetic models and environmental factors allowed to identify common traits in the pathogenic routes. We will here summarize: i) the current view of mechanisms and functions of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis, ii) the basic principles of organelle Ca2+ transport, iii) the role of Ca2+ in neuronal cell death, and iv) the new information on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's, Huntington's and Parkinson's diseases, highlighting the role of Ca2+ and mitochondria. PMID:19268425

  4. Isolation of mitochondria by gentle cell membrane disruption, and their subsequent characterization.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takahiro; Yamashita, Saki; Hirusaki, Kotoe; Katoh, Kaoru; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in several physiological processes as in integrating signals in the cell. However, understanding of the mechanism by which mitochondria sense and respond to signals has been limited due to the lack of an appropriate model system. In this study, we developed a method to isolate and characterize mitochondria without cell homogenization. By gently pipetting cells treated with streptolysin-O, a pore-forming membrane protein, we disrupted the cell membrane and were able to isolate both elongated and spherical mitochondria. Fluorescence imaging combined with super resolution microscopy showed that both the outer and inner membranes of the elongated mitochondria isolated using the newly developed method were intact. In addition, a FRET-based ATP sensor expressed in the mitochondrial matrix demonstrated that ATP generation by FoF1-ATPase in the isolated elongated mitochondria was as high as that in intracellular mitochondria. On the other hand, some of the spherical mitochondria isolated with this method had the outer membrane that no longer encapsulated the inner membrane. In addition, all mitochondria isolated using conventional procedures involving homogenization were spherical, many of them had damaged membranes, and low levels of ATP generation. Our results suggest that elongated mitochondria isolated from cells through gentle cell membrane disruption using a pore-forming protein tend to be more similar to intracellular mitochondria, having an intact membrane system and higher activity than spherical mitochondria.

  5. Mitochondria, the Cell Cycle, and the Origin of Sex via a Syncytial Eukaryote Common Ancestor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sriram G; Martin, William F

    2016-01-01

    Theories for the origin of sex traditionally start with an asexual mitosing cell and add recombination, thereby deriving meiosis from mitosis. Though sex was clearly present in the eukaryote common ancestor, the order of events linking the origin of sex and the origin of mitosis is unknown. Here, we present an evolutionary inference for the origin of sex starting with a bacterial ancestor of mitochondria in the cytosol of its archaeal host. We posit that symbiotic association led to the origin of mitochondria and gene transfer to host's genome, generating a nucleus and a dedicated translational compartment, the eukaryotic cytosol, in which-by virtue of mitochondria-metabolic energy was not limiting. Spontaneous protein aggregation (monomer polymerization) and Adenosine Tri-phosphate (ATP)-dependent macromolecular movement in the cytosol thereby became selectable, giving rise to continuous microtubule-dependent chromosome separation (reduction division). We propose that eukaryotic chromosome division arose in a filamentous, syncytial, multinucleated ancestor, in which nuclei with insufficient chromosome numbers could complement each other through mRNA in the cytosol and generate new chromosome combinations through karyogamy. A syncytial (or coenocytic, a synonym) eukaryote ancestor, or Coeca, would account for the observation that the process of eukaryotic chromosome separation is more conserved than the process of eukaryotic cell division. The first progeny of such a syncytial ancestor were likely equivalent to meiospores, released into the environment by the host's vesicle secretion machinery. The natural ability of archaea (the host) to fuse and recombine brought forth reciprocal recombination among fusing (syngamy and karyogamy) progeny-sex-in an ancestrally meiotic cell cycle, from which the simpler haploid and diploid mitotic cell cycles arose. The origin of eukaryotes was the origin of vertical lineage inheritance, and sex was required to keep vertically

  6. Mitochondria, the Cell Cycle, and the Origin of Sex via a Syncytial Eukaryote Common Ancestor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Sriram G; Martin, William F

    2016-07-02

    Theories for the origin of sex traditionally start with an asexual mitosing cell and add recombination, thereby deriving meiosis from mitosis. Though sex was clearly present in the eukaryote common ancestor, the order of events linking the origin of sex and the origin of mitosis is unknown. Here, we present an evolutionary inference for the origin of sex starting with a bacterial ancestor of mitochondria in the cytosol of its archaeal host. We posit that symbiotic association led to the origin of mitochondria and gene transfer to host's genome, generating a nucleus and a dedicated translational compartment, the eukaryotic cytosol, in which-by virtue of mitochondria-metabolic energy was not limiting. Spontaneous protein aggregation (monomer polymerization) and Adenosine Tri-phosphate (ATP)-dependent macromolecular movement in the cytosol thereby became selectable, giving rise to continuous microtubule-dependent chromosome separation (reduction division). We propose that eukaryotic chromosome division arose in a filamentous, syncytial, multinucleated ancestor, in which nuclei with insufficient chromosome numbers could complement each other through mRNA in the cytosol and generate new chromosome combinations through karyogamy. A syncytial (or coenocytic, a synonym) eukaryote ancestor, or Coeca, would account for the observation that the process of eukaryotic chromosome separation is more conserved than the process of eukaryotic cell division. The first progeny of such a syncytial ancestor were likely equivalent to meiospores, released into the environment by the host's vesicle secretion machinery. The natural ability of archaea (the host) to fuse and recombine brought forth reciprocal recombination among fusing (syngamy and karyogamy) progeny-sex-in an ancestrally meiotic cell cycle, from which the simpler haploid and diploid mitotic cell cycles arose. The origin of eukaryotes was the origin of vertical lineage inheritance, and sex was required to keep vertically

  7. Some aspects of fatty acid oxidation in isolated fat-cell mitochondria from rat.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, R D; Saggerson, E D

    1975-01-01

    Mitochondrial were prepared from fat-cells isolated from rat epididymal adipose tissues of fed and 48 h-starved rats to study some aspects of fatty acid oxidation in this tissue. The data were compared with values obtained in parallel experiments with liver mitochondria that were prepared and incubated under identical conditions. 2. In the presence of malonate, fluorocitrate and arsenite, malate, but not pyruvate-bicarbonate, facilitated palmitoyl-group oxidation in both types of mitochondria. In the presence of malate, fat-cell mitochondria exhibited slightly higher rates of palmitoylcarnitine oxidation than liver. Rates of octanoylcarnitine oxidation were similar in liver and fat-cell mitochondria. Uncoupling stimulated acylcarnitine oxidation in liver, but not in fat-cell mitochondria. Oxidation of palmitoyl- and octanoyl-carnitine was partially additive in fat-cell but not in liver mitochondria. Starvation for 48 h significantly decreased both palmitoylcarnitine oxidation and latent carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity in fat-cell mitochondria. Starvation increased latent carnitine palmitoyltransferase activity in liver mitochondria but did not alter palmitoylcarnitine oxidation. These results suggested that palmitoylcarnitine oxidation in fat-cell but not in liver mitochondria may be limited by carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 activity. 3. Fat-cell mitochondria also differed from liver mitochondria in exhibiting considerably lower rates of carnitine-dependent oxidation of palmitoyl-CoA or palmitate, suggesting that carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activity may severely rate-limit palmitoyl-CoA oxidation in adipose tissue. PMID:1227502

  8. Functional activity of mitochondria in cultured neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, E Yu; Marei, M V; Podgornyi, O V; Aleksandrova, M A; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2006-01-01

    We studied mitochondrial transmembrane potential of neural precursor cells forming neurospheres in culture. Uneven energization of mitochondria in neurosphere cells was detected. Heterogeneity of cells by the mitochondrial potential increased with neurosphere enlargement during culturing. Decrease in the mitochondrial potential in the central cells in large spheres, presumably caused by insufficient diffusion of oxygen and nutrients, can provoke their damage and death. Population of cells with high mitochondrial potential responded to addition of the nuclear dye by a decrease in mitochondrial potential, which can indicate functioning of ABCG2 complex in these cells, characteristic of undifferentiated stem cells. These data will help to create optimum conditions for culturing of neural stem cells for the maintenance of their maximum functional and proliferative activity. PMID:16929986

  9. From microbiology to cell biology: when an intracellular bacterium becomes part of its host cell.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, John P

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are now called organelles, but they used to be bacteria. As they transitioned from endosymbionts to organelles, they became more and more integrated into the biochemistry and cell biology of their hosts. Work over the last 15 years has shown that other symbioses show striking similarities to mitochondria and chloroplasts. In particular, many sap-feeding insects house intracellular bacteria that have genomes that overlap mitochondria and chloroplasts in terms of size and coding capacity. The massive levels of gene loss in some of these bacteria suggest that they, too, are becoming highly integrated with their host cells. Understanding these bacteria will require inspiration from eukaryotic cell biology, because a traditional microbiological framework is insufficient for understanding how they work.

  10. Xenogenic transfer of isolated murine mitochondria into human rho0 cells can improve respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Katrangi, Eyad; D'Souza, Gerard; Boddapati, Sarathi V; Kulawiec, Mariola; Singh, Keshav K; Bigger, Brian; Weissig, Volkmar

    2007-12-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are the direct cause of several physiological disorders and are also associated with the aging process. The modest progress made over the past two decades towards manipulating the mitochondrial genome and understanding its function within living mammalian cells means that cures for mitochondrial DNA mutations are still elusive. Here, we report that transformed mammalian cells internalize exogenous isolated mitochondria upon simple co-incubation. We first demonstrate the physical presence of internalized mitochondria within recipient cells using fluorescence microscopy. Second, we show that xenogenic transfer of murine mitochondria into human cells lacking functional mitochondria can functionally restore respiration in cells lacking mtDNA. Third, utilizing the natural competence of isolated mitochondria to take up linear DNA molecules, we demonstrate the feasibility of using cellular internalization of isolated exogenous mitochondria as a potential tool for studying mitochondrial genetics in living mammalian cells. PMID:18069915

  11. The oncolytic peptide LTX-315 induces cell death and DAMP release by mitochondria distortion in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Eike, Liv-Marie; Yang, Nannan; Rekdal, Øystein; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur

    2015-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are naturally occurring molecules found in most species, in which they play a significant role in the first line defense against intruding pathogens, and several HDPs have been shown to possess anticancer activity. Structure-activity relationship studies on the HDP bovine lactoferricin revealed a de novo design of a nonamer peptide LTX-315, with oncolytic properties. In the present study, we investigated the oncolytic activity of LTX-315 in human melanoma cells (A375). LTX-315 induced a rapid plasma membrane disruption and cell death within 2 hours. At a low concentration, fluorescence-labeled LTX-315 was internalized and accumulated in cytoplasmic vacuoles in close proximity to the mitochondria. The mitochondrial membrane potential was shown to depolarize as a consequence of LTX-315 treatment and at ultrastructural level, the mitochondria morphology was significantly altered. Release of danger signals (DAMPs) such as ATP, Cytochrome C and HMGB1 into the cell supernatant of cultured cells was evident minutes after peptide treatment. The oncolytic effect of LTX-315 involving perturbation of both the cell membrane and the mitochondria with subsequent release of DAMPs may highlight the ability of LTX-315 to induce complete regression and long-term protective immune responses as previously reported in experimental animal models. PMID:26472184

  12. Action of diclofenac on kidney mitochondria and cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Lin Eng; Vincent, Annette S.; Halliwell, Barry; Wong, Kim Ping . E-mail: bchsitkp@nus.edu.sg

    2006-09-22

    The mitochondrial membrane potential measured in isolated rat kidney mitochondria and in digitonin-permeabilized MDCK type II cells pre-energized with succinate, glutamate, and/or malate was reduced by micromolar diclofenac dose-dependently. However, ATP biosynthesis from glutamate/malate was significantly more compromised compared to that from succinate. Inhibition of the malate-aspartate shuttle by diclofenac with a resultant decrease in the ability of mitochondria to generate NAD(P)H was demonstrated. Diclofenac however had no effect on the activities of NADH dehydrogenase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, decreased NAD(P)H production due to an inhibition of the entry of malate and glutamate via the malate-aspartate shuttle explained the more pronounced decreased rate of ATP biosynthesis from glutamate and malate by diclofenac. This drug, therefore affects the bioavailability of two major respiratory complex I substrates which would normally contribute substantially to supplying the reducing equivalents for mitochondrial electron transport for generation of ATP in the renal cell.

  13. Mitochondria, Chloroplasts in Animal and Plant Cells: Significance of Conformational Matching.

    PubMed

    Stefano, George B; Snyder, Christopher; Kream, Richard M

    2015-07-17

    Many commonalities between chloroplasts and mitochondria exist, thereby suggesting a common origin via a bacterial ancestor capable of enhanced ATP-dependent energy production functionally linked to cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Accordingly, the molecular evolution/retention of the catalytic Qo quinol oxidation site of cytochrome b complexes as the tetrapeptide PEWY sequence functionally underlies the common retention of a chemiosmotic proton gradient mechanism for ATP synthesis in cellular respiration and photosynthesis. Furthermore, the dual regulatory targeting of mitochondrial and chloroplast gene expression by mitochondrial transcription termination factor (MTERF) proteins to promote optimal energy production and oxygen consumption further advances these evolutionary contentions. As a functional consequence of enhanced oxygen utilization and production, significant levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be generated within mitochondria and chloroplasts, which may effectively compromise cellular energy production following prolonged stress/inflammationary conditions. Interestingly, both types of organelles have been identified in selected animal cells, most notably specialized digestive cells lining the gut of several species of Sacoglossan sea slugs. Termed kleptoplasty or kleptoplastic endosymbiosis, functional chloroplasts from algal food sources are internalized and stored within digestive cells to provide the host with dual energy sources derived from mitochondrial and photosynthetic processes. Recently, the observation of internalized algae within embryonic tissues of the spotted salamander strongly suggest that developmental processes within a vertebrate organism may require photosynthetic endosymbiosis as an internal regulator. The dual presence of mitochondria and functional chloroplasts within specialized animal cells indicates a high degree of biochemical identity, stereoselectivity, and conformational matching that are the likely

  14. A Cyanine Dye to Probe Mitophagy: Simultaneous Detection of Mitochondria and Autolysosomes in Live Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Linlin; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Xiangjun; Liu, Meirong; Cao, Zehui; Shangguan, Dihua; Tan, Weihong

    2016-09-28

    Mitophagy is a process in which cells remove dysfunctional mitochondria and recycle their constituents in a lysosome-dependent manner. To probe this process, two different fluorescent dyes specific for mitochondria and lysosomes, respectively, are often used in combination. However, current fluorescent dyes for lysosomes cannot distinguish mitochondria-containing autolysosomes from other lysosomes. Therefore, we herein report a cyanine dye, HQO, which can simultaneously probe mitochondria and autolysosomes in live cells by exhibiting different fluorescence properties. HQO selectively accumulates in mitochondria but then transforms to the protonated HQOH(+) form with the decrease of pH when dysfunctional mitochondria evolve into autolysosomes. Since HQO and HQOH(+) exhibit different absorption and emission with Ex/Em at 530/650 and 710/750 nm, respectively, in a low polarity environment, such as that found in micelles, they are uniquely suited to monitor mitophagy with the ability to distinguish autolysosomes from other lysosomes. PMID:27574920

  15. Spaceflight and clinorotation cause cytoskeleton and mitochondria changes and increases in apoptosis in cultured cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, H.; Lewis, M. L.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex network of fibers that is sensitive to environmental factors including microgravity and altered gravitational forces. Cellular functions such as transport of cell organelles depend on cytoskeletal integrity; regulation of cytoskeletal activity plays a role in cell maintenance, cell division, and apoptosis. Here we report cytoskeletal and mitochondria alterations in cultured human lymphocyte (Jurkat) cells after exposure to spaceflight and in insect cells of Drosophila melanogaster (Schneider S-1) after exposure to conditions created by clinostat rotation. Jurkat cells were flown on the space shuttle in Biorack cassettes while Schneider S-1 cells were exposed to altered gravity forces as produced by clinostat rotation. The effects of both treatments were similar in the different cell types. Fifty percent of cells displayed effects on the microtubule network in both cell lines. Under these experimental conditions mitochondria clustering and morphological alterations of mitochondrial cristae was observed to various degrees after 4 and 48 hours of culture. Jurkat cells underwent cell divisions during exposure to spaceflight but a large number of apoptotic cells was also observed. Similar results were obtained in Schneider S-1 cells cultured under clinostat rotation. Both cell lines displayed mitochondria abnormalities and mitochondria clustering toward one side of the cells which is interpreted to be the result of microtubule disruption and failure of mitochondria transport along microtubules. The number of mitochondria was increased in cells exposed to altered gravity while cristae morphology was severely affected indicating altered mitochondria function. These results show that spaceflight as well as altered gravity produced by clinostat rotation affects microtubule and mitochondria organization and results in increases in apoptosis. Grant numbers: NAG 10-0224, NAG2-985. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ex vivo programming of dendritic cells by mitochondria-targeted nanoparticles to produce interferon-gamma for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Marrache, Sean; Tundup, Smanla; Harn, Donald A; Dhar, Shanta

    2013-08-27

    One of the limitations for clinical applications of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy is the low potency in generating tumor antigen specific T cell responses. We examined the immunotherapeutic potential of a mitochondria-targeted nanoparticle (NP) based on a biodegradable polymer and zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) photosensitizer (T-ZnPc-NPs). Here, we report that tumor antigens generated from treatment of breast cancer cells with T-ZnPc-NPs upon light stimulation activate DCs to produce high levels of interferon-gamma, an important cytokine considered as a product of T and natural killer cells. The remarkable ex vivo DC stimulation ability of this tumor cell supernatant is a result of an interleukin (IL)-12/IL-18 autocrine effect. These findings contribute to the understanding of how in situ light activation amplifies the host immune responses when NPs deliver the photosensitizer to the mitochondria and open up the possibility of using mitochondria-targeted-NP-treated, light-activated cancer cell supernatants as possible vaccines.

  17. Redox homeostasis protects mitochondria through accelerating ROS conversion to enhance hypoxia resistance in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pengying; Zhang, Dongyang; Shen, Lingxiao; Dong, Kelei; Wu, Meiling; Ou, Zhouluo; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells and the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hypoxic cells, participating in regulating redox homeostasis. The mechanism of tumor hypoxia tolerance, especially the role of mitochondria in tumor hypoxia resistance remains largely unknown. This study aimed to explore the role of mitochondria in tumor hypoxia resistance. We observed that glycolysis in hypoxic cancer cells was up-regulated more rapidly, with far lesser attenuation in aerobic oxidation, thus contributing to a more stable ATP/ADP ratio. In hypoxia, cancer cells rapidly convert hypoxia-induced O2·− into H2O2. H2O2 is further decomposed by a relatively stronger antioxidant system, causing ROS levels to increase lesser compared to normal cells. The moderate ROS leads to an appropriate degree of autophagy, eliminating the damaged mitochondria and offering nutrients to promote mitochondria fusion, thus protects mitochondria and improves hypoxia tolerance in cancer. The functional mitochondria could enable tumor cells to flexibly switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet the different physiological requirements during the hypoxia/re-oxygenation cycling of tumor growth. PMID:26956544

  18. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  19. Mitochondrial transit peptide exhibits cell penetration ability and efficiently delivers macromolecules to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aastha; Chugh, Archana

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial malfunction under various circumstances can lead to a variety of disorders. Effective targeting of macromolecules (drugs) is important for restoration of mitochondrial function and treatment of related disorders. We have designed a novel cell-penetrating mitochondrial transit peptide (CpMTP) for delivery of macromolecules to mitochondria. Comparison between properties of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and mitochondrial signal sequences enabled prediction of peptides with dual ability for cellular translocation and mitochondrial localization. Among the predicted peptides, CpMTP translocates across HeLa cells and shows successful delivery of noncovalently conjugated cargo molecules to mitochondria. CpMTP may have applications in transduction and transfection of mitochondria for therapeutics.

  20. A novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent with high selectivity for cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    He, Huan; Li, Dong-Wei; Yang, Li-Yun; Fu, Li; Zhu, Xun-Jin; Wong, Wai-Kwok; Jiang, Feng-Lei; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria have recently emerged as novel targets for cancer therapy due to its important roles in fundamental cellular function. Discovery of new chemotherapeutic agents that allow for simultaneous treatment and visualization of cancer is urgent. Herein, we demonstrate a novel bifunctional mitochondria-targeted anticancer agent (FPB), exhibiting both imaging capability and anticancer activity. It can selectively accumulate in mitochondria and induce cell apoptosis. Notably, it results in much higher toxicity toward cancer cells owing to much higher uptake by cancer cells. These features make it highly attractive in cancer imaging and treatment. PMID:26337336

  1. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  2. Methods for Mitochondria and Mitophagy Flux Analyses in Stem Cells of Resting and Regenerating Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    García-Prat, Laura; Martínez-Vicente, Marta; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria generate most of the cell's supply of ATP as a source of energy. They are also implicated in the control of cell's growth and death. Because of these critical functions, mitochondrial fitness is key for cellular homeostasis. Often, however, mitochondria become defective following damage or stress. To prevent accumulation of damaged mitochondria, the cells clear them through mitophagy, which is defined as the selective degradation of mitochondria by autophagy (the process for degradation of long-lived proteins and damaged organelles in lysosomes). Recently, constitutive mitophagic activity has been reported in quiescent muscle stem cells (satellite cells), which sustain regeneration of skeletal muscle. In response to muscle damage, these cells activate, expand, and differentiate to repair damaged myofibers. Mitophagy was shown to be required for maintenance of satellite cells in their healthy quiescent state. Conversely, damaged mitochondria accumulated in satellite cells with aging and this was attributed to defective mitophagy. This caused increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of muscle stem cell regenerative capacity at old age. In this chapter, we describe different experimental strategies to evaluate mitochondria status and mitophagy in muscle stem cells from mice. They should improve our ability to study muscle stem homeostasis in adult life, and their loss of function in aging and disease. PMID:27492176

  3. CALMODULIN ANTAGONISTS EFFECT ON Ca2+ LEVEL IN THE MITOCHONDRIA AND CYTOPLASM OF MYOMETRIUM CELLS.

    PubMed

    Shlykov, S G; Babich, L G; Yevtushenko, M E; Karakhim, S O; Kosterin, S O

    2015-01-01

    It is known that Ca(2+)-dependent regulation of this cation exchange in mitochondria is carried out with participation of calmodulin. We had shown in a previous work using two experimental models: isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, that calmodulin antagonists reduce the level of mitochondrial membrane polarization. The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of calmodulin antagonists on the level of ionized Ca in mitochondria and cytoplasm of uterine smooth muscle cells using spectrofluorometry and confocal microscopy. It was shown that myometrium mitochondria, in the presence of ATP and MgCl2 in the incubation medium, accumulate Ca ions in the matrix. Incubation of mitochondria in the presence of CCCP inhibited cation accumulation, but did not cease it. Calmodulin antagonist such as trifluoperazine (100 μm) considerably increased the level of ionized Ca in the mitochondrial matrix. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 100 μM Ca2+, before adding trifluoperazine to the incubation medium, partly prevented influence of the latter on the cation level in the matrix. Incubation of myometrium cells (primary culture) with another calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium (10 μM was accompanied by depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and an increase in the concentration of ionized Ca in cytoplasm. Thus, using two models, namely, isolated mitochondria and intact myometrium cells, it has been shown that calmodulin antagonists cause depolarization of mitochondrial membranes and an increase of the ionized Ca concentration in both the mitochondrial matrix and the cell cytoplasm.

  4. Porcine parvovirus infection induces apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongling; Huang, Yong; Du, Qian; Luo, Xiaomao; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Xiaomin; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • PPV reduces PK-15 cells viability by inducing apoptosis. • PPV infection induces apoptosis through mitochondria-mediated pathway. • PPV infection activates p53 to regulate the mitochondria apoptotic signaling. - Abstract: Porcine parvovirus (PPV) infection has been reported to induce the cytopathic effects (CPE) in some special host cells and contribute the occurrence of porcine parvovirus disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PPV-induced CPE are not clear. In this study, we investigated the morphological and molecular changes of porcine kidney cell line (PK-15 cells) infected with PPV. The results showed that PPV infection inhibited the viability of PK-15 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner. PPV infection induced typical apoptotic features including chromatin condensation, apoptotic body formation, nuclear fragmentation, and Annexin V-binding activity. Further studies showed that Bax was increased and translocated to mitochondria, whereas Bcl-2 was decreased in PPV-infected cells, which caused mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization, resulting in the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, followed by caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. However, the expression of Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) did not appear significant changes in the process of PPV-induced apoptosis. Moreover, PPV infection activated p53 signaling, which was involved in the activation of apoptotic signaling induced by PPV infection via regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PPV infection induced apoptosis in PK-15 cells through activation of p53 and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. This study may contribute to shed light on the molecular pathogenesis of PPV infection.

  5. Modified host cells with efflux pumps

    DOEpatents

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous expression of an efflux pump capable of transporting an organic molecule out of the host cell wherein the organic molecule at a sufficiently high concentration reduces the growth rate of or is lethal to the host cell.

  6. Membrane potential genesis in Nitella cells, mitochondria, and thylakoids.

    PubMed

    Kitasato, Hiroshi

    2003-10-01

    The resting membrane potential of Nitella cells shifts in parallel with the change in H+ equilibrium potential, but is not equal to the H+ equilibrium potential. The deviation of the membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential depends on the extrusion rate of H+ by the electrogenic H+-pump. The activity of the electrogenic H+-pump was formulated in terms of the change in the free energy of ATP hydrolysis. The deviation of membrane potential from the H+ equilibrium potential induces a passive H+ flow. The passive inward H+ current may be coupled with Cl- uptake. The coupling rate of H+,Cl- co-transport was discussed. The membrane potential of mitochondria was electrochemically formulated in terms of oxidation-reduction H2/H+ half-cells spontaneously formed at the inner and outer boundaries of each trans-membrane electron-conducting pathway. The membrane potential formed by a pair of H2/H+ redox cells is pH-sensitive in its nature, but deviates from the H+ equilibrium potential to an extent that depends on the logarithm of the ratio of H2 concentrations at the inner and outer boundaries. The membrane potential of thylakoids is considered to be primarily due to the electromotive force of photocells embedded in the thylakoid membrane, as far as the anode and cathode of each photocell are in contact with the inner and outer solutions, respectively. The light-induced electronic current yields oxygen at the inner boundary and causes an increase in the H2 pool at the outer boundary of the electron-conducting pathway, which has no shunting plastoquinone chain between these two boundaries.

  7. Live-Cell Imaging of Mitochondria and the Actin Cytoskeleton in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Swayne, Theresa C; Boldogh, Istvan R; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance and regulation of proper mitochondrial dynamics and functions are necessary for cellular homeostasis. Numerous diseases, including neurodegeneration and muscle myopathies, and overall cellular aging are marked by declining mitochondrial function and subsequent loss of multiple other cellular functions. For these reasons, optimized protocols are needed for visualization and quantification of mitochondria and their function and fitness. In budding yeast, mitochondria are intimately associated with the actin cytoskeleton and utilize actin for their movement and inheritance. This chapter describes optimal approaches for labeling mitochondria and the actin cytoskeleton in living budding yeast cells, for imaging the labeled cells, and for analyzing the resulting images. PMID:26498778

  8. Whole cell cryo-electron tomography suggests mitochondria divide by budding.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guo-Bin

    2014-08-01

    Eukaryotes rely on mitochondrial division to guarantee that each new generation of cells acquires an adequate number of mitochondria. Mitochondrial division has long been thought to occur by binary fission and, more recently, evidence has supported the idea that binary fission is mediated by dynamin-related protein (Drp1) and the endoplasmic reticulum. However, studies to date have depended on fluorescence microscopy and conventional electron microscopy. Here, we utilize whole cell cryo-electron tomography to visualize mitochondrial division in frozen hydrated intact HeLa cells. We observe a large number of relatively small mitochondria protruding from and connected to large mitochondria or mitochondrial networks. Therefore, this study provides evidence that mitochondria divide by budding. PMID:24870811

  9. Microfilaments and microtubules control the shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of cortical mitochondria in characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, I

    2004-12-01

    The shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of mitochondria in characean internodal cells were studied by visualizing fluorescent dyes with confocal laser scanning microscopy and conducting drug-inhibitor experiments. Shape, size, number, and distribution of mitochondria varied according to the growth status and the metabolic activity within the cell. Vermiform (sausage-shaped), disc-, or amoeba-like mitochondria were present in elongating internodes, whereas very young cells and older cells that had completed growth contained short, rodlike organelles only. Mitochondria were evenly distributed and passively transported in the streaming endoplasm. In the cortex, mitochondria were sandwiched between the plasma membrane and the stationary chloroplast files and distributed in relation to the pattern of pH banding. Highest mitochondrial densities were found at the acid, photosynthetically more active regions, whereas the alkaline sites contained fewer and smaller mitochondria. In the cortex of elongating cells, small mitochondria moved slowly along microtubules or actin filaments. The shape and motility of giant mitochondria depended on the simultaneous interaction with both cytoskeletal systems. There was no microtubule-dependent motility in the cortex of nonelongating mature cells and mitochondria only occasionally travelled along actin filaments. These observations suggest that mitochondria of characean internodes possess motor proteins for microtubules and actin filaments, both of which can be used either as tracks for migration or for immobilization. The cortical cytoskeleton probably controls the spatiotemporal distribution of mitochondria within the cell and promotes their association with chloroplasts, which is necessary for exchange of metabolites during photosynthesis and detoxification.

  10. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  11. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  12. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  13. Mitochondria released by cells undergoing TNF-α-induced necroptosis act as danger signals.

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Fadeel, B

    2014-07-03

    Necrosis leads to the release of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which may provoke inflammatory responses. However, the release of organelles from dying cells, and the consequences thereof have not been documented before. We demonstrate here that mitochondria are released from cells undergoing tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced, receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1-dependent necroptosis, a form of programmed necrosis. The released, purified mitochondria were determined to be intact as they did not emit appreciable amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Pharmacological inhibition of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) prevented mitochondrial fission in TNF-α-triggered cells, but this did not block necroptosis nor the concomitant release of mitochondria. Importantly, primary human macrophages and dendritic cells engulfed mitochondria from necroptotic cells leading to modulation of macrophage secretion of cytokines and induction of dendritic cell maturation. Our results show that intact mitochondria are released from necroptotic cells and suggest that these organelles act as bona fide danger signals.

  14. OXIDATIVE PHOSPHORYLATION AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL TRANSFORMATION IN MITOCHONDRIA IN THE INTACT ASCITES TUMOR CELL

    PubMed Central

    Hackenbrock, Charles R.; Rehn, Terry G.; Weinbach, Eugene C.; Lemasters, John J.

    1971-01-01

    We have examined the ultrastructure of mitochondria as it relates to energy metabolism in the intact cell. Oxidative phosphorylation was induced in ultrastructurally intact Ehrlich ascites tumor cells by rapidly generating intracellular adenosine diphosphate from endogenous adenosine triphosphate by the addition of 2-deoxyglucose. The occurrence of oxidative phosphorylation was ascertained indirectly by continuous and synchronous monitoring of respiratory rate, fluorescence of pyridine nucleotide, and 90° light-scattering. Oxidative phosphorylation was confirmed by direct enzymatic analysis of intracellular adenine nucleotides and by determination of intracellular inorganic orthophosphate. Microsamples of cells rapidly fixed for electron microscopy revealed that, in addition to oxidative phosphorylation, an orthodox → condensed ultrastructural transformation occurred in the mitochondria of all cells in less than 6 sec after the generation of adenosine diphosphate by 2-deoxyglucose. A 90° light-scattering increase, which also occurs at this time, showed a t ½ of only 25 sec which agreed temporally with a slower orthodox → maximally condensed mitochondrial transformation. Neither oxidative phosphorylation nor ultrastructural transformation could be initiated in mitochondria in intact cells by the intracellular generation of adenosine diphosphate in the presence of uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. Partial and complete inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation by oligomycin resulted in a positive relationship to partial and complete inhibition of 2-deoxyglucose-induced ultrastructural transformation in the mitochondria in these cells. The data presented reveal that an orthodox → condensed ultrastructural transformation is linked to induced oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria in the intact ascites tumor cell. PMID:5111873

  15. Transformations of the macromolecular landscape at mitochondria during DNA-damage-induced apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Yadav, N; Pliss, A; Kuzmin, A; Rapali, P; Sun, L; Prasad, P; Chandra, D

    2014-10-09

    Apoptosis is a dynamic process regulated by mitochondrion critical for cellular respiration and survival. Execution of apoptosis is mediated by multiple protein signaling events at mitochondria. Initiation and progression of apoptosis require numerous apoptogenic factors that are either released from or sequestered in mitochondria, which may transform the biomolecular makeup of the organelle. In this communication, using Raman microspectroscopy, we demonstrate that transformation in biomolecular composition of mitochondrion may be used as apoptosis marker in an individual cell. For the first time, we show that significant changes occur in the concentrations of RNA, DNA, protein, and lipid constituents of mitochondria during apoptosis. The structural analysis of proteins on mitochondria demonstrated a decrease in α-helix secondary structure content, and an increase in the levels of random coils and β-sheets on mitochondria. This may represent an additional hallmark of apoptosis. Strikingly, we observed nearly identical changes in macromolecular content of mitochondria both in the presence and absence of a key proapoptotic protein, Bax (Bcl-2-associated X protein). Increased DNA level in mitochondria corresponded with higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mitochondrial ROS production. Upregulation of polymerase-γ (POLG), mitochondrial helicase Twinkle, and mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) in response to DNA damage correlated with increased mtDNA and RNA synthesis. Elevated activity of oxidative phosphorylation complexes supports functional mitochondrial respiration during apoptosis. Thus, we define previously unknown dynamic correlation of macromolecular structure of mitochondria and apoptosis progression in the presence and absence of Bax protein. These findings open up a new approach for monitoring physiological status of cells by non invasive single-cell method.

  16. Mitochondria in mesenchymal stem cell biology and cell therapy: From cellular differentiation to mitochondrial transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ting-Hsien; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are characterized to have the capacity of self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into mesoderm, ectoderm-like and endoderm-like cells. MSCs hold great promise for cell therapies due to their multipotency in vitro and therapeutic advantage of hypo-immunogenicity and lower tumorigenicity. Moreover, it has been shown that MSCs can serve as a vehicle to transfer mitochondria into cells after cell transplantation. Mitochondria produce most of the energy through oxidative phosphorylation in differentiated cells. It has been increasingly clear that the switch of energy supply from glycolysis to aerobic metabolism is essential for successful differentiation of MSCs. Post-translational modifications of proteins have been established to regulate mitochondrial function and metabolic shift during MSCs differentiation. In this article, we review and provide an integrated view on the roles of different protein kinases and sirtuins in the maintenance and differentiation of MSCs. Importantly, we provide evidence to suggest that alteration in the expression of Sirt3 and Sirt5 and relative changes in the acylation levels of mitochondrial proteins might be involved in the activation of mitochondrial function and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs. We summarize their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, oxidative responses and differentiation of MSCs. On the other hand, we discuss recent advances in the study of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial transfer as well as their roles in the differentiation and therapeutic application of MSCs to improve cell function in vitro and in animal models. Accumulating evidence has substantiated that the therapeutic potential of MSCs is conferred not only by cell replacement and paracrine effects but also by transferring mitochondria into injured tissues or cells to modulate the cellular metabolism in situ. Therefore, elucidation of the underlying mechanisms

  17. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chad D.; Wong, Daniel S.; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondria network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients. PMID:26331984

  18. Biocavity laser spectroscopy of genetically altered yeast cells and isolated yeast mitochondria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Copeland, R. Guild; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    We report an analysis of 2 yeast cell mutants using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The two yeast strains differed only by the presence or absence of mitochondrial DNA. Strain 104 is a wild-type (ρ +) strain of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strain 110 was derived from strain 104 by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Removal of mtDNA causes strain 110 to grow as a "petite" (ρ -), named because it forms small colonies (of fewer cells because it grows more slowly) on agar plates supplemented with a variety of different carbon sources. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack the normal respiratory chain complexes I, III, IV, and V. Complex II is preserved because its subunits are encoded by genes located in nuclear DNA. The frequency distributions of the peak shifts produced by wild-type and petite cells and mitochondria show striking differences in the symmetry and patterns of the distributions. Wild-type ρ + cells (104) and mitochondria produced nearly symmetric, Gaussian distributions. The ρ - cells (110) and mitochondria showed striking asymmetry and skew that appeared to follow a Poisson distribution.

  19. Import of Fluorescent RNA into Mitochondria of Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Zelenka, Jaroslav; Ježek, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Methods of in vivo visualization and manipulation of mitochondrial genetic machinery are limited due to the need to surpass not only the cytoplasmic membrane but also two mitochondrial membranes. Here, we employ the matrix-addressing sequence of mitochondrial ribosomal 5S-rRNA (termed MAM), which is naturally imported into mammalian mitochondria, to construct an import system for in vivo targeting of mitochondrial (mt) DNA or mtRNA, in order to provide fluorescence hybridization of the desired sequences. PMID:26530682

  20. Binding of the host-specific toxins from Helminthosporium maydis race T and Phyllosticta maydis to mitochondria isolated from Zea mays

    SciTech Connect

    Frantzen, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    Helminthosphorium maydis race I and Phyllosticta maydis, the causal agents of southern and yellow corn leaf blights, respectively, produce host-specific toxins. The toxic specificity of these natural products is identical to the host-specificity of the pathogens for certain varieties of corn. Susceptible genotypes carry the Texas type of cytoplasmic male sterility. Isolated mitochondria from susceptible plant species are highly sensitive to these toxins, whereas other plant species, including resistant corn varieties, and their mitochondria are not. The mitochondrion may be the primary cellular site of action for these toxins. The toxins from H. maydis and P. maydis were tritiated by reduction with borotritide salts. The labeled products had a high specific activity (3.8 to 8 Ci/mmole), high biological activity, and specificity identical to that of the native toxins. A filtration binding assay was developed to investigate the binding characteristics of these labeled toxins to isolated mitochondria. Mitochondria isolated from both cytoplasmic male sterile (Texas) and normal corn demonstrated similar binding characteristics including ligand displaceable binding with both labeled toxins. Ligand displaceable binding was also detectable in mitochondria from soybeans, a nonhost plant for these fungi. The ability to displace the bound labeled toxins was generally correlated with the biological activity of the competing toxin. The results of this study suggest that a receptor site hypothesis for the mode of action of these toxins may not be valid.

  1. Myo19 ensures symmetric partitioning of mitochondria and coupling of mitochondrial segregation to cell division.

    PubMed

    Rohn, Jennifer L; Patel, Jigna V; Neumann, Beate; Bulkescher, Jutta; Mchedlishvili, Nunu; McMullan, Rachel C; Quintero, Omar A; Ellenberg, Jan; Baum, Buzz

    2014-11-01

    During animal cell division, an actin-based ring cleaves the cell into two. Problems with this process can cause chromosome missegregation and defects in cytoplasmic inheritance and the partitioning of organelles, which in turn are associated with human diseases. Although much is known about how chromosome segregation is coupled to cell division, the way organelles coordinate their inheritance during partitioning to daughter cells is less well understood. Here, using a high-content live-imaging small interfering RNA screen, we identify Myosin-XIX (Myo19) as a novel regulator of cell division. Previously, this actin-based motor was shown to control the interphase movement of mitochondria. Our analysis shows that Myo19 is indeed localized to mitochondria and that its silencing leads to defects in the distribution of mitochondria within cells and in mitochondrial partitioning at division. Furthermore, many Myo19 RNAi cells undergo stochastic division failure--a phenotype that can be mimicked using a treatment that blocks mitochondrial fission and rescued by decreasing mitochondrial fusion, implying that mitochondria can physically interfere with cytokinesis. Strikingly, using live imaging we also observe the inappropriate movement of mitochondria to the poles of spindles in cells depleted for Myo19 as they enter anaphase. Since this phenocopies the results of an acute loss of actin filaments in anaphase, these data support a model whereby the Myo19 actin-based motor helps to control mitochondrial movement to ensure their faithful segregation during division. The presence of DNA within mitochondria makes their inheritance an especially important aspect of symmetrical cell division.

  2. Macroautophagy inhibition maintains fragmented mitochondria to foster T cell receptor-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Mauro; Mariotti, Francesca R; Trapani, Laura; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Nazio, Francesca; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Soriano, Maria Eugenia; Schrepfer, Emilie; Cecconi, Francesco; Scorrano, Luca; Campello, Silvia

    2016-08-15

    Mitochondrial dynamics and functionality are linked to the autophagic degradative pathway under several stress conditions. However, the interplay between mitochondria and autophagy upon cell death signalling remains unclear. The T-cell receptor pathway signals the so-called activation-induced cell death (AICD) essential for immune tolerance regulation. Here, we show that this apoptotic pathway requires the inhibition of macroautophagy. Protein kinase-A activation downstream of T-cell receptor signalling inhibits macroautophagy upon AICD induction. This leads to the accumulation of damaged mitochondria, which are fragmented, display remodelled cristae and release cytochrome c, thereby driving apoptosis. Autophagy-forced reactivation that clears the Parkin-decorated mitochondria is as effective in inhibiting apoptosis as genetic interference with cristae remodelling and cytochrome c release. Thus, upon AICD induction regulation of macroautophagy, rather than selective mitophagy, ensures apoptotic progression. PMID:27390127

  3. The evolution of eukaryotic cells from the perspective of peroxisomes: phylogenetic analyses of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes support mitochondria-first models of eukaryotic cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Bolte, Kathrin; Rensing, Stefan A; Maier, Uwe-G

    2015-02-01

    Beta-oxidation of fatty acids and detoxification of reactive oxygen species are generally accepted as being fundamental functions of peroxisomes. Additionally, these pathways might have been the driving force favoring the selection of this compartment during eukaryotic evolution. Here we performed phylogenetic analyses of enzymes involved in beta-oxidation of fatty acids in Bacteria, Eukaryota, and Archaea. These imply an alpha-proteobacterial origin for three out of four enzymes. By integrating the enzymes' history into the contrasting models on the origin of eukaryotic cells, we conclude that peroxisomes most likely evolved non-symbiotically and subsequent to the acquisition of mitochondria in an archaeal host cell.

  4. Homocysteine activates T cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling and increasing mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Juan; Lü, Silin; Ding, Yanhong; Zheng, Ming; Wang, Xian

    2016-06-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) accelerates atherosclerosis by increasing proliferation and stimulating cytokine secretion in T cells. However, whether homocysteine (Hcy)-mediated T cell activation is associated with metabolic reprogramming is unclear. Here, our in vivo and in vitro studies showed that Hcy-stimulated splenic T-cell activation in mice was accompanied by increased levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium, mitochondrial mass and respiration. Inhibiting mitochondrial ROS production and calcium signals or blocking mitochondrial respiration largely blunted Hcy-induced T-cell interferon γ (IFN-γ) secretion and proliferation. Hcy also enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in T cells, and inhibition of ER stress with 4-phenylbutyric acid blocked Hcy-induced T-cell activation. Mechanistically, Hcy increased ER-mitochondria coupling, and uncoupling ER-mitochondria by the microtubule inhibitor nocodazole attenuated Hcy-stimulated mitochondrial reprogramming, IFN-γ secretion and proliferation in T cells, suggesting that juxtaposition of ER and mitochondria is required for Hcy-promoted mitochondrial function and T-cell activation. In conclusion, Hcy promotes T-cell activation by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling and regulating metabolic reprogramming.

  5. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria and that this occurs in a DDR-independent manner.

  6. Interrelations between the Parasitophorous Vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii and Host Cell Organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Magno, Rodrigo; Cobra Straker, Lorian; de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is capable of actively penetrating and multiplying in any nucleated cell of warm-blooded animals. Its survival strategies include escape from fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with host cell lysosomes and rearrangement of host cell organelles in relation to the parasitophorous vacuole. In this article we report the rearrangement of host cell organelles and elements of the cytoskeleton of LLCMK2 cells, a lineage derived from green monkey kidney epithelial cells, in response to infection by T. gondii tachyzoites. Transmission electron microscopy made on flat embedded monolayers cut horizontally to the apical side of the cells or field emission scanning electron microscopy of monolayers scraped with scotch tape before sputtering showed that association of mitochondria to the vacuole is much less frequent than previously described. On the other hand, all parasitophorous vacuoles were surrounded by elements of the endoplasmic reticulum. These data were complemented by observations by laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent probes from mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and reinforced by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections observed by transmission electron microscopy and labeling of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescent probes.

  7. Interrelations between the parasitophorous vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii and host cell organelles.

    PubMed

    Magno, Rodrigo Cardoso; Straker, Lorian Cobra; de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is capable of actively penetrating and multiplying in any nucleated cell of warm-blooded animals. Its survival strategies include escape from fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with host cell lysosomes and rearrangement of host cell organelles in relation to the parasitophorous vacuole. In this article we report the rearrangement of host cell organelles and elements of the cytoskeleton of LLCMK2 cells, a lineage derived from green monkey kidney epithelial cells, in response to infection by T. gondii tachyzoites. Transmission electron microscopy made on flat embedded monolayers cut horizontally to the apical side of the cells or field emission scanning electron microscopy of monolayers scraped with scotch tape before sputtering showed that association of mitochondria to the vacuole is much less frequent than previously described. On the other hand, all parasitophorous vacuoles were surrounded by elements of the endoplasmic reticulum. These data were complemented by observations by laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent probes from mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and reinforced by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections observed by transmission electron microscopy and labeling of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescent probes.

  8. Feeling Worn Out? PGC1α to the Rescue for Dysfunctional Mitochondria in T Cell Exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Maria L; Hess, Christoph

    2016-08-16

    In chronic viral infections and cancer, T cells acquire a functional state characterized by reduced effector functionality, termed exhaustion. In two related studies by Scharping et al. (2016) and Bengsch et al. (2016) in this issue of Immunity, dysfunctional mitochondria are identified as a key correlate of CD8(+) T cell exhaustion. PMID:27533009

  9. Induction of apoptosis in human cancer cells by targeting mitochondria with gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkandawire, M. M.; Lakatos, M.; Springer, A.; Clemens, A.; Appelhans, D.; Krause-Buchholz, U.; Pompe, W.; Rödel, G.; Mkandawire, M.

    2015-06-01

    A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell death. The ability to target Au nanoparticles into mitochondria of breast cancer cells and induce apoptosis reveals an alternative application of Au nanoparticles in photothermal therapy of cancer.A major challenge in designing cancer therapies is the induction of cancer cell apoptosis, although activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways by targeting gold nanoparticles to mitochondria is promising. We report an in vitro procedure targeting mitochondria with conjugated gold nanoparticles and investigating effects on apoptosis induction in the human breast cancer cell line Jimt-1. Gold nanoparticles were conjugated to a variant of turbo green fluorescent protein (mitoTGFP) harbouring an amino-terminal mitochondrial localization signal. Au nanoparticle conjugates were further complexed with cationic maltotriose-modified poly(propylene imine) third generation dendrimers. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that Au nanoparticle conjugates were directed to mitochondria upon transfection, causing partial rupture of the outer mitochondrial membrane, triggering cell

  10. Review on Trypanosoma cruzi: Host Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; Barrias, Emile Santos

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which affects a large number of individuals in Central and South America, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are metacyclic and bloodstream trypomastigote and amastigote. Metacyclic trypomastigotes are released with the feces of the insect while amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes are released from the infected host cells of the vertebrate host after a complex intracellular life cycle. The recognition between parasite and mammalian host cell involves numerous molecules present in both cell types. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host cells, mainly emphasizing the mechanisms and molecules that participate in the T. cruzi invasion process of the mammalian cells. PMID:20811486

  11. There is no evidence that mitochondria are the main source of reactive oxygen species in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Guy C; Borutaite, Vilmante

    2012-01-01

    It is often assumed that mitochondria are the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mammalian cells, but there is no convincing experimental evidence for this in the literature. What evidence there is suggests mitochondria are a significant source for ROS, which may have physiological and pathological effects. But quantitatively, endoplasmic reticulum and peroxisomes have a greater capacity to produce ROS than mitochondria, at least in liver. In most cells and physiological or pathological conditions there is a lack of evidence for or against mitochondria being the main source of cellular ROS. Mitochondria can rapidly degrade ROS and thus are potential sinks for ROS, but whether mitochondria act as net sources or sinks within cells in particular conditions is unknown.

  12. Ca2+ transport by mitochondria from L1210 mouse ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1973-06-01

    Mitochondria isolated from the ascites form of L1210 mouse leukemia cells readily accumulate Ca(2+) from the suspending medium and eject H(+) during oxidation of succinate in the presence of phosphate and Mg(2+), with normal stoichiometry between Ca(2+) uptake and electron transport. Ca(2+) loads up to 1600 ng-atoms per mg of protein are attained. As is the case in mitochondria from normal tissues, Ca(2+) uptake takes precedence over oxidative phosphorylation. However, Ca(2+) transport by the L-1210 mitochondria is unusual in other respects, which may possibly have general significance in tumor cells. The apparent affinity of the L1210 mitochondria for Ca(2+) in stimulation of oxygen uptake is about 3-fold greater than in normal liver mitochondria; moreover, the maximal rate of Ca(2+) transport is also considerably higher. Furthermore, when Ca(2+) pulses are added to L1210 mitochondria in the absence of phosphate or other permeant anions, much larger amounts of Ca(2+) are bound and H(+) ejected per atom of oxygen consumed than in the presence of phosphate; up to 7 Ca(2+) ions are bound per pair of electrons passing each energy-conserving site of the electron-transport chain. Such "superstoichiometry" of Ca(2+) uptake can be accounted for by two distinct types of respiration-dependent interaction of Ca(2+) with the L1210 mitochondria. One is the stimulation of oxygen consumption, which is achieved by relatively low concentrations of Ca(2+) (K(m) congruent with 8 muM) and is accompanied by binding of Ca(2+) up to 40 ng-atoms per mg of protein. The second process, also dependent on electron transport, is the binding of further Ca(2+) from the medium in exchange with previously stored membrane-bound protons, in which the affinity for Ca(2+) is much lower (K(m) congruent with 120 muM).

