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Sample records for host cell-targeted effectors

  1. Comparative Genomics of the Zoonotic Pathogen Ehrlichia chaffeensis Reveals Candidate Type IV Effectors and Putative Host Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Noroy, Christophe; Meyer, Damien F.

    2017-01-01

    During infection, some intracellular pathogenic bacteria use a dedicated multiprotein complex known as the type IV secretion system to deliver type IV effector (T4E) proteins inside the host cell. These T4Es allow the bacteria to evade host defenses and to subvert host cell processes to their own advantage. Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a tick-transmitted obligate intracellular pathogenic bacterium, which causes human monocytic ehrlichiosis. Using comparative whole genome analysis, we identified the relationship between eight available E. chaffeensis genomes isolated from humans and show that these genomes are highly conserved. We identified the candidate core type IV effectome of E. chaffeensis and some conserved intracellular adaptive strategies. We assigned the West Paces strain to genetic group II and predicted the repertoires of T4Es encoded by E. chaffeensis genomes, as well as some putative host cell targets. We demonstrated that predicted T4Es are preferentially distributed in gene sparse regions of the genome. In addition to the identification of the two known type IV effectors of Anaplasmataceae, we identified two novel candidates T4Es, ECHLIB_RS02720 and ECHLIB_RS04640, which are not present in all E. chaffeensis strains and could explain some variations in inter-strain virulence. We also identified another novel candidate T4E, ECHLIB_RS02720, a hypothetical protein exhibiting EPIYA, and NLS domains as well as a classical type IV secretion signal, suggesting an important role inside the host cell. Overall, our results agree with current knowledge of Ehrlichia molecular pathogenesis, and reveal novel candidate T4Es that require experimental validation. This work demonstrates that comparative effectomics enables identification of important host pathways targeted by the bacterial pathogen. Our study, which focuses on the type IV effector repertoires among several strains of E. chaffeensis species, is an original approach and provides rational putative targets

  2. Common and contrasting themes in host cell-targeted effectors from bacterial, fungal, oomycete and nematode plant symbionts described using the Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Collmer, Candace W; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Bird, David; Collmer, Alan; Tyler, Brett M

    2009-02-19

    A wide diversity of plant-associated symbionts, including microbes, produce proteins that can enter host cells, or are injected into host cells in order to modify the physiology of the host to promote colonization. These molecules, termed effectors, commonly target the host defense signaling pathways in order to suppress the defense response. Others target the gene expression machinery or trigger specific modifications to host morphology or physiology that promote the nutrition and proliferation of the symbiont. When recognized by the host's surveillance machinery, which includes cognate resistance (R) gene products, defense responses are engaged to restrict pathogen proliferation. Effectors from diverse symbionts may be delivered into plant cells via varied mechanisms, including whole organism cellular entry (viruses, some bacteria and fungi), type III and IV secretion (in bacteria), physical injection (nematodes and insects) and protein translocation signal sequences (oomycetes and fungi). This mini-review will summarize both similarities and differences in effectors and effector delivery systems found in diverse plant-associated symbionts as well as how these are described with Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO) terms.

  3. Common and contrasting themes in host cell-targeted effectors from bacterial, fungal, oomycete and nematode plant symbionts described using the Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    Torto-Alalibo, Trudy; Collmer, Candace W; Lindeberg, Magdalen; Bird, David; Collmer, Alan; Tyler, Brett M

    2009-01-01

    A wide diversity of plant-associated symbionts, including microbes, produce proteins that can enter host cells, or are injected into host cells in order to modify the physiology of the host to promote colonization. These molecules, termed effectors, commonly target the host defense signaling pathways in order to suppress the defense response. Others target the gene expression machinery or trigger specific modifications to host morphology or physiology that promote the nutrition and proliferation of the symbiont. When recognized by the host's surveillance machinery, which includes cognate resistance (R) gene products, defense responses are engaged to restrict pathogen proliferation. Effectors from diverse symbionts may be delivered into plant cells via varied mechanisms, including whole organism cellular entry (viruses, some bacteria and fungi), type III and IV secretion (in bacteria), physical injection (nematodes and insects) and protein translocation signal sequences (oomycetes and fungi). This mini-review will summarize both similarities and differences in effectors and effector delivery systems found in diverse plant-associated symbionts as well as how these are described with Plant-Associated Microbe Gene Ontology (PAMGO) terms. PMID:19278551

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis effectors interfering host apoptosis signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minqiang; Li, Wu; Xiang, Xiaohong; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis remains a serious human public health concern. The coevolution between its pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human host complicated the way to prevent and cure TB. Apoptosis plays subtle role in this interaction. The pathogen endeavors to manipulate the apoptosis via diverse effectors targeting key signaling nodes. In this paper, we summarized the effectors pathogen used to subvert the apoptosis, such as LpqH, ESAT-6/CFP-10, LAMs. The interplay between different forms of cell deaths, such as apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis, is also discussed with a focus on the modes of action of effectors, and implications for better TB control.

  5. Legionella Metaeffector Exploits Host Proteasome to Temporally Regulate Cognate Effector

    PubMed Central

    Kubori, Tomoko; Shinzawa, Naoaki; Kanuka, Hirotaka; Nagai, Hiroki

    2010-01-01

    Pathogen-associated secretion systems translocate numerous effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells to coordinate cellular processes important for infection. Spatiotemporal regulation is therefore important for modulating distinct activities of effectors at different stages of infection. Here we provide the first evidence of “metaeffector,” a designation for an effector protein that regulates the function of another effector within the host cell. Legionella LubX protein functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that hijacks the host proteasome to specifically target the bacterial effector protein SidH for degradation. Delayed delivery of LubX to the host cytoplasm leads to the shutdown of SidH within the host cells at later stages of infection. This demonstrates a sophisticated level of coevolution between eukaryotic cells and L. pneumophila involving an effector that functions as a key regulator to temporally coordinate the function of a cognate effector protein. PMID:21151961

  6. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina M; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding.

  7. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  8. Host cell targets for African swine fever virus.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Galindo, Inmaculada; Cuesta-Geijo, Miguel Ángel; Barrado-Gil, Lucía; Alonso, Covadonga

    2015-11-02

    Viruses are strict intracellular pathogens that require the cellular environment to complete a successful infection. Among them, African swine fever virus (ASFV) is an evolutionary ancient DNA virus, endemic in Africa, which is nowadays causing an emergent disease in Europe with a potential high economic impact in the pig industry. It is well known that host-cell components are critical crossroads mapping the virus path for a productive infection, some of them at the endocytic pathway. Considering that ASFV infectious cycle strongly relies in several factors from the host cell, the study of virus-host interactions remains crucial as they will reveal the obstacles, routes and tracks, hints and the target waypoint in the virus journey to destination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. An Aphid Effector Targets Trafficking Protein VPS52 in a Host-Specific Manner to Promote Virulence1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Plant- and animal-feeding insects secrete saliva inside their hosts, containing effectors, which may promote nutrient release and suppress immunity. Although for plant pathogenic microbes it is well established that effectors target host proteins to modulate host cell processes and promote disease, the host cell targets of herbivorous insects remain elusive. Here, we show that the existing plant pathogenic microbe effector paradigm can be extended to herbivorous insects in that effector-target interactions inside host cells modify critical host processes to promote plant susceptibility. We showed that the effector Mp1 from Myzus persicae associates with the host Vacuolar Protein Sorting Associated Protein52 (VPS52). Using natural variants, we provide a strong link between effector virulence activity and association with VPS52, and show that the association is highly specific to M. persicae-host interactions. Also, coexpression of Mp1, but not Mp1-like variants, specifically with host VPS52s resulted in effector relocalization to vesicle-like structures that associate with prevacuolar compartments. We show that high VPS52 levels negatively impact virulence, and that aphids are able to reduce VPS52 levels during infestation, indicating that VPS52 is an important virulence target. Our work is an important step forward in understanding, at the molecular level, how a major agricultural pest promotes susceptibility during infestation of crop plants. We give evidence that an herbivorous insect employs effectors that interact with host proteins as part of an effective virulence strategy, and that these effectors likely function in a species-specific manner. PMID:28100451

  10. Hemipteran and dipteran pests: Effectors and plant host immune regulators.

    PubMed

    Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Walling, Linda L

    2016-04-01

    Hemipteran and dipteran insects have behavioral, cellular and chemical strategies for evading or coping with the host plant defenses making these insects particularly destructive pests worldwide. A critical component of a host plant's defense to herbivory is innate immunity. Here we review the status of our understanding of the receptors that contribute to perception of hemipteran and dipteran pests and highlight the gaps in our knowledge in these early events in immune signaling. We also highlight recent advances in identification of the effectors that activate pattern-triggered immunity and those involved in effector-triggered immunity.

  11. Interactions of legionella effector proteins with host phosphoinositide lipids.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stephen; Dolinsky, Stephanie; Hilbi, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    By means of the Icm/Dot type IV secretion system Legionella pneumophila translocates several effector proteins into host cells, where they anchor to the cytoplasmic face of the LCV membrane by binding to phosphoinositide (PI) lipids. Thus, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate anchors the effector proteins SidC and SidM, which promote the interaction of LCVs with the ER and the secretory vesicle trafficking -pathway. In this chapter, we describe protocols to (1) identify PI-binding proteins in Legionella lysates using PI-beads, (2) determine PI-binding specificities and affinities of recombinant Legionella effector proteins by protein-lipid overlays, and (3) use Legionella effectors to identify cellular PI lipids.

  12. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  13. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28129393

  14. The T6SSs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain PAO1 and Their Effectors: Beyond Bacterial-Cell Targeting.

    PubMed

    Sana, Thibault G; Berni, Benjamin; Bleves, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for many diseases such as chronic lung colonization in cystic fibrosis patients and acute infections in hospitals. The capacity of P. aeruginosa to be pathogenic toward several hosts is notably due to different secretion systems. Amongst them, P. aeruginosa encodes three Type Six Secretion Systems (T6SS), named H1- to H3-T6SS, that act against either prokaryotes and/or eukaryotic cells. They are independent from each other and inject diverse toxins that interact with different components in the host cell. Here we summarize the roles of these T6SSs in the PAO1 strain, as well as the toxins injected and their targets. While H1-T6SS is only involved in antiprokaryotic activity through at least seven different toxins, H2-T6SS and H3-T6SS are also able to target prokaryotic as well as eukaryotic cells. Moreover, recent studies proposed that H2- and H3-T6SS have a role in epithelial cells invasion by injecting at least three different toxins. The diversity of T6SS effectors is astounding and other effectors still remain to be discovered. In this review, we present a table with other putative P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 T6SS-dependent effectors. Altogether, the T6SSs of P. aeruginosa are important systems that help fight other bacteria for their ecological niche, and are important in the pathogenicity process.

  15. Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica Effector Translocation into Host Cells Using Beta-lactamase Effector Fusions.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Manuel; Zobiak, Bernd; Nauth, Theresa; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2015-10-13

    Many gram-negative bacteria including pathogenic Yersinia spp. employ type III secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic target cells. Inside the host cell the effector proteins manipulate cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. To better understand the control of type III secretion during host cell interaction, sensitive and accurate assays to measure translocation are required. We here describe the application of an assay based on the fusion of a Yersinia enterocolitica effector protein fragment (Yersinia outer protein; YopE) with TEM-1 beta-lactamase for quantitative analysis of translocation. The assay relies on cleavage of a cell permeant FRET dye (CCF4/AM) by translocated beta-lactamase fusion. After cleavage of the cephalosporin core of CCF4 by the beta-lactamase, FRET from coumarin to fluorescein is disrupted and excitation of the coumarin moiety leads to blue fluorescence emission. Different applications of this method have been described in the literature highlighting its versatility. The method allows for analysis of translocation in vitro and also in in vivo, e.g., in a mouse model. Detection of the fluorescence signals can be performed using plate readers, FACS analysis or fluorescence microscopy. In the setup described here, in vitro translocation of effector fusions into HeLa cells by different Yersinia mutants is monitored by laser scanning microscopy. Recording intracellular conversion of the FRET reporter by the beta-lactamase effector fusion in real-time provides robust quantitative results. We here show exemplary data, demonstrating increased translocation by a Y. enterocolitica YopE mutant compared to the wild type strain.

  16. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; ...

    2017-01-27

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293Tmore » cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Furthermore, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen.« less

  17. Fungal LysM effectors: extinguishers of host immunity?

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Ronnie; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2009-04-01

    Lysin motifs (LysMs) have been recognized in prokaryotes and plants as carbohydrate-binding protein modules. Recently, a novel virulence factor with LysMs was characterized from the plant pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum. Here, we present a survey of public sequence data of 70 fungal species to demonstrate that putatively secreted LysM-containing proteins are widespread in the fungal kingdom, as they are found in mammalian and plant pathogenic species, in addition to saprophytes. We propose that these putative LysM effectors might have a role in sequestration of chitin oligosaccharides - breakdown products of fungal cell walls that are released during invasion and act as triggers of host immunity - to dampen host defence.

