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Sample records for host cell translational

  1. Avian reovirus nonstructural protein p17-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and host cellular protein translation shutoff involve activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Chulu, Julius L C; Huang, Wei R; Wang, L; Shih, Wen L; Liu, Hung J

    2010-08-01

    The effects of avian reovirus (ARV) p17 protein on cell cycle progression and host cellular protein translation were studied. ARV infection and ARV p17 transfection resulted in the accumulation of infected and/or transfected cells in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The accumulation of cells in the G(2)/M phase was accompanied by upregulation and phosphorylation of the G(2)/M-phase proteins ATM, p53, p21(cip1/waf1), Cdc2, cyclin B1, Chk1, Chk2, and Cdc25C, suggesting that p17 induces a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest through activation of the ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1)/Cdc2/cyclin B1 and ATM/Chk1/Chk2/Cdc25C pathways. The G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted in increased virus replication. In the present study, we also provide evidence demonstrating that p17 protein is responsible for ARV-induced host cellular protein translation shutoff. Increased phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and initiation factor eIF2alpha and reduced phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4B, and eIF4G, as well as 4E-BP1 and Mnk-1 in p17-transfected cells, demonstrated that ARV p17 suppresses translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors to induce host cellular protein translation shutoff. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin resulted in a decrease in the levels of phosphorylated 4E-BP1, eIF4B, and eIF4G and an increase in the levels eEF2 but did not affect ARV replication, suggesting that ARV replication was not hindered by inhibition of cap-dependent translation. Taken together, our data indicate that ARV p17-induced G(2)/M arrest and host cellular translation shutoff resulted in increased ARV replication.

  2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nsp1 facilitates efficient propagation in cells through a specific translational shutoff of host mRNA.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohisa; Kamitani, Wataru; DeDiego, Marta L; Enjuanes, Luis; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2012-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SCoV) is an enveloped virus containing a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome. Nine mRNAs carrying a set of common 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTR) are synthesized from the incoming viral genomic RNA in cells infected with SCoV. A nonstructural SCoV nsp1 protein causes a severe translational shutoff by binding to the 40S ribosomal subunits. The nsp1-40S ribosome complex further induces an endonucleolytic cleavage near the 5'UTR of host mRNA. However, the mechanism by which SCoV viral proteins are efficiently produced in infected cells in which host protein synthesis is impaired by nsp1 is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the viral UTRs in evasion of the nsp1-mediated shutoff. Luciferase activities were significantly suppressed in cells expressing nsp1 together with the mRNA carrying a luciferase gene, while nsp1 failed to suppress luciferase activities of the mRNA flanked by the 5'UTR of SCoV. An RNA-protein binding assay and RNA decay assay revealed that nsp1 bound to stem-loop 1 (SL1) in the 5'UTR of SCoV RNA and that the specific interaction with nsp1 stabilized the mRNA carrying SL1. Furthermore, experiments using an SCoV replicon system showed that the specific interaction enhanced the SCoV replication. The specific interaction of nsp1 with SL1 is an important strategy to facilitate efficient viral gene expression in infected cells, in which nsp1 suppresses host gene expression. Our data indicate a novel mechanism of viral gene expression control by nsp1 and give new insight into understanding the pathogenesis of SARS.

  3. Regulation of de novo translation of host cells by manipulation of PERK/PKR and GADD34-PP1 activity during Newcastle disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ying; Gu, Feng; Mao, Xiang; Niu, Qiaona; Wang, Huaxia; Sun, Yingjie; Song, Cuiping; Qiu, Xusheng; Tan, Lei; Ding, Chan

    2016-04-01

    Viral infections result in cellular stress responses, which can trigger protein translation shutoff via phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α). Newcastle disease virus (NDV) causes severe disease in poultry and selectively kills human tumour cells. In this report, we determined that infection of HeLa human cervical cancer cells and DF-1 chicken fibroblast cells with NDV maintained protein at early infection times, 0-12 h post-infection (p.i.), and gradually inhibited global protein translation at late infection times, 12-24 h p.i. Mechanistic studies showed that translation inhibition at late infection times was accompanied by phosphorylation of eIF2α, a checkpoint of translation initiation. Meanwhile, the eIF2α kinase, PKR, was upregulated and activated by phosphorylation and another eIF2α kinase, PERK, was phosphorylated and cleaved into two fragments. Pharmacological inhibition experiments revealed that only PKR activity was required for eIF2α phosphorylation, suggesting that recognition of viral dsRNA by PKR was responsible for translation shutoff. High levels of phospho-eIF2α led to preferential translation of the transcription factor ATF4 and an increase in GADD34 expression. Functionally, GADD34, in conjunction with PP1, dephosphorylated eIF2a and restored protein translation, benefiting virus protein synthesis. However, PP1 was degraded at late infection times, functionally counteracting the upregulation of GADD34. Taken together, our data support that NDV-induced translation shutoff at late infection times was attributed to sustaining phosphorylation of eIF2α, which is mediated by continual activation of PKR and degradation of PP1.

  4. Dysbiosis May Trigger Autoimmune Diseases via Inappropriate Post-Translational Modification of Host Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Aaron; Aminov, Rustam; Matthias, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in post-translational modification of proteins (PTMP) may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26903965

  5. Influenza a virus host shutoff disables antiviral stress-induced translation arrest.

    PubMed

    Khaperskyy, Denys A; Emara, Mohamed M; Johnston, Benjamin P; Anderson, Paul; Hatchette, Todd F; McCormick, Craig

    2014-07-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) polymerase complexes function in the nucleus of infected cells, generating mRNAs that bear 5' caps and poly(A) tails, and which are exported to the cytoplasm and translated by host machinery. Host antiviral defences include mechanisms that detect the stress of virus infection and arrest cap-dependent mRNA translation, which normally results in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates of translationally stalled mRNA-protein complexes known as stress granules (SGs). It remains unclear how IAV ensures preferential translation of viral gene products while evading stress-induced translation arrest. Here, we demonstrate that at early stages of infection both viral and host mRNAs are sensitive to drug-induced translation arrest and SG formation. By contrast, at later stages of infection, IAV becomes partially resistant to stress-induced translation arrest, thereby maintaining ongoing translation of viral gene products. To this end, the virus deploys multiple proteins that block stress-induced SG formation: 1) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) inactivates the antiviral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated kinase PKR, thereby preventing eIF2α phosphorylation and SG formation; 2) nucleoprotein (NP) inhibits SG formation without affecting eIF2α phosphorylation; 3) host-shutoff protein polymerase-acidic protein-X (PA-X) strongly inhibits SG formation concomitant with dramatic depletion of cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA and nuclear accumulation of poly(A)-binding protein. Recombinant viruses with disrupted PA-X host shutoff function fail to effectively inhibit stress-induced SG formation. The existence of three distinct mechanisms of IAV-mediated SG blockade reveals the magnitude of the threat of stress-induced translation arrest during viral replication.

  6. Poxvirus host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian Ingo; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Poxviruses are characterized by their large size, complex composition, and cytoplasmic life cycle. They produce two types of infectious particles: mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both MVs and EVs of vaccinia virus, the model poxvirus, take advantage of host cell endocytosis for internalization: they activate macropinocytosis-the most suitable form of endocytosis for large particles. Although largely dependent on the same cellular machinery, MV and EV entry differs with regard to the mechanisms used to trigger macropinocytosis and to undergo fusion. While EVs have to shed an additional membrane to expose the fusion complex, MV fusion requires the inactivation of fusion inhibitory proteins absent in EVs. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of poxvirus MV and EV cell entry. PMID:22440962

  7. Adipose-derived stem cells: selecting for translational success.

    PubMed

    Johal, Kavan S; Lees, Vivien C; Reid, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    We have witnessed a rapid expansion of in vitro characterization and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells, with increasing translation to both in vivo models and a breadth of clinical specialties. However, an appreciation of the truly heterogeneous nature of this unique stem cell group has identified a need to more accurately delineate subpopulations by any of a host of methods, to include functional properties or surface marker expression. Cells selected for improved proliferative, differentiative, angiogenic or ischemia-resistant properties are but a few attributes that could prove beneficial for targeted treatments or therapies. Optimizing cell culture conditions to permit re-introduction to patients is critical for clinical translation.

  8. In situ tissue regeneration through host stem cell recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Ko, In Kap; Lee, Sang Jin; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2013-01-01

    The field of tissue engineering has made steady progress in translating various tissue applications. Although the classical tissue engineering strategy, which involves the use of culture-expanded cells and scaffolds to produce a tissue construct for implantation, has been validated, this approach involves extensive cell expansion steps, requiring a lot of time and laborious effort before implantation. To bypass this ex vivo process, a new approach has been introduced. In situ tissue regeneration utilizes the body's own regenerating capacity by mobilizing host endogenous stem cells or tissue-specific progenitor cells to the site of injury. This approach relies on development of a target-specific biomaterial scaffolding system that can effectively control the host microenvironment and mobilize host stem/progenitor cells to target tissues. An appropriate microenvironment provided by implanted scaffolds would facilitate recruitment of host cells that can be guided to regenerating structural and functional tissues. PMID:24232256

  9. Progeria: translational insights from cell biology.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Leslie B; Cao, Kan; Collins, Francis S

    2012-10-01

    Cell biologists love to think outside the box, pursuing many surprising twists and unexpected turns in their quest to unravel the mysteries of how cells work. But can cell biologists think outside the bench? We are certain that they can, and clearly some already do. To encourage more cell biologists to venture into the realm of translational research on a regular basis, we would like to share a handful of the many lessons that we have learned in our effort to develop experimental treatments for Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), an endeavor that many view as a "poster child" for how basic cell biology can be translated to the clinic.

  10. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus. PMID:26599541

  11. The Transcription and Translation Landscapes during Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveal Novel Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Osnat; Cohen, Yifat; Shitrit, Alina; Shani, Odem; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Trilling, Mirko; Friedlander, Gilgi; Tanenbaum, Marvin; Stern-Ginossar, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are by definition fully dependent on the cellular translation machinery, and develop diverse mechanisms to co-opt this machinery for their own benefit. Unlike many viruses, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) does suppress the host translation machinery, and the extent to which translation machinery contributes to the overall pattern of viral replication and pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we combine RNA sequencing and ribosomal profiling analyses to systematically address this question. By simultaneously examining the changes in transcription and translation along HCMV infection, we uncover extensive transcriptional control that dominates the response to infection, but also diverse and dynamic translational regulation for subsets of host genes. We were also able to show that, at late time points in infection, translation of viral mRNAs is higher than that of cellular mRNAs. Lastly, integration of our translation measurements with recent measurements of protein abundance enabled comprehensive identification of dozens of host proteins that are targeted for degradation during HCMV infection. Since targeted degradation indicates a strong biological importance, this approach should be applicable for discovering central host functions during viral infection. Our work provides a framework for studying the contribution of transcription, translation and degradation during infection with any virus.

  12. Evidence for translational regulation by the herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff protein.

    PubMed

    Saffran, Holly A; Read, G Sullivan; Smiley, James R

    2010-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff protein (vhs) encoded by gene UL41 is an mRNA-specific RNase that triggers accelerated degradation of host and viral mRNAs in infected cells. We report here that vhs is also able to modulate reporter gene expression without greatly altering the levels of the target mRNA in transient-transfection assays conducted in HeLa cells. We monitored the effects of vhs on a panel of bicistronic reporter constructs bearing a variety of internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) located between two test cistrons. As expected, vhs inhibited the expression of the 5' cistrons of all of these constructs; however, the response of the 3' cistron varied with the IRES: expression driven from the wild-type EMCV IRES was strongly suppressed, while expression controlled by a mutant EMCV IRES and the cellular ApaF1, BiP, and DAP5 IRES elements was strongly activated. In addition, several HSV type 1 (HSV-1) 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) sequences also served as positive vhs response elements in this assay. IRES activation was also observed in 293 and HepG2 cells, but no such response was observed in Vero cells. Mutational analysis has yet to uncouple the ability of vhs to activate 3' cistron expression from its shutoff activity. Remarkably, repression of 5' cistron expression could be observed under conditions where the levels of the reporter RNA were not correspondingly reduced. These data provide strong evidence that vhs can modulate gene expression at the level of translation and that it is able to activate cap-independent translation through specific cis-acting elements.

  13. Modified host cells with efflux pumps

    DOEpatents

    Dunlop, Mary J.; Keasling, Jay D.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2016-08-30

    The present invention provides for a modified host cell comprising a heterologous expression of an efflux pump capable of transporting an organic molecule out of the host cell wherein the organic molecule at a sufficiently high concentration reduces the growth rate of or is lethal to the host cell.

  14. Adipose-derived stem cells: selecting for translational success

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Kavan S; Lees, Vivien C; Reid, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    We have witnessed a rapid expansion of in vitro characterization and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells, with increasing translation to both in vivo models and a breadth of clinical specialties. However, an appreciation of the truly heterogeneous nature of this unique stem cell group has identified a need to more accurately delineate subpopulations by any of a host of methods, to include functional properties or surface marker expression. Cells selected for improved proliferative, differentiative, angiogenic or ischemia-resistant properties are but a few attributes that could prove beneficial for targeted treatments or therapies. Optimizing cell culture conditions to permit re-introduction to patients is critical for clinical translation. PMID:25562354

  15. Translational Control by Negative-strand RNA Viruses: Methods for the Study of a Crucial Virus/Host Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Erin N.; Connor, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a vital step in the successful replication of negative-strand RNA viruses. Protein synthesis is also a critical step in the development of a successful antiviral response from the host. This makes understanding the interplay between host and viral translation an important aspect of defining the virus/host interaction. For the negative-strand RNA viruses there are disparate mechanism of how viruses interact with the host protein synthesis apparatus, ranging from the complete takeover of all protein synthesis to the subtle insertion of viral mRNAs into an otherwise unchanged protein synthesis pattern. In this article, we discuss different ways to investigate protein synthesis in virus-infected cells, ranging from the use of metabolic labeling for the study of general translation changes to using fluorescence-coupled labeling techniques that allow the pinpointing of any subcellular localization of protein synthesis during virus replication. We also discuss methods for analyzing the translation initiation factors that are frequently modified in virus-infected cells. PMID:23009810

  16. Coordinated destruction of cellular messages in translation complexes by the gammaherpesvirus host shutoff factor and the mammalian exonuclease Xrn1.

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Sergio; Gaglia, Marta M; Kumar, G Renuka; Wong, Wesley; Jackson, Andrew O; Glaunsinger, Britt A

    2011-10-01

    Several viruses encode factors that promote host mRNA degradation to silence gene expression. It is unclear, however, whether cellular mRNA turnover pathways are engaged to assist in this process. In Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus this phenotype is enacted by the host shutoff factor SOX. Here we show that SOX-induced mRNA turnover is a two-step process, in which mRNAs are first cleaved internally by SOX itself then degraded by the cellular exonuclease Xrn1. SOX therefore bypasses the regulatory steps of deadenylation and decapping normally required for Xrn1 activation. SOX is likely recruited to translating mRNAs, as it cosediments with translation initiation complexes and depletes polysomes. Cleaved mRNA intermediates accumulate in the 40S fraction, indicating that recognition occurs at an early stage of translation. This is the first example of a viral protein commandeering cellular mRNA turnover pathways to destroy host mRNAs, and suggests that Xrn1 is poised to deplete messages undergoing translation in mammalian cells.

  17. Translational environmental biology: cell biology informing conservation.

    PubMed

    Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-05-01

    Typically, findings from cell biology have been beneficial for preventing human disease. However, translational applications from cell biology can also be applied to conservation efforts, such as protecting coral reefs. Recent efforts to understand the cell biological mechanisms maintaining coral health such as innate immunity and acclimatization have prompted new developments in conservation. Similar to biomedicine, we urge that future efforts should focus on better frameworks for biomarker development to protect coral reefs.

  18. Translational environmental biology: cell biology informing conservation.

    PubMed

    Traylor-Knowles, Nikki; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2014-05-01

    Typically, findings from cell biology have been beneficial for preventing human disease. However, translational applications from cell biology can also be applied to conservation efforts, such as protecting coral reefs. Recent efforts to understand the cell biological mechanisms maintaining coral health such as innate immunity and acclimatization have prompted new developments in conservation. Similar to biomedicine, we urge that future efforts should focus on better frameworks for biomarker development to protect coral reefs. PMID:24766840

  19. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  20. Translational Control of Host Gene Expression by a Cys-Motif Protein Encoded in a Bracovirus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunseong; Kim, Yonggyun

    2016-01-01

    Translational control is a strategy that various viruses use to manipulate their hosts to suppress acute antiviral response. Polydnaviruses, a group of insect double-stranded DNA viruses symbiotic to some endoparasitoid wasps, are divided into two genera: ichnovirus (IV) and bracovirus (BV). In IV, some Cys-motif genes are known as host translation-inhibitory factors (HTIF). The genome of endoparasitoid wasp Cotesia plutellae contains a Cys-motif gene (Cp-TSP13) homologous to an HTIF known as teratocyte-secretory protein 14 (TSP14) of Microplitis croceipes. Cp-TSP13 consists of 129 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 13.987 kDa and pI value of 7.928. Genomic DNA region encoding its open reading frame has three introns. Cp-TSP13 possesses six conserved cysteine residues as other Cys-motif genes functioning as HTIF. Cp-TSP13 was expressed in Plutella xylostella larvae parasitized by C. plutellae. C. plutellae bracovirus (CpBV) was purified and injected into non-parasitized P. xylostella that expressed Cp-TSP13. Cp-TSP13 was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector and used to infect Sf9 cells to transiently express Cp-TSP13. The synthesized Cp-TSP13 protein was detected in culture broth. An overlaying experiment showed that the purified Cp-TSP13 entered hemocytes. It was localized in the cytosol. Recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly inhibited protein synthesis of secretory proteins when it was added to in vitro cultured fat body. In addition, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 directly inhibited the translation of fat body mRNAs in in vitro translation assay using rabbit reticulocyte lysate. Moreover, the recombinant Cp-TSP13 significantly suppressed cellular immune responses by inhibiting hemocyte-spreading behavior. It also exhibited significant insecticidal activities by both injection and feeding routes. These results indicate that Cp-TSP13 is a viral HTIF. PMID:27598941

  1. Molecular crowding limits translation and cell growth.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Stefan; Scott, Matthew; Pedersen, Steen; Hwa, Terence

    2013-10-15

    Bacterial growth is crucially dependent on protein synthesis and thus on the cellular abundance of ribosomes and related proteins. Here, we show that the slow diffusion of the bulky tRNA complexes in the crowded cytoplasm imposes a physical limit on the speed of translation, which ultimately limits the rate of cell growth. To study the required allocation of ancillary translational proteins to alleviate the effect of molecular crowding, we develop a model for cell growth based on a coarse-grained partitioning of the proteome. We find that coregulation of ribosome- and tRNA-affiliated proteins is consistent with measured growth-rate dependencies and results in near-optimal allocation over a broad range of growth rates. The analysis further resolves a long-standing controversy in bacterial growth physiology concerning the growth-rate dependence of translation speed and serves as a caution against premature identification of phenomenological parameters with mechanistic processes.

  2. Translation in cell-free systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jagus, R.

    1987-01-01

    The simplest, unambiguous identification of a particular mRNA is the identification of its protein product. This can be established by translation of the mRNA of interest in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. Messenger RNA protein product identification is important in the isolation of a particular mRNA species for cDNA cloning and in the identification of positive cDNA clones. The two high-activity translation systems in common use are those prepared from rabbit reticulocytes and from wheat germ. Both systems are easy to prepare, and both are available commercially. Each has advantages and disadvantages over the other and a choice between the two will depend on the type of mRNAs to be translated, the prejudices of experience, and availability. The main disadvantage of the reticulocyte system is that it requires removal of endogenous mRNA. However, this is a relatively simple procedure. The wheat germ system does not require removal of endogenous mRNA and may translate weakly initiating mRNAs more efficiently. However, ionic optima for translation in the wheat germ system are more sensitive to the nature and concentration of mRNA and may need to be determined for each template. The biggest problem with the use of the wheat germ system is its tendency to produce incomplete translation products due to premature termination.

  3. Alterations of host cell ubiquitination machinery by pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Alomairi, Jaafar; Bonacci, Thomas; Ghigo, Eric; Soubeyran, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Response of immune and non-immune cells to pathogens infections is a very dynamic process. It involves the activation/modulation of many pathways leading to actin remodeling, membrane engulfing, phagocytosis, vesicle trafficking, phagolysosome formation, aiming at the destruction of the intruder. These sophisticated and rapid mechanisms rely on post-translational modifications (PTMs) of key host cells' factors, and bacteria have developed various strategies to manipulate them to favor their survival. Among these important PTMs, ubiquitination has emerged as a major mediator/modulator/regulator of host cells response to infections that pathogens have also learned to use for their own benefit. In this mini-review, we summarize our current knowledge about the normal functions of ubiquitination during host cell infection, and we detail its hijacking by model pathogens to escape clearance and to proliferate. PMID:25774357

  4. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus replication induces host translational shutoff and mRNA decay, with concomitant formation of stress granules and processing bodies.

    PubMed

    Raaben, Matthijs; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Rottier, Peter J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2007-09-01

    Many viruses, including coronaviruses, induce host translational shutoff, while maintaining synthesis of their own gene products. In this study we performed genome-wide microarray analyses of the expression patterns of mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV)-infected cells. At the time of MHV-induced host translational shutoff, downregulation of numerous mRNAs, many of which encode protein translation-related factors, was observed. This downregulation, which is reminiscent of a cellular stress response, was dependent on viral replication and caused by mRNA decay. Concomitantly, phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha was increased in MHV-infected cells. In addition, stress granules and processing bodies appeared, which are sites for mRNA stalling and degradation respectively. We propose that MHV replication induces host translational shutoff by triggering an integrated stress response. However, MHV replication per se does not appear to benefit from the inhibition of host protein synthesis, at least in vitro, since viral replication was not negatively affected but rather enhanced in cells with impaired translational shutoff.

  5. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  6. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina M; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding.

  7. Review on Trypanosoma cruzi: Host Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; Barrias, Emile Santos

    2010-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease, which affects a large number of individuals in Central and South America, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are metacyclic and bloodstream trypomastigote and amastigote. Metacyclic trypomastigotes are released with the feces of the insect while amastigotes and bloodstream trypomastigotes are released from the infected host cells of the vertebrate host after a complex intracellular life cycle. The recognition between parasite and mammalian host cell involves numerous molecules present in both cell types. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between Trypanosoma cruzi and its host cells, mainly emphasizing the mechanisms and molecules that participate in the T. cruzi invasion process of the mammalian cells. PMID:20811486

  8. Translating Stem Cell Biology Into Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Singeç, Ilyas; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cell research has made extraordinary progress over the last decade. The robustness of nuclear reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has created entirely novel opportunities for drug discovery and personalized regenerative medicine. Patient- and disease-specific iPSCs can be expanded indefinitely and differentiated into relevant cell types of different organ systems. As the utilization of iPSCs is becoming a key enabling technology across various scientific disciplines, there are still important challenges that need to be addressed. Here we review the current state and reflect on the issues that the stem cell and translational communities are facing in bringing iPSCs closer to clinical application.

  9. Translational control in germline stem cell development

    PubMed Central

    Slaidina, Maija

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision. PMID:25313405

  10. Translational control in germline stem cell development.

    PubMed

    Slaidina, Maija; Lehmann, Ruth

    2014-10-13

    Stem cells give rise to tissues and organs during development and maintain their integrity during adulthood. They have the potential to self-renew or differentiate at each division. To ensure proper organ growth and homeostasis, self-renewal versus differentiation decisions need to be tightly controlled. Systematic genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster are revealing extensive regulatory networks that control the switch between stem cell self-renewal and differentiation in the germline. These networks, which are based primarily on mutual translational repression, act via interlocked feedback loops to provide robustness to this important fate decision.

  11. Penetration of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abram, Dinah; e Melo, J. Castro; Chou, D.

    1974-01-01

    Electron microscopy reveals that, in Bdellovibrio infection, after the formation of a passage pore in the host cell wall, the differentiated parasite penetration pole is associated with the host protoplast. This firm contact persists throughout the parasite penetration and after this process is completed. In penetrated hosts this contact is also apparent by phase microscopy. The association between the walls of the parasite and the host at the passage pore, on the other hand, is transient. Bdellovibrio do not penetrate hosts whose protoplast and cell walls are separated by plasmolysis, or in which the membrane-wall relationship is affected by low turgor pressure. It is concluded, therefore, that for penetration to occur it is essential that the host protoplast be within reach of the parasite, so that a firm contact can be established between them. A penetration mechanism is proposed that is effected by forces generated by fluxes of water and solutes due to structural changes in the infected host envelope. These forces cause a differential expansion of the host protoplast and cell wall and their separation from each other around the entry site, while the parasite remains firmly anchored to the host protoplast. Consequently, the parasite ends up enclosed in the expanded host periplasm. The actual entry, therefore, is a passive act of the parasite. Images PMID:4208138

  12. Enterovirus-induced miR-141 contributes to shutoff of host protein translation by targeting the translation initiation factor eIF4E.

    PubMed

    Ho, Bing-Ching; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Hong, Qi-Sheng; Singh, Sher; Kao, Chuan-Liang; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Su, Kang-Yi; Li, Ker-Chau; Cheng, Chiou-Ling; Cheng, Hao-Wei; Lee, Jen-Yi; Lee, Chun-Nan; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2011-01-20

    Viruses rely on the host translation machinery to complete their life cycles. Picornaviruses use an internal ribosome entry site to initiate cap-independent protein translation and in parallel host cap-dependent translation is shut off. This process is thought to occur primarily via cleavage of host translation initiation factors eIF4GI and eIF4GII by viral proteases. Here we describe another mechanism whereby miR-141 induced upon enterovirus infection targets the cap-dependent translation initiation factor, eIF4E, for shutoff of host protein synthesis. Knockdown of miR-141 reduces viral propagation, and silencing of eIF4E can completely reverse the inhibitory effect of the miR-141 antagomiR on viral propagation. Ectopic expression of miR-141 promotes the switch from cap-dependent to cap-independent translation. Moreover, we identified a transcription factor, EGR1, which is partly responsible for miR-141 induction in response to enterovirus infection. Our results suggest that upregulation of miR-141 upon enterovirus infection can facilitate viral propagation by expediting the translational switch.

  13. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell.

    PubMed

    Di Russo Case, Elizabeth; Samuel, James E

    2016-02-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without their hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH and contains degradative enzymes and reactive oxygen species, resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, such as Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia, escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  14. Contrasting Lifestyles Within the Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Case, Elizabeth Di Russo; Samuel, James E.

    2015-01-01

    CHAPTER SUMMARY Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved to exploit the protected niche provided within the boundaries of a eukaryotic host cell. Upon entering a host cell, some bacteria can evade the adaptive immune response of its host, and replicate in a relatively nutrient-rich environment devoid of competition from other host flora. Growth within a host cell is not without its hazards, however. Many pathogens enter their hosts through receptor-mediated endocytosis or phagocytosis, two intracellular trafficking pathways that terminate in a highly degradative organelle, the phagolysosome. This usually deadly compartment is maintained at a low pH, and contains degradative enzymes, and reactive oxygen species resulting in an environment to which few bacterial species are adapted. Some intracellular pathogens, like Shigella, Listeria, Francisella, and Rickettsia escape the phagosome to replicate within the cytosol of the host cell. Bacteria that remain within a vacuole either alter the trafficking of their initial phagosomal compartment or adapt to survive within the harsh environment it will soon become. In this chapter, we focus on the mechanisms by which different vacuolar pathogens either evade lysosomal fusion, as in the case of Mycobacterium and Chlamydia, or allow interaction with lysosomes to varying degrees, such as Brucella and Coxiella, and their specific adaptations to inhabit a replicative niche. PMID:26999394

  15. Stem cell therapy for CHD: towards translation.

    PubMed

    Wehman, Brody; Siddiqui, Osama T; Mishra, Rachana; Sharma, Sudhish; Kaushal, Sunjay

    2015-08-01

    Stem cell therapy has the optimistic goal of regenerating the myocardium as defined by re-growth of lost or destroyed myocardium. As applied to patients with heart failure, many confuse or limit the regenerative definition to just improving myocardial function and/or decreasing myocardial scar formation, which may not be the most important clinical outcome to achieve in this promising field of molecular medicine. Many different stem cell-based therapies have been tested and have demonstrated a safe and feasible profile in adult patients with heart failure, but with varied efficacious end points reported. Although not achieved as of yet, the encompassing goal to regenerate the heart is still believed to be within reach using these cell-based therapies in adult patients with heart failure, as the first-generation therapies are now being tested in different phases of clinical trials. Similar efforts to foster the translation of stem cell therapy to children with heart failure have, however, been limited. In this review, we aim to summarise the findings from pre-clinical models and clinical experiences to date that have focussed on the evaluation of stem cell therapy in children with heart failure. Finally, we present methodological considerations pertinent to the design of a stem cell-based trial for children with heart failure, as they represent a population of patients with very different sets of issues when compared with adult patients. As has been taught by many learned clinicians, children are not small adults!

  16. GUIDED STEM CELL CARDIOPOIESIS: DISCOVERY AND TRANSLATION

    PubMed Central

    Behfar, Atta; Faustino, Randolph S; Arrell, D Kent; Dzeja, Petras P; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2008-01-01

    Over 1,000 patients have participated worldwide in clinical trials exploring the therapeutic value of bone marrow-derived cells in ischemic heart disease. Meta-analysis evaluation of this global effort indicates that adult stem cell therapy is in general safe, but yields a rather modest level of improvement in cardiac function and structural remodeling in the setting of acute myocardial infarction or chronic heart failure. Although promising, the potential of translating adult stem cell-based therapy from bench to bedside has yet to be fully realized. Inter-trial and inter-patient variability contribute to disparity in the regenerative potential of transplanted stem cells with unpredictable efficacy on follow-up. Strategies that mimic the natural embryonic program for uniform recruitment of cardiogenic progenitors from adult sources are currently tested to secure consistent outcome. Guided cardiopoiesis has been implemented with mesenchymal stem cells obtained from the bone marrow of healthy volunteers, using a cocktail of secreted proteins that recapitulate components of the endodermal secretome critical for cardiogenic induction of the embryonic mesoderm. With appropriate validation of this newly derived cardiopoietic phenotype, the next generation of trials should achieve demonstrable benefit across patient populations. PMID:18835562

  17. HIV: master of the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Christopher W; Littman, Dan R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus has evolved various mechanisms to exploit its host cells, including the interruption and augmentation of signal transduction pathways. Recently, two DNA microarray studies have illustrated a remarkably broad-based perturbation in host transcriptional responses, which is in part mediated by the HIV-encoded Nef protein. HIV therefore seems to function as a 'master regulator' of cellular gene expression. PMID:11737949

  18. Exploitation of host cells by Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Mark P; Galyov, Edouard E

    2004-04-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved mechanisms to enter and exit eukaryotic cells using the power of actin polymerisation and to subvert the activity of cellular enzymes and signal transduction pathways. The proteins deployed by bacteria to subvert cellular processes often mimic eukaryotic proteins in their structure or function. Studies on the exploitation of host cells by the facultative intracellular pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei are providing novel insights into the pathogenesis of melioidosis, a serious invasive disease of animals and humans that is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas. B. pseudomallei can invade epithelial cells, survive and proliferate inside phagocytes, escape from endocytic vesicles, form actin-based membrane protrusions and induce host cell fusion. Here we review current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes.

  19. Mechanisms employed by retroviruses to exploit host factors for translational control of a complicated proteome.

    PubMed

    Bolinger, Cheryl; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses have evolved multiple strategies to direct the synthesis of a complex proteome from a single primary transcript. Their mechanisms are modulated by a breadth of virus-host interactions, which are of significant fundamental interest because they ultimately affect the efficiency of virus replication and disease pathogenesis. Motifs located within the untranslated region (UTR) of the retroviral RNA have established roles in transcriptional trans-activation, RNA packaging, and genome reverse transcription; and a growing literature has revealed a necessary role of the UTR in modulating the efficiency of viral protein synthesis. Examples include a 5' UTR post-transcriptional control element (PCE), present in at least eight retroviruses, that interacts with cellular RNA helicase A to facilitate cap-dependent polyribosome association; and 3' UTR constitutive transport element (CTE) of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus that interacts with Tap/NXF1 and SR protein 9G8 to facilitate RNA export and translational utilization. By contrast, nuclear protein hnRNP E1 negatively modulates HIV-1 Gag, Env, and Rev protein synthesis. Alternative initiation strategies by ribosomal frameshifting and leaky scanning enable polycistronic translation of the cap-dependent viral transcript. Other studies posit cap-independent translation initiation by internal ribosome entry at structural features of the 5' UTR of selected retroviruses. The retroviral armamentarium also commands mechanisms to counter cellular post-transcriptional innate defenses, including protein kinase R, 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase and the small RNA pathway. This review will discuss recent and historically-recognized insights into retrovirus translational control. The expanding knowledge of retroviral post-transcriptional control is vital to understanding the biology of the retroviral proteome. In a broad perspective, each new insight offers a prospective target for antiviral therapy and strategic improvement of gene

  20. An Update on Translating Stem Cell Therapy for Stroke from Bench to Bedside

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Travis; Metcalf, Christopher; Mosley, Yusef I.; Sullivan, Robert; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Pabon, Mibel; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; van Loveren, Harry; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    With a constellation of stem cell sources available, researchers hope to utilize their potential for cellular repair as a therapeutic target for disease. However, many lab-to-clinic translational considerations must be given in determining their efficacy, variables such as the host response, effects on native tissue, and potential for generating tumors. This review will discuss the current knowledge of stem cell research in neurological disease, mainly stroke, with a focus on the benefits, limitations, and clinical potential. PMID:25177494

  1. Mammalian orthoreovirus escape from host translational shutoff correlates with stress granule disruption and is independent of eIF2alpha phosphorylation and PKR.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qingsong; Carroll, Kate; Hastings, Craig; Miller, Cathy L

    2011-09-01

    In response to mammalian orthoreovirus (MRV) infection, cells initiate a stress response that includes eIF2α phosphorylation and protein synthesis inhibition. We have previously shown that early in infection, MRV activation of eIF2α phosphorylation results in the formation of cellular stress granules (SGs). In this work, we show that as infection proceeds, MRV disrupts SGs despite sustained levels of phosphorylated eIF2α and, further, interferes with the induction of SGs by other stress inducers. MRV interference with SG formation occurs downstream of eIF2α phosphorylation, suggesting the virus uncouples the cellular stress signaling machinery from SG formation. We additionally examined mRNA translation in the presence of SGs induced by eIF2α phosphorylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We found that irrespective of eIF2α phosphorylation status, the presence of SGs in cells correlated with inhibition of viral and cellular translation. In contrast, MRV disruption of SGs correlated with the release of viral mRNAs from translational inhibition, even in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2α. Viral mRNAs were also translated in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2α in PKR(-/-) cells. These results suggest that MRV escape from host cell translational shutoff correlates with virus-induced SG disruption and occurs in the presence of phosphorylated eIF2α in a PKR-independent manner.

  2. Parasite calcineurin regulates host cell recognition and attachment by apicomplexans

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Aditya S.; Saha, Sudeshna; Engelberg, Klemens; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Coleman, Bradley I.; Kosber, Aziz L.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Ganter, Markus; Espy, Nicole; Gilberger, Tim W.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Apicomplexans invade a variety of metazoan host cells through mechanisms involving host cell receptor engagement and secretion of parasite factors to facilitate cellular attachment. We find that the parasite homolog of calcineurin, a calcium-regulated phosphatase complex central to signal transduction in eukaryotes, also contributes to host cell invasion by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and related Toxoplasma gondii. Using reverse genetic and chemical-genetic approaches, we determine that calcineurin critically regulates and stabilizes attachment of extracellular P. falciparum to host erythrocytes before intracellular entry and has similar functions in host cell engagement by T. gondii. Calcineurin-mediated Plasmodium invasion is strongly associated with host receptors required for host cell recognition and calcineurin function distinguishes this form of receptor-mediated attachment from a second mode of host-parasite adhesion independent of host receptors. This specific role of calcineurin in coordinating physical interactions with host cells highlights an ancestral mechanism for parasitism used by apicomplexans. PMID:26118996

  3. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag–Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins. PMID:27329342

  4. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  5. Tissue morphodynamics: Translating planar polarity cues into polarized cell behaviors.

    PubMed

    Devenport, Danelle

    2016-07-01

    The ability of cells to collectively orient and align their behaviors is essential in multicellular organisms for unidirectional cilia beating, collective cell movements, oriented cell divisions, and asymmetric cell fate specification. The planar cell polarity pathway coordinates a vast and diverse array of collective cell behaviors by intersecting with downstream pathways that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and intercellular signaling. How the planar polarity pathway translates directional cues to produce polarized cell behaviors is the focus of this review.

  6. Stem cell hype: media portrayal of therapy translation.

    PubMed

    Kamenova, Kalina; Caulfield, Timothy

    2015-03-11

    In this Perspective, we examine the portrayal of translational stem cell research in major daily newspapers in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom between 2010 and 2013, focusing on how timelines for stem cell therapies were represented before and after Geron terminated its pioneering stem cell program. Our content analysis reveals that press coverage has shifted from ethical, legal, and social issues to clinical translation issues, and highly optimistic timelines were provided with no substantial change in representation over time. Scientists were the dominant voice with respect to translation timelines. The findings raise questions about the degree to which the media's overly optimistic slant fosters unrealistic expectations regarding the speed of clinical translation and highlight the ethical responsibility of stem cell researchers as public communicators.

  7. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify L. pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoebae hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 134...

  8. Counting Legionella cells within single amoeba host cells.

    PubMed

    Buse, Helen Y; Ashbolt, Nicholas J

    2012-03-01

    Here we present the first attempt to quantify Legionella pneumophila cell numbers within individual amoeba hosts that may be released into engineered water systems. The maximum numbers of culturable L. pneumophila cells grown within Acanthamoeba polyphaga and Naegleria fowleri were 1,348 (mean, 329) and 385 (mean, 44) CFU trophozoite(-1), respectively.

  9. Our Fat Future: Translating Adipose Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nordberg, Rachel C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human adipose stem cells (hASCs) have the potential to treat patients with a variety of clinical conditions. Recent advancements in translational research, regulatory policy, and industry have positioned hASCs on the threshold of clinical translation. We discuss the progress and challenges of bringing adipose stem cell therapy into mainstream clinical use. Significance This article details the advances made in recent years that have helped move human adipose stem cell therapy toward mainstream clinical use from a translational research, regulatory policy, and industrial standpoint. Four recurrent themes in translational technology as they pertain to human adipose stem cells are discussed: automated closed-system operations, biosensors and real-time monitoring, biomimetics, and rapid manufacturing. In light of recent FDA guidance documents, regulatory concerns about adipose stem cell therapy are discussed. Finally, an update is provided on the current state of clinical trials and the emerging industry that uses human adipose stem cells. This article is expected to stimulate future studies in translational adipose stem cell research. PMID:26185256

  10. At the Edge of Translation – Materials to Program Cells for Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Arany, Praveen R; Mooney, David J

    2010-01-01

    The rapid advancement in basic biology knowledge, especially in the stem cell field, has created new opportunities to develop biomaterials capable of orchestrating the behavior of transplanted and host cells. Based on our current understanding of cellular differentiation, a conceptual framework for the use of materials to program cells in situ is presented, namely a domino versus a switchboard model, to highlight the use of single versus multiple cues in a controlled manner to modulate biological processes. Further, specific design principles of material systems to present soluble and insoluble cues that are capable of recruiting, programming and deploying host cells for various applications are presented. The evolution of biomaterials from simple inert substances used to fill defects, to the recent development of sophisticated material systems capable of programming cells in situ is providing a platform to translate our understanding of basic biological mechanisms to clinical care. PMID:20860763

  11. Electroporation of Alphavirus RNA Translational Reporters into Fibroblastic and Myeloid Cells as a Tool to Study the Innate Immune System.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Christina L; Trobaugh, Derek W; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2016-01-01

    The ability to transfect synthetic mRNAs into cells to measure processes such as translation efficiency or mRNA decay has been an invaluable tool in cell biology. The use of electroporation over other methods of transfection is an easy, inexpensive, highly efficient, and scalable method to introduce synthetic mRNA into a wide range of cell types. More recently, coupling of noncoding RNA sequences or protein coding regions from viral pathogens to fluorescent or bioluminescence proteins in RNA "reporters" has permitted study of host-pathogen interactions. These can range from virus infection of cells to translation of the viral genome, replication and stability of viral RNAs, or the efficacy of host antiviral responses. In this chapter, we describe a method for electroporating viral RNA reporters into both fibroblastic and myeloid cells that encode firefly or Renilla luciferase, whose reaction with specific substrates and light emitting activity is a measure of viral RNA translation efficiency. We have used this method to examine host interferon-dependent responses that inhibit viral translation along with identifying secondary structures in the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) and microRNA binding sites in the 3' NTR that are responsible for antagonizing the host innate immune responses and restricting viral cell tropism. PMID:27236796

  12. Translational aspects of cardiac cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-Han; Sereti, Konstantina-Ioanna; Wu, Benjamin M; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy has been intensely studied for over a decade as a potential treatment for ischaemic heart disease. While initial trials using skeletal myoblasts, bone marrow cells and peripheral blood stem cells showed promise in improving cardiac function, benefits were found to be short-lived likely related to limited survival and engraftment of the delivered cells. The discovery of putative cardiac ‘progenitor’ cells as well as the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells has led to the delivery of cells potentially capable of electromechanical integration into existing tissue. An alternative strategy involving either direct reprogramming of endogenous cardiac fibroblasts or stimulation of resident cardiomyocytes to regenerate new myocytes can potentially overcome the limitations of exogenous cell delivery. Complimentary approaches utilizing combination cell therapy and bioengineering techniques may be necessary to provide the proper milieu for clinically significant regeneration. Clinical trials employing bone marrow cells, mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac progenitor cells have demonstrated safety of catheter based cell delivery, with suggestion of limited improvement in ventricular function and reduction in infarct size. Ongoing trials are investigating potential benefits to outcome such as morbidity and mortality. These and future trials will clarify the optimal cell types and delivery conditions for therapeutic effect. PMID:26119413

  13. Translational research of adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Gen

    2015-11-26

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) secondary to chronic coronary artery disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality world-wide. Its prevalence is increasing despite advances in medical and device therapies. Cell based therapies generating new cardiomyocytes and vessels have emerged as a promising treatment to reverse functional deterioration and prevent the progression to CHF. Functional efficacy of progenitor cells isolated from the bone marrow and the heart have been evaluated in preclinical large animal models. Furthermore, several clinical trials using autologous and allogeneic stem cells and progenitor cells have demonstrated their safety in humans yet their clinical relevance is inconclusive. This review will discuss the clinical therapeutic applications of three specific adult stem cells that have shown particularly promising regenerative effects in preclinical studies, bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cell, heart derived cardiosphere-derived cell and cardiac stem cell. We will also discuss future therapeutic approaches.

  14. Clinical translation of stem cells: insight for cartilage therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer K.; Responte, Donald J.; Cissell, Derek D.; Hu, Jerry C.; Nolta, Jan A.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    The limited regenerative capacity of articular cartilage and deficiencies of current treatments have motivated the investigation of new repair technologies. In vitro cartilage generation using primary cell sources is limited by cell availability and expansion potential. Pluripotent stem cells possess the capacity for chondrocytic differentiation and extended expansion, providing a potential future solution to cell-based cartilage regeneration. However, despite successes in producing cartilage using adult and embryonic stem cells, the translation of these technologies to the clinic has been severely limited. This review discusses recent advances in stem cell-based cartilage tissue engineering and the major current limitations to clinical translation of these products. Concerns regarding appropriate animal models and studies, stem cell manufacturing, and relevant regulatory processes and guidelines will be addressed. Understanding the significant hurdles limiting the clinical use of stem cell-based cartilage may guide future developments in the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:24083452

  15. TISdb: a database for alternative translation initiation in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ji; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Proper selection of the translation initiation site (TIS) on mRNAs is crucial for the production of desired protein products. Recent studies using ribosome profiling technology uncovered a surprising variety of potential TIS sites in addition to the annotated start codon. The prevailing alternative translation reshapes the landscape of the proteome in terms of diversity and complexity. To identify the hidden coding potential of the transcriptome in mammalian cells, we developed global translation initiation sequencing (GTI-Seq) that maps genome-wide TIS positions at nearly a single nucleotide resolution. To facilitate studies of alternative translation, we created a database of alternative TIS sites identified from human and mouse cell lines based on multiple GTI-Seq replicates. The TISdb, available at http://tisdb.human.cornell.edu, includes 6991 TIS sites from 4961 human genes and 9973 TIS sites from 5668 mouse genes. The TISdb website provides a simple browser interface for query of high-confidence TIS sites and their associated open reading frames. The output of search results provides a user-friendly visualization of TIS information in the context of transcript isoforms. Together, the information in the database provides an easy reference for alternative translation in mammalian cells and will support future investigation of novel translational products.

  16. Clinical Translation of Stem Cells in Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A.; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurode-generative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:22305565

  17. Clinical translation of stem cells in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Olle; Barker, Roger A; Brüstle, Oliver; Isacson, Ole; Svendsen, Clive N

    2012-02-01

    Stem cells and their derivatives show tremendous potential for treating many disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss here the challenges and potential for the translation of stem-cell-based approaches into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  18. A Tale of Two RNAs during Viral Infection: How Viruses Antagonize mRNAs and Small Non-Coding RNAs in The Host Cell

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Kristina M.; Nag, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection initiates an array of changes in host gene expression. Many viruses dampen host protein expression and attempt to evade the host anti-viral defense machinery. Host gene expression is suppressed at several stages of host messenger RNA (mRNA) formation including selective degradation of translationally competent messenger RNAs. Besides mRNAs, host cells also express a variety of noncoding RNAs, including small RNAs, that may also be subject to inhibition upon viral infection. In this review we focused on different ways viruses antagonize coding and noncoding RNAs in the host cell to its advantage. PMID:27271653

  19. Infrastructure development for human cell therapy translation.

    PubMed

    Dietz, A B; Padley, D J; Gastineau, D A

    2007-09-01

    The common conception of a drug is that of a chemical with defined medicinal effect. However, cells used as drugs remain critical to patient care. Cell therapy's origins began with the realization that complex tissues such as blood can retain function when transplanted to the patient. More complex transplantation followed, culminating with the understanding that transplantation of some tissues such as bone marrow may act medicinally. Administration of cells with an intended therapeutic effect is a hallmark of cellular therapy. While cells have been used as drugs for decades, testing a specific therapeutic effect of cells has begun clinical testing relatively recently. Lessons learned during the establishment of blood banking (including the importance of quality control, process control, sterility, and product tracking) are key components in the assurance of the safety and potency of cell therapy preparations. As more academic medical centers and private companies move toward exploiting the full potential of cells as drugs, needs arise for the development of the infrastructure necessary to support these investigations. Careful consideration of the design of the structure used to manufacture is important in terms of the significant capital outlay involved and the facility's role in achieving regulatory compliance. This development perspective describes the regulatory environment surrounding the infrastructure support for cell therapy and practical aspects for design consideration with particular focus on those activities associated with early clinical trials. PMID:17637785

  20. Translational findings from cardiovascular stem cell research.

    PubMed

    Mazhari, Ramesh; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using stem cells to regenerate damaged myocardium has been actively investigated since the late 1990s. Consistent with the traditional view that the heart is a "postmitotic" organ that possesses minimal capacity for self-repair, much of the preclinical and clinical work has focused exclusively on introducing stem cells into the heart, with the hope of differentiation of these cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. This approach is ongoing and retains promise but to date has yielded inconsistent successes. More recently, it has become widely appreciated that the heart possesses endogenous repair mechanisms that, if adequately stimulated, might regenerate damaged cardiac tissue from in situ cardiac stem cells. Accordingly, much recent work has focused on engaging and enhancing endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms. This article reviews the literature on stem cell-based myocardial regeneration, placing emphasis on the mutually enriching interaction between basic and clinical research.

  1. Translational Findings from Cardiovascular Stem Cell Research

    PubMed Central

    Mazhari, Ramesh; Hare, Joshua M

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using stem cells to regenerate damaged myocardium has been actively investigated since the late 1990s. Consistent with the traditional view that the heart is a “post-mitotic” organ that possesses minimal capacity for self-repair, much of the preclinical and clinical work has focused exclusively on introducing stem cells into the heart, with the hope of differentiation of these cells into functioning cardiomyocytes. This approach is ongoing and retains promise but to date has yielded inconsistent successes. More recently, it has become widely appreciated that the heart possesses endogenous repair mechanisms that, if adequately stimulated, might regenerate damaged cardiac tissue from in situ cardiac stem cells. Accordingly, much recent work has focused on engaging and enhancing endogenous cardiac repair mechanisms. This article reviews the literature on stem-cell based myocardial regeneration, placing emphasis on the mutually enriching interaction between basic and clinical research. PMID:22940024

  2. Cell-based therapy technology classifications and translational challenges

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Natalie M.; Ward, Stephen J.; Kefalas, Panos; Hyllner, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapies offer the promise of treating and altering the course of diseases which cannot be addressed adequately by existing pharmaceuticals. Cell therapies are a diverse group across cell types and therapeutic indications and have been an active area of research for many years but are now strongly emerging through translation and towards successful commercial development and patient access. In this article, we present a description of a classification of cell therapies on the basis of their underlying technologies rather than the more commonly used classification by cell type because the regulatory path and manufacturing solutions are often similar within a technology area due to the nature of the methods used. We analyse the progress of new cell therapies towards clinical translation, examine how they are addressing the clinical, regulatory, manufacturing and reimbursement requirements, describe some of the remaining challenges and provide perspectives on how the field may progress for the future. PMID:26416686

  3. Inhibition of the host translation shutoff response by herpes simplex virus 1 triggers nuclear envelope-derived autophagy.

    PubMed

    Radtke, Kerstin; English, Luc; Rondeau, Christiane; Leib, David; Lippé, Roger; Desjardins, Michel

    2013-04-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular pathway that degrades intracellular pathogens and contributes to antigen presentation. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection triggers both macroautophagy and an additional form of autophagy that uses the nuclear envelope as a source of membrane. The present study constitutes the first in-depth analysis of nuclear envelope-derived autophagy (NEDA). We established LC3a as a marker that allowed us to distinguish between NEDA and macroautophagy in both immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. NEDA was observed in many different cell types, indicating that it is a general response to HSV-1 infection. This autophagic pathway is known to depend on the viral protein γ34.5, which can inhibit macroautophagy via binding to beclin-1. Using mutant viruses, we were able to show that binding of beclin-1 by γ34.5 had no effect on NEDA, demonstrating that NEDA is regulated differently than macroautophagy. Instead, NEDA was triggered in response to γ34.5 binding to protein phosphatase 1α, an interaction used by the virus to prevent host cells from shutting off protein translation. NEDA was not triggered when late viral protein production was inhibited with acyclovir or hippuristanol, indicating that the accumulation of these proteins might stress infected cells. Interestingly, expression of the late viral protein gH was sufficient to rescue NEDA in the context of infection with a virus that otherwise does not support strong late viral protein expression. We argue that NEDA is a cellular stress response triggered late during HSV-1 infection and might compensate for the viral alteration of the macroautophagic response.

  4. Preclinical models of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease: how predictive are they for a successful clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-06-23

    Despite major advances in recent years, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). To improve our therapeutic armory against GVHD, preclinical evidence is most frequently generated in mouse and large animal models of GVHD. However, because every model has shortcomings, it is important to understand how predictive the different models are and why certain findings in these models could not be translated into the clinic. Weaknesses of the animal GVHD models include the irradiation only-based conditioning regimen, the homogenous donor/recipient genetics in mice, canine or non-human primates (NHP), anatomic site of T cells used for transfer in mice, the homogenous microbial environment in mice housed under specific pathogen-free conditions, and the lack of pharmacologic GVHD prevention in control groups. Despite these major differences toward clinical allo-HCT, findings generated in animal models of GVHD have led to the current gold standards for GVHD prophylaxis and therapy. The homogenous nature of the preclinical models allows for reproducibility, which is key for the characterization of the role of a new cytokine, chemokine, transcription factor, microRNA, kinase, or immune cell population in the context of GVHD. Therefore, when carefully balancing reasons to apply small and large animal models, it becomes evident that they are valuable tools to generate preclinical hypotheses, which then have to be rigorously evaluated in the clinical setting. In this study, we discuss several clinical approaches that were motivated by preclinical evidence, novel NHP models and their advantages, and highlight the recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of GVHD.

  5. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: new translational therapies.

    PubMed

    Prince, Anthony; Aguirre-Ghizo, Julio; Genden, Eric; Posner, Marshall; Sikora, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma includes cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, and lymph nodes of the neck. Although early disease is amenable to single-modality treatment with surgery or radiation, patients with advanced disease have a dramatically worse prognosis, despite potentially morbid/toxic treatment regimens involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or all 3 modalities. The present review seeks to provide an overview of current understanding and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the nonspecialist clinician or basic/translational researcher, followed by an overview of major translational approaches to the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Translational research topics addressed include targeted molecular therapy, immunotherapy, minimally invasive robotic surgery, and ablation of dormant/residual tumor cells. Despite the many potentially promising avenues of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma research, only 2 new treatment approaches (antiepidermal growth factor receptor therapy and robotic surgery) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the past 30 years. Focused research programs involving integrated teams of clinicians, basic scientists, and translational clinician-researchers have the potential to accelerate discovery and change treatment paradigms for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:21105129

  6. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  7. Translation of tobacco mosaic virus RNA In Acetabularia cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Cairns, E; Sarkar, S; Schweiger, H G

    1978-11-01

    Isolated Acetabularia nuclei were microinjected with Tobacco Mosaic Virus RNA and then implanted into an anucleate posterior fragment of an Acetabularia cell. Injected RNA was translated in the Acetabularia cytoplasm from the first to twelfth day after implantation of the nuclei. The production of specific virus proteins was detected and localized in the Acetabularia cytoplasm by an immunofluorescence precipitation technique.

  8. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4G Is Targeted for Proteolytic Cleavage by Caspase 3 during Inhibition of Translation in Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Lloyd, Richard E.