  13. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum, Mitochondria, and Mitochondria-Associated Membrane and Detergent Resistant Membrane Fractions from Transfected Cells and from Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected Primary Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Chad D; Wong, Daniel S; Bozidis, Petros; Zhang, Aiping; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M

    2015-09-01

    Increasingly mechanistic virology studies require dependable and sensitive methods for isolating purified organelles containing functional cellular sub-domains. The mitochondrial network is, in part, closely apposed to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM) fraction provides direct physical contact between the ER and mitochondria. Characterization of the dual localization and trafficking of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL37 proteins required establishing protocols in which the ER and mitochondria could be reliably separated. Because of its documented role in lipid and ceramide transfer from the ER to mitochondria, a method to purify MAM from infected cells was also developed. Two robust procedures were developed to efficiently isolate mitochondria, ER, and MAM fractions while providing substantial protein yields from HCMV-infected primary fibroblasts and from transfected HeLa cells. Furthermore, this unit includes protocols for isolation of detergent resistant membranes from subcellular fractions as well as techniques that allow visualization of the mitochondrial network disruption that occurs in permissively infected cells by their optimal resolution in Percoll gradients.

  14. Penetration of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Dinah; e Melo, J. Castro; Chou, D.

    1974-01-01

    Electron microscopy reveals that, in Bdellovibrio infection, after the formation of a passage pore in the host cell wall, the differentiated parasite penetration pole is associated with the host protoplast. This firm contact persists throughout the parasite penetration and after this process is completed. In penetrated hosts this contact is also apparent by phase microscopy. The association between the walls of the parasite and the host at the passage pore, on the other hand, is transient. Bdellovibrio do not penetrate hosts whose protoplast and cell walls are separated by plasmolysis, or in which the membrane-wall relationship is affected by low turgor pressure. It is concluded, therefore, that for penetration to occur it is essential that the host protoplast be within reach of the parasite, so that a firm contact can be established between them. A penetration mechanism is proposed that is effected by forces generated by fluxes of water and solutes due to structural changes in the infected host envelope. These forces cause a differential expansion of the host protoplast and cell wall and their separation from each other around the entry site, while the parasite remains firmly anchored to the host protoplast. Consequently, the parasite ends up enclosed in the expanded host periplasm. The actual entry, therefore, is a passive act of the parasite. Images PMID:4208138

  15. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria. PMID:27418514

  16. ER-mitochondria contacts couple mtDNA synthesis with mitochondrial division in human cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Samantha C; Uchiyama, Lauren F; Nunnari, Jodi

    2016-07-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes RNAs and proteins critical for cell function. In human cells, hundreds to thousands of mtDNA copies are replicated asynchronously, packaged into protein-DNA nucleoids, and distributed within a dynamic mitochondrial network. The mechanisms that govern how nucleoids are chosen for replication and distribution are not understood. Mitochondrial distribution depends on division, which occurs at endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria contact sites. These sites were spatially linked to a subset of nucleoids selectively marked by mtDNA polymerase and engaged in mtDNA synthesis--events that occurred upstream of mitochondrial constriction and division machine assembly. Our data suggest that ER tubules proximal to nucleoids are necessary but not sufficient for mtDNA synthesis. Thus, ER-mitochondria contacts coordinate licensing of mtDNA synthesis with division to distribute newly replicated nucleoids to daughter mitochondria.

  17. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Burch, Tanya C.; Rhim, Johng S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT2 PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  18. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    PubMed Central

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents [NAD(P)H] and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination, and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures, etiolated germinating rice seedlings and potato tubers as model plants. It will cover the general proteome as well as the posttranslational modification protein phosphorylation. To date 64 phosphorylated mitochondrial proteins with a total of 103 phosphorylation sites have been identified. PMID:23494127

  19. Mitochondria Biogenesis and Bioenergetics Gene Profiles in Isogenic Prostate Cells with Different Malignant Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Burch, Tanya C; Rhim, Johng S; Nyalwidhe, Julius O

    2016-01-01

    Background. The most significant hallmarks of cancer are directly or indirectly linked to deregulated mitochondria. In this study, we sought to profile mitochondria associated genes in isogenic prostate cell lines with different tumorigenic phenotypes from the same patient. Results. Two isogenic human prostate cell lines RC77N/E (nonmalignant cells) and RC77T/E (malignant cells) were profiled for expression of mitochondrial biogenesis and energy metabolism genes by qRT-PCR using the Human Mitochondria and the Mitochondrial Energy Metabolism RT(2) PCR arrays. Forty-seven genes were differentially regulated between the two cell lines. The interaction and regulatory networks of these genes were generated by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. UCP2 was the most significantly upregulated gene in primary adenocarcinoma cells in the current study. The overexpression of UCP2 upon malignant transformation was further validated using human prostatectomy clinical specimens. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the overexpression of multiple genes that are involved in mitochondria biogenesis, bioenergetics, and modulation of apoptosis. These genes may play a role in malignant transformation and disease progression. The upregulation of some of these genes in clinical samples indicates that some of the differentially transcribed genes could be the potential targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:27478826

  20. New derivatives of lupane triterpenoids disturb breast cancer mitochondria and induce cell death.

    PubMed

    Serafim, Teresa L; Carvalho, Filipa S; Bernardo, Telma C; Pereira, Gonçalo C; Perkins, Edward; Holy, Jon; Krasutsky, Dmytro A; Kolomitsyna, Oksana N; Krasutsky, Pavel A; Oliveira, Paulo J

    2014-11-01

    Novel cationic dimethylaminopyridine derivatives of pentacyclic triterpenes were previously described to promote mitochondrial depolarization and cell death in breast and melanoma cell lines. The objective of this work was to further investigate in detail the mechanism of mitochondrial perturbations, correlating those effects with breast cancer cell responses to those same agents. Initially, a panel of tumor and non-tumor cell lines was grown in high-glucose or glucose-free glutamine-containing media, the later forcing cells to synthesize ATP by oxidative phosphorylation only. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, cell death and mitochondrial membrane polarization were evaluated. Inhibition of cell proliferation was observed, accompanied by an arrest in the G1-cell cycle phase, and importantly, by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. On a later time-point, caspase-9 and 3 activation were observed, resulting in cell death. For the majority of test compounds, we determined that cell toxicity was augmented in the galactose media. To investigate direct evidences on mitochondria isolated rat liver mitochondria were used. The results showed that the compounds were strong inducers of the permeability transition pore. Confirming our previous results, this work shows that the novel DMAP derivatives strongly interact with mitochondria, resulting in pro-apoptotic signaling and cell death.

  1. Campylobacter jejuni cell lysates differently target mitochondria and lysosomes on HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Canonico, B; Campana, R; Luchetti, F; Arcangeletti, M; Betti, M; Cesarini, E; Ciacci, C; Vittoria, E; Galli, L; Papa, S; Baffone, W

    2014-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The synthesis of cytolethal distending toxin appears essential in the infection process. In this work we evaluated the sequence of lethal events in HeLa cells exposed to cell lysates of two distinct strains, C. jejuni ATCC 33291 and C. jejuni ISS3. C. jejuni cell lysates (CCLys) were added to HeLa cell monolayers which were analysed to detect DNA content, death features, bcl-2 and p53 status, mitochondria/lysosomes network and finally, CD54 and CD59 alterations, compared to cell lysates of C. jejuni 11168H cdtA mutant. We found mitochondria and lysosomes differently targeted by these bacterial lysates. Death, consistent with apoptosis for C. jejuni ATCC 33291 lysate, occurred in a slow way (>48 h); concomitantly HeLa cells increase their endolysosomal compartment, as a consequence of toxin internalization besides a simultaneous and partial lysosomal destabilization. C. jejuni CCLys induces death in HeLa cells mainly via a caspase-dependent mechanism although a p53 lysosomal pathway (also caspase-independent) seems to appear in addition. In C. jejuni ISS3-treated cells, the p53-mediated oxidative degradation of mitochondrial components seems to be lost, inducing the deepest lysosomal alterations. Furthermore, CD59 considerably decreases, suggesting both a degradation or internalisation pathway. CCLys-treated HeLa cells increase CD54 expression on their surface, because of the action of lysate as its double feature of toxin and bacterial peptide. In conclusion, we revealed that C. jejuni CCLys-treated HeLa cells displayed different features, depending on the particular strain.

  2. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung; Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon; Cho, Dong-Hyung

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  3. Detection of PIWI and piRNAs in the mitochondria of mammalian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, ChangHyuk; Tak, Hyosun; Rho, Mina; Chang, Hae Ryung; Kim, Yon Hui; Kim, Kyung Tae; Balch, Curt; Lee, Eun Kyung; Nam, Seungyoon

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • piRNA sequences were mapped to human mitochondrial (mt) genome. • We inspected small RNA-Seq datasets from somatic cell mt subcellular fractions. • Piwi and piRNA transcripts are present in mammalian somatic cancer cell mt fractions. - Abstract: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26–31 nt small noncoding RNAs that are processed from their longer precursor transcripts by Piwi proteins. Localization of Piwi and piRNA has been reported mostly in nucleus and cytoplasm of higher eukaryotes germ-line cells, where it is believed that known piRNA sequences are located in repeat regions of nuclear genome in germ-line cells. However, localization of PIWI and piRNA in mammalian somatic cell mitochondria yet remains largely unknown. We identified 29 piRNA sequence alignments from various regions of the human mitochondrial genome. Twelve out 29 piRNA sequences matched stem-loop fragment sequences of seven distinct tRNAs. We observed their actual expression in mitochondria subcellular fractions by inspecting mitochondrial-specific small RNA-Seq datasets. Of interest, the majority of the 29 piRNAs overlapped with multiple longer transcripts (expressed sequence tags) that are unique to the human mitochondrial genome. The presence of mature piRNAs in mitochondria was detected by qRT-PCR of mitochondrial subcellular RNAs. Further validation showed detection of Piwi by colocalization using anti-Piwil1 and mitochondria organelle-specific protein antibodies.

  4. Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated cell death via impairing electron transport chain complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Seokheon; Kim, Joo Yeon; Hwang, Joohyun; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2013-08-09

    Highlights: •Heptachlor inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. •Heptachlor promoted generation of reactive oxygen species. •Heptachlor induced Bax activation. •Heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. -- Abstract: Environmental toxins like pesticides have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Epidemiological studies suggested that exposures to organochlorine pesticides have an association with an increased PD risk. In the present study, we examined the mechanism of toxicity induced by an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor. In a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced both morphological and functional damages in mitochondria. Interestingly, the compound inhibited mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III activity. Rapid generation of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Bax were then detected. Subsequently, mitochondria-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis followed. Our results raise a possibility that an organochlorine pesticide heptachlor can act as a neurotoxicant associated with PD.

  5. TMX1 determines cancer cell metabolism as a thiol-based modulator of ER-mitochondria Ca2+ flux.

    PubMed

    Raturi, Arun; Gutiérrez, Tomás; Ortiz-Sandoval, Carolina; Ruangkittisakul, Araya; Herrera-Cruz, Maria Sol; Rockley, Jeremy P; Gesson, Kevin; Ourdev, Dimitar; Lou, Phing-How; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Tahbaz, Nasser; Zaugg, Michael; Baksh, Shairaz; Ballanyi, Klaus; Simmen, Thomas

    2016-08-15

    The flux of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria regulates mitochondria metabolism. Within tumor tissue, mitochondria metabolism is frequently repressed, leading to chemotherapy resistance and increased growth of the tumor mass. Therefore, altered ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux could be a cancer hallmark, but only a few regulatory proteins of this mechanism are currently known. One candidate is the redox-sensitive oxidoreductase TMX1 that is enriched on the mitochondria-associated membrane (MAM), the site of ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux. Our findings demonstrate that cancer cells with low TMX1 exhibit increased ER Ca(2+), accelerated cytosolic Ca(2+) clearance, and reduced Ca(2+) transfer to mitochondria. Thus, low levels of TMX1 reduce ER-mitochondria contacts, shift bioenergetics away from mitochondria, and accelerate tumor growth. For its role in intracellular ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) flux, TMX1 requires its thioredoxin motif and palmitoylation to target to the MAM. As a thiol-based tumor suppressor, TMX1 increases mitochondrial ATP production and apoptosis progression. PMID:27502484

  6. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  7. Bax translocation into mitochondria during dihydroartemisinin(DHA)-induced apoptosis in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ying-ying; Chen, Tong-sheng; Qu, Jun-Le

    2009-02-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to possess promising anticancer activities and induce cancer cell death through apoptotic pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. This study was investigated in human lung adenocarconoma ASTC-a-1 cell line and aimed to determine whether the apoptotic process was mediated by Bax activation and translocation during DHA-induced apoptosis. In this study, DHA induced a time-dependent apoptotic cell death, which was assayed by Cell Counting Kit (CCK-8) and Hoechst 33258 staining. Detection of Bax aggregation and translocation to mitochondria was observed in living cells which were co-transfected with GFP-Bax and Dsred-mito plasmid using confocal fluorescence microscope technique. Overall, these results demonstrated that Bax activation and translocation to mitochondria occurred during DHA-induced apoptosis.

  8. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Di Russo Case, Elizabeth; Samuel, James E

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without their hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH and contains degradative enzymes and reactive oxygen species, resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, such as Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia, escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  9. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Samuel, James E.

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host, and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without its hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH, and contains degradative enzymes, and reactive oxygen species resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, like Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  10. Comparative characteristic of mitochondria ultrastructural organization in Chlorella cells under altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A. F.

    2003-05-01

    Results from experiments that used cells from the unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris (strain Larg-1) grown on a clinostat, demonstrated the occurrence of rearrangements in cellular organelles, including changes in the mitochondrial ultrastructure compared to controls. Changes in mitochondrial structure were observed in auto- and heterotrophic regimes of cells grown in altered gravity conditions, especially in long-term experiments. The mitochondrial rearrangements become apparent during cell proliferation, which resulted in an increase in the relative volume of mitochondria per cell: up to 2.7±0.3% in short-term clino-rotation (2.2±0.1% in the control) and up to 5.3±0.4% and 5.1±0.4% in long-term clino-rotation (2.3±0.2% in the control). The size of the mitochondria and their cristae increased in cells grown under long-time clino-rotation. In addition, hypertrophied organelles, not typical for this strain, were observed. These changes in the cells were accompanied by increased electron density of the matrix and a well-ordered topography of the cristae. To examine the separation of oxidative phosphorylation and respiration, an inhibitory agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (2,4-DNP) was applied to cells which resulted in insignificant volume changes of the mitochondria (2.5±0.4% versus 2.1±0.2% in the control). The increase of mitochondrial size with regularly arranged cristae, with more condensed matrix and extension of cristae areas of clino-rotated cells, may demonstrate higher functional activity of the mitochondria under altered gravity conditions. Changes observed early in clino-rotated cells, in particular the increased level of respiration, adenylate content (especially ATP) and more intensive electron-cytochemical reactions of Mg 2+-ATPase and succinat dehydrogenase (SDH) in mitochondria (including hypertrophic organelles), also suggest increased activity of mitochondria from cells grown under altered gravity conditions compared to controls.

  11. Are maternal mitochondria the selfish entities that are masters of the cells of eukaryotic multicellular organisms?

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W; Baldelli, E; Baluška, Frantisek

    2009-01-01

    The Energide concept, as well as the endosymbiotic theory of eukaryotic cell organization and evolution, proposes that present-day cells of eukaryotic organisms are mosaics of specialized and cooperating units, or organelles. Some of these units were originally free-living prokaryotes, which were engulfed during evolutionary time. Mitochondria represent one of these types of previously independent organisms, the Energide, is another type. This new perspective on the organization of the cell has been further expanded to reveal the concept of a public milieu, the cytosol, in which Energides and mitochondria live, each with their own private internal milieu. The present paper discusses how the endosymbiotic theory implicates a new hypothesis about the hierarchical and communicational organization of the integrated prokaryotic components of the eukaryotic cell and provides a new angle from which to consider the theory of evolution and its bearing upon cellular complexity. Thus, it is proposed that the “selfish gene” hypothesis of Dawkins1 is not the only possible perspective for comprehending genomic and cellular evolution. Our proposal is that maternal mitochondria are the selfish “master” entities of the eukaryotic cell with respect not only to their propagation from cell-to-cell and from generation-to-generation but also to their regulation of all other cellular functions. However, it should be recognized that the concept of “master” and “servant” cell components is a metaphor; in present-day living organisms their organellar components are considered to be interdependent and inseparable. PMID:19513277

  12. Mitochondria-targeted heme oxygenase-1 decreases oxidative stress in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Traylor, Amie; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Johnson, Michelle S; Benavides, Gloria A; Ricart, Karina; Boddu, Ravindra; Moore, Ray D; Landar, Aimee; Barnes, Stephen; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Agarwal, Anupam

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria are both a source and target of the actions of reactive oxygen species and possess a complex system of inter-related antioxidants that control redox signaling and protect against oxidative stress. Interestingly, the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is not present in the mitochondria despite the fact that the organelle is the site of heme synthesis and contains multiple heme proteins. Detoxification of heme is an important protective mechanism since the reaction of heme with hydrogen peroxide generates pro-oxidant ferryl species capable of propagating oxidative stress and ultimately cell death. We therefore hypothesized that a mitochondrially localized HO-1 would be cytoprotective. To test this, we generated a mitochondria-targeted HO-1 cell line by transfecting HEK293 cells with a plasmid construct containing the manganese superoxide dismutase mitochondria leader sequence fused to HO-1 cDNA (Mito-HO-1). Nontargeted HO-1-overexpressing cells were generated by transfecting HO-1 cDNA (HO-1) or empty vector (Vector). Mitochondrial localization of HO-1 with increased HO activity in the mitochondrial fraction of Mito-HO-1 cells was observed, but a significant decrease in the expression of heme-containing proteins occurred in these cells. Both cytosolic HO-1- and Mito-HO-1-expressing cells were protected against hypoxia-dependent cell death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but these effects were more pronounced with Mito-HO-1. Furthermore, decrement in production of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates following hypoxia was significantly mitigated in Mito-HO-1 cells. These data suggest that specific mitochondrially targeted HO-1 under acute pathological conditions may have beneficial effects, but the selective advantage of long-term expression is constrained by a negative impact on the synthesis of heme-containing mitochondrial proteins.

  13. Iron alters cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bauckman, Kyle; Haller, Edward; Taran, Nicholas; Rockfield, Stephanie; Ruiz-Rivera, Abigail; Nanjundan, Meera

    2015-03-01

    The role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear. We previously reported that iron reduces cell survival in a Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent manner in ovarian cells; however, the underlying downstream pathway leading to reduced survival was unclear. Although levels of intracellular iron, ferritin/CD71 protein and reactive oxygen species did not correlate with iron-induced cell survival changes, we identified mitochondrial damage (via TEM) and reduced expression of outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (translocase of outer membrane: TOM20 and TOM70) in cell lines sensitive to iron. Interestingly, Ru360 (an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter) reversed mitochondrial changes and restored cell survival in HEY ovarian carcinoma cells treated with iron. Further, cells treated with Ru360 and iron also had reduced autophagic punctae with increased lysosomal numbers, implying cross-talk between these compartments. Mitochondrial changes were dependent on activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway since treatment with a MAPK inhibitor restored expression of TOM20/TOM70 proteins. Although glutathione antioxidant levels were reduced in HEY treated with iron, extracellular glutamate levels were unaltered. Strikingly, oxalomalate (inhibitor of aconitase, involved in glutamate production) reversed iron-induced responses in a similar manner to Ru360. Collectively, our results implicate iron in modulating cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent manner in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:25697096

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria interplay mediates apoptotic cell death: relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Arduíno, Daniela Moniz; Esteves, A Raquel; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-09-01

    Sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Many cellular mechanisms are thought to be involved in the death of these specific neurons in PD, including oxidative stress, changes of intracellular calcium homeostasis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Since recent studies have revealed that also endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in conjunction with abnormal protein degradation can contribute to the PD pathophysiology, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between ER and mitochondria and its relevance in the control of neuronal cell death in PD. We observed that MPP+ induced changes in the mitochondrial function, affecting mitochondrial membrane potential and electron transport chain function. Likewise, it was also evident the unfolded protein response activation by an overexpression of GRP78 protein. Moreover, stress stimuli caused the release of Ca2+ from the ER that consistently induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, with a rise of mitochondrial matrix free Ca2+. Besides, Ca2+ release inhibition prevented MPP+ mediated mitochondria-dependent caspases activation. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria are in a close communication, establishing a dynamic ER-Ca2+-mitochondria interconnection that can play a prominent role in the neuronal cell death induction under particular stressful circumstances of PD pathology.

  15. A host cell membrane microdomain is a critical factor for organelle discharge by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2016-10-01

    Host cell microdomains are involved in the attachment, entry, and replication of intracellular microbial pathogens. Entry into the host cell of Toxoplasma gondii and the subsequent survival of this protozoan parasite are tightly coupled with the proteins secreted from organelle called rhoptry. The rhoptry proteins are rapidly discharged into clusters of vesicles, called evacuoles, which are then delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) or nucleus. In this study, we examined the roles of two host cell microdomain components, cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), in evacuole formation. The acute depletion of cholesterol from the host cell plasma membrane blocked evacuole formation but not invasion. Whereas the lack of host cell GPI also altered evacuole formation but not invasion, instead inducing excess evacuole formation. The latter effect was not influenced by the evacuole-inhibiting effects of host cell cholesterol depletion, indicating the independent roles of host GPI and cholesterol in evacuole formation. In addition, the excess formation of evacuoles resulted in the enhanced recruitment of host mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum to PVs, which in turn stimulated the growth of the parasite. PMID:27217289

  16. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) engages the mitochondrial fission machinery to induce host cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Prashant; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Blanke, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    A number of pathogenic bacteria target mitochondria to modulate the host's apoptotic machinery. Studies here revealed that infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori disrupts the morphological dynamics of mitochondria as a mechanism to induce host cell death. The vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) is both essential and sufficient for inducing mitochondrial network fragmentation through the mitochondrial recruitment and activation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which is a critical regulator of mitochondrial fission within cells. Inhibition of Drp1-induced mitochondrial fission within VacA-intoxicated cells inhibited the activation of the proapoptotic Bcl-2–associated X (Bax) protein, permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane, and cell death. Our data reveal a heretofore unrecognized strategy by which a pathogenic microbe engages the host's apoptotic machinery. PMID:21903925

  17. Comparison of three methods for mitochondria isolation from the human liver cell line (HepG2)

    PubMed Central

    Azimzadeh, Pedram; Asadzadeh Aghdaei, Hamid; Tarban, Peyman; Akhondi, Mohammad Mahdi; Shirazi, Abolfazl; Khorram Khorshid, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare three available methods for mitochondrial isolation from a human cell line to predict the best method for each probable application. Background: Organelle isolation is gaining importance in experimental laboratory settings. Mitochondrial dysfunction may affect tumorgenesis process. There are some evidences that transplantation of healthy, intact and active mitochondria into cells containing defective mitochondria may reduce the proliferation. Therefore, isolated mitochondria could be considered as an effective tool for assessment and management of mitochondrial related disorders. Patients and methods: Mitochondrial isolation from the human liver cell line (HepG2) was performed using two commercially available kits, including Qproteome (Qiagen) and MITOISO2 (Sigma-Aldrich), as well as a manual method. Integrity of inner membrane of mitochondria was assessed by JC-1 staining. Activity of isolated mitochondria was evaluated by DCFH-DA staining, and total yield of isolated mitochondria determined by micro-Lowry method. Finally, relative quantification using Real-time PCR was conducted to compare the mtDNA copy number of mitochondria isolated by three different methods. Results: Compared to other methods, manual kit resulted in higher yields of total amount of mitochondrial protein and mtDNA copy numbers. Isolated mitochondria by Qproteome kit, showed a higher activity. Finally, the integrity of inner-membrane of isolated mitochondria was significantly higher in Qproteome when compared with the other two methods. Conclusion: Due to differences in quality, quantity and activity of isolated mitochondria using three techniques discussed here, the method in which best-suited to each research project should be selected according to the distinct features of isolated mitochondria. PMID:27099670

  18. Control of cell differentiation by mitochondria, typically evidenced in dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yasuo; Chida, Junji

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria are self-reproducing organelles with their own DNA and they play a central role in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis by respiration. Increasing evidence indicates that mitochondria also have critical and multiple functions in the initiation of cell differentiation, cell-type determination, cell movement, and pattern formation. This has been most strikingly realized in development of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. For example, the expression of the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S4 (mt-rps4) gene is required for the initial differentiation. The Dictyostelium homologue (Dd-TRAP1) of TRAP-1 (tumor necrosis receptor-associated protein 1), a mitochondrial molecular chaperone belonging to the Hsp90 family, allows the prompt transition of cells from growth to differentiation through a novel prestarvation factor (PSF-3) in growth medium. Moreover, a cell-type-specific organelle named a prespore-specific vacuole (PSV) is constructed by mitochondrial transformation with the help of the Golgi complex. Mitochondria are also closely involved in a variety of cellular activities including CN-resistant respiration and apoptosis. These mitochondrial functions are reviewed in this article, with special emphasis on the regulation of Dictyostelium development. PMID:24970198

  19. The Mitochondria-Mediate Apoptosis of Lepidopteran Cells Induced by Azadirachtin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jingfei; Lv, Chaojun; Hu, Meiying; Zhong, Guohua

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria have been shown to play an important role in apoptosis using mammalian cell lines. However, this seems not to be the case in Drosophila, an insect model organism; thus more in-depth studies of insect cell apoptosis are necessary. In the present study, mitochondrial involvement during azadirachtin- and camptothecin-induced apoptosis in Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 cells (isolated from Spodoptera frugiperda pupal ovarian tissue) was investigated. The results showed that both azadirachtin and camptothecin could induce apoptosis in Sf9 cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTPs) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were observed very early during apoptosis and were followed subsequently by the release of cytochrome-c from the mitochondria. Furthermore, the results also revealed that the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP induced by azadirachtin could be significantly inhibited by the permeability transition pore (PTP) inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA), which was used to identify the key role of mitochondria in the apoptosis of Sf9 cells. However, in camptothecin-treated Sf9 cells, CsA could not suppress the opening of MPTPs and the loss of MMP when apoptosis was induced. The data from caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity assays and detection of apoptosis by morphological observation and flow cytometry also uncovered the different effect of CsA on the two botanical apoptosis inducers. Although different mechanisms of apoptosis induction exist, our study revealed that mitochondria play a crucial role in insect cell line apoptosis. PMID:23516491

  20. Purity matters: A workflow for the valid high-resolution lipid profiling of mitochondria from cell culture samples

    PubMed Central

    Kappler, Lisa; Li, Jia; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Weigert, Cora; Lehmann, Rainer; Xu, Guowang; Hoene, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular lipidomics is a novel field of research that requires the careful combination of several pre-analytical and analytical steps. To define a reliable strategy for mitochondrial lipid profiling, we performed a systematic comparison of different mitochondria isolation procedures by western blot analyses and comprehensive high-resolution lipidomics. Using liver-derived HepG2 cells, we compared three common mitochondria isolation methods, differential centrifugation (DC), ultracentrifugation (UC) and a magnetic bead-assisted method (MACS). In total, 397 lipid species, including 32 cardiolipins, could be quantified in only 100 μg (by protein) of purified mitochondria. Mitochondria isolated by UC showed the highest enrichment in the mitochondria-specific cardiolipins as well as their precursors, phosphatidylglycerols. Mitochondrial fractions obtained by the commonly used DC and the more recent MACS method contained substantial contaminations by other organelles. Employing these isolation methods when performing lipidomics analyses from cell culture mitochondria may lead to inaccurate results. To conclude, we present a protocol how to obtain reliable mitochondria-specific lipid profiles from cell culture samples and show that quality controls are indispensable when performing mitochondria lipidomics. PMID:26892142

  1. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) regulate intracellular positioning of mitochondria in MC3T3-E1 cells.

    PubMed

    Rajapakshe, Anupama R; Podyma-Inoue, Katarzyna A; Terasawa, Kazue; Hasegawa, Katsuya; Namba, Toshimitsu; Kumei, Yasuhiro; Yanagishita, Masaki; Hara-Yokoyama, Miki

    2015-02-01

    The intracellular positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria meets the requirements of degradation and energy supply, which are respectively the two major functions for cellular maintenance. The positioning of both lysosomes and mitochondria is apparently affected by the nutrient status of the cells. However, the mechanism coordinating the positioning of the organelles has not been sufficiently elucidated. Lysosome-associated membrane proteins-1 and -2 (LAMP-1 and LAMP-2) are highly glycosylated proteins that are abundant in lysosomal membranes. In the present study, we demonstrated that the siRNA-mediated downregulation of LAMP-1, LAMP-2 or their combination enhanced the perinuclear localization of mitochondria, in the pre-osteoblastic cell line MC3T3-E1. On the other hand, in the osteocytic cell line MLO-Y4, in which both the lysosomes and mitochondria originally accumulate in the perinuclear region and mitochondria also fill dendrites, the effect of siRNA of LAMP-1 or LAMP-2 was barely observed. LAMPs are not directly associated with mitochondria, and there do not seem to be any accessory molecules commonly required to recruit the motor proteins to lysosomes and mitochondria. Our results suggest that LAMPs may regulate the positioning of lysosomes and mitochondria. A possible mechanism involving the indirect and context-dependent action of LAMPs is discussed.

  2. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism. PMID:26461179

  3. Neural cell apoptosis induced by microwave exposure through mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856 GHz for 5 min and 15 min, respectively, at an average power density of 30  mW/cm². JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation.

  4. Carbon monoxide impairs mitochondria-dependent endosomal maturation and antigen presentation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Sebastián A; Pogu, Julien; Anegon, Ignacio; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-12-01

    Heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) prevents T cell-mediated inflammatory disease by producing carbon monoxide (CO) and impairing DC immunogenicity. However, the cellular mechanisms causing this inhibition are unknown. Here, we show that CO impairs mitochondrial function in DCs by reducing both the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production, and resembling the effect of a nonlethal dose of a classical mitochondria uncoupler carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP). Moreover, both CO and CCCP reduced cargo transport, endosome-to-lysosome fusion, and antigen processing, dampening the production of peptide-MHC complexes on the surface of DCs. As a result, the inhibition of naive CD4(+) T-cell priming was observed. Furthermore, mitochondrial dysfunction in DCs also significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent type 1 diabetes onset in vivo. These results showed for the first time that CO interferes with T-cell priming by blocking an unknown mitochondria-dependent antigen-processing pathway in mature DC. Interestingly, other immune functions in DCs such as antigen capture, cytokine secretion, costimulation, and cell survival relied on glycolysis, suggesting that oxidative phosphorylation might only play a key role for the maturation of antigen-containing endosomes. In conclusion, CO produced by HO-1 impairs antigen-dependent inflammation by regulating DC immunogenicity by a mitochondria-dependent mechanism.

  5. Neural Cell Apoptosis Induced by Microwave Exposure Through Mitochondria-dependent Caspase-3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Hongyan; Lin, Tao; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Shuiming; Gao, Yabing; Xu, Xinping; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Zhao, Li; Wang, Lifeng; Zhou, Hongmei

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether microwave (MW) radiation induces neural cell apoptosis, differentiated PC12 cells and Wistar rats were exposed to 2.856GHz for 5min and 15min, respectively, at an average power density of 30 mW/cm2. JC-1 and TUNEL staining detected significant apoptotic events, such as the loss of mitochondria membrane potential and DNA fragmentation, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy and Hoechst staining were used to observe chromatin ultrastructure and apoptotic body formation. Annexin V-FITC/PI double staining was used to quantify the level of apoptosis. The expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP were examined by immunoblotting or immunocytochemistry. Caspase-3 activity was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation in neural cells 6h after microwave exposure. Moreover, the mitochondria membrane potential decreased, DNA fragmentation increased, leading to an increase in the apoptotic cell percentage. Furthermore, the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, expression of cytochrome c, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP all increased. In conclusion, microwave radiation induced neural cell apoptosis via the classical mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. This study may provide the experimental basis for further investigation of the mechanism of the neurological effects induced by microwave radiation. PMID:24688304

  6. HIV: master of the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Christopher W; Littman, Dan R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus has evolved various mechanisms to exploit its host cells, including the interruption and augmentation of signal transduction pathways. Recently, two DNA microarray studies have illustrated a remarkably broad-based perturbation in host transcriptional responses, which is in part mediated by the HIV-encoded Nef protein. HIV therefore seems to function as a 'master regulator' of cellular gene expression. PMID:11737949

  7. The Salmonella effector SopB prevents ROS-induced apoptosis of epithelial cells by retarding TRAF6 recruitment to mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Haihua; Zhang, Zhen; Tian, Li; Wang, Suying; Hu, Shuangyan; Qiao, Jian-Jun

    2016-09-16

    Microbial pathogens enter host cells by injecting effector proteins of the Type III secretion system (T3SS), which facilitate pathogen translocation across the host cell membrane. These effector proteins exert their effects by modulating a variety of host innate immune responses, thereby facilitating bacterial replication and systemic infection. Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium (S.typhimurium) is a clinically important pathogen that causes food poisoning and gastroenteritis. The SopB effector protein of S. typhimurium, encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI)-1 T3SS, protects host epithelial cells from infection-induced apoptosis. However, how SopB influences apoptosis induction remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism of SopB action in host cells. We found that SopB inhibits infection-induced apoptosis by attenuating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria, the crucial organelles for apoptosis initiation. Further investigation revealed that SopB binds to cytosolic tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and forms a trap preventing the mitochondrial recruitment of TRAF6, an essential event for ROS generation within mitochondria. By studying the response of Traf6(+/+) and Traf6(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts to S. typhimurium infection, we found that TRAF6 promoted apoptosis by increasing ROS accumulation, which led to increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, Bax recruitment to mitochondrial membrane, and release of Cyt c into the cytoplasm. These findings show that SopB suppresses host cell apoptosis by binding to TRAF6 and preventing mitochondrial ROS generation. PMID:27473656

  8. Mitochondria are intracellular magnesium stores: investigation by simultaneous fluorescent imagings in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Takeshi; Shindo, Yutaka; Tokuno, Kentaro; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroto; Kudo, Susumu; Kitamura, Yoshiichiro; Suzuki, Koji; Oka, Kotaro

    2005-05-15

    To determine the nature of intracellular Mg2+ stores and Mg2+ release mechanisms in differentiated PC12 cells, Mg2+ and Ca2+ mobilizations were measured simultaneously in living cells with KMG-104, a fluorescent Mg2+ indicator, and fura-2, respectively. Treatment with the mitochondrial uncoupler, carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), increased both the intracellular Mg2+ concentration ([Mg2+]i) and the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Possible candidates as intracellular Mg2+ stores under these conditions include intracellular divalent cation binding sites, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Mg-ATP and mitochondria. Given that no change in [Mg2+]i was induced by caffeine application, intracellular IP3 or Ca2+ liberated by photolysis, it appears that no Mg2+ release mechanism thus exists that is mediated via the action of Ca2+ on membrane-bound receptors in the ER or via the offloading of Mg2+ from binding sites as a result of the increased [Ca2+]i. FCCP treatment for 2 min did not alter the intracellular ATP content, indicating that Mg2+ was not released from Mg-ATP, at least in the first 2 min following exposure to FCCP. FCCP-induced [Mg2+]i increase was observed at mitochondria localized area, and vice versa. These results suggest that the mitochondria serve as the intracellular Mg2+ store in PC12 cell. Simultaneous measurements of [Ca2+]i and mitochondrial membrane potential, and also of [Ca2+]i and [Mg2+]i, revealed that the initial rise in [Mg2+]i followed that of mitochondrial depolarization for several seconds. These findings show that the source of Mg2+ in the FCCP-induced [Mg2+]i increase in PC12 cells is mitochondria, and that mitochondrial depolarization triggers the Mg2+ release.

  9. Contributions of mitochondria to animal physiology: from homeostatic sensor to calcium signalling and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    Over recent years, it has become clear that mitochondria play a central role in many key aspects of animal physiology and pathophysiology. Their central and ubiquitous task is clearly the production of ATP. Nevertheless, they also play subtle roles in glucose homeostasis, acting as the sensor for substrate supply in the transduction pathway that promotes insulin secretion by the pancreatic β-cell and that modulates the excitability of the hypothalamic glucose-sensitive neurons involved in appetite control. Mitochondria may also act as sensors of availability of oxygen, the other major mitochondrial substrate, in the regulation of respiration. Mitochondria take up calcium, and the high capacity mitochondrial calcium uptake pathway provides a mechanism that couples energy demand to increased ATP production through the calcium-dependent upregulation of mitochondrial enzyme activity. Mitochondrial calcium accumulation may also have a substantial impact on the spatiotemporal dynamics of cellular calcium signals, with subtle differences of detail in different cell types. Recent work has also revealed the centrality of mitochondrial dysfunction as an irreversible step in the pathway to both necrotic and apoptotic cell death. This review looks at recent developments in these rapidly evolving areas of cell physiology in an attempt to draw together disparate areas of research into a common theme. PMID:10066918

  10. Akt is translocated to the mitochondria during etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoungduck; Je, Young-Tae; Chun, Kwang-Hoon

    2015-11-01

    Akt, or protein kinase B, is a key serine-threonine kinase, which exerts anti-apoptotic effects and promotes cell proliferation in response to various stimuli. Recently, however, it was demonstrated that Akt exhibits a proapoptotic role in certain contexts. During etoposide‑induced apoptosis of HeLa cells, Akt enhances the interaction of second mitochondria‑derived activator of caspases/direct IAP binding protein with low pI (Smac/DIABLO) and X‑linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein by phosphorylating Smac at serine 67, and thus promotes apoptosis. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying Akt regulation in etoposide‑mediated apoptosis remain to be determined. The present study investigated whether etoposide triggers the translocation of Akt into the mitochondria. It was found that Akt activity was increased and sustained during apoptosis triggered by etoposide in HeLa cells. During apoptosis, Akt was translocated from the cytoplasm into the mitochondria in a phosphoinositide 3‑kinase-dependent manner at the early and late stages of apoptosis. Concomitantly, the depletion of Akt in the nuclear fraction was observed after etoposide treatment from analysis of confocal microscopy. The results suggest that etoposide‑stimulated Akt is translocated into the mitochondria, thereby possibly enhancing its interaction with Smac and promoting apoptosis in HeLa cells. These results indicate that Akt may be a promising candidate for a pro-apoptotic approach in cancer treatment.

  11. Metabolic shift in lung alveolar cell mitochondria following acrolein exposure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-11-15

    Acrolein, an α,β unsaturated electrophile, is an environmental pollutant released in ambient air from diesel exhausts and cooking oils. This study examines the role of acrolein in altering mitochondrial function and metabolism in lung-specific cells. RLE-6TN, H441, and primary alveolar type II (pAT2) cells were exposed to acrolein for 4 h, and its effect on mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates was studied by XF Extracellular Flux analysis. Low-dose acrolein exposure decreased mitochondrial respiration in a dose-dependent manner because of alteration in the metabolism of glucose in all the three cell types. Acrolein inhibited glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, leading to decreased substrate availability for mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN, H441, and pAT2 cells; the reduced GAPDH activity was compensated in pAT2 cells by an increase in the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, the regulatory control of the pentose phosphate pathway. The decrease in pyruvate from glucose metabolism resulted in utilization of alternative sources to support mitochondrial energy production: palmitate-BSA complex increased mitochondrial respiration in RLE-6TN and pAT2 cells. The presence of palmitate in alveolar cells for surfactant biosynthesis may prove to be the alternative fuel source for mitochondrial respiration. Accordingly, a decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and an increase in phospholipase A2 activity were found in the alveolar cells after acrolein exposure. These findings have implications for understanding the decrease in surfactant levels frequently observed in pathophysiological situations with altered lung function following exposure to environmental toxicants.

  12. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity.

  13. GLP-1 promotes mitochondrial metabolism in vascular smooth muscle cells by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Morales, Pablo E; Torres, Gloria; Sotomayor-Flores, Cristian; Peña-Oyarzún, Daniel; Rivera-Mejías, Pablo; Paredes, Felipe; Chiong, Mario

    2014-03-28

    Incretin GLP-1 has important metabolic effects on several tissues, mainly through the regulation of glucose uptake and usage. One mechanism for increasing cell metabolism is modulating endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria communication, as it allows for a more efficient transfer of Ca(2+) into the mitochondria, thereby increasing activity. Control of glucose metabolism is essential for proper vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function. GLP-1 has been shown to produce varied metabolic actions, but whether it regulates glucose metabolism in VSMC remains unknown. In this report, we show that GLP-1 increases mitochondrial activity in the aortic cell line A7r5 by increasing ER-mitochondria coupling. GLP-1 increases intracellular glucose and diminishes glucose uptake without altering glycogen content. ATP, mitochondrial potential and oxygen consumption increase at 3h of GLP-1 treatment, paralleled by increased Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to the mitochondria. Furthermore, GLP-1 increases levels of Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), an ER-mitochondria tethering protein, via a PKA-dependent mechanism. Accordingly, PKA inhibition and Mfn2 down-regulation prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) increases in GLP-1 treated cells. Inhibiting both Ca(2+) release from the ER and Ca(2+) entry into mitochondria as well as diminishing Mfn2 levels blunted the increase in mitochondrial activity in response to GLP-1. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that GLP-1 increases ER-mitochondria communication in VSMC, resulting in higher mitochondrial activity. PMID:24613839

  14. Mitochondria are targets for peroxisome-derived oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Rubio, Noemí; Nordgren, Marcus; Apanasets, Oksana; Kunze, Markus; Baes, Myriam; Agostinis, Patrizia; Fransen, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by spatially and temporally regulated redox-dependent signaling events. Although mounting evidence indicates that organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can function as signaling platforms for oxidative stress-regulated pathways, little is known about the role of peroxisomes in these processes. In this study, we employ targeted variants of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed to gain a better insight into the interplay between peroxisomes and cellular oxidative stress. We show that the phototoxic effects of peroxisomal KillerRed induce mitochondria-mediated cell death and that this process can be counteracted by targeted overexpression of a select set of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxisomal glutathione S-transferase kappa 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and mitochondrial catalase. We also present evidence that peroxisomal disease cell lines deficient in plasmalogen biosynthesis or peroxisome assembly are more sensitive to KillerRed-induced oxidative stress than control cells. Collectively, these findings confirm and extend previous observations suggesting that disturbances in peroxisomal redox control and metabolism can sensitize cells to oxidative stress. In addition, they lend strong support to the ideas that peroxisomes and mitochondria share a redox-sensitive relationship and that the redox communication between these organelles is not only mediated by diffusion of reactive oxygen species from one compartment to the other. Finally, these findings indicate that mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress, and this may have profound implications for our views on cellular aging and age-related diseases.

  15. Ultrasensitive fluorescent ratio imaging probe for the detection of glutathione ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Caixia; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Jiang, Kai

    2016-11-15

    Glutathione (GSH) ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells can mildly and effectively induce cancer cells apoptosis in early stage. Thus, if GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells could be recognized and imaged, it will be beneficial for fundamental research of cancer therapy. There have reported a lot of fluorescent probes for GSH, but the fluorescent probe with ultrasensitivity and high selectivity for the ratio imaging of GSH ultratrace changes in mitochondria of cancer cells is scarce. Herein, based on different reaction mechanism of sulfonamide under different pH, a sulfonamide-based reactive ratiometric fluorescent probe (IQDC-M) was reported for the recognizing and imaging of GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells. The detection limit of IQDC-M for GSH ultratrace change is low to 2.02nM, which is far less than 1.0‰ of endogenic GSH in living cells. And during the recognition process, IQDC-M can emit different fluorescent signals at 520nm and 592nm, which results in it recognizing GSH ultratrace change on ratio mode. More importantly, IQDC-M recognizing GSH ultratrace change specifically occurs in mitochondria of cancer cells because of appropriate water/oil amphipathy (log P) of IQDC-M. So, these make IQDC-M possible to image and monitor GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria during cancer cells apoptosis for the first time. PMID:27156018

  16. Ultrasensitive fluorescent ratio imaging probe for the detection of glutathione ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Caixia; Wang, Kui; Xuan, Xiaopeng; Lv, Qingzhang; Jiang, Kai

    2016-11-15

    Glutathione (GSH) ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells can mildly and effectively induce cancer cells apoptosis in early stage. Thus, if GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells could be recognized and imaged, it will be beneficial for fundamental research of cancer therapy. There have reported a lot of fluorescent probes for GSH, but the fluorescent probe with ultrasensitivity and high selectivity for the ratio imaging of GSH ultratrace changes in mitochondria of cancer cells is scarce. Herein, based on different reaction mechanism of sulfonamide under different pH, a sulfonamide-based reactive ratiometric fluorescent probe (IQDC-M) was reported for the recognizing and imaging of GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria of cancer cells. The detection limit of IQDC-M for GSH ultratrace change is low to 2.02nM, which is far less than 1.0‰ of endogenic GSH in living cells. And during the recognition process, IQDC-M can emit different fluorescent signals at 520nm and 592nm, which results in it recognizing GSH ultratrace change on ratio mode. More importantly, IQDC-M recognizing GSH ultratrace change specifically occurs in mitochondria of cancer cells because of appropriate water/oil amphipathy (log P) of IQDC-M. So, these make IQDC-M possible to image and monitor GSH ultratrace change in mitochondria during cancer cells apoptosis for the first time.

  17. Mitochondria mediates caspase-dependent and independent retinal cell death in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision-threatening complication of ocular surgery or trauma, is characterized by increased intraocular inflammation and retinal tissue damage. Although significant vision loss in endophthalmitis has been linked to retinal cell death, the underlying mechanisms of cell death remain elusive. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis and cultured human retinal Müller glia (MIO-M1 cell line), we demonstrate that S. aureus caused significant apoptotic cell death in the mouse retina and Müller glia, as evidenced by increased number of terminal dUTP nick end labeling and Annexin V and propidium iodide-positive cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot studies revealed the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1 staining), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 in S. aureus-infected retina/retinal cells. In addition, the activation of PARP-1 and the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria was also observed in S. aureus-infected retinal cells. Inhibition studies using pan-caspase (Q-VD-OPH) and PARP-1 (DPQ) inhibitors showed significant reduction in S. aureus-induced retinal cell death both in vivo and in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that in bacterial endophthalmitis, retinal cells undergo apoptosis in the both caspase-dependent and independent manners, and mitochondria have a central role in this process. Hence, targeting the identified signaling pathways may provide the rationale to design therapeutic interventions to prevent bystander retinal tissue damage in bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:27551524

  18. Mitochondria mediates caspase-dependent and independent retinal cell death in Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, P K; Kumar, A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision-threatening complication of ocular surgery or trauma, is characterized by increased intraocular inflammation and retinal tissue damage. Although significant vision loss in endophthalmitis has been linked to retinal cell death, the underlying mechanisms of cell death remain elusive. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus endophthalmitis and cultured human retinal Müller glia (MIO-M1 cell line), we demonstrate that S. aureus caused significant apoptotic cell death in the mouse retina and Müller glia, as evidenced by increased number of terminal dUTP nick end labeling and Annexin V and propidium iodide-positive cells. Immunohistochemistry and western blot studies revealed the reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (JC-1 staining), release of cytochrome c into the cytosol, translocation of Bax to the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-9 and -3 in S. aureus-infected retina/retinal cells. In addition, the activation of PARP-1 and the release of apoptosis inducing factor from mitochondria was also observed in S. aureus-infected retinal cells. Inhibition studies using pan-caspase (Q-VD-OPH) and PARP-1 (DPQ) inhibitors showed significant reduction in S. aureus-induced retinal cell death both in vivo and in vitro. Together, our findings demonstrate that in bacterial endophthalmitis, retinal cells undergo apoptosis in the both caspase-dependent and independent manners, and mitochondria have a central role in this process. Hence, targeting the identified signaling pathways may provide the rationale to design therapeutic interventions to prevent bystander retinal tissue damage in bacterial endophthalmitis. PMID:27551524

  19. Targetable fluorescent probe for monitoring exogenous and endogenous NO in mitochondria of living cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Zhang, Xinfu; Xiao, Yi; Zou, Wei; Wang, Liping; Jin, Liji

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous cellular messenger molecule in the cardiovascular, nervous, and immune systems. Mitochondrion is the main area where endogenous NO is synthesized by inducible NOS enzymes in mammalian cells. Thus, real-time monitoring NO in mitochondria is very meaningful for NO chemical biology. Although a variety of fluorescent probes for NO have been successfully developed, they are not suited for detecting mitochondrial NO because none of them can specifically localize in mitochondria. Herein, Mito-Rh-NO, the first mitochondria-targetable "turn-on" fluorescent probe for NO, has been developed through attaching a triphenylphosphonium to a rhodamine spirolactam. The characteristics of this probe are as following: (1) Mito-Rh-NO exhibits high sensitivity toward NO. In solution, Mito-Rh-NO responds to NO by significant fluorescence enhancement up to 60-fold, and its NO detection limit is as low as 4.0 nM. (2) The NO sensing of Mito-Rh-NO is highly selective, which will not interfere with the other reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. (3) Mito-Rh-NO has a low cytotoxic effect: after being treated with 10 μM Mito-Rh-NO for 24 h, the survival rate is higher than 90%. (4) Mito-Rh-NO specifically localizing in mitochondria: colocalization experiment of Mito-Rh-NO and Rh 123, a typical mitotracker, shows the merged fluorescent microcopy image with a high Pearson's colocalization coefficient 0.92 and overlap coefficient 0.99. (5) Mito-Rh-NO demonstrates high applicability for real-time monitoring of mitochondrial NO in live cells. Both the exogenous NO released by the donor NOC13 and endogenous NO generated in cells under stimulation have been visualized under confocal microscopy.