  18. Ehrlichia chaffeensis Exploits Host SUMOylation Pathways To Mediate Effector-Host Interactions and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Dunphy, Paige Selvy; Luo, Tian

    2014-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that selectively infects mononuclear phagocytes. We recently reported that E. chaffeensis utilizes a type 1 secretion (T1S) system to export tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors and demonstrated that these effectors interact with a functionally diverse array of host proteins. By way of these interactions, TRP effectors modulate host cell functions; however, the molecular basis of these interactions and their roles in ehrlichial pathobiology are not well defined. In this study, we describe the first bacterial protein posttranslational modification (PTM) by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO). The E. chaffeensis T1S effector TRP120 is conjugated to SUMO at a carboxy-terminal canonical consensus SUMO conjugation motif in vitro and in human cells. In human cells, TRP120 was selectively conjugated with SUMO2/3 isoforms. Disruption of TRP120 SUMOylation perturbed interactions with known host proteins, through predicted SUMO interaction motif-dependent and -independent mechanisms. E. chaffeensis infection did not result in dramatic changes in the global host SUMOylated protein profile, but a robust colocalization of predominately SUMO1 with ehrlichial inclusions was observed. Inhibiting the SUMO pathway with a small-molecule inhibitor had a significant impact on E. chaffeensis replication and recruitment of the TRP120-interacting protein polycomb group ring finger protein 5 (PCGF5) to the inclusion, indicating that the SUMO pathway is critical for intracellular survival. This study reveals the novel exploitation of the SUMO pathway by Ehrlichia, which facilitates effector-eukaryote interactions necessary to usurp the host and create a permissive intracellular niche. PMID:25047847

  19. Identification of Novel Host Interactors of Effectors Secreted by Salmonella and Citrobacter

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Niemann, George S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Sanchez, Octavio; Ansong, Charles; Lu, Shao-Yeh; Choi, Hyungwon; Valleau, Dylan; Weitz, Karl K.; Savchenko, Alexei; Cambronne, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many pathogenic bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae use type III secretion systems to inject virulence proteins, termed “effectors,” into the host cell cytosol. Although host-cellular activities of several effectors have been demonstrated, the function and host-targeted pathways of most of the effectors identified to date are largely undetermined. To gain insight into host proteins targeted by bacterial effectors, we performed coaffinity purification of host proteins from cell lysates using recombinant effectors from the Enterobacteriaceae intracellular pathogens Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Citrobacter rodentium. We identified 54 high-confidence host interactors for the Salmonella effectors GogA, GtgA, GtgE, SpvC, SrfH, SseL, SspH1, and SssB collectively and 21 interactors for the Citrobacter effectors EspT, NleA, NleG1, and NleK. We biochemically validated the interaction between the SrfH Salmonella protein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) host protein kinase, which revealed a role for this effector in regulating phosphorylation levels of this enzyme, which plays a central role in signal transduction. IMPORTANCE During infection, pathogenic bacteria face an adverse environment of factors driven by both cellular and humoral defense mechanisms. To help evade the immune response and ultimately proliferate inside the host, many bacteria evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver effector proteins directly into host cells. Translocated effector proteins function to subvert host defense mechanisms. Numerous pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system called type III secretion to deliver effectors into the host cell cytosol. Here, we identified 75 new host targets of Salmonella and Citrobacter effectors, which will help elucidate their mechanisms of action. PMID:27822540

  20. Effectors of animal and plant pathogens use a common domain to bind host phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Dor; Guo, Yirui; Kinch, Lisa N; Grishin, Nick V; Gardner, Kevin H; Orth, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems deliver effectors into host cells to manipulate cellular processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Many host targets of these effectors are found on membranes. Therefore, to identify their targets, effectors often use specialized membrane-localization domains to localize to appropriate host membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms used by many domains are unknown. Here we identify a conserved bacterial phosphoinositide-binding domain (BPD) that is found in functionally diverse Type III effectors of both plant and animal pathogens. We show that members of the BPD family functionally bind phosphoinositides and mediate localization to host membranes. Moreover, NMR studies reveal that the BPD of the newly identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III effector VopR is unfolded in solution, but folds into a specific structure upon binding its ligand phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Thus, our findings suggest a possible mechanism for promoting refolding of Type III effectors after delivery into host cells.

  1. Effectors of animal and plant pathogens use a common domain to bind host phosphoinositides

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Guo, Yirui; Kinch, Lisa N.; Grishin, Nick V.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Orth, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial Type III Secretion Systems deliver effectors into host cells to manipulate cellular processes to the advantage of the pathogen. Many host targets of these effectors are found on membranes. Therefore, to identify their targets, effectors often use specialized membrane-localization domains to localize to appropriate host membranes. However, the molecular mechanisms used by many domains are unknown. Here we identify a conserved bacterial phosphoinositide-binding domain (BPD) that is found in functionally diverse Type III effectors of both plant and animal pathogens. We show that members of the BPD family functionally bind phosphoinositides and mediate localization to host membranes. Moreover, NMR studies reveal that the BPD of the newly identified Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type III effector VopR is unfolded in solution, but folds into a specific structure upon binding its ligand phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Thus, our findings suggest a possible mechanism for promoting refolding of Type III effectors after delivery into host cells. PMID:24346350

  2. Opening the Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector tool box: insights into host cell subversion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Deslandes, Laurent; Genin, Stephane

    2014-08-01

    Effectors delivered to host cells by the Type III secretion system are essential to Ralstonia solanacearum pathogenicity, as in several other plant pathogenic bacteria. The establishment of exhaustive effector repertoires in multiple R. solanacearum strains drew a first picture of the evolutionary dynamics of the pathogen effector suites. Effector repertoires are diversified, with a core of 20-30 effectors present in most of the strains and the obtention of mutants lacking one or more effector genes revealed the functional overlap among this effector network. Recent functional studies have provided insights into the ability of single effectors to manipulate the host proteasome, elicit cell death, trigger the expression of plant genes, and/or display biochemical activities on plant protein targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Filamentous pathogen effectors interfering with small RNA silencing in plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenwu; Ma, Wenbo

    2016-08-01

    Filamentous eukaryotic pathogens including fungi and oomycetes are major threats of plant health. During the co-evolutionary arms race with the hosts, these pathogens have evolved a large repertoire of secreted virulence proteins, called effectors, to facilitate colonization and infection. Many effectors are believed to directly manipulate targeted processes inside the host cells; and a fundamental function of the effectors is to dampen immunity. Recent evidence suggests that the destructive oomycete pathogens in the genus Phytophthora encode RNA silencing suppressors. These effectors play an important virulence role during infection, likely through their inhibitory effect on host small RNA-mediated defense.

  4. At the Frontier; RXLR Effectors Crossing the Phytophthora–Host Interface

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    Plants are constantly beset by pathogenic organisms. To successfully infect their hosts, plant pathogens secrete effector proteins, many of which are translocated to the inside of the host cell where they manipulate normal physiological processes and undermine host defense. The way by which effectors cross the frontier to reach the inside of the host cell varies among different classes of pathogens. For oomycete plant pathogens – like the potato late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans – it has been shown that effector translocation to the host cell cytoplasm is dependent on conserved amino acid motifs that are present in the N-terminal part of effector proteins. One of these motifs, known as the RXLR motif, has a strong resemblance with a host translocation motif found in effectors secreted by Plasmodium species. These malaria parasites, that reside inside specialized vacuoles in red blood cells, make use of a specific protein translocation complex to export effectors from the vacuole into the red blood cell. Whether or not also oomycete RXLR effectors require a translocation complex to cross the frontier is still under investigation. For one P. infestans RXLR effector named IPI-O we have found a potential host target that could play a role in establishing the first contact between this effector and the host cell. This membrane spanning lectin receptor kinase, LecRK-I.9, interacts with IPI-O via the tripeptide RGD that overlaps with the RXLR motif. In animals, RGD is a well-known cell adhesion motif; it binds to integrins, which are membrane receptors that regulate many cellular processes and which can be hijacked by pathogens for either effector translocation or pathogen entry into host cells. PMID:22645549

  5. Effectors of biotrophic fungi and oomycetes: pathogenicity factors and triggers of host resistance.

    PubMed

    Dodds, Peter N; Rafiqi, Maryam; Gan, Pamela H P; Hardham, Adrienne R; Jones, David A; Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2009-01-01

    Many biotrophic fungal and oomycete pathogens share a common infection process involving the formation of haustoria, which penetrate host cell walls and form a close association with plant membranes. Recent studies have identified a class of pathogenicity effector proteins from these pathogens that is transferred into host cells from haustoria during infection. This insight stemmed from the identification of avirulence (Avr) proteins from these pathogens that are recognized by intracellular host resistance (R) proteins. Oomycete effectors contain a conserved translocation motif that directs their uptake into host cells independently of the pathogen, and is shared with the human malaria pathogen. Genome sequence information indicates that oomycetes may express several hundred such host-translocated effectors. Elucidating the transport mechanism of fungal and oomycete effectors and their roles in disease offers new opportunities to understand how these pathogens are able to manipulate host cells to establish a parasitic relationship and to develop new disease-control measures.

  6. Sequential Delivery of Host-Induced Virulence Effectors by Appressoria and Intracellular Hyphae of the Phytopathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum

    PubMed Central

    Kleemann, Jochen; Neumann, Ulla; van Themaat, Emiel Ver Loren; van der Does, H. Charlotte; Hacquard, Stéphane; Stüber, Kurt; Will, Isa; Schmalenbach, Wolfgang; Schmelzer, Elmon; O'Connell, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Phytopathogens secrete effector proteins to manipulate their hosts for effective colonization. Hemibiotrophic fungi must maintain host viability during initial biotrophic growth and elicit host death for subsequent necrotrophic growth. To identify effectors mediating these opposing processes, we deeply sequenced the transcriptome of Colletotrichum higginsianum infecting Arabidopsis. Most effector genes are host-induced and expressed in consecutive waves associated with pathogenic transitions, indicating distinct effector suites are deployed at each stage. Using fluorescent protein tagging and transmission electron microscopy-immunogold labelling, we found effectors localised to stage-specific compartments at the host-pathogen interface. In particular, we show effectors are focally secreted from appressorial penetration pores before host invasion, revealing new levels of functional complexity for this fungal organ. Furthermore, we demonstrate that antagonistic effectors either induce or suppress plant cell death. Based on these results we conclude that hemibiotrophy in Colletotrichum is orchestrated through the coordinated expression of antagonistic effectors supporting either cell viability or cell death. PMID:22496661

  7. Bacterial effectors target the plant cell nucleus to subvert host transcription

    PubMed Central

    Canonne, Joanne; Rivas, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote virulence, Gram-negative bacteria have evolved the ability to inject so-called type III effector proteins into host cells. The plant cell nucleus appears to be a subcellular compartment repeatedly targeted by bacterial effectors. In agreement with this observation, mounting evidence suggests that manipulation of host transcription is a major strategy developed by bacteria to counteract plant defense responses. It has been suggested that bacterial effectors may adopt at least three alternative, although not mutually exclusive, strategies to subvert host transcription. T3Es may (1) act as transcription factors that directly activate transcription in host cells, (2) affect histone packing and chromatin configuration, and/or (3) directly target host transcription factor activity. Here, we provide an overview on how all these strategies may lead to host transcriptional re-programming and, as a result, to improved bacterial multiplication inside plant cells. PMID:22353865

  8. An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

    PubMed Central

    Dagdas, Yasin F; Belhaj, Khaoula; Maqbool, Abbas; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Pandey, Pooja; Petre, Benjamin; Tabassum, Nadra; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Hughes, Richard K; Sklenar, Jan; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank; Findlay, Kim; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien; Bozkurt, Tolga O

    2016-01-01

    Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy-related processes is unknown. Here, we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus, a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor to counteract host defenses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10856.001 PMID:26765567

  9. Legionella pneumophila type IV effectors hijack the transcription and translation machinery of the host cell.

    PubMed

    Rolando, Monica; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens modulate the host response to persist and replicate inside a eukaryotic cell and cause disease. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, is present in freshwater environments and represents one of these pathogens. During coevolution with protozoan cells, L. pneumophila has acquired highly sophisticated and diverse strategies to hijack host cell processes. It secretes hundreds of effectors into the host cell, and these manipulate host signaling pathways and key cellular processes. Recently it has been shown that L. pneumophila is also able to alter the transcription and translation machinery of the host and to exploit epigenetic mechanisms in the cells it resides in to counteract host responses.