    1998-01-01

    Although much is known about the multiple mechanisms which induce apoptosis, comparatively little is understood concerning the execution phase of apoptosis and the mechanism(s) of cell killing. Several reports have demonstrated that cellular translation is shut off during apoptosis; however, details of the mechanism of translation inhibition are lacking. Translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) is a crucial protein required for binding cellular mRNA to ribosomes and is known to be cleaved as the central part of the mechanism of host translation shutoff exerted by several animal viruses. Treatment of HeLa cells with the apoptosis inducers cisplatin and etoposide resulted in cleavage of eIF4G, and the extent of its cleavage correlated with the onset and extent of observed inhibition of cellular translation. The eIF4G-specific cleavage activity could be measured in cell lysates in vitro and was inhibited by the caspase inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO at nanomolar concentrations. A combination of in vivo and in vitro inhibitor studies suggest the involvement of one or more caspases in the activation and execution of eIF4G cleavage. Furthermore recombinant human caspase 3 was expressed in bacteria, and when incubated with HeLa cell lysates, was shown to produce the same eIF4G cleavage products as those observed in apoptotic cells. In addition, purified caspase 3 caused cleavage of purified eIF4G, demonstrating that eIF4G could serve as a substrate for caspase 3. Taken together, these data suggest that cellular translation is specifically inhibited during apoptosis by a mechanism involving cleavage of eIF4G, an event dependent on caspase activity. PMID:9819442

  9. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  10. An efficient in vitro translation system from mammalian cells lacking the translational inhibition caused by eIF2 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zeenko, Vladimir V.; Wang, Chuanping; Majumder, Mithu; Komar, Anton A.; Snider, Martin D.; Merrick, William C.; Kaufman, Randal J.; Hatzoglou, Maria

    2008-01-01

    In vitro translation systems are used to investigate translational mechanisms and to synthesize proteins for characterization. Most available mammalian cell-free systems have reduced efficiency due to decreased translation initiation caused by phosphorylation of the initiation factor eIF2α on Ser51. We describe here a novel cell-free protein synthesis system using extracts from cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts that are homozygous for the Ser51 to- Ala mutation in eIF2α (A/A cells). The translation efficiency of a capped and polyadenylated firefly luciferase mRNA in A/A cell extracts was 30-fold higher than in wild-type extracts. Protein synthesis in extracts from A/A cells was active for at least 2 h and generated up to 20 μg/mL of luciferase protein. Additionally, the A/A cell-free system faithfully recapitulated the selectivity of in vivo translation for mRNA features; translation was stimulated by a 5′-end cap (m7GpppN) and a 3′-end poly(A) tail in a synergistic manner. The system also showed similar efficiencies of cap-dependent and IRES-mediated translation (EMCV IRES). Significantly, the A/A cell-free system supported the post-translational modification of proteins, as shown by glycosylation of the HIV type-1 gp120 and cleavage of the signal peptide from β-lactamase. We propose that cell-free systems from A/A cells can be a useful tool for investigating mechanisms of mammalian mRNA translation and for the production of recombinant proteins for molecular studies. In addition, cell-free systems from differentiated cells with the Ser51Ala mutation should provide a means for investigating cell type-specific features of protein synthesis. PMID:18230759

  11. Mechanisms of host cell invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Caradonna, Kacey L; Burleigh, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    One of the more accepted concepts in our understanding of the biology of early Trypanosoma cruzi-host cell interactions is that the mammalian-infective trypomastigote forms of the parasite must transit the host cell lysosomal compartment in order to establish a productive intracellular infection. The acidic environment of the lysosome provides the appropriate conditions for parasite-mediated disruption of the parasitophorous vacuole and release of T. cruzi into the host cell cytosol, where replication of intracellular amastigotes occurs. Recent findings indicate a level of redundancy in the lysosome-targeting process where T. cruzi trypomastigotes exploit different cellular pathways to access host cell lysosomes in non-professional phagocytic cells. In addition, the reversible nature of the host cell penetration process was recently demonstrated when conditions for fusion of the nascent parasite vacuole with the host endosomal-lysosomal system were not met. Thus, the concept of parasite retention as a critical component of the T. cruzi invasion process was introduced. Although it is clear that host cell recognition, attachment and signalling are required to initiate invasion, integration of this knowledge with our understanding of the different routes of parasite entry is largely lacking. In this chapter, we focus on current knowledge of the cellular pathways exploited by T. cruzi trypomastigotes to invade non-professional phagocytic cells and to gain access to the host cell lysosome compartment. PMID:21884886

  12. Interaction of chlamydiae and host cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Moulder, J W

    1991-01-01

    The obligately intracellular bacteria of the genus Chlamydia, which is only remotely related to other eubacterial genera, cause many diseases of humans, nonhuman mammals, and birds. Interaction of chlamydiae with host cells in vitro has been studied as a model of infection in natural hosts and as an example of the adaptation of an organism to an unusual environment, the inside of another living cell. Among the novel adaptations made by chlamydiae have been the substitution of disulfide-bond-cross-linked polypeptides for peptidoglycans and the use of host-generated nucleotide triphosphates as sources of metabolic energy. The effect of contact between chlamydiae and host cells in culture varies from no effect at all to rapid destruction of either chlamydiae or host cells. When successful infection occurs, it is usually followed by production of large numbers of progeny and destruction of host cells. However, host cells containing chlamydiae sometimes continue to divide, with or without overt signs of infection, and chlamydiae may persist indefinitely in cell cultures. Some of the many factors that influence the outcome of chlamydia-host cell interaction are kind of chlamydiae, kind of host cells, mode of chlamydial entry, nutritional adequacy of the culture medium, presence of antimicrobial agents, and presence of immune cells and soluble immune factors. General characteristics of chlamydial multiplication in cells of their natural hosts are reproduced in established cell lines, but reproduction in vitro of the subtle differences in chlamydial behavior responsible for the individuality of the different chlamydial diseases will require better in vitro models. PMID:2030670

  13. Methods for production of proteins in host cells

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2004-01-13

    The present invention provides methods for the production of proteins, particularly toxic proteins, in host cells. The invention provides methods which use a fusion protein comprising a chaperonin binding domain in host cells induced or regulated to have increased levels of chaperonin which binds the chaperonin binding domain.

  14. Host cells and methods for production of isobutanol

    DOEpatents

    Anthony, Larry Cameron; He, Hongxian; Huang, Lixuan Lisa; Okeefe, Daniel P.; Kruckeberg, Arthur Leo; Li, Yougen; Maggio-Hall, Lori Ann; McElvain, Jessica; Nelson, Mark J.; Patnaik, Ranjan; Rothman, Steven Cary

    2016-08-23

    Provided herein are recombinant yeast host cells and methods for their use for production of isobutanol. Yeast host cells provided comprise an isobutanol biosynthetic pathway and at least one of reduced or eliminated aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, reduced or eliminated acetolactate reductase activity; or a heterologous polynucleotide encoding a polypeptide having ketol-acid reductoisomerase activity.

  15. Aminoglycoside resistance 16S rRNA methyltransferases block endogenous methylation, affect translation efficiency and fitness of the host

    PubMed Central

    Lioy, Virginia S.; Goussard, Sylvie; Guerineau, Vincent; Yoon, Eun-Jeong; Courvalin, Patrice; Galimand, Marc; Grillot-Courvalin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, acquired 16S rRNA methyltransferases ArmA and NpmA confer high-level resistance to all clinically useful aminoglycosides by modifying, respectively, G1405 and A1408 in the A-site. These enzymes must coexist with several endogenous methyltransferases that are essential for fine-tuning of the decoding center, such as RsmH and RsmI in Escherichia coli, which methylate C1402 and RsmF C1407. The resistance methyltransferases have a contrasting distribution—ArmA has spread worldwide, whereas a single clinical isolate producing NpmA has been reported. The rate of dissemination of resistance depends on the fitness cost associated with its expression. We have compared ArmA and NpmA in isogenic Escherichia coli harboring the corresponding structural genes and their inactive point mutants cloned under the control of their native constitutive promoter in the stable plasmid pGB2. Growth rate determination and competition experiments showed that ArmA had a fitness cost due to methylation of G1405, whereas NpmA conferred only a slight disadvantage to the host due to production of the enzyme. MALDI MS indicated that ArmA impeded one of the methylations at C1402 by RsmI, and not at C1407 as previously proposed, whereas NpmA blocked the activity of RsmF at C1407. A dual luciferase assay showed that methylation at G1405 and A1408 and lack of methylation at C1407 affect translation accuracy. These results indicate that resistance methyltransferases impair endogenous methylation with different consequences on cell fitness. PMID:24398977

  16. The cis-acting replication element of the Hepatitis C virus genome recruits host factors that influence viral replication and translation

    PubMed Central

    Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The cis-acting replication element (CRE) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome is a region of conserved sequence and structure at the 3′ end of the open reading frame. It participates in a complex and dynamic RNA-RNA interaction network involving, among others, essential functional domains of the 3′ untranslated region and the internal ribosome entry site located at the 5′ terminus of the viral genome. A proper balance between all these contacts is critical for the control of viral replication and translation, and is likely dependent on host factors. Proteomic analyses identified a collection of proteins from a hepatoma cell line as CRE-interacting candidates. A large fraction of these were RNA-binding proteins sharing highly conserved RNA recognition motifs. The vast majority of these proteins were validated by bioinformatics tools that consider RNA-protein secondary structure. Further characterization of representative proteins indicated that hnRNPA1 and HMGB1 exerted negative effects on viral replication in a subgenomic HCV replication system. Furthermore DDX5 and PARP1 knockdown reduced the HCV IRES activity, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in HCV translation. The identification of all these host factors provides new clues regarding the function of the CRE during viral cycle progression. PMID:27165399

  17. The cis-acting replication element of the Hepatitis C virus genome recruits host factors that influence viral replication and translation.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Marco, Pablo; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The cis-acting replication element (CRE) of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA genome is a region of conserved sequence and structure at the 3' end of the open reading frame. It participates in a complex and dynamic RNA-RNA interaction network involving, among others, essential functional domains of the 3' untranslated region and the internal ribosome entry site located at the 5' terminus of the viral genome. A proper balance between all these contacts is critical for the control of viral replication and translation, and is likely dependent on host factors. Proteomic analyses identified a collection of proteins from a hepatoma cell line as CRE-interacting candidates. A large fraction of these were RNA-binding proteins sharing highly conserved RNA recognition motifs. The vast majority of these proteins were validated by bioinformatics tools that consider RNA-protein secondary structure. Further characterization of representative proteins indicated that hnRNPA1 and HMGB1 exerted negative effects on viral replication in a subgenomic HCV replication system. Furthermore DDX5 and PARP1 knockdown reduced the HCV IRES activity, suggesting an involvement of these proteins in HCV translation. The identification of all these host factors provides new clues regarding the function of the CRE during viral cycle progression. PMID:27165399

  18. Control of Host Cell Phosphorylation by Legionella Pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Haenssler, Eva; Isberg, Ralph R.

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the most frequent modifications in intracellular signaling and is implicated in many processes ranging from transcriptional control to signal transduction in innate immunity. Many pathogens modulate host cell phosphorylation pathways to promote growth and establish an infectious disease. The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila targets and exploits the host phosphorylation system throughout the infection cycle as part of its strategy to establish an environment beneficial for replication. Key to this manipulation is the L. pneumophila Icm/Dot type IV secretion system, which translocates bacterial proteins into the host cytosol that can act directly on phosphorylation cascades. This review will focus on the different stages of L. pneumophila infection, in which host kinases and phosphatases contribute to infection of the host cell and promote intracellular survival of the pathogen. This includes the involvement of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases during phagocytosis as well as the role of phosphoinositide metabolism during the establishment of the replication vacuole. Furthermore, L. pneumophila infection modulates the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, two signaling pathways that are central to the host innate immune response and involved in regulation of host cell survival. Therefore, L. pneumophila infection manipulates host cell signal transduction by phosphorylation at multiple levels. PMID:21747787

  19. Cancer stem cells in basic science and in translational oncology: can we translate into clinical application?

    PubMed

    Schulenburg, Axel; Blatt, Katharina; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Sadovnik, Irina; Herrmann, Harald; Marian, Brigitte; Grunt, Thomas W; Zielinski, Christoph C; Valent, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Since their description and identification in leukemias and solid tumors, cancer stem cells (CSC) have been the subject of intensive research in translational oncology. Indeed, recent advances have led to the identification of CSC markers, CSC targets, and the preclinical and clinical evaluation of the CSC-eradicating (curative) potential of various drugs. However, although diverse CSC markers and targets have been identified, several questions remain, such as the origin and evolution of CSC, mechanisms underlying resistance of CSC against various targeted drugs, and the biochemical basis and function of stroma cell-CSC interactions in the so-called 'stem cell niche.' Additional aspects that have to be taken into account when considering CSC elimination as primary treatment-goal are the genomic plasticity and extensive subclone formation of CSC. Notably, various cell fractions with different combinations of molecular aberrations and varying proliferative potential may display CSC function in a given neoplasm, and the related molecular complexity of the genome in CSC subsets is considered to contribute essentially to disease evolution and acquired drug resistance. In the current article, we discuss new developments in the field of CSC research and whether these new concepts can be exploited in clinical practice in the future.

  20. SBML and CellML translation in Antimony and JSim

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lucian P.; Butterworth, Erik; Bassingthwaighte, James B.; Sauro, Herbert M.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The creation and exchange of biologically relevant models is of great interest to many researchers. When multiple standards are in use, models are more readily used and re-used if there exist robust translators between the various accepted formats. Summary: Antimony 2.4 and JSim 2.10 provide translation capabilities from their own formats to SBML and CellML. All provided unique challenges, stemming from differences in each format’s inherent design, in addition to differences in functionality. Availability and implementation: Both programs are available under BSD licenses; Antimony from http://antimony.sourceforge.net/and JSim from http://physiome.org/jsim/. Contact: lpsmith@u.washington.edu PMID:24215024

  1. Malaria Sporozoites Traverse Host Cells within Transient Vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Risco-Castillo, Veronica; Topçu, Selma; Marinach, Carine; Manzoni, Giulia; Bigorgne, Amélie E; Briquet, Sylvie; Baudin, Xavier; Lebrun, Maryse; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier

    2015-11-11

    Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the host skin by Anopheles mosquitoes. The parasites migrate from the dermis to the liver, where they invade hepatocytes through a moving junction (MJ) to form a replicative parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Malaria sporozoites need to traverse cells during progression through host tissues, a process requiring parasite perforin-like protein 1 (PLP1). We find that sporozoites traverse cells inside transient vacuoles that precede PV formation. Sporozoites initially invade cells inside transient vacuoles by an active MJ-independent process that does not require vacuole membrane remodeling or release of parasite secretory organelles typically involved in invasion. Sporozoites use pH sensing and PLP1 to exit these vacuoles and avoid degradation by host lysosomes. Next, parasites enter the MJ-dependent PV, which has a different membrane composition, precluding lysosome fusion. The malaria parasite has thus evolved different strategies to evade host cell defense and establish an intracellular niche for replication.

  2. Coral host cells acidify symbiotic algal microenvironment to promote photosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Venn, Alexander A.; Perez, Sidney O.; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tresguerres, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Symbiotic dinoflagellate algae residing inside coral tissues supply the host with the majority of their energy requirements through the translocation of photosynthetically fixed carbon. The algae, in turn, rely on the host for the supply of inorganic carbon. Carbon must be concentrated as CO2 in order for photosynthesis to proceed, and here we show that the coral host plays an active role in this process. The host-derived symbiosome membrane surrounding the algae abundantly expresses vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA), which acidifies the symbiosome space down to pH ∼4. Inhibition of VHA results in a significant decrease in average H+ activity in the symbiosome of up to 75% and a significant reduction in O2 production rate, a measure of photosynthetic activity. These results suggest that host VHA is part of a previously unidentified carbon concentrating mechanism for algal photosynthesis and provide mechanistic evidence that coral host cells can actively modulate the physiology of their symbionts. PMID:25548188

  3. Development of a novel xenotransplantation strategy for treatment of diabetes mellitus in rat hosts and translation to non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Hammerman, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation therapy for diabetes is limited by unavailability of donor organs and outcomes complicated by immunosuppressive drug toxicity. Xenotransplantation is a strategy to overcome supply problems. Implantation of tissue obtained early during embryogenesis is a way to reduce transplant immunogenicity. Insulin-producing cells originating from embryonic pig pancreas obtained very early following pancreatic primordium formation [embryonic day 28 (E28)] engraft long-term in inbred diabetic Lewis or Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats or rhesus macaques. Endocrine cells originating from embryonic pig pancreas transplanted in host mesentery migrate to mesenteric lymph nodes, engraft, normalize glucose tolerance in rats and improve glucose tolerance in rhesus macaques without the need for immune suppression. Engraftment of primordia is permissive for engraftment of an insulin-expressing cell component from porcine islets implanted subsequently without immune suppression. Similarities between findings in inbred rat and non-human primate hosts bode well for successful translation to humans of what could be a novel xenotransplantation strategy for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22699748

  4. Long live the stem cell: the use of stem cells isolated from post mortem tissues for translational strategies.

    PubMed

    Hodgetts, Stuart I; Stagg, Kelda; Sturm, Marian; Edel, Michael; Blancafort, Pilar

    2014-11-01

    The "stem cell" has become arguably one of the most important biological tools in the arsenal of translational research directed at regeneration and repair. It remains to be seen whether every tissue has its own stem cell niche, although relatively recently a large amount of research has focused on isolating and characterizing tissue-specific stem cell populations, as well as those that are able to be directed to transdifferentiate into a variety of different lineages. Traditionally, stem cells are isolated from the viable tissue of embryonic, fetal, or adult living hosts; from "fresh" donated tissues that have been surgically or otherwise removed (biopsies), or obtained directly from tissues within minutes to several hours post mortem (PM). These human progenitor/stem cell sources remain potentially highly controversial, since they are accompanied by various still-unresolved ethical, social, moral and legal challenges. Due to the limited number of "live" donors, the small amount of material obtained from biopsies and difficulties during purification processes, harvesting from cadaveric material presents itself as an alternative strategy that could provide a hitherto untapped source of stem cells. However, PM stem cells are not without their own unique set of limitations including difficulty of obtaining samples, limited supply of material, variations in delay between death and sample collection, possible lack of medication history and suboptimal retrospective assignment of diagnostic and demographic data. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: The challenge of translation.

  5. Host cells and methods for producing isoprenyl alkanoates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Taek Soon; Fortman, Jeffrey L.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides for a method of producing an isoprenyl alkanoate in a genetically modified host cell. In one embodiment, the method comprises culturing a genetically modified host cell which expresses an enzyme capable of catalyzing the esterification of an isoprenol and a straight-chain fatty acid, such as an alcohol acetyltransferase (AAT), wax ester synthase/diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) or lipase, under a suitable condition so that the isoprenyl alkanoate is produced.

  6. Rotavirus-host cell interactions: an arms race.

    PubMed

    López, Susana; Arias, Carlos F

    2012-08-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses depend on the synthetic machinery of the cell to translate their proteins and on the cell's energy and building blocks to replicate their genomes. Cells respond to virus invasions by eliciting diverse responses to eliminate the incoming parasitic agents. In turn, to establish a successful infection, viruses have developed different strategies to take over the cellular metabolic machinery and to cope with the defense mechanisms of the cell. The characterization of this battle has allowed the discovery of the different elements that viruses and cells have developed in the attempt to overcome the enemy. Here some of the strategies used by rotaviruses to hijack the protein synthesis apparatus of the cell to ensure the translation of their mRNAs, and to deal with the cellular stress and antiviral responses will be reviewed.

  7. Listeria monocytogenes induces host DNA damage and delays the host cell cycle to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Leitão, Elsa; Costa, Ana Catarina; Brito, Cláudia; Costa, Lionel; Pombinho, Rita; Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) is a human intracellular pathogen widely used to uncover the mechanisms evolved by pathogens to establish infection. However, its capacity to perturb the host cell cycle was never reported. We show that Lm infection affects the host cell cycle progression, increasing its overall duration but allowing consecutive rounds of division. A complete Lm infectious cycle induces a S-phase delay accompanied by a slower rate of DNA synthesis and increased levels of host DNA strand breaks. Additionally, DNA damage/replication checkpoint responses are triggered in an Lm dose-dependent manner through the phosphorylation of DNA-PK, H2A.X, and CDC25A and independently from ATM/ATR. While host DNA damage induced exogenously favors Lm dissemination, the override of checkpoint pathways limits infection. We propose that host DNA replication disturbed by Lm infection culminates in DNA strand breaks, triggering DNA damage/replication responses, and ensuring a cell cycle delay that favors Lm propagation. PMID:24552813

  8. Host-pathogen reorganisation during host cell entry by Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Nans, Andrea; Ford, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen that remains a significant public health burden worldwide. A critical early event during infection is chlamydial entry into non-phagocytic host epithelial cells. Like other Gram-negative bacteria, C. trachomatis uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells. These effectors trigger bacterial uptake and promote bacterial survival and replication within the host cell. In this review, we highlight recent cryo-electron tomography that has provided striking insights into the initial interactions between Chlamydia and its host. We describe the polarised structure of extracellular C. trachomatis elementary bodies (EBs), and the supramolecular organisation of T3SS complexes on the EB surface, in addition to the changes in host and pathogen architecture that accompany bacterial internalisation and EB encapsulation into early intracellular vacuoles. Finally, we consider the implications for further understanding the mechanism of C. trachomatis entry and how this might relate to those of other bacteria and viruses.

  9. The role of models in translating within-host dynamics to parasite evolution.

    PubMed

    Greischar, Megan A; Reece, Sarah E; Mideo, Nicole

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical modelling provides an effective way to challenge conventional wisdom about parasite evolution and investigate why parasites 'do what they do' within the host. Models can reveal when intuition cannot explain observed patterns, when more complicated biology must be considered, and when experimental and statistical methods are likely to mislead. We describe how models of within-host infection dynamics can refine experimental design, and focus on the case study of malaria to highlight how integration between models and data can guide understanding of parasite fitness in three areas: (1) the adaptive significance of chronic infections; (2) the potential for tradeoffs between virulence and transmission; and (3) the implications of within-vector dynamics. We emphasize that models are often useful when they highlight unexpected patterns in parasite evolution, revealing instead why intuition yields the wrong answer and what combination of theory and data are needed to advance understanding. PMID:26399436

  10. Cap-independent translation by DAP5 controls cell fate decisions in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yoffe, Yael; David, Maya; Kalaora, Rinat; Povodovski, Lital; Friedlander, Gilgi; Feldmesser, Ester; Ainbinder, Elena; Saada, Ann; Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2016-09-01

    Multiple transcriptional and epigenetic changes drive differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). This study unveils an additional level of gene expression regulation involving noncanonical, cap-independent translation of a select group of mRNAs. This is driven by death-associated protein 5 (DAP5/eIF4G2/NAT1), a translation initiation factor mediating IRES-dependent translation. We found that the DAP5 knockdown from human ESCs (hESCs) resulted in persistence of pluripotent gene expression, delayed induction of differentiation-associated genes in different cell lineages, and defective embryoid body formation. The latter involved improper cellular organization, lack of cavitation, and enhanced mislocalized apoptosis. RNA sequencing of polysome-associated mRNAs identified candidates with reduced translation efficiency in DAP5-depleted hESCs. These were enriched in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative respiration, a pathway essential for differentiation, the significance of which was confirmed by the aberrant mitochondrial morphology and decreased oxidative respiratory activity in DAP5 knockdown cells. Further analysis identified the chromatin modifier HMGN3 as a cap-independent DAP5 translation target whose knockdown resulted in defective differentiation. Thus, DAP5-mediated translation of a specific set of proteins is critical for the transition from pluripotency to differentiation, highlighting the importance of cap-independent translation in stem cell fate decisions.

  11. Cap-independent translation by DAP5 controls cell fate decisions in human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yoffe, Yael; David, Maya; Kalaora, Rinat; Povodovski, Lital; Friedlander, Gilgi; Feldmesser, Ester; Ainbinder, Elena; Saada, Ann; Bialik, Shani; Kimchi, Adi

    2016-09-01

    Multiple transcriptional and epigenetic changes drive differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). This study unveils an additional level of gene expression regulation involving noncanonical, cap-independent translation of a select group of mRNAs. This is driven by death-associated protein 5 (DAP5/eIF4G2/NAT1), a translation initiation factor mediating IRES-dependent translation. We found that the DAP5 knockdown from human ESCs (hESCs) resulted in persistence of pluripotent gene expression, delayed induction of differentiation-associated genes in different cell lineages, and defective embryoid body formation. The latter involved improper cellular organization, lack of cavitation, and enhanced mislocalized apoptosis. RNA sequencing of polysome-associated mRNAs identified candidates with reduced translation efficiency in DAP5-depleted hESCs. These were enriched in mitochondrial proteins involved in oxidative respiration, a pathway essential for differentiation, the significance of which was confirmed by the aberrant mitochondrial morphology and decreased oxidative respiratory activity in DAP5 knockdown cells. Further analysis identified the chromatin modifier HMGN3 as a cap-independent DAP5 translation target whose knockdown resulted in defective differentiation. Thus, DAP5-mediated translation of a specific set of proteins is critical for the transition from pluripotency to differentiation, highlighting the importance of cap-independent translation in stem cell fate decisions. PMID:27664238

  12. Combinatorial biomatrix/cell-based therapies for restoration of host tissue architecture and function

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, David Antonio; Kao, W. John

    2014-01-01

    This Progress Report reviews recent advances in the utility of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimic biomaterials in presenting and delivering therapeutic cells to promote tissue healing. This overview gives a brief introduction of different cell types being used in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering while addressing critical issues that must be overcome before cell-based approaches can be routinely employed in the clinic. A selection of 5 commonly used cell-associated, biomaterial platforms (collagen, hyaluronic acid, fibrin, alginate, and poly(ethylene glycol)) are reviewed for treatment of a number of acute injury or diseases with emphasis on animal models and clinical trials. This article concludes with current challenges and future perspectives regarding foreign body host response to biomaterials and immunological reactions to allogeneic or xenogeneic cells, vascularization and angiogenesis, matching mechanical strength and anisotropy of native tissues, as well as other non-technical issues regarding the clinical translation of biomatrix/cell-based therapies. PMID:23828863

  13. Entamoeba histolytica-induced dephosphorylation in host cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, José E; Mann, Barbara J

    2002-04-01

    Activation of host cell protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases) and protein dephosphorylation is an important mechanism used by various microorganisms to deactivate or kill host defense cells. To determine whether protein tyrosine dephosphorylation played a role in signaling pathways affecting Entamoeba histolytica-mediated host cell killing, we investigated the involvement of PTPases during the attachment of E. histolytica to target cells. We observed a rapid decrease in cellular protein tyrosine levels in Jurkat cells, as measured with an antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibody, following adherence to E. histolytica. Ameba-induced protein dephosphorylation was contact dependent and required intact parasite, since blocking amebic adherence with galactose inhibited tyrosine dephosphorylation and amebic lysates had no effect on phosphotyrosine levels. Moreover, disruption of amebic adherence with galactose promoted recovery of phosphorylation in Jurkat cells, indicating that dephosphorylation precedes target cell death. The evidence suggests that ameba-induced dephosphorylation is mediated by host cell phosphatases. Prior treatment of Jurkat cells with phenylarsine oxide, a PTPase inhibitor, inhibited ameba-induced dephosphorylation. We also found proteolytic cleavage of the PTPase 1B (PTP1B) in Jurkat cells after contact with amebae. The calcium-dependent protease calpain is responsible for PTP1B cleavage and enzymatic activation. Pretreatment of Jurkat cells with calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, blocked PTP1B cleavage and inhibited ameba-induced dephosphorylation. In addition, inhibition of Jurkat cell PTPases with phenylarsine oxide blocked Jurkat cell apoptosis induced by E. histolytica. These results suggest that E. histolytica-mediated host cell death occurs by a mechanism that involves PTPase activation. PMID:11895943

  14. Specific requirement for translation initiation factor 4E or its isoform drives plant host susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In plants, eIF4E translation initiation factors and their eIFiso4E isoforms are essential susceptibility factors for many RNA viruses, including potyviruses. Mutations altering these factors are a major source of resistance to the viruses. The eIF4E allelic series is associated with specific resistance spectra in crops such as Capsicum annum. Genetic evidence shows that potyviruses have a specific requirement for a given 4E isoform that depends on the host plant. For example, Tobacco etch virus (TEV) uses eIF4E1 to infect Capsicum annuum but uses eIFiso4E to infect Arabidopsis thaliana. Here, we investigated how TEV exploits different translation initiation factor isoforms to infect these two plant species. Results A complementation system was set up in Arabidopsis to test the restoration of systemic infection by TEV. Using this system, Arabidopsis susceptibility to TEV was complemented with a susceptible pepper eIF4E1 allele but not with a resistant allele. Therefore, in Arabidopsis, TEV can use the pepper eIF4E1 instead of the endogenous eIFiso4E isoform so is able to switch between translation initiation factor 4E isoform to infect the same host. Moreover, we show that overexpressing the pepper eIF4E1 alleles is sufficient to make Arabidopsis susceptible to an otherwise incompatible TEV strain. Lastly, we show that the resistant eIF4E1 allele is similarly overcome by a resistance-breaking TEV strain as in pepper, confirming that this Arabidopsis TEV-susceptibility complementation system is allele-specific. Conclusion We report here a complementation system in Arabidopsis that makes it possible to assess the role of pepper pvr2-eIF4E alleles in susceptibility to TEV. Heterologous complementation experiments showed that the idiosyncratic properties of the 4E and iso4E proteins create a major checkpoint for viral infection of different hosts. This system could be used to screen natural or induced eIF4E alleles to find and study alleles of interest for

  15. Effects of influenza A virus NS1 protein on protein expression: the NS1 protein enhances translation and is not required for shutoff of host protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Mirella; Basler, Christopher F; Parisien, Jean-Patrick; Horvath, Curt M; Bourmakina, Svetlana; Zheng, Hongyong; Muster, Thomas; Palese, Peter; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-02-01

    The influenza A virus NS1 protein, a virus-encoded alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) antagonist, appears to be a key regulator of protein expression in infected cells. We now show that NS1 protein expression results in enhancement of reporter gene activity from transfected plasmids. This effect appears to be mediated at the translational level, and it is reminiscent of the activity of the adenoviral virus-associated I (VAI) RNA, a known inhibitor of the antiviral, IFN-induced, PKR protein. To study the effects of the NS1 protein on viral and cellular protein synthesis during influenza A virus infection, we used recombinant influenza viruses lacking the NS1 gene (delNS1) or expressing truncated NS1 proteins. Our results demonstrate that the NS1 protein is required for efficient viral protein synthesis in COS-7 cells. This activity maps to the amino-terminal domain of the NS1 protein, since cells infected with wild-type virus or with a mutant virus expressing a truncated NS1 protein-lacking approximately half of its carboxy-terminal end-showed similar kinetics of viral and cellular protein expression. Interestingly, no major differences in host cell protein synthesis shutoff or in viral protein expression were found among NS1 mutant viruses in Vero cells. Thus, another viral component(s) different from the NS1 protein is responsible for the inhibition of host protein synthesis during viral infection. In contrast to the earlier proposal suggesting that the NS1 protein regulates the levels of spliced M2 mRNA, no effects on M2 protein accumulation were seen in Vero cells infected with delNS1 virus.

  16. Hijacking Host Cell Highways: Manipulation of the Host Actin Cytoskeleton by Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Colonne, Punsiri M.; Winchell, Caylin G.; Voth, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27713866

  17. Proteomic analysis of host responses in HepG2 cells during dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-Nga; Rungrojcharoenkit, Kamonthip; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Noisakran, Sansanee; Chen, Shui-Tein; Malasit, Prida; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2007-12-01

    Dengue virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. However, its pathogenic mechanisms and pathophysiology are still poorly understood. We performed proteomic analysis to evaluate early host responses (as indicated by altered proteins) in human target cells during dengue virus infection. HepG2 cells were infected with dengue virus serotype 2 (DEN-2) at multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0. Quantitative analyses of DEN-2 infection and cell death at 12, 24, and 48 h postinfection showed that the MOI of 1.0 with 24 h postinfection duration was the optimal condition to evaluate early host responses, as this condition provided the high %Infection ( approximately 80%), while %Cell death ( approximately 20%) was comparable to that of the mock-control cells. Proteins derived from the mock-control and DEN-2-infected cells were resolved by 2-D PAGE ( n = 5 gels for each group) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby stain. Quantitative intensity analysis revealed 17 differentially expressed proteins, which were successfully identified by peptide mass fingerprinting. Most of these altered proteins were the key factors involved in transcription and translation processes. Further functional study on these altered proteins may lead to better understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms and host responses to dengue virus infection, and also to the identification of new therapeutic targets for dengue virus infection.

  18. Facilitating cells: Translation of hematopoietic chimerism to achieve clinical tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ildstad, Suzanne T; Leventhal, Joseph; Wen, Yujie; Yolcu, Esma

    2015-04-01

    For over 50 y the association between hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance has been recognized. This originated with the brilliant observation by Dr. Ray Owen that freemartin cattle twins that shared a common placental blood supply were red blood cell chimeras, which led to the discovery that hematopoietic chimerism resulted in actively acquired tolerance. This was first confirmed in neonatal mice by Medawar et al. and subsequently in adult rodents. Fifty years later this concept has been successfully translated to solid organ transplant recipients in the clinic. The field is new, but cell-based therapies are being used with increasing frequency to induce tolerance and immunomodulation. The future is bright. This review focuses on chimerism and tolerance: past, present and prospects for the future.

  19. Host epithelial geometry regulates breast cancer cell invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Boghaert, Eline; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Lee, KangAe; Gjorevski, Nikolce; Radisky, Derek C.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Breast tumor development is regulated in part by cues from the local microenvironment, including interactions with neighboring nontumor cells as well as the ECM. Studies using homogeneous populations of breast cancer cell lines cultured in 3D ECM have shown that increased ECM stiffness stimulates tumor cell invasion. However, at early stages of breast cancer development, malignant cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells, which have been shown to exert a tumor-suppressive effect on cocultured cancer cells. Here we explored how the biophysical characteristics of the host microenvironment affect the proliferative and invasive tumor phenotype of the earliest stages of tumor development, by using a 3D microfabrication-based approach to engineer ducts composed of normal mammary epithelial cells that contained a single tumor cell. We found that the phenotype of the tumor cell was dictated by its position in the duct: proliferation and invasion were enhanced at the ends and blocked when the tumor cell was located elsewhere within the tissue. Regions of invasion correlated with high endogenous mechanical stress, as shown by finite element modeling and bead displacement experiments, and modulating the contractility of the host epithelium controlled the subsequent invasion of tumor cells. Combining microcomputed tomographic analysis with finite element modeling suggested that predicted regions of high mechanical stress correspond to regions of tumor formation in vivo. This work suggests that the mechanical tone of nontumorigenic host epithelium directs the phenotype of tumor cells and provides additional insight into the instructive role of the mechanical tumor microenvironment. PMID:23150585

  20. Herpesvirus Genome Integration into Telomeric Repeats of Host Cell Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Wallaschek, Nina; Kaufer, Benedikt B

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that numerous viruses integrate their genetic material into host cell chromosomes. Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been shown to integrate their genomes into host telomeres of latently infected cells. This is unusual for herpesviruses as most maintain their genomes as circular episomes during the quiescent stage of infection. The genomic DNA of HHV-6, MDV, and several other herpesviruses harbors telomeric repeats (TMRs) that are identical to host telomere sequences (TTAGGG). At least in the case of MDV, viral TMRs facilitate integration into host telomeres. Integration of HHV-6 occurs not only in lymphocytes but also in the germline of some individuals, allowing vertical virus transmission. Although the molecular mechanism of telomere integration is poorly understood, the presence of TMRs in a number of herpesviruses suggests it is their default program for genome maintenance during latency and also allows efficient reactivation.

  1. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    PubMed

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes.

  2. Viroporins Customize Host Cells for Efficient Viral Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Giorda, Kristina M.

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites that must access the host cell machinery to propagate. Viruses hijack the host cell machinery to help with entry, replication, packaging, and release of progeny to infect new cells. To carry out these diverse functions, viruses often transform the cellular environment using viroporins, a growing class of viral-encoded membrane proteins that promote viral proliferation. Viroporins modify the integrity of host membranes, thereby stimulating the maturation of viral infection, and are critical for virus production and dissemination. Significant advances in molecular and cell biological approaches have helped to uncover some of the roles that viroporins serve in the various stages of the viral life cycle. In this study, the ability of viroporins to modify the cellular environment will be discussed, with particular emphasis on their role in the stepwise progression of the viral life cycle. PMID:23945006

  3. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J; Singer, Robert H

    2016-06-17

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display "bursting" translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells. PMID:27313041

  4. Translation dynamics of single mRNAs in live cells and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Bin; Eliscovich, Carolina; Yoon, Young J.; Singer, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Translation is the fundamental biological process converting mRNA information into proteins. Single-molecule imaging in live cells has illuminated the dynamics of RNA transcription; however, it is not yet applicable to translation. Here, we report single-molecule imaging of nascent peptides (SINAPS) to assess translation in live cells. The approach provides direct readout of initiation, elongation, and location of translation. We show that mRNAs coding for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins are translated when they encounter the ER membrane. Single-molecule fluorescence recovery after photobleaching provides direct measurement of elongation speed (5 amino acids per second). In primary neurons, mRNAs are translated in proximal dendrites but repressed in distal dendrites and display “bursting” translation. This technology provides a tool with which to address the spatiotemporal translation mechanism of single mRNAs in living cells. PMID:27313041

  5. Host translation shutoff mediated by non-structural protein 2 is a critical factor in the antiviral state resistance of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Nishank; Sun, Chengqun; Metthew Lam, L K; Gardner, Christina L; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2016-09-01

    Most previous studies of interferon-alpha/beta (IFN-α/β) response antagonism by alphaviruses have focused upon interruption of IFN-α/β induction and/or receptor signaling cascades. Infection of mice with Venezuelan equine encephalitis alphavirus (VEEV) or Sindbis virus (SINV) induces serum IFN-α/β, that elicits a systemic antiviral state in uninfected cells successfully controlling SINV but not VEEV replication. Furthermore, VEEV replication is more resistant than that of SINV to a pre-existing antiviral state in vitro. While host macromolecular shutoff is proposed as a major antagonist of IFN-α/β induction, the underlying mechanisms of alphavirus resistance to a pre-existing antiviral state are not fully defined, nor is the mechanism for the greater resistance of VEEV. Here, we have separated viral transcription and translation shutoff with multiple alphaviruses, identified the viral proteins that induce each activity, and demonstrated that VEEV nonstructural protein 2-induced translation shutoff is likely a critical factor in enhanced antiviral state resistance of this alphavirus.

  6. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    PubMed

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases.

  7. Picornavirus Molecular Pathology - Translating 50 Years of Molecular Biology to the Host

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1951 a resident at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, removed cancerous cells from the cervix of Henrietta Lacks and brought them to George Gey, the head of tissue culture research at Hopkins. Gey thought he could use these cells to study cancer in vitro. Eight months later Henrietta Lack...

  8. Arginine starvation in colorectal carcinoma cells: Sensing, impact on translation control and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Vynnytska-Myronovska, Bozhena O; Kurlishchuk, Yuliya; Chen, Oleh; Bobak, Yaroslav; Dittfeld, Claudia; Hüther, Melanie; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Stasyk, Oleh V

    2016-02-01

    Tumor cells rely on a continued exogenous nutrient supply in order to maintain a high proliferative activity. Although a strong dependence of some tumor types on exogenous arginine sources has been reported, the mechanisms of arginine sensing by tumor cells and the impact of changes in arginine availability on translation and cell cycle regulation are not fully understood. The results presented herein state that human colorectal carcinoma cells rapidly exhaust the internal arginine sources in the absence of exogenous arginine and repress global translation by activation of the GCN2-mediated pathway and inhibition of mTOR signaling. Tumor suppressor protein p53 activation and G1/G0 cell cycle arrest support cell survival upon prolonged arginine starvation. Cells with the mutant or deleted TP53 fail to stop cell cycle progression at defined cell cycle checkpoints which appears to be associated with reduced recovery after durable metabolic stress triggered by arginine withdrawal.

  9. Signaling between tumor cells and the host bone marrow microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Natasa; Croucher, Peter I; McDonald, Michelle M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells with high skeletal homing affinity express numerous cell surface receptors that bind ligands produced in bone. Upon arrival, these cells survive in the host environment, encompassed in close proximity to bone marrow cells. Interactions between tumor cells and cells of the host microenvironment are essential to not only tumor cell survival but also their activation and proliferation into environment-modifying tumors. Through the production of RANKL, PTHrP, cytokines, and integrins, activated tumor cells stimulate osteoclastogenesis, enhance bone resorption, and subsequently release matrix-bound proteins that further promote tumor growth and bone resorption. In addition, alterations in the TGF-β/BMP and Wnt signaling pathways via tumor cell growth can either stimulate or suppress osteoblastic bone formation and function, leading to sclerotic or lytic bone disease, respectively. Hence, the presence of tumor cells in bone dysregulates bone remodeling, dramatically impairing skeletal integrity. Furthermore, through complex mechanisms, cells of the immune system interact with tumor cells to further impact bone remodeling. Lastly, with alterations in bone cell activity, the environment is permissive to promoting tumor growth further, suggesting an interdependence between tumor cells and bone cells in metastatic bone disease and multiple myeloma.

  10. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Elisabeth O; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C; Hagedorn, Monica

    2016-03-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  11. Dissection of Francisella-Host Cell Interactions in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Elisabeth O.; Brenz, Yannick; Herrmann, Lydia; Repnik, Urska; Griffiths, Gareth; Zingmark, Carl; Sjöstedt, Anders; Winther-Larsen, Hanne C.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella bacteria cause severe disease in both vertebrates and invertebrates and include one of the most infectious human pathogens. Mammalian cell lines have mainly been used to study the mechanisms by which Francisella manipulates its host to replicate within a large variety of hosts and cell types, including macrophages. Here, we describe the establishment of a genetically and biochemically tractable infection model: the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum combined with the fish pathogen Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis. Phagocytosed F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the endosomal pathway and escapes further phagosomal maturation by translocating into the host cell cytosol. F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis lacking IglC, a known virulence determinant required for Francisella intracellular replication, follows the normal phagosomal maturation and does not grow in Dictyostelium. The attenuation of the F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC mutant was confirmed in a zebrafish embryo model, where growth of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis ΔiglC was restricted. In Dictyostelium, F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis interacts with the autophagic machinery. The intracellular bacteria colocalize with autophagic markers, and when autophagy is impaired (Dictyostelium Δatg1), F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis accumulates within Dictyostelium cells. Altogether, the Dictyostelium-F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infection model recapitulates the course of infection described in other host systems. The genetic and biochemical tractability of the system allows new approaches to elucidate the dynamic interactions between pathogenic Francisella and its host organism. PMID:26712555

  12. Stimulation of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase mRNA translation by reovirus capsid polypeptide sigma 3 in cotransfected COS cells.

    PubMed Central

    Giantini, M; Shatkin, A J

    1989-01-01

    The mammalian reovirus S4 gene has been implicated in the serotype-dependent inhibition of host cell protein synthesis during viral replication in mouse L cells. To examine the effect(s) of this gene on transcription or translation or both, a DNA copy of the serotype 3 S4 gene was inserted into a eucaryotic expression vector. Cotransfection of COS cells with plasmids containing S4 and the reporter gene, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), resulted in a marked stimulation of CAT expression, predominantly at the level of translation. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to the double-stranded-RNA-binding activity of the S4 gene product, polypeptide sigma 3. Images PMID:2724407

  13. Host cell proteases: critical determinants of coronavirus tropism and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses are a large group of enveloped, single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses that infect a wide range of avian and mammalian species, including humans. The emergence of deadly human coronaviruses, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have bolstered research in these viral and often zoonotic pathogens. While coronavirus cell and tissue tropism, host range, and pathogenesis are initially controlled by interactions between the spike envelope glycoprotein and host cell receptor, it is becoming increasingly apparent that proteolytic activation of spike by host cell proteases also plays a critical role. Coronavirus spike proteins are the main determinant of entry as they possess both receptor binding and fusion functions. Whereas binding to the host cell receptor is an essential first step in establishing infection, the proteolytic activation step is often critical for the fusion function of spike, as it allows for controlled release of the fusion peptide into target cellular membranes. Coronaviruses have evolved multiple strategies for proteolytic activation of spike, and a large number of host proteases have been shown to proteolytically process the spike protein. These include, but are not limited to, endosomal cathepsins, cell surface transmembrane protease/serine (TMPRSS) proteases, furin, and trypsin. This review focuses on the diversity of strategies coronaviruses have evolved to proteolytically activate their fusion protein during spike protein biosynthesis and the critical entry step of their life cycle, and highlights important findings on how proteolytic activation of coronavirus spike influences tissue and cell tropism, host range and pathogenicity. PMID:25445340

  14. High avidity autoreactive CD4+ T cells induce host CTL, overcome Tregs and mediate tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andrew G.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Ha, Sung P.; Sidney, John; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Touloukian, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress made over the past 25 years, existing immunotherapies have limited clinical effectiveness in patients with cancer. Immune tolerance consistently blunts the generated immune response, and the largely solitary focus on CD8+ T cell immunity has proven ineffective in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. To address these twin-tier deficiencies, we developed a translational model of melanoma immunotherapy focused on the exploitation of high avidity CD4+ T cells that become generated in germline antigen deficient mice. We had previously identified a TRP-1 specific HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted epitope. Using this epitope in conjunction with a newly described TRP-1 germline-knockout, we demonstrate that endogenous TRP-1 expression alters the functionality of the auto-reactive T cell repertoire. More importantly, we show, by using MHC-mismatched combinations, that CD4+ T cells derived from the self-antigen deficient host indirectly triggers the eradication of established B16 lung metastases. We demonstrate that the treatment effect is mediated entirely by endogenous CD8+ T cells and is not affected by the depletion of host Tregs. These findings suggest that high avidity CD4+ T cells can overcome endogenous conditions and mediate their anti-tumor effects exclusively through the elicitation of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:19561540

  15. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B.; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  16. Early Bunyavirus-Host Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Albornoz, Amelina; Hoffmann, Anja B; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-01-01

    The Bunyaviridae is the largest family of RNA viruses, with over 350 members worldwide. Several of these viruses cause severe diseases in livestock and humans. With an increasing number and frequency of outbreaks, bunyaviruses represent a growing threat to public health and agricultural productivity globally. Yet, the receptors, cellular factors and endocytic pathways used by these emerging pathogens to infect cells remain largely uncharacterized. The focus of this review is on the early steps of bunyavirus infection, from virus binding to penetration from endosomes. We address current knowledge and advances for members from each genus in the Bunyaviridae family regarding virus receptors, uptake, intracellular trafficking and fusion. PMID:27213430

  17. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  18. Alphavirus Infection: Host Cell Shut-Off and Inhibition of Antiviral Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fros, Jelke J.; Pijlman, Gorben P.

    2016-01-01

    Alphaviruses cause debilitating disease in humans and animals and are transmitted by blood-feeding arthropods, typically mosquitoes. With a traditional focus on two models, Sindbis virus and Semliki Forest virus, alphavirus research has significantly intensified in the last decade partly due to the re-emergence and dramatic expansion of chikungunya virus in Asia, Europe, and the Americas. As a consequence, alphavirus–host interactions are now understood in much more molecular detail, and important novel mechanisms have been elucidated. It has become clear that alphaviruses not only cause a general host shut-off in infected vertebrate cells, but also specifically suppress different host antiviral pathways using their viral nonstructural proteins, nsP2 and nsP3. Here we review the current state of the art of alphavirus host cell shut-off of viral transcription and translation, and describe recent insights in viral subversion of interferon induction and signaling, the unfolded protein response, and stress granule assembly. PMID:27294951

  19. Plasmodium species: master renovators of their host cells.

    PubMed

    de Koning-Ward, Tania F; Dixon, Matthew W A; Tilley, Leann; Gilson, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malaria, have developed elaborate strategies that they use to survive and thrive within different intracellular environments. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite is a master renovator of its erythrocyte host cell, and the changes in cell morphology and function that are induced by the parasite promote survival and contribute to the pathogenesis of severe malaria. In this Review, we discuss how Plasmodium parasites use the protein trafficking motif Plasmodium export element (PEXEL), protease-mediated polypeptide processing, a novel translocon termed the Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) and exomembranous structures to export hundreds of proteins to discrete subcellular locations in the host erythrocytes, which enables the parasite to gain access to vital nutrients and to evade the immune defence mechanisms of the host.

  20. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. PMID:27021246

  1. Context-dependent regulation of Musashi-mediated mRNA translation and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    MacNicol, Melanie C; Cragle, Chad E; MacNicol, Angus M

    2011-01-01

    Musashi-mediated mRNA translational control has been implicated in the promotion of physiological and pathological stem cell proliferation. During self-renewal of mammalian stem cells, Musashi has been proposed to act to repress the translation of mRNAs encoding inhibitors of cell cycle progression. By contrast, in maturing Xenopus oocytes Musashi activates translation of target mRNAs that encode proteins promoting cell cycle progression. The mechanisms directing Musashi to differentially control mRNA translation in mammalian stem cells and Xenopus oocytes is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that the mechanisms defining Musashi function lie within the cellular context. Specifically, we show that murine Musashi acts as an activator of translation in maturing Xenopus oocytes while Xenopus Musashi functions as a repressor of target mRNA translation in mammalian cells. We further demonstrate that within the context of a primary mammalian neural stem/progenitor cell, Musashi can be converted from a repressor of mRNA translation to an activator of translation in response to extracellular stimuli. We present current models of Musashi-mediated mRNA translational control and discuss possible mechanisms for regulating Musashi function. An understanding of these mechanisms presents exciting possibilities for development of therapeutic targets to control physiological and pathological stem cell proliferation.

  2. Th9 Cells Drive Host Immunity against Gastrointestinal Worm Infection.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Paula; Henao-Mejia, Jorge; Temann, Angela U; Gagliani, Nicola; Licona-Limón, Ileana; Ishigame, Harumichi; Hao, Liming; Herbert, De'broski R; Flavell, Richard A

    2013-10-17

    Type 2 inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-5, IL-9, and IL-13, drive the characteristic features of immunity against parasitic worms and allergens. Whether IL-9 serves an essential role in the initiation of host-protective responses is controversial, and the importance of IL-9- versus IL-4-producing CD4⁺ effector T cells in type 2 immunity is incompletely defined. Herein, we generated IL-9-deficient and IL-9-fluorescent reporter mice that demonstrated an essential role for this cytokine in the early type 2 immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. Whereas T helper 9 (Th9) cells and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) were major sources of infection-induced IL-9 production, the adoptive transfer of Th9 cells, but not Th2 cells, caused rapid worm expulsion, marked basophilia, and increased mast cell numbers in Rag2-deficient hosts. Taken together, our data show a critical and nonredundant role for Th9 cells and IL-9 in host-protective type 2 immunity against parasitic worm infection.

  3. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Charlotte H.; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S. Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine. PMID:27185791

  4. Clustered Intracellular Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Blocks Host Cell Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Santos, António J M; Durkin, Charlotte H; Helaine, Sophie; Boucrot, Emmanuel; Holden, David W

    2016-07-01

    Several bacterial pathogens and viruses interfere with the cell cycle of their host cells to enhance virulence. This is especially apparent in bacteria that colonize the gut epithelium, where inhibition of the cell cycle of infected cells enhances the intestinal colonization. We found that intracellular Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium induced the binucleation of a large proportion of epithelial cells by 14 h postinvasion and that the effect was dependent on an intact Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) type 3 secretion system. The SPI-2 effectors SseF and SseG were required to induce binucleation. SseF and SseG are known to maintain microcolonies of Salmonella-containing vacuoles close to the microtubule organizing center of infected epithelial cells. During host cell division, these clustered microcolonies prevented the correct localization of members of the chromosomal passenger complex and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 and consequently prevented cytokinesis. Tetraploidy, arising from a cytokinesis defect, is known to have a deleterious effect on subsequent cell divisions, resulting in either chromosomal instabilities or cell cycle arrest. In infected mice, proliferation of small intestinal epithelial cells was compromised in an SseF/SseG-dependent manner, suggesting that cytokinesis failure caused by S Typhimurium delays epithelial cell turnover in the intestine.

  5. Concise Review: Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Translational Medicine: Emerging Issues

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Guangwen; Chen, Xiaodong; Dong, Fengping; Li, Wenzhao; Ren, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yanyun

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are emerging as a promising therapeutic approach of cell-based therapy for a wide range of autoimmune disorders and degenerative diseases. In preclinical and clinical studies, MSCs have been shown to be highly efficient in treating graft-versus-host disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, myocardial infarction, liver cirrhosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and other disorders. The underlying therapeutic mechanisms of MSCs include their homing efficiency to the tissue injury sites, their differentiation potential, their capability to produce a large amount of trophic factors, and their immunomodulatory effect. Because tissue damage sites are complicated milieus with distinct types of inflammatory cells and factors, available data have demonstrated that the properties of MSCs could be fundamentally influenced by the inflammatory elements. Thus, an understanding of the interaction between MSCs and the inflammatory microenvironment will provide critical information in revealing the precise in vivo mechanisms of MSC-mediated therapeutic effects and designing more practical protocols for clinical use of these cells. PMID:23197640

  6. Differential stimulation of hepatitis C virus RNA translation by microRNA-122 in different cell cycle phases.

    PubMed

    Fehr, Carmen; Conrad, K Dominik; Niepmann, Michael

    2012-01-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicates preferentially in the liver, and in most cases the HCV infection becomes chronic and often results in hepatocellular carcinoma. When the HCV plus-strand RNA genome has been delivered to the cytosol of the infected cell, its translation is directed by the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the viral RNA. Thereby, IRES activity is modulated by several host factors. In particular, the liver-specific microRNA-122 (miR-122) interacts with two target sites in the HCV 5'-UTR and stimulates HCV translation, thereby most likely contributing to HCV liver tropism. Here we show that HCV IRES-dependent translation efficiency in the hepatoma cell line Huh7 is highest during the G₀ and G₁ phases of the cell cycle but significantly drops during the S phase and even more in the G₂/M phase. The superimposed stimulation of HCV translation by ectopic miR-122 works best during the G₀, G₁ and G₂/M phases but is lower during the S phase. However, the levels of Ago2 protein do not substantially change during cell cycle phases, indicating that other cellular factors involved in HCV translation stimulation by miR-122 may be differentially expressed in different cell cycle phases. Moreover, the levels of endogenously expressed miR-122 in Huh7 cells are lowest in the S phase, indicating that the predominant G₀/G₁ state of non-dividing hepatocytes in the liver facilitates high expression of the HCV genome and stimulation by miR-122, with yet unknown factors involved in the differential extent of stimulation by miR-122.

  7. DAZL regulates Tet1 translation in murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Welling, Maaike; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Muñoz, Javier; Musheev, Michael U; Kester, Lennart; Junker, Jan Philipp; Mischerikow, Nikolai; Arbab, Mandana; Kuijk, Ewart; Silberstein, Lev; Kharchenko, Peter V; Geens, Mieke; Niehrs, Christof; van de Velde, Hilde; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Heck, Albert JR; Geijsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) cultures display a heterogeneous gene expression profile, ranging from a pristine naïve pluripotent state to a primed epiblast state. Addition of inhibitors of GSK3β and MEK (so-called 2i conditions) pushes ESC cultures toward a more homogeneous naïve pluripotent state, but the molecular underpinnings of this naïve transition are not completely understood. Here, we demonstrate that DAZL, an RNA-binding protein known to play a key role in germ-cell development, marks a subpopulation of ESCs that is actively transitioning toward naïve pluripotency. Moreover, DAZL plays an essential role in the active reprogramming of cytosine methylation. We demonstrate that DAZL associates with mRNA of Tet1, a catalyst of 5-hydroxylation of methyl-cytosine, and enhances Tet1 mRNA translation. Overexpression of DAZL in heterogeneous ESC cultures results in elevated TET1 protein levels as well as increased global hydroxymethylation. Conversely, null mutation of Dazl severely stunts 2i-mediated TET1 induction and hydroxymethylation. Our results provide insight into the regulation of the acquisition of naïve pluripotency and demonstrate that DAZL enhances TET1-mediated cytosine hydroxymethylation in ESCs that are actively reprogramming to a pluripotent ground state. PMID:26077710

  8. Translating stem cell research to the clinic: a primer on translational considerations for your first stem cell protocol.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Timothy; Creane, Michael; Windebank, Anthony J; Terzic, Andre; Dietz, Allan B

    2015-08-22

    Over the last two decades, a new therapeutic paradigm has emerged which has changed the way debilitating diseases may be treated in the future. Instead of using small-molecule drugs and devices to ameliorate the symptoms of disease, clinicians may harness the therapeutic power of cells to regenerate and cure diseases which currently represent a major unmet medical need. Advancements in the scientific knowledge of stem cell biology, along with highly encouraging preclinical proof-of-concept studies, in the last several years have served as a launch pad for testing such therapeutics in humans with life-threatening diseases. However, translating basic research findings into human therapy has not been straightforward and has presented many scientific, clinical, and regulatory challenges for scientists and clinicians. In this article, we provide a guidance framework for investigators for the design of early-phase clinical studies using stem cell-based therapeutics. Furthermore, important trial parameters and design features which must be considered before regulatory submission of such studies are highlighted.