  20. A Mitochondria-Targeted Nitroxide/Hemigramicidin S Conjugate Protects Mouse Embryonic Cells Against Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jianfei; Belikova, Natalia A.; Hoye, Adam T.; Zhao Qing; Epperly, Michael W.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Wipf, Peter; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the in vitro radioprotective effect of the mitochondria-targeted hemigramicidin S-conjugated 4-amino-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-N-oxyl (hemi-GS-TEMPO) 5-125 in {gamma}-irradiated mouse embryonic cells and adenovirus-12 SV40 hybrid virus transformed human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B and explore the mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect. Methods and Materials: Cells were incubated with 5-125 before (10 minutes) or after (1 hour) {gamma}-irradiation. Superoxide generation was determined by using dihydroethidium assay, and lipid oxidation was quantitated by using a fluorescence high-performance liquid chromatography-based Amplex Red assay. Apoptosis was characterized by evaluating the accumulation of cytochrome c in the cytosol and externalization of phosphatidylserine on the cell surface. Cell survival was measured by means of a clonogenic assay. Results: Treatment (before and after irradiation) of cells with 5-125 at low concentrations (5, 10, and 20 {mu}M) effectively suppressed {gamma}-irradiation-induced superoxide generation, cardiolipin oxidation, and delayed irradiation-induced apoptosis, evaluated by using cytochrome c release and phosphatidylserine externalization. Importantly, treatment with 5-125 increased the clonogenic survival rate of {gamma}-irradiated cells. In addition, 5-125 enhanced and prolonged {gamma}-irradiation-induced G{sub 2}/M phase arrest. Conclusions: Radioprotection/mitigation by hemi-GS-TEMPO likely is caused by its ability to act as an electron scavenger and prevent superoxide generation, attenuate cardiolipin oxidation in mitochondria, and hence prevent the release of proapoptotic factors from mitochondria. Other mechanisms, including cell-cycle arrest at the G{sub 2}/M phase, may contribute to the protection.

  1. Exploitation of host cells by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Mark P; Galyov, Edouard E

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved mechanisms to enter and exit eukaryotic cells using the power of actin polymerisation and to subvert the activity of cellular enzymes and signal transduction pathways. The proteins deployed by bacteria to subvert cellular processes often mimic eukaryotic proteins in their structure or function. Studies on the exploitation of host cells by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei are providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of melioidosis, a serious invasive disease of animals and humans that is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas. B. pseudomallei can invade epithelial cells, survive and proliferate inside phagocytes, escape from endocytic vesicles, form actin-based membrane protrusions and induce host cell fusion. Here we review current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes.

  2. Bcl-xL stimulates Bax relocation to mitochondria and primes cells to ABT-737.

    PubMed

    Renault, Thibaud T; Teijido, Oscar; Missire, Florent; Ganesan, Yogesh Tengarai; Velours, Gisèle; Arokium, Hubert; Beaumatin, Florian; Llanos, Raul; Athané, Axel; Camougrand, Nadine; Priault, Muriel; Antonsson, Bruno; Dejean, Laurent M; Manon, Stéphen

    2015-07-01

    Bax cytosol-to-mitochondria translocation is a central event of the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Bcl-xL is an important regulator of this event and was recently shown to promote the retrotranslocation of mitochondrial Bax to the cytosol. The present study identifies a new aspect of the regulation of Bax localization by Bcl-xL: in addition to its role in Bax inhibition and retrotranslocation, we found that, like with Bcl-2, an increase of Bcl-xL expression levels led to an increase of Bax mitochondrial content. This finding was substantiated both in pro-lymphocytic FL5.12 cells and a yeast reporting system. Bcl-xL-dependent increase of mitochondrial Bax is counterbalanced by retrotranslocation, as we observed that Bcl-xLΔC, which is unable to promote Bax retrotranslocation, was more efficient than the full-length protein in stimulating Bax relocation to mitochondria. Interestingly, cells overexpressing Bcl-xL were more sensitive to apoptosis upon treatment with the BH3-mimetic ABT-737, suggesting that despite its role in Bax inhibition, Bcl-xL also primes mitochondria to permeabilization and cytochrome c release. PMID:25862283

  3. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation in ascites tumor mitochondria and cells by intramitochondrial Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Villalobo, A; Lehninger, A L

    1980-03-25

    Accumulation of Ca2+ (+ phosphate) by respiring mitochondria from Ehrlich ascites or AS30-D hepatoma tumor cells inhibits subsequent phosphorylating respiration in response to ADP. The respiratory chain is still functional since a proton-conducting uncoupler produces a normal stimulation of electron transport. The inhibition of phosphorylating respiration is caused by intramitochondrial Ca2+ (+ phosphate). ATP + Mg2+ together, but not singly, prevents the inhibitory action of Ca2+. Neither AMP, GTP, GDP, nor any other nucleoside 5'-triphosphate or 5'-diphosphate could replace ATP in this effect. Phosphorylating respiration on NAD(NADP)-linked substrates was much more susceptible to the inhibitory effect of intramitochondrial Ca2+ than succinate-linked respiration. Significant inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is given by the endogenous Ca2+ present in freshly isolated tumor mitochondria. The phosphorylating respiration of permeabilized Ehrlich ascites tumor cells is also inhibited by Ca2+ accumulated by the mitochondria in situ. Possible causes of the Ca2+-induced inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation are considered.

  4. Morphological Dynamics of Mitochondria – A Special Emphasis on Cardiac Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hom, Jennifer; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in cellular energy metabolism, Ca2+ homeostasis, reactive oxygen species generation, apoptosis, aging, and development. Many recent publications have shown that a continuous balance of fusion and fission of these organelles is important in maintaining their proper function. Therefore, there is a steep correlation between the form and function of mitochondria. Many major proteins involved in mitochondrial fusion and fission have been identified in different cell types, including heart. However, the functional role of mitochondrial dynamics in the heart remains, for the most part, unexplored. In this review we will cover the recent field of mitochondrial dynamics and its physiological and pathological implications, with a particular emphasis on the experimental and theoretical basis of mitochondrial dynamics in the heart. PMID:19281816

  5. Starvation Induced Cell Death in Autophagy-Defective Yeast Mutants Is Caused by Mitochondria Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sho W.; Onodera, Jun; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT) cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA). We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants. PMID:21364763

  6. Starvation induced cell death in autophagy-defective yeast mutants is caused by mitochondria dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sho W; Onodera, Jun; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2011-02-25

    Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT) cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA). We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants.

  7. Shikonin Directly Targets Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiench, Benjamin; Eichhorn, Tolga; Paulsen, Malte; Efferth, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemotherapy is a mainstay of cancer treatment. Due to increased drug resistance and the severe side effects of currently used therapeutics, new candidate compounds are required for improvement of therapy success. Shikonin, a natural naphthoquinone, was used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of different inflammatory diseases and recent studies revealed the anticancer activities of shikonin. We found that shikonin has strong cytotoxic effects on 15 cancer cell lines, including multidrug-resistant cell lines. Transcriptome-wide mRNA expression studies showed that shikonin induced genetic pathways regulating cell cycle, mitochondrial function, levels of reactive oxygen species, and cytoskeletal formation. Taking advantage of the inherent fluorescence of shikonin, we analyzed its uptake and distribution in live cells with high spatial and temporal resolution using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Shikonin was specifically accumulated in the mitochondria, and this accumulation was associated with a shikonin-dependent deregulation of cellular Ca2+ and ROS levels. This deregulation led to a breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential, dysfunction of microtubules, cell-cycle arrest, and ultimately induction of apoptosis. Seeing as both the metabolism and the structure of mitochondria show marked differences between cancer cells and normal cells, shikonin is a promising candidate for the next generation of chemotherapy. PMID:23118796

  8. Dihydroartemisinin induces apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells through the mitochondria-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Sun, Luhaoran; Zhou, Jin; Yang, Jing

    2014-06-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semisynthetic derivative of artemisinin isolated from the traditional Chinese herb Artemisia annua, has been shown to exhibit antitumor activity in various cancer cells, including colorectal cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying its antitumor activity in colorectal cancer remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated DHA-induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer HCT-116 cells in vitro. The results showed that DHA treatment significantly reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, DHA induced G1 cell cycle arrest, apoptotic cell death, and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also found that DHA decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential; activated the caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9; and increased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2. Meanwhile, the translocation of apoptotic inducing factor (AIF) and the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria were observed. Strikingly, the free radical scavenger N-acetylcysteine or the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO significantly prevented DHA-induced apoptotic cell death. Taken together, we concluded that DHA-triggered apoptosis in HCT-116 cells occurs through the ROS-mediated mitochondria-dependent pathway. Our data suggest that DHA has great potential to be developed as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:24519064

  9. Cell culture models to investigate the selective vulnerability of motoneuronal mitochondria to familial ALS-linked G93ASOD1.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Andrea; Mangolini, Alessandra; Rizzardini, Milena; Tartari, Silvia; Massari, Silvia; Bendotti, Caterina; Francolini, Maura; Borgese, Nica; Cantoni, Lavinia; Pietrini, Grazia

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial damage induced by superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mutants has been proposed to have a causative role in the selective degeneration of motoneurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In order to investigate the basis of the tissue specificity of mutant SOD1 we compared the effect of the continuous expression of wild-type or mutant (G93A) human SOD1 on mitochondrial morphology in the NSC-34 motoneuronal-like, the N18TG2 neuroblastoma and the non-neuronal Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cell lines. Morphological alterations of mitochondria were observed in NSC-34 expressing the G93A mutant (NSC-G93A) but not the wild-type SOD1, whereas a ten-fold greater level of total expression of the mutant had no effect on mitochondria of non-motoneuronal cell lines. Fragmented network, swelling and cristae remodelling but not vacuolization of mitochondria or other intracellular organelles were observed only in NSC-G93A cells. The mitochondrial alterations were not explained by a preferential localization of the mutant within NSC-G93A mitochondria, as a higher amount of the mutant SOD1 was found in mitochondria of MDCK-G93A cells. Our results suggest that mitochondrial vulnerability of motoneurons to G93ASOD1 is recapitulated in NSC-34 cells, and that peculiar features in network dynamics may account for the selective alterations of motoneuronal mitochondria. PMID:16903849

  10. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  11. Superoxide produced in the matrix of mitochondria enhances methylmercury toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-12-15

    The mechanism of intracellular metabolism of methylmercury (MeHg) is not fully known. It has been shown that superoxide (O2(-)), the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria, is responsible for MeHg demethylation. Here, we investigated the impact of different mitochondrial respiratory inhibitors, namely rotenone and antimycin A, on the O2(-)mediated degradation of MeHg in human neuroblastoma cells SH-K-SN. We also utilized paraquat (PQ) which generates O2(-) in the mitochondrial matrix. We found that the cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg was highly dependent on the topology of O2(-) production by mitochondria. Both rotenone and PQ, which increase O2(-) in the mitochondrial matrix at a dose-dependent manner, enhanced the conversion of MeHg to inorganic mercury (iHg). Surprisingly, antimycin A, which prompts emission of O2(-) into the intermembrane space, did not have the same effect even though antimycin A induced a dose dependent increase in O2(-) emission. Rotenone and PQ also enhanced the toxicity of sub-toxic doses (0.1 μM) MeHg which correlated with the accumulation of iHg in mitochondria and depletion of mitochondrial protein thiols. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MeHg degradation is mediated by mitochondrial O2(-), specifically within the matrix of mitochondria when O2(-) is in adequate supply. Our results also show that O2(-) amplifies MeHg toxicity specifically through its conversion to iHg and subsequent interaction with protein cysteine thiols (R-SH). The implications of our findings in mercury neurotoxicity are discussed herein. PMID:26545714

  12. Superoxide produced in the matrix of mitochondria enhances methylmercury toxicity in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-12-15

    The mechanism of intracellular metabolism of methylmercury (MeHg) is not fully known. It has been shown that superoxide (O2(-)), the proximal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by mitochondria, is responsible for MeHg demethylation. Here, we investigated the impact of different mitochondrial respiratory inhibitors, namely rotenone and antimycin A, on the O2(-)mediated degradation of MeHg in human neuroblastoma cells SH-K-SN. We also utilized paraquat (PQ) which generates O2(-) in the mitochondrial matrix. We found that the cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg was highly dependent on the topology of O2(-) production by mitochondria. Both rotenone and PQ, which increase O2(-) in the mitochondrial matrix at a dose-dependent manner, enhanced the conversion of MeHg to inorganic mercury (iHg). Surprisingly, antimycin A, which prompts emission of O2(-) into the intermembrane space, did not have the same effect even though antimycin A induced a dose dependent increase in O2(-) emission. Rotenone and PQ also enhanced the toxicity of sub-toxic doses (0.1 μM) MeHg which correlated with the accumulation of iHg in mitochondria and depletion of mitochondrial protein thiols. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MeHg degradation is mediated by mitochondrial O2(-), specifically within the matrix of mitochondria when O2(-) is in adequate supply. Our results also show that O2(-) amplifies MeHg toxicity specifically through its conversion to iHg and subsequent interaction with protein cysteine thiols (R-SH). The implications of our findings in mercury neurotoxicity are discussed herein.

  13. Diversity in host clone performance within a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Peter M; Berthelot, Maud E; Young, Robert J; Graham, James W A; Racher, Andrew J; Aldana, Dulce

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve the capabilities of individual Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell lines to synthesize recombinant therapeutic proteins (rPs). However, given the increasing variety in rP molecular types and formats it may be advantageous to employ a toolbox of CHO host cell lines in biomanufacturing. Such a toolbox would contain a panel of hosts with specific capabilities to synthesize certain molecular types at high volumetric concentrations and with the correct product quality (PQ). In this work, we examine a panel of clonally derived host cell lines isolated from CHOK1SV for the ability to manufacture two model proteins, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) and an Fc-fusion protein (etanercept). We show that these host cell lines vary in their relative ability to synthesize these proteins in transient and stable pool production format. Furthermore, we examined the PQ attributes of the stable pool-produced Mab and etanercept (by N-glycan ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively), and uncovered substantial variation between the host cell lines in Mab N-glycan micro-heterogeneity and etanercept N and O-linked macro-heterogeneity. To further investigate the capabilities of these hosts to act as cell factories, we examined the glycosylation pathway gene expression profiles as well as the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in the untransfected hosts. We uncovered a moderate correlation between ER mass and the volumetric product concentration in transient and stable pool Mab production. This work demonstrates the utility of leveraging diversity within the CHOK1SV pool to identify new host cell lines with different performance characteristics.

  14. Exogenous cardiolipin localizes to mitochondria and prevents TAZ knockdown-induced apoptosis in myeloid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Ikon, Nikita; Su, Betty; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Forte, Trudy M; Ryan, Robert O

    2015-08-21

    The concentration and composition of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria are altered in age-related heart disease, Barth Syndrome, and other rare genetic disorders, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. To explore whether exogenous CL can be delivered to cells, CL was combined with apolipoprotein A-I to generate water-soluble, nanoscale complexes termed nanodisks (ND). Mass spectrometry of HL60 myeloid progenitor cell extracts revealed a 30-fold increase in cellular CL content following incubation with CL-ND. When CL-ND containing a fluorescent CL analogue was employed, confocal microscopy revealed CL localization to mitochondria. The ability of CL-ND to elicit a physiological response was examined in an HL60 cell culture model of Barth Syndrome neutropenia. siRNA knockdown of the phospholipid transacylase, tafazzin (TAZ), induced apoptosis in these cells. When TAZ knockdown cells were incubated with CL-ND, the apoptotic response was attenuated. Thus, CL-ND represent a potential intervention strategy for replenishment of CL in Barth Syndrome, age-related heart disease, and other disorders characterized by depletion of this key mitochondrial phospholipid.

  15. Exogenous cardiolipin localizes to mitochondria and prevents TAZ knockdown-induced apoptosis in myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ikon, Nikita; Su, Betty; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Forteand, Trudy M.; Ryan, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    The concentration and composition of cardiolipin (CL) in mitochondria are altered in age-related heart disease, Barth Syndrome, and other rare genetic disorders, resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. To explore whether exogenous CL can be delivered to cells, CL was combined with apolipoprotein A-I to generate water-soluble, nanoscale complexes termed nanodisks (ND). Mass spectrometry HL60 myeloid progenitor cell extracts revealed a 30-fold increase in cellular CL content following incubation with CL-ND. When CL-ND containing a fluorescent CL analogue was employed, confocal microscopy revealed CL localization to mitochondria. The ability of CL-ND to elicit a physiological response was examined in an HL60 cell culture model of Barth Syndrome neutropenia. siRNA knockdown of the phospholipid transacylase, tafazzin (TAZ), induced apoptosis in these cells. When TAZ knockdown cells were incubated with CL-ND, the apoptotic response was attenuated. Thus, CL-ND represent a potential intervention strategy for replenishment of CL in Barth Syndrome, age-related heart disease, and other disorders characterized by depletion of this key mitochondrial phospholipid. PMID:26164234

  16. Cell death and the mitochondria: therapeutic targeting of the BCL-2 family-driven pathway

    PubMed Central

    Roy, M J; Vom, A; Czabotar, P E; Lessene, G

    2014-01-01

    The principal biological role of mitochondria is to supply energy to cells; although intriguingly, evolution has bestowed another essential function upon these cellular organelles: under physiological stress, mitochondria become the cornerstone of apoptotic cell death. Specifically, mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) allows cell death factors such as cytochrome c to be released into the cytoplasm, thus inducing caspase activation and the eventual destruction of essential cellular components. Proteins of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family control the tightly regulated pathway that causes MOMP. The equilibrium between pro-survival and pro-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family dictates the fate of cells, the homeostasis of organs and, by extension, the health of whole organisms. Dysregulation of this equilibrium is involved in a large number of diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity and neurodegenerative conditions. Modulating the activity of the BCL-2 family of proteins with small molecules or peptides is an attractive but challenging therapeutic goal. This review highlights the latest developments in this field and provides evidence that this strategy is likely to have a positive effect on the treatment of still poorly addressed medical conditions. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24117105

  17. Parasite calcineurin regulates host cell recognition and attachment by apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Aditya S.; Saha, Sudeshna; Engelberg, Klemens; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Coleman, Bradley I.; Kosber, Aziz L.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Ganter, Markus; Espy, Nicole; Gilberger, Tim W.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Apicomplexans invade a variety of metazoan host cells through mechanisms involving host cell receptor engagement and secretion of parasite factors to facilitate cellular attachment. We find that the parasite homolog of calcineurin, a calcium-regulated phosphatase complex central to signal transduction in eukaryotes, also contributes to host cell invasion by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related Toxoplasma gondii. Using reverse genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we determine that calcineurin critically regulates and stabilizes attachment of extracellular P. falciparum to host erythrocytes before intracellular entry and has similar functions in host cell engagement by T. gondii. Calcineurin-mediated Plasmodium invasion is strongly associated with host receptors required for host cell recognition and calcineurin function distinguishes this form of receptor-mediated attachment from a second mode of host-parasite adhesion independent of host receptors. This specific role of calcineurin in coordinating physical interactions with host cells highlights an ancestral mechanism for parasitism used by apicomplexans. PMID:26118996

  18. The binding of host-selective toxin analogs to mitochondria from normal and ;texas' male sterile cytoplasm maize.

    PubMed

    Frantzen, K A; Daly, J M; Knoche, H W

    1987-04-01

    Tritium-labeled toxin analogs were prepared by reduction with NaB(3)H(4) of either the toxin from Helminthosporium maydis race T or a toxin component from Phyllosticta maydis. These reduced analogs had high radiochemical specific activities, high biological activities, and plant specificities identical to the native toxins. A filtration assay was developed to test the binding of these labeled analogs to isolated mitochondria. Binding was not energy dependent nor was there measurable matrical uptake. The analogs were shown to be lipophilic, a characteristic which gave rise to considerable nondisplaceable binding. Under conditions limiting nondisplaceable binding, the displaceable binding was shown to be linear with respect to toxin concentration and unsaturable. No significant differences were observed in the binding characteristics between the mitochondria from normal and male-sterile (Texas) cytoplasm maize. The findings suggest that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, these toxin analogs permeate the membranes of susceptible and resistant mitochondria alike. The lack of demonstrable specific binding does not rule out the involvement of a classical receptor site but does indicate that other kinds of molecular interactions may be involved in the mechanisms for toxicity and specificity. PMID:16665353

  19. Binding of host-selective toxin analogs to mitochondria from normal and Texas male sterile cytoplasm maize

    SciTech Connect

    Frantzen, K.A.; Daly, J.M.; Knoche, H.W.

    1987-04-01

    Tritium-labeled toxin analogs were prepared by reduction with NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/ of either the toxin from Helminthosporium maydis race T or a toxin component from Phyllosticta maydis. These reduced analogs had high radiochemical specific activities, high biological activities, and plant specificities identical to the native toxins. A filtration assay was developed to test the binding of these labeled analogs to isolated mitochondria. Binding was not energy dependent nor was there measurable matrical uptake. The analogs were shown to be lipophilic, a characteristic which gave rise to considerable nondisplaceable binding. Under conditions limiting nondisplaceable binding, the displaceable binding was shown to be linear with respect to toxin concentration and unsaturable. No significant differences were observed in the binding characteristics between the mitochondria from normal and male-sterile (Texas) cytoplasm maize. The findings suggest that, at physiologically relevant concentrations, these toxin analogs permeate the membranes of susceptible and resistant mitochondria alike. The lack of demonstrable specific binding does not rule out the involvement of a classical receptor site but does indicate that other kinds of molecular interactions may be involved in the mechanisms for toxicity and specificity.

  20. Exendin-4 Protects Mitochondria from Reactive Oxygen Species Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Zhiguang; Huang, Gan; Hu, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; He, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2. Methods We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder). We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. Results The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05). The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05), and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. Conclusion Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca2-independent phospholipase A2. PMID:24204601

  1. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David JP; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10809.001 PMID:26576949

  2. Mitochondrial transfer from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells to mitochondria-defective cells recaptures impaired mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conducted mitochondrial transfer has been recently shown to rescue cellular bioenergetics and prevent cell death caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJMSCs) harvested from postpartum umbilical cords are an accessible and abundant source of stem cells. This study aimed to determine the capability of WJMSCs to transfer their own mitochondria and rescue impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and bioenergetics caused by mitochondrial DNA defects. To do this, WJMSCs were co-cultured with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted ρ(0) cells and the recapture of mitochondrial function was evaluated. WJMSCs were shown to be capable of transferring their own mitochondria into ρ(0) cells and underwent interorganellar mixture within these cells. Permissive culture media (BrdU-containing and pyruvate- and uridine-free) sieved out a survival cell population from the co-cultured WJMSCs (BrdU-sensitive) and ρ(0) cells (pyruvate/uridine-free). The survival cells had mtDNA identical to that of WJMSCs, whereas they expressed cellular markers identical to that of ρ(0) cells. Importantly, these ρ(0)-plus -WJMSC-mtDNA (ρ(+W)) cells recovered the expression of mtDNA-encoded proteins and exhibited functional oxygen consumption and respiratory control, as well as the activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, III and IV. In addition, ETC complex V-inhibitor-sensitive ATP production and metabolic shifting were also recovered. Furthermore, cellular behaviors including attachment-free proliferation, aerobic viability and OXPHOS-reliant cellular motility were also regained after mitochondrial transfer by WJMSCs. The therapeutic effect of WJMSCs-derived mitochondrial transfer was able to stably sustain for at least 45 passages. In conclusion, this study suggests that WJMSCs may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunction through the donation of healthy

  3. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  4. Solanine Induces Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:24949471

  5. Solanine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongwei; Lv, Chongqing; Yang, Longlong; Wang, Yingxiu; Zhang, Qingshun; Yu, Suhui; Kong, Hongru; Wang, Meng; Xie, Jianming; Zhang, Chunwu; Zhou, Mengtao

    2014-01-01

    Steroid alkaloids have been suggested as potential anticancer compounds. However, the underlying mechanisms of how steroid alkaloids inhibit the tumor growth are largely unknown. Here, we reported that solanine, a substance of steroid alkaloids, has a positive effect on the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. In pancreatic cancer cells and nu/nu nude mice model, we found that solanine inhibited cancer cells growth through caspase-3 dependent mitochondrial apoptosis. Mechanically, solanine promotes the opening of mitochondrial membrane permeability transition pore (MPTP) by downregulating the Bcl-2/Bax ratio; thereafter, Cytochrome c and Smac are released from mitochondria into cytosol to process the caspase-3 zymogen into an activated form. Moreover, we found that the expression of tumor metastasis related proteins, MMP-2 and MMP-9, was also decreased in the cells treated with solanine. Therefore, our results suggested that solanine was an effective compound for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  6. Foxg1 localizes to mitochondria and coordinates cell differentiation and bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Pancrazi, Laura; Di Benedetto, Giulietta; Colombaioni, Laura; Della Sala, Grazia; Testa, Giovanna; Olimpico, Francesco; Reyes, Aurelio; Zeviani, Massimo; Pozzan, Tullio; Costa, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box g1 (Foxg1) is a nuclear-cytosolic transcription factor essential for the forebrain development and involved in neurodevelopmental and cancer pathologies. Despite the importance of this protein, little is known about the modalities by which it exerts such a large number of cellular functions. Here we show that a fraction of Foxg1 is localized within the mitochondria in cell lines, primary neuronal or glial cell cultures, and in the mouse cortex. Import of Foxg1 in isolated mitochondria appears to be membrane potential-dependent. Amino acids (aa) 277–302 were identified as critical for mitochondrial localization. Overexpression of full-length Foxg1 enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and promoted mitochondrial fission and mitosis. Conversely, overexpression of the C-term Foxg1 (aa 272–481), which is selectively localized in the mitochondrial matrix, enhanced organelle fusion and promoted the early phase of neuronal differentiation. These findings suggest that the different subcellular localizations of Foxg1 control the machinery that brings about cell differentiation, replication, and bioenergetics, possibly linking mitochondrial functions to embryonic development and pathological conditions. PMID:26508630

  7. A novel manganese complex selectively induces malignant glioma cell death by targeting mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Ji; Li, Jing; Huang, Tao; Zhao, Kaidi; Chen, Qiuyun; Guo, Wenjie; Gao, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in treatment, malignant glioma commonly exhibits recurrence, subsequently leading to a poor prognosis. As manganese (Mn) compounds can be transported by the transferrin-transferrin receptor system, the present study synthesized and examined the potential use of Adpa-Mn as a novel antitumor agent. Adpa-Mn time and dose-dependently inhibited U251 and C6 cell proliferation; however, it had little effect on normal astrocytes. Apoptosis was significantly elevated following treatment with Adpa-Mn, as detected by chromatin condensation, Annexin V/propidium iodide staining, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm, and the activation of caspases-9, -7 and -3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. In addition, Adpa-Mn enhanced fluorescence intensity of monodansylcadaverine and elevated the expression levels of the autophagy-related protein microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3. Pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and chloroquine enhanced Adpa-Mn-induced cell inhibition, thus indicating that autophagy has an essential role in this process. Furthermore, evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction was detected in the Adpa-Mn-treated group, including disrupted membrane potential, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depleted adenosine triphosphate. Conversely, treatment with the mitochondrial permeability transition inhibitor cyclosporin A reversed Adpa-Mn-induced ROS production, mitochondrial damage and cell apoptosis, thus suggesting that Adpa-Mn may target the mitochondria. Taken together, these data suggested that Adpa-Mn may be considered for use as a novel anti-glioma therapeutic option. PMID:27432745

  8. Metabolic consequences of functional complexes of mitochondria, myofibrils and sarcoplasmic reticulum in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Andrienko, T; Kuznetsov, A V; Kaambre, T; Usson, Y; Orosco, A; Appaix, F; Tiivel, T; Sikk, P; Vendelin, M; Margreiter, R; Saks, V A

    2003-06-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial respiration both by endogenous and exogenous ADP in the cells in situ was studied in isolated and permeabilized cardiomyocytes, permeabilized cardiac fibers and 'ghost' fibers (all with a diameter of 10-20 micro m) at different (0-3 micro moll(-1)) free Ca(2+) concentrations in the medium. In all these preparations, the apparent K(m) of mitochondrial respiration for exogenous ADP at free Ca(2+) concentrations of 0-0.1 micro moll(-1) was very high, in the range of 250-350 micro moll(-1), in contrast to isolated mitochondria in vitro (apparent K(m) for ADP is approximately 20 micro moll(-1)). An increase in the free Ca(2+) concentration (up to 3 micro moll(-1), which is within physiological range), resulted in a very significant decrease of the apparent K(m) value to 20-30 micro moll(-1), a decrease of V(max) of respiration in permeabilized intact fibers and a strong contraction of sarcomeres. In ghost cardiac fibers, from which myosin was extracted but mitochondria were intact, neither the high apparent K(m) for ADP (300-350 micro moll(-1)) nor V(max) of respiration changed in the range of free Ca(2+) concentration studied, and no sarcomere contraction was observed. The exogenous-ADP-trapping system (pyruvate kinase + phosphoenolpyruvate) inhibited endogenous-ADP-supported respiration in permeabilized cells by no more than 40%, and this inhibition was reversed by creatine due to activation of mitochondrial creatine kinase. These results are taken to show strong structural associations (functional complexes) among mitochondria, sarcomeres and sarcoplasmic reticulum. Inside these complexes, mitochondrial functional state is controlled by channeling of ADP, mostly via energy- and phosphoryl-transfer networks, and apparently depends on the state of sarcomere structures. PMID:12756288

  9. Axin is expressed in mitochondria and suppresses mitochondrial ATP synthesis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed that axin is involved in numerous cellular functions beyond the negative regulation of β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Previously, an association of ectopic axin with mitochondria was observed. In an effort to investigate the relationship between axin and mitochondria, we found that axin expression suppressed cellular ATP production, which was more apparent as axin expression levels increased. Also, mitochondrial expression of axin was observed using two axin-expressing HeLa cell models: doxycycline-inducible ectopic axin expression (HeLa-axin) and axin expression enhanced by long-term treatment with XAV939 (HeLa-XAV). In biochemical analysis, axin is associated with oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV and is involved in defects in the assembly of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. Functionally, axin expression reduced the activity of OXPHOS complex IV and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), suggesting axin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Subsequent studies using various inhibitors of Wnt signaling showed that the reduction in cellular ATP levels was weaker in cases of ICAT protein expression and treatment with iCRT3 or NSC668036 compared with XAV939 treatment, suggesting that XAV939 treatment affects ATP synthesis in addition to suppressing Wnt signaling activity. Axin-mediated regulation of mitochondrial function may be an additional mechanism to Wnt signaling for regulation of cell growth. PMID:26704260

  10. Axin is expressed in mitochondria and suppresses mitochondrial ATP synthesis in HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jee-Hye; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Rhyu, Im Joo; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Many recent studies have revealed that axin is involved in numerous cellular functions beyond the negative regulation of β-catenin-dependent Wnt signaling. Previously, an association of ectopic axin with mitochondria was observed. In an effort to investigate the relationship between axin and mitochondria, we found that axin expression suppressed cellular ATP production, which was more apparent as axin expression levels increased. Also, mitochondrial expression of axin was observed using two axin-expressing HeLa cell models: doxycycline-inducible ectopic axin expression (HeLa-axin) and axin expression enhanced by long-term treatment with XAV939 (HeLa-XAV). In biochemical analysis, axin is associated with oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex IV and is involved in defects in the assembly of complex IV-containing supercomplexes. Functionally, axin expression reduced the activity of OXPHOS complex IV and the oxygen consumption rate (OCR), suggesting axin-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Subsequent studies using various inhibitors of Wnt signaling showed that the reduction in cellular ATP levels was weaker in cases of ICAT protein expression and treatment with iCRT3 or NSC668036 compared with XAV939 treatment, suggesting that XAV939 treatment affects ATP synthesis in addition to suppressing Wnt signaling activity. Axin-mediated regulation of mitochondrial function may be an additional mechanism to Wnt signaling for regulation of cell growth.

  11. Bacterial porin disrupts mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitizes host cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Dian-Lothrop, Elke A; Meinecke, Michael; Kepp, Oliver; Ross, Katharina; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Harsman, Anke; Hauf, Eva; Brinkmann, Volker; Günther, Dirk; Herrmann, Ines; Hurwitz, Robert; Rassow, Joachim; Wagner, Richard; Rudel, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    The bacterial PorB porin, an ATP-binding beta-barrel protein of pathogenic Neisseria gonorrhoeae, triggers host cell apoptosis by an unknown mechanism. PorB is targeted to and imported by host cell mitochondria, causing the breakdown of the mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)). Here, we show that PorB induces the condensation of the mitochondrial matrix and the loss of cristae structures, sensitizing cells to the induction of apoptosis via signaling pathways activated by BH3-only proteins. PorB is imported into mitochondria through the general translocase TOM but, unexpectedly, is not recognized by the SAM sorting machinery, usually required for the assembly of beta-barrel proteins in the mitochondrial outer membrane. PorB integrates into the mitochondrial inner membrane, leading to the breakdown of DeltaPsi(m). The PorB channel is regulated by nucleotides and an isogenic PorB mutant defective in ATP-binding failed to induce DeltaPsi(m) loss and apoptosis, demonstrating that dissipation of DeltaPsi(m) is a requirement for cell death caused by neisserial infection. PMID:19851451

  12. Preparation and use of MitoPY1 for imaging hydrogen peroxide in mitochondria of live cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Bryan C; Lin, Vivian S; Chang, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Mitochondria peroxy yellow 1 (MitoPY1) is a small-molecule fluorescent probe that selectively tracks to the mitochondria of live biological specimens and responds to local fluxes of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) by a turn-on fluorescence enhancement. This bifunctional dye uses a triphenylphosphonium targeting group and a boronate-based molecular switch to selectively respond to H(2)O(2) over competing reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the mitochondria. MitoPY1 can be used to measure mitochondrial H(2)O(2) levels in both cell culture and tissue models. In this protocol, we describe the synthesis of MitoPY1 and how to use this chemical tool to visualize mitochondrial H(2)O(2) in live cells. The preparation of MitoPY1 is anticipated to take 7-10 d, and assays involving microscopy of cultured mammalian cells can be performed in 1-2 d.

  13. 5,8,11,14-Eicosatetraynoic acid-induced destruction of mitochondria in human prostate cells (PC-3).

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K. M.; Seed, T. M.; Wilson, D. E.; Harris, J. E.; Biological and Medical Research; Rush Medical Coll.

    1992-01-01

    Culturing human prostate PC-3 cells for 4, 24, or 72 h in the presence of 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA), an inhibitor of arachidonic acid metabolism and cholesterol biosynthesis, markedly altered the morphology and reduced the number of mitochondria in the treated cells. Using quantitative electron microscopic morphometry, we documented changes in the number, form, area, matrix density, and integrity of the cristae and limiting membranes of mitochondria in cells cultured with ETYA. The inhibition of cholesterol synthesis or the substitution of ETYA for polyunsaturated fatty acids in the inner membrane may participate in the disruption of the mitochondria, which resembles the morphologic sequelae of oxidative stress. If sufficiently extensive, these changes could contribute to the inhibition of cellular proliferation by ETYA.

  14. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  15. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2012-03-01

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify Legionella pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoeba hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 1,348 (mean, 329) and 385 (mean, 44) CFU trophozoite(-1), respectively.

  16. Reactive oxygen species burst induced by aluminum stress triggers mitochondria-dependent programmed cell death in peanut root tip cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjing; Yang, Xudong; Yao, Shaochang; LwinOo, Thet; He, Huyi; Wang, Aiqin; Li, Chuangzhen; He, Longfei

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies had certified that aluminum (Al) induced ROS production and programmed cell death (PCD) in higher plants. The relationship between ROS production and PCD occurrence under Al stress is uncovered. The results showed that root elongation inhibition and PCD occurrence was induced by 100 μM AlCl3. Al stress induced ROS burst, up-regulated Rboh and COX gene expression, increased mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, decreased inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), released cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytoplasm, activated caspase 3-like protease activity. Exogenous H2O2 aggravated the changes caused by Al and accelerated PCD occurrence, but ROS scavenger CAT and AsA reversed the changes caused by Al and inhibited PCD production. A potential cascade of cellular events during Al induced PCD via mitochondria dependent pathway and the mechanism of ROS on regulating PCD induced by Al is proposed.

  17. Functional coupling between the caffeine/ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ store and mitochondria in rat aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Vallot, O; Combettes, L; Lompré, A M

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the role of mitochondria in the agonist-induced and/or caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients in rat aortic smooth muscle cells. We explored the possibility that proliferation modulates the coupling between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Ca2+ transients induced by either ATP or caffeine were measured in presence or absence of drugs interfering with mitochondrial activity in freshly dissociated cells (day 1) and in subconfluent primary culture (day 12). We found that the mitochondrial inhibitors, rotenone or carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, as well as the permeability transition pore inhibitor, cyclosporin A, had no effect on the ATP-induced Ca2+ transient at either day 1 or day 12, but prevented caffeine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ increase at day 12 but not at day 1. Close connections between ryanodine receptors and mitochondria were observed at both day 1 and 12. Thapsigargin (TG) prevented ATP- and caffeine-induced Ca2+ transients at day 1. At day 12, where only 50% of the cells were sensitive to caffeine, TG did not prevent the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, and prevented ATP-induced Ca2+ transient in only half of the cells. Together, these data demonstrate that rat aortic smooth muscle cells at day 1 have an ATP- and caffeine-sensitive pool, which is functionally independent but physically closely linked to mitochondria and totally inhibited by TG. At day 12, we propose the existence of two cell populations: half contains IP3 receptors and TG-sensitive Ca2+ pumps only; the other half contains, in addition to the IP3-sensitive pool independent from mitochondria, a caffeine-sensitive pool. This latter pool is linked to mitochondria through the permeability transition pore and is refilled by both TG-sensitive and insensitive mechanisms. PMID:11439085

  18. Upregulation of TFAM and mitochondria copy number in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Sanjiban; D'Souza, Reena Reshma; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are central to several physiological and pathological conditions in humans. In the present study, we performed copy number analysis of nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and its representative lymphoblastoid cells (LCLs). We have observed hyper diploid copies of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene in the LCLs along with increased mtDNA copy number, mitochondrial mass, intracellular ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in LCLs. Gene expression analysis confirmed TFAM over-expression in LCLs when compared to PBMC. Based on our observation, we suggest that increased copy number of TFAM gene upregulates its expression, increases mtDNA copy numbers and protects it from oxidative stress induced damage in the transformed LCLs.

  19. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load.

  20. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load. PMID:26314956

  1. Mps1 kinase regulates tumor cell viability via its novel role in mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Ling, Y; Guo, Y; Bai, Y; Shi, X; Gong, F; Tan, P; Zhang, Y; Wei, C; He, X; Ramirez, A; Liu, X; Cao, C; Zhong, H; Xu, Q; Ma, R Z

    2016-01-01

    Targeting mitotic kinase monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) for tumor therapy has been investigated for many years. Although it was suggested that Mps1 regulates cell viability through its role in spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), the underlying mechanism remains less defined. In an endeavor to reveal the role of high levels of mitotic kinase Mps1 in the development of colon cancer, we unexpectedly found the amount of Mps1 required for cell survival far exceeds that of maintaining SAC in aneuploid cell lines. This suggests that other functions of Mps1 besides SAC are also employed to maintain cell viability. Mps1 regulates cell viability independent of its role in cytokinesis as the genetic depletion of Mps1 spanning from metaphase to cytokinesis affects neither cytokinesis nor cell viability. Furthermore, we developed a single-cycle inhibition strategy that allows disruption of Mps1 function only in mitosis. Using this strategy, we found the functions of Mps1 in mitosis are vital for cell viability as short-term treatment of mitotic colon cancer cell lines with Mps1 inhibitors is sufficient to cause cell death. Interestingly, Mps1 inhibitors synergize with microtubule depolymerizing drug in promoting polyploidization but not in tumor cell growth inhibition. Finally, we found that Mps1 can be recruited to mitochondria by binding to voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) via its C-terminal fragment. This interaction is essential for cell viability as Mps1 mutant defective for interaction fails to main cell viability, causing the release of cytochrome c. Meanwhile, deprivation of VDAC1 can make tumor cells refractory to loss of Mps1-induced cell death. Collectively, we conclude that inhibition of the novel mitochondrial function Mps1 is sufficient to kill tumor cells. PMID:27383047

  2. Ceramide-Induced Apoptosis in Renal Tubular Cells: A Role of Mitochondria and Sphingosine-1-Phoshate

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Norishi

    2015-01-01

    Ceramide is synthesized upon stimuli, and induces apoptosis in renal tubular cells (RTCs). Sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) functions as a survival factor. Thus, the balance of ceramide/S1P determines ceramide-induced apoptosis. Mitochondria play a key role for ceramide-induced apoptosis by altered mitochondrial outer membrane permeability (MOMP). Ceramide enhances oligomerization of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, ceramide channel, and reduces anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins in the MOM. This process alters MOMP, resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytochrome C release into the cytosol, caspase activation, and apoptosis. Ceramide regulates apoptosis through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs)-dependent and -independent pathways. Conversely, MAPKs alter ceramide generation by regulating the enzymes involving ceramide metabolism, affecting ceramide-induced apoptosis. Crosstalk between Bcl-2 family proteins, ROS, and many signaling pathways regulates ceramide-induced apoptosis. Growth factors rescue ceramide-induced apoptosis by regulating the enzymes involving ceramide metabolism, S1P, and signaling pathways including MAPKs. This article reviews evidence supporting a role of ceramide for apoptosis and discusses a role of mitochondria, including MOMP, Bcl-2 family proteins, ROS, and signaling pathways, and crosstalk between these factors in the regulation of ceramide-induced apoptosis of RTCs. A balancing role between ceramide and S1P and the strategy for preventing ceramide-induced apoptosis by growth factors are also discussed. PMID:25751724

  3. Helium-neon laser irradiation stimulates cell proliferation through photostimulatory effects in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Ping; Wang, Jeh-Jeng; Yu, Chia-Li; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Chen, Gow-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2007-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that cellular functions could be influenced by visual light (400-700 nm). Recent evidence indicates that cellular proliferation could be triggered by the interaction of a helium-neon laser (He-Ne laser, 632.8 nm) with the mitochondrial photoacceptor-cytochrome c oxidase. Our previous studies demonstrated that He-Ne irradiation induced an increase in cell proliferation, but not migration, in the melanoma cell line A2058 cell. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in photostimulatory effects induced by an He-Ne laser. Using the A2058 cell as a model for cell proliferation, the photobiologic effects induced by an He-Ne laser were studied. He-Ne irradiation immediately induced an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi(mt)), ATP, and cAMP via enhanced cytochrome c oxidase activity and promoted phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (AP-1) expressions. He-Ne irradiation-induced A2058 cell proliferation was significantly abrogated by the addition of delta psi(mt) and JNK inhibitors. Moreover, treatment with an He-Ne laser resulted in delayed effects on IL-8 and transforming growth factor-beta1 release from A2058 cells. These results suggest that He-Ne irradiation elicits photostimulatory effects in mitochondria processes, which involve JNK/AP-1 activation and enhanced growth factor release, and ultimately lead to A2058 cell proliferation. PMID:17446900

  4. Helium-neon laser irradiation stimulates cell proliferation through photostimulatory effects in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Ping; Wang, Jeh-Jeng; Yu, Chia-Li; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Chen, Gow-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2007-08-01

    Previous reports have shown that cellular functions could be influenced by visual light (400-700 nm). Recent evidence indicates that cellular proliferation could be triggered by the interaction of a helium-neon laser (He-Ne laser, 632.8 nm) with the mitochondrial photoacceptor-cytochrome c oxidase. Our previous studies demonstrated that He-Ne irradiation induced an increase in cell proliferation, but not migration, in the melanoma cell line A2058 cell. The aim of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms involved in photostimulatory effects induced by an He-Ne laser. Using the A2058 cell as a model for cell proliferation, the photobiologic effects induced by an He-Ne laser were studied. He-Ne irradiation immediately induced an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential (delta psi(mt)), ATP, and cAMP via enhanced cytochrome c oxidase activity and promoted phosphorylation of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/activator protein-1 (AP-1) expressions. He-Ne irradiation-induced A2058 cell proliferation was significantly abrogated by the addition of delta psi(mt) and JNK inhibitors. Moreover, treatment with an He-Ne laser resulted in delayed effects on IL-8 and transforming growth factor-beta1 release from A2058 cells. These results suggest that He-Ne irradiation elicits photostimulatory effects in mitochondria processes, which involve JNK/AP-1 activation and enhanced growth factor release, and ultimately lead to A2058 cell proliferation.

  5. A Cytosolic Network Suppressing Mitochondria-Mediated Proteostatic Stress and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowen; Chen, Xin Jie

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are multifunctional organelles whose dysfunction leads to neuromuscular degeneration and ageing. The multi-functionality poses a great challenge for understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial dysfunction causes specific pathologies. Among the leading mitochondrial mediators of cell death are energy depletion, free radical production, defect in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis, the release of pro-apoptotic and non-cell-autonomous signaling molecules, and altered stress signaling 1–5. Here, we identified a novel pathway of mitochondria-mediated cell death. This pathway was named mitochondrial Precursor Over-accumulation Stress (mPOS), characterized by aberrant accumulation of mitochondrial precursors in the cytosol. mPOS can be triggered by clinically relevant mitochondrial damage which is not limited to the core machineries of protein import. We also identified a large network of genes that suppress mPOS, by modulating ribosomal biogenesis, mRNA decapping, transcript-specific translation, protein chaperoning and turnover. In response to mPOS, several ribosome-associated proteins were up-regulated including Gis2 and Nog2, which promote cap-independent translation and inhibit the nuclear export of the 60S ribosomal subunit respectively 6, 7. Gis2 and Nog2 up-regulation promotes cell survival, which may be part of a feedback loop that attenuates mPOS. Our data indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes directly to cytosolic proteostatic stress, and provide an explanation for the enigmatic association between these two hallmarks of degenerative diseases and ageing. The results are relevant to understanding diseases (e.g., spinocerebellar ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and myotonic dystrophy) that involve mutations within the anti-degenerative network. PMID:26192197

  6. Proteome-scale identification and characterization of mitochondria targeting proteins of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: Potential virulence factors modulating host mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Rana, Aarti; Kumar, Devender; Rub, Abdur; Akhter, Yusuf

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent of Johne's Disease among ruminants. During the course of infection, it expresses a number of proteins for its successful persistence inside the host that cause variety of physiological abnormalities in the host. Mitochondrion is one of the attractive targets for pathogenic bacteria. Employing a proteome-wide sequence and structural signature based approach we have identified 46 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins as potential targets for the host mitochondrial targeting. These may act as virulence factors modulating mitochondrial physiology for bacterial survival and immune evasion inside the host cells.

  7. Prostate cancer cells metabolize d-lactate inside mitochondria via a D-lactate dehydrogenase which is more active and highly expressed than in normal cells.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Lidia; Moro, Loredana; Passarella, Salvatore

    2013-03-01

    Although D-lactate metabolism has been shown to occur in a variety of mitochondria, the metabolic fate of D-lactate in cancer cells has never been investigated, as it is believed to be exported to the extracellular phase. We show that mitochondria from both cancer (PC-3) and normal (PNT1A) prostate cells can metabolize D-lactate in an energy competent manner. This is due to the mitochondrial D-lactate dehydrogenase, a membrane flavoprotein, the activity and protein level of which are higher in PC-3 than in PNT1A cells, as detected by both kinetic and immunological analysis. D-Lactate can enter prostate mitochondria and cause the export of newly synthesized malate in a carrier-mediated manner, with the rate of malate efflux from mitochondria twofold higher in cancer. PMID:23333299

  8. Antitumor triptycene analogs induce a rapid collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential in HL-60 cells and isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Ward, Mary M; Lou, Kaiyan; Zhao, Huiping; Battina, Srinivas K; Wiredu, Bernard; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean-Pierre H

    2006-01-01

    Since synthetic analogs of triptycene (TT code number), such as bisquinones TT2 and TT13, can trigger cytochrome c release without caspase activation and retain their ability to induce apoptosis in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells, fluorescent probes of transmembrane potential have been used to determine whether these antitumor compounds might directly target mitochondria in cell and cell-free systems to cause the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential ( downward arrow Deltapsim) that is linked to permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. Using JC-1 dye, the abilities of various TT analogs to induce the downward arrow Deltapsim in wild-type and MDR HL-60 cells are rapid (within 5-20 min), irreversible after drug removal, concentration dependent in the 0.64-25 microM range, and generally related to their antitumor activities in vitro. The downward arrow Deltapsim caused by TT2 and TT13, which are more potent than mitoxantrone, staurosporine and the reference depolarizing agent, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), in HL-60 cells, are not prevented by caspase-2 or -8 inhibitors, suggesting that activation of these apical caspases upstream of mitochondria is not involved in this process. Antitumor TT analogs (0.64-25 microM) also mimic the abilities of the known depolarizing agents, CCCP, alamethicin, gramicidin A and 100 microM CaCl(2), to directly induce within 20 min the downward arrow Deltapsim in isolated mitochondria prepared from mouse liver and loaded with rhodamine 123 dye. The fact that 20 microM Ca(2+), which is insufficient to trigger depolarization on its own, is required to reveal the depolarizing effect of TT2 in isolated mitochondria suggests that antitumor TT analogs might interact with the PTP to alter its conformation and increase its Ca(2+) sensitivity. Indeed, such Ca(2+)-dependent downward arrowDeltapsim of isolated mitochondria treated with 25 microM TT2 or 100 microM Ca(2+) are blocked by ruthenium red. Daunorubicin

  9. Caffeine increases mitochondrial function and blocks melatonin signaling to mitochondria in Alzheimer's mice and cells.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, Natasa; Delic, Vedad; Cao, Chuanhai; Copes, Neil; Lin, Xiaoyang; Mamcarz, Maggie; Wang, Li; Arendash, Gary W; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2012-12-01

    Caffeine and melatonin have been shown to protect the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP(sw)) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease from cognitive dysfunction. But their mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. These Alzheimer's mice have extensive mitochondrial dysfunction, which likely contributes to their cognitive decline. To further explore the mechanism through which caffeine and melatonin protect cognitive function in these mice, we monitored the function of isolated mitochondria from APP(sw) mice treated with caffeine, melatonin, or both in their drinking water for one month. Melatonin treatment yielded a near complete restoration of mitochondrial function in assays of respiratory rate, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and ATP levels. Caffeine treatment by itself yielded a small increase in mitochondrial function. However, caffeine largely blocked the large enhancement of mitochondrial function provided by melatonin. Studies with N2a neuroblastoma cells stably expressing APP(sw) showed that specific inhibition of cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 or cGMP-dependent PDE5 also blocked melatonin protection of mitochondrial function, but A(2a) and A₁ adenosine receptor antagonists were without effect. Melatonin or caffeine at the concentrations used to modulate mitochondrial function in the cells had no effect on cAMP-dependent PDE activity or cellular cAMP or cGMP levels. Therefore, caffeine and increased cyclic nucleotide levels likely block melatonin signaling to mitochondria by independent mechanisms that do not involve adenosine receptor antagonism. The results of this study indicate that melatonin restores mitochondrial function much more potently than caffeine in APP(sw) transgenic mouse and cell models of Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Mitochondria-derived hydrogen peroxide selectively enhances T cell receptor-initiated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Gill, Tejpal; Levine, Alan D

    2013-09-01

    T cell receptor (TCR)-initiated signal transduction is reported to increase production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide (O2˙(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as second messengers. Although H2O2 can modulate signal transduction by inactivating protein phosphatases, the mechanism and the subcellular localization of intracellular H2O2 as a second messenger of the TCR are not known. The antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) catalyzes the dismutation of highly reactive O2˙(-) into H2O2 and thus acts as an intracellular generator of H2O2. As charged O2˙(-) is unable to diffuse through intracellular membranes, cells express distinct SOD isoforms in the cytosol (Cu,Zn-SOD) and mitochondria (Mn-SOD), where they locally scavenge O2˙(-) leading to production of H2O2. A 2-fold organelle-specific overexpression of either SOD in Jurkat T cell lines increases intracellular production of H2O2 but does not alter the levels of intracellular H2O2 scavenging enzymes such as catalase, membrane-bound peroxiredoxin1 (Prx1), and cytosolic Prx2. We report that overexpression of Mn-SOD enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of TCR-associated membrane proximal signal transduction molecules Lck, LAT, ZAP70, PLCγ1, and SLP76 within 1 min of TCR cross-linking. This increase in mitochondrial H2O2 specifically modulates MAPK signaling through the JNK/cJun pathway, whereas overexpressing Cu,Zn-SOD had no effect on any of these TCR-mediated signaling molecules. As mitochondria translocate to the immunological synapse during TCR activation, we hypothesize this translocation provides the effective concentration of H2O2 required to selectively modulate downstream signal transduction pathways.