  10. Structural Basis of Host Autophagy-related Protein 8 (ATG8) Binding by the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen Effector Protein PexRD54*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tregidgo, Nicholas; Zess, Erin; Belhaj, Khaoula

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous plant pathogens deliver effector proteins to host cells to promote infection. The Phytophthora infestans RXLR-type effector PexRD54 binds potato ATG8 via its ATG8 family-interacting motif (AIM) and perturbs host-selective autophagy. However, the structural basis of this interaction remains unknown. Here, we define the crystal structure of PexRD54, which includes a modular architecture, including five tandem repeat domains, with the AIM sequence presented at the disordered C terminus. To determine the interface between PexRD54 and ATG8, we solved the crystal structure of potato ATG8CL in complex with a peptide comprising the effector's AIM sequence, and we established a model of the full-length PexRD54-ATG8CL complex using small angle x-ray scattering. Structure-informed deletion of the PexRD54 tandem domains reveals retention of ATG8CL binding in vitro and in planta. This study offers new insights into structure/function relationships of oomycete RXLR effectors and how these proteins engage with host cell targets to promote disease. PMID:27458016

  11. Verticillium dahliae LysM effectors differentially contribute to virulence on plant hosts.

    PubMed

    Kombrink, Anja; Rovenich, Hanna; Shi-Kunne, Xiaoqian; Rojas-Padilla, Eduardo; van den Berg, Grardy C M; Domazakis, Emmanouil; de Jonge, Ronnie; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Seidl, Michael F; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2017-05-01

    Chitin-binding lysin motif (LysM) effectors contribute to the virulence of various plant-pathogenic fungi that are causal agents of foliar diseases. Here, we report the LysM effectors of the soil-borne fungal vascular wilt pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Comparative genomics revealed three core LysM effectors that are conserved in a collection of V. dahliae strains. Remarkably, and in contrast with the previously studied LysM effectors of other plant pathogens, no expression of core LysM effectors was monitored in planta in a taxonomically diverse panel of host plants. Moreover, targeted deletion of the individual LysM effector genes in V. dahliae strain JR2 did not compromise virulence in infections on Arabidopsis, tomato or Nicotiana benthamiana. Interestingly, an additional lineage-specific LysM effector is encoded in the genome of V. dahliae strain VdLs17, but not in any other V. dahliae strain sequenced to date. Remarkably, this lineage-specific effector is expressed in planta and contributes to the virulence of V. dahliae strain VdLs17 on tomato, but not on Arabidopsis or N. benthamiana. Functional analysis revealed that this LysM effector binds chitin, is able to suppress chitin-induced immune responses and protects fungal hyphae against hydrolysis by plant hydrolytic enzymes. Thus, in contrast with the core LysM effectors of V. dahliae, this lineage-specific LysM effector of strain VdLs17 contributes to virulence in planta. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Plant Pathology published by British Society for Plant Pathology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Rust fungal effectors mimic host transit peptides to translocate into chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin; Lorrain, Cécile; Saunders, Diane G O; Win, Joe; Sklenar, Jan; Duplessis, Sébastien; Kamoun, Sophien

    2016-04-01

    Parasite effector proteins target various host cell compartments to alter host processes and promote infection. How effectors cross membrane-rich interfaces to reach these compartments is a major question in effector biology. Growing evidence suggests that effectors use molecular mimicry to subvert host cell machinery for protein sorting. We recently identified chloroplast-targeted protein 1 (CTP1), a candidate effector from the poplar leaf rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina that carries a predicted transit peptide and accumulates in chloroplasts and mitochondria. Here, we show that the CTP1 transit peptide is necessary and sufficient for accumulation in the stroma of chloroplasts. CTP1 is part of a Melampsora-specific family of polymorphic secreted proteins. Two members of that family, CTP2 and CTP3, also translocate in chloroplasts in an N-terminal signal-dependent manner. CTP1, CTP2 and CTP3 are cleaved when they accumulate in chloroplasts, while they remain intact when they do not translocate into chloroplasts. Our findings reveal that fungi have evolved effector proteins that mimic plant-specific sorting signals to traffic within plant cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Identification of Novel Host Interactors of Effectors Secreted by Salmonella and Citrobacter

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Niemann, George S.; Sydor, Michael A.; Sanchez, Octavio; Ansong, Charles; Lu, Shao-Yeh; Choi, Hyungwon; Valleau, Dylan; Weitz, Karl K.; Savchenko, Alexei; Cambronne, Eric D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2016-07-12

    Many pathogenic bacteria of the familyEnterobacteriaceaeuse type III secretion systems to inject virulence proteins, termed “effectors,” into the host cell cytosol. Although host-cellular activities of several effectors have been demonstrated, the function and host-targeted pathways of most of the effectors identified to date are largely undetermined. To gain insight into host proteins targeted by bacterial effectors, we performed coaffinity purification of host proteins from cell lysates using recombinant effectors from theEnterobacteriaceaeintracellular pathogensSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium andCitrobacter rodentium. We identified 54 high-confidence host interactors for theSalmonellaeffectors GogA, GtgA, GtgE, SpvC, SrfH, SseL, SspH1, and SssB collectively and 21 interactors for theCitrobactereffectors EspT, NleA, NleG1, and NleK. We biochemically validated the interaction between the SrfHSalmonellaprotein and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) host protein kinase, which revealed a role for this effector in regulating phosphorylation levels of this enzyme, which plays a central role in signal transduction.

    IMPORTANCEDuring infection, pathogenic bacteria face an adverse environment of factors driven by both cellular and humoral defense mechanisms. To help evade the immune response and ultimately proliferate inside the host, many bacteria evolved specialized secretion systems to deliver effector proteins directly into host cells. Translocated effector proteins function to subvert host defense mechanisms. Numerous pathogenic bacteria use a specialized secretion system called type III secretion to deliver effectors into the host cell cytosol. Here, we identified 75 new host targets ofSalmonellaandCitrobactereffectors, which will help elucidate their mechanisms of

  14. Host/pathogen interactions and immune effector mechanisms

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An understanding of the host/pathogen interactions for mycobacterial infections underpins many of the outcomes required for improving disease control, including better diagnostic tests, vaccines and breeding for disease resistance. Upon infection these mycobacteria come in contact with cells of the ...

  15. Entry of oomycete and fungal effectors into plant and animal host cells.

    PubMed

    Kale, Shiv D; Tyler, Brett M

    2011-12-01

    Fungal and oomycete pathogens cause many destructive diseases of plants and important diseases of humans and other animals. Fungal and oomycete plant pathogens secrete numerous effector proteins that can enter inside host cells to condition susceptibility. Until recently it has been unknown if these effectors enter via pathogen-encoded translocons or via pathogen-independent mechanisms. Here we review recent evidence that many fungal and oomycete effectors enter via receptor-mediated endocytosis, and can do so in the absence of the pathogen. Surprisingly, a large number of these effectors utilize cell surface phosphatidyinositol-3-phosphate (PI-3-P) as a receptor, a molecule previously known only inside cells. Binding of effectors to PI-3-P appears to be mediated by the cell entry motif RXLR in oomycetes, and by diverse RXLR-like variants in fungi. PI-3-P appears to be present on the surface of animal cells also, suggesting that it may mediate entry of effectors of fungal and oomycete animal pathogens, for example, RXLR effectors found in the oomycete fish pathogen, Saprolegnia parasitica. Reagents that can block PI-3-P-mediated entry have been identified, suggesting new therapeutic strategies.

  16. Cif type III effector protein: a smart hijacker of the host cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Taieb, Frédéric; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Oswald, Eric

    2009-09-01

    During coevolution with their hosts, bacteria have developed functions that allow them to interfere with the mechanisms controlling the proliferation of eukaryotic cells. Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of these cyclomodulins, the family of bacterial effectors that interfere with the host cell cycle. Acquired early during evolution by bacteria isolated from vertebrates and invertebrates, Cif is an effector protein of type III secretion machineries. Cif blocks the host cell cycle in G1 and G2 by inducing the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). The x-ray crystal structure of Cif reveals it to be a divergent member of a superfamily of enzymes including cysteine proteases and acetyltransferases. This review summarizes and discusses what we know about Cif, from the bacterial gene to the host target.

  17. Host-Induced gene silencing in barley powdery mildew reveals a class of ribonuclease-like effectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obligate biotrophic pathogens of plants require the ability to circumvent host defenses to enable colonization. To establish compatibility, pathogens secrete a variety of effectors, which regulate host immunity, and thus, facilitate the establishment of haustorial feeding structures. These structur...

  18. A novel nematode effector suppresses plant immunity by activating host reactive oxygen species-scavenging system.

    PubMed

    Lin, Borong; Zhuo, Kan; Chen, Shiyan; Hu, Lili; Sun, Longhua; Wang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Lian-Hui; Liao, Jinling

    2016-02-01

    Evidence is emerging that plant-parasitic nematodes can secrete effectors to interfere with the host immune response, but it remains unknown how these effectors can conquer host immune responses. Here, we depict a novel effector, MjTTL5, that could suppress plant immune response. Immunolocalization and transcriptional analyses showed that MjTTL5 is expressed specifically within the subventral gland of Meloidogyne javanica and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of the nematode. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing MjTTL5 were significantly more susceptible to M. javanica infection than wild-type plants, and vice versa, in planta silencing of MjTTL5 substantially increased plant resistance to M. javanica. Yeast two-hybrid, coimmunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescent complementation assays showed that MjTTL5 interacts specifically with Arabidopsis ferredoxin : thioredoxin reductase catalytic subunit (AtFTRc), a key component of host antioxidant system. The expression of AtFTRc is induced by the infection of M. javanica. Interaction between AtFTRc and MjTTL could drastically increase host reactive oxygen species-scavenging activity, and result in suppression of plant basal defenses and attenuation of host resistance to the nematode infection. Our results demonstrate that the host ferredoxin : thioredoxin system can be exploited cunningly by M. javanica, revealing a novel mechanism utilized by plant-parasitic nematodes to subjugate plant innate immunity and thereby promoting parasitism. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  19. The presence of professional phagocytes dictates the number of host cells targeted for Yop translocation during infection.

    PubMed

    Durand, Enrique A; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J; Castillo, Cynthia; Walsh, Rebecca L; Mecsas, Joan

    2010-08-01

    Type III secretion systems deliver effector proteins from Gram-negative bacterial pathogens into host cells, where they disarm host defences, allowing the pathogens to establish infection. Although Yersinia pseudotuberculosis delivers its effector proteins, called Yops, into numerous cell types grown in culture, we show that during infection Y. pseudotuberculosis selectively targets Yops to professional phagocytes in Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen, although it colocalizes with B and T cells as well as professional phagocytes. Strikingly, in the absence of neutrophils, the number of cells with translocated Yops was significantly reduced although the bacterial loads were similar, indicating that Y. pseudotuberculosis did not arbitrarily deliver Yops to the available cells. Using isolated splenocytes, selective binding and selective targeting to professional phagocytes when bacteria were limiting was also observed, indicating that tissue architecture was not required for the tropism for professional phagocytes. In isolated splenocytes, YadA and Invasin increased the number of all cells types with translocated Yops, but professional phagocytes were still preferentially translocated with Yops in the absence of these adhesins. Together these results indicate that Y. pseudotuberculosis discriminates among cells it encounters during infection and selectively delivers Yops to phagocytes while refraining from translocation to other cell types.

  20. The presence of professional phagocytes dictates the number of host cells targeted for Yop translocation during infection

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Enrique A.; Maldonado-Arocho, Francisco J.; Castillo, Cynthia; Walsh, Rebecca L.; Mecsas, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Type III secretion systems deliver effector proteins from gram-negative bacterial pathogens into host cells, where they disarm host defenses, allowing the pathogens to establish infection. Although Yersinia pseudotuberculosis delivers its effector proteins, called Yops, into numerous cell types grown in culture, we show that during infection Y. pseudotuberculosis selectively targets Yops to professional phagocytes in Peyer’s patches, mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen, although it co-localizes with B and T cells as well as professional phagocytes. Strikingly, in the absence of neutrophils, the number of cells with translocated Yops was significantly reduced although the bacterial loads were similar, indicating that Y. pseudotuberculosis did not arbitrarily deliver Yops to the available cells. Using isolated splenocytes, selective binding and selective targeting to professional phagocytes when bacteria were limiting was also observed, indicating that tissue architecture was not required for the tropism for professional phagocytes. In isolated splenocytes, YadA and Invasin increased the number of all cells types with translocated Yops, but professional phagocytes were still preferentially translocated with Yops in the absence of these adhesins. Together these results indicate that Y. pseudotuberculosis discriminates among cells it encounters during infection and selectively delivers Yops to phagocytes while refraining from translocation to other cell types. PMID:20148898

  1. TRANSGENIC EXPRESSION OF THE ERWINIA AMYLOVORA (FIRE BLIGHT) EFFECTOR PROTEIN EOP1 SUPRESSES HOST BASAL DEFENSE MECHANISMS IN MALUS (APPLE)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) is the causative agent of fire blight, a devastating disease of apple and pear. Like many other plant and animal bacterial pathogens Ea utilizes a type three secretion system (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Once inside the host cell, effector protei...

  2. The Salmonella effector SteA binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate for subcellular targeting within host cells.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Lia; Ismail, Ahmad; Charro, Nuno; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Holden, David W; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J; Mota, Luís Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use specialized secretion systems to deliver virulence effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. The function of these effectors depends on their localization within infected cells, but the mechanisms determining subcellular targeting of each effector are mostly elusive. Here, we show that the Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA binds specifically to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P]. Ectopically expressed SteA localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of eukaryotic cells. However, SteA was displaced from the PM of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in mutants unable to synthesize the local pool of PI(4)P and from the PM of HeLa cells after localized depletion of PI(4)P. Moreover, in infected cells, bacterially translocated or ectopically expressed SteA localized at the membrane of the Salmonella-containing vacuole (SCV) and to Salmonella-induced tubules; using the PI(4)P-binding domain of the Legionella type IV secretion effector SidC as probe, we found PI(4)P at the SCV membrane and associated tubules throughout Salmonella infection of HeLa cells. Both binding of SteA to PI(4)P and the subcellular localization of ectopically expressed or bacterially translocated SteA were dependent on a lysine residue near the N-terminus of the protein. Overall, this indicates that binding of SteA to PI(4)P is necessary for its localization within host cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. External lipid PI3P mediates entry of eukaryotic pathogen effectors into plant and animal host cells.