  9. Translating G-CSF as an Adjunct Therapy to Stem Cell Transplantation for Stroke.

    PubMed

    Peña, Ike dela; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-12-01

    Among recently investigated stroke therapies, stem cell treatment holds great promise by virtue of their putative ability to replace lost cells, promote endogenous neurogenesis,and produce behavioral and functional improvement through their "bystander effects." Translating stem cell in the clinic, however, presents a number of technical difficulties. A strategy suggested to enhance therapeutic utility of stem cells is combination therapy, i.e., co-transplantation of stem cells or adjunct treatment with pharmacological agents and substrates,which is assumed to produce more profound therapeutic benefits by circumventing limitations of individual treatments and facilitating complementary brain repair processes. We previously demonstrated enhanced functional effects of cotreatment with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF)and human umbilical cord blood cell (hUCB) transplantation in animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here,we suggest that the aforementioned combination therapy may also produce synergistic effects in stroke. Accordingly, G-CSF treatment may reduce expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhance neurogenesis rendering a receptive microenvironment for hUCB engraftment. Adjunct treatment of GCSF with hUCB may facilitate stemness maintenance and guide neural lineage commitment of hUCB cells. Moreover, regenerative mechanisms afforded by G-CSF-mobilized endogenous stem cells, secretion of growth factors by hUCB grafts and G-CSF-recruited endothelial progenitor cells(EPCs), as well as the potential graft–host integration that may promote synaptic circuitry re-establishment could altogether produce more pronounced functional improvement in stroked rats subjected to a combination G-CSF treatment and hUCB transplantation. Nevertheless, differences in pathology and repair processes underlying TBI and stroke deserve consideration when testing the effects of combinatorial G-CSF and hUCB cell transplantation for stroke treatment. Further

  10. Preparation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-free extract for in vitro translation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell-free in vitro translation systems have been in use since the 1970s. These systems can faithfully synthesize polypeptides when programmed with mRNA, enabling the production of polypeptides for analysis as well as permitting analyses of the cis- and trans-acting factors that regulate translation. Here we describe the preparation and use of cell-free translation systems from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  11. mRNA decay during herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections: mutations that affect translation of an mRNA influence the sites at which it is cleaved by the HSV virion host shutoff (Vhs) protein.

    PubMed

    Shiflett, Lora A; Read, G Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    During lytic infections, the herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (Vhs) endoribonuclease degrades many host and viral mRNAs. Within infected cells it cuts mRNAs at preferred sites, including some in regions of translation initiation. Vhs binds the translation initiation factors eIF4H, eIF4AI, and eIF4AII, suggesting that its mRNA degradative function is somehow linked to translation. To explore how Vhs is targeted to preferred sites, we examined the in vitro degradation of a target mRNA in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing in vitro-translated Vhs. Vhs caused rapid degradation of mRNAs beginning with cleavages at sites in the first 250 nucleotides, including a number near the start codon and in the 5' untranslated region. Ligation of the ends to form a circular mRNA inhibited Vhs cleavage at the same sites at which it cuts capped linear molecules. This was not due to an inability to cut any circular RNA, since Vhs cuts circular mRNAs containing an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the same sites as linear molecules with the IRES. Cutting linear mRNAs at preferred sites was augmented by the presence of a 5' cap. Moreover, mutations that altered the 5' proximal AUG abolished Vhs cleavage at nearby sites, while mutations that changed sequences surrounding the AUG to improve their match to the Kozak consensus sequence enhanced Vhs cutting near the start codon. The results indicate that mutations in an mRNA that affect its translation affect the sites at which it is cut by Vhs and suggest that Vhs is directed to its preferred cut sites during translation initiation.

  12. mRNA Decay during Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Infections: Mutations That Affect Translation of an mRNA Influence the Sites at Which It Is Cleaved by the HSV Virion Host Shutoff (Vhs) Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shiflett, Lora A.

    2013-01-01

    During lytic infections, the herpes simplex virus (HSV) virion host shutoff (Vhs) endoribonuclease degrades many host and viral mRNAs. Within infected cells it cuts mRNAs at preferred sites, including some in regions of translation initiation. Vhs binds the translation initiation factors eIF4H, eIF4AI, and eIF4AII, suggesting that its mRNA degradative function is somehow linked to translation. To explore how Vhs is targeted to preferred sites, we examined the in vitro degradation of a target mRNA in rabbit reticulocyte lysates containing in vitro-translated Vhs. Vhs caused rapid degradation of mRNAs beginning with cleavages at sites in the first 250 nucleotides, including a number near the start codon and in the 5′ untranslated region. Ligation of the ends to form a circular mRNA inhibited Vhs cleavage at the same sites at which it cuts capped linear molecules. This was not due to an inability to cut any circular RNA, since Vhs cuts circular mRNAs containing an encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) at the same sites as linear molecules with the IRES. Cutting linear mRNAs at preferred sites was augmented by the presence of a 5′ cap. Moreover, mutations that altered the 5′ proximal AUG abolished Vhs cleavage at nearby sites, while mutations that changed sequences surrounding the AUG to improve their match to the Kozak consensus sequence enhanced Vhs cutting near the start codon. The results indicate that mutations in an mRNA that affect its translation affect the sites at which it is cut by Vhs and suggest that Vhs is directed to its preferred cut sites during translation initiation. PMID:23077305

  13. Host Cell Factors as Antiviral Targets in Arenavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Linero, Florencia N.; Sepúlveda, Claudia S.; Giovannoni, Federico; Castilla, Viviana; García, Cybele C.; Scolaro, Luis A.; Damonte, Elsa B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the members of the Arenaviridae family, Lassa virus and Junin virus generate periodic annual outbreaks of severe human hemorrhagic fever (HF) in endemic areas of West Africa and Argentina, respectively. Given the human health threat that arenaviruses represent and the lack of a specific and safe chemotherapy, the search for effective antiviral compounds is a continuous demanding effort. Since diverse host cell pathways and enzymes are used by RNA viruses to fulfill their replicative cycle, the targeting of a host process has turned an attractive antiviral approach in the last years for many unrelated virus types. This strategy has the additional benefit to reduce the serious challenge for therapy of RNA viruses to escape from drug effects through selection of resistant variants triggered by their high mutation rate. This article focuses on novel strategies to identify inhibitors for arenavirus therapy, analyzing the potential for antiviral developments of diverse host factors essential for virus infection. PMID:23170173

  14. Toxoplasma exports dense granule proteins beyond the vacuole to the host cell nucleus and rewires the host genome expression.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Tardieux, Isabelle; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2014-03-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the most widespread apicomplexan parasite and occupies a large spectrum of niches by infecting virtually any warm-blooded animals. As an obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma has evolved a repertoire of strategies to fine-tune the cellular environment in an optimal way to promote growth and persistence in host tissues hence increasing the chance to be transmitted to new hosts. Short and long-term intracellular survival is associated with Toxoplasma ability to both evade the host deleterious immune defences and to stimulate a beneficial immune balance by governing host cell gene expression. It is only recently that parasite proteins responsible for driving these transcriptional changes have been identified. While proteins contained in the apical secretory Rhoptry organelle have already been identified as bona fide secreted effectors that divert host signalling pathways, recent findings revealed that dense granule proteins should be added to the growing list of effectors as they reach the host cell cytoplasm and nucleus and target various host cell pathways in the course of cell infection. Herein, we emphasize on a novel subfamily of dense granule residentproteins, exemplified with the GRA16 and GRA24 members we recently discovered as both are exported beyond the vacuole-containing parasites and reach the host cell nucleus to reshape the host genome expression.

  15. Sendai virus utilizes specific sialyloligosaccharides as host cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, M A; Paulson, J C

    1980-01-01

    Purified sialyltransferases (CMP-N-acetyl-neuraminate:D-galactosyl-glycoprotein N-acetylneuraminyl-transferase, EC 2.4.99.1) in conjunction with neuraminidase (acylneuraminyl hydrolase, EC 3.2.1.18) were used to produce cell surface sialyloligosaccharides of defined sequence to investigate their role in paramyxovirus infection of host cells. Infection of Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells by Sendai virus was monitored by hemagglutination titer of the virus produced and by changes in morphological characteristics. By either criterion, treatment of the cells with Vibrio cholerae neuraminidase to remove cell surface sialic acids rendered them resistant to infection by Sendai virus. Endogenous replacement of receptors by the cell occurred slowly but supported maximal levels of infection within 6 hr. In contrast, sialylation during a 20-min incubation with CMP-sialic acid and beta-galactoside alpha 2,3-sialytransferase restored full susceptibility to infection. This enzyme elaborates the NeuAc alpha 2,3Gal beta 1,3GalNAc (NeuAc, N-acetylneuraminic acid) sequence on glycoproteins and glycolipids. No restoration of infectivity was observed when neuraminidase-treated cells were sialylated by using beta-galactoside alpha 2,6-sialytransferase, which elaborates the NeuAc-alpha 2,6Gal beta 1,4GlcNAc sequence. These results suggest that sialyloligosaccharide receptor determinants of defined sequence are required for Sendai virus infection of host cells. Images PMID:6255459

  16. Affinity Capture and Identification of Host Cell Factors Associated with Hepatitis C Virus (+) Strand Subgenomic RNA*

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Alok; Dixit, Updesh; Manvar, Dinesh; Chaturvedi, Nootan; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leading to chronic hepatitis is a major factor in the causation of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and liver failure. This process may involve the interplay of various host cell factors, as well as the interaction of these factors with viral RNA and proteins. We report a novel strategy using a sequence-specific biotinylated peptide nucleic acid (PNA)-neamine conjugate targeted to HCV RNA for the in situ capture of subgenomic HCV (+) RNA, along with cellular and viral factors associated with it in MH14 host cells. Using this affinity capture system in conjunction with LC/MS/MS, we have identified 83 cellular factors and three viral proteins (NS5B, NS5A, and NS3–4a protease-helicase) associated with the viral genome. The capture was highly specific. These proteins were not scored with cured MH14 cells devoid of HCV replicons because of the absence of the target sequence in cells for the PNA-neamine probe and also because, unlike oligomeric DNA, cellular proteins have no affinity for PNA. The identified cellular factors belong to different functional groups, including signaling, oncogenic, chaperonin, transcriptional regulators, and RNA helicases as well as DEAD box proteins, ribosomal proteins, translational regulators/factors, and metabolic enzymes, that represent a diverse set of cellular factors associated with the HCV RNA genome. Small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of a diverse class of selected proteins in an HCV replicon cell line either enhanced or inhibited HCV replication/translation, suggesting that these cellular factors have regulatory roles in HCV replication. PMID:23429521

  17. Hypoxia Induces Autophagy through Translational Up-Regulation of Lysosomal Proteins in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Chiao-May; Sun, H. Sunny

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumorigenesis. Tumor cells have to adapt to hypoxia by altering their gene expression and protein synthesis. Here, we showed that hypoxia inhibits translation through activation of PERK and inactivation of mTOR in human colon cancer HCT116 cells. Prolonged hypoxia (1% O2, 16 h) dramatically inhibits general translation in HCT116 cells, yet selected mRNAs remain efficiently translated under such a condition. Using microarray analysis of polysome- associated mRNAs, we identified a large number of hypoxia-regulated genes at the translational level. Efficiently translated mRNAs during hypoxia were validated by polysome profiling and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Pathway enrichment analysis showed that many of the up-regulated genes are involved in lysosome, glycan and lipid metabolism, antigen presentation, cell adhesion, and remodeling of the extracellular matrix and cytoskeleton. The majority of down-regulated genes are involved in apoptosis, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and oxidative phosphorylation. Further investigation showed that hypoxia induces lysosomal autophagy and mitochondrial dysfunction through translational regulation in HCT116 cells. The abundance of several translation factors and the mTOR kinase activity are involved in hypoxia-induced mitochondrial autophagy in HCT116 cells. Our studies highlight the importance of translational regulation for tumor cell adaptation to hypoxia. PMID:27078027

  18. Recombinant host cells and media for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Brent E; Ingram, Lonnie O; Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W

    2014-02-18

    Disclosed are recombinant host cells suitable for degrading an oligosaccharide that have been optimized for growth and production of high yields of ethanol, and methods of making and using these cells. The invention further provides minimal media comprising urea-like compounds for economical production of ethanol by recombinant microorganisms. Recombinant host cells in accordance with the invention are modified by gene mutation to eliminate genes responsible for the production of unwanted products other than ethanol, thereby increasing the yield of ethanol produced from the oligosaccharides, relative to unmutated parent strains. The new and improved strains of recombinant bacteria are capable of superior ethanol productivity and yield when grown under conditions suitable for fermentation in minimal growth media containing inexpensive reagents. Systems optimized for ethanol production combine a selected optimized minimal medium with a recombinant host cell optimized for use in the selected medium. Preferred systems are suitable for efficient ethanol production by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using lignocellulose as an oligosaccharide source. The invention also provides novel isolated polynucleotide sequences, polypeptide sequences, vectors and antibodies.

  19. Atomic resolution insight into host cell recognition by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Blumenschein, Tharin M A; Friedrich, Nikolas; Childs, Robert A; Saouros, Savvas; Carpenter, Elisabeth P; Campanero-Rhodes, Maria A; Simpson, Peter; Chai, Wengang; Koutroukides, Theodoros; Blackman, Michael J; Feizi, Ten; Soldati-Favre, Dominique; Matthews, Stephen

    2007-06-01

    The obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, a member of the phylum Apicomplexa that includes Plasmodium spp., is one of the most widespread parasites and the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Micronemal proteins (MICs) are released onto the parasite surface just before invasion of host cells and play important roles in host cell recognition, attachment and penetration. Here, we report the atomic structure for a key MIC, TgMIC1, and reveal a novel cell-binding motif called the microneme adhesive repeat (MAR). Using glycoarray analyses, we identified a novel interaction with sialylated oligosaccharides that resolves several prevailing misconceptions concerning TgMIC1. Structural studies of various complexes between TgMIC1 and sialylated oligosaccharides provide high-resolution insights into the recognition of sialylated oligosaccharides by a parasite surface protein. We observe that MAR domains exist in tandem repeats, which provide a highly specialized structure for glycan discrimination. Our work uncovers new features of parasite-receptor interactions at the early stages of host cell invasion, which will assist the design of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:17491595

  20. Rosuvastatin Modulates the Post-Translational Acetylome in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming Chung; Hsing, Chung Hsi; Li, Fu An; Wu, Chien Hsing; Fu, Yaw Syan; Cheng, Jen Kun; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins are lipid-lowering drugs that can simultaneously evoke pleiotropic effects on cardioprotection, vasodilation, and diabetes prevention. Recently, statins have been reported to be able to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase, thereby up-regulating sirtuin (SIRT) that functions as non-histone deacetylases. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the post-translational acetylome that might explain the mechanism of statin-modulated pleiotropic effects. Methods Endothelial cells EAhy 926 treated with rosuvastatin were used to monitor the expression of SIRTs proteins. The protein lysates of both mock- and rosuvastatin-treated cells were further separated by two- dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with western blotting analysis. The significantly changed acetyl- containing proteins detected by using an anti-acetyl lysine antibody were collected from another preparative gel for mass spectrometric assay to identify the acetylated site in the proteins. Results Rosuvastatin treatment was shown to increase the SIRT1 expression when compared with SIRT2. Among 100 detected proteins with acetylated signal, 12 showed an increased level of acetylation, whereas 6 showed a decreased level of acetylation (deacetylation). The acetylated lysine (K) sites of 3 heat shock proteins, i.e., HSP47/K165, HSP70/K380, and heat shock-inducible protein/K417, were determined. We also found that beta-filamin, elongation factor, galectin and hCG22067 have 2 acetylated lysine sites in their peptide sequences. These dynamic acetylations might alter the protein’s function and are thought to be important in regulating statin-mediated pleiotropic effect. Conclusions Our study provided a feasible methodology for detecting acetylated proteins. This acetylome information may be utilized to explain, at least partially, the mechanisms of statin-derived pleiotropic effects. PMID:27122770

  1. In Situ Tissue Engineering of Functional Small-Diameter Blood Vessels by Host Circulating Cells Only.

    PubMed

    Talacua, Hanna; Smits, Anthal I P M; Muylaert, Dimitri E P; van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Vink, Aryan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Driessen-Mol, Anita; van Herwerden, Lex A; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2015-10-01

    Inflammation is a natural phase of the wound healing response, which can be harnessed for the in situ tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels using instructive, bioresorbable synthetic grafts. This process is dependent on colonization of the graft by host circulating cells and subsequent matrix formation. Typically, vascular regeneration in small animals is governed by transanastomotic cell ingrowth. However, this process is very rare in humans and hence less relevant for clinical translation. Therefore, a novel rat model was developed, in which cell ingrowth from the adjacent tissue is inhibited using Gore-Tex sheathing. Using this model, our aim here was to prove that functional blood vessels can be formed in situ through the host inflammatory response, specifically by blood-borne cells. The model was validated by implanting sex-mismatched aortic segments on either anastomoses of an electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) graft, filled with fibrin gel, into the rat abdominal aorta. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analysis revealed that after 1 and 3 months in vivo, over 90% of infiltrating cells originated from the bloodstream, confirming the effective shielding of transanastomotic cell ingrowth. Using the validated model, PCL/fibrin grafts were implanted, either or not loaded with monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and cell infiltration and tissue development were investigated at various key time points in the healing cascade. A phased healing response was observed, initiated by a rapid influx of inflammatory cells, mediated by the local release of MCP-1. After 3 months in vivo, the grafts consisted of a medial layer with smooth muscle cells in an oriented collagen matrix, an intimal layer with elastin fibers, and confluent endothelium. This study proves the regenerative potential of cells in the circulatory system in the setting of in situ vascular tissue engineering. PMID:26200255

  2. Dual Analysis of the Murine Cytomegalovirus and Host Cell Transcriptomes Reveal New Aspects of the Virus-Host Cell Interface

    PubMed Central

    Juranic Lisnic, Vanda; Babic Cac, Marina; Lisnic, Berislav; Trsan, Tihana; Mefferd, Adam; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Cook, Charles H.; Jonjic, Stipan; Trgovcich, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Major gaps in our knowledge of pathogen genes and how these gene products interact with host gene products to cause disease represent a major obstacle to progress in vaccine and antiviral drug development for the herpesviruses. To begin to bridge these gaps, we conducted a dual analysis of Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV) and host cell transcriptomes during lytic infection. We analyzed the MCMV transcriptome during lytic infection using both classical cDNA cloning and sequencing of viral transcripts and next generation sequencing of transcripts (RNA-Seq). We also investigated the host transcriptome using RNA-Seq combined with differential gene expression analysis, biological pathway analysis, and gene ontology analysis. We identify numerous novel spliced and unspliced transcripts of MCMV. Unexpectedly, the most abundantly transcribed viral genes are of unknown function. We found that the most abundant viral transcript, recently identified as a noncoding RNA regulating cellular microRNAs, also codes for a novel protein. To our knowledge, this is the first viral transcript that functions both as a noncoding RNA and an mRNA. We also report that lytic infection elicits a profound cellular response in fibroblasts. Highly upregulated and induced host genes included those involved in inflammation and immunity, but also many unexpected transcription factors and host genes related to development and differentiation. Many top downregulated and repressed genes are associated with functions whose roles in infection are obscure, including host long intergenic noncoding RNAs, antisense RNAs or small nucleolar RNAs. Correspondingly, many differentially expressed genes cluster in biological pathways that may shed new light on cytomegalovirus pathogenesis. Together, these findings provide new insights into the molecular warfare at the virus-host interface and suggest new areas of research to advance the understanding and treatment of cytomegalovirus-associated diseases. PMID:24086132

  3. Metal binding proteins, recombinant host cells and methods

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Anne O.; Caguiat, Jonathan J.

    2004-06-15

    The present disclosure provides artificial heavy metal binding proteins termed chelons by the inventors. These chelons bind cadmium and/or mercuric ions with relatively high affinity. Also disclosed are coding sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and recombinant host cells comprising those recombinant DNA molecules for expression of the chelon proteins. In the recombinant host cells or transgenic plants, the chelons can be used to bind heavy metals taken up from contaminated soil, groundwater or irrigation water and to concentrate and sequester those ions. Recombinant enteric bacteria can be used within the gastrointestinal tracts of animals or humans exposed to toxic metal ions such as mercury and/or cadmium, where the chelon recombinantly expressed in chosen in accordance with the ion to be rededicated. Alternatively, the chelons can be immobilized to solid supports to bind and concentrate heavy metals from a contaminated aqueous medium including biological fluids.

  4. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  5. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Di Genova, Bruno M.; Tonelli, Renata R.

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite–host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases’ pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death. PMID:26973630

  6. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.

  7. Infection Strategies of Intestinal Parasite Pathogens and Host Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Di Genova, Bruno M; Tonelli, Renata R

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia, Cryptosporidium sp., and Entamoeba histolytica are important pathogenic intestinal parasites and are amongst the leading causes worldwide of diarrheal illness in humans. Diseases caused by these organisms, giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, and amoebiasis, respectively, are characterized by self-limited diarrhea but can evolve to long-term complications. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of diarrhea associated with these three pathogens are being unraveled, with knowledge of both the strategies explored by the parasites to establish infection and the methods evolved by hosts to avoid it. Special attention is being given to molecules participating in parasite-host interaction and in the mechanisms implicated in the diseases' pathophysiologic processes. This review focuses on cell mechanisms that are modulated during infection, including gene transcription, cytoskeleton rearrangements, signal transduction pathways, and cell death.

  8. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction. PMID:23915134

  9. Stem cell recruitment of newly formed host cells via a successful seduction? Filling the gap between neurogenic niche and injured brain site.

    PubMed

    Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Yankee, Ernest; McGrogan, Michael; Case, Casey; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2013-01-01

    Here, we report that a unique mechanism of action exerted by stem cells in the repair of the traumatically injured brain involves their ability to harness a biobridge between neurogenic niche and injured brain site. This biobridge, visualized immunohistochemically and laser captured, corresponded to an area between the neurogenic subventricular zone and the injured cortex. That the biobridge expressed high levels of extracellular matrix metalloproteinases characterized initially by a stream of transplanted stem cells, but subsequently contained only few to non-detectable grafts and overgrown by newly formed host cells, implicates a novel property of stem cells. The transplanted stem cells manifest themselves as pathways for trafficking the migration of host neurogenic cells, but once this biobridge is formed between the neurogenic site and the injured brain site, the grafted cells disappear and relinquish their task to the host neurogenic cells. Our findings reveal that long-distance migration of host cells from the neurogenic niche to the injured brain site can be achieved through transplanted stem cells serving as biobridges for initiation of endogenous repair mechanisms. This is the first report of a stem cell-paved "biobridge". Indeed, to date the two major schools of discipline in stem cell repair mechanism primarily support the concept of "cell replacement" and bystander effects of "trophic factor secretion". The present novel observations of a stem cell seducing a host cell to engage in brain repair advances basic science concepts on stem cell biology and extracellular matrix, as well as provokes translational research on propagating this stem cell-paved biobridge beyond cell replacement and trophic factor secretion for the treatment of traumatic brain injury and other neurological disorders.

  10. Vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein inhibits host cell-directed transcription of target genes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Black, B L; Lyles, D S

    1992-01-01

    Infection by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) results in a rapid inhibition of host cell transcription and translation. To determine whether the viral matrix (M) protein was involved in this inhibition of host cell gene expression, an M protein expression vector was cotransfected with a target gene vector, encoding the target gene, encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Expression of M protein caused a decrease in CAT activity in a gene dosage-dependent manner, and inhibition was apparent by 12 h posttransfection. The inhibitory effect of M protein was quite potent. The level of M protein required for a 10-fold inhibition of CAT activity was less than 1% of the level of M protein produced during the sixth hour of VSV infection. Northern (RNA) analysis of cotransfected cells showed that expression of M protein caused a reduction in the steady-state level of the vector-encoded mRNAs. Expression of both CAT and M mRNAs was reduced in cells cotransfected with a plasmid encoding M protein, indicating that expression of small amounts of M protein from plasmid DNA inhibits further expression of both M and CAT mRNAs. Nuclear runoff transcription analysis demonstrated that expression of M protein inhibited transcription of the target genes. This is the first report of a viral gene product which is capable of inhibiting transcription in vivo in the absence of any other viral component. Images PMID:1318397

  11. Mammalian apoptotic signalling pathways: multiple targets of protozoan parasites to activate or deactivate host cell death.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Kristin; Hippe, Diana; Gross, Uwe; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2009-11-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential mechanism of the host to combat infectious agents and to regulate immunity during infection. Consequently, activation and deactivation of the hosts' cell death pathways by protozoan parasites play critical roles in parasite control, pathogenesis, immune evasion and parasite dissemination within the host. Here, we discuss advances in the understanding of these fascinating host-parasite interactions with special emphasis on how protozoa can modulate the cell death apparatus of its host.

  12. Arginase II Restricts Host Defense to Helicobacter pylori by Attenuating Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Translation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Singh, Kshipra; de Sablet, Thibaut; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Gobert, Alain P.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Despite eliciting a vigorous immune response, the bacterium persists for the life of the host. An important antimicrobial mechanism is the production of NO derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We have reported that macrophages can kill H. pylori in vitro by an NO-dependent mechanism, but supraphysiologic levels of the iNOS substrate L-arginine are required. Because H. pylori induces arginase activity in macrophages, we determined if this restricts NO generation by reducing L-arginine availability. Inhibition of arginase with S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC) significantly enhanced NO generation in H. pylori-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by enhancing iNOS protein translation but not iNOS mRNA levels. This effect resulted in increased killing of H. pylori that was attenuated with an NO scavenger. In contrast, inhibition of arginase in macrophages activated by the colitis-inducing bacterium Citrobacter rodentium increased NO without affecting iNOS levels. H. pylori upregulated levels of arginase II (Arg2) mRNA and protein, which localized to mitochondria, whereas arginase I was not induced. Increased iNOS protein and NO levels were also demonstrated by small interfering RNA knockdown of Arg2 and in peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 Arg2−/− mice. In H. pylori-infected mice, treatment with BEC or deletion of Arg2 increased iNOS protein levels and NO generation in gastric macrophages, but treatment of Arg2−/− mice with BEC had no additional effect. These studies implicate Arg2 in the immune evasion of H. pylori by causing intracellular depletion of L-arginine and thus reduction of NO-dependent bactericidal activity. PMID:20097867

  13. What's missing? Discussing stem cell translational research in educational information on stem cell "tourism".

    PubMed

    Master, Zubin; Zarzeczny, Amy; Rachul, Christen; Caulfield, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell tourism is a growing industry in which patients pursue unproven stem cell therapies for a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. It is a challenging market to regulate due to a number of factors including its international, online, direct-to-consumer approach. Calls to provide education and information to patients, their families, physicians, and the general public about the risks associated with stem cell tourism are mounting. Initial studies examining the perceptions of patients who have pursued stem cell tourism indicate many are highly critical of the research and regulatory systems in their home countries and believe them to be stagnant and unresponsive to patient needs. We suggest that educational material should include an explanation of the translational research process, in addition to other aspects of stem cell tourism, as one means to help promote greater understanding and, ideally, curb patient demand for unproven stem cell interventions. The material provided must stress that strong scientific research is required in order for therapies to be safe and have a greater chance at being effective. Through an analysis of educational material on stem cell tourism and translational stem cell research from patient groups and scientific societies, we describe essential elements that should be conveyed in educational material provided to patients. Although we support the broad dissemination of educational material on stem cell translational research, we also acknowledge that education may simply not be enough to engender patient and public trust in domestic research and regulatory systems. However, promoting patient autonomy by providing good quality information to patients so they can make better informed decisions is valuable in itself, irrespective of whether it serves as an effective deterrent of stem cell tourism.

  14. Casein kinase 1ε promotes cell proliferation by regulating mRNA translation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sejeong; Wolgamott, Laura; Roux, Philippe P; Yoon, Sang-Oh

    2014-01-01

    Deregulation of translation initiation factors contributes to many pathogenic conditions, including cancer. Here, we report the definition of a novel regulatory pathway for translational initiation with possible therapeutic import in cancer. Specifically, we found that casein kinase 1ε (CK1ε) is highly expressed in breast tumors and plays a critical role in cancer cell proliferation by controlling mRNA translation. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E, an essential component of the translation initiation complex eIF4F, is downregulated by binding the negative-acting factor 4E-BP1. We found that genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of CK1ε attenuated 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, thereby increasing 4E-BP1 binding to eIF4E and inhibiting mRNA translation. Mechanistic investigations showed that CK1ε interacted with and phosphorylated 4E-BP1 at two novel sites T41 and T50, which were essential for 4E-BP1 inactivation along with increased mRNA translation and cell proliferation. In summary, our work identified CK1ε as a pivotal regulator of mRNA translation and cell proliferation that acts by inhibiting 4E-BP1 function. As CK1ε is highly expressed in breast tumors, these findings offer an initial rationale to explore CK1ε blockade as a therapeutic strategy to treat cancers driven by deregulated mRNA translation.

  15. [Antiviral activity of murine interferons produced by bacterial and animal cell translation of messenger RNA].

    PubMed

    Mamontova, T V; Mentkevich, L M; Orlova, T G

    1980-01-01

    Interferon was produced by E. Coli bacteria and animal cell messenger-RNA--interferon translation (mRNA--IF). The activity of the interferon produced by simultaneous mRNA--IF translation in these two cellular systems was, approximately, similar. The interferons translated by bacteria and animal cells inhibited the cytopathic effect, reproduction and plaque-formation of vesicular stomatitis virus, and, to a greater extent, of mouse encephalomyocarditis virus. The virus titration was carried out by the dye-uptake method. The bacteria-translated interferon (BTIF) was more susceptible to the indicator-virus dose variation and had antiviral effect of shorter duration than the virus-induced and animal cell-translated interferon. The BTIF, probably, due to the action of bacterial proteolytic enzymes proved nonstable on storage.

  16. Translational Control of Viral Gene Expression in Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Michael; Tan, Seng-Lai; Katze, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    As obligate intracellular parasites, viruses rely exclusively on the translational machinery of the host cell for the synthesis of viral proteins. This relationship has imposed numerous challenges on both the infecting virus and the host cell. Importantly, viruses must compete with the endogenous transcripts of the host cell for the translation of viral mRNA. Eukaryotic viruses have thus evolved diverse mechanisms to ensure translational efficiency of viral mRNA above and beyond that of cellular mRNA. Mechanisms that facilitate the efficient and selective translation of viral mRNA may be inherent in the structure of the viral nucleic acid itself and can involve the recruitment and/or modification of specific host factors. These processes serve to redirect the translation apparatus to favor viral transcripts, and they often come at the expense of the host cell. Accordingly, eukaryotic cells have developed antiviral countermeasures to target the translational machinery and disrupt protein synthesis during the course of virus infection. Not to be outdone, many viruses have answered these countermeasures with their own mechanisms to disrupt cellular antiviral pathways, thereby ensuring the uncompromised translation of virion proteins. Here we review the varied and complex translational programs employed by eukaryotic viruses. We discuss how these translational strategies have been incorporated into the virus life cycle and examine how such programming contributes to the pathogenesis of the host cell. PMID:10839817

  17. Unsynchronized Translational and Rotational Diffusion of Nanocargo on a Living Cell Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Lehui; Wei, Lin; Liu, Chang; He, Yan; Yeung, Edward

    2012-03-16

    A robust high-speed and high-precision single nanoparticle translational and rotational tracking method has been developed to directly monitor the interactions between transferrin-modified nanocargos (gold nanorods) and the membrane proteins prior to endocytosis. This approach shows that the translational and rotational diffusions of nanocargos on living cell membranes are unsynchronized in space and in time.

  18. B Cells in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Blazar, Bruce R.; Cutler, Corey; Ritz, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) continues to be a common complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Unlike acute GVHD, which is mediated almost entirely by donor T cells, the immune pathology of cGVHD is more complex and donor B cells have also been found to play an important role. Recent studies from several laboratories have enhanced our understanding of how donor B cells contribute to this clinical syndrome and this has led to new therapeutic opportunities. Here, Dr. Sarantopoulos reviews some of the important mechanisms responsible for persistent B cell activation and loss of B cell tolerance in patients with cGVHD. Dr. Blazar describes recent studies in preclinical models that have identified novel B cell directed agents that may be effective for prevention or treatment of cGVHD. Some B cell directed therapies have already been tested in patients with cGVHD and Dr. Cutler reviews the results of these studies documenting the potential efficacy of this approach. Supported by studies mechanistic studies in patients and preclinical models, new B cell directed therapies for cGVHD will now be evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:25452031

  19. Dendritic cells in cytomegalovirus infection: viral evasion and host countermeasures.

    PubMed

    Rölle, Alexander; Olweus, Johanna

    2009-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a beta-herpesvirus that infects the majority of the population during early childhood and thereafter establishes life-long latency. Primary infection as well as spontaneous reactivation usually remains asymptomatic in healthy hosts but can, in the context of systemic immunosuppression, result in substantial morbidity and mortality. HCMV counteracts the host immune response by interfering with the recognition of infected cells. A growing body of literature has also suggested that the virus evades the immune system by paralyzing the initiators of antiviral immune responses--the dendritic cells (DCs). In the current review, we discuss the effects of CMV (HCMV and murine CMV) on various DC subsets and the ensuing innate and adaptive immune responses. The impact of HCMV on DCs has mainly been investigated using monocyte-derived DCs, which are rendered functionally impaired by infection. In mouse models, DCs are targets of viral evasion as well, but the complex cross-talk between DCs and natural killer cells has, however, demonstrated an instrumental role for DCs in the control and clearance of viral infection. Fewer studies address the role of peripheral blood DC subsets, plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c+ myeloid DCs in the response against HCMV. These DCs, rather than being paralyzed by HCMV, are largely resistant to infection, mount a vigorous first-line defense and induce T-cell responses to the virus. This possibly provides a partial explanation for an intriguing conundrum: the highly efficient control of viral infection and reactivation in immunocompetent hosts in spite of multi-layered viral evasion mechanisms.

  20. Enforcing temporal control of maternal mRNA translation during oocyte cell-cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Karthik; Wang, Yiying; Hardy, Linda L; MacNicol, Melanie C; MacNicol, Angus M

    2010-01-20

    Meiotic cell-cycle progression in progesterone-stimulated Xenopus oocytes requires that the translation of pre-existing maternal mRNAs occur in a strict temporal order. Timing of translation is regulated through elements within the mRNA 3' untranslated region (3' UTR), which respond to cell cycle-dependant signalling. One element that has been previously implicated in the temporal control of mRNA translation is the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE). In this study, we show that the CPE does not direct early mRNA translation. Rather, early translation is directed through specific early factors, including the Musashi-binding element (MBE) and the MBE-binding protein, Musashi. Our findings indicate that although the cyclin B5 3' UTR contains both CPEs and an MBE, the MBE is the critical regulator of early translation. The cyclin B2 3' UTR contains CPEs, but lacks an MBE and is translationally activated late in maturation. Finally, utilizing antisense oligonucleotides to attenuate endogenous Musashi synthesis, we show that Musashi is critical for the initiation of early class mRNA translation and for the subsequent activation of CPE-dependant mRNA translation.

  1. The early career researcher's toolkit: translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products.

    PubMed

    Rafiq, Qasim A; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I; Wilson, Samantha L; Patel, Asha K; Barnes, Amanda L; Adams, Christopher F; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine translation, we discuss common pitfalls associated with translational research, providing practical solutions and important considerations which will aid process and product development. Suggestions range from effective project management, consideration of key manufacturing, clinical and regulatory matters and means of exploiting research for successful commercialization. PMID:26628407

  2. Bright Fluorescent Streptococcus pneumoniae for Live-Cell Imaging of Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kjos, Morten; Aprianto, Rieza; Fernandes, Vitor E.; Andrew, Peter W.; van Strijp, Jos A. G.; Nijland, Reindert

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common nasopharyngeal resident in healthy people but, at the same time, one of the major causes of infectious diseases such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis. The shift from commensal to pathogen and its interaction with host cells are poorly understood. One of the major limitations for research on pneumococcal-host interactions is the lack of suitable tools for live-cell imaging. To address this issue, we developed a generally applicable strategy to create genetically stable, highly fluorescent bacteria. Our strategy relies on fusing superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) or a far-red fluorescent protein (RFP) to the abundant histone-like protein HlpA. Due to efficient translation and limited cellular diffusion of these fusions, the cells are 25-fold brighter than those of the currently best available imaging S. pneumoniae strain. These novel bright pneumococcal strains are fully virulent, and the GFP reporter can be used for in situ imaging in mouse tissue. We used our reporter strains to study the effect of the polysaccharide capsule, a major pneumococcal virulence factor, on different stages of infection. By dual-color live-cell imaging experiments, we show that unencapsulated pneumococci adhere significantly better to human lung epithelial cells than encapsulated strains, in line with previous data obtained by classical approaches. We also confirm with live-cell imaging that the capsule protects pneumococci from neutrophil phagocytosis, demonstrating the versatility and usability of our reporters. The described imaging tools will pave the way for live-cell imaging of pneumococcal infection and help further understanding of the mechanisms of pneumococcal pathogenesis. PMID:25512311

  3. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle. PMID:27180572

  4. Efficient transgene expression by alleviation of translational repression in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Kiyotaka; Okawara, Renya; Yamasaki, Shotaro; Sanada, Yuji; Kinoshita, Eri; Yoneda, Arata; Demura, Taku; Kato, Ko

    2014-10-01

    Global translational repression under abiotic stress influences translation of both endogenous and transgene mRNAs. Even in plant cell culture, hypoxia and nutrient deficient stress arise during the growth process. In this study, we first demonstrated the existence of global translational repression in Arabidopsis T87 cultured cells over a time course following inoculation. Next, we performed genome-wide analysis, which revealed that the translational states of endogenous mRNAs differed significantly between growth and stationary phase cells. This analysis showed that translation from most mRNAs was repressed upon stationary phase. Otherwise, a part of mRNA including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) gene was recalcitrant to the repression. Furthermore, by polysome analysis and followed quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of transformants having 5'untranslated regions (UTRs) of ADH or translationally repressed At3g47610 mRNA fused to reporter gene, we demonstrated that polysomal associations of reporter mRNAs were in accordance with those the mRNAs from which their 5'UTR derived, suggesting that the 5'UTR is an important determinant of the translational state of mRNAs in stationary phase cells. Finally, we demonstrated the effectiveness of 5'UTR of ADH mRNA in transformants derived from the BY-2 tobacco cell line. These results suggested that 5'UTR of ADH mRNA would be a useful element for efficient transgene expression upon stationary phase.

  5. Exploring adenylylation and phosphocholination as post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias P; Albers, Michael F; Itzen, Aymelt; Hedberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Editing the translations: Adenylylation and phosphocholination have recently been found as important post-translational modifications used by pathogenic bacteria during the infection process. This review discusses the combined use of chemical handles and specific antibodies for the identification of previously unknown substrates of these post-translational modifications in infected host cells.

  6. Influenza virus binds its host cell using multiple dynamic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sieben, Christian; Kappel, Christian; Zhu, Rong; Wozniak, Anna; Rankl, Christian; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Grubmüller, Helmut; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus belongs to a wide range of enveloped viruses. The major spike protein hemagglutinin binds sialic acid residues of glycoproteins and glycolipids with dissociation constants in the millimolar range [Sauter NK, et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31:9609–9621], indicating a multivalent binding mode. Here, we characterized the attachment of influenza virus to host cell receptors using three independent approaches. Optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule force spectroscopy revealed very low interaction forces. Further, the observation of sequential unbinding events strongly suggests a multivalent binding mode between virus and cell membrane. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal a variety of unbinding pathways that indicate a highly dynamic interaction between HA and its receptor, allowing rationalization of influenza virus–cell binding quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:22869709

  7. Graft-versus-host-related immunosuppression is induced in mixed chimeras by alloresponses against either host or donor lymphohematopoietic cells

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Graft-vs.-host (GVH)-related immunosuppression has previously been demonstrated in F1 rodent recipients of parental lymphoid cells, and has been thought to result from an immunologic attack of the donor against the host. Since all cells of such F1 recipients could potentially bear target class I MHC alloantigens, it has not previously been possible to determine precisely the target tissues responsible for development of GVH-related effects. In the present studies we have used mixed allogeneic chimeras as recipients of host or donor-strain lymphocyte inocula, and have made the surprising observation that "GVH- induced" immune unresponsiveness does not require GVH reactivity, per se, but develops in the presence of a one-way alloresponse against lymphohematopoietic cells in either the GVH or the host-versus-graft direction. PMID:3264329

  8. Clinical and preclinical translation of cell-based therapies using adipose tissue-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue is now recognized as an accessible, abundant, and reliable site for the isolation of adult stem cells suitable for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The past decade has witnessed an explosion of preclinical data relating to the isolation, characterization, cryopreservation, differentiation, and transplantation of freshly isolated stromal vascular fraction cells and adherent, culture-expanded, adipose-derived stromal/stem cells in vitro and in animal models. This body of work has provided evidence supporting clinical translational applications of adipose-derived cells in safety and efficacy trials. The present article reviews the case reports and phase I-III clinical evidence using autologous adipose-derived cells that have been published, to date, in the fields of gastroenterology, neurology, orthopedics, reconstructive surgery, and related clinical disciplines. Future directions and challenges facing the field are discussed and evaluated. PMID:20587076

  9. Interaction of human tumor viruses with host cell surface receptors and cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Katz, Arieh A

    2015-05-22

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection.

  10. Interaction of Human Tumor Viruses with Host Cell Surface Receptors and Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Georgia; Blumenthal, Melissa J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, seven viruses, namely Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), have been described to be consistently associated with different types of human cancer. These oncogenic viruses belong to distinct viral families, display diverse cell tropism and cause different malignancies. A key to their pathogenicity is attachment to the host cell and entry in order to replicate and complete their life cycle. Interaction with the host cell during viral entry is characterized by a sequence of events, involving viral envelope and/or capsid molecules as well as cellular entry factors that are critical in target cell recognition, thereby determining cell tropism. Most oncogenic viruses initially attach to cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans, followed by conformational change and transfer of the viral particle to secondary high-affinity cell- and virus-specific receptors. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the host cell surface factors and molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenic virus binding and uptake by their cognate host cell(s) with the aim to provide a concise overview of potential target molecules for prevention and/or treatment of oncogenic virus infection. PMID:26008702

  11. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  12. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  13. Measles Virus Matrix Protein Inhibits Host Cell Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xuelian; Shahriari, Shadi; Li, Hong-Mei; Ghildyal, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious virus that still causes annual epidemics in developing countries despite the availability of a safe and effective vaccine. Additionally, importation from endemic countries causes frequent outbreaks in countries where it has been eliminated. The M protein of MeV plays a key role in virus assembly and cytopathogenesis; interestingly, M is localised in nucleus, cytoplasm and membranes of infected cells. We have used transient expression of M in transfected cells and in-cell transcription assays to show that only some MeV M localizes to the nucleus, in addition to cell membranes and the cytoplasm as previously described, and can inhibit cellular transcription via binding to nuclear factors. Additionally, MeV M was able to inhibit in vitro transcription in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, a proportion of M is also localized to nucleus of MeV infected cells at early times in infection, correlating with inhibition of cellular transcription. Our data show, for the first time, that MeV M may play a role early in infection by inhibiting host cell transcription. PMID:27551716

  14. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Ahmed, Atique U.

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis—all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting. PMID:26633462

  15. Stem Cell-Based Cell Carrier for Targeted Oncolytic Virotherapy: Translational Opportunity and Open Questions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Janice; Hall, Robert R; Lesniak, Maciej S; Ahmed, Atique U

    2015-11-27

    Oncolytic virotherapy for cancer is an innovative therapeutic option where the ability of a virus to promote cell lysis is harnessed and reprogrammed to selectively destroy cancer cells. Such treatment modalities exhibited antitumor activity in preclinical and clinical settings and appear to be well tolerated when tested in clinical trials. However, the clinical success of oncolytic virotherapy has been significantly hampered due to the inability to target systematic metastasis. This is partly due to the inability of the therapeutic virus to survive in the patient circulation, in order to target tumors at distant sites. An early study from various laboratories demonstrated that cells infected with oncolytic virus can protect the therapeutic payload form the host immune system as well as function as factories for virus production and enhance the therapeutic efficacy of oncolytic virus. While a variety of cell lineages possessed potential as cell carriers, copious investigation has established stem cells as a very attractive cell carrier system in oncolytic virotherapy. The ideal cell carrier desire to be susceptible to viral infection as well as support viral infection, maintain immunosuppressive properties to shield the loaded viruses from the host immune system, and most importantly possess an intrinsic tumor homing ability to deliver loaded viruses directly to the site of the metastasis-all qualities stem cells exhibit. In this review, we summarize the recent work in the development of stem cell-based carrier for oncolytic virotherapy, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of cell carriers, especially focusing on why stem cells have emerged as the leading candidate, and finally propose a future direction for stem cell-based targeted oncolytic virotherapy that involves its establishment as a viable treatment option for cancer patients in the clinical setting.

  16. Molecular anatomy of mouse hepatitis virus persistence: coevolution of increased host cell resistance and virus virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Baric, R S

    1996-01-01

    Persistent infection of murine astrocytoma (DBT) cells with mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) has been established. From this in vitro virus-host system, persistence is mediated at the level of cellular MHV receptor (MHVR) expression and increased virus virulence. MHV persistence selects for resistant host cell populations which abate virus replication. Reductions in MHVR expression were significantly associated with increased host resistance, and transfection of MHVR into resistant host cells completely restored the capacity of cells to support efficient replication of MHV strain A59. The emergence of resistant host cells coselected for variant viruses that had increased avidity for MHVR and also recognized different receptors for entry into resistant cells. These data illustrate that MHV persistence in vitro provides a model to identify critical sites of virus-host interaction at the cellular level which are altered during the evolution of host cell resistance to viral infection and the coevolution of virus virulence. PMID:8648732

  17. Chlamydial Lytic Exit from Host Cells Is Plasmid Regulated

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunfu; Starr, Tregei; Song, Lihua; Carlson, John H.; Sturdevant, Gail L.; Beare, Paul A.; Whitmire, William M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular bacterium that is a globally important human pathogen. The chlamydial plasmid is an attenuating virulence factor, but the molecular basis for attenuation is not understood. Chlamydiae replicate within a membrane-bound vacuole termed an inclusion, where they undergo a biphasic developmental growth cycle and differentiate from noninfectious into infectious organisms. Late in the developmental cycle, the fragile chlamydia-laden inclusion retains its integrity by surrounding itself with scaffolds of host cytoskeletal proteins. The ability of chlamydiae to developmentally free themselves from this cytoskeleton network is a fundamental virulence trait of the pathogen. Here, we show that plasmidless chlamydiae are incapable of disrupting their cytoskeletal entrapment and remain intracellular as stable mature inclusions that support high numbers of infectious organisms. By using deletion mutants of the eight plasmid-carried genes (Δpgp1 to Δpgp8), we show that Pgp4, a transcriptional regulator of multiple chromosomal genes, is required for exit. Exit of chlamydiae is dependent on protein synthesis and is inhibited by the compound C1, an inhibitor of the type III secretion system (T3S). Exit of plasmid-free and Δpgp4 organisms, which failed to lyse infected cells, was rescued by latrunculin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization. Our findings describe a genetic mechanism of chlamydial exit from host cells that is dependent on an unknown pgp4-regulated chromosomal T3S effector gene. PMID:26556273

  18. Phase Transition of the Bacterium upon Invasion of a Host Cell as a Mechanism of Adaptation: a Mycoplasma gallisepticum Model

    PubMed Central

    Matyushkina, Daria; Pobeguts, Olga; Butenko, Ivan; Vanyushkina, Anna; Anikanov, Nicolay; Bukato, Olga; Evsyutina, Daria; Bogomazova, Alexandra; Lagarkova, Maria; Semashko, Tatiana; Garanina, Irina; Babenko, Vladislav; Vakhitova, Maria; Ladygina, Valentina; Fisunov, Gleb; Govorun, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    What strategies do bacteria employ for adaptation to their hosts and are these strategies different for varied hosts? To date, many studies on the interaction of the bacterium and its host have been published. However, global changes in the bacterial cell in the process of invasion and persistence, remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated phase transition of the avian pathogen Mycoplasma gallisepticum upon invasion of the various types of eukaryotic cells (human, chicken, and mouse) which was stable during several passages after isolation of intracellular clones and recultivation in a culture medium. It was shown that this phase transition is manifested in changes at the proteomic, genomic and metabolomic levels. Eukaryotic cells induced similar proteome reorganization of M. gallisepticum during infection, despite different origins of the host cell lines. Proteomic changes affected a broad range of processes including metabolism, translation and oxidative stress response. We determined that the activation of glycerol utilization, overproduction of hydrogen peroxide and the upregulation of the SpxA regulatory protein occurred during intracellular infection. We propose SpxA as an important regulator for the adaptation of M. gallisepticum to an intracellular environment. PMID:27775027

  19. Understanding translational control mechanisms of the mTOR pathway in CHO cells by polysome profiling.

    PubMed

    Courtes, Franck C; Vardy, Leah; Wong, Niki S C; Bardor, Muriel; Yap, Miranda G S; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2014-09-25

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway plays essential roles in the regulation of translational activity in many eukaryotes. Thus, from a bioprocessing point of view, understanding its molecular mechanisms may provide potential avenues for improving cell culture performance. Toward this end, the mTOR pathway of CHO cells in batch cultures was subjected to rapamycin treatment (inhibition) or nutrient supplementation (induction) and translational activities of CHO cells producing a monoclonal antibody (mAb) were evaluated with polysome profiling technology. Expectedly, rapamycin induced a shift of mRNAs from polysomes towards monosomes, thus reducing maximum cellular growth rate by 30%, while feeding additional nutrients extended mTOR pathway activity during the stationary growth phase in control batch culture, thereby contributing to an increase in global translation activity by up to 2-fold, and up to 5-fold higher specific translation of the heavy and light chains of the recombinant mAb. These increases in translation activity correlated with a 5-day extension in cellular growth and a 4-fold higher final product titer observed upon nutrient feeding. This first study of the relationship between the mTOR pathway and translational activity in CHO cultures provides key insights into the role of translational control in supporting greater productivity, which will lead to further enhancement of CHO cultures.

  20. Implementation of a Permeable Membrane Insert-based Infection System to Study the Effects of Secreted Bacterial Toxins on Mammalian Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Rebecca A; Lee, Shaun W

    2016-08-19

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete potent toxins to aid in the destruction of host tissue, to initiate signaling changes in host cells or to manipulate immune system responses during the course of infection. Though methods have been developed to successfully purify and produce many of these important virulence factors, there are still many bacterial toxins whose unique structure or extensive post-translational modifications make them difficult to purify and study in in vitro systems. Furthermore, even when pure toxin can be obtained, there are many challenges associated with studying the specific effects of a toxin under relevant physiological conditions. Most in vitro cell culture models designed to assess the effects of secreted bacterial toxins on host cells involve incubating host cells with a one-time dose of toxin. Such methods poorly approximate what host cells actually experience during an infection, where toxin is continually produced by bacterial cells and allowed to accumulate gradually during the course of infection. This protocol describes the design of a permeable membrane insert-based bacterial infection system to study the effects of Streptolysin S, a potent toxin produced by Group A Streptococcus, on human epithelial keratinocytes. This system more closely mimics the natural physiological environment during an infection than methods where pure toxin or bacterial supernatants are directly applied to host cells. Importantly, this method also eliminates the bias of host responses that are due to direct contact between the bacteria and host cells. This system has been utilized to effectively assess the effects of Streptolysin S (SLS) on host membrane integrity, cellular viability, and cellular signaling responses. This technique can be readily applied to the study of other secreted virulence factors on a variety of mammalian host cell types to investigate the specific role of a secreted bacterial factor during the course of infection.

  1. Implementation of a Permeable Membrane Insert-based Infection System to Study the Effects of Secreted Bacterial Toxins on Mammalian Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Rebecca A; Lee, Shaun W

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens secrete potent toxins to aid in the destruction of host tissue, to initiate signaling changes in host cells or to manipulate immune system responses during the course of infection. Though methods have been developed to successfully purify and produce many of these important virulence factors, there are still many bacterial toxins whose unique structure or extensive post-translational modifications make them difficult to purify and study in in vitro systems. Furthermore, even when pure toxin can be obtained, there are many challenges associated with studying the specific effects of a toxin under relevant physiological conditions. Most in vitro cell culture models designed to assess the effects of secreted bacterial toxins on host cells involve incubating host cells with a one-time dose of toxin. Such methods poorly approximate what host cells actually experience during an infection, where toxin is continually produced by bacterial cells and allowed to accumulate gradually during the course of infection. This protocol describes the design of a permeable membrane insert-based bacterial infection system to study the effects of Streptolysin S, a potent toxin produced by Group A Streptococcus, on human epithelial keratinocytes. This system more closely mimics the natural physiological environment during an infection than methods where pure toxin or bacterial supernatants are directly applied to host cells. Importantly, this method also eliminates the bias of host responses that are due to direct contact between the bacteria and host cells. This system has been utilized to effectively assess the effects of Streptolysin S (SLS) on host membrane integrity, cellular viability, and cellular signaling responses. This technique can be readily applied to the study of other secreted virulence factors on a variety of mammalian host cell types to investigate the specific role of a secreted bacterial factor during the course of infection. PMID:27585035

  2. A Viral mRNA Motif at the 3′-Untranslated Region that Confers Translatability in a Cell-Specific Manner. Implications for Virus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Moreno, Manuel; Sanz, Miguel Angel; Carrasco, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) mRNAs contain several motifs that participate in the regulation of their translation. We have discovered a motif at the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of viral mRNAs, constituted by three repeated sequences, which is involved in the translation of both SINV genomic and subgenomic mRNAs in insect, but not in mammalian cells. These data illustrate for the first time that an element present at the 3′-UTR confers translatability to mRNAs from an animal virus in a cell-specific manner. Sequences located at the beginning of the 5′-UTR may also regulate SINV subgenomic mRNA translation in both cell lines in a context of infection. Moreover, a replicon derived from Sleeping disease virus, an alphavirus that have no known arthropod vector for transmission, is much more efficient in insect cells when the repeated sequences from SINV are inserted at its 3′-UTR, due to the enhanced translatability of its mRNAs. Thus, these findings provide a clue to understand, at the molecular level, the evolution of alphaviruses and their host range. PMID:26755446

  3. Biological insights into the expression of translation initiation factors from recombinant CHOK1SV cell lines and their relationship to enhanced productivity.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Masterton, Rosalyn J; Feary, Marc; Obrezanova, Olga; Zhang, Lin; Young, Robert; Smales, C Mark

    2015-12-15

    Translation initiation is on the critical pathway for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by mammalian cells. Formation of a closed loop structure comprised of mRNA, a number of eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) and ribosomal proteins has been proposed to aid re-initiation of translation and therefore increase global translational efficiency. We have determined mRNA and protein levels of the key components of the closed loop, eIFs (eIF3a, eIF3b, eIF3c, eIF3h, eIF3i and eIF4G1), poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) 1 and PABP-interacting protein 1 (PAIP1), across a panel of 30 recombinant mAb-producing GS-CHOK1SV cell lines with a broad range of growth characteristics and production levels of a model recombinant mAb. We have used a multi-level statistical approach to investigate the relationship between key performance indicators (cell growth and recombinant antibody productivity) and the intracellular amounts of target translation initiation factor proteins and the mRNAs encoding them. We show that high-producing cell lines maintain amounts of the translation initiation factors involved in the formation of the closed loop mRNA, maintaining these proteins at appropriate levels to deliver enhanced recombinant protein production. We then utilize knowledge of the amounts of these factors to build predictive models for and use cluster analysis to identify, high-producing cell lines. The present study therefore defines the translation initiation factor amounts that are associated with highly productive recombinant GS-CHOK1SV cell lines that may be targets for screening highly productive cell lines or to engineer new host cell lines with the potential for enhanced recombinant antibody productivity. PMID:26420881

  4. Biological insights into the expression of translation initiation factors from recombinant CHOK1SV cell lines and their relationship to enhanced productivity.