  11. Siramesine triggers cell death through destabilisation of mitochondria, but not lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Hafner Česen, M; Repnik, U; Turk, V; Turk, B

    2013-01-01

    A sigma-2 receptor agonist siramesine has been shown to trigger cell death of cancer cells and to exhibit a potent anticancer activity in vivo. However, its mechanism of action is still poorly understood. We show that siramesine can induce rapid cell death in a number of cell lines at concentrations above 20 μM. In HaCaT cells, cell death was accompanied by caspase activation, rapid loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), cytochrome c release, cardiolipin peroxidation and typical apoptotic morphology, whereas in U-87MG cells most apoptotic hallmarks were not notable, although MMP was rapidly lost. In contrast to the rapid loss of MMP above 20 μM siramesine, a rapid increase in lysosomal pH was observed at all concentrations tested (5–40 μM); however, it was not accompanied by lysosomal membrane permeabilisation (LMP) and the release of lysosomal enzymes into the cytosol. Increased lysosomal pH reduced the lysosomal degradation potential as indicated by the accumulation of immature forms of cysteine cathepsins. The lipophilic antioxidant α-tocopherol, but not the hydrophilic antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine, considerably reduced cell death and destabilisation of mitochondrial membranes, but did not prevent the increase in lysosomal pH. At concentrations below 15 μM, siramesine triggered cell death after 2 days or later, which seems to be associated with a general metabolic and energy imbalance due to defects in the endocytic pathway, intracellular trafficking and energy production, and not by a specific molecular event. Overall, we show that cell death in siramesine-treated cells is induced by destabilisation of mitochondria and is independent of LMP and the release of cathepsins into the cytosol. Moreover, it is unlikely that siramesine acts exclusively through sigma-2 receptors, but rather through multiple molecular targets inside the cell. Our findings are therefore of significant importance in designing the next generation of siramesine

  12. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  13. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including "p38 MAPK Signaling", "p53 Signaling", "14-3-3-mediated Signaling", "p70S6K Signaling" and "Protein Ubiquitination Pathway". This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells. PMID:27514819

  14. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells. PMID:27514819

  15. Metformin inhibits growth of lung adenocarcinoma cells by inducing apoptosis via the mitochondria-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JUNLING; GAO, QIULING; WANG, DECUI; WANG, ZHIQIANG; HU, CHUN

    2015-01-01

    Metformin is commonly used to treat type II diabetes, although it may also reduce the risk of cancer and improve the associated prognosis. However, its mode of action in cancer remains unclear. The present study evaluated the effects of metformin on lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells and identified molecular mechanisms of metformin activity. The A549 cells were treated with metformin at different concentrations and cell viability was assayed by using an MTT assay. The cell cycle and the apoptosis rate were assayed by flow cytometry. Nude mice were transplanted with A549 cells and the tumor growth inhibition rate was detected. Once the A549 cells had been treated with 20 mM metformin for 48 h, the cell cycle was arrested in the G0/Gl phase and the apoptosis rate was 20.57±3.16%. The expression of the B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-extra large proteins was downregulated following metformin treatment, while Bax protein expression was significantly increased. Tumor size in the high-dose metformin and cisplatin plus metformin groups was significantly smaller, and the inhibition rates were 41.3 and 72.9%, respectively, compared with the control group. These results indicated that metformin displays anticancer activity against lung adenocarcinoma by causing G1 arrest of the cell cycle and subsequent cell apoptosis through the mitochondria-dependent pathway in A549 cells. Furthermore, it was found that metformin dramatically inhibited lung adenocarcinoma tumor growth in vivo. These data suggest that metformin may become a potential cytotoxic drug in the prevention and treatment of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26622674

  16. The pathways of glutamate and glutamine oxidation by tumor cell mitochondria. Role of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    Little evidence has been available on the oxidative pathways of glutamine and glutamate, the major respiratory substrates of cancer cells. Glutamate formed from glutamine by phosphate-dependent glutaminase undergoes quantitative transamination by aerobic tumor mitochondria to yield aspartate. However, when malate is also added there is a pronounced decrease in aspartate production and a large formation of citrate and alanine, in both state 3 and 4 conditions. In contrast, addition of malate to normal rat heart, liver, or kidney mitochondria oxidizing glutamate causes a marked increase in aspartate production. Further analysis showed that extramitochondrial malate is oxidized almost quantitatively to pyruvate + CO2 by NAD(P)+-linked malic enzyme, present in the mitochondria of all tumors tested, but absent in heart, liver, and kidney mitochondria. On the other hand intramitochondrial malate generated from glutamate is oxidized quantitatively to oxalacetate by mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase of tumors. Acetyl-CoA derived from extramitochondrial malate via pyruvate and oxalacetate derived from glutamate via intramitochondrial malate are quantitatively converted into citrate, which is extruded. No evidence was found that malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria converts glutamate-derived malate into pyruvate as postulated in other reports. Possible mechanisms for the integration of mitochondrial malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase activities in tumors are discussed.

  17. Acute effects of ACTH on dissociated adrenocortical cells: quantitative changes in mitochondria and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Malamed, S

    1975-08-01

    To study the role of certain organelles in steroidogenesis, dissociated rat adrenocortical cells were incubated for two hours with ACTH at a concentration that induces a high level of steroid production. Sections of ACTH treated and untreated cells were photographed in the electron microscope, and morphometric analysis was undertaken to assess possible ACTH-induced changes in total cell volume, volume density and numerical denisty of lipid droplets and mitochondria. There was no change in total cell volume. Lipid droplet volume density and numerical density decreased. Mitochondrial volume density did not change, but numerical density increased. The decrease in lipid droplet volume density indicates a rapid depletion of cholesterol for steroid production. This depletion is almost entirely due to the disappearance of lipid droplets, rather than to an overall diminution in their size, as shown by the decrease in lipid droplet numerical density. The mitochondrial data suggest that the adrenocortical cell has an adedquate mitochondrial apparatus to respond to acute ACTH stimulation with increased steroid output without an increase inmitochondrial volume.

  18. Emodin induces apoptosis of human osteosarcoma cells via mitochondria- and endoplasmic reticulum stress-related pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Jinhe; Xu, Huan; Wu, Dhua; Wu, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Emodin showed anti-cancer activity against multiple human malignant tumors by inducing apoptosis. However, the apoptotic inducing effect against human osteosarcoma and related mechanism are still not studied. This study was aimed to investigate them. Methods: Emodin was used to incubate human OS cell U2OS cells at serially diluted concentrations. Hoechst staining was used to evaluate apoptosis; flow cytometry was applied to assess the collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP); intracellular ROS generation was detected by DCFH-DA staining; endoplasmic reticulum stress activation was examined by western blotting. Results: Cell apoptosis of U2OS cells was induced by emodin incubation in a concentration-dependent manner; MMP collapse and ROS generation were identified at starting concentration of 80 μmol/L of emodin in a concentration-dependent manner. ER stress activation was found at beginning concentration of 40 μmol/L of emodin. The MMP collapse was inhibited while the ER stress was not inhibited by NAC administration. Conclusions: Emodin induces death of human osteosarcoma cells by initiating ROS-dependent mitochondria-induced and ROS-independent ER stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:26722474

  19. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  20. Hexokinase II binding to mitochondria is necessary for Kupffer cell activation and is potentiated by ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Shulga, Nataly; Pastorino, John G

    2014-09-19

    Ethanol exposure promotes the development of steatohepatitis, which can progress to end stage liver disease. Kupffer cells have been documented to play a key role in the genesis and progression of alcoholic liver disease with ethanol exposure enhancing Kupffer cell activation. In the present study, we identified the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria as a requirement for LPS-induced activation of Kupffer cells and its potentiation by ethanol. LPS and ethanol exposure induced a reduction in sirtuin-3 activity. In turn, the decline of sirtuin-3 activity led to the activation of cyclophilin-D, which mediated an increased binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria. Suppression of cyclophilin-D expression or enforced detachment of hexokinase II from the mitochondria abrogated the LPS- and ethanol-induced stimulation of Kupffer cells, preventing NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation. Moreover, activation of AMP-activated protein kinase restored sirtuin-3 activity, thereby preventing LPS and ethanol from stimulating the binding of hexokinase II to the mitochondria and precluding NADPH oxidase and inflammasome activation.

  1. Microcystin-LR induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Li, Jinhui; Huang, Hui; Yang, Mingfeng; Zhuang, Donggang; Cheng, Xuemin; Zhang, Huizhen; Fu, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the toxicity of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and to explore the mechanism of MC-LR-induced apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. HBE cells were treated with MC-LR (1, 10, 20, 30 and 40 µg/ml) alone or with MC-LR (0, 2.5, 5 and 10 µg/ml) and Z-VAD-FMK (0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120 and 140 µM), which is a caspase inhibitor, for 24 and 48 h. Cell viability was assessed via an MTT assay and the half maximal effective concentration of MC-LR was determined. The optimal concentration of Z-VAD-FMK was established as 50 µm, which was then used in the subsequent experiments. MC-LR significantly inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis of HBE cells in a dose-dependent manner, as detected by an Annexin V/propidium iodide assay. MC-LR induced cell apoptosis, excess reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, upregulated Bax expression and downregulated B-cell lymphoma-2 expression in HBE cells. Moreover, western blot analysis demonstrated that MC-LR increased the activity levels of caspase-3 and caspase-9 and induced cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm, suggesting that MC-LR-induced apoptosis is associated with the mitochondrial pathway. Furthermore, pretreatment with Z-VAD-FMK reduced MC-LR-induced apoptosis by blocking caspase activation in HBE cells. Therefore, the results of the present study suggested that MC-LR is capable of significantly inhibiting the viability of HBE cells by inducing apoptosis in a mitochondria-dependent manner. The present study provides a foundation for further understanding the mechanism underlying the toxicity of MC-LR in the respiratory system. PMID:27446254

  2. The sorting of a small potassium channel in mammalian cells can be shifted between mitochondria and plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    von Charpuis, Charlotte; Meckel, Tobias; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-07-01

    The two small and similar viral K(+) channels Kcv and Kesv are sorted in mammalian cells and yeast to different destinations. Analysis of the sorting pathways shows that Kcv is trafficking via the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane, while Kesv is inserted via the TIM/TOM complex to the inner membrane of mitochondria. Studies with Kesv mutants show that an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence in this channel is neither necessary nor sufficient for sorting of Kesv the mitochondria. Instead the sorting of Kesv can be redirected from the mitochondria to the plasma membrane by an insertion of ≥2 amino acids in a position sensitive manner into the C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD2) of this channel. The available data advocate the presence of a C-terminal sorting signal in TMD2 of Kesv channel, which is presumably not determined by the length of this domain. PMID:25449299

  3. Three dimensional time lapse imaging of live cell mitochondria with photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison, Miguel; Chakrabortty, Sabyasachi; Extermann, Jerome; Nahas, Amir; Pache, Christophe; Weil, Tanja; Lasser, Theo

    2016-03-01

    The photothermal optical lock-in optical coherence microscope (poli-OCM) introduced molecular specificity to OCM imaging, which is conventionally, a label-free technique. Here we achieve three-dimensional live cell and mitochondria specific imaging using ~4nm protein-functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). These nanoparticles do not photobleach and we demonstrate they're suitability for long-term time lapse imaging. We compare the accuracy of labelling with these AuNPs using classical fluorescence confocal imaging with a standard mitochondria specific marker. Furthermore, time lapse poli-OCM imaging every 5 minutes over 1.5 hours period was achieved, revealing the ability for three-dimensional monitoring of mitochondria dynamics.

  4. Mitochondria-targeting particles

    PubMed Central

    Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Geary, Sean M; Joiner, Mei-ling A; Anderson, Mark E; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are a promising therapeutic target for the detection, prevention and treatment of various human diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, diabetes and obesity. To reach mitochondria, therapeutic molecules need to not only gain access to specific organs, but also to overcome multiple barriers such as the cell membrane and the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. Cellular and mitochondrial barriers can be potentially overcome through the design of mitochondriotropic particulate carriers capable of transporting drug molecules selectively to mitochondria. These particulate carriers or vectors can be made from lipids (liposomes), biodegradable polymers, or metals, protecting the drug cargo from rapid elimination and degradation in vivo. Many formulations can be tailored to target mitochondria by the incorporation of mitochondriotropic agents onto the surface and can be manufactured to desired sizes and molecular charge. Here, we summarize recently reported strategies for delivering therapeutic molecules to mitochondria using various particle-based formulations. PMID:25490424

  5. Mitochondria of a human multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cell line constitutively express inducible nitric oxide synthase in the inner membrane.

    PubMed

    Fantappiè, Ornella; Sassoli, Chiara; Tani, Alessia; Nosi, Daniele; Marchetti, Serena; Formigli, Lucia; Mazzanti, Roberto

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in pathways of stress conditions. They can be transported from one cell to another, bringing their features to the cell where they are transported. It has been shown in cancer cells overexpressing multidrug resistance (MDR) that mitochondria express proteins involved in drug resistance such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistant protein and multiple resistance protein-1. The MDR phenotype is associated with the constitutive expression of COX-2 and iNOS, whereas celecoxib, a specific inhibitor of COX-2 activity, reverses drug resistance of MDR cells by releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria. It is possible that COX-2 and iNOS are also expressed in mitochondria of cancer cells overexpressing the MDR phenotype. This study involved experiments using the human HCC PLC/PRF/5 cell line with and without MDR phenotype and melanoma A375 cells that do not express the MDR1 phenotype but they do iNOS. Western blot analysis, confocal immunofluorescence and immune electron microscopy showed that iNOS is localized in mitochondria of MDR1-positive cells, whereas COX-2 is not. Low and moderate concentrations of celecoxib modulate the expression of iNOS and P-gp in mitochondria of MDR cancer cells independently from inhibition of COX-2 activity. However, A375 cells that express iNOS also in mitochondria, were not MDR1 positive. In conclusion, iNOS can be localized in mitochondria of HCC cells overexpressing MDR1 phenotype, however this phenomenon appears independent from the MDR1 phenotype occurrence. The presence of iNOS in mitochondria of human HCC cells phenotype probably concurs to a more aggressive behaviour of cancer cells.

  6. Contribution of mitochondria and lysosomes to photodynamic therapy-induced death in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieminen, Anna-Liisa; Azizuddin, Kashif; Zhang, Ping; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Pediaditakis, Peter; Lemasters, John J.; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    2008-02-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), visible light activates a photosensitizing drug added to a tissue, resulting in singlet oxygen formation and cell death. Employing confocal microscopy, we previously found that the phthalocyanine Pc 4 localized primarily to mitochondrial membranes in various cancer cell lines, resulting in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, followed by inner membrane permeabilization (mitochondrial permeability transition) with mitochondrial depolarization and swelling, which in turn led to cytochrome c release and apoptotic death. Recently, derivatives of Pc 4 with OH groups added to one of the axial ligands were synthesized. These derivatives appeared to be taken up more avidly by cells and caused more cytotoxicity than the parent compound Pc 4. Using organelle-specific fluorophores, we found that one of these derivatives, Pc 181, accumulated into lysosomes and that PDT with Pc 181 caused rapid disintegration of lysosomes. We hypothesized that chelatable iron released from lysosomes during PDT contributes to mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We monitored cytosolic Fe2+ concentrations after PDT with calcein. Fe2+ binds to calcein causing quenching of calcein fluorescence. After bafilomycin, an inhibitor of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase, calcein fluorescence became quenched, an effect prevented by starch desferal s-DFO, an iron chelator that enters cells by endocytosis. After Pc 181-PDT, cytosolic calcein fluorescence also decreased, indicating increased chelatable Fe2+ in the cytosol, and apoptosis occurred. s-DFO decreased Pc 181-PDT-induced apoptosis as measured by a decrease of caspase-3 activation. In isolated mitochondria preparations, Fe2+ induced mitochondrial swelling, which was prevented by Ru360, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter. The data support a hypothesis of oxidative injury in which Pc 181-PDT disintegrates lysosomes and releases constituents that synergistically promote

  7. Beyond mitochondria, what would be the energy source of the cell?

    PubMed

    Herrera, Arturo S; Del C A Esparza, Maria; Md Ashraf, Ghulam; Zamyatnin, Andrey A; Aliev, Gjumrakch

    2015-01-01

    Currently, cell biology is based on glucose as the main source of energy. Cellular bioenergetic pathways have become unnecessarily complex in their eagerness to explain that how the cell is able to generate and use energy from the oxidation of glucose, where mitochondria play an important role through oxidative phosphorylation. During a descriptive study about the three leading causes of blindness in the world, the ability of melanin to transform light energy into chemical energy through the dissociation of water molecule was unraveled. Initially, during 2 or 3 years; we tried to link together our findings with the widely accepted metabolic pathways already described in metabolic pathway databases, which have been developed to collect and organize the current knowledge on metabolism scattered across a multitude of scientific articles. However, firstly, the literature on metabolism is extensive but rarely conclusive evidence is available, and secondly, one would expect these databases to contain largely the same information, but the contrary is true. For the apparently well studied metabolic process Krebs cycle, which was described as early as 1937 and is found in nearly every biology and chemistry curriculum, there is a considerable disagreement between at least five databases. Of the nearly 7000 reactions contained jointly by these five databases, only 199 are described in the same way in all the five databases. Thus to try to integrate chemical energy from melanin with the supposedly well-known bioenergetic pathways is easier said than done; and the lack of consensus about metabolic network constitutes an insurmountable barrier. After years of unsuccessful results, we finally realized that the chemical energy released through the dissociation of water molecule by melanin represents over 90% of cell energy requirements. These findings reveal a new aspect of cell biology, as glucose and ATP have biological functions related mainly to biomass and not so much with

  8. Stronger control of ATP/ADP by proton leak in pancreatic β-cells than skeletal muscle mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Affourtit, Charles; Brand, Martin D.

    2005-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells respond to rising blood glucose concentrations by increasing their oxidative metabolism, which leads to an increased ATP/ADP ratio, closure of KATP channels, depolarization of the plasma membrane potential, influx of calcium and the eventual secretion of insulin. Such a signalling mechanism implies that the ATP/ADP ratio is flexible in beta cells (β-cells), which is in contrast with other cell types (e.g. muscle and liver) that maintain a stable ATP/ADP poise while respiring at widely varying rates. To determine whether this difference in flexibility is accounted for by mitochondrial peculiarities, we performed a top-down metabolic control analysis to quantitatively assess how ATP/ADP is controlled in mitochondria isolated from rat skeletal muscle and cultured beta cells. We show that the ATP/ADP ratio is more strongly controlled (approx. 7.5-fold) by proton leak in beta cells than in muscle. The comparatively high importance of proton leak in beta cell mitochondria (relative to phosphorylation) is evidenced furthermore by its relatively high level of control over membrane potential and overall respiratory activity. Modular-kinetic analysis of oxidative phosphorylation reveals that these control differences can be fully explained by a higher relative leak activity in beta cell mitochondria, which results in a comparatively high contribution of proton leak to the overall respiratory activity in this system. PMID:16137248

  9. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  10. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bin; Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Wu, Bin; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. {yields} mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. {yields} Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). {yields} Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  11. l-Lactate metabolism in HEP G2 cell mitochondria due to the l-lactate dehydrogenase determines the occurrence of the lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate outside mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Pizzuto, Roberto; Paventi, Gianluca; Porcile, Carola; Sarnataro, Daniela; Daniele, Aurora; Passarella, Salvatore

    2012-09-01

    As part of an ongoing study of l-lactate metabolism both in normal and in cancer cells, we investigated whether and how l-lactate metabolism occurs in mitochondria of human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep G2) cells. We found that Hep G2 cell mitochondria (Hep G2-M) possess an l-lactate dehydrogenase (ml-LDH) restricted to the inner mitochondrial compartments as shown by immunological analysis, confocal microscopy and by assaying ml-LDH activity in solubilized mitochondria. Cytosolic and mitochondrial l-LDHs were found to differ from one another in their saturation kinetics. Having shown that l-lactate itself can enter Hep G2 cells, we found that Hep G2-M swell in ammonium l-lactate, but not in ammonium pyruvate solutions, in a manner inhibited by mersalyl, this showing the occurrence of a carrier-mediated l-lactate transport in these mitochondria. Occurrence of the l-lactate/pyruvate shuttle and the appearance outside mitochondria of oxaloacetate, malate and citrate arising from l-lactate uptake and metabolism together with the low oxygen consumption and membrane potential generation are in favor of an anaplerotic role for l-LAC in Hep G2-M.

  12. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS.

    PubMed

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A; Russell, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis.

  13. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27679581

  14. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS.

    PubMed

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A; Russell, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis. PMID:27679581

  15. Environmental regulation of mitochondria-rich cells in Chalcalburnus tarichi (Pallas, 1811) during reproductive migration.

    PubMed

    Oğuz, Ahmet R

    2013-03-01

    Chalcalburnus tarichi is an anadromous cyprinid fish that has adapted to extreme conditions (salinity 22 ‰, pH 9.8 and alkalinity 153 mEq × l⁻¹) in Lake Van in eastern Turkey. Changes in immunoreactivity of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase in gill tissue and osmolarity and ion levels in plasma were investigated in C. tarichi during reproductive migration. Physicochemical characteristics and ion levels in Lake Van were high compared freshwater. Plasma osmolality and plasma ion concentrations ([Na⁺], [K⁺] and [Cl⁻]) increased after transfer from freshwater to Lake Van. The mitochondria-rich (MR) cells of the gill were stained in both filament and lamellar epithelia of C. tarichi by immunocytochemistry with a specific antiserum for Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase in river fish samples. Density and area of MR cells were decreased in lake-adapted fishes. These results indicated that freshwater acclimation capacity is correlated with the size and distribution of MR cells in C. tarichi, in contrast to many teleost fishes.

  16. Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells, Mitochondria, and MicroRNAs: Their Involvement in the Pathogenesis of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tsitkanou, Stavroula; Della Gatta, Paul A.; Russell, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease (MND), is a fatal motor neuron disorder. It results in progressive degeneration and death of upper and lower motor neurons, protein aggregation, severe muscle atrophy and respiratory insufficiency. Median survival with ALS is between 2 and 5 years from the onset of symptoms. ALS manifests as either familial ALS (FALS) (~10% of cases) or sporadic ALS (SALS), (~90% of cases). Mutations in the copper/zinc (CuZn) superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene account for ~20% of FALS cases and the mutant SOD1 mouse model has been used extensively to help understand the ALS pathology. As the precise mechanisms causing ALS are not well understood there is presently no cure. Recent evidence suggests that motor neuron degradation may involve a cell non-autonomous phenomenon involving numerous cell types within various tissues. Skeletal muscle is now considered as an important tissue involved in the pathogenesis of ALS by activating a retrograde signaling cascade that degrades motor neurons. Skeletal muscle heath and function are regulated by numerous factors including satellite cells, mitochondria and microRNAs. Studies demonstrate that in ALS these factors show various levels of dysregulation within the skeletal muscle. This review provides an overview of their dysregulation in various ALS models as well as how they may contribute individually and/or synergistically to the ALS pathogenesis.

  17. Role of mitochondria in apoptotic and necroptotic cell death in the developing brain

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Claire; Hagberg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxic–ischemic encephalopathy induces secondary brain injury characterized by delayed energy failure. Currently, therapeutic hypothermia is the sole treatment available after severe intrapartum asphyxia in babies and acts to attenuate secondary loss of high energy phosphates improving both short- and long-term outcome. In order to develop the next generation of neuroprotective therapies, we urgently need to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to cell death. Hypoxia–ischemia creates a toxic intracellular environment including accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrosative species and intracellular calcium after the insult, inducing mitochondrial impairment. More specifically mitochondrial respiration is suppressed and calcium signaling is dysregulated. At a certain threshold, Bax-dependent mitochondrial permeabilization will occur leading to activation of caspase-dependent and apoptosis-inducing factor-dependent apoptotic cell death. In addition, hypoxia–ischemia induces inflammation, which leads to the release of TNF-α, TRAIL, TWEAK, FasL and Toll-like receptor agonists that will activate death receptors on neurons and oligodendroglia. Death receptors trigger apoptotic death via caspase-8 and necroptotic cell death through formation of the necrosome (composed of RIP1, RIP3 and MLKL), both of which converge at the mitochondria. PMID:25661091

  18. Mechanisms of cell signaling by nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: from mitochondria to MAP kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levonen, A. L.; Patel, R. P.; Brookes, P.; Go, Y. M.; Jo, H.; Parthasarathy, S.; Anderson, P. G.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2001-01-01

    Many of the biological and pathological effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated through cell signaling pathways that are initiated by NO reacting with metalloproteins. More recently, it has been recognized that the reaction of NO with free radicals such as superoxide and the lipid peroxyl radical also has the potential to modulate redox signaling. Although it is clear that NO can exert both cytotoxic and cytoprotective actions, the focus of this overview are those reactions that could lead to protection of the cell against oxidative stress in the vasculature. This will include the induction of antioxidant defenses such as glutathione, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases in response to blood flow, and modulation of mitochondrial function and its impact on apoptosis. Models are presented that show the increased synthesis of glutathione in response to shear stress and inhibition of cytochrome c release from mitochondria. It appears that in the vasculature NO-dependent signaling pathways are of three types: (i) those involving NO itself, leading to modulation of mitochondrial respiration and soluble guanylate cyclase; (ii) those that involve S-nitrosation, including inhibition of caspases; and (iii) autocrine signaling that involves the intracellular formation of peroxynitrite and the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Taken together, NO plays a major role in the modulation of redox cell signaling through a number of distinct pathways in a cellular setting.

  19. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Heat-Soluble Proteins Identified in the Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade Improve Osmotic Tolerance of Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called “anhydrobiosis”. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  20. Steroidogenesis in MA-10 Mouse Leydig Cells Is Altered via Fatty Acid Import into the Mitochondria1

    PubMed Central

    Rone, Malena B.; Midzak, Andrew S.; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B.; Fan, Jinjiang; Ye, Xiaoying; Blonder, Josip; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondria are home to many cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid metabolism, and in steroid-synthesizing cells, they are involved in cholesterol import and metabolism, which is the initiating step in steroidogenesis. The formation of macromolecular protein complexes aids in the regulation and efficiency of these mitochondrial functions, though because of their dynamic nature, they are hard to identify. To overcome this problem, we used Blue-Native PAGE with whole-gel mass spectrometry on isolated mitochondria from control and hormone-treated MA-10 mouse tumor Leydig cells. The presence of multiple mitochondrial protein complexes was shown. Although these were qualitatively similar under control and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated conditions, quantitative differences in the components of the complexes emerged after hCG treatment. A prominent decrease was observed with proteins involved in fatty acid import into the mitochondria, implying that mitochondrial beta-oxidation is not essential for steroidogenesis. To confirm this observation, we inhibited fatty acid import utilizing the CPT1a inhibitor etomoxir, resulting in increased steroid production. Conversely, stimulation of mitochondrial beta-oxidation with metformin resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in steroidogenesis. These changes were accompanied by changes in mitochondrial respiration and in the lactic acid formed during glycolysis. Taken together, these results suggest that upon hormonal stimulation, mitochondria efficiently import cholesterol for steroid production at the expense of other lipids necessary for energy production, specifically fatty acids required for beta-oxidation. PMID:25210128

  1. Recombinant Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Induces Mitophagy by Directly Targeting Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hep G2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Rong; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are essential targets for cancer chemotherapy and other disease treatments. Recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI), a member of the potato type I proteinase inhibitor family, was derived from tartary buckwheat extracts. Our results showed that rBTI directly targeted mitochondria and induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. This occurs through enhanced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with the rise of the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) content, and changes in the GSH/oxidized glutathione ratio. Mild and transient ROS induced by rBTI were shown to be important signaling molecules required to induce Hep G2 mitophagy to remove dysfunctional mitochondria. Furthermore, rBTI could directly induce mitochondrial fragmentation. It was also noted that rBTI highly increased colocalization of mitochondria in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. Tom 20, a subunit of the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane complex responsible for recognizing mitochondrial presequences, may be the direct target of rBTI.

  2. Recombinant Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Induces Mitophagy by Directly Targeting Mitochondria and Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Hep G2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuanhua; Li, Shanshan; Ren, Rong; Li, Jiao; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-09-01

    Mitochondria are essential targets for cancer chemotherapy and other disease treatments. Recombinant buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (rBTI), a member of the potato type I proteinase inhibitor family, was derived from tartary buckwheat extracts. Our results showed that rBTI directly targeted mitochondria and induced mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. This occurs through enhanced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation associated with the rise of the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and glutathione peroxidase (GSH) content, and changes in the GSH/oxidized glutathione ratio. Mild and transient ROS induced by rBTI were shown to be important signaling molecules required to induce Hep G2 mitophagy to remove dysfunctional mitochondria. Furthermore, rBTI could directly induce mitochondrial fragmentation. It was also noted that rBTI highly increased colocalization of mitochondria in treated cells compared to nontreated cells. Tom 20, a subunit of the translocase of the mitochondrial outer membrane complex responsible for recognizing mitochondrial presequences, may be the direct target of rBTI. PMID:26301894

  3. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments.

  4. Spatial Distribution of Cellular Function: The Partitioning of Proteins between Mitochondria and the Nucleus in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qattan, Amal T.; Radulovic, Marko; Crawford, Mark; Godovac-Zimmermann, Jasminka

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent proteomics analysis of the nuclei and mitochondria of MCF7 breast cancer cells identified 985 proteins (40% of all detected proteins) present in both organelles. Numerous proteins from all five complexes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (e.g., NDUFA5, NDUFB10, NDUFS1, NDUF2, SDHA, UQRB, UQRC2, UQCRH, COX5A, COX5B, MT-CO2, ATP5A1, ATP5B, ATP5H, etc.), from the TCA-cycle (DLST, IDH2, IDH3A, OGDH, SUCLAG2, etc.), and from glycolysis (ALDOA, ENO1, FBP1, GPI, PGK1, TALDO1, etc.) were distributed to both the nucleus and mitochondria. In contrast, proteins involved in nuclear/mitochondrial RNA processing/translation and Ras/Rab signaling showed different partitioning patterns. The identity of the OxPhos, TCA-cycle, and glycolysis proteins distributed to both the nucleus and mitochondria provides evidence for spatio-functional integration of these processes over the two different subcellular organelles. We suggest that there are unrecognized aspects of functional coordination between the nucleus and mitochondria, that integration of core functional processes via wide subcellular distribution of constituent proteins is a common characteristic of cells, and that subcellular spatial integration of function may be a vital aspect of cancer. PMID:23051583

  5. Novel mitochondria-targeted heat-soluble proteins identified in the anhydrobiotic Tardigrade improve osmotic tolerance of human cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Sae; Tanaka, Junko; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Daiki D; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration through transition to a metabolically inactive state, called "anhydrobiosis". Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins involved in the desiccation tolerance of many anhydrobiotic organisms. Tardigrades, Ramazzottius varieornatus, however, express predominantly tardigrade-unique heat-soluble proteins: CAHS (Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble) and SAHS (Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble) proteins, which are secreted or localized in most intracellular compartments, except the mitochondria. Although mitochondrial integrity is crucial to ensure cellular survival, protective molecules for mitochondria have remained elusive. Here, we identified two novel mitochondrial heat-soluble proteins, RvLEAM and MAHS (Mitochondrial Abundant Heat Soluble), as potent mitochondrial protectants from Ramazzottius varieornatus. RvLEAM is a group3 LEA protein and immunohistochemistry confirmed its mitochondrial localization in tardigrade cells. MAHS-green fluorescent protein fusion protein localized in human mitochondria and was heat-soluble in vitro, though no sequence similarity with other known proteins was found, and one region was conserved among tardigrades. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RvLEAM protein as well as MAHS protein improved the hyperosmotic tolerance of human cells. The findings of the present study revealed that tardigrade mitochondria contain at least two types of heat-soluble proteins that might have protective roles in water-deficient environments. PMID:25675104

  6. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  7. Effects of alterd Gravity and Phosphorilation inhibitor 2.4-Dinitrophenole on Mitochondria Ultrastructural Organization in Chlorella Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, A.

    The results of the experiments with two species of a green alga ?hlorella in spaceflight conditions and under altered gravity testified that the regular rearrangements has been revealed first of all in the cell mitochondriome. Such reorganizations were observed at auto- and geterotrophic regimes of the culture growth in the experiments of average duration (9-18 days) and also in long-term experiments (30 days - 4.5 months) (Popova, 1999). The mitochondria rearrangements become apparent at intensification of the cell proliferation, which results in increasing a relative volume of the mitohondria per cell (up to 5.3 % in microgravity compared to the control - 2.1 %). Moreover, the size of these organelles and their cristae increased in the experimental cells. The indicated mitochondria changes were accompanied by intensifying the electron density of a matrix and often by well-ordered topography of the cristae. Taking into account that the main set of the enzymes catalyzing the oxidative phosphorylation and conduction of the electrons are localized in the cristae membranes, the considerable growth of the mitochondria size and the cristae areas testified probably about a high functional activity of these organelles. Our investigations were carried out with the purpose to check the functional state of mitochondria under altered gravity (using slow horizontal clinorotator) and under influence of the inhibitory agent, separating an oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. The ultrastructural peculiarities of the mitochondria as the energetic organelles were studied under the different 2,4- dinitrophenole concentrations and during the different terms of clinoritation at the logarithmic and stationary phases of Chlorella culture growth. The various characters of the mitochondria rearrangements and their relative volumes per cell were revealed under 2,4-dinitrophenole influence compared to the different terms of microgravity and altered gravity influences. The obtained

  8. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  9. Dynamin-related protein 1 mediates mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in chlorpyrifos-treated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Hyeon; Ko, Juyeon; Hwang, Jungwook; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a mitochondrial fission protein, mediates mitochondria-dependent apoptosis through mitochondrial division. However, little is known about the mechanism by which Drp1 modulates apoptosis in response to chlorpyrifos (CPF)-induced toxicity. In this study, we determined that CPF-induced mitochondrial apoptosis is mediated by Drp1 translocation in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Our results showed that CPF treatment induced intrinsic apoptosis by activating caspase-9, caspase-3, and cytochrome c release in SH-SY5Y cells. Cytosolic Drp1 translocated to the mitochondria in CPF-treated cells and was phosphorylated at Ser616. Treating cells with CPF induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Inhibiting this ROS generation and MAPK activation abolished CPF-induced expression of phospho-Drp1. Furthermore, Drp1 was required for p53 to translocate to the mitochondria under CPF-induced oxidative stress. Treating cells with mitochondrial-division inhibitor-1 (mdivi-1), which blocks Drp1 translocation, increased the viability of CPF-treated cells by abrogating Drp1 translocation and caspase-3 activation. Specifically, pretreating cells with mdivi-1 inhibited Bax translocation to the mitochondria by blocking p53 signaling. Taken together, these data reveal a novel mechanism by which Drp1 activates mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis and indicate that inhibiting Dpr1 function can protect against CPF-induced cytotoxicity. We propose that inhibiting Drp1 is a possible therapeutic approach for pesticide-induced toxicity when hyperactivated Drp1 contributes to pathology.

  10. Autoregulation of free radicals via uncoupling protein control in pancreatic beta-cell mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Heuett, William J; Periwal, Vipul

    2010-01-20

    Pancreatic beta-cells sense the ambient blood-glucose concentration and secrete insulin to signal other tissues to take up glucose. Mitochondria play a key role in this response as they metabolize nutrients to produce ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), both of which are involved in insulin secretion signaling. Based on data available in the literature and previously developed mathematical models, we present a model of glucose-stimulated mitochondrial respiration, ATP synthesis, and ROS production and control in beta-cells. The model is consistent with a number of experimental observations reported in the literature. Most notably, it captures the nonlinear rise in the proton leak rate at high membrane potential and the increase in this leak due to uncoupling protein (UCP) activation by ROS. The functional forms used to model ROS production and UCP regulation yield insight into these mechanisms, as many details have not yet been unraveled in the experimental literature. We examine short- and long-term effects of UCP activation inhibition and changes in the mitochondrial density on mitochondrial responses to glucose. Results suggest increasing mitochondrial density while decreasing UCP activity may be an effective way to increase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion while decreasing oxidative stress.

  11. An antimicrobial peptidomimetic induces Mucorales cell death through mitochondria-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Barbu, E Magda; Shirazi, Fazal; McGrath, Danielle M; Albert, Nathaniel; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has dramatically increased in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, the array of cellular targets whose inhibition results in fungal cell death is rather limited. Mitochondria have been mechanistically identified as central regulators of detoxification and virulence in fungi. Our group has previously designed and developed a proteolytically-resistant peptidomimetic motif D(KLAKLAK)2 with pleiotropic action ranging from targeted (i.e., ligand-directed) activity against cancer and obesity to non-targeted activity against antibiotic resistant gram-negative rods. Here we evaluated whether this non-targeted peptidomimetic motif is active against Mucorales. We show that D(KLAKLAK)2 has marked fungicidal action, inhibits germination, and reduces hyphal viability. We have also observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in D(KLAKLAK)2-treated Mucorales cells. Moreover, the fungicidal activity was directly correlated with vacuolar injury, mitochondrial swelling and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), and increased caspase-like enzymatic activity. Finally, these apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicating mechanistic pathway specificity. Together, these findings indicate that D(KLAKLAK)2 makes Mucorales exquisitely susceptible via mitochondrial injury-induced apoptosis. This prototype may serve as a candidate drug for the development of translational applications against mucormycosis and perhaps other fungal infections. PMID:24098573

  12. An Antimicrobial Peptidomimetic Induces Mucorales Cell Death through Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Barbu, E. Magda; Shirazi, Fazal; McGrath, Danielle M.; Albert, Nathaniel; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of mucormycosis has dramatically increased in immunocompromised patients. Moreover, the array of cellular targets whose inhibition results in fungal cell death is rather limited. Mitochondria have been mechanistically identified as central regulators of detoxification and virulence in fungi. Our group has previously designed and developed a proteolytically-resistant peptidomimetic motif D(KLAKLAK)2 with pleiotropic action ranging from targeted (i.e., ligand-directed) activity against cancer and obesity to non-targeted activity against antibiotic resistant gram-negative rods. Here we evaluated whether this non-targeted peptidomimetic motif is active against Mucorales. We show that D(KLAKLAK)2 has marked fungicidal action, inhibits germination, and reduces hyphal viability. We have also observed cellular changes characteristic of apoptosis in D(KLAKLAK)2-treated Mucorales cells. Moreover, the fungicidal activity was directly correlated with vacuolar injury, mitochondrial swelling and mitochondrial membrane depolarization, intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation (ROS), and increased caspase-like enzymatic activity. Finally, these apoptotic features were prevented by the addition of the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicating mechanistic pathway specificity. Together, these findings indicate that D(KLAKLAK)2 makes Mucorales exquisitely susceptible via mitochondrial injury-induced apoptosis. This prototype may serve as a candidate drug for the development of translational applications against mucormycosis and perhaps other fungal infections. PMID:24098573

  13. Ganoderma atrum Polysaccharide Ameliorates Hyperglycemia-Induced Endothelial Cell Death via a Mitochondria-ROS Pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Juan; Nie, Shao-Ping; Yao, Yu-Fei; Liu, Xiao-Zhen; Shao, Deng-Yin; Gong, De-Ming; Cui, Steve W; Phillips, Glyn O; He, Ming; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2015-09-23

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of Ganoderma atrum polysaccharide (PSG-1) in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and mitochondrial function in hyperglycemia-induced angiopathy. In this work, ROS scavenger, oxidizing agent tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBH), mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) blockers, and caspase inhibition are used to investigate whether PSG-1 may promote survival of human umbilical vein cells (HUVECs) through preventing the overproduction of ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. Experimental results show that exposure of HUVECs to 35.5 mmol/L glucose increases the proportion of cells undergoing apoptosis. PSG-1, mPTP blocker, or caspase inhibition can reduce apoptosis and ROS generation. PSG-1 also increases mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) but inhibits Bax translocation, cytochrome c release, and caspase activation. In summary, vascular protection of PSG-1 can be mediated by a mitochondria-ROS pathway. ROS generation and mPTP induction are critical for high glucose-mediated apoptosis. PSG-1 ameliorates endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting oxidative stress and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Characterization of aconitate hydratase from mitochondria and cytoplasm of ascites tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hernanz, A; de la Fuente, M

    1988-07-01

    This paper describes the characterization of aconitate hydratase (EC 4.2.1.3) in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial extracts from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells carried by BALB/C mice. The results show a similar distribution of aconitate hydratase in both extracts, with specific activities much lower than those found in pig and mouse tissues. Mitochondrial aconitate hydratase shows a substrate inhibition by citrate with a Km similar to that found in cytoplasm (Km = 1.0 mM and 0.9 mM, respectively). Oxalacetate produces a mixed type of inhibition in both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial aconitate hydratases with different inhibition constants (Ki = 0.3 mM and 1.0 mM, respectively). Moreover, the specific activities of aconitate hydratase in both cytoplasm and mitochondria decrease when the tumor progresses in the peritoneum of BALB/C mice, as well as the percentage of aconitate hydratase activity in the presence of oxalacetate as the inhibitor. These results indicate that the activity and kinetics of aconitate hydratase are markedly altered by neoplastic transformation as occurs in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells. Since aconitate hydratase is not a key enzyme, these unexpected data are of interest in the study of cancer biochemistry. PMID:3179020

  15. Identification of active elementary flux modes in mitochondria using selectively permeabilized CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Averina; Wahrheit, Judith; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Weyler, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic compartmentation is a key feature of mammalian cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, responsible for respiration and the TCA cycle. We accessed the mitochondrial metabolism of the economically important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using selective permeabilization. We tested key substrates without and with addition of ADP. Based on quantified uptake and production rates, we could determine the contribution of different elementary flux modes to the metabolism of a substrate or substrate combination. ADP stimulated the uptake of most metabolites, directly by serving as substrate for the respiratory chain, thus removing the inhibitory effect of NADH, or as allosteric effector. Addition of ADP favored substrate metabolization to CO2 and did not enhance the production of other metabolites. The controlling effect of ADP was more pronounced when we supplied metabolites to the first part of the TCA cycle: pyruvate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. In the second part of the TCA cycle, the rates were primarily controlled by the concentrations of C4-dicarboxylates. Without ADP addition, the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase-malate dehydrogenase-malic enzyme cycle consumed the ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation, preventing its accumulation and maintaining metabolic steady state conditions. Aspartate was taken up only in combination with pyruvate, whose uptake also increased, a fact explained by complex regulatory effects. Isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were identified as the key regulators of the TCA cycle, confirming existent knowledge from other cells. We have shown that selectively permeabilized cells combined with elementary mode analysis allow in-depth studying of the mitochondrial metabolism and regulation. PMID:26417715

  16. Identification of active elementary flux modes in mitochondria using selectively permeabilized CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Averina; Wahrheit, Judith; Nonnenmacher, Yannic; Weyler, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2015-11-01

    Metabolic compartmentation is a key feature of mammalian cells. Mitochondria are the powerhouse of eukaryotic cells, responsible for respiration and the TCA cycle. We accessed the mitochondrial metabolism of the economically important Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells using selective permeabilization. We tested key substrates without and with addition of ADP. Based on quantified uptake and production rates, we could determine the contribution of different elementary flux modes to the metabolism of a substrate or substrate combination. ADP stimulated the uptake of most metabolites, directly by serving as substrate for the respiratory chain, thus removing the inhibitory effect of NADH, or as allosteric effector. Addition of ADP favored substrate metabolization to CO2 and did not enhance the production of other metabolites. The controlling effect of ADP was more pronounced when we supplied metabolites to the first part of the TCA cycle: pyruvate, citrate, α-ketoglutarate and glutamine. In the second part of the TCA cycle, the rates were primarily controlled by the concentrations of C4-dicarboxylates. Without ADP addition, the activity of the pyruvate carboxylase-malate dehydrogenase-malic enzyme cycle consumed the ATP produced by oxidative phosphorylation, preventing its accumulation and maintaining metabolic steady state conditions. Aspartate was taken up only in combination with pyruvate, whose uptake also increased, a fact explained by complex regulatory effects. Isocitrate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase were identified as the key regulators of the TCA cycle, confirming existent knowledge from other cells. We have shown that selectively permeabilized cells combined with elementary mode analysis allow in-depth studying of the mitochondrial metabolism and regulation.

  17. Label-free and noninvasive optical detection of the distribution of nanometer-size mitochondria in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xuantao; Qiu, Yuanyuan; Marquez-Curtis, Leah; Gupta, Manisha; Capjack, Clarence E.; Rozmus, Wojciech; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tsui, Ying Y.

    2011-06-01

    A microfluidic flow cytometric technique capable of obtaining information on nanometer-sized organelles in single cells in a label-free, noninvasive optical manner was developed. Experimental two-dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns from malignant lymphoid cells (Jurkat cell line) and normal hematopoietic stem cells (cord blood CD34+ cells) were compared with those obtained from finite-difference time-domain simulations. In the simulations, we assumed that the mitochondria were randomly distributed throughout a Jurkat cell, and aggregated in a CD34+ cell. Comparison of the experimental and simulated light scattering patterns led us to conclude that distinction from these two types of cells may be due to different mitochondrial distributions. This observation was confirmed by conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy. A method for potential cell discrimination was developed based on analysis of the 2D light scattering patterns. Potential clinical applications using mitochondria as intrinsic biological markers in single cells were discussed in terms of normal cells (CD34+ cell and lymphocytes) versus malignant cells (THP-1 and Jurkat cell lines).

  18. Autophagy inhibition enhances isorhamnetin-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    RUAN, YUSHU; HU, KE; CHEN, HONGBO

    2015-01-01

    Isorhamnetin (ISO) is a flavonoid from plants of the Polygonaceae family and is also an immediate metabolite of quercetin in mammals. To date, the anti-tumor effects of ISO and the underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated in lung cancer cells. The present study investigated the inhibitory effects of ISO on the growth of human lung cancer A549 cells. Treatment of the lung cancer cells with ISO significantly suppressed cell proliferation and colony formation. ISO treatment also resulted in a significant increase in apoptotic cell death of A549 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further investigation showed that the apoptosis proceeded via the mitochondria-dependent pathway as indicated by alteration of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of cytochrome C and caspase activation. Of note, treatment with ISO also induced the formation of autophagosomes and light chain 3-II protein in A549 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment with autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine and hydroxychloroquine significantly inhibited the ISO-induced autophagy and enhanced the ISO-induced apoptotic cell death in vitro as well as in vivo. Thus, the results of the present study suggested that ISO is a potential anti-lung cancer agent. In addition, the results indicated that the inhibition of autophagy may be a useful strategy for enhancing the chemotherapeutic effect of ISO on lung cancer cells. PMID:26238746

  19. Interaction of chlamydiae and host cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, J W

    1991-01-01

    The obligately intracellular bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, which is only remotely related to other eubacterial genera, cause many diseases of humans, nonhuman mammals, and birds. Interaction of chlamydiae with host cells in vitro has been studied as a model of infection in natural hosts and as an example of the adaptation of an organism to an unusual environment, the inside of another living cell. Among the novel adaptations made by chlamydiae have been the substitution of disulfide-bond-cross-linked polypeptides for peptidoglycans and the use of host-generated nucleotide triphosphates as sources of metabolic energy. The effect of contact between chlamydiae and host cells in culture varies from no effect at all to rapid destruction of either chlamydiae or host cells. When successful infection occurs, it is usually followed by production of large numbers of progeny and destruction of host cells. However, host cells containing chlamydiae sometimes continue to divide, with or without overt signs of infection, and chlamydiae may persist indefinitely in cell cultures. Some of the many factors that influence the outcome of chlamydia-host cell interaction are kind of chlamydiae, kind of host cells, mode of chlamydial entry, nutritional adequacy of the culture medium, presence of antimicrobial agents, and presence of immune cells and soluble immune factors. General characteristics of chlamydial multiplication in cells of their natural hosts are reproduced in established cell lines, but reproduction in vitro of the subtle differences in chlamydial behavior responsible for the individuality of the different chlamydial diseases will require better in vitro models. PMID:2030670

  20. Mitochondria in Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Thompson, Michael A.; Pabelick, Christina M.; Prakash, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are autonomous cellular organelles that oversee a variety of functions such as metabolism, energy production, calcium buffering, and cell fate determination. Regulation of their morphology and diverse activities beyond energy production are being recognized as playing major roles in cellular health and dysfunction. This review is aimed at summarizing what is known regarding mitochondrial contributions to pathogenesis of lung diseases. Emphasis is given to understanding the importance of structural and functional aspects of mitochondria in both normal cellular function (based on knowledge from other cell types) and in development and modulation of lung diseases such as asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis and cancer. Emerging techniques that allow examination of mitochondria, and potential strategies to target mitochondria in the treatment of lung diseases are also discussed. PMID:23978003

  1. Zinc pyrithione induces cellular stress signaling and apoptosis in Hep-2 cervical tumor cells: the role of mitochondria and lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav

    2010-04-01

    Increased intracellular free zinc concentrations are associated with activation of several stress signaling pathways, specific organelle injury and final cell death. In the present work we examined the involvement of mitochondria and lysosomes and their crosstalk in free zinc-induced cell demise. We report that treatment of cervical tumor Hep-2 cells with zinc pyrithione leads to an early appearance of cytoplasmic zinc-specific foci with corresponding accumulation of zinc first in mitochondria and later in lysosomes. Concomitant with these changes, upregulation of expression of metallothionein II A gene as well as the increased abundance of its protein occurs. Moreover, zinc activates p53 and its dependent genes including Puma and Bax and they contribute to an observed loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of apoptosis. Conversely, lysosomal membrane permeabilization and its promoted cleavage of Bid occurs in a delayed manner in treated cells and their effect on decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential is limited. The use of specific inhibitors as well as siRNA technology suggest a crucial role of MT-IIA in trafficking of free zinc into mitochondria or lysosomes and regulation of apoptotic or necrotic cell demise.