    PubMed

    Kale, Shiv D; Gu, Biao; Capelluto, Daniel G S; Dou, Daolong; Feldman, Emily; Rumore, Amanda; Arredondo, Felipe D; Hanlon, Regina; Fudal, Isabelle; Rouxel, Thierry; Lawrence, Christopher B; Shan, Weixing; Tyler, Brett M

    2010-07-23

    Pathogens of plants and animals produce effector proteins that are transferred into the cytoplasm of host cells to suppress host defenses. One type of plant pathogens, oomycetes, produces effector proteins with N-terminal RXLR and dEER motifs that enable entry into host cells. We show here that effectors of another pathogen type, fungi, contain functional variants of the RXLR motif, and that the oomycete and fungal RXLR motifs enable binding to the phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). We find that PI3P is abundant on the outer surface of plant cell plasma membranes and, furthermore, on some animal cells. All effectors could also enter human cells, suggesting that PI3P-mediated effector entry may be very widespread in plant, animal and human pathogenesis. Entry into both plant and animal cells involves lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. Blocking PI3P binding inhibited effector entry, suggesting new therapeutic avenues.

  4. Dual function of a bacterial protein as an adhesin and extracellular effector of host GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stones, Daniel Henry; Krachler, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens often target conserved cellular mechanisms within their hosts to rewire signaling pathways and facilitate infection. Rho GTPases are important nodes within eukaryotic signaling networks and thus constitute a common target of pathogen-mediated manipulation. A diverse array of microbial mechanisms exists to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling. While targeting of GTPases by secreted bacterial effectors is a well-known strategy bacterial pathogens employ to interfere with the host, we have recently described pathogen adhesion as a novel extracellular stimulus that hijacks host GTPase signaling. The Multivalent Adhesion Molecule MAM7 from Vibrio parahaemolyticus directly binds host cell membrane lipids. The ensuing coalescence of phosphatidic acid ligands in the host membrane leads to downstream activation of RhoA and actin rearrangements. Herein, we discuss mechanistic models of lipid-mediated Rho activation and the implications from the infected host's and the pathogen's perspective. PMID:26156628

  5. A translocation signal for delivery of oomycete effector proteins into host plant cells.

    PubMed

    Whisson, Stephen C; Boevink, Petra C; Moleleki, Lucy; Avrova, Anna O; Morales, Juan G; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Armstrong, Miles R; Grouffaud, Severine; van West, Pieter; Chapman, Sean; Hein, Ingo; Toth, Ian K; Pritchard, Leighton; Birch, Paul R J

    2007-11-01

    Bacterial, oomycete and fungal plant pathogens establish disease by translocation of effector proteins into host cells, where they may directly manipulate host innate immunity. In bacteria, translocation is through the type III secretion system, but analogous processes for effector delivery are uncharacterized in fungi and oomycetes. Here we report functional analyses of two motifs, RXLR and EER, present in translocated oomycete effectors. We use the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-EER-containing protein Avr3a as a reporter for translocation because it triggers RXLR-EER-independent hypersensitive cell death following recognition within plant cells that contain the R3a resistance protein. We show that Avr3a, with or without RXLR-EER motifs, is secreted from P. infestans biotrophic structures called haustoria, demonstrating that these motifs are not required for targeting to haustoria or for secretion. However, following replacement of Avr3a RXLR-EER motifs with alanine residues, singly or in combination, or with residues KMIK-DDK--representing a change that conserves physicochemical properties of the protein--P. infestans fails to deliver Avr3a or an Avr3a-GUS fusion protein into plant cells, demonstrating that these motifs are required for translocation. We show that RXLR-EER-encoding genes are transcriptionally upregulated during infection. Bioinformatic analysis identifies 425 potential genes encoding secreted RXLR-EER class proteins in the P. infestans genome. Identification of this class of proteins provides unparalleled opportunities to determine how oomycetes manipulate hosts to establish infection.

  6. The type III effector repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae B728a and its role in survival and disease on host and non-host plants.

    PubMed

    Vinatzer, Boris A; Teitzel, Gail M; Lee, Min-Woo; Jelenska, Joanna; Hotton, Sara; Fairfax, Keke; Jenrette, Jenny; Greenberg, Jean T

    2006-10-01

    The bacterial plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae injects a large repertoire of effector proteins into plant cells using a type III secretion apparatus. Effectors can trigger or suppress defences in a host-dependent fashion. Host defences are often accompanied by programmed cell death, while interference with defences is sometimes associated with cell death suppression. We previously predicted the effector repertoire of the sequenced bean pathogen P. syringae pv. syringae (Psy) B728a using bioinformatics. Here we show that PsyB728a is also pathogenic on the model plant species Nicotiana benthamiana (tobacco). We confirm our effector predictions and clone the nearly complete PsyB728a effector repertoire. We find effectors to have different cell death-modulating activities and distinct roles during the infection of the susceptible bean and tobacco hosts. Unexpectedly, we do not find a strict correlation between cell death-eliciting and defence-eliciting activity and between cell death-suppressing activity and defence-interfering activity. Furthermore, we find several effectors with quantitative avirulence activities on their susceptible hosts, but with growth-promoting effects on Arabidopsis thaliana, a species on which PsyB728a does not cause disease. We conclude that P. syringae strains may have evolved large effector repertoires to extend their host ranges or increase their survival on various unrelated plant species.

  7. Host FIH-Mediated Asparaginyl Hydroxylation of Translocated Legionella pneumophila Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Price, Christopher; Merchant, Michael; Jones, Snake; Best, Ashley; Von Dwingelo, Juanita; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Alam, Nawsad; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Kwaik, Yousef A.

    2017-01-01

    FIH-mediated post-translational modification through asparaginyl hydroxylation of eukaryotic proteins impacts regulation of protein-protein interaction. We have identified the FIH recognition motif in 11 Legionella pneumophila translocated effectors, YopM of Yersinia, IpaH4.5 of Shigella and an ankyrin protein of Rickettsia. Mass spectrometry analyses of the AnkB and AnkH effectors of L. pneumophila confirm their asparaginyl hydroxylation. Consistent with localization of the AnkB effector to the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) membrane and its modification by FIH, our data show that FIH and its two interacting proteins, Mint3 and MT1-MMP are acquired by the LCV in a Dot/Icm type IV secretion-dependent manner. Chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of FIH promotes LCV-lysosomes fusion, diminishes decoration of the LCV with polyubiquitinated proteins, and abolishes intra-vacuolar replication of L. pneumophila. These data show acquisition of the host FIH by a pathogen-containing vacuole and that asparaginyl-hydroxylation of translocated effectors is indispensable for their function. PMID:28321389

  8. Modulation of the host transcriptome by Coxiella burnetii nuclear effector Cbu1314.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary M; Faris, Robert; McLachlan, Juanita; Tellez, Andres; Wright, William U; Galvan, Gloria; Luo, Zhao-Qing; Samuel, James E

    2016-05-01

    Coxiella burnetii is a Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogen that directs the formation of a parasitophorous vacuole derived from the host lysosomal network. Biogenesis and maintenance of this replicative compartment is dependent on bacterial protein synthesis and results in differential expression of specific host genes. However, the mechanisms by which the pathogen induces changes in the host transcriptome is poorly understood. In the current study we identified a Dot/Icm secreted effector, Cbu1314, which encodes two nuclear localization signals that are required for nuclear localization and association with host chromatin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and deep sequencing revealed that Cbu1314 associated with host genes involved in transcription, cell signaling, and the immune response. RNA sequencing of cells overexpressing Cbu1314 demonstrated that Cbu1314 modulates the host transcriptome and these transcriptional changes required a functional nuclear localization signal. Of the differentially expressed genes, sixteen were also identified as Cbu1314 targets using ChIP sequencing. Collectively these results suggest that Cbu1314 associates with host chromatin and plays a role in modulating the host transcriptome.

  9. Multiple Candidate Effectors from the Oomycete Pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Suppress Host Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fabro, Georgina; Steinbrenner, Jens; Coates, Mary; Ishaque, Naveed; Baxter, Laura; Studholme, David J.; Körner, Evelyn; Allen, Rebecca L.; Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Rougon-Cardoso, Alejandra; Greenshields, David; Lei, Rita; Badel, Jorge L.; Caillaud, Marie-Cecile; Sohn, Kee-Hoon; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Parker, Jane E.; Beynon, Jim; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2011-01-01

    Oomycete pathogens cause diverse plant diseases. To successfully colonize their hosts, they deliver a suite of effector proteins that can attenuate plant defenses. In the oomycete downy mildews, effectors carry a signal peptide and an RxLR motif. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). We investigated if candidate effectors predicted in the genome sequence of Hpa isolate Emoy2 (HaRxLs) were able to manipulate host defenses in different Arabidopsis accessions. We developed a rapid and sensitive screening method to test HaRxLs by delivering them via the bacterial type-three secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000-LUX (Pst-LUX) and assessing changes in Pst-LUX growth in planta on 12 Arabidopsis accessions. The majority (∼70%) of the 64 candidates tested positively contributed to Pst-LUX growth on more than one accession indicating that Hpa virulence likely involves multiple effectors with weak accession-specific effects. Further screening with a Pst mutant (ΔCEL) showed that HaRxLs that allow enhanced Pst-LUX growth usually suppress callose deposition, a hallmark of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). We found that HaRxLs are rarely strong avirulence determinants. Although some decreased Pst-LUX growth in particular accessions, none activated macroscopic cell death. Fewer HaRxLs conferred enhanced Pst growth on turnip, a non-host for Hpa, while several reduced it, consistent with the idea that turnip's non-host resistance against Hpa could involve a combination of recognized HaRxLs and ineffective HaRxLs. We verified our results by constitutively expressing in Arabidopsis a sub-set of HaRxLs. Several transgenic lines showed increased susceptibility to Hpa and attenuation of Arabidopsis PTI responses, confirming the HaRxLs' role in Hpa virulence. This study shows TTSS screening system provides a useful tool to test whether candidate

  10. Multiple candidate effectors from the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis suppress host plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Fabro, Georgina; Steinbrenner, Jens; Coates, Mary; Ishaque, Naveed; Baxter, Laura; Studholme, David J; Körner, Evelyn; Allen, Rebecca L; Piquerez, Sophie J M; Rougon-Cardoso, Alejandra; Greenshields, David; Lei, Rita; Badel, Jorge L; Caillaud, Marie-Cecile; Sohn, Kee-Hoon; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Parker, Jane E; Beynon, Jim; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2011-11-01

    Oomycete pathogens cause diverse plant diseases. To successfully colonize their hosts, they deliver a suite of effector proteins that can attenuate plant defenses. In the oomycete downy mildews, effectors carry a signal peptide and an RxLR motif. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). We investigated if candidate effectors predicted in the genome sequence of Hpa isolate Emoy2 (HaRxLs) were able to manipulate host defenses in different Arabidopsis accessions. We developed a rapid and sensitive screening method to test HaRxLs by delivering them via the bacterial type-three secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000-LUX (Pst-LUX) and assessing changes in Pst-LUX growth in planta on 12 Arabidopsis accessions. The majority (~70%) of the 64 candidates tested positively contributed to Pst-LUX growth on more than one accession indicating that Hpa virulence likely involves multiple effectors with weak accession-specific effects. Further screening with a Pst mutant (ΔCEL) showed that HaRxLs that allow enhanced Pst-LUX growth usually suppress callose deposition, a hallmark of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI). We found that HaRxLs are rarely strong avirulence determinants. Although some decreased Pst-LUX growth in particular accessions, none activated macroscopic cell death. Fewer HaRxLs conferred enhanced Pst growth on turnip, a non-host for Hpa, while several reduced it, consistent with the idea that turnip's non-host resistance against Hpa could involve a combination of recognized HaRxLs and ineffective HaRxLs. We verified our results by constitutively expressing in Arabidopsis a sub-set of HaRxLs. Several transgenic lines showed increased susceptibility to Hpa and attenuation of Arabidopsis PTI responses, confirming the HaRxLs' role in Hpa virulence. This study shows TTSS screening system provides a useful tool to test whether candidate

  11. Mechanisms of nuclear suppression of host immunity by effectors from the Arabidopsis downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa).