    PubMed

    Mead, Emma J; Masterton, Rosalyn J; Feary, Marc; Obrezanova, Olga; Zhang, Lin; Young, Robert; Smales, C Mark

    2015-12-15

    Translation initiation is on the critical pathway for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by mammalian cells. Formation of a closed loop structure comprised of mRNA, a number of eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) and ribosomal proteins has been proposed to aid re-initiation of translation and therefore increase global translational efficiency. We have determined mRNA and protein levels of the key components of the closed loop, eIFs (eIF3a, eIF3b, eIF3c, eIF3h, eIF3i and eIF4G1), poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) 1 and PABP-interacting protein 1 (PAIP1), across a panel of 30 recombinant mAb-producing GS-CHOK1SV cell lines with a broad range of growth characteristics and production levels of a model recombinant mAb. We have used a multi-level statistical approach to investigate the relationship between key performance indicators (cell growth and recombinant antibody productivity) and the intracellular amounts of target translation initiation factor proteins and the mRNAs encoding them. We show that high-producing cell lines maintain amounts of the translation initiation factors involved in the formation of the closed loop mRNA, maintaining these proteins at appropriate levels to deliver enhanced recombinant protein production. We then utilize knowledge of the amounts of these factors to build predictive models for and use cluster analysis to identify, high-producing cell lines. The present study therefore defines the translation initiation factor amounts that are associated with highly productive recombinant GS-CHOK1SV cell lines that may be targets for screening highly productive cell lines or to engineer new host cell lines with the potential for enhanced recombinant antibody productivity.

  5. Lost in translation: pluripotent stem cell-derived hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Mania; Liebhaber, Steffi; Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Lachmann, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) such as embryonic stem cells or induced pluripotent stem cells represent a promising cell type to gain novel insights into human biology. Understanding the differentiation process of PSCs in vitro may allow for the identification of cell extrinsic/intrinsic factors, driving the specification process toward all cell types of the three germ layers, which may be similar to the human in vivo scenario. This would not only lay the ground for an improved understanding of human embryonic development but would also contribute toward the generation of novel cell types used in cell replacement therapies. In this line, especially the developmental process of mesodermal cells toward the hematopoietic lineage is of great interest. Therefore, this review highlights recent progress in the field of hematopoietic specification of pluripotent stem cell sources. In addition, we would like to shed light on emerging factors controlling primitive and definitive hematopoietic development and to highlight recent approaches to improve the differentiation potential of PSC sources toward hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. While the generation of fully defined hematopoietic stem cells from PSCs remains challenging in vitro, we here underline the instructive role of cell extrinsic factors such as cytokines for the generation of PSC-derived mature hematopoietic cells. Thus, we have comprehensively examined the role of cytokines for the derivation of mature hematopoietic cell types such as macrophages, granulocytes, megakaryocytes, erythrocytes, dendritic cells, and cells of the B- and T-cell lineage. PMID:26174486

  6. How stem cells speak with host immune cells in inflammatory brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2013-09-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases.

  7. Fierce Competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for Host Cell Structures in Dually Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Julia D.; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A.; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M.

    2013-01-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients. PMID:23243063

  8. Fierce competition between Toxoplasma and Chlamydia for host cell structures in dually infected cells.

    PubMed

    Romano, Julia D; de Beaumont, Catherine; Carrasco, Jose A; Ehrenman, Karen; Bavoil, Patrik M; Coppens, Isabelle

    2013-02-01

    The prokaryote Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, two obligate intracellular pathogens of humans, have evolved a similar modus operandi to colonize their host cell and salvage nutrients from organelles. In order to gain fundamental knowledge on the pathogenicity of these microorganisms, we have established a cell culture model whereby single fibroblasts are coinfected by C. trachomatis and T. gondii. We previously reported that the two pathogens compete for the same nutrient pools in coinfected cells and that Toxoplasma holds a significant competitive advantage over Chlamydia. Here we have expanded our coinfection studies by examining the respective abilities of Chlamydia and Toxoplasma to co-opt the host cytoskeleton and recruit organelles. We demonstrate that the two pathogen-containing vacuoles migrate independently to the host perinuclear region and rearrange the host microtubular network around each vacuole. However, Toxoplasma outcompetes Chlamydia to the host microtubule-organizing center to the detriment of the bacterium, which then shifts to a stress-induced persistent state. Solely in cells preinfected with Chlamydia, the centrosomes become associated with the chlamydial inclusion, while the Toxoplasma parasitophorous vacuole displays growth defects. Both pathogens fragment the host Golgi apparatus and recruit Golgi elements to retrieve sphingolipids. This study demonstrates that the productive infection by both Chlamydia and Toxoplasma depends on the capability of each pathogen to successfully adhere to a finely tuned developmental program that aims to remodel the host cell for the pathogen's benefit. In particular, this investigation emphasizes the essentiality of host organelle interception by intravacuolar pathogens to facilitate access to nutrients.

  9. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements.

  10. Escherichia coli persister cells suppress translation by selectively disassembling and degrading their ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Junho; Rogers, Janet; Kearns, Mark; Leslie, Macall; Hartson, Steven D; Wilson, Kevin S

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persisters are rare, phenotypically distinct cells that survive exposure to multiple antibiotics. Previous studies indicated that formation and maintenance of the persister phenotype are regulated by suppressing translation. To examine the mechanism of this translational suppression, we developed novel methodology to rapidly purify ribosome complexes from persister cells. We purified His-tagged ribosomes from Escherichia coli cells that over-expressed HipA protein, which induces persister formation, and were treated with ampicillin to remove antibiotic-sensitive cells. We profiled ribosome complexes and analyzed the ribosomal RNA and protein components from these persister cells. Our results show that (i) ribosomes in persisters exist largely as inactive ribosomal subunits, (ii) rRNAs and tRNAs are mostly degraded and (iii) a small fraction of the ribosomes remain mostly intact, except for reduced amounts of seven ribosomal proteins. Our findings explain the basis for translational suppression in persisters and suggest how persisters survive exposure to multiple antibiotics.

  11. Emerging functions as host cell factors - an encyclopedia of annexin-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Kuehnl, Alexander; Musiol, Agnes; Raabe, Carsten A; Rescher, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Emerging infectious diseases and drug-resistant infectious agents call for the development of innovative antimicrobial strategies. With pathogenicity now considered to arise from the complex and bi-directional interplay between a microbe and the host, host cell factor targeting has emerged as a promising approach that might overcome the limitations of classical antimicrobial drug development and could open up novel and efficient therapeutic strategies. Interaction with and modulation of host cell membranes is a recurrent theme in the host-microbe relationship. In this review, we provide an overview of what is currently known about the role of the Ca2+ dependent, membrane-binding annexin protein family in pathogen-host interactions, and discuss their emerging functions as host cell derived auxiliary proteins in microbe-host interactions and host cell targets.

  12. Inter-polysomal coupling of termination and initiation during translation in eukaryotic cell-free system.

    PubMed

    Sogorin, Evgeny A; Agalarov, Sultan Ch; Spirin, Alexander S

    2016-01-01

    The recording of the luciferase-generated luminescence in the eukaryotic cell-free translation system programmed with mRNA encoding firefly luciferase (Luc-mRNA) showed that the addition of free exogenous mRNAs into the translation reactor induces the immediate release of the functionally active protein from the polyribosomes of the translation system. The phenomenon did not depend on the coding specificity of the added free mRNA. At the same time it depended on the "initiation potential" of the added mRNA (including the features that ensure the successful initiation of translation, such as the presence of the cap structure and the sufficient concentration of the added mRNA in the translation mixture). The phenomenon also strictly depended on the presence of the stop codon in the translated mRNA. As the above-mentioned features of the added mRNA imply its activity in initiation of a new translation, the experimental data are found in agreement with the scenario where the molecules of the added mRNA interact by their 5'-ends with terminating and recycling ribosomes, stimulating the release of the complete polypeptides and providing for the initiation of a new translation. PMID:27075299

  13. Inter-polysomal coupling of termination and initiation during translation in eukaryotic cell-free system

    PubMed Central

    Sogorin, Evgeny A.; Agalarov, Sultan Ch.; Spirin, Alexander S.

    2016-01-01

    The recording of the luciferase-generated luminescence in the eukaryotic cell-free translation system programmed with mRNA encoding firefly luciferase (Luc-mRNA) showed that the addition of free exogenous mRNAs into the translation reactor induces the immediate release of the functionally active protein from the polyribosomes of the translation system. The phenomenon did not depend on the coding specificity of the added free mRNA. At the same time it depended on the “initiation potential” of the added mRNA (including the features that ensure the successful initiation of translation, such as the presence of the cap structure and the sufficient concentration of the added mRNA in the translation mixture). The phenomenon also strictly depended on the presence of the stop codon in the translated mRNA. As the above-mentioned features of the added mRNA imply its activity in initiation of a new translation, the experimental data are found in agreement with the scenario where the molecules of the added mRNA interact by their 5′-ends with terminating and recycling ribosomes, stimulating the release of the complete polypeptides and providing for the initiation of a new translation. PMID:27075299

  14. Visualization of single endogenous polysomes reveals the dynamics of translation in live human cells.

    PubMed

    Pichon, Xavier; Bastide, Amandine; Safieddine, Adham; Chouaib, Racha; Samacoits, Aubin; Basyuk, Eugenia; Peter, Marion; Mueller, Florian; Bertrand, Edouard

    2016-09-12

    Translation is an essential step in gene expression. In this study, we used an improved SunTag system to label nascent proteins and image translation of single messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) in human cells. Using a dedicated reporter RNA, we observe that translation of single mRNPs stochastically turns on and off while they diffuse through the cytoplasm. We further measure a ribosome density of 1.3 per kilobase and an elongation rate of 13-18 amino acids per second. Tagging the endogenous POLR2A gene revealed similar elongation rates and ribosomal densities and that nearly all messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are engaged in translation. Remarkably, tagging of the heavy chain of dynein 1 (DYNC1H1) shows this mRNA accumulates in foci containing three to seven RNA molecules. These foci are translation sites and thus represent specialized translation factories. We also observe that DYNC1H1 polysomes are actively transported by motors, which may deliver the mature protein at appropriate cellular locations. The SunTag should be broadly applicable to study translational regulation in live single cells. PMID:27597760

  15. Ligation-free ribosome profiling of cell type-specific translation in the brain.

    PubMed

    Hornstein, Nicholas; Torres, Daniela; Das Sharma, Sohani; Tang, Guomei; Canoll, Peter; Sims, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome profiling has emerged as a powerful tool for genome-wide measurements of translation, but library construction requires multiple ligation steps and remains cumbersome relative to more conventional deep-sequencing experiments. We report a new, ligation-free approach to ribosome profiling that does not require ligation. Library construction for ligation-free ribosome profiling can be completed in one day with as little as 1 ng of purified RNA footprints. We apply ligation-free ribosome profiling to mouse brain tissue to identify new patterns of cell type-specific translation and test its ability to identify translational targets of mTOR signaling in the brain.

  16. Roles of the Picornaviral 3C Proteinase in the Viral Life Cycle and Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Di; Chen, Shun; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu

    2016-01-01

    The Picornaviridae family comprises a large group of non-enveloped viruses that have a major impact on human and veterinary health. The viral genome contains one open reading frame encoding a single polyprotein that can be processed by viral proteinases. The crucial 3C proteinases (3Cpros) of picornaviruses share similar spatial structures and it is becoming apparent that 3Cpro plays a significant role in the viral life cycle and virus host interaction. Importantly, the proteinase and RNA-binding activity of 3Cpro are involved in viral polyprotein processing and the initiation of viral RNA synthesis. In addition, 3Cpro can induce the cleavage of certain cellular factors required for transcription, translation and nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to modulate cell physiology for viral replication. Due to interactions between 3Cpro and these essential factors, 3Cpro is also involved in viral pathogenesis to support efficient infection. Furthermore, based on the structural conservation, the development of irreversible inhibitors and discovery of non-covalent inhibitors for 3Cpro are ongoing and a better understanding of the roles played by 3Cpro may provide insights into the development of potential antiviral treatments. In this review, the current knowledge regarding the structural features, multiple functions in the viral life cycle, pathogen host interaction, and development of antiviral compounds for 3Cpro is summarized. PMID:26999188

  17. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Is a Feed-Forward Translational Coactivator of Transforming Growth Factor β Early Protransforming Events in Breast Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarlo, Lindsey; Mestel, Celine; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is overexpressed early in breast cancers in association with disease progression and reduced survival. Much remains to be understood regarding the role of eIF4E in human cancer. We determined, using immortalized human breast epithelial cells, that elevated expression of eIF4E translationally activates the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway, promoting cell invasion, a loss of cell polarity, increased cell survival, and other hallmarks of early neoplasia. Overexpression of eIF4E is shown to facilitate the selective translation of integrin β1 mRNA, which drives the translationally controlled assembly of a TGF-β receptor signaling complex containing α3β1 integrins, β-catenin, TGF-β receptor I, E-cadherin, and phosphorylated Smad2/3. This receptor complex acutely sensitizes nonmalignant breast epithelial cells to activation by typically substimulatory levels of activated TGF-β. TGF-β can promote cellular differentiation or invasion and transformation. As a translational coactivator of TGF-β, eIF4E confers selective mRNA translation, reprogramming nonmalignant cells to an invasive phenotype by reducing the set point for stimulation by activated TGF-β. Overexpression of eIF4E may be a proinvasive facilitator of TGF-β activity. PMID:25986608

  18. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Is a Feed-Forward Translational Coactivator of Transforming Growth Factor β Early Protransforming Events in Breast Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Decarlo, Lindsey; Mestel, Celine; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen; Schneider, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is overexpressed early in breast cancers in association with disease progression and reduced survival. Much remains to be understood regarding the role of eIF4E in human cancer. We determined, using immortalized human breast epithelial cells, that elevated expression of eIF4E translationally activates the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway, promoting cell invasion, a loss of cell polarity, increased cell survival, and other hallmarks of early neoplasia. Overexpression of eIF4E is shown to facilitate the selective translation of integrin β1 mRNA, which drives the translationally controlled assembly of a TGF-β receptor signaling complex containing α3β1 integrins, β-catenin, TGF-β receptor I, E-cadherin, and phosphorylated Smad2/3. This receptor complex acutely sensitizes nonmalignant breast epithelial cells to activation by typically substimulatory levels of activated TGF-β. TGF-β can promote cellular differentiation or invasion and transformation. As a translational coactivator of TGF-β, eIF4E confers selective mRNA translation, reprogramming nonmalignant cells to an invasive phenotype by reducing the set point for stimulation by activated TGF-β. Overexpression of eIF4E may be a proinvasive facilitator of TGF-β activity.

  19. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria R; Rocca, Bruno J; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T; Tripodi, Sergio A; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  20. Expression of Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein in Human Kidney and in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Maria R.; Rocca, Bruno J.; Barone, Aurora; Onorati, Monica; Mundo, Lucia; Crivelli, Filippo; Di Nuovo, Franca; De Falco, Giulia; del Vecchio, Maria T.; Tripodi, Sergio A.; Tosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Translationally controlled tumor protein is a multifaceted protein involved in several physiological and biological functions. Its expression in normal kidney and in renal carcinomas, once corroborated by functional data, may add elements to elucidate renal physiology and carcinogenesis. In this study, translationally controlled tumor protein expression was evaluated by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting, and its localization was examined by immunohistochemistry on 84 nephrectomies for cancer. In normal kidney protein expression was found in the cytoplasm of proximal and distal tubular cells, in cells of the thick segment of the loop of Henle, and in urothelial cells of the pelvis. It was also detectable in cells of renal carcinoma with different pattern of localization (membranous and cytoplasmic) depending on tumor histotype. Our data may suggest an involvement of translationally controlled tumor protein in normal physiology and carcinogenesis. However, functional in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to verify this hypothesis. PMID:26425551

  1. In vitro translation in a hybrid cell free lysate with exogenous cellular ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Panthu, Baptiste; Décimo, Didier; Balvay, Laurent; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2015-05-01

    Cell free protein synthesis systems (CFPS) have been widely used to express proteins and to explore the pathways of gene expression. In the present manuscript, we describe the design of a novel adaptable hybrid in vitro translation system which is assembled with ribosomes isolated from many different origins. We first show that this hybrid system exhibits all important features such as efficiency, sensitivity, reproducibility and the ability to translate specialized mRNAs in less than 1 h. In addition, the unique design of this cell free assay makes it highly adaptable to utilize ribosomes isolated from many different organs, tissues or cell types.

  2. Inkjet printing of silk nest arrays for cell hosting.

    PubMed

    Suntivich, Rattanon; Drachuk, Irina; Calabrese, Rossella; Kaplan, David L; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2014-04-14

    An inkjet printing approach is presented for the facile fabrication of microscopic arrays of biocompatible silk "nests" capable of hosting live cells for prospective biosensors. The patterning of silk fibroin nests were constructed by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of silk polyelectrolytes chemically modified with poly-(l-lysine) and poly-(l-glutamic acid) side chains. The inkjet-printed silk circular regions with a characteristic "nest" shape had diameters of 70-100 μm and a thickness several hundred nanometers were stabilized by ionic pairing and by the formation of the silk II crystalline secondary structure. These "locked-in" silk nests remained anchored to the substrate during incubation in cell growth media to provide a biotemplated platform for printing-in, immobilization, encapsulation and growth of cells. The process of inkjet-assisted printing is versatile and can be applied on any type of substrate, including rigid and flexible, with scalability and facile formation. PMID:24605757

  3. Stress and death of cnidarian host cells play a role in cnidarian bleaching.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Camille W; Davy, Simon K; Weis, Virginia M

    2013-08-01

    Coral bleaching occurs when there is a breakdown of the symbiosis between cnidarian hosts and resident Symbiodinium spp. Multiple mechanisms for the bleaching process have been identified, including apoptosis and autophagy, and most previous work has focused on the Symbiodinium cell as the initiator of the bleaching cascade. In this work we show that it is possible for host cells to initiate apoptosis that can contribute to death of the Symbiodinium cell. First we found that colchicine, which results in apoptosis in other animals, causes cell death in the model anemone Aiptasia sp. but not in cultured Symbiodinium CCMP-830 cells or in cells freshly isolated from host Aiptasia (at least within the time frame of our study). In contrast, when symbiotic Aiptasia were incubated in colchicine, cell death in the resident Symbiodinium cells was observed, suggesting a host effect on symbiont mortality. Using live-cell confocal imaging of macerated symbiotic host cell isolates, we identified a pattern where the initiation of host cell death was followed by mortality of the resident Symbiodinium cells. This same pattern was observed in symbiotic host cells that were subjected to temperature stress. This research suggests that mortality of symbionts during temperature-induced bleaching can be initiated in part by host cell apoptosis. PMID:23619418

  4. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O'Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A; Wu, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss potential solutions that could help overcome them. Furthermore, we discuss the use of allogeneic versus autologous stem cell products, including a review of their respective advantages and disadvantages, major clinical requirements, quality standards, time lines, and costs of clinical grade development.

  5. Developing a case study model for successful translation of stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Baum, Elona; Gibbons, Don; Tekamp-Olson, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    Cell therapies derived from pluripotent stem cells are entering the preclinical and early clinical development phase, but eventual translation faces many challenges. We describe a new approach by California to form global public-private "disease team" partnerships to enable new clinical opportunities to be evaluated in the complex regulatory environment. PMID:20569687

  6. Developing a case study model for successful translation of stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Trounson, Alan; Baum, Elona; Gibbons, Don; Tekamp-Olson, Patricia

    2010-06-01

    Cell therapies derived from pluripotent stem cells are entering the preclinical and early clinical development phase, but eventual translation faces many challenges. We describe a new approach by California to form global public-private "disease team" partnerships to enable new clinical opportunities to be evaluated in the complex regulatory environment.

  7. Anaplasma phagocytophilum Ats-1 Is Imported into Host Cell Mitochondria and Interferes with Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Hua; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Rudel, Thomas; Rikihisa, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the causative agent of human granulocytic anaplasmosis, infects human neutrophils and inhibits mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Bacterial factors involved in this process are unknown. In the present study, we screened a genomic DNA library of A. phagocytophilum for effectors of the type IV secretion system by a bacterial two-hybrid system, using A. phagocytophilum VirD4 as bait. A hypothetical protein was identified as a putative effector, hereby named Anaplasma translocated substrate 1 (Ats-1). Using triple immunofluorescence labeling and Western blot analysis of infected cells, including human neutrophils, we determined that Ats-1 is abundantly expressed by A. phagocytophilum, translocated across the inclusion membrane, localized in the host cell mitochondria, and cleaved. Ectopically expressed Ats-1 targeted mitochondria in an N-terminal 17 residue-dependent manner, localized in matrix or at the inner membrane, and was cleaved as native protein, which required residues 55–57. In vitro-translated Ats-1 was imported in a receptor-dependent manner into isolated mitochondria. Ats-1 inhibited etoposide-induced cytochrome c release from mitochondria, PARP cleavage, and apoptosis in mammalian cells, as well as Bax-induced yeast apoptosis. Ats-1(55–57) had significantly reduced anti-apoptotic activity. Bax redistribution was inhibited in both etoposide-induced and Bax-induced apoptosis by Ats-1. Taken together, Ats-1 is the first example of a bacterial protein that traverses five membranes and prevents apoptosis at the mitochondria. PMID:20174550

  8. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Taft, Robert A; Low, Benjamin E; Byers, Shannon L; Murray, Stephen A; Kutny, Peter; Wiles, Michael V

    2013-01-01

    There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs). We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH) that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium). ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82%) lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55%) when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240) of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137) of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the production

  9. The translational imperative: Making cell therapy simple and effective ☆

    PubMed Central

    Prestwich, Glenn D.; Erickson, Isaac E.; Zarembinski, Thomas I.; West, Michael; Tew, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The current practice of cell therapy, in which multipotent or terminally differentiated cells are injected into tissues or intravenously, is inefficient. Few therapeutic cells are retained at the site of administration and engraftment is low. An injectable and biologically appropriate vehicle for delivery, retention, growth and differentiation of therapeutic cells is needed to improve the efficacy of cell therapy. We focus on a hyaluronan-based semi-synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM), HyStem®, which is a manufacturable, approvable and affordable clinical product. The composition of this sECM can be customized for use with mesenchymal stem cells as well as cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent sources. In addition, it can support therapeutic uses of progenitor and mature cell populations obtained from skin, fat, liver, heart, muscle, bone, cartilage, nerves and other tissues. This overview presents four pre-clinical uses of HyStem® for cell therapy to repair injured vocal folds, improve post-myocardial infarct heart function, regenerate damaged liver tissue and restore brain function following ischemic stroke. Finally, we address the real-world limitations – manufacture, regulation, market acceptance and financing – surrounding cell therapy and the development of clinical combination products. PMID:22776825

  10. The translational imperative: making cell therapy simple and effective.

    PubMed

    Prestwich, Glenn D; Erickson, Isaac E; Zarembinski, Thomas I; West, Michael; Tew, William P

    2012-12-01

    The current practice of cell therapy, in which multipotent or terminally differentiated cells are injected into tissues or intravenously, is inefficient. Few therapeutic cells are retained at the site of administration and engraftment is low. An injectable and biologically appropriate vehicle for delivery, retention, growth and differentiation of therapeutic cells is needed to improve the efficacy of cell therapy. We focus on a hyaluronan-based semi-synthetic extracellular matrix (sECM), HyStem®, which is a manufacturable, approvable and affordable clinical product. The composition of this sECM can be customized for use with mesenchymal stem cells as well as cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent sources. In addition, it can support therapeutic uses of progenitor and mature cell populations obtained from skin, fat, liver, heart, muscle, bone, cartilage, nerves and other tissues. This overview presents four pre-clinical uses of HyStem® for cell therapy to repair injured vocal folds, improve post-myocardial infarct heart function, regenerate damaged liver tissue and restore brain function following ischemic stroke. Finally, we address the real-world limitations - manufacture, regulation, market acceptance and financing - surrounding cell therapy and the development of clinical combination products. PMID:22776825

  11. Translating cell biology in vitro to immunity in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boes, Marianne; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2004-07-01

    The elimination of pathogens and pathogen-infected cells initially rests on the rapid deployment of innate immune defences. Should these defences fail, it is the lymphocytes - T cells and B cells - with their antigen-specific receptors that must rise to the task of providing adaptive immunity. Technological advances are now allowing immunologists to correlate data obtained in vitro with in vivo functions. A better understanding of T-cell activation in vivo could lead to more effective strategies for the treatment and prevention of infectious and autoimmmune diseases.

  12. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D.; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Apetoh, Lionel; Baert, Thais; Birge, Raymond B.; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Breckpot, Karine; Brough, David; Chaurio, Ricardo; Cirone, Mara; Coosemans, An; Coulie, Pierre G.; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Dini, Luciana; de Witte, Peter; Dudek-Peric, Aleksandra M.; Faggioni, Alberto; Fucikova, Jitka; Gaipl, Udo S.; Golab, Jakub; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hemminki, Akseli; Herrmann, Martin; Hodge, James W.; Kepp, Oliver; Kroemer, Guido; Krysko, Dmitri V.; Land, Walter G.; Madeo, Frank; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Mattarollo, Stephen R.; Maueroder, Christian; Merendino, Nicolò; Multhoff, Gabriele; Pabst, Thomas; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland; Riganti, Chiara; Romano, Erminia; Rufo, Nicole; Smyth, Mark J.; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Spisek, Radek; Stagg, John; Vacchelli, Erika; Vandenabeele, Peter; Vandenberk, Lien; Van den Eynde, Benoit J.; Van Gool, Stefaan; Velotti, Francesca; Zitvogel, Laurence; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens, including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of the so-called “damage-associated molecular patterns” (DAMPs). The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD) favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical, and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation. PMID:26635802

  13. Embryonic Stem Cells Exhibit mRNA Isoform Specific Translational Regulation.

    PubMed

    Wong, Queenie Wing-Lei; Vaz, Candida; Lee, Qian Yi; Zhao, Tian Yun; Luo, Raymond; Archer, Stuart K; Preiss, Thomas; Tanavde, Vivek; Vardy, Leah A

    2016-01-01

    The presence of multiple variants for many mRNAs is a major contributor to protein diversity. The processing of these variants is tightly controlled in a cell-type specific manner and has a significant impact on gene expression control. Here we investigate the differential translation rates of individual mRNA variants in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and in ESC derived Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) using polysome profiling coupled to RNA sequencing. We show that there are a significant number of detectable mRNA variants in ESCs and NPCs and that many of them show variant specific translation rates. This is correlated with differences in the UTRs of the variants with the 5'UTR playing a predominant role. We suggest that mRNA variants that contain alternate UTRs are under different post-transcriptional controls. This is likely due to the presence or absence of miRNA and protein binding sites that regulate translation rate. This highlights the importance of addressing translation rate when using mRNA levels as a read out of protein abundance. Additional analysis shows that many annotated non-coding mRNAs are present on the polysome fractions in ESCs and NPCs. We believe that the use of polysome fractionation coupled to RNA sequencing is a useful method for analysis of the translation state of many different RNAs in the cell.

  14. The Effect of Enterohemorrhagic E. coli Infection on the Cell Mechanics of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Quan; Su, Pin-Tzu; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Huang, Chien-Hsiu; Osterday, Kathryn; del Álamo, Juan C.; Syu, Wan-Jr; Chiou, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) is a type of human pathogenic bacteria. The main virulence characteristics of EHEC include the formation of attaching and effacing lesions (A/E lesions) and the production of one or more Shiga-like toxins, which may induce human uremic complications. When EHEC infects host cells, it releases translocated intimin receptor (Tir) and effector proteins inside the host cells, inducing the rearrangement and accumulation of the F-actin cytoskeleton, a phenotype leading to the formation of pedestals in the apical cell surface, and the growth of stress fibers at the base of the cells. To examine the effect of EHEC infection on cell mechanics, we carried out a series of experiments to examine HeLa cells with and without EHEC infection to quantify the changes in (1) focal adhesion area, visualized by anti-vinculin staining; (2) the distribution and orientation of stress fibers; and (3) the intracellular viscoelasticity, via directional video particle tracking microrheology. Our results indicated that in EHEC-infected HeLa cells, the focal adhesion area increased and the actin stress fibers became thicker and more aligned. The cytoskeletal reorganization induced by EHEC infection mediated a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic elastic shear modulus of the infected cells, and a transition in the viscoelastic behavior of the cells from viscous-like to elastic-like. These changes in mechanobiological characteristics might modulate the attachments between EHEC and the host cell to withstand exfoliation, and between the host cell and the extracellular matrix, and might also alter epithelial integrity. PMID:25369259

  15. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells

    PubMed Central

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G.

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are unable consistently to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells. PMID:17222473

  16. A dual fluorescence flow cytometric analysis of bacterial adherence to mammalian host cells.

    PubMed

    Hara-Kaonga, Bochiwe; Pistole, Thomas G

    2007-04-01

    Flow cytometry has provided a powerful tool for analyzing bacteria-host cell associations. Established approaches have used bacteria, labeled either directly with fluorochromes or indirectly with fluorescently conjugated antibodies, to detect these associations. Although useful, these techniques are consistently unable to include all host cells in the analysis while excluding free, aggregated bacteria. This study describes a new flow cytometry method of assessing bacterial adherence to host cells based on direct fluorescent labeling of both bacteria and host cells. Eukaryotic host cells were labeled with PKH-26, a red fluorescent dye, and bacteria were labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate, a green fluorescent dye. The red host cells were gated and the mean green fluorescence intensity (MFI) of these red cells was determined. We used MFI values obtained from control samples (unlabeled and labeled host cells with unlabeled bacteria) to eliminate contributions due to autofluorescence. The final MFI values represent fluorescence of host cells resulting from the adherent bacteria. Because all red fluorescent cells are analyzed, this method includes all the eukaryotic cells for analysis but excludes all free or aggregated bacteria that are not bound to target cells.

  17. Transcription and translation are primary targets of Pim kinase inhibitor SGI-1776 in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingshan; Chen, Lisa S; Neelapu, Sattva S; Miranda, Roberto N; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Gandhi, Varsha

    2012-10-25

    Proviral integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus (Pim) kinases are serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases and oncoproteins that promote tumor progression. Three isoforms of Pim kinases have been identified and are known to phosphorylate numerous substrates, with regulatory functions in transcription, translation, cell cycle, and survival pathways. These kinases are involved in production, proliferation, and survival of normal B cells and are overexpressed in B-cell malignancies such as mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). SGI-1776 is a small molecule and Pim kinase inhibitor with selectivity for Pim-1. We hypothesize that Pim kinase function can be inhibited by SGI-1776 in MCL and that inhibition of phosphorylation of downstream substrates will disrupt transcriptional, translational, and cell cycle processes and promote cell death. SGI-1776 treatment in 4 MCL cell lines resulted in apoptosis induction. Phosphorylation of transcription (c-Myc) and translation targets (4E-BP1), tested in Jeko-1 and Mino, was declined. Consistent with these data, Mcl-1 and cyclin D1 protein levels were decreased. Importantly, similar to cell line data, MCL primary cells but not normal cells showed similar inhibition of substrate phosphorylation and cytotoxicity from SGI-1776 treatment. Genetic knockdown of Pim-1/Pim-2 affected similar proteins in MCL cell lines. Collectively these data demonstrate Pim kinases as therapeutic targets in MCL. PMID:22955922

  18. Analysis of mRNA Translation Rate in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Anisa B; Vardy, Leah A

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is essential to enable embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to either self-renew or to differentiate. Translational regulation of mRNA plays a major role in regulating gene expression and has been shown to be important for ESC differentiation. Sucrose gradients can be used to separate mRNAs based on the number of associated ribosomes and this can be used as a readout of the rate of translation. Following centrifugation through a sucrose gradient, mRNAs can be recovered, purified, and analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to determine their ribosomal load in different cell states. Here, we describe how to differentiate mouse ESCs to Neural Precursor Cells (NPCs) and analyze the rate of translation of individual mRNAs by qRT-PCR following polysome fractionation.

  19. Hurdles to clinical translation of human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Neofytou, Evgenios; O’Brien, Connor Galen; Couture, Larry A.; Wu, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells are known to have the capacity to renew indefinitely, being intrinsically able to differentiate into many different cell types. These characteristics have generated tremendous enthusiasm about the potential applications of these cells in regenerative medicine. However, major challenges remain with the development and testing of novel experimental stem cell therapeutics in the field. In this Review, we focus on the nature of the preclinical challenges and discuss potential solutions that could help overcome them. Furthermore, we discuss the use of allogeneic versus autologous stem cell products, including a review of their respective advantages and disadvantages, major clinical requirements, quality standards, time lines, and costs of clinical grade development. PMID:26132109

  20. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    SciTech Connect

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  1. Putative alternative polyadenylation (APA) events in the early interaction of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells.

    PubMed

    Afonso-Grunz, Fabian

    2015-12-01

    The immune response of epithelial cells upon infection is mediated by changing activity levels of a variety of proteins along with changes in mRNA, and also ncRNA abundance. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) represents a mechanism that diversifies gene expression similar to alternative splicing. T-cell activation, neuronal activity, development and several human diseases including viral infections involve APA, but at present it remains unclear if this mechanism is also implicated in the response to bacterial infections. Our recently published study of interacting Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and human host cells includes genome-wide expression profiles of human epithelial cells prior and subsequent to infection with the invasive pathogen. The generated dataset (GEO accession number: GSE61730) covers several points of time post infection, and one of these interaction stages was additionally profiled with MACE-based dual 3'Seq, which allows for identification of polyadenylation (PA) sites. The present study features the polyadenylation landscape in early interacting cells based on this data, and provides a comparison of the identified PA sites with those of a corresponding 3P-Seq dataset of non-interacting cells. Differential PA site usage of FTL, PRDX1 and VAPA results in transcription of mRNA isoforms with distinct sets of miRNA and protein binding sites that influence processing, localization, stability, and translation of the respective mRNA. APA of these candidate genes consequently harbors the potential to modulate the host cell response to bacterial infection.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis - translation to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dulamea, A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by an aberrant activation of the immune system and combining demyelination with neurodegeneration. Studies on experimental models of multiple sclerosis revealed immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells therapy in multiple sclerosis patients showed tolerability, safety on short term, some immunomodulatory properties reducing the Th1 proinflammatory response and the inflammatory MRI parameters. The author reviews the data about experimental studies and clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  3. Hematopoietic stem cells: potential new applications for translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Felfly, Hady; Haddad, Gabriel G

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are multipotent cells that produce the various lineages of blood and HSC transplantations (HSCT) are widely used to reconstitute damaged bone marrow (BM). Over time, HSCT has evolved for the treatment of non-blood diseases as well, brain in particular. However, HSCT required total myeloablation through irradiation and/or chemotherapy for the treatment of BM-related diseases, and HSCs are difficult to safely deliver in large amounts into the brain. In blood disorders, for a minimal myelosuppression to be sufficient and allow donor cells to engraft, it is necessary to determine the minimal percentage of normal BM cells needed to achieve phenotypic correction. Recent studies on animal models of ?-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD), through Competitive Repopulation Assay (CRA) following lethal irradiation of recipients, demonstrated that an average of 25% normal BM cells allows the production of enough normal red blood cells to significantly correct the ?-thalassemia and SCD phenotypes, at the levels of BM, blood, histology, and survival, with normal donor cells contributing to 50-60% of peripheral red blood cells. Further assays using mild myelosuppression showed that long term sustained phenotypic correction can be obtained for both diseases through a novel transplantation strategy based on modulating four parameters: dose of irradiation/myelosuppression, number of transplanted cells, timing of cell injections, and number of cell doses. Through a minimal dose of irradiation of 1Gy (100 Rads) or 2Gy, two injections of BM cells within the first 24h after myelosuppression resulted in engraftment in 100% of mice and a sustained therapeutic mixed chimerism in ?-thalassemia, while three to four injections were needed to achieve a similar outcome in SCD. Following the success of these trials, we modified this novel HSCT strategy and applied it to determine whether we can protect mice from lethal stroke induced through the Middle

  4. Human ribosomes from cells with reduced dyskerin levels are intrinsically altered in translation.

    PubMed

    Penzo, Marianna; Rocchi, Laura; Brugiere, Sabine; Carnicelli, Domenica; Onofrillo, Carmine; Couté, Yohann; Brigotti, Maurizio; Montanaro, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Dyskerin is a pseudouridine (ψ) synthase involved in fundamental cellular processes including uridine modification in rRNA and small nuclear RNA and telomere stabilization. Dyskerin functions are altered in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (X-DC) and cancer. Dyskerin's role in rRNA pseudouridylation has been suggested to underlie the alterations in mRNA translation described in cells lacking dyskerin function, although relevant direct evidences are currently lacking. Our purpose was to establish definitely whether defective dyskerin function might determine an intrinsic ribosomal defect leading to an altered synthetic activity. Therefore, ribosomes from dyskerin-depleted human cells were purified and 1) added to a controlled reticulocyte cell-free system devoid of ribosomes to study mRNA translation; 2) analyzed for protein contamination and composition by mass spectrometry, 3) analyzed for global pseudouridylation levels. Ribosomes purified from dyskerin-depleted cells showed altered translational fidelity and internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated translation. These ribosomes displayed reduced uridine modification, whereas they were not different in terms of protein contamination or ribosomal protein composition with respect to ribosomes from matched control cells with full dyskerin activity. In conclusion, lack of dyskerin function in human cells induces a defect in rRNA uridine modification, which is sufficient to alter ribosome activity.

  5. Positive mRNA Translational Control in Germ Cells by Initiation Factor Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Friday, Andrew J.; Keiper, Brett D.

    2015-01-01

    Ultimately, the production of new proteins in undetermined cells pushes them to new fates. Other proteins hold a stem cell in a mode of self-renewal. In germ cells, these decision-making proteins are produced largely from translational control of preexisting mRNAs. To date, all of the regulation has been attributed to RNA binding proteins (RBPs) that repress mRNAs in many models of germ cell development (Drosophila, mouse, C. elegans, and Xenopus). In this review, we focus on the selective, positive function of translation initiation factors eIF4E and eIF4G, which recruit mRNAs to ribosomes upon derepression. Evidence now shows that the two events are not separate but rather are coordinated through composite complexes of repressors and germ cell isoforms of eIF4 factors. Strikingly, the initiation factor isoforms are themselves mRNA selective. The mRNP complexes of translation factors and RBPs are built on specific populations of mRNAs to prime them for subsequent translation initiation. Simple rearrangement of the partners causes a dormant mRNP to become synthetically active in germ cells when and where they are required to support gametogenesis. PMID:26357652

  6. Vimentin and post-translational modifications in cell motility during cancer - a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, A-M; Tao, Z-Q; Li, R; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X; Zhao, J

    2016-07-01

    The post-translational modifications (PTMs) are defined as the covalent modification or enzymatic modification of proteins during or after protein biosynthesis. Proteins are synthesized by ribosomes translating mRNA into polypeptide chains, which may then undergo PTM to form the mature protein product. PTMs are important components in cell signaling. Moreover, it is a known fact that PTM regulation offers an immense array and depth of regulatory possibilities. The present review article will focus on their possible role in cancer cell motility with special reference to vimentin, an intermediate filament (IF), as the later is an important process responsible for life-threatening state viz. cancer metastasis. PMID:27383311

  7. Insights from Ayurveda for translational stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Kalpana S.; Bhonde, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda, the traditional Indian system of medicine has given great emphasis to the promotion of health. Ayurveda therapies are based on restoration of body balance and nourishment of dhatus or tissues. Rasayana concept of Ayurveda explains tissue regeneration and cell renewal. The drugs and therapies explained as rasayana provide research opportunities for biology of regeneration. Specific rasayana stimulate and nourish respective dhatus. Interpretation of this description offers clues for specific differentiation of stem cells with appropriate extract. The preliminary experiments on Medhya drugs suggest neuronal stem cells differentiation. Authors highlight the potential of Ayurveda and its possible contributions in regenerative medicine. Authors propose a protocol based on integrative approach derived from Ayurveda concepts and current understanding of regenerative medicine. The advanced understanding about adult and embryonic stem cells along with concepts of regeneration in Ayurveda has immense potential in the development of regenerative medicine. PMID:24812469

  8. Regulation of Host Cell Transcriptional Physiology by the Avian Pneumovirus Provides Key Insights into Host-Pathogen Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Shirin; Kapur, Vivek

    2003-01-01

    Infection with a viral pathogen triggers several pathways in the host cell that are crucial to eliminating infection, as well as those that are used by the virus to enhance its replication and virulence. We have here used suppression subtractive hybridization and cDNA microarray analyses to characterize the host transcriptional response in an avian pneumovirus model of infection. The results of our investigations reveal a dynamic host response that includes the regulation of genes with roles in a vast array of cellular functions as well as those that have not been described previously. The results show a considerable upregulation in transcripts representing the interferon-activated family of genes, predicted to play a role in virus replication arrest. The analysis also identified transcripts for proinflammatory leukocyte chemoattractants, adhesion molecules, and complement that were upregulated and may account for the inflammatory pathology that is the hallmark of viral respiratory infection. Interestingly, alterations in the transcription of several genes in the ubiquitin and endosomal protein trafficking pathways were observed, suggesting a role for these pathways in virus maturation and budding. Taken together, the results of our investigations provide key insights into individual genes and pathways that constitute the host cell's response to avian pneumovirus infection, and they have enabled the development of resources and a model of host-pathogen interaction for an important avian respiratory tract pathogen. PMID:12663796

  9. Cutaneous graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant - a review*

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Cesar Daniel Villarreal; Alanis, Julio Cesar Salas; Pérez, Jose Carlos Jaime; Candiani, Jorge Ocampo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (allo-HSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The earliest and most common manifestation is cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. We discuss various insights into the disease's mechanisms and the different treatments for acute and chronic skin graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27438202

  10. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288

  11. Role of sulfated glycans in adherence of the microsporidian Encephalitozoon intestinalis to host cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hayman, J Russell; Southern, Timothy R; Nash, Theodore E

    2005-02-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular opportunistic protists that infect a wide variety of animals, including humans, via environmentally resistant spores. Infection requires that spores be in close proximity to host cells so that the hollow polar tube can pierce the cell membrane and inject the spore contents into the cell cytoplasm. Like other eukaryotic microbes, microsporidia may use specific mechanisms for adherence in order to achieve target cell proximity and increase the likelihood of successful infection. Our data show that Encephalitozoon intestinalis exploits sulfated glycans such as the cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in selection of and attachment to host cells. When exogenous sulfated glycans are used as inhibitors in spore adherence assays, E. intestinalis spore adherence is reduced by as much as 88%. However, there is no inhibition when nonsulfated glycans are used, suggesting that E. intestinalis spores utilize sulfated host cell glycans in adherence. These studies were confirmed by exposure of host cells to xylopyranoside, which limits host cell surface GAGs, and sodium chlorate, which decreases surface sulfation. Spore adherence studies with CHO mutant cell lines that are deficient in either surface GAGs or surface heparan sulfate also confirmed the necessity of sulfated glycans. Furthermore, when spore adherence is inhibited, host cell infection is reduced, indicating a direct association between spore adherence and infectivity. These data show that E. intestinalis specifically adheres to target cells by way of sulfated host cell surface GAGs and that this mechanism serves to enhance infectivity.

  12. Regulatory T-Cell Therapy for Graft-versus-host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Jessica; Bastian, David; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Anasetti, Claudio; Betts, Brain; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a significant cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Existing strategies to prevent and treat GVHD are incomplete, where a significant portion of allo-HCT recipients developed this complication. Despite this, one such therapy has emerged involving the use of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to control GVHD. The use of natural Tregs (nTregs) yielded positive pre-clinical results and are actively under investigation to reduce GVHD. However, broad application of this approach may require standardization of Treg expansion methods and dosing. Inducible Tregs (iTregs) can be seamlessly generated, but controversial pre-clinical findings and phenotype instability have hampered their translation into the clinic. Here, we review the current biological differences between nTregs and iTregs, as well as their effects on GVHD and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) responses. We conclude by exploring the idea of combinational cellular therapies for the prevention of GVHD and preservation of GVL. PMID:27722210

  13. STING in tumor and host cells cooperatively work for NK cell-mediated tumor growth retardation.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Ken; Takeda, Yohei; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Shime, Hiroaki; Okabe, Masaru; Ikawa, Masahito; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2016-09-30

    An interferon-inducing DNA sensor STING participates in tumor rejection in mouse models. Here we examined what mechanisms contribute to STING-dependent growth retardation of B16 melanoma sublines by NK cells in vivo. The studies were designed using WT and STING KO black mice, and B16D8 (an NK-sensitive melanoma line having STING) and STING KO B16D8 sublines established for this study. The results from tumor-implant studies suggested that STING in host immune cells and tumor cells induced distinct profiles of chemokines including CXCL10, CCL5 and IL-33, and both participated in NK cell infiltration and activation in B16D8 tumor. Spontaneous activation of STING occurs in host-immune and tumor cells of this NK-sensitive tumor, thereby B16D8 tumor growth being suppressed in this model. Our data show that STING induces tumor cytotoxicity by NK cells through tumor and host immune cell network to contribute to innate surveillance and suppression of tumors in vivo. PMID:27608599

  14. Translation of adenovirus 2 late mRNAs microinjected into cultured African green monkey kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, W.D.; Anderson, C.W.

    1984-08-01

    Adenovirus 2-infected monkey cells fail to synthesize fiber, a 62,000 M/sub r/ virion polypeptide expressed at late times in productively infected cells. Yet these cells contain fiber mRNA that, after isolation, can be translated in vitro. The reason for the failure of monkey cells to translate fiber mRNA has been approached by microinjecting adenovirus mRNA into the cytoplasm of cultured monkey cells. Late adenovirus 2 mRNA, isolated from infected HeLa cells, was efficiently expressed when microinjected into the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-C. Expressed viral proteins identified by immunoprecipitation included the adenovirus fiber polypeptide. This result demonstrates that the monkey cell translational apparatus is capable of recognizing and expressing functional adenovirus mRNA. Microinjection of late virus mRNA into cells previously infected with wild-type adenovirus 2 failed to increase significantly the yield of infectious virus. 26 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  15. Cell-Type-Specific mRNA Purification by Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP)

    PubMed Central

    Heiman, Myriam; Kulicke, Ruth; Fenster, Robert J.; Greengard, Paul; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Cellular diversity and architectural complexity create barriers to understanding the function of the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) at a molecular level. To address this problem, we recently developed a methodology that provides the ability to profile the entire translated mRNA complement of any genetically defined cell population. This methodology, which we termed translating ribosome affinity purification, or TRAP, combines cell-type-specific transgene expression with affinity purification of translating ribosomes. TRAP can be used to study the cell-type-specific mRNA profiles of any genetically defined cell type, and has been successfully used to date in organisms ranging from D. melanogaster to mice and human cultured cells. Unlike other methodologies that rely upon micro-dissection, cell panning, or cell sorting, the TRAP methodology bypasses the need for tissue fixation or single-cell suspensions (and potential artifacts these treatments introduce), and reports on mRNAs in the entire cell body. This protocol provides a step-by-step guide to implementing the TRAP methodology, which takes two days to complete once all materials are in hand. PMID:24810037

  16. Translational repression determines a neuronal potential in Drosophila asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Okabe, M; Imai, T; Kurusu, M; Hiromi, Y; Okano, H

    2001-05-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental strategy for generating cellular diversity during animal development. Daughter cells manifest asymmetry in their differential gene expression. Transcriptional regulation of this process has been the focus of many studies, whereas cell-type-specific 'translational' regulation has been considered to have a more minor role. During sensory organ development in Drosophila, Notch signalling directs the asymmetry between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, and a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 (TTK69) acts downstream of Notch as a determinant of non-neuronal identity. Here we show that repression of TTK69 protein expression in the neuronal lineage occurs translationally rather than transcriptionally. This translational repression is achieved by a direct interaction between cis-acting sequences in the 3' untranslated region of ttk69 messenger RNA and its trans-acting repressor, the RNA-binding protein Musashi (MSI). Although msi can act downstream of Notch, Notch signalling does not affect MSI expression. Thus, Notch signalling is likely to regulate MSI activity rather than its expression. Our results define cell-type-specific translational control of ttk69 by MSI as a downstream event of Notch signalling in asymmetric cell division.

  17. Funding translational work in cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Mahendra S

    2011-07-01

    The cell therapy branch of the regenerative medicine field has been innovative in developing new models of delivery and development and identifying alternative sources of funding. We discuss the implications of these changes for pharmaceutical companies and the opportunities they offer to a new entrepreneur. PMID:21726828

  18. Cancer cell: using inflammation to invade the host

    PubMed Central

    Arias, José-Ignacio; Aller, María-Angeles; Arias, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    Background Inflammation is increasingly recognized as an important component of tumorigenesis, although the mechanisms involved are not fully characterized. The invasive capacity of cancers is reflected in the classic metastatic cascade: tumor (T), node (N) and metastasis (M). However, this staging system for cancer would also have a tumoral biological significance. Presentation of the hypothesis To integrate the mechanisms that control the inflammatory response in the actual staging system of cancer. It is considered that in both processes of inflammation and cancer, three successive phenotypes are presented that represent the expression of trophic functional systems of increasing metabolic complexity for using oxygen. Testing the hypothesis While a malignant tumor develops it express phenotypes that also share the inflammatory response such as: an ischemic phenotype (anoxic-hypoxic), a leukocytic phenotype with anaerobic glycolysis and migration, and an angiogenic phenotype with hyperactivity of glycolytic enzymes, tumor proliferation and metastasis, and cachexia of the host. The increasing metabolic complexity of the tumor cell to use oxygen allows for it to be released, migrate and proliferate, thus creating structures of growing complexity. Implication of the hypothesis One aim of cancer gene therapy could be the induction of oxidative phosphorylation, the last metabolic step required by inflammation in order to differentiate the tissue that it produces. PMID:17437633

  19. Sheep primary cells as in vitro models to investigate Mycoplasma agalactiae host cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shrilakshmi; Gabriel, Cordula; Kragl, Martin; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate infection models are imperative for the understanding of pathogens like mycoplasmas that are known for their strict host and tissue specificity, and lack of suitable cell and small animal models has hindered pathogenicity studies. This is particularly true for the economically important group of ruminant mycoplasmas whose virulence factors need to be elucidated for designing effective intervention strategies. Mycoplasma agalactiae serves as a useful role model especially because it is phylogenetically very close to M. bovis and causes similar symptoms by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we successfully prepared and characterized four different primary sheep cell lines, namely the epithelial and stromal cells from the mammary gland and uterus, respectively. Using immunohistochemistry, we identified vimentin and cytokeratin as specific markers to confirm the typical cell phenotypes of these primary cells. Furthermore, M. agalactiae's consistent adhesion and invasion into these primary cells proves the reliability of these cell models. Mimicking natural infections, mammary epithelial and stromal cells showed higher invasion and adhesion rates compared to the uterine cells as also seen via double immunofluorescence staining. Altogether, we have generated promising in vitro cell models to study host-pathogen interactions of M. agalactiae and related ruminant pathogens in a more authentic manner.

  20. Cbk1 regulation of the RNA binding protein Ssd1 integrates cell fate with translational control

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Jaclyn M.; Wanless, Antony G.; Seidel, Christopher W.; Weiss, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Spatial control of gene expression, at the level of both transcription and translation, is critical for cellular differentiation [1-4]. In budding yeast, the conserved Ndr/warts kinase Cbk1 localizes to the new daughter cell where it acts as a cell fate determinant. Cbk1 both induces a daughter-specific transcriptional program and promotes morphogenesis in a less well-defined role [5-8]. Cbk1 is essential in cells expressing functional Ssd1, an RNA binding protein of unknown function [9-11]. We show that Cbk1 inhibits Ssd1 in vivo. Loss of this regulation dramatically slows bud expansion, leading to highly aberrant cell wall organization at the site of cell growth. Ssd1 associates with specific mRNAs, a significant number of which encode cell wall remodeling proteins. Translation of these messages is rapidly and specifically suppressed when Cbk1 is inhibited; this suppression requires Ssd1. Transcription of several of these Ssd1-associated mRNAs is also regulated by Cbk1, indicating that the kinase controls both the transcription and translation of daughter-specific mRNAs. This work suggests a novel system by which cells coordinate localized expression of genes involved in processes critical for cell growth and division. PMID:19962308

  1. Identifying Francisella tularensis genes required for growth in host cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract: Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cel...

  2. Inhibition of Non-ATG Translational Events in Cells via Covalent Small Molecules Targeting RNA.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wang-Yong; Wilson, Henry D; Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-04-29

    One major class of disease-causing RNAs is expanded repeating transcripts. These RNAs cause diseases via multiple mechanisms, including: (i) gain-of-function, in which repeating RNAs bind and sequester proteins involved in RNA biogenesis and (ii) repeat associated non-ATG (RAN) translation, in which repeating transcripts are translated into toxic proteins without use of a canonical, AUG, start codon. Herein, we develop and study chemical probes that bind and react with an expanded r(CGG) repeat (r(CGG)(exp)) present in a 5' untranslated region that causes fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS). Reactive compounds bind to r(CGG)(exp) in cellulo as shown with Chem-CLIP-Map, an approach to map small molecule binding sites within RNAs in cells. Compounds also potently improve FXTAS-associated pre-mRNA splicing and RAN translational defects, while not affecting translation of the downstream open reading frame. In contrast, oligonucleotides affect both RAN and canonical translation when they bind to r(CGG)(exp), which is mechanistically traced to a decrease in polysome loading. Thus, designer small molecules that react with RNA targets can be used to profile the RNAs to which they bind in cells, including identification of binding sites, and can modulate several aspects of RNA-mediated disease pathology in a manner that may be more beneficial than oligonucleotides.