  2. A mitochondria-targeted ratiometric fluorescent probe to monitor endogenously generated sulfur dioxide derivatives in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang; Teoh, Chai Lean; Peng, Juanjuan; Su, Dongdong; Yuan, Lin; Chang, Young-Tae

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) can be endogenously produced by enzymes in mitochondria during oxidation of H2S or sulphur-containing amino acids, and plays important roles in several physiological processes. However, the design and synthesis of fluorescent probes which can detect mitochondrial SO2 and its derivatives in living cells still remain unresolved. Herein, we report the preparation of a lipophilic cationic dye 1 (Mito-Ratio-SO2), which targets the mitochondria in living cells and is sensitive to the presence of SO2 derivatives. The ratiometric probe Mito-Ratio-SO2 displays a 170 nm blue-shift in emission with two well-resolved emission bands upon addition of sulfite. Mechanistic studies indicate that three probe-SO2 adducts coexist after reaction, as supported by liquid chromatography and density function theory investigations. Importantly, the ratiometric probe is highly selective for sulfite over other bio-species including H2S. Fluorescence co-localization studies indicate that the probe localizes solely in the mitochondria of HeLa cells. Last but not least, fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells successfully demonstrates the detection of intrinsically generated intracellular SO2 derivatives in living cells.

  3. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  4. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori Ann; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2016-08-23

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  5. Copper oxide nanoparticles induced mitochondria mediated apoptosis in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Ahmad, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2013-01-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are heavily utilized in semiconductor devices, gas sensor, batteries, solar energy converter, microelectronics and heat transfer fluids. It has been reported that liver is one of the target organs for nanoparticles after they gain entry into the body through any of the possible routes. Recent studies have shown cytotoxic response of CuO NPs in liver cells. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis in liver cells due to CuO NPs exposure is largely lacking. We explored the possible mechanisms of apoptosis induced by CuO NPs in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Prepared CuO NPs were spherical in shape with a smooth surface and had an average diameter of 22 nm. CuO NPs (concentration range 2-50 µg/ml) were found to induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells in dose-dependent manner, which was likely to be mediated through reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress. Tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic gene caspase-3 were up-regulated due to CuO NPs exposure. Decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential with a concomitant increase in the gene expression of bax/bcl2 ratio suggested that mitochondria mediated pathway involved in CuO NPs induced apoptosis. This study has provided valuable insights into the possible mechanism of apoptosis caused by CuO NPs at in vitro level. Underlying mechanism(s) of apoptosis due to CuO NPs exposure should be further invested at in vivo level. PMID:23940521

  6. Monomethylarsonous acid, but not inorganic arsenic, is a mitochondria-specific toxicant in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Pace, Clare; Banerjee, Tania Das; Welch, Barrett; Khalili, Roxana; Dagda, Ruben K; Angermann, Jeff

    2016-09-01

    Arsenic exposure has been implicated as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer, yet the role mitochondrial dysfunction plays in the cellular mechanisms of pathology is largely unknown. To investigate arsenic-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we exposed rat aortic smooth muscle cells (A7r5) to inorganic arsenic (iAs(III)) and its metabolite monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and compared their effects on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that MMA(III) is significantly more toxic to mitochondria than iAs(III). Exposure of VSMCs to MMA(III), but not iAs(III), significantly decreased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates and concomitantly increased compensatory extracellular acidification rates, a proxy for glycolysis. Treatment with MMA(III) significantly increased hydrogen peroxide and superoxide levels compared to iAs(III). Exposure to MMA(III) resulted in significant decreases in mitochondrial ATP, aberrant perinuclear clustering of mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial content. Mechanistically, we observed that mitochondrial superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contribute to mitochondrial toxicity, as treatment of cells with MnTBAP (a mitochondrial superoxide dismutase mimetic) and catalase significantly reduced mitochondrial respiration deficits and cell death induced by both arsenic compounds. Overall, our data demonstrates that MMA(III) is a mitochondria-specific toxicant that elevates mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial sources of ROS.

  7. Simultaneously targeting mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by photodynamic therapy induces apoptosis in human lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shahzidi, Susan; Cunderlíková, Beata; Więdłocha, Antoni; Zhen, Yan; Vasovič, Vlada; Nesland, Jahn M; Peng, Qian

    2011-11-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photodetection with protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) precursors have widely been used in the diseases with abnormally proliferative cells, but the mechanism of the modality is not fully understood yet. In this study 70-95% of apoptotic cells after PDT with PpIX precursor, hexaminolevulinate (HAL) in two human lymphoma cell lines, Namalwa and Bjab, were confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and flow cytometry. HAL-derived PpIX was mainly distributed in the mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), both of which were initial targets after light exposure causing two major pathways simultaneously involved in the apoptotic induction. One was the mitochondrial pathway including the release of cytochrome c, cleavage of caspases-9/-3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and DNA fragmentation factor. The other was the ER stress-mediated pathway triggering a transient increase in the cytosolic Ca(2+) level after photodamage to the ER calcium pump protein SERCA2. The released Ca(2+) further initiated the caspase-8 cleavage. The use of both extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA and intracellular Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM confirmed that such cytosolic Ca(2+) originated from the ER rather than extracellular Ca(2+)-containing medium. About 30% of the apoptosis was blocked with BAPTA-AM alone; while a complete inhibition of such apoptosis was achieved with a combination of the caspase-9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK and caspase-8 inhibitor Z-IETD-FMK, thus quantifying each role of the mitochondrial and ER pathways. PMID:21881674

  8. Targeting microbiota-mitochondria inter-talk: Microbiota control mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saint-Georges-Chaumet, Y; Attaf, D; Pelletier, E; Edeas, M

    2015-09-26

    Our aim is to highlight the subtle relationship that exists between microbiota and mitochondria. Microbiota targets mitochondria by modulating the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production and the mitochondrial activity through interactions with toxins, proteins or other metabolites released by gut microbiota. The intriguing relationship that exists between mitochondria and microbiota is strengthened by the probable prokaryotic origin of mitochondria. Emerging data implicates a role for ROS, nitric oxide, Short Chain Fatty Acids and hydrogen sulfide in the cross-talk between microbiota - mitochondria and REDOX signaling. Several studies have shown that microbiota act and modulate mitochondrial activity, and use it as a relay to strengthen host-microbiotal interaction. This modulation depends on the gut bacterial strain quality and diversity to increase its pathogenic versus beneficial effects. Furthermore, based on conclusions from new studies, it is possible that microbiota can directly interact with the host cell gene expression by favoring bacterial and mitochondrial DNA insertion in the nuclear genome. The emerging knowledge of mitochondria-microbiota interaction may be of great importance to better understand the mechanism of mitochondrial and metabolic diseases, and the syndromes associated with change in quality and quantity of microbiotal species. We suggest that microbiota via mitochondrial modulation influence cell homeostasis and metabolism. The challenge will be to find strategies to modulate the quality and diversity of microbiota rather than acting on microbiota metabolites and microbiota related factors. The medicine of tomorrow will be completely personalized. Firstly there will be a test to show the quality, quantity and diversity of microbiota, and secondly a preventive or therapeutic strategy will be administrated (probiotics, diet, prodrug or fecal transplantation). The era of digital medicine is here.

  9. Hitting the Bull’s-Eye in Metastatic Cancers—NSAIDs Elevate ROS in Mitochondria, Inducing Malignant Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stephen John; Pritchard, Rhys; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ralph, Raymond Keith

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastases that impede the function of vital organs are a major cause of cancer related mortality. Mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by hypoxia, low nutrient levels, or other stresses, such as genotoxic events, act as key drivers of the malignant changes in primary tumors to enhance their progression to metastasis. Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondrial modifications and mutations resulting from oxidative stress, and leading to OxPhos stimulation and/or enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are essential for promoting and sustaining the highly metastatic phenotype. Moreover, the modified mitochondria in emerging or existing metastatic cancer cells, by their irreversible differences, provide opportunities for selectively targeting their mitochondrial functions with a one-two punch. The first blow would block their anti-oxidative defense, followed by the knockout blow—promoting production of excess ROS, capitulating the terminal stage—activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), specifically killing metastatic cancer cells or their precursors. This review links a wide area of research relevant to cellular mechanisms that affect mitochondria activity as a major source of ROS production driving the pro-oxidative state in metastatic cancer cells. Each of the important aspects affecting mitochondrial function are discussed including: hypoxia, HIFs and PGC1 induced metabolic changes, increased ROS production to induce a more pro-oxidative state with reduced antioxidant defenses. It then focuses on how the mitochondria, as a major source of ROS in metastatic cancer cells driving the pro-oxidative state of malignancy enables targeting drugs affecting many of these altered processes and why the NSAIDs are an excellent example of mitochondria-targeted agents that provide a one-two knockout activating the mPTP and their efficacy as selective anticancer metastasis drugs. PMID:25688484

  10. Interaction of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 and BAX in Mitochondria Promotes Male Germ Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yue; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Swerdloff, Ronald; Hwang, David; Cobb, Laura J.; Sinha Hikim, Amiya; Lue, Yan He; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2010-01-01

    Germ cell apoptosis is crucial for spermatogenesis and can be triggered by various stimuli, including intratesticular hormone deprivation. This study proposes a role for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in male germ cell apoptosis. Groups of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received one of the following treatments for 5 days: (i) daily intratesticular (IT) injections with saline (control); (ii) a single subcutaneous injection of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH-A), acyline, on day 1 and a daily IT injection of saline; (iii) daily IT injection of IGFBP-3; and (iv) a GnRH-A injection on day 1 and a daily IT injection of IGFBP-3. Germ cell apoptosis increased significantly after IGFBP-3 or GnRH-A treatment which was further enhanced by the combined treatment. After co-immunoprecipitation with BAX antibody, IGFBP-3 association with BAX was demonstrated in total and mitochondrial fractions but not in the cytosol of testis extracts. BAX-associated IGFBP-3 expression was increased in mitochondria after treatment compared with control, which was confirmed by an IGFBP-3 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Dot blot studies further validated the BAX-IGFBP-3 binding in vitro. IGFBP-3 as well as BAX induced release of cytochrome c and DIABLO from isolated testicular mitochondria in vitro. IGFBP-3, when combined with an ineffective dose of BAX, triggered release of these proteins from isolated mitochondria at a 4-fold lower dose than IGFBP-3 alone. Our data demonstrate that the IGFBP-3 and BAX interaction activates germ cell apoptosis via the mitochondria-dependent pathway. This represents a novel pathway regulating germ call homeostasis that may have significance for male fertility and testicular disease. PMID:19887447

  11. In situ tissue regeneration through host stem cell recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ko, In Kap; Lee, Sang Jin; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering has made steady progress in translating various tissue applications. Although the classical tissue engineering strategy, which involves the use of culture-expanded cells and scaffolds to produce a tissue construct for implantation, has been validated, this approach involves extensive cell expansion steps, requiring a lot of time and laborious effort before implantation. To bypass this ex vivo process, a new approach has been introduced. In situ tissue regeneration utilizes the body's own regenerating capacity by mobilizing host endogenous stem cells or tissue-specific progenitor cells to the site of injury. This approach relies on development of a target-specific biomaterial scaffolding system that can effectively control the host microenvironment and mobilize host stem/progenitor cells to target tissues. An appropriate microenvironment provided by implanted scaffolds would facilitate recruitment of host cells that can be guided to regenerating structural and functional tissues. PMID:24232256

  12. Respiration characteristics of mitochondria in parental and giant transformed cells of the murine Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Horbay, Rostyslav O; Manko, Bohdan O; Manko, Volodymyr V; Lootsik, Maxim D; Stoika, Rostyslav S

    2012-01-01

    Respiration characteristics of mitochondria of the parental and giant cells of murine NK/Ly (Nemeth-Kellner lymphoma) were studied. The giant cell-enriched ascites were obtained by serial intraperitoneal injections of vinblastine in tumour-bearing mice. Ascites containing >70% giant cells were used. Their diameter of was over 17 μm (~2800 μm(3)), while the diameter of the parental cells was 12.7 μm (1100 μm(3)). The respiration rate of mitochondria in situ was measured by oxygen consumption in intact and digitonin-permeabilized NK/Ly cells. Endogenous respiration of intact giant NK/Ly cells was three times higher compared to the parental ones, roughly in agreement with the volume change. The giant NK/Ly cells were far more resistant to permeabilization with digitonin than the parental cells, as shown by Trypan Blue and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release tests. After digitonin permeabilization, oxygen consumption was reduced to a minimal level (0.06 ng atom O/(s × 106 cells) in both types of cells. Addition of α-ketoglutarate or succinate to the incubation medium increased oxygen consumption in the parental cells by 46 and 164% respectively. In the giant NK/Ly cells, the corresponding increases were 164 and 276%. Addition of ADP to α-ketoglutarate- or succinate-supplemented medium further stimulated oxygen consumption of the permeabilized NK/Ly cells; however, the effect of ADP was more pronounced in the giant cells. In addition, indices of respiratory control were significantly higher in the giant cells. Oligomycin suppressed considerably the respiration of the intact giant cells but had a much weaker effect on parental cells. Thus, giant NK/Ly cells possess much higher respiration rates and show tighter coupling between the respiration and oxidative phosphorylation compared with parental cells.

  13. Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium channel in mitochondria of endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Piotr; Koziel, Agnieszka; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, we describe the existence of a large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium (BKCa) channel in the mitochondria of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. A single-channel current was recorded from endothelial mitoplasts (i.e., inner mitochondrial membrane) using the patch-clamp technique in the mitoplast-attached mode. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance equal to 270 ± 10 pS in a symmetrical 150/150 mM KCl isotonic solution. The channel activity, which was determined as the open probability, increased with the addition of calcium ions and the potassium channel opener NS1619. Conversely, the activity of the channel was irreversibly blocked by paxilline and iberiotoxin, BKCa channel inhibitors. The open-state probability was found to be voltage dependent. The substances known to modulate BKCa channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of mitochondria isolated from human endothelial EA.hy926 cells. In isolated mitochondria, 100 μM Ca²⁺, 10 μM NS1619, and 0.5 μM NS11021 depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated nonphosphorylating respiration. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin and paxilline in a potassium-dependent manner. Under phosphorylating conditions, NS1619-induced, iberiotoxin-sensitive uncoupling diverted energy from ATP synthesis during the phosphorylating respiration of the endothelial mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against proteins of the plasma membrane BKCa channel identified a pore-forming α-subunit and an auxiliary β₂-subunit of the channel in the endothelial mitochondrial inner membrane. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the inner mitochondrial membrane in human endothelial EA.hy926 cells contains a large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel with properties similar to those of the surface membrane BKCa channel.

  14. [Structure of mitochondria and activity of their respiratory chain in subsequent generations of yeast cells exposed to He-Ne laser light].

    PubMed

    Manteĭfel', V M; Karu, T I

    2005-01-01

    The data on the effect of He-Ne laser light (lambda = 632.8 nm) on mitochondria of yeasts in late log phase were reviewed. The qualitative analysis of the ultrathin sections of cells demonstrated a nonuniform thickness of the giant branched mitochondria typical for budding yeasts. Exposure to a dose of 460 J/m@2 accelerated cell proliferation, activated respiratory chain enzymes (cytochrome c oxidase and NADH dehydrogenase), and also changed the microstructure of the giant mitochondria--much of the narrow regions of the mitochondrial tube with sections < or = 0.06 microm2 were dilated (while no signs of organelle damage were observed). Relative surface area of the cristae increased in such mitochondria, which can be due to the activation of their respiration and ATP synthesis. The number of associations between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum increased in cells in early log phase, which reflects high capacity of mitochondria to absorb Ca2+. Altered giant mitochondria configuration can increase the efficiency of both energy transfer and Ca2+ distribution in the cytoplasm. PMID:16535977

  15. Role of mitochondria ROS generation in ethanol-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and cell death in astroglial cells

    PubMed Central

    Alfonso-Loeches, Silvia; Ureña-Peralta, Juan R.; Morillo-Bargues, Maria José; Oliver-De La Cruz, Jorge; Guerri, Consuelo

    2014-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and NOD-like receptors (NLRs) are innate immunity sensors that provide an early/effective response to pathogenic or injury conditions. We have reported that ethanol-induced TLR4 activation triggers signaling inflammatory responses in glial cells, causing neuroinflammation and brain damage. However, it is uncertain if ethanol is able to activate NLRs/inflammasome in astroglial cells, which is the mechanism of activation, and whether there is crosstalk between both immune sensors in glial cells. Here we show that chronic ethanol treatment increases the co-localization of caspase-1 with GFAP+ cells, and up-regulates IL-1β and IL-18 in the frontal medial cortex in WT, but not in TLR4 knockout mice. We further show that cultured cortical astrocytes expressed several inflammasomes (NLRP3, AIM2, NLRP1, and IPAF), although NLRP3 mRNA is the predominant form. Ethanol, as ATP and LPS treatments, up-regulates NLRP3 expression, and causes caspase-1 cleavage and the release of IL-1β and IL-18 in astrocytes supernatant. Ethanol-induced NLRP3/caspase-1 activation is mediated by mitochondrial (m) reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation because when using a specific mitochondria ROS scavenger, the mito-TEMPO (500 μM) or NLRP3 blocking peptide (4 μg/ml) or a specific caspase-1 inhibitor, Z-YVAD-FMK (10 μM), abrogates mROS release and reduces the up-regulation of IL-1β and IL-18 induced by ethanol or LPS or ATP. Confocal microscopy studies further confirm that ethanol, ATP or LPS promotes NLRP3/caspase-1 complex recruitment within the mitochondria to promote cell death by caspase-1-mediated pyroptosis, which accounts for ≈73% of total cell death (≈22%) and the remaining (≈25%) die by caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. Suppression of the TLR4 function abrogates most ethanol effects on NLRP3 activation and reduces cell death. These findings suggest that NLRP3 participates, in ethanol-induced neuroinflammation and highlight the NLRP3/TLR4 crosstalk in

  16. Segregation of sperm mitochondria in two- and four-cell embryos of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis: Implications for the mechanism of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, Andrew T; Kenchington, Ellen L R; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2006-07-01

    Species of the family Mytilidae have 2 mitochondrial genomes, one that is transmitted through the egg and one that is transmitted through the sperm. In the Mytilus edulis species complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) there is also a strong mother-dependent sex-ratio bias in favor of one or the other sex among progeny from pair matings. In a previous study, we have shown that sperm mitochondria enter the egg and that their behavior during cell division is different depending on whether the egg originated from a female- or male-biased mother. Specifically, in eggs from females that produce mostly or exclusively daughters, sperm mitochondria disperse randomly among cells after egg division. In eggs from females that produce predominantly sons, sperm mitochondria tend to stay together in the same cell. Here, we extend these observations and show that in 2- and 4-cell embryos from male-biased mothers most sperm mitochondria are located near or at the cleavage furrow of the major cell, in contrast to embryos from female-biased mothers where there is no preferential association of sperm mitochondria with the cleavage furrow. This observation provides evidence for an early developmental mechanism through which sperm mitochondria are preferentially channeled into the primordial cells of male embryos, thus making the paternal mitochondrial genome the dominant mtDNA component of the male germ line.

  17. Apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration in human HeLa tumour cells by photoproducts of Rose Bengal acetate.

    PubMed

    Panzarini, Elisa; Tenuzzo, Bernadette; Palazzo, Fabio; Chionna, Alfonsina; Dini, Luciana

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the apoptosis induction and mitochondria alteration after photodamage exerted by incubation of HeLa cells with Rose Bengal acetate-derivative (RBAc) followed by irradiation for a total dose of 1.6 J/cm2. This treatment was previously demonstrated to reduce cell viability under mild treatment conditions, suggesting the restoration of the photoactive molecule in particularly sensitive cell sites. Indeed, Rose Bengal (RB) is a very efficient photosensitizer, whose photophysical properties are inactivated by addition of the quencher group acetate. The RBAc behaves as a fluorogenic substrate by entering easily the cells where the original, photoactive molecule is restored by specific esterases. Different intracellular sites of photodamage of RB are present. In particular, fluorescence imaging of Rodamine 123 and JC-1 labelled cells showed altered morphology and loss of potential membrane of mitochondria. MTT and NR assays gave indications of alteration of mitochondrial and lysosomal enzyme activities. These damaged sites were likely responsible for triggering apoptosis. Significant amount of apoptotic cell death (about 40%) was induced after light irradiation followed RBAc incubation as revealed by morphological (modification of cell shape and blebs formation), cytochemical (FITC-Annexin-V positive cells) and nuclear fragmentation assays.

  18. Control of Host Cell Phosphorylation by Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most frequent modifications in intracellular signaling and is implicated in many processes ranging from transcriptional control to signal transduction in innate immunity. Many pathogens modulate host cell phosphorylation pathways to promote growth and establish an infectious disease. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila targets and exploits the host phosphorylation system throughout the infection cycle as part of its strategy to establish an environment beneficial for replication. Key to this manipulation is the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates bacterial proteins into the host cytosol that can act directly on phosphorylation cascades. This review will focus on the different stages of L. pneumophila infection, in which host kinases and phosphatases contribute to infection of the host cell and promote intracellular survival of the pathogen. This includes the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases during phagocytosis as well as the role of phosphoinositide metabolism during the establishment of the replication vacuole. Furthermore, L. pneumophila infection modulates the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, two signaling pathways that are central to the host innate immune response and involved in regulation of host cell survival. Therefore, L. pneumophila infection manipulates host cell signal transduction by phosphorylation at multiple levels. PMID:21747787

  19. In self-defence: hexokinase promotes voltage-dependent anion channel closure and prevents mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay-Zohar, Heftsi; Israelson, Adrian; Abu-Hamad, Salah; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2004-01-01

    In tumour cells, elevated levels of mitochondria-bound isoforms of hexokinase (HK-I and HK-II) result in the evasion of apoptosis, thereby allowing the cells to continue proliferating. The molecular mechanisms by which bound HK promotes cell survival are not yet fully understood. Our studies relying on the purified mitochondrial outer membrane protein VDAC (voltage-dependent anion channel), isolated mitochondria or cells in culture suggested that the anti-apoptotic activity of HK-I occurs via modulation of the mitochondrial phase of apoptosis. In the present paper, a direct interaction of HK-I with bilayer-reconstituted purified VDAC, inducing channel closure, is demonstrated for the first time. Moreover, HK-I prevented the Ca(2+)-dependent opening of the mitochondrial PTP (permeability transition pore) and release of the pro-apoptotic protein cytochrome c. The effects of HK-I on VDAC activity and PTP opening were prevented by the HK reaction product glucose 6-phosphate, a metabolic intermediate in most biosynthetic pathways. Furthermore, glucose 6-phosphate re-opened both the VDAC and the PTP closed by HK-I. The HK-I-mediated effects on VDAC and PTP were not observed using either yeast HK or HK-I lacking the N-terminal hydrophobic peptide responsible for binding to mitochondria, or in the presence of an antibody specific for the N-terminus of HK-I. Finally, HK-I overexpression in leukaemia-derived U-937 or vascular smooth muscle cells protected against staurosporine-induced apoptosis, with a decrease of up to 70% in cell death. These results offer insight into the mechanisms by which bound HK promotes tumour cell survival, and suggests that its overexpression not only ensures supplies of energy and phosphometabolites, but also reflects an anti-apoptotic defence mechanism. PMID:14561215

  20. Melatonin protects the integrity of granulosa cells by reducing oxidative stress in nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes in mice

    PubMed Central

    TANABE, Manabu; TAMURA, Hiroshi; TAKETANI, Toshiaki; OKADA, Maki; LEE, Lifa; TAMURA, Isao; MAEKAWA, Ryo; ASADA, Hiromi; YAMAGATA, Yoshiaki; SUGINO, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin protects luteinized granulosa cells (GCs) from oxidative stress in the follicle during ovulation. However, it is unclear in which cellular components (e.g., nuclei, mitochondria, or plasma membranes) melatonin works as an antioxidant. GCs from immature (3 wks) ICR mice were incubated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM) in the presence or absence of melatonin (100 μg/ml) for 2 h. DNA damage was assessed by fluorescence-based immunocytochemistry using specific antibodies for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an indicator of oxidative guanine base damage in DNA, and for histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), a marker of double-strand breaks of DNA. Mitochondrial function was assessed by the fluorescence intensity of MitoTracker Red probes, which diffuse across the membrane and accumulate in mitochondria with active membrane potentials. Lipid peroxidation of plasma membranes was analyzed by measuring hexanoyl-lysine (HEL), a oxidative stress marker for lipid peroxidation. Apoptosis of GCs was assessed by nuclear fragmentation using DAPI staining, and apoptotic activities were evaluated by caspase-3/7 activities. H2O2 treatment significantly increased the fluorescence intensities of 8-OHdG and γH2AX, reduced the intensity of MitoTracker Red in the mitochondria, increased HEL concentrations in GCs, and enhanced the number of apoptotic cells and caspase-3/7 activities. All these changes were significantly decreased by melatonin treatment. Melatonin reduced oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in GCs, suggesting that melatonin protects GCs by reducing oxidative stress of cellular components including nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. Melatonin helps to maintain the integrity of GCs as an antioxidant in the preovulatory follicle. PMID:25366368

  1. Melatonin protects the integrity of granulosa cells by reducing oxidative stress in nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes in mice.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Manabu; Tamura, Hiroshi; Taketani, Toshiaki; Okada, Maki; Lee, Lifa; Tamura, Isao; Maekawa, Ryo; Asada, Hiromi; Yamagata, Yoshiaki; Sugino, Norihiro

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin protects luteinized granulosa cells (GCs) from oxidative stress in the follicle during ovulation. However, it is unclear in which cellular components (e.g., nuclei, mitochondria, or plasma membranes) melatonin works as an antioxidant. GCs from immature (3 wks) ICR mice were incubated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 mM) in the presence or absence of melatonin (100 μg/ml) for 2 h. DNA damage was assessed by fluorescence-based immunocytochemistry using specific antibodies for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an indicator of oxidative guanine base damage in DNA, and for histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX), a marker of double-strand breaks of DNA. Mitochondrial function was assessed by the fluorescence intensity of MitoTracker Red probes, which diffuse across the membrane and accumulate in mitochondria with active membrane potentials. Lipid peroxidation of plasma membranes was analyzed by measuring hexanoyl-lysine (HEL), a oxidative stress marker for lipid peroxidation. Apoptosis of GCs was assessed by nuclear fragmentation using DAPI staining, and apoptotic activities were evaluated by caspase-3/7 activities. H2O2 treatment significantly increased the fluorescence intensities of 8-OHdG and γH2AX, reduced the intensity of MitoTracker Red in the mitochondria, increased HEL concentrations in GCs, and enhanced the number of apoptotic cells and caspase-3/7 activities. All these changes were significantly decreased by melatonin treatment. Melatonin reduced oxidative stress-induced DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in GCs, suggesting that melatonin protects GCs by reducing oxidative stress of cellular components including nuclei, mitochondria, and plasma membranes. Melatonin helps to maintain the integrity of GCs as an antioxidant in the preovulatory follicle.

  2. Bax overexpression enhances cytochrome c release from mitochondria and sensitizes KATOIII gastric cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agent-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sawa, H; Kobayashi, T; Mukai, K; Zhang, W; Shiku, H

    2000-04-01

    To evaluate whether overexpression of Bax, an apoptosis-promoting gene, sensitizes KATOIII gastric cancer cells to apoptosis induced by chemotherapeutic agents, three stable cell lines of KATOIII transfected with Bax (KATOIII-Bax), Bcl-2 (KATOIII-Bcl-2), or control pCI-neo expression vector (KATOIII-pCI-neo) were established. The cells were treated with paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil, or doxorubicin, and the apoptotic response was measured. Our results showed that the sensitivity of the KATOIII-Bax cells to chemotherapeutic agents was enhanced compared with that of the KATOIII-pCI-neo cells, and the KATOIII-Bcl-2 cells were more resistant to these agents. Western blotting revealed that cytochrome c level in the cytosol fraction of the KATOIII-Bax cells was higher than that of the KATOIII-pCI-neo cells. Significant increase of cytochrome c level in the cytosol fraction of the KATOIII-Bax cells was detected 24 h after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents, when apoptotic cells were less than 10%. The cytochrome c level in the cytosol fraction of the KATOIII-Bax cells was higher than that of the KATOIII-pCI-neo cells at all time points examined after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Marked activation of caspase-3 in the KATOIII-Bax cells was observed 48 h and 72 h after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents compared with that in the KATOIII-pCI-neo cells. Consistently, zVAD-fmk, a pancaspase inhibitor, repressed the paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In addition, Bcl-2 overexpression strongly blocked KATOIII cell apoptosis by inhibiting the cytochrome c release from mitochondria and caspase-3 activation. These findings suggest that cytochrome c release is a major mechanism of apoptotic response and Bax overexpression sensitizes KATOIII cells to chemotherapeutic agent-induced apoptosis through enhancing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. PMID:10717243

  3. Rhein Elicits In Vitro Cytotoxicity in Primary Human Liver HL-7702 Cells by Inducing Apoptosis through Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bounda, Guy-Armel; Zhou, Wang; Wang, Dan-dan; Yu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study rhein-induced apoptosis signaling pathway and to investigate its molecular mechanisms in primary human hepatic cells. Results. Cell viability of HL-7702 cells treated with rhein showed significant decrease in dose-dependent manner. Following rhein treatment (25 μM, 50 μM, and 100 μM) for 12 h, the detection of apoptotic cells was significantly analyzed by flow cytometry and nuclear morphological changes by Hoechst 33258, respectively. Fatty degeneration studies showed upregulation level of the relevant hepatic markers (P < 0.01). Caspase activities expressed significant upregulation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8. Moreover, apoptotic cells by rhein were significantly inhibited by Z-LEHD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK, caspase-9 inhibitor, and caspase-3 inhibitor, respectively. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by fluorometry. Additionally, NAC, a ROS scavenger, significantly attenuated rhein-induced oxidative damage in HL-7702 cells. Furthermore, real-time qPCR results showed significant upregulation of p53, PUMA, Apaf-1, and Casp-9 and Casp-3 mRNA, with no significant changes of Fas and Cytochrome-c. Immunoblotting revealed significant Cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into cytosol and no change in Fas expression. Conclusion. Taken together, these observations suggested that rhein could induce apoptosis in HL-7702 cells via mitochondria-mediated signal pathway with involvement of oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:26221172

  4. Targeting human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) to mitochondria enhances cisplatin cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihong; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Carcel-Trullols, Jaime; Li, Liwen; Naito, Akihiro; Spencer, Horace J; Spring, Paul M; Smoller, Bruce R; Watson, Amanda J; Margison, Geoffrey P; Higuchi, Masahiro; Fan, Chun-Yang

    2007-08-01

    Many chemoradiation therapies cause DNA damage through oxidative stress. An important cellular mechanism that protects cells against oxidative stress involves DNA repair. One of the primary DNA repair mechanisms for oxidative DNA damage is base excision repair (BER). BER involves the tightly coordinated function of four enzymes (glycosylase, apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease, polymerase and ligase), in which 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 initiates the cycle. An imbalance in the production of any one of these enzymes may result in the generation of more DNA damage and increased cell killing. In this study, we targeted mitochondrial DNA to enhance cancer chemotherapy by over-expressing a human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) gene in the mitochondria of human hepatoma cells. Increased hOGG1 transgene expression was achieved at RNA, protein and enzyme activity levels. In parallel, we observed enhanced mitochondrial DNA damage, increased mitochondrial respiration rate, increased membrane potential and elevated free radical production. A greater proportion of the hOGG1-over-expressing hepatoma cells experienced apoptosis. Following exposure to a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, cancer cells over-expressing hOGG1 displayed much shortened long-term survival when compared with control cells. Our results suggest that over-expression of hOGG1 in mitochondria may promote mitochondrial DNA damage by creating an imbalance in the BER pathway and sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin. These findings support further evaluation of hOGG1 over-expression strategies for cancer therapy.

  5. Rhein Elicits In Vitro Cytotoxicity in Primary Human Liver HL-7702 Cells by Inducing Apoptosis through Mitochondria-Mediated Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bounda, Guy-Armel; Zhou, Wang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Yu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To study rhein-induced apoptosis signaling pathway and to investigate its molecular mechanisms in primary human hepatic cells. Results. Cell viability of HL-7702 cells treated with rhein showed significant decrease in dose-dependent manner. Following rhein treatment (25 μM, 50 μM, and 100 μM) for 12 h, the detection of apoptotic cells was significantly analyzed by flow cytometry and nuclear morphological changes by Hoechst 33258, respectively. Fatty degeneration studies showed upregulation level of the relevant hepatic markers (P < 0.01). Caspase activities expressed significant upregulation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and caspase-8. Moreover, apoptotic cells by rhein were significantly inhibited by Z-LEHD-FMK and Z-DEVD-FMK, caspase-9 inhibitor, and caspase-3 inhibitor, respectively. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by fluorometry. Additionally, NAC, a ROS scavenger, significantly attenuated rhein-induced oxidative damage in HL-7702 cells. Furthermore, real-time qPCR results showed significant upregulation of p53, PUMA, Apaf-1, and Casp-9 and Casp-3 mRNA, with no significant changes of Fas and Cytochrome-c. Immunoblotting revealed significant Cytochrome-c release from mitochondria into cytosol and no change in Fas expression. Conclusion. Taken together, these observations suggested that rhein could induce apoptosis in HL-7702 cells via mitochondria-mediated signal pathway with involvement of oxidative stress mechanism. PMID:26221172

  6. Malaria Sporozoites Traverse Host Cells within Transient Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Risco-Castillo, Veronica; Topçu, Selma; Marinach, Carine; Manzoni, Giulia; Bigorgne, Amélie E; Briquet, Sylvie; Baudin, Xavier; Lebrun, Maryse; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier

    2015-11-11

    Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the host skin by Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites migrate from the dermis to the liver, where they invade hepatocytes through a moving junction (MJ) to form a replicative parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Malaria sporozoites need to traverse cells during progression through host tissues, a process requiring parasite perforin-like protein 1 (PLP1). We find that sporozoites traverse cells inside transient vacuoles that precede PV formation. Sporozoites initially invade cells inside transient vacuoles by an active MJ-independent process that does not require vacuole membrane remodeling or release of parasite secretory organelles typically involved in invasion. Sporozoites use pH sensing and PLP1 to exit these vacuoles and avoid degradation by host lysosomes. Next, parasites enter the MJ-dependent PV, which has a different membrane composition, precluding lysosome fusion. The malaria parasite has thus evolved different strategies to evade host cell defense and establish an intracellular niche for replication.

  7. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  8. SIRT1 positively regulates autophagy and mitochondria function in embryonic stem cells under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ou, Xuan; Lee, Man Ryul; Huang, Xinxin; Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2014-05-01

    SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays a role in regulation of autophagy. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress, and has been linked to age-related reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is highly dependent on mitochondrial metabolism. H2O2 induces oxidative stress and autophagic cell death through interference with Beclin 1 and the mTOR signaling pathways. We evaluated connections between SIRT1 activity and induction of autophagy in murine (m) and human (h) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) upon ROS challenge. Exogenous H2 O2 (1 mM) induced apoptosis and autophagy in wild-type (WT) and Sirt1-/- mESCs. High concentrations of H2O2 (1 mM) induced more apoptosis in Sirt1-/-, than in WT mESCs. However, addition of 3-methyladenine, a widely used autophagy inhibitor, in combination with H2O2 induced more cell death in WT than in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Decreased induction of autophagy in Sirt1-/- mESCs was demonstrated by decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, lowered expression of Beclin-1, and decreased LC3 punctae and LysoTracker staining. H2O2 induced autophagy with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Increased phosphorylation of P70/85-S6 kinase and ribosomal S6 was noted in Sirt1-/- mESCs, suggesting that SIRT1 regulates the mTOR pathway. Consistent with effects in mESCs, inhibition of SIRT1 using Lentivirus-mediated SIRT1 shRNA in hESCs demonstrated that knockdown of SIRT1 decreased H2O2-induced autophagy. This suggests a role for SIRT1 in regulating autophagy and mitochondria function in ESCs upon oxidative stress, effects mediated at least in part by the class III PI3K/Beclin 1 and mTOR pathways.

  9. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taek Soon; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method of producing an isoprenyl alkanoate in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a straight-chain fatty acid, such as an alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) or lipase, under a suitable condition so that the isoprenyl alkanoate is produced.

  10. Protein-bound polysaccharide-K induces apoptosis via mitochondria and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent pathways in HL-60 promyelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hirahara, Noriyuki; Edamatsu, Takeo; Fujieda, Ayako; Fujioka, Masaki; Wada, Tsutomu; Tajima, Yoshitsugu

    2013-07-01

    Protein-bound polysaccharide-K (PSK) is extracted from Coriolus versicolor (CM101). PSK is a biological response modifier (BRM), and its mechanism of action is partly mediated by modulating host immune systems; however, recent studies showed antiproliferative activity of PSK. Therefore, we examined the mechanism underlying the antiproliferative activity of PSK using seven different human malignant cell lines (WiDr, HT29, SW480, KATOIII, AGS, HL-60 and U937), and PSK was found to inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells most profoundly. Therefore, HL-60 cells were used to elucidate the mechanism of the antiproliferative activity. Western blotting was performed to detect phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, was used to examine the roles in PSK-induced apoptosis and growth inhibition. Flow cytometry was performed for mitochondrial membrane potential detection. PSK activated caspase-3 and induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Co-treatment with SB203580 blocked PSK-induced apoptosis, caspase-3 activation and growth inhibition. PSK induced apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. The depolarization of mitochondria induced by PSK was reversed by co-treatment with SB203580. The present study revealed that PSK induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells via a mitochondrial and p38 MAPK-dependent pathway. PMID:23604455

  11. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Chang, Yi-Chuang; Tseng, Wei-Chang; Huang, Yeou-Lih; Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling; Chen, Chang-Yu

    2012-03-01

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  12. Analysis of ER-mitochondria contacts using correlative fluorescence microscopy and soft X-ray tomography of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Elgass, Kirstin D; Smith, Elizabeth A; LeGros, Mark A; Larabell, Carolyn A; Ryan, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial fission is important for organelle transport, quality control and apoptosis. Changes to the fission process can result in a wide variety of neurological diseases. In mammals, mitochondrial fission is executed by the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1; encoded by DNM1L), which oligomerizes around mitochondria and constricts the organelle. The mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mff, MiD49 (encoded by MIEF2) and MiD51 (encoded by MIEF1) are involved in mitochondrial fission by recruiting Drp1 from the cytosol to the organelle surface. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules have been shown to wrap around and constrict mitochondria before a fission event. Up to now, the presence of MiD49 and MiD51 at ER-mitochondrial division foci has not been established. Here, we combine confocal live-cell imaging with correlative cryogenic fluorescence microscopy and soft x-ray tomography to link MiD49 and MiD51 to the involvement of the ER in mitochondrial fission. We gain further insight into this complex process and characterize the 3D structure of ER-mitochondria contact sites.

  13. Analysis of ER–mitochondria contacts using correlative fluorescence microscopy and soft X-ray tomography of mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgass, Kirstin D.; Smith, Elizabeth A.; LeGros, Mark A.; Larabell, Carolyn A.; Ryan, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial fission is important for organelle transport, quality control and apoptosis. Changes to the fission process can result in a wide variety of neurological diseases. In mammals, mitochondrial fission is executed by the GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1; encoded by DNM1L), which oligomerizes around mitochondria and constricts the organelle. The mitochondrial outer membrane proteins Mff, MiD49 (encoded by MIEF2) and MiD51 (encoded by MIEF1) are involved in mitochondrial fission by recruiting Drp1 from the cytosol to the organelle surface. In addition, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) tubules have been shown to wrap around and constrict mitochondria before a fission event. Up to now, the presence of MiD49 and MiD51 at ER–mitochondrial division foci has not been established. Here, we combine confocal live-cell imaging with correlative cryogenic fluorescence microscopy and soft x-ray tomography to link MiD49 and MiD51 to the involvement of the ER in mitochondrial fission. We gain further insight into this complex process and characterize the 3D structure of ER–mitochondria contact sites. PMID:26101352

  14. Asiatic acid uncouples respiration in isolated mouse liver mitochondria and induces HepG2 cells death.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yapeng; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Ying; Wang, Dang; Gao, Jing; Zhu, Li

    2016-09-01

    Asiatic acid, one of the triterpenoid components isolated from Centella asiatica, has received increasing attention due to a wide variety of biological activities. To date, little is known about its mechanisms of action. Here we examined the cytotoxic effect of asiatic acid on HepG2 cells and elucidated some of the underlying mechanisms. Asiatic acid induced rapid cell death, as well as mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dissipation, ATP depletion and cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol in HepG2 cells. In mitochondria isolated from mouse liver, asiatic acid treatment significantly stimulated the succinate-supported state 4 respiration rate, dissipated the MMP, increased Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+)-loaded mitochondria, decreased ATP content and promoted cytochrome c release, indicating the uncoupling effect of asiatic acid. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by succinate-supported mitochondrial respiration was also significantly inhibited by asiatic acid. In addition, asiatic acid inhibited Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling but did not induce mitochondrial swelling in hyposmotic potassium acetate medium which suggested that asiatic acid may not act as a protonophoric uncoupler. Inhibition of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) or blockade of adenine nucleotide transporter (ANT) attenuated the effect of asiatic acid on MMP dissipation, Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial respiration and HepG2 cell death. When combined inhibition of UCPs and ANT, asiatic acid-mediated uncoupling effect was noticeably alleviated. These results suggested that both UCPs and ANT partially contribute to the uncoupling properties of asiatic acid. In conclusion, asiatic acid is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler and this property is potentially involved in its toxicity on HepG2 cells.

  15. Preparation of a mitochondria-targeted and NO-releasing nanoplatform and its enhanced pro-apoptotic effect on cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangsheng; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Hao; Hu, Caiping; Yu, Changmin; Wu, Shuizhu

    2014-09-24

    The therapeutic applications of exogenous nitric oxide are usually limited by its short half-life and its vulnerability to many biological substances, thus straightforward and precise spatiotemporal control of NO delivery may be critical to its therapeutic effects. Herein, the mitochondria-targeted and photoresponsive NO-releasing nanosystem is demonstrated as a new approach for cancer treatment. The nanosystem is fabricated by covalently incorporating a NO photo-donor and a mitochondria targeting ligand onto carbon-dots; accordingly, multi-functionalities (mitochondria-targeting, light-enhanced efficient NO-releasing, and cell imaging) are achieved. The in vitro NO release profiles for the nanosystem show that the duration of NO release from the present C-dot-based nanosystem containing immobilized SNO can be extended up to 8 hours or more. Upon cellular internalization, the nanosystem can target mitochondria and release NO. The action of the nanosystem on three cancer cell lines is evaluated; it is found that the targeted NO-releasing system can cause high cytotoxicity towards the cancer cells by specifically damaging their mitochondria. Additionally, light irradiation can amplify the cell apoptosis by enhancing NO release. These observations demonstrate that incorporating mitochondria-targeting ligand onto a NO-releasing system can enhance its pro-apoptosis action, thereby providing new insights for exploiting NO in cancer therapy.

  16. Pancreatic β-cell Na+ channels control global Ca2+ signaling and oxidative metabolism by inducing Na+ and Ca2+ responses that are propagated into mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Nita, Iulia I; Hershfinkel, Michal; Kantor, Chase; Rutter, Guy A; Lewis, Eli C; Sekler, Israel

    2014-08-01

    Communication between the plasma membrane and mitochondria is essential for initiating the Ca(2+) and metabolic signals required for secretion in β cells. Although voltage-dependent Na(+) channels are abundantly expressed in β cells and activated by glucose, their role in communicating with mitochondria is unresolved. Here, we combined fluorescent Na(+), Ca(2+), and ATP imaging, electrophysiological analysis with tetrodotoxin (TTX)-dependent block of the Na(+) channel, and molecular manipulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) transporters to study the communication between Na(+) channels and mitochondria. We show that TTX inhibits glucose-dependent depolarization and blocks cytosolic Na(+) and Ca(2+) responses and their propagation into mitochondria. TTX-sensitive mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx was largely blocked by knockdown of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) expression. Knockdown of the mitochondrial Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCLX) and Na(+) dose response analysis demonstrated that NCLX mediates the mitochondrial Na(+) influx and is tuned to sense the TTX-sensitive cytosolic Na(+) responses. Finally, TTX blocked glucose-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) rise, mitochondrial metabolic activity, and ATP production. Our results show that communication of the Na(+) channels with mitochondria shape both global Ca(2+) and metabolism signals linked to insulin secretion in β cells.- Nita, I. I., Hershfinkel, M., Kantor, C., Rutter, G. A., Lewis, E. C., Sekler, I. Pancreatic β-cell Na(+) channels control global Ca(2+) signaling and oxidative metabolism by inducing Na(+) and Ca(2+) responses that are propagated into mitochondria.

  17. Side effects of antibiotics during bacterial infection: mitochondria, the main target in host cell.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rochika; Sripada, Lakshmi; Singh, Rajesh

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotics are frontline therapy against microbial infectious diseases. Many antibiotics are known to cause several side effects in humans. Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the main target of antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis. According to the endosymbiont theory, mitochondrion is of bacterial origin and their molecular and structural components of the protein expression system are almost similar. It has been observed that the rate of mutations in mitochondrial rRNA is higher as compared to that of nuclear rRNA. The presence of these mutations may mimic prokaryotic rRNA structure and bind to antibiotics targeted to ribosomes of bacteria. Mitochondrial functions are compromised hence may be one of the major causes of side effects observed during antibiotic therapy. The current review had summarized the studies on the role of antibiotics on mitochondrial functions and its relevance to the observed side effects in physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes induces host DNA damage and delays the host cell cycle to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Elsa; Costa, Ana Catarina; Brito, Cláudia; Costa, Lionel; Pombinho, Rita; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a human intracellular pathogen widely used to uncover the mechanisms evolved by pathogens to establish infection. However, its capacity to perturb the host cell cycle was never reported. We show that Lm infection affects the host cell cycle progression, increasing its overall duration but allowing consecutive rounds of division. A complete Lm infectious cycle induces a S-phase delay accompanied by a slower rate of DNA synthesis and increased levels of host DNA strand breaks. Additionally, DNA damage/replication checkpoint responses are triggered in an Lm dose-dependent manner through the phosphorylation of DNA-PK, H2A.X, and CDC25A and independently from ATM/ATR. While host DNA damage induced exogenously favors Lm dissemination, the override of checkpoint pathways limits infection. We propose that host DNA replication disturbed by Lm infection culminates in DNA strand breaks, triggering DNA damage/replication responses, and ensuring a cell cycle delay that favors Lm propagation. PMID:24552813

  19. Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Nans, Andrea; Ford, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains a significant public health burden worldwide. A critical early event during infection is chlamydial entry into non-phagocytic host epithelial cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, C. trachomatis uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. These effectors trigger bacterial uptake and promote bacterial survival and replication within the host cell. In this review, we highlight recent cryo-electron tomography that has provided striking insights into the initial interactions between Chlamydia and its host. We describe the polarised structure of extracellular C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EBs), and the supramolecular organisation of T3SS complexes on the EB surface, in addition to the changes in host and pathogen architecture that accompany bacterial internalisation and EB encapsulation into early intracellular vacuoles. Finally, we consider the implications for further understanding the mechanism of C. trachomatis entry and how this might relate to those of other bacteria and viruses.

  20. Bovine lactoferricin causes apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells by sequential permeabilization of the cell membrane and targeting of mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Mader, Jamie S.; Richardson, Angela; Salsman, Jayme; Top, Deniz; Antueno, Roberto de; Duncan, Roy; Hoskin, David W. . E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca

    2007-07-15

    Bovine lactoferricin (LfcinB) is a cationic antimicrobial peptide that kills Jurkat T-leukemia cells by the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. However, the process by which LfcinB triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis is not well understood. Here, we show that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells was preceded by LfcinB binding to, and progressive permeabilization of the cell membrane. Colloidal gold electron microscopy revealed that LfcinB entered the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells prior to the onset of mitochondrial depolarization. LfcinB was not internalized by endocytosis because endocytosis inhibitors did not prevent LfcinB-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, intracellular delivery of LfcinB via fusogenic liposomes caused the death of Jurkat T-leukemia cells, as well as normal human fibroblasts. Collectively, these findings suggest that LfcinB caused damage to the cell membrane that allowed LfcinB to enter the cytoplasm of Jurkat T-leukemia cells and mediate cytotoxicity. In addition, confocal microscopy showed that intracellular LfcinB co-localized with mitochondria in Jurkat T-leukemia cells, while flow cytometry and colloidal gold electron microscopy showed that LfcinB rapidly associated with purified mitochondria. Furthermore, purified mitochondria treated with LfcinB rapidly lost transmembrane potential and released cytochrome c. We conclude that LfcinB-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T-leukemia cells resulted from cell membrane damage and the subsequent disruption of mitochondrial membranes by internalized LfcinB.