    PubMed

    Caillaud, M-C; Wirthmueller, L; Fabro, G; Piquerez, S J M; Asai, S; Ishaque, N; Jones, J D G

    2012-01-01

    Filamentous phytopathogens form sophisticated intracellular feeding structures called haustoria in plant cells. Pathogen effectors are likely to play a role in the establishment and maintenance of haustoria additional to their more characterized role of suppressing plant defense. Recent studies suggest that effectors may manipulate host transcription or other nuclear regulatory components for the benefit of pathogen development. However, the specific mechanisms by which these effectors promote susceptibility remain unclear. Of two recent screenings, we identified 15 nuclear-localized Hpa effectors (HaRxLs) that interact directly or indirectly with host nuclear components. When stably expressed in planta, nuclear HaRxLs cause diverse developmental phenotypes highlighting that nuclear effectors might interfere with fundamental plant regulatory mechanisms. Here, we report recent advances in understanding how a pathogen can manipulate nuclear processes in order to cause disease.

  12. Shigella Manipulates Host Immune Responses by Delivering Effector Proteins with Specific Roles

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Mimuro, Hitomi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium deploys multiple defense systems against microbial infection to sense bacterial components and danger alarms, as well as to induce intracellular signal transduction cascades that trigger both the innate and the adaptive immune systems, which are pivotal for bacterial elimination. However, many enteric bacterial pathogens, including Shigella, deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) via the type III secretion system (T3SS) that enable bacterial evasion from host immune systems; consequently, these pathogens are able to efficiently colonize the intestinal epithelium. In this review, we present and select recently discovered examples of interactions between Shigella and host immune responses, with particular emphasis on strategies that bacteria use to manipulate inflammatory outputs of host-cell responses such as cell death, membrane trafficking, and innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:25999954

  13. Identification of Two Legionella pneumophila Effectors that Manipulate Host Phospholipids Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Viner, Ram; Chetrit, David; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Segal, Gil

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila translocates a large number of effector proteins into host cells via the Icm/Dot type-IVB secretion system. Some of these effectors were shown to cause lethal effect on yeast growth. Here we characterized one such effector (LecE) and identified yeast suppressors that reduced its lethal effect. The LecE lethal effect was found to be suppressed by the over expression of the yeast protein Dgk1 a diacylglycerol (DAG) kinase enzyme and by a deletion of the gene encoding for Pah1 a phosphatidic acid (PA) phosphatase that counteracts the activity of Dgk1. Genetic analysis using yeast deletion mutants, strains expressing relevant yeast genes and point mutations constructed in the Dgk1 and Pah1 conserved domains indicated that LecE functions similarly to the Nem1-Spo7 phosphatase complex that activates Pah1 in yeast. In addition, by using relevant yeast genetic backgrounds we examined several L. pneumophila effectors expected to be involved in phospholipids biosynthesis and identified an effector (LpdA) that contains a phospholipase-D (PLD) domain which caused lethal effect only in a dgk1 deletion mutant of yeast. Additionally, LpdA was found to enhance the lethal effect of LecE in yeast cells, a phenomenon which was found to be dependent on its PLD activity. Furthermore, to determine whether LecE and LpdA affect the levels or distribution of DAG and PA in-vivo in mammalian cells, we utilized fluorescent DAG and PA biosensors and validated the notion that LecE and LpdA affect the in-vivo levels and distribution of DAG and PA, respectively. Finally, we examined the intracellular localization of both LecE and LpdA in human macrophages during L. pneumophila infection and found that both effectors are localized to the bacterial phagosome. Our results suggest that L. pneumophila utilize at least two effectors to manipulate important steps in phospholipids biosynthesis. PMID:23133385

  14. A Legionella effector modulates host cytoskeletal structure by inhibiting actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhenhua; Stephenson, Robert; Qiu, Jiazhang; Zheng, Shijun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2014-03-01

    Successful infection by the opportunistic pathogen Legionella pneumophila requires the collective activity of hundreds of virulence proteins delivered into the host cell by the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. These virulence proteins, also called effectors modulate distinct host cellular processes to create a membrane-bound niche called the Legionella containing vacuole (LCV) supportive of bacterial growth. We found that Ceg14 (Lpg0437), a Dot/Icm substrate is toxic to yeast and such toxicity can be alleviated by overexpression of profilin, a protein involved in cytoskeletal structure in eukaryotes. We further showed that mutations in profilin affect actin binding but not other functions such as interactions with poly-l-proline or phosphatidylinositol, abolish its suppressor activity. Consistent with the fact the profilin suppresses its toxicity, expression of Ceg14 but not its non-toxic mutants in yeast affects actin distribution and budding of daughter cells. Although Ceg14 does not detectably interact with profilin, it co-sediments with filamentous actin and inhibits actin polymerization, causing the accumulation of short actin filaments. Together with earlier studies, these results reveal that multiple L. pneumophila effectors target components of the host cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2013 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Secreted effectors in Toxoplasma gondii and related species: determinants of host range and pathogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    English, E D; Adomako-Ankomah, Y; Boyle, J P

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed the discovery of a number of secreted proteins in Toxoplasma gondii that play important roles in host–pathogen interactions and parasite virulence, particularly in the mouse model. However, the role that these proteins play in driving the unique features of T. gondii compared to some of its nearest apicomplexan relatives (Hammondia hammondi and Neospora caninum) is unknown. These unique features include distinct dissemination characteristics in vivo and a vast host range. In this review we comprehensively survey what is known about disease outcome, the host response and host range for T. gondii, H. hammondi, and N. caninum. We then review what is presently known about recently identified secreted virulence effectors in these three genetically related, but phenotypically distinct, species. Finally we exploit the existence of genome sequences for these three organisms and discuss what is known about the presence, and functionality, of key T. gondii effectors in these three species. PMID:25655311

  16. Convergent targeting of a common host protein-network by pathogen effectors from three kingdoms of life.

    PubMed

    Weßling, Ralf; Epple, Petra; Altmann, Stefan; He, Yijian; Yang, Li; Henz, Stefan R; McDonald, Nathan; Wiley, Kristin; Bader, Kai Christian; Gläßer, Christine; Mukhtar, M Shahid; Haigis, Sabine; Ghamsari, Lila; Stephens, Amber E; Ecker, Joseph R; Vidal, Marc; Jones, Jonathan D G; Mayer, Klaus F X; Ver Loren van Themaat, Emiel; Weigel, Detlef; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Dangl, Jeffery L; Panstruga, Ralph; Braun, Pascal

    2014-09-10

    While conceptual principles governing plant immunity are becoming clear, its systems-level organization and the evolutionary dynamic of the host-pathogen interface are still obscure. We generated a systematic protein-protein interaction network of virulence effectors from the ascomycete pathogen Golovinomyces orontii and Arabidopsis thaliana host proteins. We combined this data set with corresponding data for the eubacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The resulting network identifies host proteins onto which intraspecies and interspecies pathogen effectors converge. Phenotyping of 124 Arabidopsis effector-interactor mutants revealed a correlation between intraspecies and interspecies convergence and several altered immune response phenotypes. Several effectors and the most heavily targeted host protein colocalized in subnuclear foci. Products of adaptively selected Arabidopsis genes are enriched for interactions with effector targets. Our data suggest the existence of a molecular host-pathogen interface that is conserved across Arabidopsis accessions, while evolutionary adaptation occurs in the immediate network neighborhood of effector targets. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Convergent targeting of a common host protein-network by pathogen effectors from three kingdoms of life

    PubMed Central

    Weßling, Ralf; Epple, Petra; Altmann, Stefan; He, Yijian; Yang, Li; Henz, Stefan R.; McDonald, Nathan; Wiley, Kristin; Bader, Kai Christian; Gläßer, Christine; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Haigis, Sabine; Ghamsari, Lila; Stephens, Amber E.; Ecker, Joseph R.; Vidal, Marc; Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; van Themaat, Emiel Ver Loren; Weigel, Detlef; Schulze-Lefert, Paul; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Panstruga, Ralph; Braun, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY While conceptual principles governing plant immunity are becoming clear, its systems-level organization and the evolutionary dynamic of the host-pathogen interface are still obscure. We generated a systematic protein-protein interaction network of virulence effectors from the ascomycete pathogen Golovinomyces orontii and Arabidopsis thaliana host proteins. We combined this dataset with corresponding data for the eubacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. The resulting network identifies host proteins onto which intraspecies and interspecies pathogen effectors converge. Phenotyping of 124 Arabidopsis effector-interactor mutants revealed a correlation between intra- and interspecies convergence and several altered immune response phenotypes. The effectors and most heavily targeted host protein co-localized in sub-nuclear foci. Products of adaptively selected Arabidopsis genes are enriched for interactions with effector targets. Our data suggest the existence of a molecular host-pathogen interface that is conserved across Arabidopsis accessions, while evolutionary adaptation occurs in the immediate network neighborhood of effector targets. PMID:25211078

  18. Copper Is a Host Effector Mobilized to Urine during Urinary Tract Infection To Impair Bacterial Colonization.

    PubMed

    Hyre, Amanda N; Kavanagh, Kylie; Kock, Nancy D; Donati, George L; Subashchandrabose, Sargurunathan

    2017-03-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a major global infectious disease affecting millions of people annually. Human urinary copper (Cu) content is elevated during UTI caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). UPEC upregulates the expression of Cu efflux genes during clinical UTI in patients as an adaptive response to host-derived Cu. Whether Cu is mobilized to urine as a host response to UTI and its role in protection against UTI remain unresolved. To address these questions, we tested the hypothesis that Cu is a host effector mobilized to urine during UTI to limit bacterial growth. Our results reveal that Cu is mobilized to urine during UTI caused by the major uropathogens Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, in addition to UPEC, in humans. Ceruloplasmin, a Cu-containing ferroxidase, is found at higher levels in UTI urine than in healthy control urine and serves as the molecular source of urinary Cu during UTI. Our results demonstrate that ceruloplasmin decreases the bioavailability of iron in urine by a transferrin-dependent mechanism. Experimental UTI with UPEC in nonhuman primates recapitulates the increased urinary Cu content observed during clinical UTI. Furthermore, Cu-deficient mice are highly colonized by UPEC, indicating that Cu is involved in the limiting of bacterial growth within the urinary tract. Collectively, our results indicate that Cu is a host effector that is involved in protection against pathogen colonization of the urinary tract. Because urinary Cu levels are amenable to modulation, augmentation of the Cu-based host defense against UTI represents a novel approach to limiting bacterial colonization during UTI.

  19. Global impact of Salmonella type III secretion effector SteA on host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cardenal-Muñoz, Elena Gutiérrez, Gabriel Ramos-Morales, Francisco

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • We analyzed HeLa cells transcriptome in response to Salmonella SteA. • Significant differential expression was detected for 58 human genes. • They are involved in ECM organization and regulation of some signaling pathways. • Cell death, cell adhesion and cell migration were decreased in SteA-expressing cells. • These results contribute to understand the role of SteA during infections. - Abstract: Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes gastroenteritis, bacteremia and typhoid fever in several animal species including humans. Its virulence is greatly dependent on two type III secretion systems, encoded in pathogenicity islands 1 and 2. These systems translocate proteins called effectors into eukaryotic host cell. Effectors interfere with host signal transduction pathways to allow the internalization of pathogens and their survival and proliferation inside vacuoles. SteA is one of the few Salmonella effectors that are substrates of both type III secretion systems. Here, we used gene arrays and bioinformatics analysis to study the genetic response of human epithelial cells to SteA. We found that constitutive synthesis of SteA in HeLa cells leads to induction of genes related to extracellular matrix organization and regulation of cell proliferation and serine/threonine kinase signaling pathways. SteA also causes repression of genes related to immune processes and regulation of purine nucleotide synthesis and pathway-restricted SMAD protein phosphorylation. In addition, a cell biology approach revealed that epithelial cells expressing steA show altered cell morphology, and decreased cytotoxicity, cell–cell adhesion and migration.