  3. Translational control of regA, a key gene controlling cell differentiation in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Babinger, Karin; Hallmann, Armin; Schmitt, Rüdiger

    2006-10-01

    The complete division of labour between the reproductive and somatic cells of the green alga Volvox carteri is controlled by three types of genes. One of these is the regA gene, which controls terminal differentiation of the somatic cells. Here, we examined translational control elements located in the 5' UTR of regA, particularly the eight upstream start codons (AUGs) that have to be bypassed by the translation machinery before regA can be translated. The results of our systematic mutational, structural and functional analysis of the 5' UTR led us to conclude that a ribosome-shunting mechanism--rather than leaky scanning, ribosomal reinitiation, or internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-mediated initiation--controls the translation of regA mRNA. This mechanism, which involves dissociation of the 40S initiation complex from the message, followed by reattachment downstream, in order to bypass a secondary structure block in the mRNA, was validated by deleting the predicted ;landing site' (which prevented regA expression) and inserting a stable 64 nucleotide hairpin just upstream of this site (which did not prevent regA expression). We believe that this is the first report suggesting that translation of an mRNA in a green eukaryote is controlled by ribosome shunting. PMID:16971469

  4. Host cell subversion by Toxoplasma GRA16, an exported dense granule protein that targets the host cell nucleus and alters gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bougdour, Alexandre; Durandau, Eric; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Ortet, Philippe; Barakat, Mohamed; Kieffer, Sylvie; Curt-Varesano, Aurélie; Curt-Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Bastien, Olivier; Coute, Yohann; Pelloux, Hervé; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2013-04-17

    After invading host cells, Toxoplasma gondii multiplies within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that is maintained by parasite proteins secreted from organelles called dense granules. Most dense granule proteins remain within the PV, and few are known to access the host cell cytosol. We identify GRA16 as a dense granule protein that is exported through the PV membrane and reaches the host cell nucleus, where it positively modulates genes involved in cell-cycle progression and the p53 tumor suppressor pathway. GRA16 binds two host enzymes, the deubiquitinase HAUSP and PP2A phosphatase, which exert several functions, including regulation of p53 and the cell cycle. GRA16 alters p53 levels in a HAUSP-dependent manner and induces nuclear translocation of the PP2A holoenzyme. Additionally, certain GRA16-deficient strains exhibit attenuated virulence, indicating the importance of these host alterations in pathogenesis. Therefore, GRA16 represents a potentially emerging subfamily of exported dense granule proteins that modulate host function.

  5. A Drosophila Reporter for the Translational Activation of ATF4 Marks Stressed Cells during Development.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kwonyoon; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Park, Jung-Eun; Yoon, Jee-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ji

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved signaling pathways that help to restore cellular homeostasis in response to various physiological or pathological conditions. ATF4 is a transcription factor whose mRNA translation is stimulated in response to stress-activated eIF2alpha kinases. Established conditions that activate eIF2alpha phosphorylation and ATF4 translation include excessive stress in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and amino acid deprivation. ATF4 is activated through a unique translational activation mechanism that involves multiple upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR), which is conserved from yeast to mammals. Taking advantage of this, we developed a translational activation reporter of ATF4 in Drosophila, in which the dsRed reporter coding sequence was placed downstream of the Drosophila ATF4 5' UTR. This reporter remained inactive in most tissues under normal conditions, but showed dsRed expression when starved, or when challenged with conditions that imposed ER stress. In normally developing flies, a small number of cell types showed reporter expression even without exogenous stress, which included the salivary gland, gut, the male reproductive organ, and the photoreceptor cells, suggestive of inherent stress during the normal development of these cell types. These results establish a new tool to study ATF4-mediated stress response in Drosophila development and disease.

  6. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in Cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2016-04-19

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  7. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  8. Stem cells and their derivatives: a renaissance in cardiovascular translational research.

    PubMed

    Kattman, Steven J; Koonce, Chad H; Swanson, Bradley J; Anson, Blake D

    2011-02-01

    Moving from the bench to the bedside is an expensive and arduous journey with a high risk of failure. One roadblock on the path of translational medicine is the paucity of predictive in vitro models available during preclinical drug development. The ability of human embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells to generate virtually any tissue of the body, in vitro, makes these cells an obvious choice for use in drug discovery and translational medicine. Technological advancements in the production of stem cells and their differentiation into relevant cell types, such as cardiomyocytes, has permitted the utility of these cells in the translational medicine setting. In particular, the derivation and differentiation of patient-specific iPS cells will facilitate an understanding of basic disease etiology, enable better drug efficacy and safety screens, and ultimately lead to personalized patient therapies. This review will focus on recent advancements in the derivation and differentiation of human ES and iPS cells into cardiomyocytes and their uses in safety testing and modeling human disease. PMID:21061105

  9. From microbiology to cell biology: when an intracellular bacterium becomes part of its host cell.

    PubMed

    McCutcheon, John P

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria and chloroplasts are now called organelles, but they used to be bacteria. As they transitioned from endosymbionts to organelles, they became more and more integrated into the biochemistry and cell biology of their hosts. Work over the last 15 years has shown that other symbioses show striking similarities to mitochondria and chloroplasts. In particular, many sap-feeding insects house intracellular bacteria that have genomes that overlap mitochondria and chloroplasts in terms of size and coding capacity. The massive levels of gene loss in some of these bacteria suggest that they, too, are becoming highly integrated with their host cells. Understanding these bacteria will require inspiration from eukaryotic cell biology, because a traditional microbiological framework is insufficient for understanding how they work.

  10. Darwinian evolution in a translation-coupled RNA replication system within a cell-like compartment.

    PubMed

    Ichihashi, Norikazu; Usui, Kimihito; Kazuta, Yasuaki; Sunami, Takeshi; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    The ability to evolve is a key characteristic that distinguishes living things from non-living chemical compounds. The construction of an evolvable cell-like system entirely from non-living molecules has been a major challenge. Here we construct an evolvable artificial cell model from an assembly of biochemical molecules. The artificial cell model contains artificial genomic RNA that replicates through the translation of its encoded RNA replicase. We perform a long-term (600-generation) replication experiment using this system, in which mutations are spontaneously introduced into the RNA by replication error, and highly replicable mutants dominate the population according to Darwinian principles. During evolution, the genomic RNA gradually reinforces its interaction with the translated replicase, thereby acquiring competitiveness against selfish (parasitic) RNAs. This study provides the first experimental evidence that replicating systems can be developed through Darwinian evolution in a cell-like compartment, even in the presence of parasitic replicators.

  11. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Daley, George Q; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F; Barker, Roger A; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Breuer, Christopher K; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-14

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them.

  12. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Daley, George Q; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F; Barker, Roger A; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Breuer, Christopher K; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-14

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them. PMID:27185282

  13. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion.

  14. A Systems Survey of Progressive Host-Cell Reorganization during Rotavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Green, Victoria A; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2016-07-13

    Pathogen invasion is often accompanied by widespread alterations in cellular physiology, which reflects the hijacking of host factors and processes for pathogen entry and replication. Although genetic perturbation screens have revealed the complexity of host factors involved for numerous pathogens, it has remained challenging to temporally define the progression of events in host cell reorganization during infection. We combine high-confidence genome-scale RNAi screening of host factors required for rotavirus infection in human intestinal cells with an innovative approach to infer the trajectory of virus infection from fixed cell populations. This approach reveals a comprehensive network of host cellular processes involved in rotavirus infection and implicates AMPK in initiating the development of a rotavirus-permissive environment. Our work provides a powerful approach that can be generalized to order complex host cellular requirements along a trajectory of cellular reorganization during pathogen invasion. PMID:27414499

  15. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  16. Differential evolution of eastern equine encephalitis virus populations in response to host cell type.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, L A; Scott, T W

    2001-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) cycle between hosts in two widely separated taxonomic groups, vertebrate amplifying hosts and invertebrate vectors, both of which may separately or in concert shape the course of arbovirus evolution. To elucidate the selective pressures associated with virus replication within each portion of this two-host life cycle, the effects of host type on the growth characteristics of the New World alphavirus, eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus, were investigated. Multiple lineages of an ancestral EEE virus stock were repeatedly transferred through either mosquito or avian cells or in alternating passages between these two cell types. When assayed in both cell types, derived single host lineages exhibited significant differences in infectivity, growth pattern, plaque morphology, and total virus yield, demonstrating that this virus is capable of host-specific evolution. Virus lineages grown in alternation between the two cell types expressed intermediate phenotypes consistent with dual adaptation to both cellular environments. Both insect-adapted and alternated lineages greatly increased in their ability to infect insect cells. These results indicate that different selective pressures exist for virus replication within each portion of the two-host life cycle, and that alternation of hosts selects for virus populations well adapted for replication in both host systems. PMID:11290699

  17. Immune regulation and evasion of Mammalian host cell immunity during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Pratheek, B M; Saha, Soham; Maiti, Prasanta K; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2013-06-01

    The mammalian host immune system has wide array of defence mechanisms against viral infections. Depending on host immunity and the extent of viral persistence, either the host immune cells might clear/restrict the viral load and disease progression or the virus might evade host immunity by down regulating host immune effector response(s). Viral antigen processing and presentation in the host cells through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) elicit subsequent anti-viral effector T cell response(s). However, modulation of such response(s) might generate one of the important viral immune evasion strategies. Viral peptides are mostly generated by proteolytic cleavage in the cytosol of the infected host cells. CD8(+) T lymphocytes play critical role in the detection of viral infection by recognizing these peptides displayed at the plasma membrane by MHC-I molecules. The present review summarises the current knowledge on the regulation of mammalian host innate and adaptive immune components, which are operative in defence mechanisms against viral infections and the variety of strategies that viruses have evolved to escape host cell immunity. The understanding of viral immune evasion strategies is important for designing anti-viral immunotherapies.

  18. Th17 Pathway As a Target for Multipotent Stromal Cell Therapy in Dogs: Implications for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Kol, A.; Walker, N. J.; Nordstrom, M.; Borjesson, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental Th17 driven inflammatory and autoimmune disease such as Crohn’s disease, graft versus host disease and multiple sclerosis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multipotent stromal/stem cell (MSC) inhibit Th17 polarization and activation in vitro and in rodent models. As such, MSC based therapeutic approaches are being investigated as novel therapeutic approaches to treat Th17 driven diseases in humans. The significance of naturally occurring diseases in dogs is increasingly recognized as a realistic platform to conduct pre-clinical testing of novel therapeutics. Full characterization of Th17 cells in dogs has not been completed. We have developed and validated a flow-cytometric method to detect Th17 cells in canine blood. We further demonstrate that Th17 and other IL17 producing cells are present in tissues of dogs with naturally occurring chronic inflammatory diseases. Finally, we have determined the kinetics of a canine specific Th17 polarization in vitro and demonstrate that canine MSC inhibit Th17 polarization in vitro, in a PGE2 independent mechanism. Our findings provide fundamental research tools and suggest that naturally occurring diseases in dogs, such as inflammatory bowel disease, may be harnessed to translate novel MSC based therapeutic strategies that target the Th17 pathway. PMID:26872054

  19. Th17 Pathway As a Target for Multipotent Stromal Cell Therapy in Dogs: Implications for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Kol, A; Walker, N J; Nordstrom, M; Borjesson, D L

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental Th17 driven inflammatory and autoimmune disease such as Crohn's disease, graft versus host disease and multiple sclerosis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multipotent stromal/stem cell (MSC) inhibit Th17 polarization and activation in vitro and in rodent models. As such, MSC based therapeutic approaches are being investigated as novel therapeutic approaches to treat Th17 driven diseases in humans. The significance of naturally occurring diseases in dogs is increasingly recognized as a realistic platform to conduct pre-clinical testing of novel therapeutics. Full characterization of Th17 cells in dogs has not been completed. We have developed and validated a flow-cytometric method to detect Th17 cells in canine blood. We further demonstrate that Th17 and other IL17 producing cells are present in tissues of dogs with naturally occurring chronic inflammatory diseases. Finally, we have determined the kinetics of a canine specific Th17 polarization in vitro and demonstrate that canine MSC inhibit Th17 polarization in vitro, in a PGE2 independent mechanism. Our findings provide fundamental research tools and suggest that naturally occurring diseases in dogs, such as inflammatory bowel disease, may be harnessed to translate novel MSC based therapeutic strategies that target the Th17 pathway. PMID:26872054

  20. Th17 Pathway As a Target for Multipotent Stromal Cell Therapy in Dogs: Implications for Translational Research.

    PubMed

    Kol, A; Walker, N J; Nordstrom, M; Borjesson, D L

    2016-01-01

    Detrimental Th17 driven inflammatory and autoimmune disease such as Crohn's disease, graft versus host disease and multiple sclerosis remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Multipotent stromal/stem cell (MSC) inhibit Th17 polarization and activation in vitro and in rodent models. As such, MSC based therapeutic approaches are being investigated as novel therapeutic approaches to treat Th17 driven diseases in humans. The significance of naturally occurring diseases in dogs is increasingly recognized as a realistic platform to conduct pre-clinical testing of novel therapeutics. Full characterization of Th17 cells in dogs has not been completed. We have developed and validated a flow-cytometric method to detect Th17 cells in canine blood. We further demonstrate that Th17 and other IL17 producing cells are present in tissues of dogs with naturally occurring chronic inflammatory diseases. Finally, we have determined the kinetics of a canine specific Th17 polarization in vitro and demonstrate that canine MSC inhibit Th17 polarization in vitro, in a PGE2 independent mechanism. Our findings provide fundamental research tools and suggest that naturally occurring diseases in dogs, such as inflammatory bowel disease, may be harnessed to translate novel MSC based therapeutic strategies that target the Th17 pathway.

  1. Central nervous system myeloid cells as drug targets: current status and translational challenges.

    PubMed

    Biber, Knut; Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Erik; Prinz, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Myeloid cells of the central nervous system (CNS), which include parenchymal microglia, macrophages at CNS interfaces and monocytes recruited from the circulation during disease, are increasingly being recognized as targets for therapeutic intervention in neurological and psychiatric diseases. The origin of these cells in the immune system distinguishes them from ectodermal neurons and other glia and endows them with potential drug targets distinct from classical CNS target groups. However, despite the identification of several promising therapeutic approaches and molecular targets, no agents directly targeting these cells are currently available. Here, we assess strategies for targeting CNS myeloid cells and address key issues associated with their translation into the clinic.

  2. Codon-Driven Translational Efficiency Is Stable across Diverse Mammalian Cell States

    PubMed Central

    Villar, Diego; White, Robert J.; Marioni, John C.; Kutter, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Whether codon usage fine-tunes mRNA translation in mammals remains controversial, with recent papers suggesting that production of proteins in specific Gene Ontological (GO) pathways can be regulated by actively modifying the codon and anticodon pools in different cellular conditions. In this work, we compared the sequence content of genes in specific GO categories with the exonic genome background. Although a substantial fraction of variability in codon usage could be explained by random sampling, almost half of GO sets showed more variability in codon usage than expected by chance. Nevertheless, by quantifying translational efficiency in healthy and cancerous tissues in human and mouse, we demonstrated that a given tRNA pool can equally well translate many different sets of mRNAs, irrespective of their cell-type specificity. This disconnect between variations in codon usage and the stability of translational efficiency is best explained by differences in GC content between gene sets. GC variation across the mammalian genome is most likely a result of the interplay between genome repair and gene duplication mechanisms, rather than selective pressures caused by codon-driven translational rates. Consequently, codon usage differences in mammalian transcriptomes are most easily explained by well-understood mutational biases acting on the underlying genome. PMID:27166679

  3. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M C; Brum, Felipe L; da Silva, Camila C; Zuma, Aline A; Elias, Maria C; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number.

  4. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M. C.; Brum, Felipe L.; da Silva, Camila C.; Zuma, Aline A.; Elias, Maria C.; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  5. Endosymbiosis in trypanosomatid protozoa: the bacterium division is controlled during the host cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Catta-Preta, Carolina M C; Brum, Felipe L; da Silva, Camila C; Zuma, Aline A; Elias, Maria C; de Souza, Wanderley; Schenkman, Sergio; Motta, Maria Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Mutualism is defined as a beneficial relationship for the associated partners and usually assumes that the symbiont number is controlled. Some trypanosomatid protozoa co-evolve with a bacterial symbiont that divides in coordination with the host in a way that results in its equal distribution between daughter cells. The mechanism that controls this synchrony is largely unknown, and its comprehension might provide clues to understand how eukaryotic cells evolved when acquiring symbionts that later became organelles. Here, we approached this question by studying the effects of inhibitors that affect the host exclusively in two symbiont-bearing trypanosomatids, Strigomonas culicis and Angomonas deanei. We found that inhibiting host protein synthesis using cycloheximide or host DNA replication using aphidicolin did not affect the duplication of bacterial DNA. Although the bacteria had autonomy to duplicate their DNA when host protein synthesis was blocked by cycloheximide, they could not complete cytokinesis. Aphidicolin promoted the inhibition of the trypanosomatid cell cycle in the G1/S phase, leading to symbiont filamentation in S. culicis but not in A. deanei. Treatment with camptothecin blocked the host protozoa cell cycle in the G2 phase and induced the formation of filamentous symbionts in both species. Oryzalin, which affects host microtubule polymerization, blocked trypanosomatid mitosis and abrogated symbiont division. Our results indicate that host factors produced during the cell division cycle are essential for symbiont segregation and may control the bacterial cell number. PMID:26082757

  6. A host cell membrane microdomain is a critical factor for organelle discharge by Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Michiru; Andrabi, Syed Bilal Ahmad; Matsubara, Ryuma; Aonuma, Hiroka; Nagamune, Kisaburo

    2016-10-01

    Host cell microdomains are involved in the attachment, entry, and replication of intracellular microbial pathogens. Entry into the host cell of Toxoplasma gondii and the subsequent survival of this protozoan parasite are tightly coupled with the proteins secreted from organelle called rhoptry. The rhoptry proteins are rapidly discharged into clusters of vesicles, called evacuoles, which are then delivered to parasitophorous vacuoles (PVs) or nucleus. In this study, we examined the roles of two host cell microdomain components, cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI), in evacuole formation. The acute depletion of cholesterol from the host cell plasma membrane blocked evacuole formation but not invasion. Whereas the lack of host cell GPI also altered evacuole formation but not invasion, instead inducing excess evacuole formation. The latter effect was not influenced by the evacuole-inhibiting effects of host cell cholesterol depletion, indicating the independent roles of host GPI and cholesterol in evacuole formation. In addition, the excess formation of evacuoles resulted in the enhanced recruitment of host mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum to PVs, which in turn stimulated the growth of the parasite. PMID:27217289

  7. Human Cytomegalovirus Strategies to Maintain and Promote mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Heather A.; Ziehr, Benjamin; Moorman, Nathaniel J.

    2016-01-01

    mRNA translation requires the ordered assembly of translation initiation factors and ribosomal subunits on a transcript. Host signaling pathways regulate each step in this process to match levels of protein synthesis to environmental cues. In response to infection, cells activate multiple defenses that limit viral protein synthesis, which viruses must counteract to successfully replicate. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) inhibits host defenses that limit viral protein expression and manipulates host signaling pathways to promote the expression of both host and viral proteins necessary for virus replication. Here we review key regulatory steps in mRNA translation, and the strategies used by HCMV to maintain protein synthesis in infected cells. PMID:27089357

  8. Genome-Wide and Experimental Resolution of Relative Translation Elongation Speed at Individual Gene Level in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wei; Cui, Yizhi; Zhong, Jiayong; Jin, Jingjie; He, Qing-Yu; Wang, Tong; Zhang, Gong

    2016-01-01

    In the process of translation, ribosomes first assemble on mRNAs (translation initiation) and then translate along the mRNA (elongation) to synthesize proteins. Elongation pausing is deemed highly relevant to co-translational folding of nascent peptides and the functionality of protein products, which positioned the evaluation of elongation speed as one of the central questions in the field of translational control. By integrating three types of RNA-seq methods, we experimentally and computationally resolved elongation speed, with our proposed elongation velocity index (EVI), a relative measure at individual gene level and under physiological condition in human cells. We successfully distinguished slow-translating genes from the background translatome. We demonstrated that low-EVI genes encoded more stable proteins. We further identified cell-specific slow-translating codons, which might serve as a causal factor of elongation deceleration. As an example for the biological relevance, we showed that the relatively slow-translating genes tended to be associated with the maintenance of malignant phenotypes per pathway analyses. In conclusion, EVI opens a new view to understand why human cells tend to avoid simultaneously speeding up translation initiation and decelerating elongation, and the possible cancer relevance of translating low-EVI genes to gain better protein quality. PMID:26926465

  9. Interactions between Trypanosoma cruzi Secreted Proteins and Host Cell Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe Costa, Renata; da Silveira, Jose F.; Bahia, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is one of the prevalent neglected tropical diseases, affecting at least 6–7 million individuals in Latin America. It is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. After infection, the parasite invades and multiplies in the myocardium, leading to acute myocarditis that kills around 5% of untreated individuals. T. cruzi secretes proteins that manipulate multiple host cell signaling pathways to promote host cell invasion. The primary secreted lysosomal peptidase in T. cruzi is cruzipain, which has been shown to modulate the host immune response. Cruzipain hinders macrophage activation during the early stages of infection by interrupting the NF-kB P65 mediated signaling pathway. This allows the parasite to survive and replicate, and may contribute to the spread of infection in acute Chagas disease. Another secreted protein P21, which is expressed in all of the developmental stages of T. cruzi, has been shown to modulate host phagocytosis signaling pathways. The parasite also secretes soluble factors that exert effects on host extracellular matrix, such as proteolytic degradation of collagens. Finally, secreted phospholipase A from T. cruzi contributes to lipid modifications on host cells and concomitantly activates the PKC signaling pathway. Here, we present a brief review of the interaction between secreted proteins from T. cruzi and the host cells, emphasizing the manipulation of host signaling pathways during invasion. PMID:27065960

  10. Leptin stimulates protein synthesis-activating translation machinery in human trophoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Antonio; Maymó, Julieta; Gambino, Yésica; Dueñas, José L; Goberna, Raimundo; Varone, Cecilia; Sánchez-Margalet, Víctor

    2009-11-01

    Leptin was originally considered as an adipocyte-derived signaling molecule for the central control of metabolism. However, pleiotropic effects of leptin have been identified in reproduction and pregnancy, particularly in placenta, where it may work as an autocrine hormone, mediating angiogenesis, growth, and immunomodulation. Leptin receptor (LEPR, also known as Ob-R) shows sequence homology to members of the class I cytokine receptor (gp130) superfamily. In fact, leptin may function as a proinflammatory cytokine. We have previously found that leptin is a trophic and mitogenic factor for trophoblastic cells. In order to further investigate the mechanism by which leptin stimulates cell growth in JEG-3 cells and trophoblastic cells, we studied the phosphorylation state of different proteins of the initiation stage of translation and the total protein synthesis by [(3)H]leucine incorporation in JEG-3 cells. We have found that leptin dose-dependently stimulates the phosphorylation and activation of the translation initiation factor EIF4E as well as the phosphorylation of the EIF4E binding protein EIF4EBP1 (PHAS-I), which releases EIF4E to form active complexes. Moreover, leptin dose-dependently stimulates protein synthesis, and this effect can be partially prevented by blocking mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PIK3) pathways. In conclusion, leptin stimulates protein synthesis, at least in part activating the translation machinery, via the activation of MAPK and PIK3 pathways.

  11. Polysome Profiling Links Translational Control to the Radioresponse of Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Amy; Rath, Barbara H; Bisht, Kheem; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Changes in polysome-bound mRNA (translatome) are correlated closely with changes in the proteome in cells. Therefore, to better understand the processes mediating the response of glioblastoma to ionizing radiation (IR), we used polysome profiling to define the IR-induced translatomes of a set of human glioblastoma stem-like cell (GSC) lines. Although cell line specificity accounted for the largest proportion of genes within each translatome, there were also genes that were common to the GSC lines. In particular, analyses of the IR-induced common translatome identified components of the DNA damage response, consistent with a role for the translational control of gene expression in cellular radioresponse. Moreover, translatome analyses suggested that IR enhanced cap-dependent translation processes, an effect corroborated by the finding of increased eIF4F-cap complex formation detected after irradiation in all GSC lines. Translatome analyses also predicted that Golgi function was affected by IR. Accordingly, Golgi dispersal was detected after irradiation of each of the GSC lines. In addition to the common responses seen, translatome analyses predicted cell line-specific changes in mitochondria, as substantiated by changes in mitochondrial mass and DNA content. Together, these results suggest that analysis of radiation-induced translatomes can provide new molecular insights concerning the radiation response of cancer cells. More specifically, they suggest that the translational control of gene expression may provide a source of molecular targets for glioblastoma radiosensitization. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3078-87. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Cellular Aspects of Shigella Pathogenesis: Focus on the Manipulation of Host Cell Processes

    PubMed Central

    Killackey, Samuel A.; Sorbara, Matthew T.; Girardin, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is a Gram-negative bacterium that is responsible for shigellosis. Over the years, the study of Shigella has provided a greater understanding of how the host responds to bacterial infection, and how bacteria have evolved to effectively counter the host defenses. In this review, we provide an update on some of the most recent advances in our understanding of pivotal processes associated with Shigella infection, including the invasion into host cells, the metabolic changes that occur within the bacterium and the infected cell, cell-to-cell spread mechanisms, autophagy and membrane trafficking, inflammatory signaling and cell death. This recent progress sheds a new light into the mechanisms underlying Shigella pathogenesis, and also more generally provides deeper understanding of the complex interplay between host cells and bacterial pathogens in general. PMID:27066460

  13. Donor satellite cell engraftment is significantly augmented when the host niche is preserved and endogenous satellite cells are incapacitated.

    PubMed

    Boldrin, Luisa; Neal, Alice; Zammit, Peter S; Muntoni, Francesco; Morgan, Jennifer E

    2012-09-01

    Stem cell transplantation is already in clinical practice for certain genetic diseases and is a promising therapy for dystrophic muscle. We used the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy to investigate the effect of the host satellite cell niche on the contribution of donor muscle stem cells (satellite cells) to muscle regeneration. We found that incapacitation of the host satellite cells and preservation of the muscle niche promote donor satellite cell contribution to muscle regeneration and functional reconstitution of the satellite cell compartment. But, if the host niche is not promptly refilled, or is filled by competent host satellite cells, it becomes nonfunctional and donor engraftment is negligible. Application of this regimen to aged host muscles also promotes efficient regeneration from aged donor satellite cells. In contrast, if the niche is destroyed, yet host satellite cells remain proliferation-competent, donor-derived engraftment is trivial. Thus preservation of the satellite cell niche, concomitant with functional impairment of the majority of satellite cells within dystrophic human muscles, may improve the efficiency of stem cell therapy.

  14. Mouse host unlicensed NK cells promote donor allogeneic bone marrow engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maite; Sun, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells exist as subsets based on expression of inhibitory receptors that recognize major histocompatibility complex I (MHCI) molecules. NK cell subsets bearing MHCI binding receptors for self-MHCI have been termed as “licensed” and exhibit a higher ability to respond to stimuli. In the context of bone marrow transplantation (BMT), host licensed-NK (L-NK) cells have also been demonstrated to be responsible for the acute rejection of allogeneic and MHCI-deficient BM cells (BMCs) in mice after lethal irradiation. However, the role of recipient unlicensed-NK (U-NK) cells has not been well established with regard to allogeneic BMC resistance. After NK cell stimulation, the prior depletion of host L-NK cells resulted in a marked increase of donor engraftment compared with the untreated group. Surprisingly, this increased donor engraftment was reduced after total host NK cell depletion, indicating that U-NK cells can actually promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment. Furthermore, direct coculture of U-NK cells with allogeneic but not syngeneic BMCs resulted in increased colony-forming unit cell growth in vitro, which was at least partially mediated by granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) production. These data demonstrate that host NK cell subsets exert markedly different roles in allogeneic BMC engraftment where host L- and U-NK cells reject or promote donor allogeneic BMC engraftment, respectively. PMID:26738538

  15. Cell Type-specific Translational Profiling in the Xenopus laevis Retina

    PubMed Central

    Watson, F.L.; Mills, E. A.; Wang, X.; Guo, C.; Chen, D.F.; Marsh-Armstrong, N.

    2013-01-01

    Background Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification (TRAP), a method recently developed to generate cell type-specific translational profiles, relies on creating transgenic lines of animals in which a tagged ribosomal protein is placed under regulatory control of a cell type-specific promoter. An antibody is then used to affinity purify the tagged ribosomes so that cell type-specific mRNAs can be isolated from whole tissue lysates. Results Here, cell type-specific transgenic lines were generated to enable TRAP studies for retinal ganglion cells and rod photoreceptors in the Xenopus laevis retina. Using real time quantitative PCR for assessing expression levels of cell type-specific mRNAs, the TRAP method was shown to selectively isolate mRNAs expressed in the targeted cell and was efficient at purifying mRNAs expressed at both high and low levels. Statistical measures used to distinguish cell type-specific RNAs from low level background and non-specific RNAs showed TRAP to be highly effective in Xenopus. Conclusions TRAP can be used to purify mRNAs expressed in rod photoreceptors and retinal ganglion cells in Xenopus laevis. The generated transgenic lines will enable numerous studies into the development, disease and injury of the Xenopus laevis retina. PMID:23074098

  16. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J.; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M.; Hughes, Andrew D.; Rojas-Canales, Darling M.; Nakao, A.; Shufesky, William J.; Williams, Amanda L.; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A.; Shlomchik, Warren D.; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Morelli, Adrian E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  17. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection.

  18. Graft-infiltrating host dendritic cells play a key role in organ transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Quan; Liu, Quan; Divito, Sherrie J; Zeng, Qiang; Yatim, Karim M; Hughes, Andrew D; Rojas-Canales, Darling M; Nakao, A; Shufesky, William J; Williams, Amanda L; Humar, Rishab; Hoffman, Rosemary A; Shlomchik, Warren D; Oberbarnscheidt, Martin H; Lakkis, Fadi G; Morelli, Adrian E

    2016-01-01

    Successful engraftment of organ transplants has traditionally relied on preventing the activation of recipient (host) T cells. Once T-cell activation has occurred, however, stalling the rejection process becomes increasingly difficult, leading to graft failure. Here we demonstrate that graft-infiltrating, recipient (host) dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in driving the rejection of transplanted organs by activated (effector) T cells. We show that donor DCs that accompany heart or kidney grafts are rapidly replaced by recipient DCs. The DCs originate from non-classical monocytes and form stable, cognate interactions with effector T cells in the graft. Eliminating recipient DCs reduces the proliferation and survival of graft-infiltrating T cells and abrogates ongoing rejection or rejection mediated by transferred effector T cells. Therefore, host DCs that infiltrate transplanted organs sustain the alloimmune response after T-cell activation has already occurred. Targeting these cells provides a means for preventing or treating rejection. PMID:27554168

  19. Identification of agents effective against multiple toxins and viruses by host-oriented cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Zilbermintz, Leeor; Leonardi, William; Jeong, Sun-Young; Sjodt, Megan; McComb, Ryan; Ho, Chi-Lee C; Retterer, Cary; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Bavari, Sina; Levitin, Anastasia; West, Joel; Bradley, Kenneth A; Clubb, Robert T; Cohen, Stanley N; Gupta, Vivek; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-08-27

    A longstanding and still-increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases is resistance to antimicrobial countermeasures. Potentially, the targeting of host proteins and pathways essential for the detrimental effects of pathogens offers an approach that may discover broad-spectrum anti-pathogen countermeasures and circumvent the effects of pathogen mutations leading to resistance. Here we report implementation of a strategy for discovering broad-spectrum host-oriented therapies against multiple pathogenic agents by multiplex screening of drugs for protection against the detrimental effects of multiple pathogens, identification of host cell pathways inhibited by the drug, and screening for effects of the agent on other pathogens exploiting the same pathway. We show that a clinically used antimalarial drug, Amodiaquine, discovered by this strategy, protects host cells against infection by multiple toxins and viruses by inhibiting host cathepsin B. Our results reveal the practicality of discovering broadly acting anti-pathogen countermeasures that target host proteins exploited by pathogens.

  20. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Ogihara, Satoshi; Wang, Jin-Town; Wu, Meng-Chuan; McNeil, Paul L.; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+), single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA) or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA) strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:22949854

  1. Porphyromonas gingivalis as a Model Organism for Assessing Interaction of Anaerobic Bacteria with Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Wunsch, Christopher M; Lewis, Janina P

    2015-12-17

    Anaerobic bacteria far outnumber aerobes in many human niches such as the gut, mouth, and vagina. Furthermore, anaerobic infections are common and frequently of indigenous origin. The ability of some anaerobic pathogens to invade human cells gives them adaptive measures to escape innate immunity as well as to modulate host cell behavior. However, ensuring that the anaerobic bacteria are live during experimental investigation of the events may pose challenges. Porphyromonas gingivalis, a Gram-negative anaerobe, is capable of invading a variety of eukaryotic non-phagocytic cells. This article outlines how to successfully culture and assess the ability of P. gingivalis to invade human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Two protocols were developed: one to measure bacteria that can successfully invade and survive within the host, and the other to visualize bacteria interacting with host cells. These techniques necessitate the use of an anaerobic chamber to supply P. gingivalis with an anaerobic environment for optimal growth. The first protocol is based on the antibiotic protection assay, which is largely used to study the invasion of host cells by bacteria. However, the antibiotic protection assay is limited; only intracellular bacteria that are culturable following antibiotic treatment and host cell lysis are measured. To assess all bacteria interacting with host cells, both live and dead, we developed a protocol that uses fluorescent microscopy to examine host-pathogen interaction. Bacteria are fluorescently labeled with 2',7'-Bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM) and used to infect eukaryotic cells under anaerobic conditions. Following fixing with paraformaldehyde and permeabilization with 0.2% Triton X-100, host cells are labeled with TRITC phalloidin and DAPI to label the cell cytoskeleton and nucleus, respectively. Multiple images taken at different focal points (Z-stack) are obtained for temporal

  2. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells.

    PubMed

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2.

  3. Analysis of Host Gene Expression Profile in HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devadas, Krishnakumar; Biswas, Santanu; Haleyurgirisetty, Mohan; Wood, Owen; Ragupathy, Viswanath; Lee, Sherwin; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-01-01

    HIV replication is closely regulated by a complex pathway of host factors, many of them being determinants of cell tropism and host susceptibility to HIV infection. These host factors are known to exert a positive or negative influence on the replication of the two major types of HIV, HIV-1 and HIV-2, thereby modulating virus infectivity, host response to infection and ultimately disease progression profiles characteristic of these two types. Understanding the differential regulation of host cellular factors in response to HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections will help us to understand the apparent differences in rates of disease progression and pathogenesis. This knowledge would aid in the discovery of new biomarkers that may serve as novel targets for therapy and diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the differential expression of host genes in response to HIV-1/HIV-2 infection. To achieve this, we analyzed the effects of HIV-1 (MN) and HIV-2 (ROD) infection on the expression of host factors in PBMC at the RNA level using the Agilent Whole Human Genome Oligo Microarray. Differentially expressed genes were identified and their biological functions determined. Host gene expression profiles were significantly changed. Gene expression profiling analysis identified a subset of differentially expressed genes in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected cells. Genes involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, immune cell proliferation and activation, cytokines, chemokines, and transcription factors were differentially expressed in HIV-1 infected cells. Relatively few genes were differentially expressed in cells infected with HIV-2. PMID:26821323

  4. Modulation of the Translational Landscape During Herpesvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Glaunsinger, Britt A.

    2016-01-01

    Herpesviral mRNAs are produced and translated by cellular machinery, rendering them susceptible to the network of regulatory events that impact translation. In response, these viruses have evolved to infiltrate and hijack translational control pathways as well as to integrate specialized host translation strategies into their own repertoire. They are robust systems to dissect mechanisms of mammalian translational regulation and continue to offer insight into cis-acting mRNA features that impact assembly and activity of the translation apparatus. Here, I discuss recent advances revealing the extent to which the three herpesvirus subfamilies regulate both host and viral translation, thereby dramatically impacting the landscape of protein synthesis in infected cells. PMID:26958918

  5. Chlamydia psittaci IncA is phosphorylated by the host cell and is exposed on the cytoplasmic face of the developing inclusion.

    PubMed

    Rockey, D D; Grosenbach, D; Hruby, D E; Peacock, M G; Heinzen, R A; Hackstadt, T

    1997-04-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacteria that replicate within a non-acidified vacuole called an inclusion. Chlamydia psittaci (strain GPIC) produces a 39 kDa protein (IncA) that is localized to the inclusion membrane. While IncA is present as a single 39 kDa species in purified reticulate bodies, two additional higher M(r) forms are found in C. psittaci-infected cells. This finding suggested that IncA may be post-translationally modified in the host cell. Here we present evidence that IncA is a serine/threonine phosphoprotein that is phosphorylated by host cell enzymes. This conclusion is supported by the following experimental findings: (i) treatment of infected cells with inhibitors of host cell phosphatases or kinases altered the electrophoretic migration pattern of IncA; (ii) treatment with calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase eliminated the multiple-banding pattern of IncA, leaving only the protein band with the lowest relative molecular weight; and (iii) radioimmunoprecipitation of lysates of [32P]-orthophosphate-labelled infected HeLa cells with anti-IncA antisera demonstrated that the two highest M(r) IncA bands were phosphorylated. A vaccinia-virus recombinant expressing incA was used to determine if HeLa cells can phosphorylate IncA in the absence of a chlamydial background. IncA in lysates of these cells migrated identically to that seen in C. psittaci-infected cells, indicating the host cell was responsible for the phosphorylation of the protein. Microinjection of fluorescently labelled anti-IncA antibodies into C. psittaci-infected HeLa cells resulted in immunostaining of the outer face of the inclusion membrane. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IncA is phosphorylated by the host cell, and regions of IncA are exposed at the cytoplasmic face of the inclusion.

  6. Host parasite communications-Messages from helminths for the immune system: Parasite communication and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Gillian; Buck, Amy H; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Helminths are metazoan organisms many of which have evolved parasitic life styles dependent on sophisticated manipulation of the host environment. Most notably, they down-regulate host immune responses to ensure their own survival, by exporting a range of immuno-modulatory mediators that interact with host cells and tissues. While a number of secreted immunoregulatory parasite proteins have been defined, new work also points to the release of extracellular vesicles, or exosomes, that interact with and manipulate host gene expression. These recent results are discussed in the overall context of how helminths communicate effectively with the host organism.

  7. Host parasite communications-Messages from helminths for the immune system: Parasite communication and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Coakley, Gillian; Buck, Amy H; Maizels, Rick M

    2016-07-01

    Helminths are metazoan organisms many of which have evolved parasitic life styles dependent on sophisticated manipulation of the host environment. Most notably, they down-regulate host immune responses to ensure their own survival, by exporting a range of immuno-modulatory mediators that interact with host cells and tissues. While a number of secreted immunoregulatory parasite proteins have been defined, new work also points to the release of extracellular vesicles, or exosomes, that interact with and manipulate host gene expression. These recent results are discussed in the overall context of how helminths communicate effectively with the host organism. PMID:27297184

  8. Translocation of sickle cell erythrocyte microRNAs into Plasmodium falciparum inhibits parasite translation and contributes to malaria resistance.

    PubMed

    LaMonte, Gregory; Philip, Nisha; Reardon, Joseph; Lacsina, Joshua R; Majoros, William; Chapman, Lesley; Thornburg, Courtney D; Telen, Marilyn J; Ohler, Uwe; Nicchitta, Christopher V; Haystead, Timothy; Chi, Jen-Tsan

    2012-08-16

    Erythrocytes carrying a variant hemoglobin allele (HbS), which causes sickle cell disease and resists infection by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. The molecular basis of this resistance, which has long been recognized as multifactorial, remains incompletely understood. Here we show that the dysregulated microRNA (miRNA) composition, of either heterozygous HbAS or homozygous HbSS erythrocytes, contributes to resistance against P. falciparum. During the intraerythrocytic life cycle of P. falciparum, a subset of erythrocyte miRNAs translocate into the parasite. Two miRNAs, miR-451 and let-7i, were highly enriched in HbAS and HbSS erythrocytes, and these miRNAs, along with miR-223, negatively regulated parasite growth. Surprisingly, we found that miR-451 and let-7i integrated into essential parasite messenger RNAs and, via impaired ribosomal loading, resulted in translational inhibition. Hence, sickle cell erythrocytes exhibit cell-intrinsic resistance to malaria in part through an atypical miRNA activity, which may represent a unique host defense strategy against complex eukaryotic pathogens.

  9. Stem cells in human neurodegenerative disorders--time for clinical translation?

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell-based approaches have received much hype as potential treatments for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, transplantation of stem cells or their derivatives in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases can improve function by replacing the lost neurons and glial cells and by mediating remyelination, trophic actions, and modulation of inflammation. Endogenous neural stem cells are also potential therapeutic targets because they produce neurons and glial cells in response to injury and could be affected by the degenerative process. As we discuss here, however, significant hurdles remain before these findings can be responsibly translated to novel therapies. In particular, we need to better understand the mechanisms of action of stem cells after transplantation and learn how to control stem cell proliferation, survival, migration, and differentiation in the pathological environment.

  10. Release of lipopolysaccharide from intracellular compartments containing Salmonella typhimurium to vesicles of the host epithelial cell.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-del Portillo, F; Stein, M A; Finlay, B B

    1997-01-01

    The biological effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on eucaryotic cells have traditionally been characterized following extracellular challenge of LPS on susceptible cells. In this study, we report the capacity of Salmonella typhimurium to release LPS once it is located in the intracellular environment of cultured epithelial cells. LPS is liberated from vacuolar compartments, where intracellular bacteria reside, to vesicles present in the host cell cytosol. The vesicle-associated LPS is detected in infected cells from the time when invading bacteria enter the host cell. Release of LPS is restricted to S. typhimurium-infected cells, with no LPS observed in neighboring uninfected cells, suggesting that dissemination of LPS occurs entirely within the intracellular environment of the infected cell. The amount of LPS present in host vesicles reaches a maximum when intracellular S. typhimurium cells start to proliferate, a time at which the entire host cell cytosol is filled with numerous vesicles containing LPS. All these data support the concept that intracellular bacterial pathogens might signal the host cell from intracellular locations by releasing bioactive bacterial components such as LPS. PMID:8975888

  11. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males.

    PubMed

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-10-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3' UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I. PMID:26443637

  12. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2015-01-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3′ UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I. PMID:26443637

  13. Methods and procedures in adipose stem cells: state of the art and perspective for translation medicine.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, G F; De Francesco, F; D'Andrea, F; Ferraro, G A

    2015-03-01

    Stem cells have potential in the retrieval and repair of injured tissue and renovation of organ function. To date, several studies have been carried out to elucidate how differentiation of stem cells can be used in regenerative medicine applications. Adipose tissue is an abundant and accessible source of stem cell, useful for regenerative therapeutic use. Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are favorable for future translational research and can be applied in many clinical settings. Adipose tissue repair has been recently adopted in clinical trials to prove that ASCs can be successfully used in patients. Variability in cell culture procedures (isolation, characterization, and differentiation) may have an influence on the experimental outcome. In this report, we consider the selection mechanisms of ASCs using flow cytometry, cell culture, freezing/thawing, cell cycle evaluation, histochemistry/immunofluorescence, and differentiation of ASCs. Both researchers and regulatory institutions should consider a new policy for GMP procedures and protocols, paying special attention to stem cell bio-physiology, to facilitate more clinically oriented studies. ASCs show angiogenic properties, with prospects of repairing tissue damaged by radiotherapy, as well as possessing the ability to heal chronic wounds. They can also be useful in surgical practice. We focus on the potential clinical application of ASCs that are currently available regarding translational medicine and the methods and procedures for their isolation, differentiation, and characterization.

  14. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males.

    PubMed

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-10-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3' UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I.

  15. Selection and characterization of cells resistant to diphtheria toxin and pseudomonas exotoxin A: presumptive translational mutants.

    PubMed

    Moehring, T J; Moehring, J M

    1977-06-01

    Two classes of diphtheria toxin-resistant variants were selected from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells: permeability variants, in which uptake of toxin was impaired, and a new class of cytoplasmic variants, which were cross-resistant to Pseudomonas exotoxin. EF-2 prepared from the cytoplasmic variants was resistant to ADP-ribosylation by either toxin. The evidence presented suggests that these are translational variants possessing a mutationally altered EF-2 gene product. These studies also confirmed that Pseudomonas toxin ADP-ribosylates EF-2 in toxin-sensitive intact cells, as well as in cell-free systems.

  16. Endosymbiosis of Chlorella species to the ciliate Paramecium bursaria alters the distribution of the host's trichocysts beneath the host cell cortex.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2011-04-01

    Each symbiotic Chlorella of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole membrane derived from the host digestive vacuole membrane. Alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can grow independently. Mixing them experimentally can cause reinfection. Earlier, we reported that the symbiotic algae appear to push the host trichocysts aside to become fixed beneath the host cell cortex during the algal reinfection process. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy with a monoclonal antibody against the trichocysts demonstrates that the trichocysts change their locality to form algal attachment sites and decrease their density beneath the host cell cortex through algal reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy to detect acid phosphatase activity showed that some trichocysts near the host cell cortex are digested by the host lysosomal fusion during algal reinfection. Removal of algae from the host cell using cycloheximide recovers the trichocyst's arrangement and number near the host cell cortex. These results indicate that symbiotic algae compete for their attachment sites with preexisting trichocysts and that the algae have the ability to ensure algal attachment sites beneath the host cell cortex.

  17. Chew on this: Amoebic trogocytosis and host cell killing by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ralston, Katherine S.

    2015-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica was named “histolytica” (histo-: tissue; lytic-: dissolving) for its ability to destroy host tissues. Direct killing of host cells by the amoebae is likely to be the driving factor that underlies tissue destruction, but the mechanism was unclear. We recently showed that after attaching to host cells, amoebae bite off and ingest distinct host cell fragments, and that this contributes to cell killing. Here we review this process, termed “amoebic trogocytosis” (trogo-: nibble), and how this process interplays with phagocytosis, or whole cell ingestion, in this organism. “Nibbling” processes have been described in other microbes and in multicellular organisms. The discovery of amoebic trogocytosis in E. histolytica may also shed light on an evolutionarily conserved process for intercellular exchange. PMID:26070402

  18. Concise review: the relevance of human stem cell-derived organoid models for epithelial translational medicine.

    PubMed

    Hynds, Robert E; Giangreco, Adam

    2013-03-01

    Epithelial organ remodeling is a major contributing factor to worldwide death and disease, costing healthcare systems billions of dollars every year. Despite this, most fundamental epithelial organ research fails to produce new therapies and mortality rates for epithelial organ diseases remain unacceptably high. In large part, this failure in translating basic epithelial research into clinical therapy is due to a lack of relevance in existing preclinical models. To correct this, new models are required that improve preclinical target identification, pharmacological lead validation, and compound optimization. In this review, we discuss the relevance of human stem cell-derived, three-dimensional organoid models for addressing each of these challenges. We highlight the advantages of stem cell-derived organoid models over existing culture systems, discuss recent advances in epithelial tissue-specific organoids, and present a paradigm for using organoid models in human translational medicine. PMID:23203919

  19. Reflections on governance models for the clinical translation of stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Governance models for the oversight of human embryonic stem cell research have been proposed which mirror in large part familiar oversight mechanisms for research with human subjects and non-human animals. While such models are in principle readily endorsable, there are a set of concerns related to their implementation--such as ensuring that an elaborated informed consent process and conducting long-term monitoring of research subjects are tenable--which suggest areas where gathering data may facilitate more appropriate oversight. In addition, it is unclear whether a new governance model based at individual institutions are sufficient to address the ethical issues inherent to this research. Regardless, some of the concerns that have arisen in considering the appropriate governance of stem cell research, particularly the important translational pathway of innovation in contrast to staged research, transparency and publication, and social justice, may be useful in science and translational research more broadly.

  20. Concise Review: Advances in Generating Hepatocytes from Pluripotent Stem Cells for Translational Medicine.

    PubMed

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara; Hay, David C

    2016-06-01

    The liver is one of the major organs in the human body. Severe or prolonged exposure of the liver to different factors may cause life-threatening disease, which necessitates donor organ transplantation. While orthotopic liver transplantation can be used to effectively treat liver failure, it is an invasive procedure, which is severely limited by organ donation. Therefore, alternative sources of liver support have been proposed and studied. This includes the use of pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes as a renewable source of cells for therapy. In addition to cell-based therapies, in vitro engineered liver tissue provides powerful models for human drug discovery and disease modeling. This review focuses on the generation of hepatocyte-like cells from pluripotent stem cells and their application in translational medicine. Stem Cells 2016;34:1421-1426.

  1. The translation of cell-based therapies: clinical landscape and manufacturing challenges.

    PubMed

    Heathman, Thomas R J; Nienow, Alvin W; McCall, Mark J; Coopman, Karen; Kara, Bo; Hewitt, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have the potential to make a large contribution toward currently unmet patient need and thus effective manufacture of these products is essential. Many challenges must be overcome before this can become a reality and a better definition of the manufacturing requirements for cell-based products must be obtained. The aim of this study is to inform industry and academia of current cell-based therapy clinical development and to identify gaps in their manufacturing requirements. A total of 1342 active cell-based therapy clinical trials have been identified and characterized based on cell type, target indication and trial phase. Multiple technologies have been assessed for the manufacture of these cell types in order to facilitate product translation and future process development.

  2. Systems for the expression of orthogonal translation components in eubacterial host cells

    DOEpatents

    Ryu, Youngha; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    The invention related to compositions and methods for the in vivo production of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids. Specifically, the invention provides plasmid systems for the efficient eubacterial expression of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural acids at genetically-programmed positions.

  3. Systems for the expression of orthogonal translation components in eubacterial host cells

    DOEpatents

    Ryu, Youngha; Schultz, Peter G.

    2011-06-14

    The invention relates to compositions and methods for the in vivo production of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids. Specifically, the invention provides plasmid systems for the efficient eubacterial expression of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids at genetically-programmed positions.

  4. Systems for the expression of orthogonal translation components eubacterial host cells

    DOEpatents

    Ryu, Youngha; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-06-12

    The invention relates to compositions and methods for the in vivo production of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids. Specifically, the invention provides plasmid systems for the efficient eubacterial expression of polypeptides comprising one or more unnatural amino acids at genetically-programmed positions.

  5. Epigenetics: A New Model for Intracellular Parasite-Host Cell Regulation.

    PubMed

    Robert McMaster, W; Morrison, Charlotte J; Kobor, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Intracellular protozoan parasites are an extremely important class of pathogens that cause a spectrum of diseases in human and animal hosts. There is a growing body of evidence suggesting that protozoan parasites, like other prokaryotic and viral pathogens, manipulate host cells via epigenetic modifications of the host genome that alter transcription and corresponding signaling pathways. In light of these data, we examine the role of epigenetics in downregulation of host macrophages by Leishmania that could potentially lead to a permanent state of inactivation, thus favoring pathogen survival and disease progression. PMID:27142564

  6. Diversity in host clone performance within a Chinese hamster ovary cell line.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Peter M; Berthelot, Maud E; Young, Robert J; Graham, James W A; Racher, Andrew J; Aldana, Dulce

    2015-01-01

    Much effort has been expended to improve the capabilities of individual Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) host cell lines to synthesize recombinant therapeutic proteins (rPs). However, given the increasing variety in rP molecular types and formats it may be advantageous to employ a toolbox of CHO host cell lines in biomanufacturing. Such a toolbox would contain a panel of hosts with specific capabilities to synthesize certain molecular types at high volumetric concentrations and with the correct product quality (PQ). In this work, we examine a panel of clonally derived host cell lines isolated from CHOK1SV for the ability to manufacture two model proteins, an IgG4 monoclonal antibody (Mab) and an Fc-fusion protein (etanercept). We show that these host cell lines vary in their relative ability to synthesize these proteins in transient and stable pool production format. Furthermore, we examined the PQ attributes of the stable pool-produced Mab and etanercept (by N-glycan ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), respectively), and uncovered substantial variation between the host cell lines in Mab N-glycan micro-heterogeneity and etanercept N and O-linked macro-heterogeneity. To further investigate the capabilities of these hosts to act as cell factories, we examined the glycosylation pathway gene expression profiles as well as the levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in the untransfected hosts. We uncovered a moderate correlation between ER mass and the volumetric product concentration in transient and stable pool Mab production. This work demonstrates the utility of leveraging diversity within the CHOK1SV pool to identify new host cell lines with different performance characteristics.

  7. A universal strategy for regulating mRNA translation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Jicong; Arha, Manish; Sudrik, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Wu, Xia; Kane, Ravi S.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a simple strategy to control mRNA translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells which relies on a unique protein–RNA interaction. Specifically, we used the Pumilio/FBF (PUF) protein to repress translation by binding in between the ribosome binding site (RBS) and the start codon (in Escherichia coli), or by binding to the 5′ untranslated region of target mRNAs (in mammalian cells). The design principle is straightforward, the extent of translational repression can be tuned and the regulator is genetically encoded, enabling the construction of artificial signal cascades. We demonstrate that this approach can also be used to regulate polycistronic mRNAs; such regulation has rarely been achieved in previous reports. Since the regulator used in this study is a modular RNA-binding protein, which can be engineered to target different 8-nucleotide RNA sequences, our strategy could be used in the future to target endogenous mRNAs for regulating metabolic flows and signaling pathways in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. PMID:25845589

  8. T cell epitopes and post-translationally modified epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McGinty, John W; Marré, Meghan L; Bajzik, Veronique; Piganelli, Jon D; James, Eddie A

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which progressive loss of self-tolerance, evidenced by accumulation of auto-antibodies and auto-reactive T cells that recognize diverse self-proteins, leads to immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells and loss of insulin secretion. In this review, we discuss antigens and epitopes in T1D and the role that post-translational modifications play in circumventing tolerance mechanisms and increasing antigenic diversity. Emerging data suggest that, analogous to other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and celiac disease, enzymatically modified epitopes are preferentially recognized in T1D. Modifying enzymes such as peptidyl deiminases and tissue transglutaminase are activated in response to beta cell stress, providing a mechanistic link between post-translational modification and interactions with the environment. Although studies of such responses in the at-risk population have been limited, current data suggests that breakdown in tolerance through post-translational modification represents an important checkpoint in the development of T1D. PMID:26370701

  9. Expression of poliovirus 2Apro in mammalian cells: effects on translation.

    PubMed

    Aldabe, R; Feduchi, E; Novoa, I; Carrasco, L

    1995-12-11

    Poliovirus protease 2Apro has been efficiently expressed in HeLa and COS cells upon transfection with vector pTM1-2A and infection with the recombinant vaccinia virus bearing the T7 RNA polymerase. The expressed poliovirus protease localizes to the cytoplasm of the transfected cells, both in the endoplasmic reticulum and in vesicles scattered in the cytoplasm. Cleavage of p220, a component of initiation factor eIF-4F, selectively occurs from 5 h post-infection in transfected cells infected with the recombinant virus. This cleavage correlates in time with the profound inhibition observed in the synthesis of vaccinia virus proteins. A similar blockade of vesicular stomatitis virus translation takes place upon 2Apro expression. Finally, the synthesis of poliovirus protein 2C from a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses this protein under the EMC untranslated leader region is not affected by the synthesis of 2Apro. These findings lend support to the idea that translation of capped mRNAs requires the integrity of p220, while this requirement is not observed when translation of a mRNA bearing a picornavirus leader region is assayed.