  1. Mitochondria and calcium flux as targets of neuroprotection caused by minocycline in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Martinez, Eva Maria; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Karachitos, Andonis; Bandez, Manuel J; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco J; Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; de Mera, Raquel Maria Melero Fernandez; Jordan, Maria J; Aguirre, Norberto; Galindo, Maria F; Villalobos, Carlos; Navarro, Ana; Kmita, Hanna; Jordán, Joaquín

    2010-01-15

    Minocycline, an antibiotic of the tetracycline family, has attracted considerable interest for its theoretical therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative diseases. However, the mechanism of action underlying its effect remains elusive. Here we have studied the effect of minocycline under excitotoxic conditions. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging studies in rat cerebellar granular neuron cultures using fura2/AM and mitochondria-targeted aequorin revealed that minocycline, at concentrations higher than those shown to block inflammation and inflammation-induced neuronal death, inhibited NMDA-induced cytosolic and mitochondrial rises in Ca(2+) concentrations in a reversible manner. Moreover, minocycline added in the course of NMDA stimulation decreased Ca(2+) intracellular levels, but not when induced by depolarization with a high K(+) medium. We also found that minocycline, at the same concentrations, partially depolarized mitochondria by about 5-30 mV, prevented mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake under conditions of environmental stress, and abrogated NMDA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Consistently, minocycline also abrogates the rise in ROS induced by 75 microM Ca(2+) in isolated brain mitochondria. In search for the mechanism of mitochondrial depolarization, we found that minocycline markedly inhibited state 3 respiration of rat brain mitochondria, although distinctly increased oxygen uptake in state 4. Minocycline inhibited NADH-cytochrome c reductase and cytochrome c oxidase activities, whereas the activity of succinate-cytochrome c reductase was not modified, suggesting selective inhibition of complexes I and IV. Finally, minocycline affected activity of voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) as determined in the reconstituted system. Taken together, our results indicate that mitochondria are a critical factor in minocycline-mediated neuroprotection.

  2. The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin and myrtucommulone A cause mitochondrial dysfunctions in leukemic cells by direct interference with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Fischer, Dagmar; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin (Hypf) and myrtucommulone A (MC A) induce death of cancer cells by triggering the intrinsic/mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. However, the upstream targets and mechanisms leading to these mitochondrial events in cancer cells remain elusive. Here we show that Hypf and MC A directly act on mitochondria derived from human leukemic HL-60 cells and thus, disrupt mitochondrial functions. In isolated mitochondria, Hypf and MC A efficiently impaired mitochondrial viability (EC50 = 0.2 and 0.9 µM, respectively), caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (at 0.03 and 0.1 µM, respectively), and suppressed mitochondrial ATP synthesis (IC50 = 0.2 and 0.5 µM, respectively). Consequently, the compounds activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in HL-60 cells, a cellular energy sensor involved in apoptosis of cancer cells. Side by side comparison with the protonophore CCCP and the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin suggest that Hypf and MC A act as protonophores that primarily dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential by direct interaction with the mitochondrial membrane. Together, Hypf and MC A abolish the mitochondrial proton motive force that on one hand impairs mitochondrial viability and on the other cause activation of AMPK due to lowered ATP levels which may further facilitate the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis.

  3. The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin and myrtucommulone A cause mitochondrial dysfunctions in leukemic cells by direct interference with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wiechmann, Katja; Müller, Hans; Fischer, Dagmar; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2015-11-01

    The acylphloroglucinols hyperforin (Hypf) and myrtucommulone A (MC A) induce death of cancer cells by triggering the intrinsic/mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, accompanied by a loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential and release of cytochrome c. However, the upstream targets and mechanisms leading to these mitochondrial events in cancer cells remain elusive. Here we show that Hypf and MC A directly act on mitochondria derived from human leukemic HL-60 cells and thus, disrupt mitochondrial functions. In isolated mitochondria, Hypf and MC A efficiently impaired mitochondrial viability (EC50 = 0.2 and 0.9 µM, respectively), caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential (at 0.03 and 0.1 µM, respectively), and suppressed mitochondrial ATP synthesis (IC50 = 0.2 and 0.5 µM, respectively). Consequently, the compounds activated the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in HL-60 cells, a cellular energy sensor involved in apoptosis of cancer cells. Side by side comparison with the protonophore CCCP and the ATP synthase inhibitor oligomycin suggest that Hypf and MC A act as protonophores that primarily dissipate the mitochondrial membrane potential by direct interaction with the mitochondrial membrane. Together, Hypf and MC A abolish the mitochondrial proton motive force that on one hand impairs mitochondrial viability and on the other cause activation of AMPK due to lowered ATP levels which may further facilitate the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. PMID:26386573

  4. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; White, Eileen

    2016-03-01

    Decades ago, Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events that drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation also alter biochemical metabolism, including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy; provide building blocks for new cells; and control redox homeostasis, oncogenic signaling, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Indeed, mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control are often upregulated in cancers. While some cancers have mutations in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes that produce oncogenic metabolites, there is negative selection for pathogenic mitochondrial genome mutations. Eliminating mtDNA limits tumorigenesis, and rare human tumors with mutant mitochondrial genomes are relatively benign. Thus, mitochondria play a central and multifunctional role in malignant tumor progression, and targeting mitochondria provides therapeutic opportunities.

  5. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; White, Eileen

    2016-03-01

    Decades ago, Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events that drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation also alter biochemical metabolism, including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy; provide building blocks for new cells; and control redox homeostasis, oncogenic signaling, innate immunity, and apoptosis. Indeed, mitochondrial biogenesis and quality control are often upregulated in cancers. While some cancers have mutations in nuclear-encoded mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes that produce oncogenic metabolites, there is negative selection for pathogenic mitochondrial genome mutations. Eliminating mtDNA limits tumorigenesis, and rare human tumors with mutant mitochondrial genomes are relatively benign. Thus, mitochondria play a central and multifunctional role in malignant tumor progression, and targeting mitochondria provides therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26942671

  6. Entamoeba histolytica-induced dephosphorylation in host cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, José E; Mann, Barbara J

    2002-04-01

    Activation of host cell protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) and protein dephosphorylation is an important mechanism used by various microorganisms to deactivate or kill host defense cells. To determine whether protein tyrosine dephosphorylation played a role in signaling pathways affecting Entamoeba histolytica-mediated host cell killing, we investigated the involvement of PTPases during the attachment of E. histolytica to target cells. We observed a rapid decrease in cellular protein tyrosine levels in Jurkat cells, as measured with an antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody, following adherence to E. histolytica. Ameba-induced protein dephosphorylation was contact dependent and required intact parasite, since blocking amebic adherence with galactose inhibited tyrosine dephosphorylation and amebic lysates had no effect on phosphotyrosine levels. Moreover, disruption of amebic adherence with galactose promoted recovery of phosphorylation in Jurkat cells, indicating that dephosphorylation precedes target cell death. The evidence suggests that ameba-induced dephosphorylation is mediated by host cell phosphatases. Prior treatment of Jurkat cells with phenylarsine oxide, a PTPase inhibitor, inhibited ameba-induced dephosphorylation. We also found proteolytic cleavage of the PTPase 1B (PTP1B) in Jurkat cells after contact with amebae. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is responsible for PTP1B cleavage and enzymatic activation. Pretreatment of Jurkat cells with calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, blocked PTP1B cleavage and inhibited ameba-induced dephosphorylation. In addition, inhibition of Jurkat cell PTPases with phenylarsine oxide blocked Jurkat cell apoptosis induced by E. histolytica. These results suggest that E. histolytica-mediated host cell death occurs by a mechanism that involves PTPase activation. PMID:11895943

  7. Role of the Mitochondria in Immune-Mediated Apoptotic Death of the Human Pancreatic β Cell Line βLox5

    PubMed Central

    Lightfoot, Yaíma L.; Chen, Jing; Mathews, Clayton E.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable in the life and death of many types of eukaryotic cells. In pancreatic beta cells, mitochondria play an essential role in the secretion of insulin, a hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. Unregulated blood glucose is a hallmark symptom of diabetes. The onset of Type 1 diabetes is preceded by autoimmune-mediated destruction of beta cells. However, the exact role of mitochondria has not been assessed in beta cell death. In this study, we examine the role of mitochondria in both Fas- and proinflammatory cytokine-mediated destruction of the human beta cell line, βLox5. IFNγ primed βLox5 cells for apoptosis by elevating cell surface Fas. Consequently, βLox5 cells were killed by caspase-dependent apoptosis by agonistic activation of Fas, but only after priming with IFNγ. This beta cell line undergoes both apoptotic and necrotic cell death after incubation with the combination of the proinflammatory cytokines IFNγ and TNFα. Additionally, both caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms that require proper mitochondrial function are involved. Mitochondrial contributions to βLox5 cell death were analyzed using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depleted βLox5 cells, or βLox5 ρ0 cells. βLox5 ρ0 cells are not sensitive to IFNγ and TNFα killing, indicating a direct role for the mitochondria in cytokine-induced cell death of the parental cell line. However, βLox5 ρ0 cells are susceptible to Fas killing, implicating caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptotic death is the mechanism by which these human beta cells die after Fas ligation. These data support the hypothesis that immune mediators kill βLox5 cells by both mitochondrial-dependent intrinsic and caspase-dependent extrinsic pathways. PMID:21738580

  8. Targeting mitochondria in cancer cells using gold nanoparticle-enhanced radiotherapy: A Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkby, Charles Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Radiation damage to mitochondria has been shown to alter cellular processes and even lead to apoptosis. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) may be used to enhance these effects in scenarios where they collect on the outer membranes of mitochondria. A Monte Carlo (MC) approach is used to estimate mitochondrial dose enhancement under a variety of conditions. Methods: The PENELOPE MC code was used to generate dose distributions resulting from photons striking a 13 nm diameter AuNP with various thicknesses of water-equivalent coatings. Similar dose distributions were generated with the AuNP replaced by water so as to estimate the gain in dose on a microscopic scale due to the presence of AuNPs within an irradiated volume. Models of mitochondria with AuNPs affixed to their outer membrane were then generated—considering variation in mitochondrial size and shape, number of affixed AuNPs, and AuNP coating thickness—and exposed (in a dose calculation sense) to source spectra ranging from 6 MV to 90 kVp. Subsequently dose enhancement ratios (DERs), or the dose with the AuNPs present to that for no AuNPs, for the entire mitochondrion and its components were tallied under these scenarios. Results: For a representative case of a 1000 nm diameter mitochondrion affixed with 565 AuNPs, each with a 13 nm thick coating, the mean DER over the whole organelle ranged from roughly 1.1 to 1.6 for the kilovoltage sources, but was generally less than 1.01 for the megavoltage sources. The outer membrane DERs remained less than 1.01 for the megavoltage sources, but rose to 2.3 for 90 kVp. The voxel maximum DER values were as high as 8.2 for the 90 kVp source and increased further when the particles clustered together. The DER exhibited dependence on the mitochondrion dimensions, number of AuNPs, and the AuNP coating thickness. Conclusions: Substantial dose enhancement directly to the mitochondria can be achieved under the conditions modeled. If the mitochondrion dose can be directly

  9. Hijacking Host Cell Highways: Manipulation of the Host Actin Cytoskeleton by Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27713866

  10. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment. PMID:23150585

  11. Herpesvirus Genome Integration into Telomeric Repeats of Host Cell Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that numerous viruses integrate their genetic material into host cell chromosomes. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been shown to integrate their genomes into host telomeres of latently infected cells. This is unusual for herpesviruses as most maintain their genomes as circular episomes during the quiescent stage of infection. The genomic DNA of HHV-6, MDV, and several other herpesviruses harbors telomeric repeats (TMRs) that are identical to host telomere sequences (TTAGGG). At least in the case of MDV, viral TMRs facilitate integration into host telomeres. Integration of HHV-6 occurs not only in lymphocytes but also in the germline of some individuals, allowing vertical virus transmission. Although the molecular mechanism of telomere integration is poorly understood, the presence of TMRs in a number of herpesviruses suggests it is their default program for genome maintenance during latency and also allows efficient reactivation.

  12. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    PubMed

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes.

  13. Alterations of host cell ubiquitination machinery by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Alomairi, Jaafar; Bonacci, Thomas; Ghigo, Eric; Soubeyran, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Response of immune and non-immune cells to pathogens infections is a very dynamic process. It involves the activation/modulation of many pathways leading to actin remodeling, membrane engulfing, phagocytosis, vesicle trafficking, phagolysosome formation, aiming at the destruction of the intruder. These sophisticated and rapid mechanisms rely on post-translational modifications (PTMs) of key host cells' factors, and bacteria have developed various strategies to manipulate them to favor their survival. Among these important PTMs, ubiquitination has emerged as a major mediator/modulator/regulator of host cells response to infections that pathogens have also learned to use for their own benefit. In this mini-review, we summarize our current knowledge about the normal functions of ubiquitination during host cell infection, and we detail its hijacking by model pathogens to escape clearance and to proliferate. PMID:25774357

  14. Viroporins Customize Host Cells for Efficient Viral Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Giorda, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites that must access the host cell machinery to propagate. Viruses hijack the host cell machinery to help with entry, replication, packaging, and release of progeny to infect new cells. To carry out these diverse functions, viruses often transform the cellular environment using viroporins, a growing class of viral-encoded membrane proteins that promote viral proliferation. Viroporins modify the integrity of host membranes, thereby stimulating the maturation of viral infection, and are critical for virus production and dissemination. Significant advances in molecular and cell biological approaches have helped to uncover some of the roles that viroporins serve in the various stages of the viral life cycle. In this study, the ability of viroporins to modify the cellular environment will be discussed, with particular emphasis on their role in the stepwise progression of the viral life cycle. PMID:23945006

  15. Mitochondria and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Sejal; Zaganjor, Elma; Haigis, Marcia C

    2016-07-28

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic, biosynthetic, and signaling organelles that are integral in stress sensing to allow for cellular adaptation to the environment. Therefore, it is not surprising that mitochondria are important mediators of tumorigenesis, as this process requires flexibility to adapt to cellular and environmental alterations in addition to cancer treatments. Multiple aspects of mitochondrial biology beyond bioenergetics support transformation, including mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover, fission and fusion dynamics, cell death susceptibility, oxidative stress regulation, metabolism, and signaling. Thus, understanding mechanisms of mitochondrial function during tumorigenesis will be critical for the next generation of cancer therapeutics. PMID:27471965

  16. On Cellular Darwinism: Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The significant role of mitochondria within cells is becoming increasingly clear. This letter uses the NKCS model of coupled fitness landscapes to explore aspects of organelle-nucleus coevolution. The phenomenon of mitochondrial diversity is allowed to emerge under a simple intracellular evolutionary process, including varying the relative rate of evolution by the organelle. It is shown how the conditions for the maintenance of more than one genetic variant of mitochondria are similar to those previously suggested as needed for the original symbiotic origins of the relationship using the NKCS model.

  17. The oncology drug elesclomol selectively transports copper to the mitochondria to induce oxidative stress in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Masazumi; Vo, Nha H; Shin Ogawa, Luisa; Chimmanamada, Dinesh; Inoue, Takayo; Chu, John; Beaudette-Zlatanova, Britte C; Lu, Rongzhen; Blackman, Ronald K; Barsoum, James; Koya, Keizo; Wada, Yumiko

    2012-05-15

    Elesclomol is an investigational drug that exerts potent anticancer activity through the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and is currently under clinical evaluation as a novel anticancer therapeutic. Here we report the first description of selective mitochondrial ROS induction by elesclomol in cancer cells based on the unique physicochemical properties of the compound. Elesclomol preferentially chelates copper (Cu) outside of cells and enters as elesclomol-Cu(II). The elesclomol-Cu(II) complex then rapidly and selectively transports the copper to mitochondria. In this organelle Cu(II) is reduced to Cu(I), followed by subsequent ROS generation. Upon dissociation from the complex, elesclomol is effluxed from cells and repeats shuttling elesclomol-Cu complexes from the extracellular to the intracellular compartments, leading to continued copper accumulation within mitochondria. An optimal range of redox potentials exhibited by copper chelates of elesclomol and its analogs correlated with the elevation of mitochondrial Cu(I) levels and cytotoxic activity, suggesting that redox reduction of the copper triggers mitochondrial ROS induction. Importantly the mitochondrial selectivity exhibited by elesclomol is a distinct characteristic of the compound that is not shared by other chelators, including disulfiram. Together these findings highlight a unique mechanism of action with important implications for cancer therapy.

  18. Mitochondria in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cloonan, Suzanne M; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell's most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  19. Unveiling Interactions among Mitochondria, Caspase-Like Proteases, and the Actin Cytoskeleton during Plant Programmed Cell Death (PCD)

    PubMed Central

    Lord, Christina E. N.; Dauphinee, Adrian N.; Watts, Rebecca L.; Gunawardena, Arunika H. L. A. N.

    2013-01-01

    Aponogeton madagascariensis produces perforations over its leaf surface via programmed cell death (PCD). PCD begins between longitudinal and transverse veins at the center of spaces regarded as areoles, and continues outward, stopping several cells from these veins. The gradient of PCD that exists within a single areole of leaves in an early stage of development was used as a model to investigate cellular dynamics during PCD. Mitochondria have interactions with a family of proteases known as caspases, and the actin cytoskeleton during metazoan PCD; less is known regarding these interactions during plant PCD. This study employed the actin stain Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin, the actin depolymerizer Latrunculin B (Lat B), a synthetic caspase peptide substrate and corresponding specific inhibitors, as well as the mitochondrial pore inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) to analyze the role of these cellular constituents during PCD. Results depicted that YVADase (caspase-1) activity is higher during the very early stages of perforation formation, followed by the bundling and subsequent breakdown of actin. Actin depolymerization using Lat B caused no change in YVADase activity. In vivo inhibition of YVADase activity prevented PCD and actin breakdown, therefore substantiating actin as a likely substrate for caspase-like proteases (CLPs). The mitochondrial pore inhibitor CsA significantly decreased YVADase activity, and prevented both PCD and actin breakdown; therefore suggesting the mitochondria as a possible trigger for CLPs during PCD in the lace plant. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study using either caspase-1 inhibitor (Ac-YVAD-CMK) or CsA, following which the actin cytoskeleton was examined. Overall, our findings suggest the mitochondria as a possible upstream activator of YVADase activity and implicate these proteases as potential initiators of actin breakdown during perforation formation via PCD in the lace plant. PMID:23483897

  20. Neuroglobin upregulation induced by 17β-estradiol sequesters cytocrome c in the mitochondria preventing H2O2-induced apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    De Marinis, E; Fiocchetti, M; Acconcia, F; Ascenzi, P; Marino, M

    2013-01-01

    The sex steroid hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) upregulates the levels of neuroglobin (NGB), a new neuroprotectant globin, to elicit its neuroprotective effect against H2O2-induced apoptosis. Several mechanisms could be proposed to justify the NGB involvement in E2 prevention of stress-induced apoptotic cell death. Here, we evaluate the ability of E2 to modulate the intracellular NGB localization and the NGB interaction with mitochondrial cytochrome c following the H2O2-induced toxicity. Present results demonstrate that NGB is expressed in the nuclei, mitochondria, and cytosol of human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE cells. E2, but not H2O2 treatment of SK-N-BE cells, reallocates NGB mainly at the mitochondria and contemporarily reduces the number of apoptotic nuclei and the levels of cleaved caspase-3. Remarkably, the E2 treatment strongly increases NGB–cytochrome c association into mitochondria and reduces the levels of cytochrome c into the cytosol of SK-N-BE cells. Although both estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are expressed in the nucleus, mitochondria, and cytosol of SK-N-BE cells, this E2 effect specifically requires the mitochondrial ERβ activity. As a whole, these data demonstrate that the interception of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway into mitochondria (i.e., the prevention of cytochrome c release) is one of the pivotal mechanisms underlying E2-dependent NGB neuroprotection against H2O2 toxicity. PMID:23429294

  1. Signaling between tumor cells and the host bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Natasa; Croucher, Peter I; McDonald, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells with high skeletal homing affinity express numerous cell surface receptors that bind ligands produced in bone. Upon arrival, these cells survive in the host environment, encompassed in close proximity to bone marrow cells. Interactions between tumor cells and cells of the host microenvironment are essential to not only tumor cell survival but also their activation and proliferation into environment-modifying tumors. Through the production of RANKL, PTHrP, cytokines, and integrins, activated tumor cells stimulate osteoclastogenesis, enhance bone resorption, and subsequently release matrix-bound proteins that further promote tumor growth and bone resorption. In addition, alterations in the TGF-β/BMP and Wnt signaling pathways via tumor cell growth can either stimulate or suppress osteoblastic bone formation and function, leading to sclerotic or lytic bone disease, respectively. Hence, the presence of tumor cells in bone dysregulates bone remodeling, dramatically impairing skeletal integrity. Furthermore, through complex mechanisms, cells of the immune system interact with tumor cells to further impact bone remodeling. Lastly, with alterations in bone cell activity, the environment is permissive to promoting tumor growth further, suggesting an interdependence between tumor cells and bone cells in metastatic bone disease and multiple myeloma.

  2. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 translocates to mitochondria in the early phase of apoptosis induced by synthetic chenodeoxycholic acid derivatives in human stomach cancer cell line SNU-1.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Hee; Park, Joo-Sung; Moon, Bongkyung; Kim, Min Chan; Kim, Jae-Kon; Lee, Sungeun; Suh, Hongsuk; Kim, Nam Deuk; Kim, Jong-Min; Park, Young Chul; Yoo, Young Hyun

    2003-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing activity of synthetic CDCA derivatives, HS-1199 and HS-1200, on gastric cancer cell line SNU-1 cells was explored. CDCA derivatives demonstrated various apoptosis hallmarks, such as mitochondrial changes, activation of caspase, DNA fragmentation, and nuclear condensation. Importantly, the orphan receptor Nur77 (TR3) was shown to translocate from the nucleus to mitochondria at the early time points after CDCA derivatives treatment. These data support the theory that CDCA derivatives-induced apoptosis of SNU-1 gastric cancer cell lines is mediated by mitochondria and caspase, and, at least in part, by Nur77.

  3. Silencing of Pokemon enhances caspase-dependent apoptosis via fas- and mitochondria-mediated pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Qin; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Lin, Bi-Yun; Shi, Ying; Liu, Yun-Peng; Liu, Jing-Jing; Guleng, Bayasi; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The role of Pokemon (POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic actor), a recently identified POK transcription factor with proto-oncogenic activity, in hepatocellular carcinogenesis has only been assessed by a few studies. Our previous study revealed that Pokemon is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and promotes HCC cell proliferation and migration via an AKT- and ERK- dependent manner. In the present study, we used the TUNEL assay and FACS analysis to demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced apoptosis was significantly increased in cells with silenced Pokemon. Western blots showed that p53 expression and phosphorylation were significantly increased in Pokemon defective cells, thereby initiating the mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways. In the mitochondria-mediated pathway, expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (including Bad, Bid, Bim and Puma) as well as AIF was increased and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential resulted in cytochrome C released from mitochondrial in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells. In addition, upon oxaliplatin treatment of Pokemon-silenced cells, the FAS receptor, FADD and their downstream targets caspase-10 and caspase-8 were activated, causing increased release of caspase-8 active fragments p18 and p10. Increased activated caspase-8-mediated cleavage and activation of downstream effector caspases such as caspase-9 and caspase-3 was observed in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells as compared to control. Therefore, Pokemon might serve as an important mediator of crosstalk between intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in HCC cells. Moreover, our findings suggest that Pokemon could be an attractive therapeutic target gene for human cancer therapy. PMID:23874836

  4. Silencing of Pokemon Enhances Caspase-Dependent Apoptosis via Fas- and Mitochondria-Mediated Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bi-Yun; Shi, Ying; Liu, Yun-Peng; Liu, Jing-Jing; Guleng, Bayasi; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The role of Pokemon (POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic actor), a recently identified POK transcription factor with proto-oncogenic activity, in hepatocellular carcinogenesis has only been assessed by a few studies. Our previous study revealed that Pokemon is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and promotes HCC cell proliferation and migration via an AKT- and ERK- dependent manner. In the present study, we used the TUNEL assay and FACS analysis to demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced apoptosis was significantly increased in cells with silenced Pokemon. Western blots showed that p53 expression and phosphorylation were significantly increased in Pokemon defective cells, thereby initiating the mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways. In the mitochondria-mediated pathway, expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (including Bad, Bid, Bim and Puma) as well as AIF was increased and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential resulted in cytochrome C released from mitochondrial in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells. In addition, upon oxaliplatin treatment of Pokemon-silenced cells, the FAS receptor, FADD and their downstream targets caspase-10 and caspase-8 were activated, causing increased release of caspase-8 active fragments p18 and p10. Increased activated caspase-8-mediated cleavage and activation of downstream effector caspases such as caspase-9 and caspase-3 was observed in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells as compared to control. Therefore, Pokemon might serve as an important mediator of crosstalk between intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in HCC cells. Moreover, our findings suggest that Pokemon could be an attractive therapeutic target gene for human cancer therapy. PMID:23874836

  5. Defective repair of 8-hydroxyguanine in mitochondria of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mambo, Elizabeth; Nyaga, Simon G; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Evans, Michele K

    2002-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the major causes of mortality among women in the United States. Although the causes of breast cancer remain unclear, it has been speculated that DNA base damage may lead to mutations that subsequently can be carcinogenic. Recently, defective oxidative DNA damage repair has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. The major oxidative DNA lesion, 8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG), is increased in breast cancer, suggesting that this lesion may play a crucial role in the etiology of breast cancer. However, it is not known whether the repair of 8-oxoG or other oxidative base lesions is altered during breast carcinogenesis. We examined the ability of nuclear and mitochondrial extracts of two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468, to repair 8-oxoG lesion. We report that mitochondrial extracts from the two breast cancer cell lines are defective in the base excision repair of 8-oxoG relative to two noncancer cell lines. We also show that the incision activity of 8-oxoG was significantly lower in mitochondrial than in nuclear extracts in the breast cancer cell lines. The defective mitochondrial repair activity was not attributable to lower levels of human 8-hydroxyguanine DNA glycosylase, the base excision repair enzyme known to incise 8-oxoG in DNA. The repair of thymine glycol, another major oxidative DNA base lesion that blocks transcription and causes cell death, was similar in cancer and noncancer cells. Furthermore, nuclear extracts incised thymine glycol with a much higher efficiency than 8-oxoG. These data provide evidence for defective repair of 8-oxoG in mitochondria of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cell lines. These results may implicate 8-oxoG repair mechanisms in mitochondria of certain breast cancers.

  6. Silencing of Pokemon enhances caspase-dependent apoptosis via fas- and mitochondria-mediated pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Qin; Xiao, Chuan-Xing; Lin, Bi-Yun; Shi, Ying; Liu, Yun-Peng; Liu, Jing-Jing; Guleng, Bayasi; Ren, Jian-Lin

    2013-01-01

    The role of Pokemon (POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic actor), a recently identified POK transcription factor with proto-oncogenic activity, in hepatocellular carcinogenesis has only been assessed by a few studies. Our previous study revealed that Pokemon is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and promotes HCC cell proliferation and migration via an AKT- and ERK- dependent manner. In the present study, we used the TUNEL assay and FACS analysis to demonstrate that oxaliplatin induced apoptosis was significantly increased in cells with silenced Pokemon. Western blots showed that p53 expression and phosphorylation were significantly increased in Pokemon defective cells, thereby initiating the mitochondria-mediated and death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathways. In the mitochondria-mediated pathway, expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members (including Bad, Bid, Bim and Puma) as well as AIF was increased and decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential resulted in cytochrome C released from mitochondrial in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells. In addition, upon oxaliplatin treatment of Pokemon-silenced cells, the FAS receptor, FADD and their downstream targets caspase-10 and caspase-8 were activated, causing increased release of caspase-8 active fragments p18 and p10. Increased activated caspase-8-mediated cleavage and activation of downstream effector caspases such as caspase-9 and caspase-3 was observed in HepG2 si-Pokemon cells as compared to control. Therefore, Pokemon might serve as an important mediator of crosstalk between intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in HCC cells. Moreover, our findings suggest that Pokemon could be an attractive therapeutic target gene for human cancer therapy.

  7. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  8. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina M; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding.

  9. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Elisabeth O; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Hagedorn, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  10. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Elisabeth O.; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  11. Host cell proteases: critical determinants of coronavirus tropism and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a large group of enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a wide range of avian and mammalian species, including humans. The emergence of deadly human coronaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have bolstered research in these viral and often zoonotic pathogens. While coronavirus cell and tissue tropism, host range, and pathogenesis are initially controlled by interactions between the spike envelope glycoprotein and host cell receptor, it is becoming increasingly apparent that proteolytic activation of spike by host cell proteases also plays a critical role. Coronavirus spike proteins are the main determinant of entry as they possess both receptor binding and fusion functions. Whereas binding to the host cell receptor is an essential first step in establishing infection, the proteolytic activation step is often critical for the fusion function of spike, as it allows for controlled release of the fusion peptide into target cellular membranes. Coronaviruses have evolved multiple strategies for proteolytic activation of spike, and a large number of host proteases have been shown to proteolytically process the spike protein. These include, but are not limited to, endosomal cathepsins, cell surface transmembrane protease/serine (TMPRSS) proteases, furin, and trypsin. This review focuses on the diversity of strategies coronaviruses have evolved to proteolytically activate their fusion protein during spike protein biosynthesis and the critical entry step of their life cycle, and highlights important findings on how proteolytic activation of coronavirus spike influences tissue and cell tropism, host range and pathogenicity. PMID:25445340

  12. [Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQR1 selectively protects MDR-negative cells against ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Fetisova, E K; Antoshina, M M; Cherepanynets, V D; Izumov, D S; Kireev, I I; Kireev, R I; Lyamzaev, K G; Riabchenko, N I; Chernyak, B V; Skulachev, V P

    2014-01-01

    Radioprotection appeared to be an important problem of today due to atom energetic development and utilization of radiation material in the industry, science and medicine. It has been shown that mitochondrial targeted antioxidant SkQR1 could attenuate radiation injury of human erythroleukemia K562 cells. Pretreatment with SkQR1 before irradiation decreased DNA double strand breaks formation, diminished the number of chromosomal aberrations and suppressed delayed ROS production. Prevention of oxidative stress and normalization of mitochondrial function by mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may be a potential therapeutic strategy not only against immediate consequences of radiation, but, either against its late consequences such as genomic instability. SkQR1 did not protect against radiation-induced damage the K562 subline with high level of multidrug resistance (MDR) due to SkQR1 extrusion with Pgp 170 MDR pump. We suggest that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used for selective protection of normal cells against radiation-induced damage without interference with radiotherapy of MDR-positive tumors. PMID:25929130

  13. [Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQR1 selectively protects MDR-negative cells against ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Fetisova, E K; Antoshina, M M; Cherepanynets, V D; Izumov, D S; Kireev, I I; Kireev, R I; Lyamzaev, K G; Riabchenko, N I; Chernyak, B V; Skulachev, V P

    2014-01-01

    Radioprotection appeared to be an important problem of today due to atom energetic development and utilization of radiation material in the industry, science and medicine. It has been shown that mitochondrial targeted antioxidant SkQR1 could attenuate radiation injury of human erythroleukemia K562 cells. Pretreatment with SkQR1 before irradiation decreased DNA double strand breaks formation, diminished the number of chromosomal aberrations and suppressed delayed ROS production. Prevention of oxidative stress and normalization of mitochondrial function by mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may be a potential therapeutic strategy not only against immediate consequences of radiation, but, either against its late consequences such as genomic instability. SkQR1 did not protect against radiation-induced damage the K562 subline with high level of multidrug resistance (MDR) due to SkQR1 extrusion with Pgp 170 MDR pump. We suggest that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used for selective protection of normal cells against radiation-induced damage without interference with radiotherapy of MDR-positive tumors.

  14. Two Dictyostelium orthologs of the prokaryotic cell division protein FtsZ localize to mitochondria and are required for the maintenance of normal mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Paul R; Yu, Xuan-Chuan; Hereld, Dale; Barth, Christian; Savage, Amelia; Kiefel, Ben R; Lay, Sui; Fisher, Paul R; Margolin, William; Beech, Peter L

    2003-12-01

    In bacteria, the protein FtsZ is the principal component of a ring that constricts the cell at division. Though all mitochondria probably arose through a single, ancient bacterial endosymbiosis, the mitochondria of only certain protists appear to have retained FtsZ, and the protein is absent from the mitochondria of fungi, animals, and higher plants. We have investigated the role that FtsZ plays in mitochondrial division in the genetically tractable protist Dictyostelium discoideum, which has two nuclearly encoded FtsZs, FszA and FszB, that are targeted to the inside of mitochondria. In most wild-type amoebae, the mitochondria are spherical or rod-shaped, but in fsz-null mutants they become elongated into tubules, indicating that a decrease in mitochondrial division has occurred. In support of this role in organelle division, antibodies to FszA and FszA-green fluorescent protein (GFP) show belts and puncta at multiple places along the mitochondria, which may define future or recent sites of division. FszB-GFP, in contrast, locates to an electron-dense, submitochondrial body usually located at one end of the organelle, but how it functions during division is unclear. This is the first demonstration of two differentially localized FtsZs within the one organelle, and it points to a divergence in the roles of these two proteins.

  15. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B.; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  16. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  17. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  18. Resveratrol protects against hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage to mitochondria by activating SIRT1 in rat mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Nie, Ling; Yin, Yang-Guang; Tang, Jian-Lin; Zhou, Ji-Yin; Li, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Shi-Wen

    2012-03-15

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Resveratrol has potent protective effects on diabetes and diabetic complications including diabetic nephropathy. We aimed to investigate the protective effects of resveratrol on mitochondria and the underlying mechanisms by using an in vitro model of hyperglycemia. We exposed primary cultured rat mesangial cells to high glucose (30 mM) for 48 h. We found that pretreatment with resveratrol (10 μM) 6 h prior to high glucose treatment significantly reduced hyperglycemia-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial superoxide generation, as well as stimulated MnSOD activity. In addition, resveratrol pretreatment significantly reversed the decrease of mitochondrial complex III activity in glucose-treated mesangial cells, which is considered to be the major source of mitochondrial oxidative stress in glucose-treated cells. Furthermore, resveratrol pretreatment efficiently restored the hyperpolarization of ∆Ψm, increased ATP production and preserved the mtDNA content. All of these protective effects of resveratrol were successfully blocked by siRNA targeting SIRT1 and EX-527, a specific inhibitor of SIRT1 activity. Our results indicated that resveratrol efficiently reduced oxidative stress and maintained mitochondrial function related with activating SIRT1 in glucose-treated mesangial cells. It suggested that resveratrol is pharmacologically promising for treating diabetic nephropathy. -- Highlights: ► We treat mesangial cells with glucose as an in vitro model of diabetic nephropathy. ► We find that the nephroprotective effects of resveratrol relate with mitochondria. ► The beneficial effect of resveratrol was prevented by siRNA SIRT1 or its inhibitor.

  19. Plasmodium species: master renovators of their host cells.

    PubMed

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Gilson, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, have developed elaborate strategies that they use to survive and thrive within different intracellular environments. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite is a master renovator of its erythrocyte host cell, and the changes in cell morphology and function that are induced by the parasite promote survival and contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria. In this Review, we discuss how Plasmodium parasites use the protein trafficking motif Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), protease-mediated polypeptide processing, a novel translocon termed the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) and exomembranous structures to export hundreds of proteins to discrete subcellular locations in the host erythrocytes, which enables the parasite to gain access to vital nutrients and to evade the immune defence mechanisms of the host.

  20. Vitamin K2 Induces Mitochondria-Related Apoptosis in Human Bladder Cancer Cells via ROS and JNK/p38 MAPK Signal Pathways.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fengsen; Yu, Yuejin; Guan, Rijian; Xu, Zhiliang; Liang, Huageng; Hong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin K2 on apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells have been well established in previous studies. However, the apoptotic effect of vitamin K2 on bladder cancer cells has not been evaluated. The aim of this study is to examine the apoptotic activity of Vitamin K2 in bladder cancer cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. In this study, Vitamin K2 induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells through mitochondria pathway including loss of mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome C release and caspase-3 cascade. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK was detected in Vitamin K2-treated cells and both SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) completely abolished the Vitamin K2-induced apoptosis and loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in bladder cancer cells, upon treatment of vitamin K2 and the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) almost blocked the Vitamin K2-triggered apoptosis, loss of mitochondria membrane potential and activation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings revealed that Vitamin K2 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via ROS-mediated JNK/p38 MAPK and Mitochondrial pathways.

  1. Vitamin K2 Induces Mitochondria-Related Apoptosis in Human Bladder Cancer Cells via ROS and JNK/p38 MAPK Signal Pathways.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fengsen; Yu, Yuejin; Guan, Rijian; Xu, Zhiliang; Liang, Huageng; Hong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin K2 on apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells have been well established in previous studies. However, the apoptotic effect of vitamin K2 on bladder cancer cells has not been evaluated. The aim of this study is to examine the apoptotic activity of Vitamin K2 in bladder cancer cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. In this study, Vitamin K2 induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells through mitochondria pathway including loss of mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome C release and caspase-3 cascade. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK was detected in Vitamin K2-treated cells and both SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) completely abolished the Vitamin K2-induced apoptosis and loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in bladder cancer cells, upon treatment of vitamin K2 and the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) almost blocked the Vitamin K2-triggered apoptosis, loss of mitochondria membrane potential and activation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings revealed that Vitamin K2 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via ROS-mediated JNK/p38 MAPK and Mitochondrial pathways. PMID:27570977

  2. Vitamin K2 Induces Mitochondria-Related Apoptosis in Human Bladder Cancer Cells via ROS and JNK/p38 MAPK Signal Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Fengsen; Yu, Yuejin; Guan, Rijian; Xu, Zhiliang; Liang, Huageng; Hong, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effects of vitamin K2 on apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells have been well established in previous studies. However, the apoptotic effect of vitamin K2 on bladder cancer cells has not been evaluated. The aim of this study is to examine the apoptotic activity of Vitamin K2 in bladder cancer cells and investigate the underlying mechanism. In this study, Vitamin K2 induced apoptosis in bladder cancer cells through mitochondria pathway including loss of mitochondria membrane potential, cytochrome C release and caspase-3 cascade. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK was detected in Vitamin K2-treated cells and both SP600125 (an inhibitor of JNK) and SB203580 (an inhibitor of p38 MAPK) completely abolished the Vitamin K2-induced apoptosis and loss of mitochondria membrane potential. Moreover, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in bladder cancer cells, upon treatment of vitamin K2 and the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) almost blocked the Vitamin K2-triggered apoptosis, loss of mitochondria membrane potential and activation of JNK and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these findings revealed that Vitamin K2 induces apoptosis in bladder cancer cells via ROS-mediated JNK/p38 MAPK and Mitochondrial pathways. PMID:27570977

  3. Th9 Cells Drive Host Immunity against Gastrointestinal Worm Infection.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Paula; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Temann, Angela U; Gagliani, Nicola; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Ishigame, Harumichi; Hao, Liming; Herbert, De'broski R; Flavell, Richard A

    2013-10-17

    Type 2 inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13, drive the characteristic features of immunity against parasitic worms and allergens. Whether IL-9 serves an essential role in the initiation of host-protective responses is controversial, and the importance of IL-9- versus IL-4-producing CD4⁺ effector T cells in type 2 immunity is incompletely defined. Herein, we generated IL-9-deficient and IL-9-fluorescent reporter mice that demonstrated an essential role for this cytokine in the early type 2 immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Whereas T helper 9 (Th9) cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) were major sources of infection-induced IL-9 production, the adoptive transfer of Th9 cells, but not Th2 cells, caused rapid worm expulsion, marked basophilia, and increased mast cell numbers in Rag2-deficient hosts. Taken together, our data show a critical and nonredundant role for Th9 cells and IL-9 in host-protective type 2 immunity against parasitic worm infection.

  4. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    PubMed

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-01

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells.

  5. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    PubMed

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-01

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells. PMID:27627995

  6. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Charlotte H.; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S. Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine. PMID:27185791

  7. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, António J M; Durkin, Charlotte H; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Holden, David W

    2016-07-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine.

  8. The pharmacological NFkappaB inhibitors BAY117082 and MG132 induce cell arrest and apoptosis in leukemia cells through ROS-mitochondria pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Delgado-Cañedo, Andrés; Schröder, Rafael; Becker, Matheus; Klamt, Fábio; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2010-02-28

    A growing body of evidence suggests the inhibition of NFkappaB as a strategy to induce cell death in tumor cells. In this work, we evaluated the effects of the pharmacological NFkappaB inhibitors BAY117082 and MG132 on leukemia cells apoptosis. BAY117082 and MG132 presented potent apoptotic effects compared to inhibitors of MAPKs, EGFR, PI3K/Akt, PKC and PKA signaling pathways. Non-tumor peripheral blood cells were insensitive to BAY117082 and MG132 apoptotic effects. BAY117082 and MG132-induced apoptosis was dependent on their ability to increase ROS as a prelude to mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) depolarization, permeability transition pore opening and cytochrome c release. Antioxidants blocked MG132 and BAY117082 effects on ROS, MMP and cell death. Although apoptotic markers as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation and sub-G1 were detected in BAY117082-treated cells, caspases activation did not occur and apoptosis was insensitive to caspase inhibitors, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. In contrast, MG132 induced classical apoptosis through ROS-mitochondria and subsequent caspase-9/caspase-3 activation. At sub-apoptotic concentrations, BAY117082 and MG132 arrested cells in G2/M phase of the cell cycle and blocked doxorubicin-induced NFkappaB, which sensitized doxorubicin-resistant cells. Data suggest that the NFkappaB inhibitors MG132 and BAY117082 are potential anti-leukemia agents.

  9. Melatonin promotes Bax sequestration to mitochondria reducing cell susceptibility to apoptosis via the lipoxygenase metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Radogna, F; Albertini, M C; De Nicola, M; Diederich, M; Bejarano, I; Ghibelli, L

    2015-03-01

    Extra-neurological functions of melatonin include control of the immune system and modulation of apoptosis. We previously showed that melatonin inhibits the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in leukocytes via stimulation of high affinity MT1/MT2 receptors, thereby promoting re-localization of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein to mitochondria. Here we show that Bcl-2 sequesters pro-apoptotic Bax into mitochondria in an inactive form after melatonin treatment, thus reducing cell propensity to apoptosis. Bax translocation and the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin are strictly dependent on the presence of Bcl-2, and on the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) metabolite 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE), which we have previously shown to be produced as a consequence of melatonin binding to its low affinity target calmodulin. Therefore, the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin requires the simultaneous, independent interaction with high (MT1/MT2) and low (calmodulin) affinity targets, eliciting two independent signal transduction pathways converging into Bax sequestration and inactivation. MT1/MT2 vs. lipoxygenase pathways are activated by 10(-9) vs. 10(-5)M melatonin, respectively; the anti-apoptotic effect of melatonin is achieved at 10(-5)M, but drops to 10(-9)M upon addition of exogenous 5-HETE, revealing that lipoxygenase activation is the rate-limiting pathway. Therefore, in areas of inflammation with increased 5-HETE levels, physiological nanomolar concentrations of melatonin may suffice to maintain leukocyte viability.

  10. Release of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum and its subsequent influx into mitochondria trigger celastrol-induced paraptosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Soo Ah; Kim, You-Sun; Kim, Jin Yeop; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Choi, Kyeong Sook

    2014-01-01

    Celastrol, a triterpene extracted from the Chinese “Thunder of God Vine”, is known to have anticancer activity, but its underlying mechanism is not completely understood. In this study, we show that celastrol kills several breast and colon cancer cell lines by induction of paraptosis, a cell death mode characterized by extensive vacuolization that arises via dilation of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria. Celastrol treatment markedly increased mitochondrial Ca2+ levels and induced ER stress via proteasome inhibition in these cells. Both MCU (mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter) knockdown and pretreatment with ruthenium red, an inhibitor of MCU, inhibited celastrol-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, dilation of mitochondria/ER, accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and cell death in MDA-MB 435S cells. Inhibition of the IP3 receptor (IP3R) with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) also effectively blocked celastrol-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation and subsequent paraptotic events. Collectively, our results show that the IP3R-mediated release of Ca2+ from the ER and its subsequent MCU-mediated influx into mitochondria critically contribute to celastrol-induced paraptosis in cancer cells. PMID:25149175

  11. Mitochondria-targeted Triphenylamine Derivatives Activatable by Two-Photon Excitation for Triggering and Imaging Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chennoufi, Rahima; Bougherara, Houcine; Gagey-Eilstein, Nathalie; Dumat, Blaise; Henry, Etienne; Subra, Frédéric; Bury-Moné, Stéphanie; Mahuteau-Betzer, Florence; Tauc, Patrick; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Deprez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) leads to cell death by using a combination of a photosensitizer and an external light source for the production of lethal doses of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since a major limitation of PDT is the poor penetration of UV-visible light in tissues, there is a strong need for organic compounds whose activation is compatible with near-infrared excitation. Triphenylamines (TPAs) are fluorescent compounds, recently shown to efficiently trigger cell death upon visible light irradiation (458 nm), however outside the so-called optical/therapeutic window. Here, we report that TPAs target cytosolic organelles of living cells, mainly mitochondria, triggering a fast apoptosis upon two-photon excitation, thanks to their large two-photon absorption cross-sections in the 760–860 nm range. Direct ROS imaging in the cell context upon multiphoton excitation of TPA and three-color flow cytometric analysis showing phosphatidylserine externalization indicate that TPA photoactivation is primarily related to the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via ROS production, although significant differences in the time courses of cell death-related events were observed, depending on the compound. TPAs represent a new class of water-soluble organic photosensitizers compatible with direct two-photon excitation, enabling simultaneous multiphoton fluorescence imaging of cell death since a concomitant subcellular TPA re-distribution occurs in apoptotic cells. PMID:26947258

  12. Mitochondria and mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Santos, João; Amaral, Sandra

    2013-10-15

    Mitochondria are cellular organelles with crucial roles in ATP synthesis, metabolic integration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and management, the regulation of apoptosis (namely via the intrinsic pathway), among many others. Additionally, mitochondria in different organs or cell types may have distinct properties that can decisively influence functional analysis. In terms of the importance of mitochondria in mammalian reproduction, and although there are species-specific differences, these aspects involve both energetic considerations for gametogenesis and fertilization, control of apoptosis to ensure the proper production of viable gametes, and ROS signaling, as well as other emerging aspects. Crucially, mitochondria are the starting point for steroid hormone biosynthesis, given that the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone (a common precursor for all steroid hormones) takes place via the activity of the cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) on the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, mitochondrial activity in reproduction has to be considered in accordance with the very distinct strategies for gamete production in the male and female. These include distinct gonad morpho-physiologies, different types of steroids that are more prevalent (testosterone, estrogens, progesterone), and, importantly, the very particular timings of gametogenesis. While spermatogenesis is complete and continuous since puberty, producing a seemingly inexhaustible pool of gametes in a fixed environment; oogenesis involves the episodic production of very few gametes in an environment that changes cyclically. These aspects have always to be taken into account when considering the roles of any common element in mammalian reproduction.

  13. Preferential involvement of mitochondria in Toll-like receptor 3 agonist-induced neuroblastoma cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Tai, Ming-Hong; Liou, Chia-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Hung-Yi; Wang, Pei-Wen

    2012-04-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) can mediate its therapeutic effect through Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) expressed on tumor cells including neuroblastoma. We used synthetic dsRNA polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [Poly(I:C)] as a TLR3 agonist to treat TLR3-expressing SK-N-AS neuroblatoma (NB) cells. We found up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress proteins glucose-regulated protein 78 and inositol-requiring enzyme 1. Bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of ER function, effectively blocked poly(I:C)-induced activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3, MnSOD and glutathione peroxidase 1 and reduced poly(I:C)-induced SK-N-AS apoptosis. Pan caspase inhibitor and inhibitor of caspase-9, but not of caspase-8, inhibited poly(I:C)-induced activated caspase-3 expression. Rho zero (ρ(0))-SK-N-AS cells were resistant to poly(I:C)-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and apoptosis, but not to inhibition of cell growth, as compared to parent SK-N-AS cells. Taking together, these findings suggest that mitochondria are preferentially involved in poly(I:C)-induced NB cell apoptosis, but not in inhibition of cell growth. A crosstalk between mitochondria and ER is implicated.

  14. Hsp105 family proteins suppress staurosporine-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Ishihara, Keiichi; Saito, Youhei; Hatayama, Takumi . E-mail: hatayama@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp

    2006-10-15

    Hsp105 (Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta}), major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells, belong to a subgroup of the HSP70 family, HSP105/110. Previously, we have shown that Hsp105{alpha} has completely different effects on stress-induced apoptosis depending on cell type. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Hsp105{alpha} regulates stress-induced apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we established HeLa cells that overexpress either Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} by removing doxycycline and examined how Hsp105 modifies staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells. Apoptotic features such as the externalization of phosphatidylserine on the plasma membrane and nuclear morphological changes were induced by the treatment with STS, and the STS-induced apoptosis was suppressed by overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. In addition, we found that overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta} suppressed the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 by preventing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria, which results in the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria, was also suppressed by the overexpression of Hsp105{alpha} or Hsp105{beta}. Thus, it is suggested that Hsp105 suppresses the stress-induced apoptosis at its initial step, the translocation of Bax to mitochondria in HeLa cells.

  15. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in SCC-4 human tongue cancer cells through mitochondria-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Ip, Siu-Wan; Lan, Sheng-Hui; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chen, Ya-Yin; Huang, Hui-Ying; Lin, Zen-Pin; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Yang, Mei-Due; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-05-01

    Although there have been advances in the fields of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy of tongue cancer, the cure rates are still not substantially satisfactory. Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the major pungent ingredient of hot chili pepper and has been reported to have an antitumor effect on many human cancer cell types. The molecular mechanisms of the antitumor effect of capsaicin are not yet completely understood. Herein, we investigated whether capsaicin induces apoptosis in human tongue cancer cells. Capsaicin decreased the percentage of viable cells in a dose-dependent manner in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells. In addition, capsaicin produced DNA fragmentation, decreased the DNA contents (sub-G1 phase), and induced G0/G1 phase arrest in SCC-4 cells. We demonstrated that capsaicin-induced apoptosis is associated with an increase in reactive oxygen species and Ca²⁺ generations and a disruption of the mitochondrial transmenbrane potential (ΔΨ(m)). Treatment with capsaicin induced a dramatic increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities, as assessed by flow cytometric methods. A possible mechanism of capsaicin-induced apoptosis is involved in the activation of caspase-3 (one of the apoptosis-executing enzyme). Confocal laser microscope examination also showed that capsaicin induced the releases of AIF, ATF-4, and GADD153 from mitochondria of SCC-4 cells.