  20. Host Fate is Rapidly Determined by Innate Effector-Microbial Interactions During Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Kevin W.; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Nielsen, Travis; Tan, Brandon; Junus, Justin; Hujer, Kristine M.; Wright, Meredith S.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Chen, Wangxue; Spellberg, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Defining mechanisms driving pathogenesis is critical to enable new therapeutic approaches. Methods. We studied virulence differences across a diverse panel of A. baumannii clinical isolates during murine bacteremia to elucidate host-microbe interactions that drive outcome. Results. We identified hypervirulent strains that were lethal at low intravenous inocula and achieved very high early, and persistent, blood bacterial densities. Virulent strains were nonlethal at low inocula but lethal at 2.5-fold higher inocula. Finally, relatively avirulent (hypovirulent) strains were nonlethal at 20-fold higher inocula and were efficiently cleared by early time points. In vivo virulence correlated with in vitro resistance to complement and macrophage uptake. Depletion of complement, macrophages, and neutrophils each independently increased bacterial density of the hypovirulent strain but insufficiently to change lethality. However, disruption of all 3 effector mechanisms enabled early bacterial densities similar to hypervirulent strains, rendering infection 100% fatal. Conclusions. The lethality of A. baumannii strains depends on distinct stages. Strains resistant to early innate effectors are able to establish very high early bacterial blood density, and subsequent sustained bacteremia leads to Toll-like receptor 4–mediated hyperinflammation and lethality. These results have important implications for translational efforts to develop therapies that modulate host-microbe interactions. PMID:25378635

  1. Effector prediction in host-pathogen interaction based on a Markov model of a ubiquitous EPIYA motif

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effector secretion is a common strategy of pathogen in mediating host-pathogen interaction. Eight EPIYA-motif containing effectors have recently been discovered in six pathogens. Once these effectors enter host cells through type III/IV secretion systems (T3SS/T4SS), tyrosine in the EPIYA motif is phosphorylated, which triggers effectors binding other proteins to manipulate host-cell functions. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the distribution pattern of EPIYA motif in broad biological species, to predict potential effectors with EPIYA motif, and to suggest roles and biological functions of potential effectors in host-pathogen interactions. Results A hidden Markov model (HMM) of five amino acids was built for the EPIYA-motif based on the eight known effectors. Using this HMM to search the non-redundant protein database containing 9,216,047 sequences, we obtained 107,231 sequences with at least one EPIYA motif occurrence and 3115 sequences with multiple repeats of the EPIYA motif. Although the EPIYA motif exists among broad species, it is significantly over-represented in some particular groups of species. For those proteins containing at least four copies of EPIYA motif, most of them are from intracellular bacteria, extracellular bacteria with T3SS or T4SS or intracellular protozoan parasites. By combining the EPIYA motif and the adjacent SH2 binding motifs (KK, R4, Tarp and Tir), we built HMMs of nine amino acids and predicted many potential effectors in bacteria and protista by the HMMs. Some potential effectors for pathogens (such as Lawsonia intracellularis, Plasmodium falciparum and Leishmania major) are suggested. Conclusions Our study indicates that the EPIYA motif may be a ubiquitous functional site for effectors that play an important pathogenicity role in mediating host-pathogen interactions. We suggest that some intracellular protozoan parasites could secrete EPIYA-motif containing effectors through secretion systems similar to the

  2. Genome plasticity in filamentous plant pathogens contributes to the emergence of novel effectors and their cellular processes in the host.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanhan; Li, Ying; Qi, Zhongqiang; Zheng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2016-02-01

    Plant diseases cause extensive yield loss of crops worldwide, and secretory 'warfare' occurs between plants and pathogenic organisms all the time. Filamentous plant pathogens have evolved the ability to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization through secreting effectors inside plant cells. The stresses from hosts and environment can drive the genome dynamics of plant pathogens. Remarkable advances in plant pathology have been made owing to these adaptable genome regions of several lineages of filamentous phytopathogens. Characterization new effectors and interaction analyses between pathogens and plants have provided molecular insights into the plant pathways perturbed during the infection process. In this mini-review, we highlight promising approaches of identifying novel effectors based on the genome plasticity. We also discuss the interaction mechanisms between plants and their filamentous pathogens and outline the possibilities of effector gene expression under epigenetic control that will be future directions for research.

  3. Exploitation of the host cell ubiquitin machinery by microbial effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Han; Machner, Matthias P

    2017-06-15

    Pathogenic bacteria are in a constant battle for survival with their host. In order to gain a competitive edge, they employ a variety of sophisticated strategies that allow them to modify conserved host cell processes in ways that favor bacterial survival and growth. Ubiquitylation, the covalent attachment of the small modifier ubiquitin to target proteins, is such a pathway. Ubiquitylation profoundly alters the fate of a myriad of cellular proteins by inducing changes in their stability or function, subcellular localization or interaction with other proteins. Given the importance of ubiquitylation in cell development, protein homeostasis and innate immunity, it is not surprising that this post-translational modification is exploited by a variety of effector proteins from microbial pathogens. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of the many ways microbes take advantage of host ubiquitylation, along with some surprising deviations from the canonical theme. The lessons learned from the in-depth analyses of these host-pathogen interactions provide a fresh perspective on an ancient post-translational modification that we thought was well understood.This article is part of a Minifocus on Ubiquitin Regulation and Function. For further reading, please see related articles: 'Mechanisms of regulation and diversification of deubiquitylating enzyme function' by Pawel Leznicki and Yogesh Kulathu (J. Cell Sci.130, 1997-2006). 'Cell scientist to watch - Mads Gyrd-Hansen' (J. Cell Sci.130, 1981-1983). © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. The bifunctional effector AvrXccC of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris requires plasma membrane-anchoring for host recognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Tang, Xiaoyan; He, Chaozu

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial pathogens use type III secretion systems (TTSS) to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells for pathogenesis. In bacterial-plant interactions, one effector may function as an avirulence factor to betray the pathogen to the plant surveillance system and induce the hypersensitive response (HR) in the resistant host carrying a corresponding resistance (R) gene. However, the same effector can also sustain the growth of the pathogen by acting as a virulence factor to modulate plant physiology in the susceptible host lacking the corresponding R gene. Here, we identified and characterized a bifunctional TTSS effector AvrXccC belonging to the AvrB effector family in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris 8004. This effector is required for full bacterial virulence in the susceptible host cabbage (Brassica oleracea) and avirulence in the resistant host mustard (Brassica napiformis L.H. Baily). Expressing avrXccC in mustard-virulent strain Xcc HRI 3849A converts its virulence to avirulence. The effector AvrXccC is anchored to the plant plasma membrane, and the N-terminal myristoylation site (amino acids 2-7: GLcaSK) is essential for its localization. In addition, the avirulence function of AvrXccC for host recognition depends on its plasma membrane localization. Promoter activity assays showed that the expression of avrXccC is hrpG/hrpX-dependent. Moreover, the secretion of AvrXccC displayed hrp-dependency and the core sequence for AvrXccC translocation was defined to the N-terminal 40 amino acids.

  5. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes

    PubMed Central

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs. PMID:27446117

  6. A Bacterial Parasite Effector Mediates Insect Vector Attraction in Host Plants Independently of Developmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Orlovskis, Zigmunds; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2016-01-01

    Parasites can take over their hosts and trigger dramatic changes in host appearance and behavior that are typically interpreted as extended phenotypes that promote parasite survival and fitness. For example, Toxoplasma gondii is thought to manipulate the behaviors of infected rodents to aid transmission to cats and parasitic trematodes of the genus Ribeiroia alter limb development in their amphibian hosts to facilitate predation of the latter by birds. Plant parasites and pathogens also reprogram host development and morphology. However, whereas some parasite-induced morphological alterations may have a direct benefit to the fitness of the parasite and may therefore be adaptive, other host alterations may be side effects of parasite infections having no adaptive effects on parasite fitness. Phytoplasma parasites of plants often induce the development of leaf-like flowers (phyllody) in their host plants, and we previously found that the phytoplasma effector SAP54 generates these leaf-like flowers via the degradation of plant MADS-box transcription factors (MTFs), which regulate all major aspects of development in plants. Leafhoppers prefer to reproduce on phytoplasma-infected and SAP54-trangenic plants leading to the hypothesis that leafhopper vectors are attracted to plants with leaf-like flowers. Surprisingly, here we show that leafhopper attraction occurs independently of the presence of leaf-like flowers. First, the leafhoppers were also attracted to SAP54 transgenic plants without leaf-like flowers and to single leaves of these plants. Moreover, leafhoppers were not attracted to leaf-like flowers of MTF-mutant plants without the presence of SAP54. Thus, the primary role of SAP54 is to attract leafhopper vectors, which spread the phytoplasmas, and the generation of leaf-like flowers may be secondary or a side effect of the SAP54-mediated degradation of MTFs.

  7. The Ustilago maydis Effector Pep1 Suppresses Plant Immunity by Inhibition of Host Peroxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zechmann, Bernd; Hillmer, Morten; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1) as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H2O2 strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction. PMID:22589719

  8. The inflammasomes: molecular effectors of host resistance against bacterial, viral, parasitic, and fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Skeldon, Alexander; Saleh, Maya

    2011-01-01

    The inflammasomes are large multi-protein complexes scaffolded by cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that form an important part of the innate immune system. They are activated following the recognition of microbial-associated molecular patterns or host-derived danger signals (danger-associated molecular patterns) by PRRs. This recognition results in the recruitment and activation of the pro-inflammatory protease caspase-1, which cleaves its preferred substrates pro-interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and pro-IL-18 into their mature biologically active cytokine forms. Through processing of a number of other cellular substrates, caspase-1 is also required for the release of "alarmins" and the induction and execution of an inflammatory form of cell death termed pyroptosis. A growing spectrum of inflammasomes have been identified in the host defense against a variety of pathogens. Reciprocally, pathogens have evolved effector strategies to antagonize the inflammasome pathway. In this review we discuss recent developments in the understanding of inflammasome-mediated recognition of bacterial, viral, parasitic, and fungal infections and the beneficial or detrimental effects of inflammasome signaling in host resistance.

  9. Phylogenomics of Xanthomonas field strains infecting pepper and tomato reveals diversity in effector repertoires and identifies determinants of host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Potnis, Neha; Timilsina, Sujan; Wilson, Mark; Patané, José; Martins, Joaquim; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Akhunova, Alina; Almeida, Nalvo; Vallad, Gary E.; Barak, Jeri D.; White, Frank F.; Miller, Sally A.; Ritchie, David; Goss, Erica; Bart, Rebecca S.; Setubal, João C.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato is caused by four distinct Xanthomonas species and is a severely limiting factor on fruit yield in these crops. The genetic diversity and the type III effector repertoires of a large sampling of field strains for this disease have yet to be explored on a genomic scale, limiting our understanding of pathogen evolution in an agricultural setting. Genomes of 67 Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xe), Xanthomonas perforans (Xp), and Xanthomonas gardneri (Xg) strains isolated from diseased pepper and tomato fields in the southeastern and midwestern United States were sequenced in order to determine the genetic diversity in field strains. Type III effector repertoires were computationally predicted for each strain, and multiple methods of constructing phylogenies were employed to understand better the genetic relationship of strains in the collection. A division in the Xp population was detected based on core genome phylogeny, supporting a model whereby the host-range expansion of Xp field strains on pepper is due, in part, to a loss of the effector AvrBsT. Xp-host compatibility was further studied with the observation that a double deletion of AvrBsT and XopQ allows a host range expansion for Nicotiana benthamiana. Extensive sampling of field strains and an improved understanding of effector content will aid in efforts to design disease resistance strategies targeted against highly conserved core effectors. PMID:26089818

  10. A Fungal Effector With Host Nuclear Localization and DNA-Binding Properties Is Required for Maize Anthracnose Development.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Walter A; Sanz-Martín, José M; Rech, Gabriel E; Armijos-Jaramillo, Vinicio D; Rivera, Lina P; Echeverria, María Mercedes; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-02-01

    Plant pathogens have the capacity to manipulate the host immune system through the secretion of effectors. We identified 27 putative effector proteins encoded in the genome of the maize anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum graminicola that are likely to target the host's nucleus, as they simultaneously contain sequence signatures for secretion and nuclear localization. We functionally characterized one protein, identified as CgEP1. This protein is synthesized during the early stages of disease development and is necessary for anthracnose development in maize leaves, stems, and roots. Genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies confirmed that this effector targets the host's nucleus and defines a novel class of double-stranded DNA-binding protein. We show that CgEP1 arose from a gene duplication in an ancestor of a lineage of monocot-infecting Colletotrichum spp. and has undergone an intense evolution process, with evidence for episodes of positive selection. We detected CgEP1 homologs in several species of a grass-infecting lineage of Colletotrichum spp., suggesting that its function may be conserved across a large number of anthracnose pathogens. Our results demonstrate that effectors targeted to the host nucleus may be key elements for disease development and aid in the understanding of the genetic basis of anthracnose development in maize plants.

  11. Quantification of disease expression conferred by three host gene-necrotrophic effector interactions in the wheat-Parastagonospora nodorum pathosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disease Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) is caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Parastagonospora nodorum, which induces cell death in wheat through the production of necrotrophic effectors (NEs). The objective of this project is to determine the relative importance of three host gene-NE int...

  12. Fungal effector Ecp6 outcompetes host immune receptor for chitin binding through intrachain LysM dimerization

    PubMed Central

    Kombrink, Anja; Hansen, Guido; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan

    2013-01-01

    While host immune receptors detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns to activate immunity, pathogens attempt to deregulate host immunity through secreted effectors. Fungi employ LysM effectors to prevent recognition of cell wall-derived chitin by host immune receptors, although the mechanism to compete for chitin binding remained unclear. Structural analysis of the LysM effector Ecp6 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum reveals a novel mechanism for chitin binding, mediated by intrachain LysM dimerization, leading to a chitin-binding groove that is deeply buried in the effector protein. This composite binding site involves two of the three LysMs of Ecp6 and mediates chitin binding with ultra-high (pM) affinity. Intriguingly, the remaining singular LysM domain of Ecp6 binds chitin with low micromolar affinity but can nevertheless still perturb chitin-triggered immunity. Conceivably, the perturbation by this LysM domain is not established through chitin sequestration but possibly through interference with the host immune receptor complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00790.001 PMID:23840930

  13. Fungal effector Ecp6 outcompetes host immune receptor for chitin binding through intrachain LysM dimerization.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Saleem-Batcha, Raspudin; Kombrink, Anja; Hansen, Guido; Valkenburg, Dirk-Jan; Thomma, Bart P H J; Mesters, Jeroen R

    2013-07-02

    While host immune receptors detect pathogen-associated molecular patterns to activate immunity, pathogens attempt to deregulate host immunity through secreted effectors. Fungi employ LysM effectors to prevent recognition of cell wall-derived chitin by host immune receptors, although the mechanism to compete for chitin binding remained unclear. Structural analysis of the LysM effector Ecp6 of the fungal tomato pathogen Cladosporium fulvum reveals a novel mechanism for chitin binding, mediated by intrachain LysM dimerization, leading to a chitin-binding groove that is deeply buried in the effector protein. This composite binding site involves two of the three LysMs of Ecp6 and mediates chitin binding with ultra-high (pM) affinity. Intriguingly, the remaining singular LysM domain of Ecp6 binds chitin with low micromolar affinity but can nevertheless still perturb chitin-triggered immunity. Conceivably, the perturbation by this LysM domain is not established through chitin sequestration but possibly through interference with the host immune receptor complex. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00790.001.