  10. A universal strategy for regulating mRNA translation in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jicong; Arha, Manish; Sudrik, Chaitanya; Mukherjee, Abhirup; Wu, Xia; Kane, Ravi S

    2015-04-30

    We describe a simple strategy to control mRNA translation in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells which relies on a unique protein-RNA interaction. Specifically, we used the Pumilio/FBF (PUF) protein to repress translation by binding in between the ribosome binding site (RBS) and the start codon (in Escherichia coli), or by binding to the 5' untranslated region of target mRNAs (in mammalian cells). The design principle is straightforward, the extent of translational repression can be tuned and the regulator is genetically encoded, enabling the construction of artificial signal cascades. We demonstrate that this approach can also be used to regulate polycistronic mRNAs; such regulation has rarely been achieved in previous reports. Since the regulator used in this study is a modular RNA-binding protein, which can be engineered to target different 8-nucleotide RNA sequences, our strategy could be used in the future to target endogenous mRNAs for regulating metabolic flows and signaling pathways in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  11. Synergetic regulation of translational reading-frame switch by ligand-responsive RNAs in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-Ting; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2014-12-16

    Distinct translational initiation mechanisms between prokaryotes and eukaryotes limit the exploitation of prokaryotic riboswitch repertoire for regulatory RNA circuit construction in mammalian application. Here, we explored programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as the regulatory gene expression platform for engineered ligand-responsive RNA devices in higher eukaryotes. Regulation was enabled by designed ligand-dependent conformational rearrangements of the two cis-acting RNA motifs of opposite activity in -1 PRF. Particularly, RNA elements responsive to trans-acting ligands can be tailored to modify co-translational RNA refolding dynamics of a hairpin upstream of frameshifting site to achieve reversible and adjustable -1 PRF attenuating activity. Combined with a ligand-responsive stimulator, synthetic RNA devices for synergetic translational-elongation control of gene expression can be constructed. Due to the similarity between co-transcriptional RNA hairpin folding and co-translational RNA hairpin refolding, the RNA-responsive ligand repertoire provided in prokaryotic systems thus becomes accessible to gene-regulatory circuit construction for synthetic biology application in mammalian cells. PMID:25414357

  12. Translation of tobacco necrosis virus and its satellite in a cell-free wheat germ system.

    PubMed Central

    Salvato, M S; Fraenkel-Conrat, H

    1977-01-01

    Tobacco necrosis virus (TNV) and its satellite virus (STNV) each contain a single-stranded RNA genome, of about 1.4 X 10(6) and 0.4 X 10(6) daltons, respectively, which is very active in stimulating amino acid incorporation in a wheat germ cell-free system. With STNV RNA the predominant incorporation product of 22,000 daltons coelectrophoreses with viral coat protein and crossreacts with antibody to viral coat protein. A similar result is obtained with TNV RNA, the only major translation product being a 30,000-dalton protein which corresponds to the coat protein by gel sizing, serological tests, and tryptic peptide analysis. Other products appearing in smaller amounts are about 63,000, 43,000, and 26,000 daltons and smaller. The possible nature of these products is discussed, as well as the unusual feature of a large, presumably multigenic, viral RNA yielding the coat protein as the predominant translation product in a eukaryotic system. Much less STNV RNA than TNV RNA produces maximal translation. Cotranslation of both RNAs in vitro indicates that STNV RNA has a translational advantage over TNV RNA. The fact that these RNAs lack 5'-terminal capping and 3'-terminal poly(A) is discussed. PMID:267924

  13. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  14. Brucella abortus choloylglycine hydrolase affects cell envelope composition and host cell internalization.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Comerci, Diego J

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization.

  15. Anaplasma phagocytophilum APH0032 Is Exposed on the Cytosolic Face of the Pathogen-Occupied Vacuole and Co-opts Host Cell SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Oki, Aminat T.; Huang, Bernice; Beyer, Andrea R.; May, Levi J.; Truchan, Hilary K.; Walker, Naomi J.; Galloway, Nathan L.; Borjesson, Dori L.; Carlyon, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum, a member of the family Anaplasmataceae and the obligate intracellular bacterium that causes granulocytic anaplasmosis, resides in a host cell-derived vacuole. Bacterial proteins that localize to the A. phagocytophilum-occupied vacuole membrane (AVM) are critical host-pathogen interfaces. Of the few bacterial AVM proteins that have been identified, the domains responsible for AVM localization and the host cell pathways that they co-opt are poorly defined. APH0032 is an effector that is expressed and localizes to the AVM late during the infection cycle. Herein, the APH0032 domain that is essential for associating with host cell membranes was mapped. Immunofluorescent labeling of infected cells that had been differentially permeabilized confirmed that APH0032 is exposed on the AVM's cytosolic face, signifying its potential to interface with host cell processes. SUMOylation is the covalent attachment of a member of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) family of proteins to lysines in target substrates. Previous work from our laboratory determined that SUMOylation is important for A. phagocytophilum survival and that SUMOylated proteins decorate the AVM. Algorithmic prediction analyses identified APH0032 as a candidate for SUMOylation. Endogenous APH0032 was precipitated from infected cells using a SUMO affinity matrix, confirming that the effector co-opts SUMOylation during infection. APH0032 pronouncedly colocalized with SUMO1, but not SUMO2/3 moieties on the AVM. Ectopic expression of APH0032 in A. phagocytophilum infected host cells significantly boosted the bacterial load. This study delineates the first domain of any Anaplasmataceae protein that is essential for associating with the pathogen-occupied vacuole membrane, demonstrates the importance of APH0032 to infection, and identifies it as the second A. phagocytophilum effector that co-opts SUMOylation, thus underscoring the relevance of this post-translational modification to

  16. HIV-host interactome revealed directly from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y; Greco, Todd M; Mohammed, Kevin D; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M; Cristea, Ileana M; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P; Chait, Brian T; Muesing, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen-host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27572969

  17. HIV–host interactome revealed directly from infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yang; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Greco, Todd M.; Mohammed, Kevin D.; Tong, Tommy; Keegan, Sarah; Binley, James M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Fenyö, David; Rout, Michael P.; Chait, Brian T.; Muesing, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Although genetically compact, HIV-1 commandeers vast arrays of cellular machinery to sustain and protect it during cycles of viral outgrowth. Transposon-mediated saturation linker scanning mutagenesis was used to isolate fully replication-competent viruses harbouring a potent foreign epitope tag. Using these viral isolates, we performed differential isotopic labelling and affinity-capture mass spectrometric analyses on samples obtained from cultures of human lymphocytes to classify the vicinal interactomes of the viral Env and Vif proteins as they occur during natural infection. Importantly, interacting proteins were recovered without bias, regardless of their potential for positive, negative or neutral impact on viral replication. We identified specific host associations made with trimerized Env during its biosynthesis, at virological synapses, with innate immune effectors (such as HLA-E) and with certain cellular signalling pathways (for example, Notch1). We also defined Vif associations with host proteins involved in the control of nuclear transcription and nucleoside biosynthesis as well as those interacting stably or transiently with the cytoplasmic protein degradation apparatus. Our approach is broadly applicable to elucidating pathogen–host interactomes, providing high-certainty identification of interactors by their direct access during cycling infection. Understanding the pathophysiological consequences of these associations is likely to provide strategic targets for antiviral intervention. PMID:27375898

  18. CK2 phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5 potentiates cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Homma, Miwako Kato; Wada, Ikuo; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Yamaki, Junko; Krebs, Edwin G.; Homma, Yoshimi

    2005-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (CK2) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays an important role in cell cycle progression. Although its function in this process remains unclear, it is known to be required for the G1 and G2/M phase transitions in yeast. Here, we show that CK2 activity changes notably during cell cycle progression and is increased within 3 h of serum stimulation of quiescent cells. During the time period in which it exhibits high enzymatic activity, CK2 associates with and phosphorylates a key molecule for translation initiation, eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF) 5. Using MS, we show that Ser-389 and -390 of eIF5 are major sites of phosphorylation by CK2. This is confirmed using eIF5 mutants that lack CK2 sites; the phosphorylation levels of mutant eIF5 proteins are significantly reduced, relative to WT eIF5, both in vitro and in vivo. Expression of these mutants reveals that they have a dominant-negative effect on phosphorylation of endogenous eIF5, and that they perturb synchronous progression of cells through S to M phase, resulting in a significant reduction in growth rate. Furthermore, the formation of mature eIF5/eIF2/eIF3 complex is reduced in these cells, and, in fact, restricted diffusional motion of WT eIF5 was almost abolished in a GFP-tagged eIF5 mutant lacking CK2 phosphorylation sites, as measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. These results suggest that CK2 may be involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression by associating with and phosphorylating a key molecule for translation initiation. PMID:16227438

  19. Perturbation of Host Cell Cytoskeleton by Cranberry Proanthocyanidins and Their Effect on Enteric Infections

    PubMed Central

    Harmidy, Kevin; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2011-01-01

    Cranberry-derived compounds, including a fraction known as proanthocyanidins (PACs) exhibit anti-microbial, anti-infective, and anti-adhesive properties against a number of disease-causing organisms. In this study, the effect of cranberry proanthocyanidins (CPACs) on the infection of epithelial cells by two enteric bacterial pathogens, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and Salmonella Typhimurium was investigated. Immunofluorescence data showed that actin pedestal formation, required for infection by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), was disrupted in the presence of CPACs. In addition, invasion of HeLa cells by Salmonella Typhimurium was significantly reduced, as verified by gentamicin protection assay and immunofluorescence. CPACs had no effect on bacterial growth, nor any detectable effect on the production of bacterial effector proteins of the type III secretion system. Furthermore, CPACs did not affect the viability of host cells. Interestingly, we found that CPACs had a potent and dose-dependent effect on the host cell cytoskeleton that was evident even in uninfected cells. CPACs inhibited the phagocytosis of inert particles by a macrophage cell line, providing further evidence that actin-mediated host cell functions are disrupted in the presence of cranberry CPACs. Thus, although CPAC treatment inhibited Salmonella invasion and EPEC pedestal formation, our results suggest that this is likely primarily because of the perturbation of the host cell cytoskeleton by CPACs rather than an effect on bacterial virulence itself. These findings have significant implications for the interpretation of experiments on the effects of CPACs on bacteria-host cell interactions. PMID:22076143

  20. Oral chronic graft-versus-host disease: analysis of dendritic cells subpopulations*

    PubMed Central

    Botari, Clara Marino Espricigo; Nunes, Adauto José Ferreira; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Orti-Raduan, Érica Sinara Lenharo; Salvio, Ana Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The graft-versus-host disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Aiming at contributing to the understanding of the role of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and natural killer cells in chronic graft-versus-host disease, we examined biopsies of jugal mucosa of 26 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Half of these patients developed oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. Microscopic sections were immunohistochemically stained for anti-CD1a, anti-CD123 and anti-CD56. We calculated the number of immunostained cells in the corium per square millimeter and applied the Mann-Whitney test. Results showed a statistically significant increase of myeloid dendritic cells (CD1a+; p=0,02) and natural killer cells (CD56; p=0,04) in patients with oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. CD123 immunostaining showed no statistical difference between groups. It was concluded that myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells participate in the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25054751

  1. NSun2 Promotes Cell Growth via Elevating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 Translation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junyue; Yi, Jie; Cai, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hao; Liu, Zhenyun; Zhang, Xiaotian; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Jiang, Bin; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The tRNA methytransferase NSun2 promotes cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Here, we report that NSun2 regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) expression in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Knockdown of NSun2 decreased the CDK1 protein level, while overexpression of NSun2 elevated it without altering CDK1 mRNA levels. Further studies revealed that NSun2 methylated CDK1 mRNA in vitro and in cells and that methylation by NSun2 enhanced CDK1 translation. Importantly, NSun2-mediated regulation of CDK1 expression had an impact on the cell division cycle. These results provide new insight into the regulation of CDK1 during the cell division cycle. PMID:26391950

  2. Integrating artificial with natural cells to translate chemical messages that direct E. coli behaviour.

    PubMed

    Lentini, Roberta; Santero, Silvia Perez; Chizzolini, Fabio; Cecchi, Dario; Fontana, Jason; Marchioretto, Marta; Del Bianco, Cristina; Terrell, Jessica L; Spencer, Amy C; Martini, Laura; Forlin, Michele; Assfalg, Michael; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Bentley, William E; Mansy, Sheref S

    2014-01-01

    Previous efforts to control cellular behaviour have largely relied upon various forms of genetic engineering. Once the genetic content of a living cell is modified, the behaviour of that cell typically changes as well. However, other methods of cellular control are possible. All cells sense and respond to their environment. Therefore, artificial, non-living cellular mimics could be engineered to activate or repress already existing natural sensory pathways of living cells through chemical communication. Here we describe the construction of such a system. The artificial cells expand the senses of Escherichia coli by translating a chemical message that E. coli cannot sense on its own to a molecule that activates a natural cellular response. This methodology could open new opportunities in engineering cellular behaviour without exploiting genetically modified organisms. PMID:24874202

  3. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  4. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  5. Differences between graft-versus-leukemia and graft-versus-host reactivity. I. Interaction of donor immune T cells with tumor and/or host cells.

    PubMed

    Rocha, M; Umansky, V; Lee, K H; Hacker, H J; Benner, A; Schirrmacher, V

    1997-03-15

    Graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) and Graft-versus-host (GVH) reactions were compared after systemic transfer of allogeneic antitumor immune T lymphocytes from B10.D2 (H-2d; Mls(b)) into DBA/2 (H-2d; Mis(a)) mice. Before immune cell transfer, recipient DBA/2 mice were sublethally irradiated with 5 Gy to prevent host-versus-graft reactivity. Recipients were either bearing syngeneic metastatic ESb lymphomas (GVL system) or were normal, non-tumor-bearing mice (GVH system). We previously reported that this adoptive immunotherapy protocol (ADI) had pronounced GVL activity and led to immune rejection of even advanced metastasized cancer. In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used for immunohistochemical analysis of native frozen tissue sections from either spleen or liver to distinguish donor from host cells, to differentiate between CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes, and to stain sialoadhesin-positive macrophages at different time points after cell transfer. The kinetics of donor cell infiltration in spleen and liver differed in that the lymphoid organ was infiltrated earlier (days 1 to 5 after transfer) than the nonlymphoid organ (days 5 to 20). After reaching a peak, donor cell infiltration decreased gradually and was not detectable in the spleen after day 20 and in the liver after day 30. The organ-infiltrating donor immune cells were mostly T lymphocytes and stained positive for CD4 or CD8 T-cell markers. A remarkable GVL-associated observation was made with regard to a subset of macrophages bearing the adhesion molecule sialoadhesin (SER+ macrophages). In the livers of tumor-bearing mice, their numbers increased between days 1 and 12 after ADI by a factor greater than 30. Double-staining for donor cell marker and SER showed that the sialoadhesin-expressing macrophages were of host origin. The SER+ host macrophages from GVL livers were isolated by enzyme perfusion and rosetting 12 days after ADI, when they reached peak values of about 60 cells per liver lobule, and were

  6. Structure of the Essential Plasmodium Host Cell Traversal Protein SPECT1

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Brent Y.; Ghosh, Partho

    2014-01-01

    Host cell traversal by Plasmodium, the protozoan cause of malaria, is an essential part of this parasite's virulence. In this process, the parasite enters a host cell through a parasite-induced pore, traverses the host cell, and then exits the host cell. Two P. berghei proteins, SPECT1 and SPECT2, are required for host cell traversal by the sporozoite form of the parasite. In the absence of either, no pore formation is observed. While SPECT2 has sequence homology to pore-forming proteins, SPECT1 has no homology to proteins of known structure or function. Here we present the 2.75 Å resolution structure of a slightly truncated version of P. berghei SPECT1. The structure reveals that the protein forms a four-helix bundle, with the rare feature of having all of these helices in parallel or antiparallel alignment. Also notable is the presence of a large, conserved, hydrophobic internal cavity in the protein, which may constitute a ligand-binding site or be indicative of partial instability in SPECT1, or both. The structure of SPECT1 will make possible targeted mutagenesis experiments aimed at understanding its mechanism of action in host cell traversal. PMID:25479287

  7. Intestinal epithelial cells as mediators of the commensal–host immune crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yoshiyuki; Ivanov, Ivaylo I

    2014-01-01

    Commensal bacteria regulate the homeostasis of host effector immune cell subsets. The mechanisms involved in this commensal–host crosstalk are not well understood. Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) not only create a physical barrier between the commensals and immune cells in host tissues, but also facilitate interactions between them. Perturbations of epithelial homeostasis or function lead to the development of intestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and intestinal cancer. IECs receive signals from commensals and produce effector immune molecules. IECs also affect the function of immune cells in the lamina propria. Here we discuss some of these properties of IECs that define them as innate immune cells. We focus on how IECs may integrate and transmit signals from individual commensal bacteria to mucosal innate and adaptive immune cells for the establishment of the unique mucosal immunological equilibrium. PMID:23318659

  8. Theoretical Comparison of Translational and Rotational Motions of Nanoparticles in Cell Membrane and Consideration for Medical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Yasutaka; Katayama, Koichi; Araki, Tsutomu; Naruse, Yujiro

    2007-11-01

    The interaction between nanoparticles and biological cells under physical excitation is investigated theoretically. Our research aim is to thoroughly utilize a series of physical stimuli on a target cells (malignant cells or bacteria) in various medical applications. In this study, we focused on a theoretical comparison of the translational and rotational motions of nanoparticles in the cell membrane in terms of energy dissipation. The theoretical analysis suggested that rotational motion is more efficient than translational motion for providing frictional heat to the cells. The promising applications of rotational nanoparticles include their use as physical antibiotics and artificial immune system components for the selective destruction of bacteria and malignant cells.

  9. Stem Cell-Paved Biobridges Facilitate Stem Transplant and Host Brain Cell Interactions for Stroke Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Kelsey; Gonzales-Portillo, Gabriel S.; Acosta, Sandra; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.; Tajiri, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    Distinguished by an infarct core encased within a penumbra, stroke remains a primary source of mortality within the United States. While our scientific knowledge regarding the pathology of stroke continues to improve, clinical treatment options for patients suffering from stroke are extremely limited. Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) remains the sole FDA-approved drug proven to be helpful following stroke. However, due to the need to administer the drug within 4.5 hours of stroke onset its usefulness is constrained to less than 5% of all patients suffering from ischemic stroke. One experimental therapy for the treatment of stroke involves the utilization of stem cells. Stem cell transplantation has been linked to therapeutic benefit by means of cell replacement and release of growth factors; however the precise means by which this is accomplished has not yet been clearly delineated. Using a traumatic brain injury model, we recently demonstrated the ability of transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to form a biobridge connecting the area of injury to the neurogenic niche within the brain. We hypothesize that MSCs may also have the capacity to create a similar biobridge following stroke, thereby forming a conduit between the neurogenic niche and the stroke core and peri-infarct area. We propose that this biobridge could assist and promote interaction of host brain cells with transplanted stem cells and offer more opportunities to enhance the effectiveness of stem cell therapy in stroke. PMID:25770817

  10. Repression of protein translation and mTOR signaling by proteasome inhibitor in colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, William Ka Kei; Volta, Viviana; Cho, Chi Hin; Wu, Ya Chun; Li, Hai Tao; Yu, Le; Li, Zhi Jie; Sung, Joseph Jao Yiu

    2009-09-04

    Protein homeostasis relies on a balance between protein synthesis and protein degradation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is a major catabolic pathway for protein degradation. In this respect, proteasome inhibition has been used therapeutically for the treatment of cancer. Whether inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor can repress protein translation via a negative feedback mechanism, however, is unknown. In this study, proteasome inhibitor MG-132 lowered the proliferation of colon cancer cells HT-29 and SW1116. In this connection, MG-132 reduced the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) at Ser2448 and Ser2481 and the phosphorylation of its downstream targets 4E-BP1 and p70/p85 S6 kinases. Further analysis revealed that MG-132 inhibited protein translation as evidenced by the reductions of {sup 35}S-methionine incorporation and polysomes/80S ratio. Knockdown of raptor, a structural component of mTOR complex 1, mimicked the anti-proliferative effect of MG-132. To conclude, we demonstrate that the inhibition of protein degradation by proteasome inhibitor represses mTOR signaling and protein translation in colon cancer cells.

  11. Mechanical insights into ribosomal progression overcoming RNA G-quadruplex from periodical translation suppression in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    G-quadruplexes formed on DNA and RNA can be roadblocks to movement of polymerases and ribosome on template nucleotides. Although folding and unfolding processes of the G-quadruplexes are deliberately studied in vitro, how the mechanical and physical properties of the G-quadruplexes affect intracellular biological systems is still unclear. In this study, mRNAs with G-quadruplex forming sequences located either in the 5‧ untranslated region (UTR) or in the open reading frame (ORF) were constructed to evaluate positional effects of the G-quadruplex on translation suppression in cells. Periodic fluctuation of translation suppression was observed at every three nucleotides within the ORF but not within the 5‧ UTR. The results suggested that difference in motion of ribosome at the 5‧ UTR and the ORF determined the ability of the G-quadruplex structure to act as a roadblock to translation in cells and provided mechanical insights into ribosomal progression to overcome the roadblock.

  12. CotH3 mediates fungal invasion of host cells during mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Gebremariam, Teclegiorgis; Liu, Mingfu; Luo, Guanpingsheng; Bruno, Vincent; Phan, Quynh T.; Waring, Alan J.; Edwards, John E.; Filler, Scott G.; Yeaman, Michael R.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.

    2013-01-01

    Angioinvasion is a hallmark of mucormycosis. Previously, we identified endothelial cell glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) as a receptor for Mucorales that mediates host cell invasion. Here we determined that spore coat protein homologs (CotH) of Mucorales act as fungal ligands for GRP78. CotH proteins were widely present in Mucorales and absent from noninvasive pathogens. Heterologous expression of CotH3 and CotH2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae conferred the ability to invade host cells via binding to GRP78. Homology modeling and computational docking studies indicated structurally compatible interactions between GRP78 and both CotH3 and CotH2. A mutant of Rhizopus oryzae, the most common cause of mucormycosis, with reduced CotH expression was impaired for invading and damaging endothelial cells and CHO cells overexpressing GRP78. This strain also exhibited reduced virulence in a diabetic ketoacidotic (DKA) mouse model of mucormycosis. Treatment with anti-CotH Abs abolished the ability of R. oryzae to invade host cells and protected DKA mice from mucormycosis. The presence of CotH in Mucorales explained the specific susceptibility of DKA patients, who have increased GRP78 levels, to mucormycosis. Together, these data indicate that CotH3 and CotH2 function as invasins that interact with host cell GRP78 to mediate pathogenic host-cell interactions and identify CotH as a promising therapeutic target for mucormycosis. PMID:24355926

  13. Polysome Profiling Links Translational Control to the Radioresponse of Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Wahba, Amy; Rath, Barbara H; Bisht, Kheem; Camphausen, Kevin; Tofilon, Philip J

    2016-05-15

    Changes in polysome-bound mRNA (translatome) are correlated closely with changes in the proteome in cells. Therefore, to better understand the processes mediating the response of glioblastoma to ionizing radiation (IR), we used polysome profiling to define the IR-induced translatomes of a set of human glioblastoma stem-like cell (GSC) lines. Although cell line specificity accounted for the largest proportion of genes within each translatome, there were also genes that were common to the GSC lines. In particular, analyses of the IR-induced common translatome identified components of the DNA damage response, consistent with a role for the translational control of gene expression in cellular radioresponse. Moreover, translatome analyses suggested that IR enhanced cap-dependent translation processes, an effect corroborated by the finding of increased eIF4F-cap complex formation detected after irradiation in all GSC lines. Translatome analyses also predicted that Golgi function was affected by IR. Accordingly, Golgi dispersal was detected after irradiation of each of the GSC lines. In addition to the common responses seen, translatome analyses predicted cell line-specific changes in mitochondria, as substantiated by changes in mitochondrial mass and DNA content. Together, these results suggest that analysis of radiation-induced translatomes can provide new molecular insights concerning the radiation response of cancer cells. More specifically, they suggest that the translational control of gene expression may provide a source of molecular targets for glioblastoma radiosensitization. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3078-87. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27005284

  14. The cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity: structural determinants of host defence

    PubMed Central

    Mostowy, Serge; Shenoy, Avinash R.

    2016-01-01

    Host cells use antimicrobial proteins, pathogen-restrictive compartmentalization and cell death in their defence against intracellular pathogens. Recent work has revealed that four components of the cytoskeleton — actin, microtubules, intermediate filaments and septins, which are well known for their roles in cell division, shape and movement — have important functions in innate immunity and cellular self-defence. Investigations using cellular and animal models have shown that these cytoskeletal proteins are crucial for sensing bacteria and for mobilizing effector mechanisms to eliminate them. In this Review, we highlight the emerging roles of the cytoskeleton as a structural determinant of cell-autonomous host defence. PMID:26292640

  15. Coxiella burnetii Nine Mile II proteins modulate gene expression of monocytic host cells during infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Coxiella burnetii is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes acute and chronic disease in humans. Bacterial replication occurs within enlarged parasitophorous vacuoles (PV) of eukaryotic cells, the biogenesis and maintenance of which is dependent on C. burnetii protein synthesis. These observations suggest that C. burnetii actively subverts host cell processes, however little is known about the cellular biology mechanisms manipulated by the pathogen during infection. Here, we examined host cell gene expression changes specifically induced by C. burnetii proteins during infection. Results We have identified 36 host cell genes that are specifically regulated when de novo C. burnetii protein synthesis occurs during infection using comparative microarray analysis. Two parallel sets of infected and uninfected THP-1 cells were grown for 48 h followed by the addition of chloramphenicol (CAM) to 10 μg/ml in one set. Total RNA was harvested at 72 hpi from all conditions, and microarrays performed using Phalanx Human OneArray™ slides. A total of 784 (mock treated) and 901 (CAM treated) THP-1 genes were up or down regulated ≥2 fold in the C. burnetii infected vs. uninfected cell sets, respectively. Comparisons between the complementary data sets (using >0 fold), eliminated the common gene expression changes. A stringent comparison (≥2 fold) between the separate microarrays revealed 36 host cell genes modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Ontological analysis of these genes identified the innate immune response, cell death and proliferation, vesicle trafficking and development, lipid homeostasis, and cytoskeletal organization as predominant cellular functions modulated by C. burnetii protein synthesis. Conclusions Collectively, these data indicate that C. burnetii proteins actively regulate the expression of specific host cell genes and pathways. This is in addition to host cell genes that respond to the presence of the pathogen whether or not

  16. Host Cell Signalling and Leishmania Mechanisms of Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Shio, Marina Tiemi; Hassani, Kasra; Isnard, Amandine; Ralph, Benjamin; Contreras, Irazu; Gomez, Maria Adelaida; Abu-Dayyeh, Issa; Olivier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are able to secure their survival and propagation within their host by altering signalling pathways involved in the ability of macrophages to kill pathogens or to engage adaptive immune system. An important step in this immune evasion process is the activation of host protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 by Leishmania. SHP-1 has been shown to directly inactivate JAK2 and Erk1/2 and to play a role in the negative regulation of several transcription factors involved in macrophage activation. These signalling alterations contribute to the inactivation of critical macrophage functions (e.g., Nitric oxide, IL-12, and TNF-α). Additionally, to interfere with IFN-γ receptor signalling, Leishmania also alters several LPS-mediated responses. Recent findings from our laboratory revealed a pivotal role for SHP-1 in the inhibition of TLR-induced macrophage activation through binding to and inactivating IL-1-receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1). Furthermore, we identified the binding site as an evolutionarily conserved ITIM-like motif, which we named kinase tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (KTIM). Collectively, a better understanding of the evasion mechanisms utilized by Leishmania parasite could help to develop more efficient antileishmanial therapies in the near future. PMID:22131998

  17. Essential elements for translation: the germline factor Vasa functions broadly in somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vasa is a conserved RNA-helicase found in the germ lines of all metazoans tested. Whereas Vasa presence is often indicated as a metric for germline determination in animals, it is also expressed in stem cells of diverse origin. Recent research suggests, however, that Vasa has a much broader function, including a significant role in cell cycle regulation. Results herein indicate that Vasa is utilized widely, and often induced transiently, during development in diverse somatic cells and adult precursor tissues. We identified that Vasa in the sea urchin is essential for: (1) general mRNA translation during embryogenesis, (2) developmental re-programming upon manipulations to the embryo and (3) larval wound healing. We also learned that Vasa interacted with mRNAs in the perinuclear area and at the spindle in an Importin-dependent manner during cell cycle progression. These results suggest that, when present, Vasa functions are essential to contributing to developmental regulation. PMID:25977366

  18. Concise Review: Advances in Generating Hepatocytes from Pluripotent Stem Cells for Translational Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Szkolnicka, Dagmara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The liver is one of the major organs in the human body. Severe or prolonged exposure of the liver to different factors may cause life‐threatening disease, which necessitates donor organ transplantation. While orthotopic liver transplantation can be used to effectively treat liver failure, it is an invasive procedure, which is severely limited by organ donation. Therefore, alternative sources of liver support have been proposed and studied. This includes the use of pluripotent stem cell‐derived hepatocytes as a renewable source of cells for therapy. In addition to cell‐based therapies, in vitro engineered liver tissue provides powerful models for human drug discovery and disease modeling. This review focuses on the generation of hepatocyte‐like cells from pluripotent stem cells and their application in translational medicine. Stem Cells 2016;34:1421–1426 PMID:27015786

  19. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation.

    PubMed

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  20. Trypanosoma cruzi: Entry into Mammalian Host Cells and Parasitophorous Vacuole Formation

    PubMed Central

    Barrias, Emile Santos; de Carvalho, Tecia Maria Ulisses; De Souza, Wanderley

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted to vertebrate hosts by blood-sucking insects. This protozoan is an obligate intracellular parasite. The infective forms of the parasite are the metacyclic trypomastigotes, amastigotes, and bloodstream trypomastigotes. The recognition between the parasite and mammalian host cell, involves numerous molecules present in both cell types, and similar to several intracellular pathogens, T. cruzi is internalized by host cells via multiple endocytic pathways. Morphological studies demonstrated that after the interaction of the infective forms of T. cruzi with phagocytic or non-phagocytic cell types, plasma membrane (PM) protrusions can form, showing similarity with those observed during canonical phagocytosis or macropinocytic events. Additionally, several molecules known to be molecular markers of membrane rafts, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been demonstrated to be present at the invasion site. These events may or may not depend on the host cell lysosomes and cytoskeleton. In addition, after penetration, components of the host endosomal-lysosomal system, such as early endosomes, late endosomes, and lysosomes, participate in the formation of the nascent parasitophorous vacuole (PV). Dynamin, a molecule involved in vesicle formation, has been shown to be involved in the PV release from the host cell PM. This review focuses on the multiple pathways that T. cruzi can use to enter the host cells until complete PV formation. We will describe different endocytic processes, such as phagocytosis, macropinocytosis, and endocytosis using membrane microdomains and clathrin-dependent endocytosis and show results that are consistent with their use by this smart parasite. We will also discuss others mechanisms that have been described, such as active penetration and the process that takes advantage of cell membrane wound repair. PMID:23914186

  1. Trichomonas vaginalis Exosomes Deliver Cargo to Host Cells and Mediate Host∶Parasite Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Olivia; Lustig, Gila; Stevens, Grant C.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a common sexually transmitted parasite that colonizes the human urogential tract where it remains extracellular and adheres to epithelial cells. Infections range from asymptomatic to highly inflammatory, depending on the host and the parasite strain. Here, we use a combination of methodologies including cell fractionation, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, RNA, proteomic and cytokine analyses and cell adherence assays to examine pathogenic properties of T. vaginalis. We have found that T.vaginalis produces and secretes microvesicles with physical and biochemical properties similar to mammalian exosomes. The parasite-derived exosomes are characterized by the presence of RNA and core, conserved exosomal proteins as well as parasite-specific proteins. We demonstrate that T. vaginalis exosomes fuse with and deliver their contents to host cells and modulate host cell immune responses. Moreover, exosomes from highly adherent parasite strains increase the adherence of poorly adherent parasites to vaginal and prostate epithelial cells. In contrast, exosomes from poorly adherent strains had no measurable effect on parasite adherence. Exosomes from parasite strains that preferentially bind prostate cells increased binding of parasites to these cells relative to vaginal cells. In addition to establishing that parasite exosomes act to modulate host∶parasite interactions, these studies are the first to reveal a potential role for exosomes in promoting parasite∶parasite communication and host cell colonization. PMID:23853596

  2. Translational applications of molecular imaging in cardiovascular disease and stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Du, Wei; Tao, Hongyan; Zhao, Shihua; He, Zuo-Xiang; Li, Zongjin

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Molecular imaging techniques provide valuable information at cellular and molecular level, as opposed to anatomical and structural layers acquired from traditional imaging modalities. More specifically, molecular imaging employs imaging probes which interact with specific molecular targets and therefore makes it possible to visualize biological processes in vivo. Molecular imaging technology is now progressing towards preclinical and clinical application that gives an integral and comprehensive guidance for the investigation of cardiovascular disease. In addition, cardiac stem cell therapy holds great promise for clinical translation. Undoubtedly, combining stem cell therapy with molecular imaging technology will bring a broad prospect for the study and treatment of cardiac disease. This review will focus on the progresses of molecular imaging strategies in cardiovascular disease and cardiac stem cell therapy. Furthermore, the perspective on the future role of molecular imaging in clinical translation and potential strategies in defining safety and efficacy of cardiac stem cell therapies will be discussed.

  3. Engineering of ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    A number of natural and artificial bacterial riboswitches have been reported thus far. However, they generally function only in bacteria, not in eukaryotes. This is because of the differences of expression mechanisms (transcription, translation, and so on) between these two main types of organisms. For example, the mechanism of translation initiation is quite different between bacteria and eukaryotes, especially in ribosome loading on mRNA. While the bacterial ribosome binds to a well-conserved, internal sequence some bases before the start codon to initiate translation, the eukaryotic one is loaded on the 5' terminus with the help of certain eukaryotic initiation factors. This means not only that bacterial riboswitches regulating translation initiation are not available in eukaryotic translation systems, but also that it is physically difficult to construct eukaryotic ON riboswitches that regulate the eukaryotic canonical translation initiation, because an aptamer cannot be inserted upstream of the ribosome loading site. However, the mechanism of noncanonical translation initiation via "ribosomal shunt" enables us to design translation initiation-modulating (specifically, ribosomal shunt-modulating) eukaryotic ON riboswitches. This chapter describes a facile method for engineering these ribosomal shunt-modulating eukaryotic ON riboswitches by using a cell-free translation system. Because these riboswitches do not require hybridization switching thanks to a unique shunting mechanism, they have the major advantages of a low energy requirement for upregulation and relatively straightforward design over common hybridization switch-based ON riboswitches.

  4. Mutations in Coliphage P1 Affecting Host Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jean Tweedy; Walker, Donald H.

    1980-01-01

    A total of 103 amber mutants of coliphage P1 were tested for lysis of nonpermissive cells. Of these, 83 caused cell lysis at the normal lysis time and have defects in particle morphogenesis. Five amber mutants, with mutations in the same gene (gene 2), caused premature lysis and may have a defect in a lysis regulator. Fifteen amber mutants were unable to cause cell lysis. Artificially lysed cells infected with five of these mutants produced viable phage particles, and phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. However, phage production by these mutants was not continued after the normal lysis time. We conclude that the defect of these five mutants is in a lysis function. The five mutations were found to be in the same gene (designated gene 17). The remaining 10 amber mutants, whose mutations were found to be in the same gene (gene 10), were also unable to cause cell lysis. They differed from those in gene 17 in that no viable phage particles were produced from artificially lysed cells, and no phage particles were seen in thin sections of unlysed, infected cells. We conclude that the gene 10 mutants cannot synthesize late proteins, and it is possible that gene 10 may code for a regulator of late gene expression for P1. Images PMID:16789200

  5. Concise review: microfluidic technology platforms: poised to accelerate development and translation of stem cell-derived therapies.

    PubMed

    Titmarsh, Drew M; Chen, Huaying; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are a powerful resource for producing a variety of cell types with utility in clinically associated applications, including preclinical drug screening and development, disease and developmental modeling, and regenerative medicine. Regardless of the type of stem cell, substantial barriers to clinical translation still exist and must be overcome to realize full clinical potential. These barriers span processes including cell isolation, expansion, and differentiation; purification, quality control, and therapeutic efficacy and safety; and the economic viability of bioprocesses for production of functional cell products. Microfluidic systems have been developed for a myriad of biological applications and have the intrinsic capability of controlling and interrogating the cellular microenvironment with unrivalled precision; therefore, they have particular relevance to overcoming such barriers to translation. Development of microfluidic technologies increasingly utilizes stem cells, addresses stem cell-relevant biological phenomena, and aligns capabilities with translational challenges and goals. In this concise review, we describe how microfluidic technologies can contribute to the translation of stem cell research outcomes, and we provide an update on innovative research efforts in this area. This timely convergence of stem cell translational challenges and microfluidic capabilities means that there is now an opportunity for both disciplines to benefit from increased interaction. PMID:24311699

  6. Concise review: microfluidic technology platforms: poised to accelerate development and translation of stem cell-derived therapies.

    PubMed

    Titmarsh, Drew M; Chen, Huaying; Glass, Nick R; Cooper-White, Justin J

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are a powerful resource for producing a variety of cell types with utility in clinically associated applications, including preclinical drug screening and development, disease and developmental modeling, and regenerative medicine. Regardless of the type of stem cell, substantial barriers to clinical translation still exist and must be overcome to realize full clinical potential. These barriers span processes including cell isolation, expansion, and differentiation; purification, quality control, and therapeutic efficacy and safety; and the economic viability of bioprocesses for production of functional cell products. Microfluidic systems have been developed for a myriad of biological applications and have the intrinsic capability of controlling and interrogating the cellular microenvironment with unrivalled precision; therefore, they have particular relevance to overcoming such barriers to translation. Development of microfluidic technologies increasingly utilizes stem cells, addresses stem cell-relevant biological phenomena, and aligns capabilities with translational challenges and goals. In this concise review, we describe how microfluidic technologies can contribute to the translation of stem cell research outcomes, and we provide an update on innovative research efforts in this area. This timely convergence of stem cell translational challenges and microfluidic capabilities means that there is now an opportunity for both disciplines to benefit from increased interaction.

  7. Translational downregulation of HSP90 expression by iron chelators in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sidarovich, Viktoryia; Adami, Valentina; Gatto, Pamela; Greco, Valentina; Tebaldi, Toma; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential cellular nutrient, being a critical cofactor of several proteins involved in cell growth and replication. Compared with normal cells, neoplastic cells have been shown to require a greater amount of iron, thus laying the basis for the promising anticancer activity of iron chelators. In this work, we evaluated the effects of molecules with iron chelation activity on neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines. Of the 17 iron chelators tested, six reduced cell viability of two NB cell lines with an inhibition of growth of 50% below 10 µM; four of the six molecules-ciclopirox olamine (CPX), piroctone, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and deferasirox-were also shown to efficiently chelate intracellular iron within minutes after addition. Effects on cell viability of one of the compounds, CPX, were indeed dependent on chelation of intracellular iron and mediated by both G0/G1 cell cycle block and induction of apoptosis. By combined transcriptome and translatome profiling we identified early translational downregulation of several members of the heat shock protein group as a specific effect of CPX treatment. We functionally confirmed iron-dependent depletion of HSP90 and its client proteins at pharmacologically achievable concentrations of CPX, and we extended this effect to piroctone, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and deferasirox. Given the documented sensitivity of NB cells to HSP90 inhibition, we propose CPX and other iron chelators as investigational antitumor agents in NB therapy. PMID:25564462

  8. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/host cell interplay.

    PubMed

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex biological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or nonphagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the upregulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells.

  9. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Involved in the Trypanosoma cruzi/Host Cell Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Patricia Silvia; Cueto, Juan Agustín; Casassa, Ana Florencia; Vanrell, María Cristina; Gottlieb, Roberta A.; Colombo, María Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi has a complex bi-ological cycle that involves vertebrate and invertebrate hosts. In mammals, the infective trypomastigote form of this parasite can invade several cell types by exploiting phagocytic-like or non-phagocytic mechanisms depending on the class of cell involved. Morphological studies showed that when trypomastigotes contact macrophages, they induce the formation of plasma membrane protrusions that differ from the canonical phagocytosis that occurs in the case of noninfective epimastigotes. In contrast, when trypomastigotes infect epithelial or muscle cells, the cell surface is minimally modified, suggesting the induction of a different class of process. Lysosomal-dependent or -independent T. cruzi invasion of host cells are two different models that describe the molecular and cellular events activated during parasite entry into nonphagocytic cells. In this context, we have previously shown that induction of autophagy in host cells before infection favors T. cruzi invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that autophagosomes and the autophagosomal protein LC3 are recruited to the T. cruzi entry sites and that the newly formed T. cruzi parasitophorous vacuole has characteristics of an autophagolysosome. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of T. cruzi invasion in nonphagocytic cells. Based on our findings, we propose a new model in which T. cruzi takes advantage of the up-regulation of autophagy during starvation to increase its successful colonization of host cells. PMID:22454195

  10. Insect Gut Symbiont Susceptibility to Host Antimicrobial Peptides Caused by Alteration of the Bacterial Cell Envelope*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyeun Kate; Son, Dae Woo; Kim, Chan-Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Marchetti, Roberta; Silipo, Alba; Sturiale, Luisa; Park, Ha Young; Huh, Ye Rang; Nakayama, Hiroshi; Fukatsu, Takema; Molinaro, Antonio; Lee, Bok Luel

    2015-01-01

    The molecular characterization of symbionts is pivotal for understanding the cross-talk between symbionts and hosts. In addition to valuable knowledge obtained from symbiont genomic studies, the biochemical characterization of symbionts is important to fully understand symbiotic interactions. The bean bug (Riptortus pedestris) has been recognized as a useful experimental insect gut symbiosis model system because of its cultivatable Burkholderia symbionts. This system is greatly advantageous because it allows the acquisition of a large quantity of homogeneous symbionts from the host midgut. Using these naïve gut symbionts, it is possible to directly compare in vivo symbiotic cells with in vitro cultured cells using biochemical approaches. With the goal of understanding molecular changes that occur in Burkholderia cells as they adapt to the Riptortus gut environment, we first elucidated that symbiotic Burkholderia cells are highly susceptible to purified Riptortus antimicrobial peptides. In search of the mechanisms of the increased immunosusceptibility of symbionts, we found striking differences in cell envelope structures between cultured and symbiotic Burkholderia cells. The bacterial lipopolysaccharide O antigen was absent from symbiotic cells examined by gel electrophoretic and mass spectrometric analyses, and their membranes were more sensitive to detergent lysis. These changes in the cell envelope were responsible for the increased susceptibility of the Burkholderia symbionts to host innate immunity. Our results suggest that the symbiotic interactions between the Riptortus host and Burkholderia gut symbionts induce bacterial cell envelope changes to achieve successful gut symbiosis. PMID:26116716

  11. Delivery of host cell-directed therapeutics for intracellular pathogen clearance

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Michael A.; Gallovic, Matthew D.; Peine, Kevin J.; Duong, Anthony D.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Gunn, John S.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Ainslie, Kristy M.

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens present a major health risk because of their innate ability to evade clearance. Their location within host cells and ability to react to the host environment by mutation or transcriptional changes often enables survival mechanisms to resist standard therapies. Host-directed drugs do not target the pathogen, minimizing the potential development of drug resistance; however, they can be difficult to deliver efficiently to intracellular sites. Vehicle delivery of host-mediated response drugs not only improves drug distribution and toxicity profiles, but can reduce the total amount of drug necessary to clear infection. In this article, we will review some host-directed drugs and current drug delivery techniques that can be used to efficiently clear intracellular infections. PMID:24134600

  12. A paradigm for endosymbiotic life: cell differentiation of Rhizobium bacteria provoked by host plant factors.

    PubMed

    Kondorosi, Eva; Mergaert, Peter; Kereszt, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Symbiosis between Rhizobium bacteria and legumes leads to the formation of the root nodule. The endosymbiotic bacteria reside in polyploid host cells as membrane-surrounded vesicles where they reduce atmospheric nitrogen to support plant growth by supplying ammonia in exchange for carbon sources and energy. The morphology and physiology of endosymbionts, despite their common function, are highly divergent in different hosts. In galegoid plants, the endosymbionts are terminally differentiated, uncultivable polyploid cells, with remarkably elongated and even branched Y-shaped cells. Bacteroid differentiation is controlled by host peptides, many of which have antibacterial activity and require the bacterial function of BacA. Although the precise and combined action of several hundred host peptides and BacA has yet to be discovered, similarities, especially to certain insect-bacterium symbioses involving likewise host peptides for manipulation of endosymbionts, suggest convergent evolution. Rhizobium-legume symbiosis provides a rich source of information for understanding host-controlled endosymbiotic life in eukaryotic cells.

  13. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David JP; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10809.001 PMID:26576949

  14. Host cell proteins in biotechnology-derived products: A risk assessment framework.

    PubMed

    de Zafra, Christina L Zuch; Quarmby, Valerie; Francissen, Kathleen; Vanderlaan, Martin; Zhu-Shimoni, Judith

    2015-11-01

    To manufacture biotechnology products, mammalian or bacterial cells are engineered for the production of recombinant therapeutic human proteins including monoclonal antibodies. Host cells synthesize an entire repertoire of proteins which are essential for their own function and survival. Biotechnology manufacturing processes are designed to produce recombinant therapeutics with a very high degree of purity. While there is typically a low residual level of host cell protein in the final drug product, under some circumstances a host cell protein(s) may copurify with the therapeutic protein and, if it is not detected and removed, it may become an unintended component of the final product. The purpose of this article is to enumerate and discuss factors to be considered in an assessment of risk of residual host cell protein(s) detected and identified in the drug product. The consideration of these factors and their relative ranking will lead to an overall risk assessment that informs decision-making around how to control the levels of host cell proteins.

  15. THE COURSE OF VIRUS-INDUCED RABBIT PAPILLOMAS AS DETERMINED BY VIRUS, CELLS, AND HOST

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, John G.

    1938-01-01

    An experimental analysis of the factors responsible for the observed differences in the course of virus-induced papillomas of the rabbit has shown that some are referable to the virus, others to the cells, and yet others to host influences. The interplay of these factors affords enlightening illustration of the nature of the cell-virus relationship in virus-induced tumors. Retrogression of the rabbit papillomas appears to be consequent on a generalized resistance of host origin, elicited by and directed against the proliferating, virus-infected cells. PMID:19870740

  16. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia M. Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    In the present short review, we analyze past experiments that addressed the interactions of intracellular pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium) with host cells and the initial use of the term active penetration to indicate that a protozoan “crossed the host cell membrane, penetrating into the cytoplasm.” However, the subsequent use of transmission electron microscopy showed that, for all of the protozoans and cell types examined, endocytosis, classically defined as involving the formation of a membrane-bound vacuole, took place during the interaction process. As a consequence, the recently penetrated parasites are always within a vacuole, designated the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). PMID:23355838

  17. Active penetration of Trypanosoma cruzi into host cells: historical considerations and current concepts.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Wanderley; de Carvalho, Tecia M Ulisses

    2013-01-01

    In the present short review, we analyze past experiments that addressed the interactions of intracellular pathogenic protozoa (Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, and Plasmodium) with host cells and the initial use of the term active penetration to indicate that a protozoan "crossed the host cell membrane, penetrating into the cytoplasm." However, the subsequent use of transmission electron microscopy showed that, for all of the protozoans and cell types examined, endocytosis, classically defined as involving the formation of a membrane-bound vacuole, took place during the interaction process. As a consequence, the recently penetrated parasites are always within a vacuole, designated the parasitophorous vacuole (PV). PMID:23355838

  18. Phagoptosis - Cell Death By Phagocytosis - Plays Central Roles in Physiology, Host Defense and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brown, G C; Vilalta, A; Fricker, M

    2015-01-01

    Cell death by phagocytosis - termed 'phagoptosis' for short - is a form of cell death caused by the cell being phagocytosed i.e. recognised, engulfed and digested by another cell. Phagocytes eat cells that: i) expose 'eat-me' signals, ii) lose 'don't-eat-me' signals, and/or iii) bind opsonins. Live cells may express such signals as a result of cell stress, damage, activation or senescence, which can result in phagoptosis. Phagoptosis may be the most abundant form of cell death physiologically as it mediates erythrocyte turnover. It also regulates: reproduction by phagocytosis of sperm, development by removal stem cells and excess cells, and immunity by removal of activated neutrophils and T cells. Phagoptosis mediates the recognition of non-self and host defence against pathogens and cancer cells. However, in inflammatory conditions, excessive phagoptosis may kill our cells, leading to conditions such as hemophagy and neuronal loss.

  19. Stem cell progeny contribute to the schistosome host-parasite interface

    PubMed Central

    Collins, James J; Wendt, George R; Iyer, Harini; Newmark, Phillip A

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomes infect more than 200 million of the world's poorest people. These parasites live in the vasculature, producing eggs that spur a variety of chronic, potentially life-threatening, pathologies exacerbated by the long lifespan of schistosomes, that can thrive in the host for decades. How schistosomes maintain their longevity in this immunologically hostile environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that somatic stem cells in Schistosoma mansoni are biased towards generating a population of cells expressing factors associated exclusively with the schistosome host-parasite interface, a structure called the tegument. We show cells expressing these tegumental factors are short-lived and rapidly turned over. We suggest that stem cell-driven renewal of this tegumental lineage represents an important strategy for parasite survival in the context of the host vasculature. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12473.001 PMID:27003592

  20. Adult human mesenchymal stromal cells and the treatment of graft versus host disease

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Richard P; Sturm, Marian J

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease is a difficult and potentially lethal complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It occurs with minor human leucocyte antigen (HLA) mismatch and is normally treated with corticosteroid and other immunosuppressive therapy. When it is refractory to steroid therapy, mortality approaches 80%. Mesenchymal stromal cells are rare cells found in bone marrow and other tissues. They can be expanded in culture and possess complex and diverse immunomodulatory activity. Moreover, human mesenchymal stromal cells carry low levels of class 1 and no class 2 HLA antigens, making them immunoprivileged and able to be used without HLA matching. Their use in steroid-refractory graft versus host disease was first described in 2004. Subsequently, they have been used in a number of Phase I and II trials in acute and chronic graft versus host disease trials with success. We discuss their mode of action, the results, their production, and potential dangers with a view to future application. PMID:24627644

  1. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples. PMID:25820736

  2. Salmonella modulation of host cell gene expression promotes its intracellular growth.

    PubMed

    Hannemann, Sebastian; Gao, Beile; Galán, Jorge E

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium has evolved a complex functional interface with its host cell largely determined by two type III secretion systems (T3SS), which through the delivery of bacterial effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular processes. We show here that Salmonella Typhimurium infection of epithelial cells results in a profound transcriptional reprogramming that changes over time. This response is triggered by Salmonella T3SS effector proteins, which stimulate unique signal transduction pathways leading to STAT3 activation. We found that the Salmonella-stimulated changes in host cell gene expression are required for the formation of its specialized vesicular compartment that is permissive for its intracellular replication. This study uncovers a cell-autonomous process required for Salmonella pathogenesis potentially opening up new avenues for the development of anti-infective strategies that target relevant host pathways.

  3. 2-D Western blotting for evaluation of antibodies developed for detection of host cell protein.

    PubMed

    Berkelman, Tom; Harbers, Adriana; Bandhakavi, Sricharan

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins generated for therapeutic use must be substantially free of residual host cell protein (HCP). The presence of host cell protein (HCP) is usually assayed by ELISA using a polyclonal antibody mixture raised against a population of proteins derived from the host cell background. This antibody should recognize as high a proportion as possible of the potential HCPs in a given sample. A recommended method for evaluating the assay involves two-dimensional electrophoretic separation followed by Western blotting.We present here a method using commercial anti-HCP antibody and samples derived from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. The 2-D electrophoresis procedure gives highly reproducible spot patterns and entire procedure can be completed in less than 2 days. Software analysis enables the straightforward generation of percent coverage values for the antibody when used to probe HCP-containing samples.

  4. Protein post-translational modifications and regulation of pluripotency in human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Peterson, Suzanne E; Loring, Jeanne F

    2014-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are known to be essential mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells to diversify their protein functions and dynamically coordinate their signaling networks. Defects in PTMs have been linked to numerous developmental disorders and human diseases, highlighting the importance of PTMs in maintaining normal cellular states. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into a variety of functional somatic cells; these cells hold a great promise for the advancement of biomedical research and clinical therapy. The mechanisms underlying cellular pluripotency in human cells have been extensively explored in the past decade. In addition to the vast amount of knowledge obtained from the genetic and transcriptional research in hPSCs, there is a rapidly growing interest in the stem cell biology field to examine pluripotency at the protein and PTM level. This review addresses recent progress toward understanding the role of PTMs (glycosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation) in the regulation of cellular pluripotency.

  5. Cell differentiation and flagellar elongation in Naegleria gruberi. Dependence on transcription and translation

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents evidence that the phenotypic transformation of Naegleria gruberi from amebae to flagellates that occurs when cells are placed in a nutrient-free aqueous environment is dependent on transcription and translation. RNA and protein are synthesized during the hour-long differentiation. Actinomycin D and daunomycin selectively inhibit RNA synthesis, and cycloheximide selectively inhibits protein synthesis, throughout the time required for differentiation. These inhibitors prevent differentiation if added soon after the cells are transferred to nonnutrient buffer but cease to block specific differentiation events at subsequent, reproducible times, the transition points. After each transition point, morphogenesis can occur in the presence of the inhibitor and in the virtual absence of transcription or translation. A map of the transition points indicates that RNA synthesis is required until halfway through the temporal process from initiation to flagellum assembly, and that protein synthesis is required until three-fourths of the way through. Even when flagellum outgrowth can occur in the presence of cycloheximide, the length of the flagella formed is determined by the extent of synthesis of an unknown "limiting precursor." The transition points for formation of flagella and for formation of the streamlined flagellate body shape are temporally separate. These results indicate that differentiation in Naegleria involves a redirection of cell metabolism to produce new RNA and protein molecules that are essential for morphogenesis. PMID:6154711

  6. Engineering mammalian cell factories with SINEUP noncoding RNAs to improve translation of secreted proteins.

    PubMed

    Patrucco, Laura; Chiesa, Andrea; Soluri, Maria Felicia; Fasolo, Francesca; Takahashi, Hazuki; Carninci, Piero; Zucchelli, Silvia; Santoro, Claudio; Gustincich, Stefano; Sblattero, Daniele; Cotella, Diego

    2015-09-15

    Whenever the function of a recombinant protein depends on post-translational processing, mammalian cells become an indispensable tool for their production. This is particularly true for biologics and therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Despite some drawbacks, Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are the workhorse for MAbs production in academia and industry. Several methodologies have been adopted to improve expression and stability, including methods based on selective pressure or cell engineering. We have previously identified SINEUPs as a new functional class of natural and synthetic long non-coding RNAs that through the activity of an inverted SINEB2 element are able to promote translation of partially overlapping sense coding mRNAs. Here we show that by taking advantage of their modular structure, synthetic SINEUPs can be designed to increase production of secreted proteins. Furthermore, by experimentally validating antisense to elastin (AS-eln) RNA as a natural SINEUP, we show that SINEUP-mediated control may target extracellular proteins. These results lead us to propose synthetic SINEUPs as new versatile tools to optimize production of secreted proteins in manufacturing pipelines and natural SINEUPs as new regulatory RNAs in the secretory pathways.