  16. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Linero, Florencia N.; Sepúlveda, Claudia S.; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C.; Scolaro, Luis A.; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection. PMID:23170173

  17. Testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells via extrinsic apoptotic pathway with mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species involvement.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Neves, Karla Bianca; Pestana, Cezar Rangel; Queiroz, André Lima; Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto; Chignalia, Andréia Z; Valim, Yara Maria; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curti, Carlos; Tostes, Rita C

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone exerts both beneficial and harmful effects on the cardiovascular system. Considering that testosterone induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ROS activate cell death signaling pathways, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via mitochondria-dependent ROS generation. Potential mechanisms were addressed. Cultured VSMCs were stimulated with testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or vehicle (2-12 h) in the presence of flutamide (10(-5) mol/l), CCCP (10(-6) mol/l), mimetic manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP; 3 × 10(-5) mol/l), Z-Ile-Glu(O-ME)-Thr-Asp(O-Me) fluoromethyl ketone (Z-IETD-FMK; 10(-5) mol/l), or vehicle. ROS were determined with lucigenin and dichlorodihydrofluorescein; apoptosis, with annexin V and calcein; O2 consumption, with a Clark-type electrode, and procaspases, caspases, cytochrome c, Bax, and Bcl-2 levels by immunoblotting. Testosterone induced ROS generation (relative light units/mg protein, 2 h; 162.6 ± 16 vs. 100) and procaspase-3 activation [arbitrary units, (AU), 6 h; 166.2 ± 19 vs. 100]. CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. Testosterone increased annexin-V fluorescence (AU, 197.6 ± 21.5 vs. 100) and decreased calcein fluorescence (AU, 34.4 ± 6.4 vs. 100), and O2 consumption (nmol O2/min, 18.6 ± 2.0 vs. 34.4 ± 3.9). Testosterone also reduced Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio but not cytochrome-c release from mitochondria. Moreover, testosterone (6 h) induced cleavage of procaspase 8 (AU, 161.1 ± 13.5 vs. 100) and increased gene expression of Fas ligand (2(ΔΔCt), 3.6 ± 1.2 vs. 0.7 ± 0.5), and TNF-α (1.7 ± 0.4 vs. 0.3 ± 0.1). CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. These data indicate that testosterone induces apoptosis in VSMCs via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway with the involvement of androgen receptor activation and mitochondria-generated ROS.

  18. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression.

  19. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells. Images PMID:6255459

  20. Translation and Assembly of Radiolabeled Mitochondrial DNA-Encoded Protein Subunits from Cultured Cells and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Formosa, Luke E; Hofer, Annette; Tischner, Christin; Wenz, Tina; Ryan, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the mitochondrial electron transport chain consists of five multi-subunit membrane complexes responsible for the generation of cellular ATP. Of these, four complexes are under dual genetic control as they contain subunits encoded by both the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, thereby adding another layer of complexity to the puzzle of respiratory complex biogenesis. These subunits must be synthesized and assembled in a coordinated manner in order to ensure correct biogenesis of different respiratory complexes. Here, we describe techniques to (1) specifically radiolabel proteins encoded by mtDNA to monitor the rate of synthesis using pulse labeling methods, and (2) analyze the stability, assembly, and turnover of subunits using pulse-chase methods in cultured cells and isolated mitochondria.

  1. Giant mitochondria do not fuse and exchange their contents with normal mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Marian; Terman, Alexei; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2008-01-01

    Giant mitochondria accumulate within aged or diseased postmitotic cells as a consequence of insufficient autophagy, which is normally responsible for mitochondrial degradation. We report that giant mitochondria accumulating in cultured rat myoblasts due to inhibition of autophagy have low inner membrane potential and do not fuse with each other or with normal mitochondria. In addition to the low inner mitochondrial membrane potential in giant mitochondria, the quantity of the OPA1 mitochondrial fusion protein in these mitochondria was low, but the abundance of mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) remained unchanged. The combination of these factors may explain the lack of mitochondrial fusion in giant mitochondria and imply that the dysfunctional giant mitochondria cannot restore their function by fusing and exchanging their contents with fully functional mitochondria. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms of accumulation of age-related mitochondrial damage in postmitotic cells.

  2. [Mitochondria inheritance in yeast saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Fizikova, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The review is devoted to the main mechanisms of mitochondria inheritance in yeast Saccharonmyces cerevisiae. The genetic mechanisms of functionally active mitochondria inheritance in eukaryotic cells is one of the most relevant in modem researches. A great number of genetic diseases are associated with mitochondria dysfunction. Plasticity of eukaryotic cell metabolism according to the environmental changes is ensured by adequate mitochondria functioning by means of ATP synthesis coordination, reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis regulation and is an important factor of cell adaptation to stress. Mitochondria participation in important for cell vitality processes masters the presence of accurate mechanisms of mitochondria functions regulation according to environment fluctuations. The mechanisms of mitochondria division and distribution are highly conserved. Baker yeast S. cerevisiae is an ideal model object for mitochondria researches due to energetic metabolism lability, ability to switch over respiration to fermentation, and petite-positive phenotype. Correction of metabolism according to the environmental changes is necessary for cell vitality. The influence of respiratory, carbon, amino acid and phosphate metabolism on mitochondria functions was shown. As far as the mechanisms that stabilize functions of mitochondria and mtDNA are highly conserve, we can project yeast regularities on higher eukaryotes systems. This makes it possible to approximate understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of a great number of human diseases.

  3. Metabolic pathways in Anopheles stephensi mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Giulivi, Cecilia; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Horton, Ashley A; Luckhart, Shirley

    2008-10-15

    No studies have been performed on the mitochondria of malaria vector mosquitoes. This information would be valuable in understanding mosquito aging and detoxification of insecticides, two parameters that have a significant impact on malaria parasite transmission in endemic regions. In the present study, we report the analyses of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of cultured cells [ASE (Anopheles stephensi Mos. 43) cell line] from A. stephensi, a major vector of malaria in India, South-East Asia and parts of the Middle East. ASE cell mitochondria share many features in common with mammalian muscle mitochondria, despite the fact that these cells are of larval origin. However, two major differences with mammalian mitochondria were apparent. One, the glycerol-phosphate shuttle plays as major a role in NADH oxidation in ASE cell mitochondria as it does in insect muscle mitochondria. In contrast, mammalian white muscle mitochondria depend primarily on lactate dehydrogenase, whereas red muscle mitochondria depend on the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle. Two, ASE mitochondria were able to oxidize proline at a rate comparable with that of alpha-glycerophosphate. However, the proline pathway appeared to differ from the currently accepted pathway, in that oxoglutarate could be catabolized completely by the tricarboxylic acid cycle or via transamination, depending on the ATP need.

  4. Targeting peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers to mitochondria within cells by conjugation to lipophilic cations: implications for mitochondrial DNA replication, expression and disease

    PubMed Central

    Muratovska, Aleksandra; Lightowlers, Robert N.; Taylor, Robert W.; Turnbull, Douglass M.; Smith, Robin A. J.; Wilce, Jacqueline A.; Martin, Stephen W.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2001-01-01

    The selective manipulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and expression within mammalian cells has proven difficult. One promising approach is to use peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligomers, nucleic acid analogues that bind selectively to complementary DNA or RNA sequences inhibiting replication and translation. However, the potential of PNAs is restricted by the difficulties of delivering them to mitochondria within cells. To overcome this problem we conjugated a PNA 11mer to a lipophilic phosphonium cation. Such cations are taken up by mitochondria through the lipid bilayer driven by the membrane potential across the inner membrane. As anticipated, phosphonium–PNA (ph–PNA) conjugates of 3.4–4 kDa were imported into both isolated mitochondria and mitochondria within human cells in culture. This was confirmed by using an ion-selective electrode to measure uptake of the ph–PNA conjugates; by cell fractionation in conjunction with immunoblotting; by confocal microscopy; by immunogold-electron microscopy; and by crosslinking ph–PNA conjugates to mitochondrial matrix proteins. In all cases dissipating the mitochondrial membrane potential with an uncoupler prevented ph–PNA uptake. The ph–PNA conjugate selectively inhibited the in vitro replication of DNA containing the A8344G point mutation that causes the human mtDNA disease ‘myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibres’ (MERRF) but not the wild-type sequence that differs at a single nucleotide position. Therefore these modified PNA oligomers retain their selective binding to DNA and the lipophilic cation delivers them to mitochondria within cells. When MERRF cells were incubated with the ph–PNA conjugate the ratio of MERRF to wild-type mtDNA was unaffected, even though the ph–PNA content of the mitochondria was sufficient to inhibit MERRF mtDNA replication in a cell-free system. This unexpected finding suggests that nucleic acid derivatives cannot bind their complementary sequences during mt

  5. Essential Regulation of Cell Bioenergetics By Constitutive InsP3 Receptor Ca2+ Transfer to Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, César; Miller, Russell A.; Smith, Ian; Bui, Thi; Molgó, Jordi; Müller, Marioly; Vais, Horia; Cheung, King-Ho; Yang, Jun; Parker, Ian; Thompson, Craig; Birnbaum, Morris; Hallows, Kenneth R.; Foskett, J. Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate cellular metabolism are a fundamental requirement of all cells. Most eukaryotic cells rely on aerobic mitochondrial metabolism to generate ATP. Nevertheless, regulation of mitochondrial activity is incompletely understood. Here we identified an unexpected and essential role for constitutive InsP3R-mediated Ca2+ release in maintaining cellular bioenergetics. Macroautophagy provides eukaryotes with an adaptive response to nutrient deprivation that prolongs survival. Constitutive InsP3R Ca2+ signaling is required for macroautophagy suppression in cells in nutrient-replete media. In its absence, cells become metabolically compromised due to diminished mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Mitochondrial uptake of InsP3R released Ca2+ is fundamentally required to provide optimal bioenergetics by providing sufficient reducing equivalents to support oxidative phosphorylation. Absence of this Ca2+ transfer results in enhanced phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase and activation of AMPK, which activates pro-survival macroautophagy. Thus, constitutive InsP3R Ca2+ release to mitochondria is an essential cellular process that is required for efficient mitochondrial respiration and maintenance of normal cell bioenergetics. PMID:20655468

  6. A water-soluble and fast-response mitochondria-targeted fluorescent probe for colorimetric and ratiometric sensing of endogenously generated SO2 derivatives in living cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Li, Kun; Xie, Ke-Xin; Li, Ling-Ling; Yu, Kang-Kang; Wang, Xin; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2016-02-25

    A novel water-soluble mitochondria-targeted ratiometric fluorescent probe (Cl-2) is presented. Cl-2 can respond selectively to SO2 derivatives within 1 min. Notably, Cl-2 can be used to monitor successfully the concentration change of endogenously generated SO2 derivatives in living cells.

  7. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  8. Atomic resolution insight into host cell recognition by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Blumenschein, Tharin M A; Friedrich, Nikolas; Childs, Robert A; Saouros, Savvas; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Campanero-Rhodes, Maria A; Simpson, Peter; Chai, Wengang; Koutroukides, Theodoros; Blackman, Michael J; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Matthews, Stephen

    2007-06-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, a member of the phylum Apicomplexa that includes Plasmodium spp., is one of the most widespread parasites and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Micronemal proteins (MICs) are released onto the parasite surface just before invasion of host cells and play important roles in host cell recognition, attachment and penetration. Here, we report the atomic structure for a key MIC, TgMIC1, and reveal a novel cell-binding motif called the microneme adhesive repeat (MAR). Using glycoarray analyses, we identified a novel interaction with sialylated oligosaccharides that resolves several prevailing misconceptions concerning TgMIC1. Structural studies of various complexes between TgMIC1 and sialylated oligosaccharides provide high-resolution insights into the recognition of sialylated oligosaccharides by a parasite surface protein. We observe that MAR domains exist in tandem repeats, which provide a highly specialized structure for glycan discrimination. Our work uncovers new features of parasite-receptor interactions at the early stages of host cell invasion, which will assist the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:17491595

  9. 18α-Glycyrrhetinic Acid Induces Apoptosis of HL-60 Human Leukemia Cells through Caspases- and Mitochondria-Dependent Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Chang; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Yang, Jiun-Long; Wu, Rick Sai-Chuen; Wu, Ping-Ping; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigate the molecular mechanisms of caspases and mitochondria in the extrinsic and intrinsic signal apoptosis pathways in human leukemia HL-60 cells after in vitro exposure to 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA). Cells were exposed to 18α-GA at various concentrations for various time periods and were harvested for flow cytometry total viable cell and apoptotic cell death measurements. Cells treated with 18α-GA significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 value of 100 μM at 48 h. The cell growth inhibition resulted in induction of apoptosis and decreased the mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) and increased caspase-8, -9 and -3 activities. Furthermore, cytochrome c and AIF were released from mitochondria, as shown by western blotting and confirmed by confocal laser microscopy. Western blotting showed that 18α-GA increased the levels of pro-apoptotic proteins such as Bax and Bid and decreased the anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl, furthermore, results also showed that 18α-GA increased Fas and Fas-L which are associated with surface death receptor in HL-60 cells. Based on those observations, the present study supports the hypothesis that 18α-GA-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells involves the activation of the both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways. PMID:27376261

  10. Hijacking mitochondria: bacterial toxins that modulate mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Tong, Janette; Gabriel, Kipros

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial infection has enormous global social and economic impacts stemming from effects on human health and agriculture. Although there are still many unanswered questions, decades of research has uncovered many of the pathogenic mechanisms at play. It is now clear that bacterial pathogens produce a plethora of proteins known as "toxins" and "effectors" that target a variety of physiological host processes during the course of infection. One of the targets of host targeted bacterial toxins and effectors are the mitochondria. The mitochondrial organelles are major players in many biological functions, including energy conversion to ATP and cell death pathways, which inherently makes them targets for bacterial proteins. We present a summary of the toxins targeted to mitochondria and for those that have been studied in finer detail, we also summarize what we know about the mechanisms of targeting and finally their action at the organelle.

  11. Peptide-Mediated Delivery of Chemical Probes and Therapeutics to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jean, Sae Rin; Ahmed, Marya; Lei, Eric K; Wisnovsky, Simon P; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-09-20

    poorly understood mitochondrial DNA repair and replication pathways. In this work, a variety of novel proteins were identified that are essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial nucleic acids. Mitochondria-targeted peptides have also been used to increase the therapeutic window of antibacterial drugs with significant mammalian toxicity. Given the evolutionary similarity of mitochondria and bacteria, peptides are effective transporters that can target both of these entities. These antimicrobial peptides are highly effective even in difficult to target intracellular bacteria which reside within host cells. This peptide-based approach to targeting mitochondria has provided a variety of insights into the "druggability" of mitochondria and new biological processes that could be future drug targets. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial-targeting field is quite nascent and many exciting applications of organelle-specific conjugates remain to be explored. In this Account, we highlight the development and optimization of the mitochondria-penetrating peptides that our laboratory has developed, the unique applications of mitochondria-targeted bioactive cargo, and offer a perspective on important directions for the field.

  12. Peptide-Mediated Delivery of Chemical Probes and Therapeutics to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jean, Sae Rin; Ahmed, Marya; Lei, Eric K; Wisnovsky, Simon P; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-09-20

    poorly understood mitochondrial DNA repair and replication pathways. In this work, a variety of novel proteins were identified that are essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial nucleic acids. Mitochondria-targeted peptides have also been used to increase the therapeutic window of antibacterial drugs with significant mammalian toxicity. Given the evolutionary similarity of mitochondria and bacteria, peptides are effective transporters that can target both of these entities. These antimicrobial peptides are highly effective even in difficult to target intracellular bacteria which reside within host cells. This peptide-based approach to targeting mitochondria has provided a variety of insights into the "druggability" of mitochondria and new biological processes that could be future drug targets. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial-targeting field is quite nascent and many exciting applications of organelle-specific conjugates remain to be explored. In this Account, we highlight the development and optimization of the mitochondria-penetrating peptides that our laboratory has developed, the unique applications of mitochondria-targeted bioactive cargo, and offer a perspective on important directions for the field. PMID:27529125

  13. Mitochondria: the calcium connection.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Laura; Drago, Ilaria; Zampese, Enrico; Pozzan, Tullio

    2010-01-01

    Calcium handling by mitochondria is a key feature in cell life. It is involved in energy production for cell activity, in buffering and shaping cytosolic calcium rises and also in determining cell fate by triggering or preventing apoptosis. Both mitochondria and the mechanisms involved in the control of calcium homeostasis have been extensively studied, but they still provide researchers with long-standing or even new challenges. Technical improvements in the tools employed for the investigation of calcium dynamics have been-and are still-opening new perspectives in this field, and more prominently for mitochondria. In this review we present a state-of-the-art toolkit for calcium measurements, with major emphasis on the advantages of genetically encoded indicators. These indicators can be efficiently and selectively targeted to specific cellular sub-compartments, allowing previously unavailable high-definition calcium dynamic studies. We also summarize the main features of cellular and, in more detail, mitochondrial calcium handling, especially focusing on the latest breakthroughs in the field, such as the recent direct characterization of the calcium microdomains that occur on the mitochondrial surface upon cellular stimulation. Additionally, we provide a major example of the key role played by calcium in patho-physiology by briefly describing the extensively reported-albeit highly controversial-alterations of calcium homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease, casting lights on the possible alterations in mitochondrial calcium handling in this pathology.

  14. Enclosure of mitochondria by chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Brown, R H; Rigsby, L L; Akin, D E

    1983-02-01

    In Panicum species of the Laxa group, some of which have characteristics intermediate to C(3) and C(4) photosynthesis species, some mitochondria in leaf bundle sheath cells are surrounded by chloroplasts when viewed in profile. Serial sectioning of leaves of one Laxa species, Panicum schenckii Hack, shows that these mitochondria are enclosed by chloroplasts. Complete enclosure rather than invagination also is indicated by absence of two concentric chloroplast membranes surrounding the mitochondrial profiles.

  15. Dual Analysis of the Murine Cytomegalovirus and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveal New Aspects of the Virus-Host Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Juranic Lisnic, Vanda; Babic Cac, Marina; Lisnic, Berislav; Trsan, Tihana; Mefferd, Adam; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Cook, Charles H.; Jonjic, Stipan; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq). We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus-associated diseases. PMID:24086132

  16. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  17. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  18. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  19. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.

  20. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death.

  1. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:23915134

  2. A novel class of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles modifies mitochondrial proteins and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism in breast cancer cells through redox mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Zhou, Fen; Diers, Anne R; Smith, M Ryan; Golzarian, Hafez; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment over the past several years, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related death among women in the United States. A major goal in breast cancer treatment is to develop safe and clinically useful therapeutic agents that will prevent the recurrence of breast cancers after front-line therapeutics have failed. Ideally, these agents would have relatively low toxicity against normal cells, and will specifically inhibit the growth and proliferation of cancer cells. Our group and others have previously demonstrated that breast cancer cells exhibit increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption compared with non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells. This suggests that it may be possible to deliver redox active compounds to the mitochondria to selectively inhibit cancer cell metabolism. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a series of mitochondria-targeted soft electrophiles (MTSEs) has been designed which selectively accumulate within the mitochondria of highly energetic breast cancer cells and modify mitochondrial proteins. A prototype MTSE, IBTP, significantly inhibits mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, cell attachment, and migration in vitro. These results suggest MTSEs may represent a novel class of anti-cancer agents that prevent cancer cell growth by modification of specific mitochondrial proteins.

  3. Mammalian apoptotic signalling pathways: multiple targets of protozoan parasites to activate or deactivate host cell death.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Kristin; Hippe, Diana; Gross, Uwe; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2009-11-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential mechanism of the host to combat infectious agents and to regulate immunity during infection. Consequently, activation and deactivation of the hosts' cell death pathways by protozoan parasites play critical roles in parasite control, pathogenesis, immune evasion and parasite dissemination within the host. Here, we discuss advances in the understanding of these fascinating host-parasite interactions with special emphasis on how protozoa can modulate the cell death apparatus of its host.

  4. Central role of mitochondria and p53 in PUVA-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes cell line NCTC-2544

    SciTech Connect

    Viola, Giampietro Fortunato, Elena; Cecconet, Laura; Del Giudice, Laura; Dall'Acqua, Francesco; Basso, Giuseppe

    2008-02-15

    Despite strong evidence concerning the high efficiency of PUVA therapy (psoralen plus UVA light), its mechanism of action has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we have evaluated in a cell line of human keratinocytes (NCTC-2544) the effects of two linear psoralen derivatives, 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP), that are widely used in PUVA therapy and two angular derivatives, Angelicin (ANG) and 4,6,4'-trymetyl angelicin (TMA). All derivatives photoinduce cellular death, TMA being the most active compound. The cell cycle analysis showed that the four derivatives induce, 24 h after irradiation, a cell cycle arrest in G1 phase later followed by massive apoptosis. The G1 arrest is correlated to an increase in the expression of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1}, a protein associated with the cell cycle block and apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of NCTC-2544 resulted in p53 activation by 5-MOP, 8-MOP, and ANG but not TMA and its phosphorylation at serine-15. The levels of p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} paralleled p53 protein staining pattern suggesting that p53 activation correlated with p21{sup Waf1/Cip1} induction. Simultaneous to p53 activation, psoralens induced mitochondrial depolarization, cytochrome c release, mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, as well as caspase-3 and -9 activation. Thus these results strongly indicate the necessity of p53 activation and the induction of the apoptotic machinery downstream of mitochondria.

  5. High-Resolution Respirometry for Simultaneous Measurement of Oxygen and Hydrogen Peroxide Fluxes in Permeabilized Cells, Tissue Homogenate and Isolated Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Makrecka-Kuka, Marina; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Whereas mitochondria are well established as the source of ATP in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), it is debated if they are also the major cellular sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we describe the novel approach of combining high-resolution respirometry and fluorometric measurement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, applied to mitochondrial preparations (permeabilized cells, tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria). The widely used H2O2 probe Amplex Red inhibited respiration in intact and permeabilized cells and should not be applied at concentrations above 10 µM. H2O2 fluxes were generally less than 1% of oxygen fluxes in physiological substrate and coupling states, specifically in permeabilized cells. H2O2 flux was consistently highest in the Complex II-linked LEAK state, reduced with CI&II-linked convergent electron flow and in mitochondria respiring at OXPHOS capacity, and were further diminished in uncoupled mitochondria respiring at electron transfer system capacity. Simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 flux requires careful optimization of assay conditions and reveals information on mitochondrial function beyond separate analysis of ROS production.

  6. Physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells via suppressing survivin expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-dong; Xiong, Shi-jiang; Tan, Fei; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: A previous study has shown that physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside (PG) derived from Rumex japonicusHoutt causes apoptosis and blocks cell cycle progression in human lung cancer cells. In the present study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying PG-induced cancer cell apoptosis. Methods: Human OSCC-derived cell line KB was treated PG (10, 20, 50 μg/mL). Cell apoptosis was detected with flow cytometry. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and release of cytochome C from mitochondria were measured; the expression of relevant signaling proteins was analyzed using Western blotting or qRT-PCR. For evaluation of in vivo anticancer action, nude mice grafted with KB cells were treated with PG (10, 20, 40 mg·kg−1·d−1, ip) for 24 days. Results: PG dose-dependently suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in KB cells. PG-induced apoptosis was mediated via the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway, as evidenced by the decreased Bcl-2, increased Bax and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, as well as the loss of MMP, caspase-9 activation, and increased cytosolic cytochrome c. Furthermore, PG suppressed the expression of survivin, whereas overexpression of survivin markedly attenuated PG-induced apoptosis. Meanwhile PG increased the expression of tumor suppressor PTEN, and decreased p-Akt, p-GSK3β and miR-21 levels. Pharmacological activation of Akt/GSK3β signaling or transfection with miR-21 mimic abolished PG-induced survivin reduction and cell apoptosis. Similar results were observed in PG-treated nude mice grafted with KB cells. Conclusion: Physcion 8-O-β-glucopyranoside induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of human OSCC cells by suppressing survivin expression via miR-21/PTEN/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway. PMID:27063218

  7. Animal mitochondria: evolution, function, and disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, M; You, C-P; Zhao, R-R; Liu, S-J; Zhang, Z-H; Zhang, C; Liu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are sub-cellular organelles responsible for producing the majority of cellular energy through the process of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and are found in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Mitochondria have a unique genetic system, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which is a small, self-replicating and diverse genome. In the past 30 years, mtDNA has made significant contribution to molecular ecology and phylogeography. Mitochondria also represent a unique system of mitochondrial-nuclear genomic cooperation. Additionally, mitochondrial dysfunction can be fatal. In this paper, we review several aspects of mitochondria, including evolution and the origin of mitochondria, energy supply and the central role of mitochondria in apoptosis, and mitochondrial dysfunction. It is shown that mitochondria play a critical role in many aspects of life.

  8. Coenzyme Q10 protects astrocytes from ROS-induced damage through inhibition of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway.

    PubMed

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  9. Cissus quadrangularis Linn. Stem Ethanolic Extract Liberates Reactive Oxygen Species and Induces Mitochondria Mediated Apoptosis in KB Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Saba; Siddiqui, Sahabjada; Dhasmana, Anupam; Safia; Haque, Ejazul; Kamil, Mohammed; Lohani, Mohtashim; Arshad, Mohammad; Mir, Snober Shabnam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cissus quadrangularis Linn. (CQ) commonly known as Hadjod (Family: Vitaceae) is usually distributed in India and Sri Lanka and contains several bioactive compounds responsible for various metabolic and physiologic effects. Objective: In this study, the biological effects of CQ ethanolic extract were evaluated by in vitro and supported by in silico analysis on KB oral epidermoid cancer cell line. Materials and Methods: Anti-cancer potential of ethanolic extract of CQ stem against KB oral epidermoid cancer cells was evaluated in terms of morphological analysis, nuclei staining, liberation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell cycle arrest, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and p53 and Bcl-2 protein expression which reveal the induction of apoptosis along with supporting in silico analysis. Results: Ethanolic extract of CQ stem contains various bioactive compounds responsible for cancer cell morphological alterations, liberation of ROS, G1 phase cell cycle arrest and decreased MMP along with up-regulation of p53 and down-regulation of Bcl-2. By employing in silico approach, we have also postulated that the CQ extract active constituents sequester Bcl-2 with higher affinity as compared to p53, which may be the reason for induction of growth arrest and apoptosis in KB cells. Conclusion: Our data indicate that the CQ extract has a remarkable apoptotic effect that suggests that it could be a viable treatment option for specific types of cancers. SUMMARY Cissus quadrangularis stem ethanolic extract induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phaseIt liberates (ROS) and mitochondria mediated apoptosisIt upregulates p53 and down-regulates Bcl-2 protein expressionIn silico studies indicates that the active constituents of CQ binds Bcl-2 with higher affinity as compared to p53. PMID:26929569

  10. Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (e.g. renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics and exercise training. PMID:22499901

  11. Prophylactic role of D-Saccharic acid-1,4-lactone in tertiary butyl hydroperoxide induced cytotoxicity and cell death of murine hepatocytes via mitochondria-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Semantee; Chatterjee, Srabasti; Manna, Prasenjit; Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Gachhui, Ratan; Sil, Parames C

    2011-01-01

    D-Saccharic acid 1,4-lactone (DSL) is a derivative of D-glucaric acid. It is a beta-glucuronidase inhibitor and possesses anticarcinogenic, detoxifying, and antioxidant properties. In the present study, the protective effects of DSL were investigated against tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP) induced cytotoxicity and cell death in vitro using murine hepatocytes. Exposure of TBHP caused a reduction in cell viability, enhanced the membrane leakage, and disturbed the intracellular antioxidant machineries in murine hepatocytes. Investigating the signaling mechanism of TBHP-induced cellular pathophysiology and protective action of DSL, we found that TBHP exposure disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential, facilitated cytochrome c release in the cytosol, and led to apoptotic cell death via mitochondria-dependent pathways. DSL counteracted these changes and maintained normalcy in hepatocytes. Combining, results suggest that DSL possesses the ability to ameliorate TBHP-induced oxidative insult, cytotoxicity, and apoptotic cell death probably due to its antioxidant activity and functioning via mitochondria-dependent pathways.

  12. Mitochondria in Cancer Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a disease characterized by uncontrolled growth. Metabolic demands to sustain rapid proliferation must be compelling since aerobic glycolysis is the first as well as the most commonly shared characteristic of cancer. During the last decade, the significance of metabolic reprogramming of cancer has been at the center of attention. Nonetheless, despite all the knowledge gained on cancer biology, the field is not able to reach agreement on the issue of mitochondria: Are damaged mitochondria the cause for aerobic glycolysis in cancer? Warburg proposed the damaged mitochondria theory over 80 years ago; the field has been testing the theory equally long. In this review, we will discuss alterations in metabolic fluxes of cancer cells, and provide an opinion on the damaged mitochondria theory. PMID:26877834

  13. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  14. Mitochondria-dependent apoptogenic activity of the aqueous root extract of Croton membranaceus against human BPH-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Afriyie, D K; Asare, G A; Bugyei, K; Lin, J; Peng, J; Hong, Z

    2015-01-01

    Croton membranaceus aqueous root extract (CMARE) is among the widely used phytotherapeutics in Ghana for the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. However, the mechanism of action of CMARE remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to establish whether apoptosis is involved in the antiproliferative effect of CMARE on human BPH-1 cells. We determined the effect of treatment with 0, 1, 3, and 5 mg/mL CMARE for 24, 48, and 72 h on the viability and morphology of BPH-1 cells using the MMT assay and phase-contrast microscopy, respectively. We examined the apoptosis-inducing effects of CMARE after 48 h at the cellular level using Hoescht 33258 and JC-1 dye staining and flow cytometry analysis. We performed reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting to confirm the apoptotic effects of CMARE at the molecular level. CMARE induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition in the proliferation of BPH-1 cells (P < 0.05) and an alteration in their morphology and a reduction their density. Furthermore, CMARE induced dose-dependent staining of the nuclear chromatin, significant DNA fragmentation with G₀/G₁ sub-diploid cells (P < 0.01), and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential in the treated cells compared to the controls after 48 h (P < 0.01). Additionally, while CMARE induced a significant upregulation of the mRNA and protein levels of Bax, those of Bcl2 did not change significantly. Therefore, induction of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis of BPH-1 cells may be a possible mechanism of action of CMARE.

  15. Dendritic cells in cytomegalovirus infection: viral evasion and host countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Rölle, Alexander; Olweus, Johanna

    2009-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a beta-herpesvirus that infects the majority of the population during early childhood and thereafter establishes life-long latency. Primary infection as well as spontaneous reactivation usually remains asymptomatic in healthy hosts but can, in the context of systemic immunosuppression, result in substantial morbidity and mortality. HCMV counteracts the host immune response by interfering with the recognition of infected cells. A growing body of literature has also suggested that the virus evades the immune system by paralyzing the initiators of antiviral immune responses--the dendritic cells (DCs). In the current review, we discuss the effects of CMV (HCMV and murine CMV) on various DC subsets and the ensuing innate and adaptive immune responses. The impact of HCMV on DCs has mainly been investigated using monocyte-derived DCs, which are rendered functionally impaired by infection. In mouse models, DCs are targets of viral evasion as well, but the complex cross-talk between DCs and natural killer cells has, however, demonstrated an instrumental role for DCs in the control and clearance of viral infection. Fewer studies address the role of peripheral blood DC subsets, plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c+ myeloid DCs in the response against HCMV. These DCs, rather than being paralyzed by HCMV, are largely resistant to infection, mount a vigorous first-line defense and induce T-cell responses to the virus. This possibly provides a partial explanation for an intriguing conundrum: the highly efficient control of viral infection and reactivation in immunocompetent hosts in spite of multi-layered viral evasion mechanisms.

  16. Fisetin induces apoptosis in human nonsmall lung cancer cells via a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Hyun, Jin Won

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the apoptotic effects of fisetin, a phenolic compound, against the human nonsmall cell lung cancer cell line, NCI-H460. Fisetin showed dose-dependent cytotoxic activity against NCI-H460 cells, with 50% inhibition of cell viability occurring at a concentration of 75 μg/mL. Fisetin induced both the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and apoptosis, as evidenced by apoptotic body formation, DNA fragmentation, an increase in the number of sub-G1 phase cells, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization. Moreover, fisetin significantly modulated the expression of apoptosis-associated proteins, resulting in reduced expression of B cell lymphoma-2, increased expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein, and activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. In addition, pretreatment with a caspase inhibitor blocked fisetin-induced cell death.

  17. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle. PMID:27180572

  18. Mitochondria and metazoan epigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Coffman, James A.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, mitochondrial activity controls ATP production, calcium dynamics, and redox state, thereby establishing physiological parameters governing the transduction of biochemical signals that regulate nuclear gene expression. However, these activities are commonly assumed to fulfill a ‘housekeeping’ function: necessary for life, but an epiphenomenon devoid of causal agency in the developmental flow of genetic information. Moreover, it is difficult to perturb mitochondrial function without generally affecting cell viability. For these reasons little is known about the extent of mitochondrial influence on gene activity in early development. Recent discoveries pertaining to the redox regulation of key developmental signaling systems together with the fact that mitochondria are often asymmetrically distributed in animal embryos suggests that they may contribute spatial information underlying differential specification of cell fate. In many cases such asymmetries correlate with localization of genetic determinants (i.e., mRNAs or proteins), particularly in embryos that rely heavily on cell-autonomous means of cell fate specification. In such embryos the localized genetic determinants play a dominant role, and any developmental information contributed by the mitochondria themselves is likely to be less obvious and more difficult to isolate experimentally. Hence, ‘regulative’ embryos that make more extensive use of conditional cell fate specification are better suited to experimental investigation of mitochondrial impacts on developmental gene regulation. Recent studies of the sea urchin embryo, which is a paradigmatic example of such a system, suggest that anisotropic distribution of mitochondria provides a source gradient of spatial information that directs epigenetic specification of the secondary axis via Nodal-Lefty signaling. PMID:19429498

  19. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  20. Etoposide induces pancreatic β-cells cytotoxicity via the JNK/ERK/GSK-3 signaling-mediated mitochondria-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuan-I; Su, Chin-Chuan; Yang, Ching-Yao; Hung, Dong-Zong; Lin, Ching-Ting; Lu, Tien-Hui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Huang, Chun-Fa

    2016-10-01

    Etoposide is widely used in the treatment of the different types of tumors such as pancreatic cancer. However, etoposide also causes several unwanted side-effects in normal viable cells, including pancreatic β-cells, which are vulnerable to chemical-induced injuries, and the molecular mechanisms underlying etoposide-induced apoptosis are still unclear. Here, the results showed that in RIN-m5F cells (a β-cell-derived cell line), the number of viable cells was significantly decreased after 24h of etoposide treatment and underwent mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals accompanied by mitochondrial dysfunction, and increases in the population of sub-G1 hypodiploid cells and apoptotic cells, caspase-3 activity, and the activation of caspase cascades. Etoposide also increased the phosphorylation levels of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3α/β in treated RIN-m5F cells. Pretreatment with LiCl, a GSK-3 inhibitor, prevented etoposide-induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and GSK-3 protein phosphorylation in RIN-m5F cells. Furthermore, exposure of the cells to etoposide induced the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)1/2 but not p38-MAPK, which was suppressed by the specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125) and ERK1/2 inhibitor (PD98059), respectively. Additionally, pretreatment with both SP600125 and PD98059 effectively suppressed etoposide-induced β-cell cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and GSK-3 protein phosphorylation; however, LiCl did not reverse JNK and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results suggest that etoposide is capable of causing cytotoxicity on pancreatic β-cells by inducing apoptosis through the JNK/ERK-mediated GSK-3 downstream-triggered mitochondria-dependent signaling pathway.

  1. Graft-versus-host-related immunosuppression is induced in mixed chimeras by alloresponses against either host or donor lymphohematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Graft-vs.-host (GVH)-related immunosuppression has previously been demonstrated in F1 rodent recipients of parental lymphoid cells, and has been thought to result from an immunologic attack of the donor against the host. Since all cells of such F1 recipients could potentially bear target class I MHC alloantigens, it has not previously been possible to determine precisely the target tissues responsible for development of GVH-related effects. In the present studies we have used mixed allogeneic chimeras as recipients of host or donor-strain lymphocyte inocula, and have made the surprising observation that "GVH- induced" immune unresponsiveness does not require GVH reactivity, per se, but develops in the presence of a one-way alloresponse against lymphohematopoietic cells in either the GVH or the host-versus-graft direction. PMID:3264329

  2. Not only insulin stimulates mitochondriogenesis in muscle cells, but mitochondria are also essential for insulin-mediated myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Gajkowska, Barbara; Hocquette, Jean-François; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2006-04-01

    Viability and myogenesis from C2C12 muscle cells and L6 rat myoblasts were dose-dependently stimulated by insulin. The metabolic inhibitors of phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI-3K, LY294002) and of MAPKK/ERK kinase (MEK, PD98059) differently affected insulin-stimulated myogenesis of the cells. After LY294002 and PD98059 treatment, viability deteriorated and apparently an additive effect of both metabolic inhibitors was observed, irrespective of the method of measurement (neutral red or MTT assay). These inhibitors were antagonistic in myogenesis. Our results confirm that insulin regulates cell viability by at least two distinct pathways, namely by PI-3K- and MEK-dependent signalling cascades. Both pathways are agonistic in cell viability, whereas PI-3K rather than MEK supports insulin-mediated myogenicity. Accordingly, inhibition of insulin action by LY294002, but not PD98059, was accompanied with a reduced level of Ser473-phosphorylated Akt with additional loss of myogenin protein. Besides, repression of insulin signalling by either PI-3K or MEK inhibitor diminished expression of selected subunits of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation enzymes (OXPHOS). In turn, insulin raised and accelerated protein expression of subunits I and IV of mitochondrial cytochrome-c oxidase (COX). In addition, the level of myogenin, the molecular marker of terminal and general muscle differentiation indices decreased if selected OXPHOS enzymes were individually blocked by rotenone, myxothiazol or oligomycin. Summing up, our results pointed to mitochondria as an essential organelle for insulin-dependent myogenesis. Insulin positively affects mitochondrial function by induction of OXPHOS enzymes, which provide energy indispensable for the anabolic effect of insulin.

  3. Aluminium based adjuvants and their effects on mitochondria and lysosomes of phagocytosing cells.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, Lars; Exley, Christopher; Darabi, Anna; Sandén, Emma; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Aluminium oxyhydroxide, Al(OH)3 is one of few compounds approved as an adjuvant in human vaccines. However, the mechanism behind its immune stimulating properties is still poorly understood. In vitro co-culture of an aluminium adjuvant and the human monocytic cell line THP-1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation. Inhibition occurred at concentrations of adjuvant several times lower than would be found at the injection site using a vaccine formulation containing an aluminium adjuvant. Based on evaluation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, THP-1 cells showed no mitochondrial rupture after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant, instead an increase in mitochondrial activity was seen. The THP-1 cells are phagocytosing cells and after co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant the phagosomal pathway was obstructed. Primary or early phagosomes mature into phagolysosomes with an internal pH of 4.5 - 5 and carry a wide variety of hydrolysing enzymes. Co-culture with the aluminium adjuvant yielded a reduced level of acidic vesicles and cathepsin L activity, a proteolytic enzyme of the phagolysosomes, was almost completely inhibited. THP-1 cells are an appropriate in vitro model in order to investigate the mechanism behind the induction of a phagocytosing antigen presenting cell into an inflammatory cell by aluminium adjuvants. Much information will be gained by investigating the phagosomal pathway and what occurs inside the phagosomes and to elucidate the ultimate fate of phagocytosed aluminium particles.

  4. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-11

    Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC(50)=75 μM). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer. PMID:22546556

  5. Amorfrutin C Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation in Colon Cancer Cells through Targeting Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christopher; Rousseau, Morten; Micikas, Robert J; Fischer, Cornelius; Plauth, Annabell; Wowro, Sylvia J; Siems, Karsten; Hetterling, Gregor; Kliem, Magdalena; Schroeder, Frank C; Sauer, Sascha

    2016-01-22

    A known (1) and a structurally related new natural product (2), both belonging to the amorfrutin benzoic acid class, were isolated from the roots of Glycyrrhiza foetida. Compound 1 (amorfrutin B) is an efficient agonist of the nuclear peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) gamma and of other PPAR subtypes. Compound 2 (amorfrutin C) showed comparably lower PPAR activation potential. Amorfrutin C exhibited striking antiproliferative effects for human colorectal cancer cells (HT-29 and T84), prostate cancer (PC-3), and breast cancer (MCF7) cells (IC50 values ranging from 8 to 16 μM in these cancer cell lines). Notably, amorfrutin C (2) showed less potent antiproliferative effects in primary colon cells. For HT-29 cells, compound 2 induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and modulated protein expression of key cell cycle modulators. Amorfrutin C further induced apoptotic events in HT-29 cells, including caspase activation, DNA fragmentation, PARP cleavage, phosphatidylserine externalization, and formation of reactive oxygen species. Mechanistic studies revealed that 2 disrupts the mitochondrial integrity by depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane (IC50 0.6 μM) and permanent opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, leading to increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification. Structure-activity-relationship experiments revealed the carboxylic acid and the hydroxy group residues of 2 as fundamental structural requirements for inducing these apoptotic effects. Synergy analyses demonstrated stimulation of the death receptor signaling pathway. Taken together, amorfrutin C (2) represents a promising lead for the development of anticancer drugs. PMID:26731300

  6. Interaction of human tumor viruses with host cell surface receptors and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-05-22

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  7. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  8. Targeting mitochondria by Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins: the impact of compound sub-mitochondrial partition on cell respiration and overall photodynamic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Ahmad M; Craik, James D; Ezzeddine, Rima; Tovmasyan, Artak; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in aerobic ATP production and redox control. They harness crucial metabolic pathways and control cell death mechanisms, properties that make these organelles essential for survival of most eukaryotic cells. Cancer cells have altered cell death pathways and typically show a shift towards anaerobic glycolysis for energy production, factors which point to mitochondria as potential culprits in cancer development. Targeting mitochondria is an attractive approach to tumor control, but design of pharmaceutical agents based on rational approaches is still not well established. The aim of this study was to investigate which structural features of specially designed Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins would direct them to mitochondria and to particular mitochondrial targets. Since Zn(II)N-alkylpyridylporphyrins can act as highly efficient photosensitizers, their localization can be confirmed by photodamage to particular mitochondrial components. Using cultured LS174T adenocarcinoma cells, we found that subcellular distribution of Zn-porphyrins is directed by the nature of the substituents attached to the meso pyridyl nitrogens at the porphyrin ring. Increasing the length of the aliphatic chain from one carbon (methyl) to six carbons (hexyl) increased mitochondrial uptake of the compounds. Such modifications also affected sub-mitochondrial distribution of the Zn-porphyrins. The amphiphilic hexyl derivative (ZnTnHex-2-PyP) localized in the vicinity of cytochrome c oxidase complex, causing its inactivation during illumination. Photoinactivation of critical cellular targets explains the superior efficiency of the hexyl derivative in causing mitochondrial photodamage, and suppressing cellular respiration and survival. Design of potent photosensitizers and redox-active scavengers of free radicals should take into consideration not only selective organelle uptake and localization, but also selective targeting of critical macromolecular structures.

  9. Mitochondria-targeted DsRed2 protein expression during the early stage of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryo development.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Min, Sung-Hun; Choi, Hoonsung; Park, Junghyung; Kim, Sun-Uk; Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Sang-Rae; Kong, Il-Keun; Chang, Kyu-Tae; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2016-09-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been widely used as an efficient tool in biomedical research for the generation of transgenic animals from somatic cells with genetic modifications. Although remarkable advances in SCNT techniques have been reported in a variety of mammals, the cloning efficiency in domestic animals is still low due to the developmental defects of SCNT embryos. In particular, recent evidence has revealed that mitochondrial dysfunction is detected during the early development of SCNT embryos. However, there have been relatively few or no studies regarding the development of a system for evaluating mitochondrial behavior or dynamics. For the first time, in mitochondria of bovine SCNT embryos, we developed a method for the visualization of mitochondria and expression of fluorescence proteins. To express red fluorescence in mitochondria of cloned embryos, bovine ear skin fibroblasts, nuclear donor, were stably transfected with a vector carrying mitochondria-targeting DsRed2 gene tagged with V5 epitope (mito-DsRed2-V5 tag) using lentivirus-mediated gene transfer because of its ability to integrate in the cell genome and the potential for long-term transgene expression in the transduced cells and their dividing cells. From western blotting analysis of V5 tag protein using mitochondrial fraction and confocal microscopy of red fluorescence using SCNT embryos, we found that the mitochondrial expression of the mito-DsRed2 protein was detected until the blastocyst stage. In addition, according to image analysis, it may be suggested possible use of the system for visualization of mitochondrial localization and evaluation of mitochondrial behaviors or dynamics in early development of bovine SCNT embryos. PMID:27287919

  10. Sorafenib induces preferential apoptotic killing of a drug- and radio-resistant Hep G2 cells through a mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Wang, Yu-Huei; Liu, Tsan-Zon; Jen, Yee-Min; Shiau, Chia-Yang

    2009-10-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar, BAY43-9006), a bi-arylurea, is a newly established anti-cancer drug and its functional attribute of cytotoxicity is based on the multi-kinase inhibitory action. Here, we report yet another novel pathway in which sorafenib can induce apoptotic cell death preferentially and efficaciously on an experimentally proven drug- and radio-resistant human Hep G2 cells via a mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism. A real time confocal imaging assay revealed that sorafenib could rapidly provoke the production of ROS plethorically, mainly concentrating in the mitochondria, albeit substantial amounts of ROS could also be detected in cytosol and nucleus. The rapid production of ROS could simultaneously induce intracellular glutathione (iGSH) depletion. A nearly 90% of iGSH was found to be depleted in 1h period after the cells received the drug treatment. Besides mitochondria, iGSH depletion could also be detected in other cellular compartment including cytoplasm and nucleus. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that sorafenib could trigger mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. All these events compoundedly serve as the final arbitrator to initiate lethal apoptotic process through the release of cytochrome c and caspase 3/7 activation. Collectively, we provide first evidence here that sorafenib can provoke an alternative pathway for apoptosis induction of Hep G2 cells through a mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism which is independent of original kinase inhibitory attribute of the drug action. Most importantly, we also demonstrate that sorafenib can effectively eradicate a highly drug- and radio-resistant HCC cells. Thus, our data can provide the basis for a potential applicability of sorafenib in a combined treatment modality.

  11. Noscapine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colon cancer cells in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zi-Rong; Liu, Meng; Peng, Xiu-Lan; Lei, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Ji-Xiang; Dong, Wei-Guo

    2012-05-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine inhibited cell viability of colon cancer in a time- and dose- dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G{sub 2}/M phase arrest and chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Noscapine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by noscapine. -- Abstract: Noscapine, a phthalide isoquinoline alkaloid derived from opium, has been widely used as a cough suppressant for decades. Noscapine has recently been shown to potentiate the anti-cancer effects of several therapies by inducing apoptosis in various malignant cells without any detectable toxicity in cells or tissues. However, the mechanism by which noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells remains unclear. The signaling pathways by which noscapine induces apoptosis were investigated in colon cancer cell lines treated with various noscapine concentrations for 72 h, and a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed. Noscapine effectively inhibited the proliferation of LoVo cells in vitro (IC{sub 50} = 75 {mu}M). This cytotoxicity was reflected by cell cycle arrest at G{sub 2}/M and subsequent apoptosis, as indicated by increased chromatin condensation and fragmentation, the upregulation of Bax and cytochrome c (Cyt-c), the downregulation of survivin and Bcl-2, and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9. Moreover, in a xenograft tumor model in mice, noscapine injection clearly inhibited tumor growth via the induction of apoptosis, which was demonstrated using a TUNEL assay. These results suggest that noscapine induces apoptosis in colon cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways. Noscapine may be a safe and effective chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human colon cancer.

  12. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  13. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  14. Why to compare absolute numbers of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sabine; Schulz, Sabine; Schropp, Eva-Maria; Eberhagen, Carola; Simmons, Alisha; Beisker, Wolfgang; Aichler, Michaela; Zischka, Hans

    2014-11-01

    Prompted by pronounced structural differences between rat liver and rat hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria, we suspected these mitochondrial populations to differ massively in their molecular composition. Aiming to reveal these mitochondrial differences, we came across the issue on how to normalize such comparisons and decided to focus on the absolute number of mitochondria. To this end, fluorescently stained mitochondria were quantified by flow cytometry. For rat liver mitochondria, this approach resulted in mitochondrial protein contents comparable to earlier reports using alternative methods. We determined similar protein contents for rat liver, heart and kidney mitochondria. In contrast, however, lower protein contents were determined for rat brain mitochondria and for mitochondria from the rat hepatocellular carcinoma cell line McA 7777. This result challenges mitochondrial comparisons that rely on equal protein amounts as a typical normalization method. Exemplarily, we therefore compared the activity and susceptibility toward inhibition of complex II of rat liver and hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria and obtained significant discrepancies by either normalizing to protein amount or to absolute mitochondrial number. Importantly, the latter normalization, in contrast to the former, demonstrated a lower complex II activity and higher susceptibility toward inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma mitochondria compared to liver mitochondria. These findings demonstrate that solely normalizing to protein amount may obscure essential molecular differences between mitochondrial populations.

  15. Old is new again: a chemical probe for targeting mitochondria and monitoring mitochondrial membrane potential in cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Liu, Wenwen; Huang, Xianhong; Zhang, Guanxin; Wang, Xuefei; Wang, Zhuo; Zhang, Deqing; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-09-01

    Here, we explore the new application of an old molecule. We find that the tetraphenylethene-indolium molecule (TPE-indo) can both image the mitochondria (in the aggregated state), and indicate mitochondrial activity by the fluorescence change of TPE-indo. TPE-indo shows good photostability, longer emission wavelength, targeting effect for mitochondria, and better response to the changes of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm).