  14. Effector-Triggered Immunity Determines Host Genotype-Specific Incompatibility in Legume-Rhizobium Symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Michiko; Miwa, Hiroki; Masuda, Sachiko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Okazaki, Shin

    2016-08-01

    Symbiosis between legumes and rhizobia leads to the formation of N2-fixing root nodules. In soybean, several host genes, referred to as Rj genes, control nodulation. Soybean cultivars carrying the Rj4 gene restrict nodulation by specific rhizobia such as Bradyrhizobium elkanii We previously reported that the restriction of nodulation was caused by B. elkanii possessing a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), which is known for its delivery of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis for the T3SS-dependent nodulation restriction in Rj4 soybean. Inoculation tests revealed that soybean cultivar BARC-2 (Rj4/Rj4) restricted nodulation by B. elkanii USDA61, whereas its nearly isogenic line BARC-3 (rj4/rj4) formed nitrogen-fixing nodules with the same strain. Root-hair curling and infection threads were not observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61, indicating that Rj4 blocked B. elkanii infection in the early stages. Accumulation of H2O2 and salicylic acid (SA) was observed in the roots of BARC-2 inoculated with USDA61. Transcriptome analyses revealed that inoculation of USDA61, but not its T3SS mutant in BARC-2, induced defense-related genes, including those coding for hypersensitive-induced responsive protein, which act in effector-triggered immunity (ETI) in Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that B. elkanii T3SS triggers the SA-mediated ETI-type response in Rj4 soybean, which consequently blocks symbiotic interactions. This study revealed a common molecular mechanism underlying both plant-pathogen and plant-symbiont interactions, and suggests that establishment of a root nodule symbiosis requires the evasion or suppression of plant immune responses triggered by rhizobial effectors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Type VII Secreted Effector EsxH Targets Host ESCRT to Impair Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Victor; Sirisaengtaksin, Natalie; Wells, Ashley; Porto, Maura; Köster, Stefan; Penberthy, Kristen; Kubota, Yoshihisha; Dricot, Amelie; Rogan, Daniel; Vidal, Marc; Hill, David E.; Bean, Andrew J.; Philips, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) disrupts anti-microbial pathways of macrophages, cells that normally kill bacteria. Over 40 years ago, D'Arcy Hart showed that Mtb avoids delivery to lysosomes, but the molecular mechanisms that allow Mtb to elude lysosomal degradation are poorly understood. Specialized secretion systems are often used by bacterial pathogens to translocate effectors that target the host, and Mtb encodes type VII secretion systems (TSSSs) that enable mycobacteria to secrete proteins across their complex cell envelope; however, their cellular targets are unknown. Here, we describe a systematic strategy to identify bacterial virulence factors by looking for interactions between the Mtb secretome and host proteins using a high throughput, high stringency, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) platform. Using this approach we identified an interaction between EsxH, which is secreted by the Esx-3 TSSS, and human hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hgs/Hrs), a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). ESCRT has a well-described role in directing proteins destined for lysosomal degradation into intraluminal vesicles (ILVs) of multivesicular bodies (MVBs), ensuring degradation of the sorted cargo upon MVB-lysosome fusion. Here, we show that ESCRT is required to deliver Mtb to the lysosome and to restrict intracellular bacterial growth. Further, EsxH, in complex with EsxG, disrupts ESCRT function and impairs phagosome maturation. Thus, we demonstrate a role for a TSSS and the host ESCRT machinery in one of the central features of tuberculosis pathogenesis. PMID:24204276

  16. Sterile Immunity to Malaria after DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Immunization Is Associated with Effector Memory CD8+T Cells Targeting AMA1 Class I Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Sedegah, Martha; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Farooq, Fouzia; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Kim, Yohan; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Huang, Jun; McGrath, Shannon; Abot, Esteban; Limbach, Keith; Shi, Meng; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Chuang, Ilin; Tamminga, Cindy; Epstein, Judith E.; Villasante, Eileen; Richie, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fifteen volunteers were immunized with three doses of plasmid DNA encoding P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1) and boosted with human adenovirus-5 (Ad) expressing the same antigens (DNA/Ad). Four volunteers (27%) demonstrated sterile immunity to controlled human malaria infection and, overall, protection was statistically significantly associated with ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ activities to AMA1 but not CSP. DNA priming was required for protection, as 18 additional subjects immunized with Ad alone (AdCA) did not develop sterile protection. Methodology/Principal Findings We sought to identify correlates of protection, recognizing that DNA-priming may induce different responses than AdCA alone. Among protected volunteers, two and three had higher ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to CSP and AMA1, respectively, than non-protected volunteers. Unexpectedly, non-protected volunteers in the AdCA trial showed ELISpot and CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses to AMA1 equal to or higher than the protected volunteers. T cell functionality assessed by intracellular cytokine staining for IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 likewise did not distinguish protected from non-protected volunteers across both trials. However, three of the four protected volunteers showed higher effector to central memory CD8+ T cell ratios to AMA1, and one of these to CSP, than non-protected volunteers for both antigens. These responses were focused on discrete regions of CSP and AMA1. Class I epitopes restricted by A*03 or B*58 supertypes within these regions of AMA1 strongly recalled responses in three of four protected volunteers. We hypothesize that vaccine-induced effector memory CD8+ T cells recognizing a single class I epitope can confer sterile immunity to P. falciparum in humans. Conclusions/Significance We suggest that better understanding of which epitopes within malaria antigens can confer sterile immunity and design of vaccine approaches

  17. Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with host MAPKKK ε to suppress plant immune signaling.

    PubMed

    King, Stuart R F; McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C; Armstrong, Miles R; Bukharova, Tatyana; Sukarta, Octavina; Win, Joe; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R J; Banfield, Mark J

    2014-03-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are key players in plant immune signaling pathways, transducing the perception of invading pathogens into effective defense responses. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, deliver RXLR effector proteins to plant cells to modulate host immune signaling and promote colonization. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these effectors act in plant cells is limited. Here, we report that the P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with the kinase domain of MAPKKKε, a positive regulator of cell death associated with plant immunity. Expression of PexRD2 or silencing MAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans. We show that PexRD2 perturbs signaling pathways triggered by or dependent on MAPKKKε. By contrast, homologs of PexRD2 from P. infestans had reduced or no interaction with MAPKKKε and did not promote disease susceptibility. Structure-led mutagenesis identified PexRD2 variants that do not interact with MAPKKKε and fail to support enhanced pathogen growth or perturb MAPKKKε signaling pathways. Our findings provide evidence that P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 has evolved to interact with a specific host MAPKKK to perturb plant immunity-related signaling.

  18. Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector PexRD2 Interacts with Host MAPKKKε to Suppress Plant Immune Signaling[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    King, Stuart R.F.; McLellan, Hazel; Boevink, Petra C.; Armstrong, Miles R.; Bukharova, Tatyana; Sukarta, Octavina; Win, Joe; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R.J.; Banfield, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are key players in plant immune signaling pathways, transducing the perception of invading pathogens into effective defense responses. Plant pathogenic oomycetes, such as the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, deliver RXLR effector proteins to plant cells to modulate host immune signaling and promote colonization. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which these effectors act in plant cells is limited. Here, we report that the P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 interacts with the kinase domain of MAPKKKε, a positive regulator of cell death associated with plant immunity. Expression of PexRD2 or silencing MAPKKKε in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans. We show that PexRD2 perturbs signaling pathways triggered by or dependent on MAPKKKε. By contrast, homologs of PexRD2 from P. infestans had reduced or no interaction with MAPKKKε and did not promote disease susceptibility. Structure-led mutagenesis identified PexRD2 variants that do not interact with MAPKKKε and fail to support enhanced pathogen growth or perturb MAPKKKε signaling pathways. Our findings provide evidence that P. infestans RXLR effector PexRD2 has evolved to interact with a specific host MAPKKK to perturb plant immunity–related signaling. PMID:24632534

  19. Translocation of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli effector Tir to the plasma membrane via host Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mao, Chan; Gu, Jiang; Wang, Hai-Guang; Fang, Yao; Yang, Ping; Tang, Bin; Li, Na; Wang, Ting-Ting; Zou, Quan-Ming; Li, Qian

    2017-08-01

    The translocated intimin receptor (Tir) is a canonical type III secretion system effector, secreted by the enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (E. coli). This receptor alters the regular cellular processing of host cells, to promote intracellular bacterial replication and evasion of the host immune system. Tir is translocated and integrated into the host cell plasma membrane, a process required for its pathogenic activity in these cells, however, the underlying mechanisms of how this occurs remain to be elucidated. The present study used immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy to demonstrate that the Tir of enterohemorrhagic E. coli was localized to the plasma membrane and colocalized with the 58K Golgi protein of the host cells. Treatment with brefeldin A destroyed the Golgi structure, inhibited the formation of actin pedestal and blocked the localization of Tir on the host cell plasma membrane. The results of the present study suggested that Tir is translocated to the host plasma membrane in a Golgi‑dependent manner. It may mimic the activities of eukaryotic secretory proteins in order to make use of the Golgi apparatus for transportation and integration into the plasma membrane. These findings reveal a novel trafficking pathway for the translocation of bacterial secretory effectors to their specific subcellular compartments.

  20. A translocated effector required for Bartonella dissemination from derma to blood safeguards migratory host cells from damage by co-translocated effectors.

    PubMed

    Okujava, Rusudan; Guye, Patrick; Lu, Yun-Yueh; Mistl, Claudia; Polus, Florine; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Halin, Cornelia; Rolink, Antonius G; Dehio, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens secrete multiple effectors to modulate host cellular functions. These effectors may interfere with each other to efficiently control the infection process. Bartonellae are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria using a VirB type IV secretion system to translocate a cocktail of Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) into host cells. Based on in vitro infection models we demonstrate here that BepE protects infected migratory cells from injurious effects triggered by BepC and is required for in vivo dissemination of bacteria from the dermal site of inoculation to blood. Human endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with a ΔbepE mutant of B. henselae (Bhe) displayed a cell fragmentation phenotype resulting from Bep-dependent disturbance of rear edge detachment during migration. A ΔbepCE mutant did not show cell fragmentation, indicating that BepC is critical for triggering this deleterious phenotype. Complementation of ΔbepE with BepEBhe or its homologues from other Bartonella species abolished cell fragmentation. This cyto-protective activity is confined to the C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID) domain of BepEBhe (BID2.EBhe). Ectopic expression of BID2.EBhe impeded the disruption of actin stress fibers by Rho Inhibitor 1, indicating that BepE restores normal cell migration via the RhoA signaling pathway, a major regulator of rear edge retraction. An intradermal (i.d.) model for B. tribocorum (Btr) infection in the rat reservoir host mimicking the natural route of infection by blood sucking arthropods allowed demonstrating a vital role for BepE in bacterial dissemination from derma to blood. While the Btr mutant ΔbepDE was abacteremic following i.d. inoculation, complementation with BepEBtr, BepEBhe or BIDs.EBhe restored bacteremia. Given that we observed a similar protective effect of BepEBhe on infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells migrating through a monolayer of lymphatic endothelial cells we propose that