  7. eIF3 targets cell proliferation mRNAs for translational activation or repression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Amy S.Y.; Kranzusch, Philip J.; Cate, Jamie H.D.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of protein synthesis is fundamental for all aspects of eukaryotic biology by controlling development, homeostasis, and stress responses1,2. The 13-subunit, 800-kDa eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) organizes initiation factor and ribosome interactions required for productive translation3. However, current understanding of eIF3 function does not explain genetic evidence correlating eIF3 deregulation with tissue-specific cancers and developmental defects4. Here we report the genome-wide discovery of human transcripts that interact with eIF3 using photo-activatable crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP)5. eIF3 binds to a highly specific programme of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) involved in cell growth control processes, including cell cycling, differentiation, and apoptosis, via the mRNA 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR). Surprisingly, functional analysis of the interaction between eIF3 and two mRNAs encoding cell proliferation regulators, c-Jun and BTG1, reveals that eIF3 employs different modes of RNA stem loop binding to exert either translational activation or repression. Our findings illuminate a new role for eIF3 in governing a specialized repertoire of gene expression and suggest that binding of eIF3 to specific mRNAs could be targeted to control carcinogenesis. PMID:25849773

  8. Regulatory T Cells in Autoimmune Diabetes: Mechanisms of Action and Translational Potential.

    PubMed

    Ovcinnikovs, Vitalijs; Walker, Lucy S K

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of specialized T cells with regulatory function, harnessing the power of these cells to ameliorate autoimmunity has been a major goal. Here we collate the evidence that regulatory T cells (Treg) can inhibit Type 1 diabetes in animal models and humans. We discuss the anatomical sites and molecular mechanisms of Treg suppressive function in the Type 1 diabetes setting, citing evidence that Treg can function in both the pancreatic lymph nodes and within the pancreatic lesion. Involvement of the CTLA-4 pathway, as well as TGF-β and IL-2 deprivation will be considered. Finally, we summarize current efforts to manipulate Treg therapeutically in individuals with Type 1 diabetes. The translation of this research area from bench to bedside is still in its infancy, but the remarkable therapeutic potential of successfully manipulating Treg populations is clear to see. PMID:26615100

  9. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: still lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Saba, Nabil F.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is preferentially expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and is a promising therapeutic target. Yet other than cetuximab, no agent targeting EGFR has been approved for this disease, and none has shown benefit over the standard of care. Several randomized trials of antibody and small molecule agents have found no new indication for these agents, despite their initial promise. In this review, we examine the major clinical evidence and discuss potential future developments of translational science in this area, including use of these agents in risk-stratified subgroups, inhibition of downstream/parallel targets, and combination with immunotherapy. PMID:27004227

  10. Global analysis of fungal morphology exposes mechanisms of host cell escape

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Veri, Amanda O.; Ketela, Troy; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry; Cowen, Leah E.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental transitions between single-cell yeast and multicellular filaments underpin virulence of diverse fungal pathogens. For the leading human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, filamentation is thought to be required for immune cell escape via induction of an inflammatory programmed cell death. Here we perform a genome-scale analysis of C. albicans morphogenesis and identify 102 negative morphogenetic regulators and 872 positive regulators, highlighting key roles for ergosterol biosynthesis and N-linked glycosylation. We demonstrate that C. albicans filamentation is not required for escape from host immune cells; instead, macrophage pyroptosis is driven by fungal cell-wall remodelling and exposure of glycosylated proteins in response to the macrophage phagosome. The capacity of killed, previously phagocytized cells to drive macrophage lysis is also observed with the distantly related fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. This study provides a global view of morphogenetic circuitry governing a key virulence trait, and illuminates a new mechanism by which fungi trigger host cell death. PMID:25824284

  11. Functional investigations on embryonic stem cells labeled with clinically translatable iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Liqin; Cao, Jianbo; Huang, Yue; Lin, Yu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiuqin; Liu, Gang

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI correlated well with histological studies. These findings demonstrate that Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles have potential to be clinically translatable MRI probes and may enable non-invasive in vivo tracking of ESCs in experimental and clinical settings during cell-based therapies.Stem cell based therapies offer significant potential in the field of regenerative medicine. The development of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticle labeling and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have been increasingly used to track the transplanted cells, enabling in vivo determination of cell fate. However, the impact of SPIO-labeling on the cell phenotype and differentiation capacity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) remains unclear. In this study, we wrapped SPIO nanoparticles with stearic acid grafted PEI600, termed as Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO, to generate efficient and non-toxic ESC labeling tools. Our results showed that efficient labeling of ESCs at an optimized low dosage of Stearic-LWPEI-SPIO nanoparticles did not alter the differentiation and self-renewal properties of ESCs. The localization of the transplanted ESCs observed by MRI

  12. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. II. Characterization of host mutants that have pleiotropic effects on T4 growth.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, B L; Revel, H R; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    Mutant host-defective Escherichi coli that fail to propagate bacteriophage T4 and have a pleiotropic effect on T4 development have been isolated and characterized. In phage-infected mutant cells, specific early phage proteins are absent or reduced in amount, phage DNA synthesis is depressed by about 50%, specific structural phage proteins, including some tail and collar components, are deficient or missing, and host-cell lysis is delayed and slow. Almost all phage that can overcome the host block carry mutantions that map in functionally undefined 'nonessential' regions of the T4 genome, most near gene 39. The mutant host strains are temperature sensitive for growth and show simultaneous reversion of the ts phenotype and the inability to propagate T4+. The host mutations are cotransduced with ilv (83 min) and may lie in the gene for transcription termination factor rho. Images PMID:6999171

  13. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  14. Translation-coupling systems

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2015-05-19

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  15. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, immune stimulation and host defence against infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Jared H; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is intricately regulated allowing potent effectors to expand and become rapidly mobilized after infection, while simultaneously silencing potentially detrimental responses that averts immune-mediated damage to host tissues. This relies in large part on the delicate interplay between immune suppressive regulatory CD4+ T (Treg) cells and immune effectors that without active suppression by Treg cells cause systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity. Although these beneficial roles have been classically described as counterbalanced by impaired host defence against infection, newfound protective roles for Treg cells against specific viral pathogens (e.g. herpes simplex virus 2, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, West Nile virus) have been uncovered using transgenic mice that allow in vivo Treg-cell ablation based on Foxp3 expression. In turn, Foxp3+ Treg cells also provide protection against some parasitic (Plasmodium sp., Toxoplasma gondii) and fungal (Candida albicans) pathogens. By contrast, for bacterial and mycobacterial infections (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis), experimental manipulation of Foxp3+ cells continues to indicate detrimental roles for Treg cells in host defence. This variance is probably related to functional plasticity in Treg cell suppression that shifts discordantly following infection with different types of pathogens. Furthermore, the efficiency whereby Treg cells silence immune activation coupled with the plasticity in Foxp3+ cell activity suggest that overriding Treg-mediated suppression represents a prerequisite ‘signal zero’ that together with other stimulation signals [T-cell receptor (signal 1), co-stimulation (signal 2), inflammatory cytokines (signal 3)] are essential for T-cell activation in vivo. Herein, the importance of Foxp3+ Treg cells in host defence against infection, and the significance of infection-induced shifts in Treg-cell suppression are summarized. PMID

  16. Cell specific post-translational processing of pikachurin, a protein involved in retinal synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianzhong; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Pikachurin is a recently identified, highly conserved, extracellular matrix-like protein. Murine pikachurin has 1,017 amino acids (~110 kDa), can bind to α-dystroglycan, and has been found to localize mainly in the synaptic cleft of photoreceptor ribbon synapses. Its knockout selectively disrupts synaptogenesis between photoreceptor and bipolar cells. To further characterize this synaptic protein, we used an antibody raised against the N-terminal of murine pikachurin on Western blots of mammalian and amphibian retinas and found, unexpectedly, that a low weight ~60-kDa band was the predominant signal for endogenous pikachurin. This band was predicted to be an N-terminal product of post-translational cleavage of pikachurin. A similar sized protein was also detected in human Y79 retinoblastoma cells, a cell line with characteristics of photoreceptor cells. In Y79 cells, endogenous pikachurin immunofluorescence was found on the cell surface of living cells. The expression of the N-fragment was not significantly affected by dystroglycan overexpression in spite of the biochemical evidence for pikachurin-α-dystroglycan binding. The presence of a corresponding endogenous C-fragment was not determined because of the lack of a suitable antibody. However, a protein of ~65 kDa was detected in Y79 cells expressing recombinant pikachurin with a C-terminal tag. In contrast, in QBI-HEK 293A cells, whose endogenous pikachurin protein level is negligible, recombinant pikachurin did not appear to be cleaved. Instead pikachurin was found either intact or as dimers. Finally, whole and N- and C-fragments of recombinant pikachurin were present in the conditioned media of Y79 cells indicating the secretion of pikachurin. The site of cleavage, however, was not conclusively determined. Our data suggest the existence of post-translational cleavage of pikachurin protein as well as the extracellular localization of cleaved protein specifically by retinal cells. The functions of the

  17. Stem cell transplantation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: therapeutic potential and perspectives on clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Faravelli, Irene; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Zanetta, Chiara; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurological disease characterized by degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. There are currently no clinically impactful treatments for this disorder. Death occurs 3-5 years after diagnosis, usually due to respiratory failure. ALS pathogenesis seems to involve several pathological mechanisms (i.e., oxidative stress, inflammation, and loss of the glial neurotrophic support, glutamate toxicity) with different contributions from environmental and genetic factors. This multifaceted combination highlights the concept that an effective therapeutic approach should counteract simultaneously different aspects: stem cell therapies are able to maintain or rescue motor neuron function and modulate toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) at the same time, eventually representing the most comprehensive therapeutic approach for ALS. To achieve an effective cell-mediated therapy suitable for clinical applications, several issues must be addressed, including the identification of the most performing cell source, a feasible administration protocol, and the definition of therapeutic mechanisms. The method of cell delivery represents a major issue in developing cell-mediated approaches since the cells, to be effective, need to be spread across the CNS, targeting both lower and upper motor neurons. On the other hand, there is the need to define a strategy that could provide a whole distribution without being too invasive or burdened by side effects. Here, we review the recent advances regarding the therapeutic potential of stem cells for ALS with a focus on the minimally invasive strategies that could facilitate an extensive translation to their clinical application.

  18. Stem cell therapy for ischaemic stroke: translation from preclinical studies to clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Balami, Joyce S; Fricker, Rosemary A; Chen, Ruoli

    2013-03-01

    No pharmacological intervention has been shown convincingly to improve neurological outcome in stroke patients after the brain tissue is infarcted. While conventional therapeutic strategies focus on preventing brain damage, stem cell treatment has the potential to repair the injured brain tissue. Stem cells not only produce a source of trophic molecules to minimize brain damage caused by ischaemia/reperfusion and promote recovery, but also potentially turn to new cells to replace those lost in ischaemic core. Although preclinical studies have shown promise, stem cell therapy for stroke treatment in human is still at an early stage and it is difficult to draw conclusions from current clinical trials about the efficacy of the different treatments used in humans. This article reviews the potential of various types of stem cells, from embryonic to adult to induced pluripotent stem cells, in stroke therapy, highlights new evidence from the ongoing clinical trials and discusses some of the problems associated with translating stem cell technology to a clinical therapy for stroke. PMID:23394533

  19. HtrA chaperone activity contributes to host cell binding in Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis caused by the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter jejuni is associated with attachment of bacteria to the intestinal epithelium and subsequent invasion of epithelial cells. In C. jejuni, the periplasmic protein HtrA is required for efficient binding to epithelial cells. HtrA has both protease and chaperone activity, and is important for virulence of several bacterial pathogens. Results The aim of this study was to determine the role of the dual activities of HtrA in host cell interaction of C. jejuni by comparing an htrA mutant lacking protease activity, but retaining chaperone activity, with a ΔhtrA mutant and the wild type strain. Binding of C. jejuni to both epithelial cells and macrophages was facilitated mainly by HtrA chaperone activity that may be involved in folding of outer membrane adhesins. In contrast, HtrA protease activity played only a minor role in interaction with host cells. Conclusion We show that HtrA protease and chaperone activities contribute differently to C. jejuni's interaction with mammalian host cells, with the chaperone activity playing the major role in host cell binding. PMID:21939552

  20. Identification of a Peptide-Pheromone that Enhances Listeria monocytogenes Escape from Host Cell Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol. PMID:25822753

  1. Identification of a peptide-pheromone that enhances Listeria monocytogenes escape from host cell vacuoles.

    PubMed

    Xayarath, Bobbi; Alonzo, Francis; Freitag, Nancy E

    2015-03-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive facultative intracellular bacterial pathogen that invades mammalian cells and escapes from membrane-bound vacuoles to replicate within the host cell cytosol. Gene products required for intracellular bacterial growth and bacterial spread to adjacent cells are regulated by a transcriptional activator known as PrfA. PrfA becomes activated following L. monocytogenes entry into host cells, however the signal that stimulates PrfA activation has not yet been defined. Here we provide evidence for L. monocytogenes secretion of a small peptide pheromone, pPplA, which enhances the escape of L. monocytogenes from host cell vacuoles and may facilitate PrfA activation. The pPplA pheromone is generated via the proteolytic processing of the PplA lipoprotein secretion signal peptide. While the PplA lipoprotein is dispensable for pathogenesis, bacteria lacking the pPplA pheromone are significantly attenuated for virulence in mice and have a reduced efficiency of bacterial escape from the vacuoles of nonprofessional phagocytic cells. Mutational activation of PrfA restores virulence and eliminates the need for pPplA-dependent signaling. Experimental evidence suggests that the pPplA peptide may help signal to L. monocytogenes its presence within the confines of the host cell vacuole, stimulating the expression of gene products that contribute to vacuole escape and facilitating PrfA activation to promote bacterial growth within the cytosol.

  2. Host cell proteins binding to domain IV of the 5' noncoding region of poliovirus RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Blyn, L B; Chen, R; Semler, B L; Ehrenfeld, E

    1995-01-01

    Translation of poliovirus RNA occurs by the binding of ribosomes to an internal segment of RNA sequence within the 5' untranslated region of the viral RNA. This region is predicted to consist of six domains (I to VI) that possess complex secondary and tertiary structures. Domain IV is a large region in which alterations in the sequence or structure markedly reduce translational efficiency. In this study, we employed RNA mobility shift assays to demonstrate that a protein(s) from uninfected HeLa cell extracts, as well as from neuroblastoma extracts, interacts with the domain IV structure. A mutation in domain IV caused reduced binding of HeLa cell proteins and reduced translation both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the binding of at least one of these proteins plays a role in the mechanism of viral translation. UV cross-linking indicated that a protein(s) with a size of approximately 40 kDa interacted directly with the RNA. Using streptavidin beads to capture biotinylated RNA bound to proteins, we were able to visualize a number of HeLa and neuroblastoma cell proteins that interact with domain IV. These proteins have molecular masses of approximately 39, approximately 40, and approximately 42 kDa. PMID:7769700

  3. Mechanically resilient, injectable, and bioadhesive supramolecular gelatin hydrogels crosslinked by weak host-guest interactions assist cell infiltration and in situ tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qian; Wei, Kongchang; Lin, Sien; Xu, Zhen; Sun, Yuxin; Shi, Peng; Li, Gang; Bian, Liming

    2016-09-01

    Although considered promising materials for assisting organ regeneration, few hydrogels meet the stringent requirements of clinical translation on the preparation, application, mechanical property, bioadhesion, and biocompatibility of the hydrogels. Herein, we describe a facile supramolecular approach for preparing gelatin hydrogels with a wide array of desirable properties. Briefly, we first prepare a supramolecular gelatin macromer via the efficient host-guest complexation between the aromatic residues of gelatin and free diffusing photo-crosslinkable acrylated β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) monomers. The subsequent crosslinking of the macromers produces highly resilient supramolecular gelatin hydrogels that are solely crosslinked by the weak host-guest interactions between the gelatinous aromatic residues and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). The obtained hydrogels are capable of sustaining excessive compressive and tensile strain, and they are capable of quick self healing after mechanical disruption. These hydrogels can be injected in the gelation state through surgical needles and re-molded to the targeted geometries while protecting the encapsulated cells. Moreover, the weak host-guest crosslinking likely facilitate the infiltration and migration of cells into the hydrogels. The excess β-CDs in the hydrogels enable the hydrogel-tissue adhesion and enhance the loading and sustained delivery of hydrophobic drugs. The cell and animal studies show that such hydrogels support cell recruitment, differentiation, and bone regeneration, making them promising carrier biomaterials of therapeutic cells and drugs via minimally invasive procedures. PMID:27294539

  4. Memory CD4+ T cells do not induce graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Britt E; McNiff, Jennifer; Yan, Jun; Doyle, Hester; Mamula, Mark; Shlomchik, Mark J; Shlomchik, Warren D

    2003-07-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT). Donor T cells that accompany stem cell grafts cause GVHD by attacking recipient tissues; therefore, all patients receive GVHD prophylaxis by depletion of T cells from the allograft or through immunosuppressant drugs. In addition to providing a graft-versus-leukemia effect, donor T cells are critical for reconstituting T cell-mediated immunity. Ideally, immunity to infectious agents would be transferred from donor to host without GVHD. Most donors have been exposed to common pathogens and have an increased precursor frequency of memory T cells against pathogenic antigens. We therefore asked whether memory CD62L-CD44+ CD4+ T cells would induce less GVHD than unfractionated or naive CD4+ T cells. Strikingly, we found that memory CD4 cells induced neither clinical nor histologic GVHD. This effect was not due to the increased number of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells found in the CD62L-CD44+ fraction because memory T cells depletion of these cells did not cause GVHD. Memory CD4 cells engrafted and responded to antigen both in vivo and in vitro. If these murine results are applicable to human alloSCT, selective administration of memory T cells could greatly improve post-transplant immune reconstitution.

  5. Residue-specific Incorporation of Noncanonical Amino Acids into Model Proteins Using an Escherichia coli Cell-free Transcription-translation System.

    PubMed

    Worst, Emanuel G; Exner, Matthias P; De Simone, Alessandro; Schenkelberger, Marc; Noireaux, Vincent; Budisa, Nediljko; Ott, Albrecht

    2016-08-01

    The canonical set of amino acids leads to an exceptionally wide range of protein functionality. Nevertheless, the set of residues still imposes limitations on potential protein applications. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can enlarge this scope. There are two complementary approaches for the incorporation of noncanonical amino acids. For site-specific incorporation, in addition to the endogenous canonical translational machineries, an orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase-tRNA pair must be provided that does not interact with the canonical ones. Consequently, a codon that is not assigned to a canonical amino acid, usually a stop codon, is also required. This genetic code expansion enables the incorporation of a noncanonical amino acid at a single, given site within the protein. The here presented work describes residue-specific incorporation where the genetic code is reassigned within the endogenous translational system. The translation machinery accepts the noncanonical amino acid as a surrogate to incorporate it at canonically prescribed locations, i.e., all occurrences of a canonical amino acid in the protein are replaced by the noncanonical one. The incorporation of noncanonical amino acids can change the protein structure, causing considerably modified physical and chemical properties. Noncanonical amino acid analogs often act as cell growth inhibitors for expression hosts since they modify endogenous proteins, limiting in vivo protein production. In vivo incorporation of toxic noncanonical amino acids into proteins remains particularly challenging. Here, a cell-free approach for a complete replacement of L-arginine by the noncanonical amino acid L-canavanine is presented. It circumvents the inherent difficulties of in vivo expression. Additionally, a protocol to prepare target proteins for mass spectral analysis is included. It is shown that L-lysine can be replaced by L-hydroxy-lysine, albeit with lower efficiency. In principle, any

  6. Evidence that the epidermal growth factor receptor on host cells confers reovirus infection efficiency.

    PubMed

    Strong, J E; Tang, D; Lee, P W

    1993-11-01

    Reovirus binds to multiple sialoglycoproteins on the host cell surface. In an attempt to probe additional specific determinants that dictate host cell susceptibility to reovirus infection, we found that two mouse cell lines (NR6 and B82) previously shown to express no endogenous epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors were relatively resistant to reovirus infection, whereas the same cell lines transfected with the gene encoding the EGF receptor manifested significantly higher susceptibility as determined by induction of cytopathic effects, viral protein synthesis, and plaque titration. This enhancement of infection efficiency requires a functional EGF receptor since it was not observed in cells expressing a mutated (kinase-inactive) EGF receptor. The observed difference in infection efficiency is not due to differences in virus binding or internalization. These studies suggest that the reovirus infection process is closely coupled to the EGF receptor-mediated cell signal transduction pathway.

  7. Immune Reconstitution and Graft-Versus-Host Reactions in Rat Models of Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zinöcker, Severin; Dressel, Ralf; Wang, Xiao-Nong; Dickinson, Anne M.; Rolstad, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) extends the lives of thousands of patients who would otherwise succumb to hematopoietic malignancies such as leukemias and lymphomas, aplastic anemia, and disorders of the immune system. In alloHCT, different immune cell types mediate beneficial graft-versus-tumor (GvT) effects, regulate detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), and are required for protection against infections. Today, the “good” (GvT effector cells and memory cells conferring protection) cannot be easily separated from the “bad” (GvHD-causing cells), and alloHCT remains a hazardous medical modality. The transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells into an immunosuppressed patient creates a delicate environment for the reconstitution of donor blood and immune cells in co-existence with host cells. Immunological reconstitution determines to a large extent the immune status of the allo-transplanted host against infections and the recurrence of cancer, and is critical for long-term protection and survival after clinical alloHCT. Animal models continue to be extremely valuable experimental tools that widen our understanding of, for example, the dynamics of post-transplant hematopoiesis and the complexity of immune reconstitution with multiple ways of interaction between host and donor cells. In this review, we discuss the rat as an experimental model of HCT between allogeneic individuals. We summarize our findings on lymphocyte reconstitution in transplanted rats and illustrate the disease pathology of this particular model. We also introduce the rat skin explant assay, a feasible alternative to in vivo transplantation studies. The skin explant assay can be used to elucidate the biology of graft-versus-host reactions, which are known to have a major impact on immune reconstitution, and to perform genome-wide gene expression studies using controlled combinations of minor and major histocompatibility between the donor and the recipient

  8. Selective destruction of a host blood cell type by a parasitoid wasp.

    PubMed

    Rizki, R M; Rizki, T M

    1984-10-01

    Foreign objects that enter the hemocoel of Drosophila melanogaster larvae are encapsulated by one type of blood cell, the lamellocyte, yet eggs of the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina heterotoma remain unencapsulated in D. melanogaster larval hosts that have many lamellocytes. Here we demonstrate that shortly after a female wasp oviposits in the hemocoel the lamellocytes undergo morphological changes and lose their adhesiveness. These affected blood cells are eventually destroyed as the parasitoid egg continues its development. The factor responsible for lamellocyte destruction, lamellolysin, is contained in an accessory gland of the female reproductive system and is injected along with the egg into the host hemocoel. Lamellolysin does not alter the morphology or the defense functions of the other types of blood cells in the host. PMID:6435126

  9. RNAi Screen Reveals an Abl Kinase-Dependent Host Cell Pathway Involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Pielage, Julia F.; Powell, Kimberly R.; Kalman, Daniel; Engel, Joanne N.

    2008-01-01

    Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of ∼80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa–induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. PMID:18369477

  10. Influenza A Virus Dysregulates Host Histone Deacetylase 1 That Inhibits Viral Infection in Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nagesh, Prashanth Thevkar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses dysregulate the host factors that inhibit virus infection. Here, we demonstrate that human enzyme, histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) is a new class of host factor that inhibits influenza A virus (IAV) infection, and IAV dysregulates HDAC1 to efficiently replicate in epithelial cells. A time-dependent decrease in HDAC1 polypeptide level was observed in IAV-infected cells, reducing to <50% by 24 h of infection. A further depletion (97%) of HDAC1 expression by RNA interference increased the IAV growth kinetics, increasing it by >3-fold by 24 h and by >6-fold by 48 h of infection. Conversely, overexpression of HDAC1 decreased the IAV infection by >2-fold. Likewise, a time-dependent decrease in HDAC1 activity, albeit with slightly different kinetics to HDAC1 polypeptide reduction, was observed in infected cells. Nevertheless, a further inhibition of deacetylase activity increased IAV infection in a dose-dependent manner. HDAC1 is an important host deacetylase and, in addition to its role as a transcription repressor, HDAC1 has been lately described as a coactivator of type I interferon response. Consistent with this property, we found that inhibition of deacetylase activity either decreased or abolished the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription I (STAT1) and expression of interferon-stimulated genes, IFITM3, ISG15, and viperin in IAV-infected cells. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC1 expression in infected cells decreased viperin expression by 58% and, conversely, the overexpression of HDAC1 increased it by 55%, indicating that HDAC1 is a component of IAV-induced host type I interferon antiviral response. IMPORTANCE Influenza A virus (IAV) continues to significantly impact global public health by causing regular seasonal epidemics, occasional pandemics, and zoonotic outbreaks. IAV is among the successful human viral pathogens that has evolved various strategies to evade host defenses, prevent the development of a universal

  11. Relationships between host and symbiont cell cycles in sea anemones and their symbiotic dinoflagellates.

    PubMed

    Dimond, James L; Pineda, Rea R; Ramos-Ascherl, Zullaylee; Bingham, Brian L

    2013-10-01

    The processes by which cnidarians and their algal endosymbionts achieve balanced growth and biomass could include coordination of host and symbiont cell cycles. We evaluated this theory with natural populations of sea anemones hosting symbiotic dinoflagellates, focusing on the temperate sea anemone Anthopleura elegantissima symbiotic with Symbiodinium muscatinei in Washington State, USA, and the tropical anemone Stichodactyla helianthus associating with unknown Symbiodinium spp. in Belize. By extruding symbiont-containing gastrodermal cells from the relatively large tentacles of these species and using nuclear staining and flow cytometry, we selectively analyzed cell cycle distributions of the symbionts and the host gastrodermal cells that house them. We found no indications of diel synchrony in host and symbiont G2/M phases, and we observed evidence of diel periodicity only in Symbiodinium spp. associated with S. helianthus but not in the anemone itself. Seasonally, S. muscatinei showed considerable G2/M phase variability among samples collected quarterly over an annual period, while the G2/M phase of its host varied much less. Within samples taken at different times of the year, correlations between host and symbiont G2/M phases ranged from very weakly to very strongly positive, with significant correlations in only half of the samples (two of four A. elegantissima samples and one of two S. helianthus samples). Overall, the G2/M phase relationships across species and sampling periods were positive. Thus, while we found no evidence of close cell cycle coupling, our results suggest a loose, positive relationship between cell cycle processes of the symbiotic partners. PMID:24243963

  12. Effect of lactoferrin protein on red blood cells and macrophages: mechanism of parasite–host interaction

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Namrata; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Dubey, Mohan Lal; Vahishta, R K; Sehgal, Rakesh; Verma, Anita K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Background Lactoferrin is a natural multifunctional protein known to have antitumor, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activity. Apart from its antimicrobial effects, lactoferrin is known to boost the immune response by enhancing antioxidants. Lactoferrin exists in various forms depending on its iron saturation. The present study was done to observe the effect of lactoferrin, isolated from bovine and buffalo colostrum, on red blood cells (RBCs) and macrophages (human monocytic cell line-derived macrophages THP1 cells). Methods Lactoferrin obtained from both species and in different iron saturation forms were used in the present study, and treatment of host cells were given with different forms of lactoferrin at different concentrations. These treated host cells were used for various studies, including morphometric analysis, viability by MTT assay, survivin gene expression, production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic properties, invasion assay, and Toll-like receptor-4, Toll-like receptor-9, and MDR1 expression, to investigate the interaction between lactoferrin and host cells and the possible mechanism of action with regard to parasitic infections. Results The mechanism of interaction between host cells and lactoferrin have shown various aspects of gene expression and cellular activity depending on the degree of iron saturation of lactoferrin. A significant increase (P<0.05) in production of reactive oxygen species, phagocytic activity, and Toll-like receptor expression was observed in host cells incubated with iron-saturated lactoferrin when compared with an untreated control group. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) change in percentage viability in the different groups of host cells treated, and no downregulation of survivin gene expression was found at 48 hours post-incubation. Upregulation of the Toll-like receptor and downregulation of the P-gp gene confirmed the immunomodulatory potential of lactoferrin protein. Conclusion The present study

  13. Visualizing the dynamic behavior of poliovirus plus-strand RNA in living host cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xian-En; Wen, Ji-Kai; Zhou, Ya-Feng; Xie, Wei-Hong

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of viral nucleic acids in host cells is important for understanding virus-host interaction. By labeling endogenous RNA with molecular beacon, we have realized the direct visualization of viral nucleic acids in living host cells and have studied the dynamic behavior of poliovirus plus-strand RNA. Poliovirus plus-strand RNA was observed to display different distribution patterns in living Vero cells at different post-infection time points. Real-time imaging suggested that the translocation of poliovirus plus-strand RNA is a characteristic rearrangement process requiring intact microtubule network of host cells. Confocal-FRAP measurements showed that 49.4 +/- 3.2% of the poliovirus plus-strand RNA molecules diffused freely (with a D-value of 9.6 +/- 1.6 x 10(-10) cm2/s) within their distribution region, while the remaining (50.5 +/- 2.9%) were almost immobile and moved very slowly only with change of the RNA distribution region. Under the electron microscope, it was found that virus-induced membrane rearrangement is microtubule-associated in poliovirus-infected Vero cells. These results reveal an entrapment and diffusion mechanism for the movement of poliovirus plus-strand RNA in living mammalian cells, and demonstrate that the mechanism is mainly associated with microtubules and virus-induced membrane structures.

  14. A roadmap toward clinical translation of genetically-modified stem cells for treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Bauer, Gerhard; Reinke, Petra; Renner, Matthias; Schneider, Christian K

    2014-11-01

    During the past decade, successful gene therapies for immunodeficiencies were finally brought to the clinic. This was accomplished through new gene therapy vectors and improved procedures for genetic modification of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. For HIV, autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) gene therapy with 'anti-HIV genes' promises a functional cure for the disease. However, to develop such a therapy and translate it into a clinical application is rather challenging. The risks and benefits of such a therapy have to be understood, and regulatory hurdles need to be overcome. In this joint paper by academic researchers and regulators, we are, therefore, outlining a high level roadmap for the early stage development of HSC gene therapy as a potential functional cure for HIV.

  15. Culture of human limbal epithelial stem cells on tenon's fibroblast feeder-layers: a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The coculture technique is the standard method to expand ex vivo limbal stem cells (LSCs) by using inactivated embryonic murine feeder layers (3T3). Although alternative techniques such as amniotic membranes or scaffolds have been proposed, feeder layers are still considered to be the best method, due to their ability to preserve some critical properties of LSCs such as cell growth and viability, stemness phenotype, and clonogenic potential. Furthermore, clinical applications of LSCs cultured on 3T3 have taken place. Nevertheless, for an improved Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliance, the use of human feeder-layers as well as a fine standardization of the process is strictly encouraged. Here, we describe a translational approach in accordance with GMP regulations to culture LSCs onto human Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs). In this chapter, based on our experience we identify and analyze issues that often are encountered by researchers and discuss solutions to common problems. PMID:25063497

  16. Multiphase water-in-oil emulsion droplets for cell-free transcription-translation.

    PubMed

    Torre, Paola; Keating, Christine D; Mansy, Sheref S

    2014-05-27

    The construction of genetically encoded cellular mimics in compartments containing organized synthetic cytosols is desirable for the development of artificial cells. Phase separated aqueous domains were placed within water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a manner compatible with transcription and translation machinery. Aqueous two-phase and three-phase systems (ATPS and A3PS) were assembled with dextran, poly(ethylene glycol), and Ficoll. Aqueous two-phase systems were capable of supporting the cell-free expression of protein within water droplets, whereas the aqueous three-phase-based system did not give rise to detectable protein synthesis. The expressed protein preferentially partitioned to the dextran-enriched phase. The system could serve as a foundation for building cellular mimics with liquid organelles.

  17. Hepatic differentiation of porcine embryonic stem cells for translational research of hepatocyte transplantation.

    PubMed

    Park, K M; Hussein, K H; Ghim, J H; Ahn, C; Cha, S H; Lee, G S; Hong, S H; Yang, S; Woo, H M

    2015-04-01

    Porcine embryonic stem cells (ES) are considered attractive preclinical research tools for human liver diseases. Although several studies previously reported generation of porcine ES, none of these studies has described hepatic differentiation from porcine ES. The aim of this study was to generate hepatocytes from porcine ES and analyze their characteristics. We optimized conditions for definitive endoderm induction and developed a 4-step hepatic differentiation protocol. A brief serum-free condition with activin A efficiently induced definitive endoderm differentiation from porcine ES. The porcine ES-derived hepatocyte-like cells highly expressed hepatic markers including albumin and α-fetoprotein, and displayed liver characteristics such as glycogen storage, lipid production, and low-density lipoprotein uptake. For the first time, we describe a highly efficient protocol for hepatic differentiation from porcine ES. Our findings provide valuable information for translational liver research using porcine models, including hepatic regeneration and transplant studies, drug screening, and toxicology.

  18. Culture of human limbal epithelial stem cells on tenon's fibroblast feeder-layers: a translational approach.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, Gaia; Siciliano, Camilla; Frati, Giacomo; De Falco, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The coculture technique is the standard method to expand ex vivo limbal stem cells (LSCs) by using inactivated embryonic murine feeder layers (3T3). Although alternative techniques such as amniotic membranes or scaffolds have been proposed, feeder layers are still considered to be the best method, due to their ability to preserve some critical properties of LSCs such as cell growth and viability, stemness phenotype, and clonogenic potential. Furthermore, clinical applications of LSCs cultured on 3T3 have taken place. Nevertheless, for an improved Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) compliance, the use of human feeder-layers as well as a fine standardization of the process is strictly encouraged. Here, we describe a translational approach in accordance with GMP regulations to culture LSCs onto human Tenon's fibroblasts (TFs). In this chapter, based on our experience we identify and analyze issues that often are encountered by researchers and discuss solutions to common problems.

  19. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus-host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton.

    PubMed

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Wommack, K Eric; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-11-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus-host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus-host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage-host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host-virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  20. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J. J.; Gupta, G.; Gray, P. C.; Hush, D. R.; Fugate, M. L.; Cleland, T. J.; Roberts, R. M.; Hlavacek, W. S.; Smith, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  1. Identification of agents effective against multiple toxins and viruses by host-oriented cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zilbermintz, Leeor; Leonardi, William; Jeong, Sun-Young; Sjodt, Megan; McComb, Ryan; Ho, Chi-Lee C.; Retterer, Cary; Gharaibeh, Dima; Zamani, Rouzbeh; Soloveva, Veronica; Bavari, Sina; Levitin, Anastasia; West, Joel; Bradley, Kenneth A.; Clubb, Robert T.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Gupta, Vivek; Martchenko, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding and still-increasing threat to the effective treatment of infectious diseases is resistance to antimicrobial countermeasures. Potentially, the targeting of host proteins and pathways essential for the detrimental effects of pathogens offers an approach that may discover broad-spectrum anti-pathogen countermeasures and circumvent the effects of pathogen mutations leading to resistance. Here we report implementation of a strategy for discovering broad-spectrum host-oriented therapies against multiple pathogenic agents by multiplex screening of drugs for protection against the detrimental effects of multiple pathogens, identification of host cell pathways inhibited by the drug, and screening for effects of the agent on other pathogens exploiting the same pathway. We show that a clinically used antimalarial drug, Amodiaquine, discovered by this strategy, protects host cells against infection by multiple toxins and viruses by inhibiting host cathepsin B. Our results reveal the practicality of discovering broadly acting anti-pathogen countermeasures that target host proteins exploited by pathogens. PMID:26310922

  2. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  3. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment. PMID:26810036

  4. Knockdown of Five Genes Encoding Uncharacterized Proteins Inhibits Entamoeba histolytica Phagocytosis of Dead Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Sateriale, Adam; Miller, Peter; Huston, Christopher D

    2016-04-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan parasite that causes invasive amebiasis, which is endemic to many developing countries and characterized by dysentery and liver abscesses. The virulence of E. histolytica correlates with the degree of host cell engulfment, or phagocytosis, and E. histolytica phagocytosis alters amebic gene expression in a feed-forward manner that results in an increased phagocytic ability. Here, we used a streamlined RNA interference screen to silence the expression of 15 genes whose expression was upregulated in phagocytic E. histolytica trophozoites to determine whether these genes actually function in the phagocytic process. When five of these genes were silenced, amebic strains with significant decreases in the ability to phagocytose apoptotic host cells were produced. Phagocytosis of live host cells, however, was largely unchanged, and the defects were surprisingly specific for phagocytosis. Two of the five encoded proteins, which we named E. histolytica ILWEQ (EhILWEQ) and E. histolytica BAR (EhBAR), were chosen for localization via SNAP tag labeling and localized to the site of partially formed phagosomes. Therefore, both EhILWEQ and EhBAR appear to contribute to E. histolytica virulence through their function in phagocytosis, and the large proportion (5/15 [33%]) of gene-silenced strains with a reduced ability to phagocytose host cells validates the previously published microarray data set demonstrating feed-forward control of E. histolytica phagocytosis. Finally, although only limited conclusions can be drawn from studies using the virulence-deficient G3 Entamoeba strain, the relative specificity of the defects induced for phagocytosis of apoptotic cells but not healthy cells suggests that cell killing may play a rate-limiting role in the process of Entamoeba histolytica host cell engulfment.

  5. Binding of Host Factors Influences Internalization and Intracellular Trafficking of Streptococcus uberis in Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Raul A.; Dunlap, John R.; Oliver, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    We showed that internalization of Streptococcus uberis into bovine mammary epithelial cells occurred through receptor- (RME) and caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CME). We reported also that treatment of S. uberis with host proteins including lactoferrin (LF) enhanced its internalization into host cells. Since the underlying mechanism(s) involved in such enhancement was unknown we investigated if preincubation of S. uberis with host proteins drives internalization of this pathogen into host cells through CME. Thus, experiments involving coculture of collagen-, fibronectin-, and LF-pretreated S. uberis with bovine mammary epithelial cells treated with RME and CME inhibitors were conducted. Results showed that internalization of host proteins-pretreated S. uberis into mammary epithelial cells treated with RME inhibitors was higher than that of untreated controls. These results suggest that pretreatment with selected host proteins commits S. uberis to CME, thus avoiding intracellular bactericidal mechanisms and allowing its persistence into bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:20614000

  6. Functional heterogeneity of embryonic stem cells revealed through translational amplification of an early endodermal transcript.

    PubMed

    Canham, Maurice A; Sharov, Alexei A; Ko, Minoru S H; Brickman, Joshua M

    2010-05-01

    ES cells are defined as self-renewing, pluripotent cell lines derived from early embryos. Cultures of ES cells are also characterized by the expression of certain markers thought to represent the pluripotent state. However, despite the widespread expression of key markers such as Oct4 and the appearance of a characteristic undifferentiated morphology, functional ES cells may represent only a small fraction of the cultures grown under self-renewing conditions. Thus phenotypically "undifferentiated" cells may consist of a heterogeneous population of functionally distinct cell types. Here we use a transgenic allele designed to detect low level transcription in the primitive endoderm lineage as a tool to identify an immediate early endoderm-like ES cell state. This reporter employs a tandem array of internal ribosomal entry sites to drive translation of an enhanced Yellow Fluorescent Protein (Venus) from the transcript that normally encodes for the early endodermal marker Hex. Expression of this Venus transgene reports on single cells with low Hex transcript levels and reveals the existence of distinct populations of Oct4 positive undifferentiated ES cells. One of these cells types, characterized by both the expression of the Venus transgene and the ES cells marker SSEA-1 (V(+)S(+)), appears to represent an early step in primitive endoderm specification. We show that the fraction of cells present within this state is influenced by factors that both promote and suppress primitive endoderm differentiation, but conditions that support ES cell self-renewal prevent their progression into differentiation and support an equilibrium between this state and at least one other that resembles the Nanog positive inner cell mass of the mammalian blastocysts. Interestingly, while these subpopulations are equivalently and clonally interconvertible under self-renewing conditions, when induced to differentiate both in vivo and in vitro they exhibit different behaviours. Most strikingly

  7. Establishment of a translational endothelial cell model using directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells from Cynomolgus monkey

    PubMed Central

    Thoma, Eva C.; Heckel, Tobias; Keller, David; Giroud, Nicolas; Leonard, Brian; Christensen, Klaus; Roth, Adrian; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Graf, Martin; Patsch, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Due to their broad differentiation potential, pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) offer a promising approach for generating relevant cellular models for various applications. While human PSC-based cellular models are already advanced, similar systems for non-human primates (NHPs) are still lacking. However, as NHPs are the most appropriate animals for evaluating the safety of many novel pharmaceuticals, the availability of in vitro systems would be extremely useful to bridge the gap between cellular and animal models. Here, we present a NHP in vitro endothelial cell system using induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) from Cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis). Based on an adapted protocol for human IPSCs, we directly differentiated macaque IPSCs into endothelial cells under chemically defined conditions. The resulting endothelial cells can be enriched using immuno-magnetic cell sorting and display endothelial marker expression and function. RNA sequencing revealed that the differentiation process closely resembled vasculogenesis. Moreover, we showed that endothelial cells derived from macaque and human IPSCs are highly similar with respect to gene expression patterns and key endothelial functions, such as inflammatory responses. These data demonstrate the power of IPSC differentiation technology to generate defined cell types for use as translational in vitro models to compare cell type-specific responses across species. PMID:27779219

  8. Infiltrating cells from host brain restore the microglial population in grafted cortical tissue.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Tao, Sijue; Fang, Yukun; Guo, Jing; Zhu, Lirui; Zhang, Shengxiang

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of embryonic cortical tissue is considered as a promising therapy for brain injury. Grafted neurons can reestablish neuronal network and improve cortical function of the host brain. Microglia is a key player in regulating neuronal survival and plasticity, but its activation and dynamics in grafted cortical tissue remain unknown. Using two-photon intravital imaging and parabiotic model, here we investigated the proliferation and source of microglia in the donor region by transplanting embryonic cortical tissue into adult cortex. Live imaging showed that the endogenous microglia of the grafted tissue were rapidly lost after transplantation. Instead, host-derived microglia infiltrated and colonized the graft. Parabiotic model suggested that the main source of infiltrating cells is the parenchyma of the host brain. Colonized microglia proliferated and experienced an extensive morphological transition and eventually differentiated into resting ramified morphology. Collectively, these results demonstrated that donor tissue has little contribution to the activated microglia and host brain controls the microglial population in the graft.

  9. Bacterial endocytobionts of ciliophora and their interactions with the host cell.

    PubMed

    Fokin, Sergei I

    2004-01-01

    Ciliates may be hosts for numerous bacteria, which can occupy almost all cellular compartments of the protists. About 200 ciliate species are recorded as hosts of different intracellular bacteria, being a small part of the diversity for such types of endocytobiosis in nature. In the Paramecium genus alone close to 60 types of bacteria adapted for intracellular life are known. In this review extensive material concerning the variety of endocytobionts, their categories, and their interaction with host cells is presented. Special attention is paid to endocytobiosis in Paramecium with highly infectious bacteria Holospora, bacteria of the Caedibacter and Polynucleobacter genera, methanogenic bacteria, and "xenosomes" as well as to life cycles and strategies of bacterial endonucleobionts. The above model bacteria and their interactions with hosts have not been exhaustively studied. A number of unsolved problems concerning their interactions within an endocytobiotic system and their ecological implications remain to be studied.

  10. Mg2Si As Li-Intercalation Host For Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo; Surampudi, Subbarao; Attia, Alan; Halpert, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Compound Mg2Si shows promise as lithium-intercalation host for ambient-temperature rechargeable lithium electrochemical cells. As anode reactant material, LiXMg2Si chemically stable in presence of organic electrolyte used in such cells and stores large amounts of lithium. Intercalation reactions highly reversible at room temperature. Also retains sufficient mechanical strength during charge/discharge cycling. Lithium cells containing LixMg2Si anodes prove useful in spacecraft, military, communications, automotive, and other applications in which high energy-storage densities of lithium cells in general and rechargeability of cells needed.

  11. Characterizing and prototyping genetic networks with cell-free transcription-translation reactions.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Melissa K; Hayes, Clarmyra A; Chappell, James; Sun, Zachary Z; Murray, Richard M; Noireaux, Vincent; Lucks, Julius B

    2015-09-15

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to engineer cellular behavior by engineering synthetic gene networks for a variety of biotechnology and medical applications. The process of engineering gene networks often involves an iterative 'design-build-test' cycle, whereby the parts and connections that make up the network are built, characterized and varied until the desired network function is reached. Many advances have been made in the design and build portions of this cycle. However, the slow process of in vivo characterization of network function often limits the timescale of the testing step. Cell-free transcription-translation (TX-TL) systems offer a simple and fast alternative to performing these characterizations in cells. Here we provide an overview of a cell-free TX-TL system that utilizes the native Escherichia coli TX-TL machinery, thereby allowing a large repertoire of parts and networks to be characterized. As a way to demonstrate the utility of cell-free TX-TL, we illustrate the characterization of two genetic networks: an RNA transcriptional cascade and a protein regulated incoherent feed-forward loop. We also provide guidelines for designing TX-TL experiments to characterize new genetic networks. We end with a discussion of current and emerging applications of cell free systems.

  12. Single-cell sequencing provides clues about the host interactions of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB)

    PubMed Central

    Pamp, Sünje J.; Harrington, Eoghan D.; Quake, Stephen R.; Relman, David A.; Blainey, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are host-specific intestinal symbionts that comprise a distinct clade within the Clostridiaceae, designated Candidatus Arthromitus. SFB display a unique life cycle within the host, involving differentiation into multiple cell types. The latter include filaments that attach intimately to intestinal epithelial cells, and from which “holdfasts” and spores develop. SFB induce a multifaceted immune response, leading to host protection from intestinal pathogens. Cultivation resistance has hindered characterization of these enigmatic bacteria. In the present study, we isolated five SFB filaments from a mouse using a microfluidic device equipped with laser tweezers, generated genome sequences from each, and compared these sequences with each other, as well as to recently published SFB genome sequences. Based on the resulting analyses, SFB appear to be dependent on the host for a variety of essential nutrients. SFB have a relatively high abundance of predicted proteins devoted to cell cycle control and to envelope biogenesis, and have a group of SFB-specific autolysins and a dynamin-like protein. Among the five filament genomes, an average of 8.6% of predicted proteins were novel, including a family of secreted SFB-specific proteins. Four ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) sequence types, and a myosin-cross-reactive antigen (MCRA) protein were discovered; we hypothesize that they are involved in modulation of host responses. The presence of polymorphisms among mouse SFB genomes suggests the evolution of distinct SFB lineages. Overall, our results reveal several aspects of SFB adaptation to the mammalian intestinal tract. PMID:22434425

  13. Transglutaminase 2 is essential for adherence of Porphyromonas gingivalis to host cells

    PubMed Central

    Boisvert, Heike; Lorand, Laszlo; Duncan, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is the major causative agent of periodontitis, and it may also be involved in the development of systemic diseases (atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis). P. gingivalis is found on and within oral and gingival epithelial cells following binding to surface components of host cells, which serve as receptors for the bacterium. Evidence is presented in this study that shows that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) plays a critical role in the adherence of P. gingivalis to host cells. Studies of confocal microscopy indicate colocalization of P. gingivalis with TG2 on the surface of HEp-2 epithelial cells, with clusters of TG2 seen at bacterial attachment sites. By silencing the expression of TG2 with siRNA in HEp-2 cells, P. gingivalis association was greatly diminished. The bacterium does not bind well to a mouse fibroblast cell line that produces low amounts of surface TG2, but binding can be restored by introduction of TG2 expressed on a plasmid. TG2 can form very tight complexes with fibronectin (FN), and the complementary binding sites of the two proteins are known. A synthetic peptide that mimics the main FN-binding sequence of TG2 blocks the formation of TG2–FN complexes and is highly effective in inhibiting adherence of P. gingivalis to host cells. These findings provide evidence of a role for cell-surface TG2 in bacterial attachment and subsequent internalization. PMID:24706840

  14. Binding of intimin from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli to Tir and to host cells.

    PubMed

    Hartland, E L; Batchelor, M; Delahay, R M; Hale, C; Matthews, S; Dougan, G; Knutton, S; Connerton, I; Frankel, G

    1999-04-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) induce characteristic attaching and effacing (A/E) lesions on epithelial cells. This event is mediated, in part, by binding of the bacterial outer membrane protein, intimin, to a second EPEC protein, Tir (translocated intimin receptor), which is exported by the bacteria and integrated into the host cell plasma membrane. In this study, we have localized the intimin-binding domain of Tir to a central 107-amino-acid region, designated Tir-M. We provide evidence that both the amino- and carboxy-termini of Tir are located within the host cell. In addition, using immunogold labelling electron microscopy, we have confirmed that intimin can bind independently to host cells even in the absence of Tir. This Tir-independent interaction and the ability of EPEC to induce A/E lesions requires an intact lectin-like module residing at the carboxy-terminus of the intimin polypeptide. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and gel overlays, we show that intimin can bind both Tir and Tir-M even when the lectin-like domain is disrupted. These data provide strong evidence that intimin interacts not only with Tir but also in a lectin-like manner with a host cell intimin receptor.

  15. Adaptation of HIV-1 Depends on the Host-Cell Environment

    PubMed Central

    van Opijnen, Tim; de Ronde, Anthony; Boerlijst, Maarten C.; Berkhout, Ben

    2007-01-01

    Many viruses have the ability to rapidly develop resistance against antiviral drugs and escape from the host immune system. To which extent the host environment affects this adaptive potential of viruses is largely unknown. Here we show that for HIV-1, the host-cell environment is key to the adaptive potential of the virus. We performed a large-scale selection experiment with two HIV-1 strains in two different T-cell lines (MT4 and C8166). Over 110 days of culture, both virus strains adapted rapidly to the MT4 T-cell line. In contrast, when cultured on the C8166 T-cell line, the same strains did not show any increase in fitness. By sequence analyses and infections with viruses expressing either yellow or cyan fluorescent protein, we were able to show that the absence of adaptation was linked to a lower recombination rate in the C8166 T-cell line. Our findings suggest that if we can manipulate the host-cellular factors that mediate viral evolution, we may be able to significantly retard viral adaptability. PMID:17342205

  16. Exogenous TNFR2 activation protects from acute GvHD via host T reg cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Martin; Biehl, Marlene; Steinfatt, Tim; Brandl, Andreas; Kums, Juliane; Amich, Jorge; Vaeth, Martin; Kuen, Janina; Holtappels, Rafaela; Podlech, Jürgen; Mottok, Anja; Kraus, Sabrina; Jordán-Garrote, Ana-Laura; Bäuerlein, Carina A; Brede, Christian; Ribechini, Eliana; Fick, Andrea; Seher, Axel; Polz, Johannes; Ottmüller, Katja J; Baker, Jeanette; Nishikii, Hidekazu; Ritz, Miriam; Mattenheimer, Katharina; Schwinn, Stefanie; Winter, Thorsten; Schäfer, Viktoria; Krappmann, Sven; Einsele, Hermann; Müller, Thomas D; Reddehase, Matthias J; Lutz, Manfred B; Männel, Daniela N; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike; Wajant, Harald; Beilhack, Andreas

    2016-08-22

    Donor CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (T reg cells) suppress graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT [allo-HCT]). Current clinical study protocols rely on the ex vivo expansion of donor T reg cells and their infusion in high numbers. In this study, we present a novel strategy for inhibiting GvHD that is based on the in vivo expansion of recipient T reg cells before allo-HCT, exploiting the crucial role of tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) in T reg cell biology. Expanding radiation-resistant host T reg cells in recipient mice using a mouse TNFR2-selective agonist before allo-HCT significantly prolonged survival and reduced GvHD severity in a TNFR2- and T reg cell-dependent manner. The beneficial effects of transplanted T cells against leukemia cells and infectious pathogens remained unaffected. A corresponding human TNFR2-specific agonist expanded human T reg cells in vitro. These observations indicate the potential of our strategy to protect allo-HCT patients from acute GvHD by expanding T reg cells via selective TNFR2 activation in vivo. PMID:27526711

  17. Data sharing in stem cell translational science: policy statement by the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party.

    PubMed

    Bredenoord, Annelien L; Mostert, Menno; Isasi, Rosario; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2015-01-01

    Data and sample sharing constitute a scientific and ethical imperative but need to be conducted in a responsible manner in order to protect individual interests as well as maintain public trust. In 2014, the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH) adopted a common Framework for Responsible Sharing of Genomic and Health-Related Data. The GA4GH Framework is applicable to data sharing in the stem cell field, however, interpretation is required so as to provide guidance for this specific context. In this paper, the International Stem Cell Forum Ethics Working Party discusses those principles that are specific to translational stem cell science, including engagement, data quality and safety, privacy, security and confidentiality, risk-benefit analysis and sustainability.