  16. SG2NA recruits DJ-1 and Akt into the mitochondria and membrane to protect cells from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Tanti, Goutam Kumar; Goswami, Shyamal K

    2014-10-01

    SG2NA is a WD-40 repeat protein with multiple protein-protein interaction domains of unknown functions. We demonstrate that it associates with the antioxidant protein DJ-1 and the survival kinase Akt. The C-terminal WD-40 repeat domain of SG2NA is required for its interaction with Akt, while DJ-1 binds it further upstream. No interaction between DJ-1 and Akt occurs in the absence of SG2NA. SG2NA, DJ-1, and Akt colocalize in mitochondria and plasma membrane. Their association is enhanced by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species up to a threshold level but falters thereafter with further increase in oxidants. Mutants of DJ-1 found in patients with familial parkinsonism are not recruited by SG2NA, suggesting its role in neuroprotection. Cells depleted of SG2NA are susceptible, while those overexpressing it are resistant to apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Our study thus unravels a novel pathway of recruitment of Akt and DJ-1 that provides protection against oxidative stress, especially in neurons.

  17. Molecular anatomy of mouse hepatitis virus persistence: coevolution of increased host cell resistance and virus virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Baric, R S

    1996-01-01

    Persistent infection of murine astrocytoma (DBT) cells with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has been established. From this in vitro virus-host system, persistence is mediated at the level of cellular MHV receptor (MHVR) expression and increased virus virulence. MHV persistence selects for resistant host cell populations which abate virus replication. Reductions in MHVR expression were significantly associated with increased host resistance, and transfection of MHVR into resistant host cells completely restored the capacity of cells to support efficient replication of MHV strain A59. The emergence of resistant host cells coselected for variant viruses that had increased avidity for MHVR and also recognized different receptors for entry into resistant cells. These data illustrate that MHV persistence in vitro provides a model to identify critical sites of virus-host interaction at the cellular level which are altered during the evolution of host cell resistance to viral infection and the coevolution of virus virulence. PMID:8648732

  18. Chlamydial Lytic Exit from Host Cells Is Plasmid Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; Starr, Tregei; Song, Lihua; Carlson, John H.; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Beare, Paul A.; Whitmire, William M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is a globally important human pathogen. The chlamydial plasmid is an attenuating virulence factor, but the molecular basis for attenuation is not understood. Chlamydiae replicate within a membrane-bound vacuole termed an inclusion, where they undergo a biphasic developmental growth cycle and differentiate from noninfectious into infectious organisms. Late in the developmental cycle, the fragile chlamydia-laden inclusion retains its integrity by surrounding itself with scaffolds of host cytoskeletal proteins. The ability of chlamydiae to developmentally free themselves from this cytoskeleton network is a fundamental virulence trait of the pathogen. Here, we show that plasmidless chlamydiae are incapable of disrupting their cytoskeletal entrapment and remain intracellular as stable mature inclusions that support high numbers of infectious organisms. By using deletion mutants of the eight plasmid-carried genes (Δpgp1 to Δpgp8), we show that Pgp4, a transcriptional regulator of multiple chromosomal genes, is required for exit. Exit of chlamydiae is dependent on protein synthesis and is inhibited by the compound C1, an inhibitor of the type III secretion system (T3S). Exit of plasmid-free and Δpgp4 organisms, which failed to lyse infected cells, was rescued by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Our findings describe a genetic mechanism of chlamydial exit from host cells that is dependent on an unknown pgp4-regulated chromosomal T3S effector gene. PMID:26556273

  19. Connective tissue diseases: Mitochondria drive NETosis and inflammation in SLE.

    PubMed

    Boilard, Eric; Fortin, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell, providing energy through oxidative respiration. Possibly owing to their similarities with bacteria, however, mitochondria extruded from cells promote inflammation. New research demonstrates that in systemic lupus erythematosus, mitochondrial respiration is critical in neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and that mitochondria released by neutrophils induce inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:26935279

  20. Taurine induces the apoptosis of breast cancer cells by regulating apoptosis-related proteins of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiali; Lu, Hongfei; Wang, Yibing; Liu, Chunju; Zhu, Weifeng; Zheng, Shuangyan; Wan, Fusheng

    2015-01-01

    Taurine (Tau), the most abundant free amino acid in humans has numerous potential health benefits through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, limited studies have assessed its effect on tumors and the antitumor mechanism remains unknown. The present study investigated the cellular and molecular changes induced by Tau, leading to the induction of apoptosis in human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. MCF-7 is p53 proficient (p53+/+) and MDA-MB-231 is a p53 null mutant (p53-/-). Cell proliferation and viability were assessed by MTT. Flow cytometry and hoechst33342 fluorescent staining were employed to detect apoptosis. Spectrophotometry was used to detect caspase-3 activity. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to detect the levels of mRNA and proteins of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), Bax and Bcl-2. Finally, the affect of Tau on the growth of MDA-MB-231-cell-nude mice xenografts was examined. In the study, Tau inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of the two cell lines in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Notably, the inhibitory effect of Tau on p53-/- cancer cells was clearly significant compared to the p53+/+ cancer cells. Further studies showed that Tau promoted apoptosis in human breast cancer cells and inhibited the growth of tumor in nude mice by inducing the expression of PUMA, which further up- and downregulated the expression of Bax and Bcl-2 protein, giving rise to increased activation of caspase-3. Collectively, these results indicate that Tau is a potent candidate for the chemotherapy of breast cancer through increasing the PUMA expression independent of p53 status. PMID:25395275

  1. Bypassing Mechanisms of Mitochondria-Mediated Cancer Stem Cells Resistance to Chemo- and Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lyakhovich, Alex; Lleonart, Matilde E.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are highly resistant to conventional chemo- and radiotherapeutic regimes. Therefore, the multiple drug resistance (MDR) of cancer is most likely due to the resistance of CSCs. Such resistance can be attributed to some bypassing pathways including detoxification mechanisms of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RO/NS) formation or enhanced autophagy. Unlike in normal cells, where RO/NS concentration is maintained at certain threshold required for signal transduction or immune response mechanisms, CSCs may develop alternative pathways to diminish RO/NS levels leading to cancer survival. In this minireview, we will focus on elaborated mechanisms developed by CSCs to attenuate high RO/NS levels. Gaining a better insight into the mechanisms of stem cell resistance to chemo- or radiotherapy may lead to new therapeutic targets thus serving for better anticancer strategies. PMID:26697128

  2. Differential regulation of full-length genome and a single-stranded 7S DNA along the cell cycle in human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Antes, Anita; Tappin, Inger; Chung, Stella; Lim, Robert; Lu, Bin; Parrott, Andrew M; Hill, Helene Z; Suzuki, Carolyn K; Lee, Chee-Gun

    2010-10-01

    Mammalian mitochondria contain full-length genome and a single-stranded 7S DNA. Although the copy number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) varies depending on the cell type and also in response to diverse environmental stresses, our understanding of how mtDNA and 7S DNA are maintained and regulated is limited, partly due to lack of reliable in vitro assay systems that reflect the in vivo functionality of mitochondria. Here we report an in vitro assay system to measure synthesis of both mtDNA and 7S DNA under a controllable in vitro condition. With this assay system, we demonstrate that the replication capacity of mitochondria correlates with endogenous copy numbers of mtDNA and 7S DNA. Our study also shows that higher nucleotide concentrations increasingly promote 7S DNA synthesis but not mtDNA synthesis. Consistently, the mitochondrial capacity to synthesize 7S DNA but not mtDNA noticeably varied along the cell cycle, reaching its highest level in S phase. These findings suggest that syntheses of mtDNA and 7S DNA proceed independently and that the mitochondrial capacity to synthesize 7S DNA dynamically changes not only with cell-cycle progression but also in response to varying nucleotide concentrations.

  3. Early perturbation in mitochondria redox homeostasis in response to environmental stress predicts cell fate in diatoms

    PubMed Central

    van Creveld, Shiri Graff; Rosenwasser, Shilo; Schatz, Daniella; Koren, Ilan; Vardi, Assaf

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous marine photosynthetic eukaryotes that are responsible for about 20% of global photosynthesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the redox-based mechanisms that mediate diatom sensing and acclimation to environmental stress. Here we used a redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein sensor targeted to various subcellular organelles in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, to map the spatial and temporal oxidation patterns in response to environmental stresses. Specific organelle oxidation patterns were found in response to various stress conditions such as oxidative stress, nutrient limitation and exposure to diatom-derived infochemicals. We found a strong correlation between the mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) redox potential (EGSH) and subsequent induction of cell death in response to the diatom-derived unsaturated aldehyde 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD), and a volatile halocarbon (BrCN) that mediate trophic-level interactions in marine diatoms. Induction of cell death in response to DD was mediated by oxidation of mitochondrial EGSH and was reversible by application of GSH only within a narrow time frame. We found that cell fate can be accurately predicted by a distinct life-death threshold of mitochondrial EGSH (−335 mV). We propose that compartmentalized redox-based signaling can integrate the input of diverse environmental cues and will determine cell fate decisions as part of algal acclimation to stress conditions. PMID:25083933

  4. How stem cells speak with host immune cells in inflammatory brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases.

  5. Crosstalk between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    PubMed Central

    Demarquoy, Jean; Le Borgne, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are small ubiquitous organelles. They both play major roles in cell metabolism, especially in terms of fatty acid metabolism, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ROS scavenging, and it is now clear that they metabolically interact with each other. These two organelles share some properties, such as great plasticity and high potency to adapt their form and number according to cell requirements. Their functions are connected, and any alteration in the function of mitochondria may induce changes in peroxisomal physiology. The objective of this paper was to highlight the interconnection and the crosstalk existing between mitochondria and peroxisomes. Special emphasis was placed on the best known connections between these organelles: origin, structure, and metabolic interconnections. PMID:26629313

  6. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. PMID:26203188

  7. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    PubMed

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses.

  8. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A*

    PubMed Central

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S.; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N.; Taylor, Susan S.; Insel, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin− (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin− S49 cells. WT, but not kin−, S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin− cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin− cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin− S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin− cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. PMID:26203188

  9. Fierce Competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for Host Cell Structures in Dually Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Julia D.; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A.; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients. PMID:23243063

  10. Fierce competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for host cell structures in dually infected cells.

    PubMed

    Romano, Julia D; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-02-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients.

  11. Ochratoxin A mediates MAPK activation, modulates IL-2 and TNF-α mRNA expression and induces apoptosis by mitochondria-dependent and mitochondria-independent pathways in human H9 T cells.

    PubMed

    Darif, Youssef; Mountassif, Driss; Belkebir, Abdelkarim; Zaid, Younes; Basu, Kaustuv; Mourad, Walid; Oudghiri, Mounia

    2016-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a natural fungal secondary metabolite that contaminates food and animal feed. Human exposure and involvement of this mycotoxin in several pathologies have been demonstrated worldwide. We investigated OTA immunotoxicity on H9 cells, a human cutaneous CD4+ T lymphoma cell line. Cells were treated with 0, 1, 5, 10, and 20 µM OTA for up to 24 hr. Western blotting revealed increased phosphorylation of all three major mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase, p38). OTA triggered mitochondrial transmembrane potential loss and caspase-3 activation. The 24-hr OTA treatment caused marked changes in cell morphology and DNA fragmentation, suggesting the occurrence of apoptotic events that involved a mitochondria-dependent pathway. Moreover, OTA triggered significant modulation of survivin, interleukin 2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α): mRNA expression of survivin and IL-2 were decreased, while TNF-α was increased. OTA also caused caspase-8 activation in a time-dependent manner, which evokes the death receptor pathway activation; we suspect that this occurred via the autocrine pro-apoptotic effect of TNF-α on H9 cells. PMID:27193732

  12. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements.

  13. Emerging functions as host cell factors - an encyclopedia of annexin-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Alexander; Musiol, Agnes; Raabe, Carsten A; Rescher, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infectious agents call for the development of innovative antimicrobial strategies. With pathogenicity now considered to arise from the complex and bi-directional interplay between a microbe and the host, host cell factor targeting has emerged as a promising approach that might overcome the limitations of classical antimicrobial drug development and could open up novel and efficient therapeutic strategies. Interaction with and modulation of host cell membranes is a recurrent theme in the host-microbe relationship. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of the Ca2+ dependent, membrane-binding annexin protein family in pathogen-host interactions, and discuss their emerging functions as host cell derived auxiliary proteins in microbe-host interactions and host cell targets.

  14. Mechanistic studies of cancer cell mitochondria- and NQO1-mediated redox activation of beta-lapachone, a potentially novel anticancer agent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jason Z.; Ke, Yuebin; Misra, Hara P.; Trush, Michael A.; Li, Y. Robert; Zhu, Hong; Jia, Zhenquan

    2014-12-15

    Beta-lapachone (beta-Lp) derived from the Lapacho tree is a potentially novel anticancer agent currently under clinical trials. Previous studies suggested that redox activation of beta-Lp catalyzed by NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) accounted for its killing of cancer cells. However, the exact mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Using chemiluminescence and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping techniques, this study for the first time demonstrated the real-time formation of ROS in the redox activation of beta-lapachone from cancer cells mediated by mitochondria and NQO1 in melanoma B16–F10 and hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cancer cells. ES936, a highly selective NQO1 inhibitor, and rotenone, a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) complex I were found to significantly block beta-Lp meditated redox activation in B16–F10 cells. In HepG2 cells ES936 inhibited beta-Lp-mediated oxygen radical formation by ∼ 80% while rotenone exerted no significant effect. These results revealed the differential contribution of METC and NQO1 to beta-lapachone-induced ROS formation and cancer cell killing. In melanoma B16–F10 cells that do not express high NQO1 activity, both NOQ1 and METC play a critical role in beta-Lp redox activation. In contrast, in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells expressing extremely high NQO1 activity, redox activation of beta-Lp is primarily mediated by NQO1 (METC plays a minor role). These findings will contribute to our understanding of how cancer cells are selectively killed by beta-lapachone and increase our ability to devise strategies to enhance the anticancer efficacy of this potentially novel drug while minimizing its possible adverse effects on normal cells. - Highlights: • Both isolated mitochondria and purified NQO1 are able to generate ROS by beta-Lp. • The differential roles of mitochondria and NQO1 in mediating redox activation of beta-Lp • In cancer cells with

  15. Role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury.

    PubMed

    Kass, George E N; Price, Shirley C

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria have multiple functions in eukaryotic cells and are organized into dynamic tubular networks that continuously undergo changes through coordinated fusion and fission and migration through the cytosol. Mitochondria integrate cell-signaling networks, especially those involving the intracellular messenger Ca(2+), into the regulation of metabolic pathways. Recently, it has become clear that mitochondria are central to the three main cell death pathways, namely necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagic cell death. This article discusses the role of mitochondria in drug-induced cholestatic injury to the liver. The role of mitochondria in the cellular adaptation against the toxic effects of bile acids is discussed also. PMID:18242496

  16. Mitochondria-acting hexokinase II peptides carried by short-length carbon nanotubes with increased cellular uptake, endosomal evasion, and enhanced bioactivity against cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoong, Sia Lee; Lau, Wei Liang; Liu, Ang Yu; Prendergast, D'arcy; Ho, Han Kiat; Yu, Victor Chun Kong; Lee, Chengkuo; Ang, Wee Han; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2015-08-01

    Type II hexokinase (HKII) has emerged as a viable therapeutic target due to its involvement in metabolic reprogramming and also apoptosis prevention. The peptide derived from the fifteen amino acid sequence in the HKII N-terminal region [HKII(pep)] can compete with endogenous proteins for binding on mitochondria and trigger apoptosis. However, this peptide is not cell-permeable. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were used to effectively deliver HKII(pep) across cellular barriers without compromising their bioactivity. The peptide was conjugated on either oxidized MWCNTs or 2,2'-(ethylenedioxy)bis(ethylamine)-functionalized MWCNTs, yielding MWCNT-HKII(pep) and MWCNT-TEG-HKII(pep), respectively. Both conjugates were shown to be internalized by breast cancer MCF-7 cells using confocal microscopy. Moreover, these nanoconjugates seemed to have escaped from endosomes and be in the vicinity of mitochondria. The WST-1 cytotoxicity assay conducted on MCF-7 and colon carcinoma HCT116 cells revealed that MWCNT-peptide conjugates were significantly more effective in curbing cancer cell growth compared to a commercially available cell permeable HKII fusion peptide. In addition, both nanoconjugates displayed an enhanced ability in eliciting apoptosis and depleting the ATP level in HCT116 cells compared to the mere HKII peptide. Importantly, hexokinase II release from mitochondria was demonstrated in MWCNT-HKII(pep) and MWCNT-TEG-HKII(pep) treated cells, highlighting that the structure and bioactivity of HKII(pep) were not compromised after covalent conjugation to MWCNTs.Type II hexokinase (HKII) has emerged as a viable therapeutic target due to its involvement in metabolic reprogramming and also apoptosis prevention. The peptide derived from the fifteen amino acid sequence in the HKII N-terminal region [HKII(pep)] can compete with endogenous proteins for binding on mitochondria and trigger apoptosis. However, this peptide is not cell-permeable. In this study

  17. Beclin-1-independent autophagy mediates programmed cancer cell death through interplays with endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria in colbat chloride-induced hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lei; Liu, Ning; Liu, Shan-Shan; Xia, Wu-Yan; Liu, Meng-Yao; Li, Lin-Feng; Gao, Jian-Xin

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy has dual functions in cell survival and death. However, the effects of autophagy on cancer cell survival or death remain controversial. In this study, we show that Autophagy can mediate programmed cell death (PCD) of cancer cells in responding to cobalt chloride (CoCl2)-induced hypoxia in a Beclin-1-independent but autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)-dependent manner. Although ATG5 is not directly induced by CoCl2, its constitutive expression is essential for CoCl2-induced PCD. The ATG5-mediated autophagic PCD requires interplays with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and/or mitochondria. In this process, ATG5 plays a central role in regulating ER stress protein CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP) and mitochondrial protein second mitochondria derived activator of caspases (Smac). Two pathways for autophagic PCD in cancer cells responding to hypoxia have been identified: ATG5/CHOP/Smac pathway and ATG5/Smac pathway, which are probably dependent on the context of cell lines. The former is more potent than the latter for the induction of PCD at the early stage of hypoxia, although the ultimate efficiency of both pathways is comparable. In addition, both pathways may require ATG5-mediated conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II. Therefore, we have defined two autophagy-mediated pathways for the PCD of cancer cells in hypoxia, which are dependent on ATG5, interplayed with ER and mitochondria and tightly regulated by hypoxic status. The findings provide a new evidence that autophagy may inhibit tumor cell proliferation through trigger of PCD, facilitating the development of novel anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26609472

  18. Reactive oxygen species regulated mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in PC12 cells exposed to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Jae Hyeon; Shin, In Chul; Koh, Hyun Chul

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxidative species (ROS) generated by environmental toxicants including pesticides could be one of the factors underlying the neuronal cell damage in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study we found that chlorpyrifos (CPF) induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal components of PC12 cells as demonstrated by the activation of caspases and nuclear condensation. Furthermore, CPF also reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase-positive immunoreactivity in substantia nigra of the rat. In addition, CPF induced inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. Importantly, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment effectively blocked apoptosis via the caspase-9 and caspase-3 pathways while NAC attenuated the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity as well as the oxidative metabolism of dopamine (DA). These results demonstrated that CPF-induced apoptosis was involved in mitochondrial dysfunction through the production of ROS. In the response of cellular antioxidant systems to CPF, we found that CPF treatment increased HO-1 expression while the expression of CuZnSOD and MnSOD was reduced. In addition, we found that CPF treatment activated MAPK pathways, including ERK 1/2, the JNK, and the p38 MAP kinase in a time-dependent manner. NAC treatment abolished MAPK phosphorylation caused by CPF, indicating that ROS are upstream signals of MAPK. Interestingly, MAPK inhibitors abolished cytotoxicity and reduced ROS generation by CPF treatment. Our results demonstrate that CPF induced neuronal cell death in part through MAPK activation via ROS generation, suggesting its potential to generate oxidative stress via mitochondrial damage and its involvement in oxidative stress-related neurodegenerative disease. -- Highlights: ► Chlorpyrifos induces apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity. ► ROS is involved in chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis. ► Chlorpyrifos affects cellular antioxidant systems. ► Chlorpyrifos-induced apoptosis mediates activation of MAPK.

  19. Roles of reactive oxygen species and mitochondria in cadmium-induced injury of liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; He, Wenting; Yan, Chuan; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei

    2011-04-01

    The roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial damage in the cadmium (Cd)-induced injury of liver cells were studied by using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and acetyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride (ALCAR). After exposure of experimental rats to cadmium (Cd) for 16 h, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ROS production, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and DNA single-strand break (DNA-SSB) were analyzed. Loss of MMP, increase of ROS production, inhibition of GSH-Px activity, elevation of GSH content, rise of MDA content and DNA-SSB level suggest the participation of ROS and mitochondrion in Cd-induced injury of liver cell. NAC pretreatment attenuated oxidative stress, reversed the decline in GSH-Px activity and reduced GSH and MDA levels significantly. However, Cd-induced loss in MMP was significantly exacerbated by NAC. For another, ALCAR did not perform as well as NAC in terms of reducing ROS production, restoring GSH-Px activity and reducing GSH content. Nevertheless, it significantly improved the recovery of MMP and reduction of MDA content. In addition, conspicuous DNA damage was observed in the samples treated with NAC or ALCAR, indicating Cd could attack DNA through other pathways. These results suggest that oxidative stress or mitochondrial impairment plays a main role in different injuries respectively.

  20. Translation in a wheat germ cell-free system of RNA from mitochondria of the normal and Texas male-sterile cytoplasms of maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Hendrick, C A; al-Janabi, S M; Crane, V C; Girton, L E

    1994-01-01

    RNA isolated from etiolated seedling shoot mitochondria of maize (Zea mays L.) with normal (N) or Texas male-sterile (T) cytoplasm stimulated the incorporation of [35S]-methionine into protein when added to a cell-free protein-synthesizing system from wheat germ. Discrete polypeptides with molecular masses of up to approximately 67 kDa were synthesized, and the pattern of bands was distinct from that obtained with total RNA. Products of translation of T-urf13 RNA were identified by immunoprecipitation, and of atpA, coxI, and coxII RNA by hybrid arrest of translation by the cloned gene. Several polypeptides were differentially synthesized from N and T mitochondrial RNA; these differences were more extensive than those found when isolated, intact, N and T mitochondria are allowed to synthesize proteins.

  1. An ancestral bacterial division system is widespread in eukaryotic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Leger, Michelle M; Petrů, Markéta; Žárský, Vojtěch; Eme, Laura; Vlček, Čestmír; Harding, Tommy; Lang, B Franz; Eliáš, Marek; Doležal, Pavel; Roger, Andrew J

    2015-08-18

    Bacterial division initiates at the site of a contractile Z-ring composed of polymerized FtsZ. The location of the Z-ring in the cell is controlled by a system of three mutually antagonistic proteins, MinC, MinD, and MinE. Plastid division is also known to be dependent on homologs of these proteins, derived from the ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont that gave rise to plastids. In contrast, the mitochondria of model systems such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mammals, and Arabidopsis thaliana seem to have replaced the ancestral α-proteobacterial Min-based division machinery with host-derived dynamin-related proteins that form outer contractile rings. Here, we show that the mitochondrial division system of these model organisms is the exception, rather than the rule, for eukaryotes. We describe endosymbiont-derived, bacterial-like division systems comprising FtsZ and Min proteins in diverse less-studied eukaryote protistan lineages, including jakobid and heterolobosean excavates, a malawimonad, stramenopiles, amoebozoans, a breviate, and an apusomonad. For two of these taxa, the amoebozoan Dictyostelium purpureum and the jakobid Andalucia incarcerata, we confirm a mitochondrial localization of these proteins by their heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The discovery of a proteobacterial-like division system in mitochondria of diverse eukaryotic lineages suggests that it was the ancestral feature of all eukaryotic mitochondria and has been supplanted by a host-derived system multiple times in distinct eukaryote lineages.

  2. Inkjet printing of silk nest arrays for cell hosting.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Rattanon; Drachuk, Irina; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-04-14

    An inkjet printing approach is presented for the facile fabrication of microscopic arrays of biocompatible silk "nests" capable of hosting live cells for prospective biosensors. The patterning of silk fibroin nests were constructed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of silk polyelectrolytes chemically modified with poly-(l-lysine) and poly-(l-glutamic acid) side chains. The inkjet-printed silk circular regions with a characteristic "nest" shape had diameters of 70-100 μm and a thickness several hundred nanometers were stabilized by ionic pairing and by the formation of the silk II crystalline secondary structure. These "locked-in" silk nests remained anchored to the substrate during incubation in cell growth media to provide a biotemplated platform for printing-in, immobilization, encapsulation and growth of cells. The process of inkjet-assisted printing is versatile and can be applied on any type of substrate, including rigid and flexible, with scalability and facile formation. PMID:24605757

  3. Stress and death of cnidarian host cells play a role in cnidarian bleaching.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Camille W; Davy, Simon K; Weis, Virginia M

    2013-08-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when there is a breakdown of the symbiosis between cnidarian hosts and resident Symbiodinium spp. Multiple mechanisms for the bleaching process have been identified, including apoptosis and autophagy, and most previous work has focused on the Symbiodinium cell as the initiator of the bleaching cascade. In this work we show that it is possible for host cells to initiate apoptosis that can contribute to death of the Symbiodinium cell. First we found that colchicine, which results in apoptosis in other animals, causes cell death in the model anemone Aiptasia sp. but not in cultured Symbiodinium CCMP-830 cells or in cells freshly isolated from host Aiptasia (at least within the time frame of our study). In contrast, when symbiotic Aiptasia were incubated in colchicine, cell death in the resident Symbiodinium cells was observed, suggesting a host effect on symbiont mortality. Using live-cell confocal imaging of macerated symbiotic host cell isolates, we identified a pattern where the initiation of host cell death was followed by mortality of the resident Symbiodinium cells. This same pattern was observed in symbiotic host cells that were subjected to temperature stress. This research suggests that mortality of symbionts during temperature-induced bleaching can be initiated in part by host cell apoptosis. PMID:23619418

  4. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates anticancer property of 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 by promoting mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Jianye; Wang, Min; Chen, Qidan; Song, Jia; Yu, Ziqi; Huang, Wei; Fang, Jianpei

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most prevalent childhood malignancy. Although most children with ALL are cured, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails owing to severe toxicities and drug resistance. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2), a major bioactive component isolated from Panax ginseng, has been shown to have a therapeutic effect on some tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell death induced by 20(S)-GRh2 in ALL cells remains unclear. In this study, we showed that 20(S)-GRh2 inhibited the cell growth and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. But it has no cytotoxic effect on human normal blood cells. Furthermore, autophagy plays a protective role in 20(S)-GRh2-induced apoptosis in ALL cell lines and human primary ALL cells. We demonstrated that either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy could be more effective in reducing viability and enhancing 20(S)-GRh2-induced toxicity than 20(S)-GRh2 treatment alone. In addition, inhibition of autophagy could aggravate mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial damage, and then accelerate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of autophagy can sensitize ALL cells towards 20(S)-GRh2. The appropriate inhibition of autophagy could provide a powerful strategy to increase the potency of 20(S)-GRh2 as a novel anticancer agent for ALL therapy. PMID:27027340

  5. ATP/ADP Turnover and Import of Glycolytic ATP into Mitochondria in Cancer Cells Is Independent of the Adenine Nucleotide Translocator.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Eduardo N; DeHart, David N; Patnaik, Jyoti; Klatt, Sandra C; Gooz, Monika Beck; Lemasters, John J

    2016-09-01

    Non-proliferating cells oxidize respiratory substrates in mitochondria to generate a protonmotive force (Δp) that drives ATP synthesis. The mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ), a component of Δp, drives release of mitochondrial ATP(4-) in exchange for cytosolic ADP(3-) via the electrogenic adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which leads to a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio up to >100-fold greater than matrix ATP/ADP. In rat hepatocytes, ANT inhibitors, bongkrekic acid (BA), and carboxyatractyloside (CAT), and the F1FO-ATP synthase inhibitor, oligomycin (OLIG), inhibited ureagenesis-induced respiration. However, in several cancer cell lines, OLIG but not BA and CAT inhibited respiration. In hepatocytes, respiratory inhibition did not collapse ΔΨ until OLIG, BA, or CAT was added. Similarly, in cancer cells OLIG and 2-deoxyglucose, a glycolytic inhibitor, depolarized mitochondria after respiratory inhibition, which showed that mitochondrial hydrolysis of glycolytic ATP maintained ΔΨ in the absence of respiration in all cell types studied. However in cancer cells, BA, CAT, and knockdown of the major ANT isoforms, ANT2 and ANT3, did not collapse ΔΨ after respiratory inhibition. These findings indicated that ANT did mediate mitochondrial ATP/ADP exchange in cancer cells. We propose that suppression of ANT contributes to low cytosolic ATP/ADP, activation of glycolysis, and a Warburg metabolic phenotype in proliferating cells.

  6. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  7. Beta-adrenergic receptors couple to CFTR chloride channels of intercalated mitochondria-rich cells in the heterocellular toad skin epithelium.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Erik Hviid; Amstrup, Jan; Willumsen, Niels J

    2003-12-30

    In the heterocellular toad skin epithelium the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol activates cyclic AMP-dependent Cl(-) channels that are not located in the principal cells. With four experimental approaches, in the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the signalling pathway targets cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-chloride channels of mitochondria-rich cells. (i) Serosal application of isoproterenol (log(10)EC(50)=-7.1+/-0.2; Hill coefficient=1.1+/-0.2), as well as noradrenaline, activated an anion pathway with an apical selectivity sequence, G(Cl)>G(Br)> or =G(NO(3))>G(I), comparable to the published selectivity sequence of cloned human CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes. (ii) Known modulators of human CFTR, glibenclamide (200 micromol/l) and genistein (50 micromol/l), depressed and activated, respectively, the receptor-stimulated G(Cl). Genistein did not modify the anion selectivity. (iii) Transcellular voltage clamp studies of single isolated mitochondria-rich cells revealed functional beta-adrenergic receptors on the basolateral membrane. With approximately 60,000 mitochondria-rich cells per cm(2), the saturating activation of 11.9+/-1.6 nS/cell accounted for the measured isoproterenol-activated transepithelial conductance of 600-900 microS/cm(2). In forskolin-stimulated cells, glibenclamide (200 micromol/l) reversibly inhibited the transcellular conductance by 9.6+/-1.6 nS/cell. (iv) With primers constructed from cloned Xenopus CFTR and PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed mRNA from toad skin, full-length Bufo CFTR cDNA was generated. The derived protein of 1466 residues shows 86% homology with xCFTR and 89% homology with hCFTR. All major functional sequences, that is, the R- and the NBF1- and NBF2-domains are well-conserved as are the predicted transmembrane segments proposed to form the pore of the channel protein. These new results taken together with our previously identified small-conductance CFTR-like Cl

  8. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, Robert A; Low, Benjamin E; Byers, Shannon L; Murray, Stephen A; Kutny, Peter; Wiles, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH) that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium). ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82%) lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55%) when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240) of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137) of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the production

  9. Mitochondria in Neuroplasticity and Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Mark P.; Gleichmann, Marc; Cheng, Aiwu

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondrial electron transport generates the ATP that is essential for the excitability and survival of neurons, and the protein phosphorylation reactions that mediate synaptic signaling and related long-term changes in neuronal structure and function. Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that divide, fuse and move purposefully within axons and dendrites. An Major functions of mitochondria in neurons include the regulation of Ca2+ and redox signaling, developmental and synaptic plasticity, and the arbitration of cell survival and death. The importance of mitochondria in neurons is evident in the neurological phenotypes in rare diseases caused by mutations in mitochondrial genes. Mitochondria-mediated oxidative stress, perturbed Ca2+ homeostasis and apoptosis may also contribute to the pathogenesis of prominent neurological diseases including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases, stroke, ALS and psychiatric disorders. Advances in understanding the molecular and cell biology of mitochondria are leading to novel approaches for the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:19081372

  10. Mitochondria are clamped to vacuoles for lipid transport.

    PubMed

    Klecker, Till; Westermann, Benedikt

    2014-07-14

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Elbaz-Alon et al. (2014) and Hönscher et al. (2014) describe a contact site between mitochondria and the lysosome-like yeast vacuole named vCLAMP (vacuole and mitochondria patch). They show that vCLAMP plays a role in lipid exchange, thereby linking mitochondria to the endomembrane system.

  11. Protection of Tong-Sai-Mai Decoction against Apoptosis Induced by H2O2 in PC12 Cells: Mechanisms via Bcl-2-Mitochondria-ROS-INOS Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Maxwell Kim Kit; Lu, Yin; Di, Liu-qing; Xu, Hui-qin

    2014-01-01

    Tong-Sai-Mai decoction (TSM) is a Chinese materia medica polyherbal formulation that has been applied in treating brain ischemia for hundreds of years. Because it could repress the oxidative stress in in vivo studies, now we focus on the in vitro studies to investigate the mechanism by targeting the oxidative stress dependent signaling. The relation between the neurogenesis and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production remains largely unexamined. PC12 cells are excitable cell types widely used as in vitro model for neuronal cells. Most marker genes that are related to neurotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycles are expressed at high levels in these cells. The aim of the present study is to explore the cytoprotection of TSM against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced apoptosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying PC12 cells. Our findings revealed that TSM cotreatment with H2O2 restores the expression of bcl-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase (INOS), and mitochondria membrane potential. Meanwhile, it reduces intracellular [Ca2+] concentration, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and the expression of caspase-3 and bax. The results of the present study suggested that the cytoprotective effects of the TSM might be mediated, at least in part, by the bcl-2-mitochondria-ROS-INOS pathway. Due to its nontoxic characteristics, TSM could be further developed to treat the neurodegenerative diseases which are closely associated with the oxidative stress. PMID:25404948

  12. Atypical Cell Populations Associated with Acquired Resistance to Cytostatics and Cancer Stem Cell Features: The Role of Mitochondria in Nuclear Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Gustmann, Sebastian; Jastrow, Holger; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Dammann, Philip; Klein, Jacqueline; Dembinski, Ulrike; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J.; Schultheis, Beate; Aldinger, Constanze; Strumberg, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, acquired resistance to cytostatics had mostly been attributed to biochemical mechanisms such as decreased intake and/or increased efflux of therapeutics, enhanced DNA repair, and altered activity or deregulation of target proteins. Although these mechanisms have been widely investigated, little is known about membrane barriers responsible for the chemical imperviousness of cell compartments and cellular segregation in cytostatic-treated tumors. In highly heterogeneous cross-resistant and radiorefractory cell populations selected by exposure to anticancer agents, we found a number of atypical recurrent cell types in (1) tumor cell cultures of different embryonic origins, (2) mouse xenografts, and (3) paraffin sections from patient tumors. Alongside morphologic peculiarities, these populations presented cancer stem cell markers, aberrant signaling pathways, and a set of deregulated miRNAs known to confer both stem-cell phenotypes and highly aggressive tumor behavior. The first type, named spiral cells, is marked by a spiral arrangement of nuclei. The second type, monastery cells, is characterized by prominent walls inside which daughter cells can be seen maturing amid a rich mitochondrial environment. The third type, called pregnant cells, is a giant cell with a syncytium-like morphology, a main nucleus, and many endoreplicative functional progeny cells. A rare fourth cell type identified in leukemia was christened shepherd cells, as it was always associated with clusters of smaller cells. Furthermore, a portion of resistant tumor cells displayed nuclear encapsulation via mitochondrial aggregation in the nuclear perimeter in response to cytostatic insults, probably conferring imperviousness to drugs and long periods of dormancy until nuclear eclosion takes place. This phenomenon was correlated with an increase in both intracellular and intercellular mitochondrial traffic as well as with the uptake of free extracellular mitochondria. All these cellular

  13. The Effect of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Infection on the Cell Mechanics of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Su, Pin-Tzu; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Huang, Chien-Hsiu; Osterday, Kathryn; del Álamo, Juan C.; Syu, Wan-Jr; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is a type of human pathogenic bacteria. The main virulence characteristics of EHEC include the formation of attaching and effacing lesions (A/E lesions) and the production of one or more Shiga-like toxins, which may induce human uremic complications. When EHEC infects host cells, it releases translocated intimin receptor (Tir) and effector proteins inside the host cells, inducing the rearrangement and accumulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, a phenotype leading to the formation of pedestals in the apical cell surface, and the growth of stress fibers at the base of the cells. To examine the effect of EHEC infection on cell mechanics, we carried out a series of experiments to examine HeLa cells with and without EHEC infection to quantify the changes in (1) focal adhesion area, visualized by anti-vinculin staining; (2) the distribution and orientation of stress fibers; and (3) the intracellular viscoelasticity, via directional video particle tracking microrheology. Our results indicated that in EHEC-infected HeLa cells, the focal adhesion area increased and the actin stress fibers became thicker and more aligned. The cytoskeletal reorganization induced by EHEC infection mediated a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic elastic shear modulus of the infected cells, and a transition in the viscoelastic behavior of the cells from viscous-like to elastic-like. These changes in mechanobiological characteristics might modulate the attachments between EHEC and the host cell to withstand exfoliation, and between the host cell and the extracellular matrix, and might also alter epithelial integrity. PMID:25369259

  14. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are unable consistently to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells. PMID:17222473

  15. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G

    2007-04-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are consistently unable to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells.

  16. Mitochondria-targeted esculetin alleviates mitochondrial dysfunction by AMPK-mediated nitric oxide and SIRT3 regulation in endothelial cells: potential implications in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Karnewar, Santosh; Vasamsetti, Sathish Babu; Gopoju, Raja; Kanugula, Anantha Koteswararao; Ganji, Sai Krishna; Prabhakar, Sripadi; Rangaraj, Nandini; Tupperwar, Nitin; Kumar, Jerald Mahesh; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-targeted compounds are emerging as a new class of drugs that can potentially alter the pathophysiology of those diseases where mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role. We have synthesized a novel mitochondria-targeted esculetin (Mito-Esc) with an aim to investigate its effect during oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell death and angiotensin (Ang)-II-induced atherosclerosis in ApoE−/− mice. Mito-Esc but not natural esculetin treatment significantly inhibited H2O2- and Ang-II-induced cell death in human aortic endothelial cells by enhancing NO production via AMPK-mediated eNOS phosphorylation. While L-NAME (NOS inhibitor) significantly abrogated Mito-Esc-mediated protective effects, Compound c (inhibitor of AMPK) significantly decreased Mito-Esc-mediated increase in NO production. Notably, Mito-Esc promoted mitochondrial biogenesis by enhancing SIRT3 expression through AMPK activation; and restored H2O2-induced inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. siSIRT3 treatment not only completely reversed Mito-Esc-mediated mitochondrial biogenetic marker expressions but also caused endothelial cell death. Furthermore, Mito-Esc administration to ApoE−/− mice greatly alleviated Ang-II-induced atheromatous plaque formation, monocyte infiltration and serum pro-inflammatory cytokines levels. We conclude that Mito-Esc is preferentially taken up by the mitochondria and preserves endothelial cell survival during oxidative stress by modulating NO generation via AMPK. Also, Mito-Esc-induced SIRT3 plays a pivotal role in mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and perhaps contributes to its anti-atherogenic effects. PMID:27063143

  17. Safrole induces cell death in human tongue squamous cancer SCC-4 cells through mitochondria-dependent caspase activation cascade apoptotic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chun-Shu; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-07-01

    Safrole is one of important food-borne phytotoxin that exhibits in many natural products such as oil of sassafras and spices such as anise, basil, nutmeg, and pepper. This study was performed to elucidate safrole-induced apoptosis in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells. The effect of safrole on apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and DAPI staining and its regulatory molecules were studied by Western blotting analysis. Safrole-induced apoptosis was accompanied with up-regulation of the protein expression of Bax and Bid and down-regulation of the protein levels of Bcl-2 (up-regulation of the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2), resulting in cytochrome c release, promoted Apaf-1 level and sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in a time-dependent manner. We also used real-time PCR to show safrole promoted the mRNA expressions of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SCC-4 cells. These findings indicate that safrole has a cytotoxic effect in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells by inducing apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis of SCC-4 cells by safrole is involved in mitochondria- and caspase-dependent signal pathways.

  18. Mitofusin-2-mediated tethering of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum promotes cell cycle arrest of vascular smooth muscle cells in G0/G1 phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Li, Xiaolan; Guan, Yang; Guo, Xiaomei

    2015-06-01

    Mitofusin-2 (Mfn-2) is a hyperplasia suppressor. Changes in Mfn-2 expression are thought to reflect mitochondrial remodeling during cell proliferation. However, it is unclear how the participation of Mfn-2 in mitochondrial remodeling prevents cellular proliferation. Here we show that arresting vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the G0/G1 phase by serum starvation up-regulates Mfn-2 expression and causes mitochondria to assemble into a tubular network and to attach to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the S phase, short rod-shaped mitochondrial structures that were dissociated from the ER were observed. Levels of glucose, ATP, l-amino acid, and NADP(+) did not vary throughout the cell cycle. However, NAD(+) level was lower and NADH level was higher in the G0/G1 phase than in the S phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential was lower in the S phase than in the G0/G1 phase. Infecting VSMCs with an adenovirus encoding full-length Mfn-2 increased NADH level and reduced NAD(+) level, while infecting the cells with an adenovirus that silences the p21(ras) signature motif produced opposite effects. These results suggest that Mfn-2 up-regulation causes mitochondrial fusion into tubular networks and attachment to the ER, which in turn halts proliferation of VSMCs.

  19. Safrole induces cell death in human tongue squamous cancer SCC-4 cells through mitochondria-dependent caspase activation cascade apoptotic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Huang, An-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yu, Chun-Shu; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Chiu, Chang-Fang; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-07-01

    Safrole is one of important food-borne phytotoxin that exhibits in many natural products such as oil of sassafras and spices such as anise, basil, nutmeg, and pepper. This study was performed to elucidate safrole-induced apoptosis in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells. The effect of safrole on apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and DAPI staining and its regulatory molecules were studied by Western blotting analysis. Safrole-induced apoptosis was accompanied with up-regulation of the protein expression of Bax and Bid and down-regulation of the protein levels of Bcl-2 (up-regulation of the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2), resulting in cytochrome c release, promoted Apaf-1 level and sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 in a time-dependent manner. We also used real-time PCR to show safrole promoted the mRNA expressions of caspase-3, -8, and -9 in SCC-4 cells. These findings indicate that safrole has a cytotoxic effect in human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-4 cells by inducing apoptosis. The induction of apoptosis of SCC-4 cells by safrole is involved in mitochondria- and caspase-dependent signal pathways. PMID:21591240

  20. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application. PMID:26121477

  1. Finite-particle tracking reveals submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria during transport in mitral cell dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennerich, Arne; Schild, Detlev

    2006-03-01

    The mechanisms of molecular motor regulation during bidirectional organelle transport are still uncertain. There is, for instance, the unsettled question of whether opposing motor proteins can be engaged in a tug-of-war. Clearly, any non-synchronous activation of the molecular motors of one cargo can principally lead to changes in the cargo's shape and size; the cargo's size and shape parameters would certainly be observables of such changes. We therefore set out to measure position, shape and size parameters of fluorescent mitochondria (during their transport) in dendrites of cultured neurons using a finite-particle tracking algorithm. Our data clearly show transport-related submicroscopic-size changes of mitochondria. The observed displacements of the mitochondrial front and rear ends are consistent with a model in which microtubule plus- and minus-end-directed motor proteins or motors of the same type but moving along anti-parallel microtubules are often out-of-phase and occasionally engaged in a tug-of-war. Mostly the leading and trailing ends of mitochondria undergo similar characteristic movements but with a substantial time delay between the displacements of both ends, a feature reminiscent of an inchworm-like motility mechanism. More generally, we demonstrate that observing the position, shape and size of actively transported finite objects such as mitochondria can yield information on organelle transport that is generally not accessible by tracking the organelles' centroid alone.

  2. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    SciTech Connect

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  3. How do viruses control mitochondria-mediated apoptosis?

    PubMed

    Neumann, Simon; El Maadidi, Souhayla; Faletti, Laura; Haun, Florian; Labib, Shirin; Schejtman, Andrea; Maurer, Ulrich; Borner, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    There is no doubt that viruses require cells to successfully reproduce and effectively infect the next host. The question is what is the fate of the infected cells? All eukaryotic cells can "sense" viral infections and exhibit defence strategies to oppose viral replication and spread. This often leads to the elimination of the infected cells by programmed cell death or apoptosis. This "sacrifice" of infected cells represents the most primordial response of multicellular organisms to viruses. Subverting host cell apoptosis, at least for some time, is therefore a crucial strategy of viruses to ensure their replication, the production of essential viral proteins, virus assembly and the spreading to new hosts. For that reason many viruses harbor apoptosis inhibitory genes, which once inside infected cells are expressed to circumvent apoptosis induction during the virus reproduction phase. On the other hand, viruses can take advantage of stimulating apoptosis to (i) facilitate shedding and hence dissemination, (ii) to prevent infected cells from presenting viral antigens to the immune system or (iii) to kill non-infected bystander and immune cells which would limit viral propagation. Hence the decision whether an infected host cell undergoes apoptosis or not depends on virus type and pathogenicity, its capacity to oppose antiviral responses of the infected cells and/or to evade any attack from immune cells. Viral genomes have therefore been adapted throughout evolution to satisfy the need of a particular virus to induce or inhibit apoptosis during its life cycle. Here we review the different strategies used by viruses to interfere with the two major apoptosis as well as with the innate immune signaling pathways in mammalian cells. We will focus on the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and discuss new ideas about how particular viruses could activately engage mitochondria to induce apoptosis of their host.

  4. Regulation of Host Cell Transcriptional Physiology by the Avian Pneumovirus Provides Key Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shirin; Kapur, Vivek

    2003-01-01

    Infection with a viral pathogen triggers several pathways in the host cell that are crucial to eliminating infection, as well as those that are used by the virus to enhance its replication and virulence. We have here used suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analyses to characterize the host transcriptional response in an avian pneumovirus model of infection. The results of our investigations reveal a dynamic host response that includes the regulation of genes with roles in a vast array of cellular functions as well as those that have not been described previously. The results show a considerable upregulation in transcripts representing the interferon-activated family of genes, predicted to play a role in virus replication arrest. The analysis also identified transcripts for proinflammatory leukocyte chemoattractants, adhesion molecules, and complement that were upregulated and may account for the inflammatory pathology that is the hallmark of viral respiratory infection. Interestingly, alterations in the transcription of several genes in the ubiquitin and endosomal protein trafficking pathways were observed, suggesting a role for these pathways in virus maturation and budding. Taken together, the results of our investigations provide key insights into individual genes and pathways that constitute the host cell's response to avian pneumovirus infection, and they have enabled the development of resources and a model of host-pathogen interaction for an important avian respiratory tract pathogen. PMID:12663796

  5. Exchangeable and total calcium pools in mitochondria of rat epididymal fat-pads and isolated fat-cells. Role in the regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Severson, D L; Denton, R M; Bridges, B J; Randle, P J

    1976-01-15

    1. Isolated fat-cells and intact epididymal fat-pads were incubated in medium containing 45Ca2+ and the incorporation of 45Ca into mitochondrial and extramitochondrial fractions was studied. Redistribution of 45Ca between these fractions was essentially prevented by the addition of EGTA [ethanedioxybis(ethylamine)tetra-acetate] and Ruthenium Red to the sucrose-based extraction medium. 2. Incorporation of 45Ca into mitochondrial fractions of both fat-cells and fat-pads was found to be complete within 2-5 min, suggesting that mitochondria contain a pool of calcium in rapid isotopic exchange with extracellular Ca2+. This pool was about 20 times larger in mitochondria within fat-cells than within fat-pads. In fat-cells, 45Ca incorporation into the mitochondrial fraction accounted for about 34% of the total 45Ca incorporation into cells after 20 min and about 50% of the total mitochondrial calcium content measured by atomic absorption; values in fat-pads were about 7 and 20% respectively.

  6. The Relationship between the Bcl-2/Bax Proteins and the Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis Pathway in the Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells into Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanquan; Zhang, Lili; Yuan, Xiaodong; Ou, Ya; Zhu, Xuhong; Cheng, Zanzan; Zhang, Pingshu; Wu, Xiaoying; Meng, Yan; Zhang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Our objective is to study the relationship between the regulatory proteins Bcl-2/Bax and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis during the differentiation of adipose-derived stromal cells (ADSCs) into neurons. Immunocytochemistry and western blotting showed that the cells weakly expressed neuron-specific enolase (NSE) in the non-induced group and expressed NSE more strongly in the groups induced for 1 h, 3 h, 5 h and 8 h. NSE expression peaked at 5 h (P < 0.05), although there was no significant difference between 5 and 8 h (P > 0.05). Bcl-2 expression gradually decreased over time in the non-induced group (P < 0.05). However, Bax, caspase-9, Cyt-c and caspase-3 expression gradually increased and peaked at 8 h (P < 0.05). Transmission electron microscopy revealed karyopyknosis, chromatin edge setting, mitochondria swelling and cavitation in cells at 5 h, and the mitochondrial membrane potential decreased over time, as demonstrated by laser scanning confocal microscopy. After a 5 h induction, cells differentiated into typical neurons and expressed Bcl-2, which inhibited apoptosis. Bax showed a strong apoptosis-promoting capacity, leading to changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and structure, and then triggered the caspase-independent apoptotic response through the mitochondrial pathway. At the same time, Cyt-c was directly or indirectly released from the mitochondria to the cytoplasm to trigger the caspase-dependent apoptotic response through the mitochondrial pathway. Therefore, Bcl-2/Bax play an important role in regulating caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptosis mediated by the mitochondrial pathway during the differentiation of ADSCs into neurons. PMID:27706181

  7. Cutaneous graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant - a review*

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Cesar Daniel Villarreal; Alanis, Julio Cesar Salas; Pérez, Jose Carlos Jaime; Candiani, Jorge Ocampo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (allo-HSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The earliest and most common manifestation is cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. We discuss various insights into the disease's mechanisms and the different treatments for acute and chronic skin graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27438202

  8. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288