  18. Identification and translational validation of novel mammaglobin-A CD8 T cell epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Soysal, S. D.; Kan-Mitchell, J.; Huarte, E.; Zhang, X.; Wilkinson-Ryan, I.; Fleming, T.; Tiriveedhi, V.; Mohanakumar, T.; Li, L.; Herndon, J.; Oertli, D.; Goedegebuure, S. P.; Gillanders, W. E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammaglobin-A (MAM-A) is a secretory protein that is overexpressed in 80 % of human breast cancers. Its near-universal expression in breast cancer as well as its exquisite tissue specificity makes it an attractive target for a breast cancer prevention vaccine, and we recently initiated a phase 1 clinical trial of a MAM-A DNA vaccine. Previously, we have identified multiple MAM-A CD8 T cell epitopes using a reverse immunology candidate epitope approach based on predicted binding, but to date no attempt has been made to identify epitopes using an unbiased approach. In this study, we used human T cells primed in vitro with autologous dendritic cells expressing MAM-A to systematically identify MAM-A CD8 T cell epitopes. Using this unbiased approach, we identified three novel HLA-A2-restricted MAM-A epitopes. CD8 T cells specific for these epitopes are able to recognize and lyse human breast cancer cells in a MAM-A-specific, HLA-A2-dependent fashion. HLA-A2+/MAM-A+ breast cancer patients have an increased prevalence of CD8 T cells specific for these novel MAM-A epitopes, and vaccination with a MAM-A DNA vaccine significantly increases the number of these CD8 T cells. The identification and translational validation of novel MAM-A epitopes has important implications for the ongoing clinical development of vaccine strategies targeting MAM-A. The novel MAM-A epitopes represent attractive targets for epitope-based vaccination strategies, and can also be used to monitor immune responses. Taken together these studies provide additional support for MAM-A as an important therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer. PMID:25212176

  19. Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus: interaction with fibroblasts and muscle cells - new insights into parasite-mediated host cell cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Ricardo Chaves; Benchimol, Marlene

    2012-09-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus are parasitic, flagellated protists that inhabit the urogenital tract of humans and bovines, respectively. T. vaginalis causes the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide and has been associated with an increased risk for human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection in humans. Infections by T. foetus cause significant losses to the beef industry worldwide due to infertility and spontaneous abortion in cows. Several studies have shown a close association between trichomonads and the epithelium of the urogenital tract. However, little is known concerning the interaction of trichomonads with cells from deeper tissues, such as fibroblasts and muscle cells. Published parasite-host cell interaction studies have reported contradictory results regarding the ability of T. foetus and T. vaginalis to interact with and damage cells of different tissues. In this study, parasite-host cell interactions were examined by culturing primary human fibroblasts obtained from abdominal biopsies performed during plastic surgeries with trichomonads. In addition, mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, primary chick embryo myogenic cells and L6 muscle cells were also used as models of target cells. The parasite-host cell cultures were processed for scanning and transmission electron microscopy and were tested for cell viability and cell death. JC-1 staining, which measures mitochondrial membrane potential, was used to determine whether the parasites induced target cell damage. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labelling staining was used as an indicator of chromatin damage. The colorimetric crystal violet assay was performed to ana-lyse the cytotoxicity induced by the parasite. The results showed that T. foetus and T. vaginalis adhered to and were cytotoxic to both fibroblasts and muscle cells, indicating that trichomonas infection of the connective and muscle tissues is likely to occur; such infections could cause

  20. Giant Host Red Blood Cell Membrane Mimicking Polymersomes Bind Parasite Proteins and Malaria Parasites.

    PubMed

    Najer, Adrian; Thamboo, Sagana; Palivan, Cornelia G; Beck, Hans-Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease that needs to be addressed using innovative approaches to counteract spread of drug resistance and to establish or optimize vaccination strategies. With our approach, we aim for a dual action with drug- and 'vaccine-like' activity against malaria. By inhibiting entry of malaria parasites into host red blood cells (RBCs) - using polymer vesicle-based (polymersome) nanomimics of RBC membranes - the life cycle of the parasite is interrupted and the exposed parasites are accessible to the host immune system. Here, we describe how host cell-sized RBC membrane mimics, formed with the same block copolymers as nanomimics, also bind the corresponding malaria parasite ligand and whole malaria parasites, similar to nanomimics. This was demonstrated using fluorescence imaging techniques and confirms the suitability of giant polymersomes (GUVs) as simple mimics for RBC membranes.

  1. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism. PMID:26195817

  2. Angiogenin Mediates Cell-Autonomous Translational Control under Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Attenuates Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Mami, Iadh; Bouvier, Nicolas; El Karoui, Khalil; Gallazzini, Morgan; Rabant, Marion; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Li, Shuping; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Beaune, Philippe; Thervet, Eric; Chevet, Eric; Hu, Guo-Fu; Pallet, Nicolas

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathophysiology of kidney disease and aging, but the molecular bases underlying the biologic outcomes on the evolution of renal disease remain mostly unknown. Angiogenin (ANG) is a ribonuclease that promotes cellular adaptation under stress but its contribution to ER stress signaling remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the ANG-mediated contribution to the signaling and biologic outcomes of ER stress in kidney injury. ANG expression was significantly higher in samples from injured human kidneys than in samples from normal human kidneys, and in mouse and rat kidneys, ANG expression was specifically induced under ER stress. In human renal epithelial cells, ER stress induced ANG expression in a manner dependent on the activity of transcription factor XBP1, and ANG promoted cellular adaptation to ER stress through induction of stress granules and inhibition of translation. Moreover, the severity of renal lesions induced by ER stress was dramatically greater in ANG knockout mice (Ang(-/-)) mice than in wild-type mice. These results indicate that ANG is a critical mediator of tissue adaptation to kidney injury and reveal a physiologically relevant ER stress-mediated adaptive translational control mechanism.

  3. Virus-host coevolution in a persistently coxsackievirus B3-infected cardiomyocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, Sandra; Klingel, Karin; Lindig, Vanessa; Dörner, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Spiller, O Brad; Fechner, Henry

    2011-12-01

    Coevolution of virus and host is a process that emerges in persistent virus infections. Here we studied the coevolutionary development of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and cardiac myocytes representing the major target cells of CVB3 in the heart in a newly established persistently CVB3-infected murine cardiac myocyte cell line, HL-1(CVB3). CVB3 persistence in HL-1(CVB3) cells represented a typical carrier-state infection with high levels (10(6) to 10(8) PFU/ml) of infectious virus produced from only a small proportion (approximately 10%) of infected cells. CVB3 persistence was characterized by the evolution of a CVB3 variant (CVB3-HL1) that displayed strongly increased cytotoxicity in the naive HL-1 cell line and showed increased replication rates in cultured primary cardiac myocytes of mouse, rat, and naive HL-1 cells in vitro, whereas it was unable to establish murine cardiac infection in vivo. Resistance of HL-1(CVB3) cells to CVB3-HL1 was associated with reduction of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression. Decreasing host cell CAR expression was partially overcome by the CVB3-HL1 variant through CAR-independent entry into resistant cells. Moreover, CVB3-HL1 conserved the ability to infect cells via CAR. The employment of a soluble CAR variant resulted in the complete cure of HL-1(CVB3) cells with respect to the adapted virus. In conclusion, this is the first report of a CVB3 carrier-state infection in a cardiomyocyte cell line, revealing natural coevolution of CAR downregulation with CAR-independent viral entry in resistant host cells as an important mechanism of induction of CVB3 persistence.

  4. Virus-Host Coevolution in a Persistently Coxsackievirus B3-Infected Cardiomyocyte Cell Line ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pinkert, Sandra; Klingel, Karin; Lindig, Vanessa; Dörner, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Spiller, O. Brad; Fechner, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Coevolution of virus and host is a process that emerges in persistent virus infections. Here we studied the coevolutionary development of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and cardiac myocytes representing the major target cells of CVB3 in the heart in a newly established persistently CVB3-infected murine cardiac myocyte cell line, HL-1CVB3. CVB3 persistence in HL-1CVB3 cells represented a typical carrier-state infection with high levels (106 to 108 PFU/ml) of infectious virus produced from only a small proportion (approximately 10%) of infected cells. CVB3 persistence was characterized by the evolution of a CVB3 variant (CVB3-HL1) that displayed strongly increased cytotoxicity in the naive HL-1 cell line and showed increased replication rates in cultured primary cardiac myocytes of mouse, rat, and naive HL-1 cells in vitro, whereas it was unable to establish murine cardiac infection in vivo. Resistance of HL-1CVB3 cells to CVB3-HL1 was associated with reduction of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression. Decreasing host cell CAR expression was partially overcome by the CVB3-HL1 variant through CAR-independent entry into resistant cells. Moreover, CVB3-HL1 conserved the ability to infect cells via CAR. The employment of a soluble CAR variant resulted in the complete cure of HL-1CVB3 cells with respect to the adapted virus. In conclusion, this is the first report of a CVB3 carrier-state infection in a cardiomyocyte cell line, revealing natural coevolution of CAR downregulation with CAR-independent viral entry in resistant host cells as an important mechanism of induction of CVB3 persistence. PMID:21976640

  5. Biological properties of a hemagglutinin mutant of influenza virus selected by host cells.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, D M; Deom, C M; Schulze, I T

    1984-11-01

    Chick embryo fibroblast (CEF)-grown stocks of the WSN strain of influenza A(HINI) contain two variants which were designated F and C for fuzzy and clear plaque morphology on Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. During growth in MDBK cells plaque-isolated F virus was completely replaced by C virus (L. Noronha-Blob and I.T. Schulze (1976), Virology 69, 314-322). The parental (F) and the mutant (C) viruses contain hemagglutinins which differ in their ability to bind to host cells. In addition, the host cells from which the purified viruses are obtained affect their binding properties. Thus, as compared to MDBK-grown F virus (FBK), MDBK-grown C virus (CBK) produced high amounts of mRNA and high virus yields in MDBK cells. CBK had greater affinity for SA alpha 2,3Gal and SA alpha 2,6Gal linkages on derivatized human erythrocytes than did FBK, independent of whether neuraminidase was present on the virions. CBK was also resistant to components of calf serum which inhibited FBK hemagglutination at 37 degrees. As compared to FBK, CBK had increased ability to bind to both MDBK cells and CEF at 37 degrees in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of neuraminidase. In addition, when cells with virus bound at 0 degrees were transferred to 37 degrees, CBK remained cell associated whereas about 80% of FBK dissociated from both cells. Thus, mutation from F to C increased the ability of the virus to associate with MDBK cell receptors. Studies carried out with F and C viruses from both cells indicated that the expression of the mutation depended in part on the host cells in which the virus was grown and in part on the cells used to measure the binding properties. A model relating these observations to selection of HA variants in nature is presented.

  6. Virus-host coevolution in a persistently coxsackievirus B3-infected cardiomyocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, Sandra; Klingel, Karin; Lindig, Vanessa; Dörner, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Spiller, O Brad; Fechner, Henry

    2011-12-01

    Coevolution of virus and host is a process that emerges in persistent virus infections. Here we studied the coevolutionary development of coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and cardiac myocytes representing the major target cells of CVB3 in the heart in a newly established persistently CVB3-infected murine cardiac myocyte cell line, HL-1(CVB3). CVB3 persistence in HL-1(CVB3) cells represented a typical carrier-state infection with high levels (10(6) to 10(8) PFU/ml) of infectious virus produced from only a small proportion (approximately 10%) of infected cells. CVB3 persistence was characterized by the evolution of a CVB3 variant (CVB3-HL1) that displayed strongly increased cytotoxicity in the naive HL-1 cell line and showed increased replication rates in cultured primary cardiac myocytes of mouse, rat, and naive HL-1 cells in vitro, whereas it was unable to establish murine cardiac infection in vivo. Resistance of HL-1(CVB3) cells to CVB3-HL1 was associated with reduction of coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) expression. Decreasing host cell CAR expression was partially overcome by the CVB3-HL1 variant through CAR-independent entry into resistant cells. Moreover, CVB3-HL1 conserved the ability to infect cells via CAR. The employment of a soluble CAR variant resulted in the complete cure of HL-1(CVB3) cells with respect to the adapted virus. In conclusion, this is the first report of a CVB3 carrier-state infection in a cardiomyocyte cell line, revealing natural coevolution of CAR downregulation with CAR-independent viral entry in resistant host cells as an important mechanism of induction of CVB3 persistence. PMID:21976640

  7. The challenges of translating stem cells for spinal cord injury and related disorders: what are the barriers and opportunities?

    PubMed

    Hewson, Stephanie M; Fehlings, Lauren N; Messih, Mark; Fehlings, Michael G

    2013-02-01

    Stem cell therapies have significant potential to treat spinal cord injury (SCI), but it remains difficult to translate these therapies from 'bench to bedside'. Identifying barriers to translation and understanding how these barriers are viewed by stakeholders in the field of stem cell research are key steps to clinical translation. The Stem Cell Global Blueprint Conference, held in Toronto (ON, Canada) presented a unique opportunity to analyze the perspectives of multiple stakeholders on the future of stem cell therapies for SCI treatment. This article is an analysis of data collected at the conference, including a consensus-building process and pre- and in-conference questionnaires. The authors used these data to assess current perceptions of stem cell research and compared the findings with the literature. The authors identified the major barriers according to a wide range of stakeholders and what strategies they suggested to overcome these obstacles, with the aim of forwarding discussion on stem cell research. It is not a systematic review of the area, but rather a presentation of expert opinion with literature citations to give context and support to their arguments and suggestions. The authors believe that the international SCI community is ready for larger-scale clinical translation, which will require the continued cooperation of all stakeholders in the stem cell and SCI communities.

  8. Single-cell genomics-based analysis of virus–host interactions in marine surface bacterioplankton

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M; Swan, Brandon K; Poulos, Bonnie; Luo, Haiwei; Koren, Sergey; Hallam, Steven J; Sullivan, Matthew B; Woyke, Tanja; Eric Wommack, K; Stepanauskas, Ramunas

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections dynamically alter the composition and metabolic potential of marine microbial communities and the evolutionary trajectories of host populations with resulting feedback on biogeochemical cycles. It is quite possible that all microbial populations in the ocean are impacted by viral infections. Our knowledge of virus–host relationships, however, has been limited to a minute fraction of cultivated host groups. Here, we utilized single-cell sequencing to obtain genomic blueprints of viruses inside or attached to individual bacterial and archaeal cells captured in their native environment, circumventing the need for host and virus cultivation. A combination of comparative genomics, metagenomic fragment recruitment, sequence anomalies and irregularities in sequence coverage depth and genome recovery were utilized to detect viruses and to decipher modes of virus–host interactions. Members of all three tailed phage families were identified in 20 out of 58 phylogenetically and geographically diverse single amplified genomes (SAGs) of marine bacteria and archaea. At least four phage–host interactions had the characteristics of late lytic infections, all of which were found in metabolically active cells. One virus had genetic potential for lysogeny. Our findings include first known viruses of Thaumarchaeota, Marinimicrobia, Verrucomicrobia and Gammaproteobacteria clusters SAR86 and SAR92. Viruses were also found in SAGs of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. A high fragment recruitment of viral metagenomic reads confirmed that most of the SAG-associated viruses are abundant in the ocean. Our study demonstrates that single-cell genomics, in conjunction with sequence-based computational tools, enable in situ, cultivation-independent insights into host–virus interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:25848873

  9. Fibronectin-Degrading Activity of Trypanosoma cruzi Cysteine Proteinase Plays a Role in Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Fernando Yukio; Cortez, Cristian; Izidoro, Mario Augusto; Juliano, Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, binds to diverse extracellular matrix proteins. Such an ability prevails in the parasite forms that circulate in the bloodstream and contributes to host cell invasion. Whether this also applies to the insect-stage metacyclic trypomastigotes, the developmental forms that initiate infection in the mammalian host, is not clear. Using T. cruzi CL strain metacyclic forms, we investigated whether fibronectin bound to the parasites and affected target cell invasion. Fibronectin present in cell culture medium bound to metacyclic forms and was digested by cruzipain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase. G strain, with negligible cruzipain activity, displayed a minimal fibronectin-degrading effect. Binding to fibronectin was mediated by gp82, the metacyclic stage-specific surface molecule implicated in parasite internalization. When exogenous fibronectin was present at concentrations higher than cruzipain can properly digest, or fibronectin expression was stimulated by treatment of epithelial HeLa cells with transforming growth factor beta, the parasite invasion was reduced. Treatment of HeLa cells with purified recombinant cruzipain increased parasite internalization, whereas the treatment of parasites with cysteine proteinase inhibitor had the opposite effect. Metacyclic trypomastigote entry into HeLa cells was not affected by anti-β1 integrin antibody but was inhibited by anti-fibronectin antibody. Overall, our results have indicated that the cysteine proteinase of T. cruzi metacyclic forms, through its fibronectin-degrading activity, is implicated in host cell invasion. PMID:25267835

  10. Interrelations between the Parasitophorous Vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii and Host Cell Organelles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardoso Magno, Rodrigo; Cobra Straker, Lorian; de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is capable of actively penetrating and multiplying in any nucleated cell of warm-blooded animals. Its survival strategies include escape from fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with host cell lysosomes and rearrangement of host cell organelles in relation to the parasitophorous vacuole. In this article we report the rearrangement of host cell organelles and elements of the cytoskeleton of LLCMK2 cells, a lineage derived from green monkey kidney epithelial cells, in response to infection by T. gondii tachyzoites. Transmission electron microscopy made on flat embedded monolayers cut horizontally to the apical side of the cells or field emission scanning electron microscopy of monolayers scraped with scotch tape before sputtering showed that association of mitochondria to the vacuole is much less frequent than previously described. On the other hand, all parasitophorous vacuoles were surrounded by elements of the endoplasmic reticulum. These data were complemented by observations by laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent probes from mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and reinforced by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections observed by transmission electron microscopy and labeling of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescent probes.

  11. Interrelations between the parasitophorous vacuole of Toxoplasma gondii and host cell organelles.

    PubMed

    Magno, Rodrigo Cardoso; Straker, Lorian Cobra; de Souza, Wanderley; Attias, Marcia

    2005-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is capable of actively penetrating and multiplying in any nucleated cell of warm-blooded animals. Its survival strategies include escape from fusion of the parasitophorous vacuole with host cell lysosomes and rearrangement of host cell organelles in relation to the parasitophorous vacuole. In this article we report the rearrangement of host cell organelles and elements of the cytoskeleton of LLCMK2 cells, a lineage derived from green monkey kidney epithelial cells, in response to infection by T. gondii tachyzoites. Transmission electron microscopy made on flat embedded monolayers cut horizontally to the apical side of the cells or field emission scanning electron microscopy of monolayers scraped with scotch tape before sputtering showed that association of mitochondria to the vacuole is much less frequent than previously described. On the other hand, all parasitophorous vacuoles were surrounded by elements of the endoplasmic reticulum. These data were complemented by observations by laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent probes from mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum and reinforced by three-dimensional reconstruction from serial sections observed by transmission electron microscopy and labeling of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum by fluorescent probes.

  12. Participation of the serine-rich Entamoeba histolytica protein in amebic phagocytosis of apoptotic host cells.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jose E; Huston, Christopher D

    2008-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an intestinal ameba that causes dysentery and liver abscesses. Cytotoxicity and phagocytosis of host cells characterize invasive E. histolytica infection. Prior to phagocytosis of host cells, E. histolytica induces apoptotic host cell death, using a mechanism that requires contact via an amebic galactose-specific lectin. However, lectin inhibition only partially blocks phagocytosis of already dead cells, implicating at least one additional receptor in phagocytosis. To identify receptors for engulfment of apoptotic cells, monoclonal antibodies against E. histolytica membrane antigens were screened for inhibition of phagocytosis. Of 43 antibodies screened, one blocked lectin-independent uptake of apoptotic cells, with >90% inhibition at a dose of 20 microg/ml (P < 0.0003 versus control). The same antibody also inhibited adherence to apoptotic lymphocytes and, to a lesser extent, adherence to and killing of viable lymphocytes. The antigen recognized by the inhibitory antibody was purified by affinity chromatography and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as the serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP). Consistent with this, the inhibitory antibody bound to recombinant SREHP present in bacterial lysates on immunoblots. The SREHP is an abundant immunogenic surface protein of unclear function. The results of this unbiased antibody screen strongly implicate the SREHP as a participant in E. histolytica phagocytosis and suggest that it may play an important role in adherence to apoptotic cells. PMID:18086807

  13. CCL5 promotes proliferation of MCF-7 cells through mTOR-dependent mRNA translation

    SciTech Connect

    Murooka, Thomas T.; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2009-09-18

    The proliferative capacity of cancer cells is regulated by factors intrinsic to cancer cells and by secreted factors in the microenvironment. Here, we investigated the proto-oncogenic potential of the chemokine receptor, CCR5, in MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. At physiological levels, CCL5, a ligand for CCR5, enhanced MCF-7.CCR5 proliferation. Treatment with the mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin, inhibited this CCL5-inducible proliferation. Because mTOR directly modulates mRNA translation, we investigated whether CCL5 activation of CCR5 leads to increased translation. CCL5 induced the formation of the eIF4F translation initiation complex through an mTOR-dependent process. Indeed, CCL5 initiated mRNA translation, shown by an increase in high-molecular-weight polysomes. Specifically, we show that CCL5 mediated a rapid up-regulation of protein expression for cyclin D1, c-Myc and Dad-1, without affecting their mRNA levels. Taken together, we describe a mechanism by which CCL5 influences translation of rapamycin-sensitive mRNAs, thereby providing CCR5-positive breast cancer cells with a proliferative advantage.

  14. Optimizing eukaryotic cell hosts for protein production through systems biotechnology and genome-scale modeling.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Jahir M; Lewis, Nathan E

    2015-07-01

    Eukaryotic cell lines, including Chinese hamster ovary cells, yeast, and insect cells, are invaluable hosts for the production of many recombinant proteins. With the advent of genomic resources, one can now leverage genome-scale computational modeling of cellular pathways to rationally engineer eukaryotic host cells. Genome-scale models of metabolism include all known biochemical reactions occurring in a specific cell. By describing these mathematically and using tools such as flux balance analysis, the models can simulate cell physiology and provide targets for cell engineering that could lead to enhanced cell viability, titer, and productivity. Here we review examples in which metabolic models in eukaryotic cell cultures have been used to rationally select targets for genetic modification, improve cellular metabolic capabilities, design media supplementation, and interpret high-throughput omics data. As more comprehensive models of metabolism and other cellular processes are developed for eukaryotic cell culture, these will enable further exciting developments in cell line engineering, thus accelerating recombinant protein production and biotechnology in the years to come.

  15. A Novel Mechanism of Bacterial Toxin Transfer within Host Blood Cell-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E.; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system. PMID:25719452

  16. Pluripotent stem cells in translation: a Food and Drug Administration-National Institutes of Health collaboration.

    PubMed

    Kleitman, Naomi; Rao, Mahendra S; Owens, David F

    2013-07-01

    Recently, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. National Institutes of Health, and the stem cell research community have collaborated on a series of workshops that address moving pluripotent stem cell therapies into the clinic. The first two workshops in the series focused on preclinical science, and a third, future workshop will focus on clinical trials. This summary addresses major points from both of the recent preclinically focused meetings. When entering into a therapeutics developmental program based on pluripotent cells, investigators must make decisions at the very early stages that will have major ramifications during later phases of development. Presentations and discussions from both invited participants and FDA staff described the need to characterize and document the quality, variability, and suitability of the cells and commercial reagents used at every translational stage. This requires consideration of future regulatory requirements, ranging from donor eligibility of the original source material to the late-stage manufacturing protocols. Federal, industrial, and academic participants agreed that planning backward is the best way to anticipate what evidence will be needed to justify human testing of novel therapeutics and to eliminate wasted efforts.

  17. Translating Stem Cell Research to Cardiac Disease Therapies: Pitfalls and Prospects for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Michael R.; Myerburg, Robert J.; Francis, Darrel P.; Cole, Graham D.; Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, there have been numerous stem cell studies focused on cardiac diseases, ranging from proof-of-concept to phase 2 trials. This series of articles focuses on the legacy of these studies and the outlook for future treatment of cardiac diseases with stem cell therapies. The first section by Rosen and Myerburg is an independent review that analyzes the basic science and translational strategies supporting the rapid advance of stem cell technology to the clinic, the philosophies behind them, trial designs, and means for going forward that may impact favorably on progress. The second and third sections were collected in response to the initial section of this review. The commentary by Francis and Cole discusses the Rosen and Myerburg review and details how trial outcomes can be affected by noise, poor trial design (particularly the absence of blinding), and normal human tendencies toward optimism and denial. The final, independent article by Marbán takes a different perspective concerning the potential for positive impact of stem cell research applied to heart disease and future prospects for its clinical application. PMID:25169179

  18. Translational Control during Calicivirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Elizabeth; Locker, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies developed by caliciviruses to subvert or regulate the host protein synthesis machinery to their advantage. As intracellular obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on the host cell resources to produce viral proteins. Thus, many viruses have developed strategies that regulate the function of the host protein synthesis machinery, often leading to preferential translation of viral mRNAs. Caliciviruses lack a 5′ cap structure but instead have a virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5′ end of their mRNAs. Furthermore, they encode 2–4 open reading frames within their genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Therefore, they use alternative mechanisms for translation whereby VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to act as a proteinaceous cap-substitute, and some structural proteins are produced by reinitiation of translation events. This review discusses our understanding of these key mechanisms during caliciviruses infection as well as recent insights into the global regulation of eIF4E activity. PMID:27104553

  19. Translational Control during Calicivirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Royall, Elizabeth; Locker, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies developed by caliciviruses to subvert or regulate the host protein synthesis machinery to their advantage. As intracellular obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on the host cell resources to produce viral proteins. Thus, many viruses have developed strategies that regulate the function of the host protein synthesis machinery, often leading to preferential translation of viral mRNAs. Caliciviruses lack a 5' cap structure but instead have a virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of their mRNAs. Furthermore, they encode 2-4 open reading frames within their genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Therefore, they use alternative mechanisms for translation whereby VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to act as a proteinaceous cap-substitute, and some structural proteins are produced by reinitiation of translation events. This review discusses our understanding of these key mechanisms during caliciviruses infection as well as recent insights into the global regulation of eIF4E activity. PMID:27104553

  20. Different host cell proteases activate the SARS-coronavirus spike-protein for cell-cell and virus-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Graham; Bertram, Stephanie; Glowacka, Ilona; Steffen, Imke; Chaipan, Chawaree; Agudelo, Juliet; Lu Kai; Rennekamp, Andrew J.; Hofmann, Heike; Bates, Paul; Poehlmann, Stefan

    2011-05-10

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) poses a considerable threat to human health. Activation of the viral spike (S)-protein by host cell proteases is essential for viral infectivity. However, the cleavage sites in SARS-S and the protease(s) activating SARS-S are incompletely defined. We found that R667 was dispensable for SARS-S-driven virus-cell fusion and for SARS-S-activation by trypsin and cathepsin L in a virus-virus fusion assay. Mutation T760R, which optimizes the minimal furin consensus motif 758-RXXR-762, and furin overexpression augmented SARS-S activity, but did not result in detectable SARS-S cleavage. Finally, SARS-S-driven cell-cell fusion was independent of cathepsin L, a protease essential for virus-cell fusion. Instead, a so far unknown leupeptin-sensitive host cell protease activated cellular SARS-S for fusion with target cells expressing high levels of ACE2. Thus, different host cell proteases activate SARS-S for virus-cell and cell-cell fusion and SARS-S cleavage at R667 and 758-RXXR-762 can be dispensable for SARS-S activation.

  1. Where in the Cell Are You? Probing HIV-1 Host Interactions through Advanced Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Dirk, Brennan S.; Van Nynatten, Logan R.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses must continuously evolve to hijack the host cell machinery in order to successfully replicate and orchestrate key interactions that support their persistence. The type-1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) is a prime example of viral persistence within the host, having plagued the human population for decades. In recent years, advances in cellular imaging and molecular biology have aided the elucidation of key steps mediating the HIV-1 lifecycle and viral pathogenesis. Super-resolution imaging techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) and photoactivation and localization microscopy (PALM) have been instrumental in studying viral assembly and release through both cell–cell transmission and cell–free viral transmission. Moreover, powerful methods such as Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) have shed light on the protein-protein interactions HIV-1 engages within the host to hijack the cellular machinery. Specific advancements in live cell imaging in combination with the use of multicolor viral particles have become indispensable to unravelling the dynamic nature of these virus-host interactions. In the current review, we outline novel imaging methods that have been used to study the HIV-1 lifecycle and highlight advancements in the cell culture models developed to enhance our understanding of the HIV-1 lifecycle. PMID:27775563

  2. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21111079

  3. Transcription of host-substituted simian virus 40 DNA in whole cells and extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Kuff, E L; Ferdinand, F J; Khoury, G

    1978-01-01

    Viral transcriptional complexes were extracted from the nuclei of monkey kidney cells infected with wild-type simian virus 40 (SV40) or a variant strain containing a high proportion of host-substituted DNA molecules. The RNAs synthesized by these complexes in an in vitro system were analyzed for their content of SV40 and host sequences by a technique of sequential hybridization to plaque-purified and substituted viral DNAs. The relative labeling of the two types of sequences was commensurate with their proportion in the viral DNA (about 20% host). The substituted virus contains both reiterated and unique types of cellular sequences, and both kinds appeared to be transcribed. Transcripts of the substituted sequences formed a much smaller proportion of the virus related RNA recovered from intact infected cells, suggesting that host sequence transcripts are synthesized but rapidly degraded in the whole cell. The alternative, that transcription of these sequences is artificially enhanced in the in vitro system, cannot be rigorously excluded. We compared the self-annealing of viral RNAs from nuclear extracts of cells infected with wild-type and substituted viruses; transcripts labeled both in vivo and in vitro showed a two- to threefold-higher level of self-annealing in the case of the variant than in the case of wild type SV40. PMID:202741

  4. Rickettsial entry into host cells: finding the keys to unlock the doors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this issue of Infection and Immunity, Ojogun et al. present compelling evidence that A. phagocytophilum outer membrane protein A (OmpA) is required for efficient entry into host myeloid cells. Using classical approaches, this team of investigators led by Jason Carlyon shows that entry can be bloc...

  5. Host Cell P-glycoprotein Is Essential for Cholesterol Uptake and Replication of Toxoplasma gondii*

    PubMed Central

    Bottova, Iveta; Hehl, Adrian B.; Štefanić, Saša; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Pieters, Jean; Sonda, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that actively exports a wide range of compounds from the cell and is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. However, the role of P-gp in normal physiological processes remains elusive. Using P-gp-deficient fibroblasts, we showed that P-gp was critical for the replication of the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii but was not involved in invasion of host cells by the parasite. Importantly, we found that the protein participated in the transport of host-derived cholesterol to the intracellular parasite. T. gondii replication in P-gp-deficient host cells not only resulted in reduced cholesterol content in the parasite but also altered its sphingolipid metabolism. In addition, we found that different levels of P-gp expression modified the cholesterol metabolism in uninfected fibroblasts. Collectively our findings reveal a key and previously undocumented role of P-gp in host-parasite interaction and suggest a physiological role for P-gp in cholesterol trafficking in mammalian cells. PMID:19389707

  6. Host cell P-glycoprotein is essential for cholesterol uptake and replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Bottova, Iveta; Hehl, Adrian B; Stefanić, Sasa; Fabriàs, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Schraner, Elisabeth; Pieters, Jean; Sonda, Sabrina

    2009-06-26

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a membrane-bound efflux pump that actively exports a wide range of compounds from the cell and is associated with the phenomenon of multidrug resistance. However, the role of P-gp in normal physiological processes remains elusive. Using P-gp-deficient fibroblasts, we showed that P-gp was critical for the replication of the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii but was not involved in invasion of host cells by the parasite. Importantly, we found that the protein participated in the transport of host-derived cholesterol to the intracellular parasite. T. gondii replication in P-gp-deficient host cells not only resulted in reduced cholesterol content in the parasite but also altered its sphingolipid metabolism. In addition, we found that different levels of P-gp expression modified the cholesterol metabolism in uninfected fibroblasts. Collectively our findings reveal a key and previously undocumented role of P-gp in host-parasite interaction and suggest a physiological role for P-gp in cholesterol trafficking in mammalian cells. PMID:19389707

  7. Trypanosoma cruzi Invasion into Host Cells: A Complex Molecular Targets Interplay.

    PubMed

    Campo, Vanessa Leiria; Martins-Teixeira, Maristela Braga; Carvalho, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    Chagas' disease is still a worldwide threat, with estimated from 6 to 7 million infected people, mainly in Latin America. Despite all efforts, especially from international consortia (DNDi, NMTrypI), to develop an innovative therapeutic strategy against this disease, no candidate has achieved full requirements for clinical use yet. In this review, we point out the general molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in T. cruzi cell invasion and elucidate the roles of specific parasite and host targets in the progress of Chagas' disease. Among these molecular targets are Gp85/transsialidase, mucins, cruzipain and oligopeptidase B, found in parasite cell surface, and Galectin-3 and Toll-like receptors present in host cells. Thus, the deep understanding of their interplay and involvement on T. cruzi host cell adhesion, invasion and evasion from host immune may expand the chances for discovering new therapeutic agents against this neglected disease. Additionally, these targets may represent a remarkable strategy to block parasite invasion in the early stages of infection. PMID:27281167

  8. New evidence that Deformed Wing Virus and Black Queen Cell Virus are Multi-host pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The host-range breadth of pathogens can have important consequences for pathogens’ long term evolution and virulence, and play critical roles in the emergence and spread of the new diseases. Black queen cell virus (BQCV) and Deformed wing virus (DWV) are the two most common and prevalent viruses in...

  9. Identification of a Transcription Factor That Regulates Host Cell Exit and Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Lalitha; Gurses, Serdar A.; Hurley, Benjamin E.; Miller, Jessica L.; Karakousis, Petros C.; Briken, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) with host cell death signaling pathways is characterized by an initial anti-apoptotic phase followed by a pro-necrotic phase to allow for host cell exit of the bacteria. The bacterial modulators regulating necrosis induction are poorly understood. Here we describe the identification of a transcriptional repressor, Rv3167c responsible for regulating the escape of Mtb from the phagosome. Increased cytosolic localization of MtbΔRv3167c was accompanied by elevated levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and reduced activation of the protein kinase Akt, and these events were critical for the induction of host cell necrosis and macroautophagy. The increase in necrosis led to an increase in bacterial virulence as reflected in higher bacterial burden and reduced survival of mice infected with MtbΔRv3167c. The regulon of Rv3167c thus contains the bacterial mediators involved in escape from the phagosome and host cell necrosis induction, both of which are crucial steps in the intracellular lifecycle and virulence of Mtb. PMID:27191591

  10. Robotic large-scale application of wheat cell-free translation to structural studies including membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Beebe, Emily T; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Nozawa, Akira; Matsubara, Yuko; Frederick, Ronnie O; Primm, John G; Goren, Michael A; Fox, Brian G

    2011-04-30

    The use of the Protemist XE, an automated discontinuous-batch protein synthesis robot, in cell-free translation is reported. The soluble Galdieria sulphuraria protein DCN1 was obtained in greater than 2mg total synthesis yield per mL of reaction mixture from the Protemist XE, and the structure was subsequently solved by X-ray crystallography using material from one 10 mL synthesis (PDB ID: 3KEV). The Protemist XE was also capable of membrane protein translation. Thus human sigma-1 receptor was translated in the presence of unilamellar liposomes and bacteriorhodopsin was translated directly into detergent micelles in the presence of all-trans-retinal. The versatility, ease of use, and compact size of the Protemist XE robot demonstrate its suitability for large-scale synthesis of many classes of proteins.

  11. Reciprocal Regulation of AKT and MAP Kinase Dictates Virus-Host Cell Fusion ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nishi R.; Mani, Prashant; Nandwani, Neha; Mishra, Rajakishore; Rana, Ajay; Sarkar, Debi P.

    2010-01-01

    Viruses of the Paramyxoviridae family bind to their host cells by using hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN), which enhances fusion protein (F)-mediated membrane fusion. Although respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza virus 5 of this family are suggested to trigger host cell signaling during infection, the virus-induced intracellular signals dictating virus-cell fusion await elucidation. Using an F- or HN-F-containing reconstituted envelope of Sendai virus, another paramyxovirus, we revealed the role and regulation of AKT1 and Raf/MEK/ERK cascades during viral fusion with liver cells. Our observation that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation promotes viral fusion via ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangements, whereas AKT1 attenuates fusion by promoting phosphorylation of F protein, indicates a counteractive regulation of viral fusion by reciprocal activation of AKT1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, establishing a novel conceptual framework for a therapeutic strategy. PMID:20164223

  12. Genomic instability of the host cell induced by the human papillomavirus replication machinery.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Sumerina, Alina; Verst, Tatjana; Ojarand, Mari; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2007-04-18

    Development of invasive cervical cancer upon infection by 'high-risk' human papillomavirus (HPV) in humans is a stepwise process in which some of the initially episomal 'high-risk' type of HPVs (HR-HPVs) integrate randomly into the host cell genome. We show that HPV replication proteins E1 and E2 are capable of inducing overamplification of the genomic locus where HPV origin has been integrated. Clonal analysis of the cells in which the replication from integrated HPV origin was induced showed excision, rearrangement and de novo integration of the HPV containing and flanking cellular sequences. These data suggest that papillomavirus replication machinery is capable of inducing genomic changes of the host cell that may facilitate the formation of the HPV-dependent cancer cell. PMID:17396148

  13. Synchronous induction of detachment and reattachment of symbiotic Chlorella spp. from the cell cortex of the host Paramecium bursaria.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Paramecium bursaria harbor several hundred symbiotic Chlorella spp. Each alga is enclosed in a perialgal vacuole membrane, which can attach to the host cell cortex. How the perialgal vacuole attaches beneath the host cell cortex remains unknown. High-speed centrifugation (> 1000×g) for 1min induces rapid detachment of the algae from the host cell cortex and concentrates the algae to the posterior half of the host cell. Simultaneously, most of the host acidosomes and lysosomes accumulate in the anterior half of the host cell. Both the detached algae and the dislocated acidic vesicles recover their original positions by host cyclosis within 10min after centrifugation. These recoveries were inhibited if the host cytoplasmic streaming was arrested by nocodazole. Endosymbiotic algae during the early reinfection process also show the capability of desorption after centrifugation. These results demonstrate that adhesion of the perialgal vacuole beneath the host cell cortex is repeatedly inducible, and that host cytoplasmic streaming facilitates recovery of the algal attachment. This study is the first report to illuminate the mechanism of the induction to desorb for symbiotic algae and acidic vesicles, and will contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of algal and organelle arrangements in Paramecium.

  14. Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection protects human endocervical epithelial cells from apoptosis via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Follows, S A; Murlidharan, J; Massari, P; Wetzler, L M; Genco, C A

    2009-09-01

    Several microbial pathogens can modulate the host apoptotic response to infection, which may contribute to immune evasion. Various studies have reported that infection with the sexually transmitted disease pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae can either inhibit or induce apoptosis. N. gonorrhoeae infection initiates at the mucosal epithelium, and in women, cells from the ectocervix and endocervix are among the first host cells encountered by this pathogen. In this study, we defined the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae infection in human endocervical epithelial cells (End/E6E7 cells). We first established that N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090B failed to induce cell death in End/E6E7 cells. Subsequently, we demonstrated that stimulation with N. gonorrhoeae protected these cells from staurosporine (STS)-induced apoptosis. Importantly, only End/E6E7 cells incubated with live bacteria and in direct association with N. gonorrhoeae were protected from STS-induced apoptosis, while heat-killed and antibiotic-killed bacteria failed to induce protection. Stimulation of End/E6E7 cells with live N. gonorrhoeae induced NF-kappaB activation and resulted in increased gene expression of the NF-kappaB-regulated antiapoptotic genes bfl-1, cIAP-2, and c-FLIP. Furthermore, cIAP-2 protein levels also increased in End/E6E7 cells incubated with gonococci. Collectively, our results indicate that the antiapoptotic effect of N. gonorrhoeae in human endocervical epithelial cells results from live infection via expression of host antiapoptotic proteins. Securing an intracellular niche through the inhibition of apoptosis may be an important mechanism utilized by N. gonorrhoeae for microbial survival and immune evasion in cervical epithelial cells. PMID:19546192

  15. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  16. An Emerging Approach for Parallel Quantification of Intracellular Protozoan Parasites and Host Cell Characterization Using TissueFAXS Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Dürk, Julius; Bedal, Konstanze; Stricker, Kristina; Prokoph, Lukas Ali; Koch, Christoph; Wege, Anja K; Zirpel, Henner; van Zandbergen, Ger; Ecker, Rupert; Boghiu, Bogdan; Ritter, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of host-pathogen interactions is a fundamental approach in microbiological and immunological oriented disciplines. It is commonly accepted that host cells start to change their phenotype after engulfing pathogens. Techniques such as real time PCR or ELISA were used to characterize the genes encoding proteins that are associated either with pathogen elimination or immune escape mechanisms. Most of such studies were performed in vitro using primary host cells or cell lines. Consequently, the data generated with such approaches reflect the global RNA expression or protein amount recovered from all cells in culture. This is justified when all host cells harbor an equal amount of pathogens under experimental conditions. However, the uptake of pathogens by phagocytic cells is not synchronized. Consequently, there are host cells incorporating different amounts of pathogens that might result in distinct pathogen-induced protein biosynthesis. Therefore, we established a technique able to detect and quantify the number of pathogens in the corresponding host cells using immunofluorescence-based high throughput analysis. Paired with multicolor staining of molecules of interest it is now possible to analyze the infection profile of host cell populations and the corresponding phenotype of the host cells as a result of parasite load.

  17. An Emerging Approach for Parallel Quantification of Intracellular Protozoan Parasites and Host Cell Characterization Using TissueFAXS Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Dürk, Julius; Bedal, Konstanze; Stricker, Kristina; Prokoph, Lukas Ali; Koch, Christoph; Wege, Anja K; Zirpel, Henner; van Zandbergen, Ger; Ecker, Rupert; Boghiu, Bogdan; Ritter, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of host-pathogen interactions is a fundamental approach in microbiological and immunological oriented disciplines. It is commonly accepted that host cells start to change their phenotype after engulfing pathogens. Techniques such as real time PCR or ELISA were used to characterize the genes encoding proteins that are associated either with pathogen elimination or immune escape mechanisms. Most of such studies were performed in vitro using primary host cells or cell lines. Consequently, the data generated with such approaches reflect the global RNA expression or protein amount recovered from all cells in culture. This is justified when all host cells harbor an equal amount of pathogens under experimental conditions. However, the uptake of pathogens by phagocytic cells is not synchronized. Consequently, there are host cells incorporating different amounts of pathogens that might result in distinct pathogen-induced protein biosynthesis. Therefore, we established a technique able to detect and quantify the number of pathogens in the corresponding host cells using immunofluorescence-based high throughput analysis. Paired with multicolor staining of molecules of interest it is now possible to analyze the infection profile of host cell populations and the corresponding phenotype of the host cells as a result of parasite load. PMID:26488169

  18. An Emerging Approach for Parallel Quantification of Intracellular Protozoan Parasites and Host Cell Characterization Using TissueFAXS Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Maximilian; Dufner, Bianca; Dürk, Julius; Bedal, Konstanze; Stricker, Kristina; Prokoph, Lukas Ali; Koch, Christoph; Wege, Anja K.; Zirpel, Henner; van Zandbergen, Ger; Ecker, Rupert; Boghiu, Bogdan; Ritter, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of host-pathogen interactions is a fundamental approach in microbiological and immunological oriented disciplines. It is commonly accepted that host cells start to change their phenotype after engulfing pathogens. Techniques such as real time PCR or ELISA were used to characterize the genes encoding proteins that are associated either with pathogen elimination or immune escape mechanisms. Most of such studies were performed in vitro using primary host cells or cell lines. Consequently, the data generated with such approaches reflect the global RNA expression or protein amount recovered from all cells in culture. This is justified when all host cells harbor an equal amount of pathogens under experimental conditions. However, the uptake of pathogens by phagocytic cells is not synchronized. Consequently, there are host cells incorporating different amounts of pathogens that might result in distinct pathogen-induced protein biosynthesis. Therefore, we established a technique able to detect and quantify the number of pathogens in the corresponding host cells using immunofluorescence-based high throughput analysis. Paired with multicolor staining of molecules of interest it is now possible to analyze the infection profile of host cell populations and the corresponding phenotype of the host cells as a result of parasite load. PMID:26488169

  19. B7-H3 expression in donor T cells and host cells negatively regulates acute graft-versus-host disease lethality.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Rachelle G; Flynn, Ryan; Kreymborg, Katharina; McDonald-Hyman, Cameron; Saha, Asim; Taylor, Patricia A; Osborn, Mark J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Lieberknect, Elisabeth; Murphy, William J; Serody, Jonathan S; Munn, David H; Freeman, Gordon J; Allison, James P; Mak, Tak W; van den Brink, Marcel; Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-05-21

    Members of the B7 family have been shown to be important for regulating immune responses by providing either positive or negative costimulatory signals. The function of B7-H3 has been controversial. We show that B7-H3 is upregulated in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) target organs, including the colon, liver, and lung. Infusion of allogeneic donor T cells into B7-H3(-/-) vs wild-type (WT) recipients resulted in increased GVHD lethality associated with increased T-cell proliferation, colonic inflammatory cytokines, and destruction of epithelial barriers. Allogeneic B7-H3(-/-) vs WT donor T cells also had increased T-cell proliferation and GVHD lethality associated with increased proliferation and cytokine secretion in the spleen, intraepithelial lymphocyte inflammatory cytokines, and intestinal permeability. Both resting and activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) lack B7-H3 messenger RNA. Consistent with these data, GVHD was augmented in recipients of B7-H3(-/-) Treg-depleted grafts. In two delayed lymphocyte infusion (DLI) models, T cells lacking B7-H3 are capable of providing graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. We conclude that B7-H3 is responsible for providing a negative costimulatory signal. Our studies provide support for developing and testing new therapies directed toward the B7-H3 pathway, including approaches to augment host B7-H3 early after bone marrow transplantation to prevent GVHD and to develop potent antagonistic antibodies later after transplant to facilitate DLI-mediated GVL without GVHD complications. PMID:25814530

  20. Population structure of Endomicrobia in single host cells of termite gut flagellates (Trichonympha spp.).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hao; Dietrich, Carsten; Thompson, Claire L; Meuser, Katja; Brune, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota of many phylogenetically lower termites is dominated by the cellulolytic flagellates of the genus Trichonympha, which are consistently associated with bacterial symbionts. In the case of Endomicrobia, an unusual lineage of endosymbionts of the Elusimicrobia phylum that is also present in other gut flagellates, previous studies have documented strict host specificity, leading to the cospeciation of "Candidatus Endomicrobium trichonymphae" with their respective flagellate hosts. However, it currently remains unclear whether one Trichonympha species is capable of harboring more than one Endomicrobia phylotype. In the present study, we selected single Trichonympha cells from the guts of Zootermopsis nevadensis and Reticulitermes santonensis and characterized their Endomicrobia populations based on internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region sequences. We found that each host cell harbored a homogeneous population of symbionts that were specific to their respective host species, but phylogenetically distinct between each host lineage, corroborating cospeciation being caused by vertical inheritance. The experimental design of the present study also allowed for the identification of an unexpectedly large amount of tag-switching between samples, which indicated that any high-resolution analysis of microbial community structures using the pyrosequencing technique has to be interpreted with great caution.

  1. Novel insights into host-fungal pathogen interactions derived from live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Bain, Judith; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman outlined in his 1959 lecture, "There's plenty of room at the bottom", the enormous possibility of producing and visualising things at smaller scales. The advent of advanced scanning and transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microscopy has begun to open the door to visualise host-pathogen interactions at smaller scales, and spinning disc confocal and two-photon microscopy has improved our ability to study these events in real time in three dimensions. The aim of this review is to illustrate some of the advances in understanding host-fungal interactions that have been made in recent years in particular those relating to the interactions of live fungal pathogens with phagocytes. Dynamic imaging of host-pathogen interactions has recently revealed novel detail and unsuspected mechanistic insights, facilitating the dissection of the phagocytic process into its component parts. Here, we will highlight advances in our knowledge of host-fungal pathogen interactions, including the specific effects of fungal cell viability, cell wall composition and morphogenesis on the phagocytic process and try to define the relative contributions of neutrophils and macrophages to the clearance of fungal pathogens in vitro and the infected host. PMID:25398200

  2. Novel insights into host-fungal pathogen interactions derived from live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Bain, Judith; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2015-03-01

    The theoretical physicist and Nobel laureate Richard Feynman outlined in his 1959 lecture, "There's plenty of room at the bottom", the enormous possibility of producing and visualising things at smaller scales. The advent of advanced scanning and transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution microscopy has begun to open the door to visualise host-pathogen interactions at smaller scales, and spinning disc confocal and two-photon microscopy has improved our ability to study these events in real time in three dimensions. The aim of this review is to illustrate some of the advances in understanding host-fungal interactions that have been made in recent years in particular those relating to the interactions of live fungal pathogens with phagocytes. Dynamic imaging of host-pathogen interactions has recently revealed novel detail and unsuspected mechanistic insights, facilitating the dissection of the phagocytic process into its component parts. Here, we will highlight advances in our knowledge of host-fungal pathogen interactions, including the specific effects of fungal cell viability, cell wall composition and morphogenesis on the phagocytic process and try to define the relative contributions of neutrophils and macrophages to the clearance of fungal pathogens in vitro and the infected host.

  3. Post-translational regulation of rotavirus protein NSP1 expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Piña-Vázquez, C; De Nova-Ocampo, M; Guzmán-León, S; Padilla-Noriega, L

    2007-02-01

    The nonstructural rotavirus protein NSP1 binds specifically to viral mRNAs and to interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), inducing IRF3 degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. By using a vaccinia virus expression system in mammalian cells, we found that the yield of NSP1 was 8- and 13-fold lower than the viral proteins VP2 or NSP3, respectively; while in the presence of proteasome inhibitors such difference could be reduced to 2- to 2.5-fold, respectively. The susceptibility of NSP1 to proteasome degradation was fully reversed in a dose-dependent manner by transfection with the full complement of 11 molecules of translation-competent rotavirus mRNAs, but this effect was abrogated by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. These results demonstrate that NSP1 is degraded through a proteasome-dependent pathway, and viral proteins, alone or in combination with viral mRNAs, interfere with such degradation.

  4. Attachment and invasion of Neisseria meningitidis to host cells is related to surface hydrophobicity, bacterial cell size and capsule.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Stephanie N; Tzeng, Yih-Ling; Heel, Kathryn; Lee, Chiang W; Mowlaboccus, Shakeel; Seemann, Torsten; Lu, Wei; Lin, Ya-Hsun; Ryan, Catherine S; Peacock, Christopher; Stephens, David S; Davies, John K; Kahler, Charlene M

    2013-01-01

    We compared exemplar strains from two hypervirulent clonal complexes, strain NMB-CDC from ST-8/11 cc and strain MC58 from ST-32/269 cc, in host cell attachment and invasion. Strain NMB-CDC attached to and invaded host cells at a significantly greater frequency than strain MC58. Type IV pili retained the primary role for initial attachment to host cells for both isolates regardless of pilin class and glycosylation pattern. In strain MC58, the serogroup B capsule was the major inhibitory determinant affecting both bacterial attachment to and invasion of host cells. Removal of terminal sialylation of lipooligosaccharide (LOS) in the presence of capsule did not influence rates of attachment or invasion for strain MC58. However, removal of either serogroup B capsule or LOS sialylation in strain NMB-CDC increased bacterial attachment to host cells to the same extent. Although the level of inhibition of attachment by capsule was different between these strains, the regulation of the capsule synthesis locus by the two-component response regulator MisR, and the level of surface capsule determined by flow cytometry were not significantly different. However, the diplococci of strain NMB-CDC were shown to have a 1.89-fold greater surface area than strain MC58 by flow cytometry. It was proposed that the increase in surface area without changing the amount of anchored glycolipid capsule in the outer membrane would result in a sparser capsule and increase surface hydrophobicity. Strain NMB-CDC was shown to be more hydrophobic than strain MC58 using hydrophobicity interaction chromatography and microbial adhesion-to-solvents assays. In conclusion, improved levels of adherence of strain NMB-CDC to cell lines was associated with increased bacterial cell surface and surface hydrophobicity. This study shows that there is diversity in bacterial cell surface area and surface hydrophobicity within N. meningitidis which influence steps in meningococcal pathogenesis.

  5. Dual Mechanism for the Translation of Subgenomic mRNA from Sindbis Virus in Infected and Uninfected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, Miguel Ángel; Castelló, Alfredo; Ventoso, Iván; Berlanga, Juan José; Carrasco, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Infection of BHK cells by Sindbis virus (SV) gives rise to a profound inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, whereas translation of viral subgenomic mRNA that encodes viral structural proteins, continues for hours. To gain further knowledge on the mechanism by which this subgenomic mRNA is translated, the requirements for some initiation factors (eIFs) and for the presence of the initiator AUG were examined both in infected and in uninfected cells. To this end, BHK cells were transfected with different SV replicons or with in vitro made SV subgenomic mRNAs after inactivation of some eIFs. Specifically, eIF4G was cleaved by expression of the poliovirus 2A protease (2Apro) and the alpha subunit of eIF2 was inactivated by phosphorylation induced by arsenite treatment. Moreover, cellular location of these and other translation components was analyzed in BHK infected cells by confocal microscopy. Cleavage of eIF4G by poliovirus 2Apro does not hamper translation of subgenomic mRNA in SV infected cells, but bisection of this factor blocks subgenomic mRNA translation in uninfected cells or in cell-free systems. SV infection induces phosphorylation of eIF2α, a process that is increased by arsenite treatment. Under these conditions, translation of subgenomic mRNA occurs to almost the same extent as controls in the infected cells but is drastically inhibited in uninfected cells. Notably, the correct initiation site on the subgenomic mRNA is still partially recognized when the initiation codon AUG is modified to other codons only in infected cells. Finally, immunolocalization of different eIFs reveals that eIF2 α and eIF4G are excluded from the foci, where viral RNA replication occurs, while eIF3, eEF2 and ribosomes concentrate in these regions. These findings support the notion that canonical initiation takes place when the subgenomic mRNA is translated out of the infection context, while initiation can occur without some eIFs and even at non-AUG codons in infected cells

  6. Sphingolipids from a symbiotic microbe regulate homeostasis of host intestinal natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    An, Dingding; Oh, Sungwhan F; Olszak, Torsten; Neves, Joana F; Avci, Fikri Y; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Lu, Xi; Zeissig, Sebastian; Blumberg, Richard S; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-01-16

    Coevolution of beneficial microorganisms with the mammalian intestine fundamentally shapes mammalian physiology. Here, we report that the intestinal microbe Bacteroides fragilis modifies the homeostasis of host invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells by supplementing the host's endogenous lipid antigen milieu with unique inhibitory sphingolipids. The process occurs early in life and effectively impedes iNKT cell proliferation during neonatal development. Consequently, total colonic iNKT cell numbers are restricted into adulthood, and hosts are protected against experimental iNKT cell-mediated, oxazolone-induced colitis. In studies with neonatal mice lacking access to bacterial sphingolipids, we found that treatment with B. fragilis glycosphingolipids-exemplified by an isolated peak (MW = 717.6) called GSL-Bf717-reduces colonic iNKT cell numbers and confers protection against oxazolone-induced colitis in adulthood. Our results suggest that the distinctive inhibitory capacity of GSL-Bf717 and similar molecules may prove useful in the treatment of autoimmune and allergic disorders in which iNKT cell activation is destructive.

  7. IgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. PMID:27225312

  8. Serratia marcescens induces apoptotic cell death in host immune cells via a lipopolysaccharide- and flagella-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Kenichi; Adachi, Tatsuo; Imamura, Katsutoshi; Takano, Shinya; Usui, Kimihito; Suzuki, Kazushi; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Takeshi; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2012-10-19

    Injection of Serratia marcescens into the blood (hemolymph) of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, induced the activation of c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), followed by caspase activation and apoptosis of blood cells (hemocytes). This process impaired the innate immune response in which pathogen cell wall components, such as glucan, stimulate hemocytes, leading to the activation of insect cytokine paralytic peptide. S. marcescens induced apoptotic cell death of silkworm hemocytes and mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro. We searched for S. marcescens transposon mutants with attenuated ability to induce apoptosis of silkworm hemocytes. Among the genes identified, disruption mutants of wecA (a gene involved in lipopolysaccharide O-antigen synthesis), and flhD and fliR (essential genes in flagella synthesis) showed reduced motility and impaired induction of mouse macrophage cell death. Th