  1. A Translocated Effector Required for Bartonella Dissemination from Derma to Blood Safeguards Migratory Host Cells from Damage by Co-translocated Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Okujava, Rusudan; Guye, Patrick; Lu, Yun-Yueh; Mistl, Claudia; Polus, Florine; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Halin, Cornelia; Rolink, Antonius G.; Dehio, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens secrete multiple effectors to modulate host cellular functions. These effectors may interfere with each other to efficiently control the infection process. Bartonellae are Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacteria using a VirB type IV secretion system to translocate a cocktail of Bartonella effector proteins (Beps) into host cells. Based on in vitro infection models we demonstrate here that BepE protects infected migratory cells from injurious effects triggered by BepC and is required for in vivo dissemination of bacteria from the dermal site of inoculation to blood. Human endothelial cells (HUVECs) infected with a ΔbepE mutant of B. henselae (Bhe) displayed a cell fragmentation phenotype resulting from Bep-dependent disturbance of rear edge detachment during migration. A ΔbepCE mutant did not show cell fragmentation, indicating that BepC is critical for triggering this deleterious phenotype. Complementation of ΔbepE with BepEBhe or its homologues from other Bartonella species abolished cell fragmentation. This cyto-protective activity is confined to the C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery (BID) domain of BepEBhe (BID2.EBhe). Ectopic expression of BID2.EBhe impeded the disruption of actin stress fibers by Rho Inhibitor 1, indicating that BepE restores normal cell migration via the RhoA signaling pathway, a major regulator of rear edge retraction. An intradermal (i.d.) model for B. tribocorum (Btr) infection in the rat reservoir host mimicking the natural route of infection by blood sucking arthropods allowed demonstrating a vital role for BepE in bacterial dissemination from derma to blood. While the Btr mutant ΔbepDE was abacteremic following i.d. inoculation, complementation with BepEBtr, BepEBhe or BIDs.EBhe restored bacteremia. Given that we observed a similar protective effect of BepEBhe on infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells migrating through a monolayer of lymphatic endothelial cells we propose that

  2. A Virulence Essential CRN Effector of Phytophthora capsici Suppresses Host Defense and Induces Cell Death in Plant Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mafurah, Joseph Juma; Ma, Huifei; Zhang, Meixiang; Xu, Jing; He, Feng; Ye, Tingyue; Shen, Danyu; Chen, Yanyu; Rajput, Nasir Ahmed; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a soil-borne plant pathogen with a wide range of hosts. The pathogen secretes a large array of effectors during infection of host plants, including Crinkler (CRN) effectors. However, it remains largely unknown on the roles of these effectors in virulence especially in P. capsici. In this study, we identified a cell death-inducing CRN effector PcCRN4 using agroinfiltration approach. Transient expression of PcCRN4 gene induced cell death in N. benthamiana, N. tabacum and Solanum lycopersicum. Overexpression of the gene in N. benthamiana enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici. Subcellular localization results showed that PcCRN4 localized to the plant nucleus, and the localization was required for both of its cell death-inducing activity and virulent function. Silencing PcCRN4 gene in P. capsici significantly reduced pathogen virulence. The expression of the pathogenesis-related gene PR1b in N. benthamiana was significantly induced when plants were inoculated with PcCRN4-silenced P. capsici transformant compared to the wilt-type. Callose deposits were also abundant at sites inoculated with PcCRN4-silenced transformant, indicating that silencing of PcCRN4 in P. capsici reduced the ability of the pathogen to suppress plant defenses. Transcriptions of cell death-related genes were affected when PcCRN4-silenced line were inoculated on Arabidopsis thaliana, suggesting that PcCRN4 may induce cell death by manipulating cell death-related genes. Overall, our results demonstrate that PcCRN4 is a virulence essential effector and it needs target to the plant nucleus to suppress plant immune responses. PMID:26011314

  3. TAL effectors and activation of predicted host targets distinguish Asian from African strains of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola while strict conservation suggests universal importance of five TAL effectors

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Katherine E.; Booher, Nicholas J.; Wang, Li; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) causes the increasingly important disease bacterial leaf streak of rice (BLS) in part by type III delivery of repeat-rich transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors to upregulate host susceptibility genes. By pathogen whole genome, single molecule, real-time sequencing and host RNA sequencing, we compared TAL effector content and rice transcriptional responses across 10 geographically diverse Xoc strains. TAL effector content is surprisingly conserved overall, yet distinguishes Asian from African isolates. Five TAL effectors are conserved across all strains. In a prior laboratory assay in rice cv. Nipponbare, only two contributed to virulence in strain BLS256 but the strict conservation indicates all five may be important, in different rice genotypes or in the field. Concatenated and aligned, TAL effector content across strains largely reflects relationships based on housekeeping genes, suggesting predominantly vertical transmission. Rice transcriptional responses did not reflect these relationships, and on average, only 28% of genes upregulated and 22% of genes downregulated by a strain are up- and down- regulated (respectively) by all strains. However, when only known TAL effector targets were considered, the relationships resembled those of the TAL effectors. Toward identifying new targets, we used the TAL effector-DNA recognition code to predict effector binding elements in promoters of genes upregulated by each strain, but found that for every strain, all upregulated genes had at least one. Filtering with a classifier we developed previously decreases the number of predicted binding elements across the genome, suggesting that it may reduce false positives among upregulated genes. Applying this filter and eliminating genes for which upregulation did not strictly correlate with presence of the corresponding TAL effector, we generated testable numbers of candidate targets for four of the five strictly conserved TAL

  4. Effector CD8+ T cell engraftment and anti-tumor immunity in lymphodepleted hosts is IL-7Rα dependent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. Bryce; Riesenberg, Brian P.; May, Bennett R.; Gilreath, Stuart C.; Li, Guangfu; Staveley-O’Carroll, Kevin F.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Cole, David J.; Rubinstein, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy, in which activated tumor-reactive T cells are transferred into murine lymphodepleted hosts, is a promising cancer treatment option. Activation of T cells decreases IL-7 responsiveness; therefore, IL-15 is generally considered the main driver of effector T cell responses in this setting. However, we found in lymphodepleted hosts that CD8+ T cells activated with IL-12 showed enhanced engraftment that was initially dependent on host IL-7, but not IL-15. Mechanistically, enhanced IL-7 responsiveness was conferred by elevated IL-7Rα expression, which was critical for anti-tumor immunity. Elevated IL-7Rα expression was achievable without IL-12, as polyclonal CD8+ T cells activated with high TCR stimulation depended on T cell IL-7Rα expression and host IL-7 for maximal engraftment. Finally, IL-12 conditioning during the activation of human CD8+ T cells, including TCR-modified T cells generated using a clinically relevant protocol, led to enhanced IL-7Rα expression. Our results demonstrate the importance of the donor IL-7Rα/host IL-7 axis for effector CD8+ T cell engraftment and suggest novel strategies to improve adoptive cellular therapy as a cancer treatment. PMID:26297711

  5. Structural basis for the recognition and degradation of host TRIM proteins by Salmonella effector SopA

    PubMed Central

    Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Herhaus, Lina; Kalayil, Sissy; Hahn, Marcel; Dikic, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    The hallmark of Salmonella Typhimurium infection is an acute intestinal inflammatory response, which is mediated through the action of secreted bacterial effector proteins. The pro-inflammatory Salmonella effector SopA is a HECT-like E3 ligase, which was previously proposed to activate host RING ligases TRIM56 and TRIM65. Here we elucidate an inhibitory mechanism of TRIM56 and TRIM65 targeting by SopA. We present the crystal structure of SopA in complex with the RING domain of human TRIM56, revealing the atomic details of their interaction and the basis for SopA selectivity towards TRIM56 and TRIM65. Structure-guided biochemical analysis shows that SopA inhibits TRIM56 E3 ligase activity by occluding the E2-interacting surface of TRIM56. We further demonstrate that SopA ubiquitinates TRIM56 and TRIM65, resulting in their proteasomal degradation during infection. Our results provide the basis for how a bacterial HECT ligase blocks host RING ligases and exemplifies the multivalent power of bacterial effectors during infection. PMID:28084320

  6. A Brucella Type IV Effector Targets the COG Tethering Complex to Remodel Host Secretory Traffic and Promote Intracellular Replication.

    PubMed

    Miller, Cheryl N; Smith, Erin P; Cundiff, Jennifer A; Knodler, Leigh A; Bailey Blackburn, Jessica; Lupashin, Vladimir; Celli, Jean

    2017-09-13

    Many intracellular pathogens exploit host secretory trafficking to support their intracellular cycle, but knowledge of these pathogenic processes is limited. The bacterium Brucella abortus uses a type IV secretion system (VirB T4SS) to generate a replication-permissive Brucella-containing vacuole (rBCV) derived from the host ER, a process that requires host early secretory trafficking. Here we show that the VirB T4SS effector BspB contributes to rBCV biogenesis and Brucella replication by interacting with the conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) tethering complex, a major coordinator of Golgi vesicular trafficking, thus remodeling Golgi membrane traffic and redirecting Golgi-derived vesicles to the BCV. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates COG-dependent trafficking via delivery of a T4SS effector to promote rBCV biogenesis and intracellular proliferation, providing mechanistic insight into how bacterial exploitation of host secretory functions promotes pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Bordetella evades the host immune system by inducing IL-10 through a type III effector, BopN

    PubMed Central

    Nagamatsu, Kanna; Kuwae, Asaomi; Konaka, Tadashi; Nagai, Shigenori; Yoshida, Sei; Eguchi, Masahiro; Watanabe, Mineo; Mimuro, Hitomi; Koyasu, Shigeo

    2009-01-01

    The inflammatory response is one of several host alert mechanisms that recruit neutrophils from the circulation to the area of infection. We demonstrate that Bordetella, a bacterial pathogen, exploits an antiinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10), to evade the host immune system. We identified a Bordetella effector, BopN, that is translocated into the host cell via the type III secretion system, where it induces enhanced production of IL-10. Interestingly, the BopN effector translocates itself into the nucleus and is involved in the down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. Using pharmacological blockade, we demonstrated that BopN-induced IL-10 production is mediated, at least in part, by its ability to block the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway. We also showed that BopN blocks nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB p65 (NF-κBp65) but, in contrast, promotes nuclear translocation of NF-κBp50. A BopN-deficient strain was unable to induce IL-10 production in mice, resulting in the elimination of bacteria via neutrophil infiltration into the pulmonary alveoli. Furthermore, IL-10–deficient mice effectively eliminated wild-type as well as BopN mutant bacteria. Thus, Bordetella exploits BopN as a stealth strategy to shut off the host inflammatory reaction. These results explain the ability of Bordetella species to avoid induction of the inflammatory response. PMID:20008527

  8. [Mechanisms of in vivo suppressive effect of togaviridae and bunyaviridae on the activity of effectors of graft vs host reaction].

    PubMed

    Khozinskiĭ, V V; Semenov, B F

    1982-02-01

    Experiments on mice demonstrated the ability of 3 flaviviruses and 1 bunyavirus to suppress the activity of the effectors of the graft-versus-host (GVH) reaction. The conditions of the suppression of the primary immunological recognition were shown to differ in infections caused by different viruses. In experimental flavivirus infections caused by Langat, dengue 2 or yellow fever (strain 17D) viruses T-suppressor cells were activated, and their activity was realized only in respect to syngeneic or semisyngeneic target cells. In mice infected with Tahyna virus (a bunyavirus) no suppressor cells capable of suppressing the activity of the effectors of the GVH reaction were detected. The suppression of this reaction, not linked with the activity of the detected T-suppressor cells, was observed in the Langat virus infection under conditions of bilateral incompatibility when both the donor and the recipient were infected.

  9. A Downy Mildew Effector Attenuates Salicylic Acid–Triggered Immunity in Arabidopsis by Interacting with the Host Mediator Complex

    PubMed Central

    Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Asai, Shuta; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Piquerez, Sophie; Fabro, Georgina; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are continually exposed to pathogen attack but usually remain healthy because they can activate defences upon perception of microbes. However, pathogens have evolved to overcome plant immunity by delivering effectors into the plant cell to attenuate defence, resulting in disease. Recent studies suggest that some effectors may manipulate host transcription, but the specific mechanisms by which such effectors promote susceptibility remain unclear. We study the oomycete downy mildew pathogen of Arabidopsis, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa), and show here that the nuclear-localized effector HaRxL44 interacts with Mediator subunit 19a (MED19a), resulting in the degradation of MED19a in a proteasome-dependent manner. The Mediator complex of ∼25 proteins is broadly conserved in eukaryotes and mediates the interaction between transcriptional regulators and RNA polymerase II. We found MED19a to be a positive regulator of immunity against Hpa. Expression profiling experiments reveal transcriptional changes resembling jasmonic acid/ethylene (JA/ET) signalling in the presence of HaRxL44, and also 3 d after infection with Hpa. Elevated JA/ET signalling is associated with a decrease in salicylic acid (SA)–triggered immunity (SATI) in Arabidopsis plants expressing HaRxL44 and in med19a loss-of-function mutants, whereas SATI is elevated in plants overexpressing MED19a. Using a PR1::GUS reporter, we discovered that Hpa suppresses PR1 expression specifically in cells containing haustoria, into which RxLR effectors are delivered, but not in nonhaustoriated adjacent cells, which show high PR1::GUS expression levels. Thus, HaRxL44 interferes with Mediator function by degrading MED19, shifting the balance of defence transcription from SA-responsive defence to JA/ET-signalling, and enhancing susceptibility to biotrophs by attenuating SA-dependent gene expression. PMID:24339748

  10. Variations in type III effector repertoires, pathological phenotypes and host range of Xanthomonas citri pv. citri pathotypes.

    PubMed

    Escalon, Aline; Javegny, Stéphanie; Vernière, Christian; Noël, Laurent D; Vital, Karine; Poussier, Stéphane; Hajri, Ahmed; Boureau, Tristan; Pruvost, Olivier; Arlat, Matthieu; Gagnevin, Lionel

    2013-06-01

    The mechanisms determining the host range of Xanthomonas are still undeciphered, despite much interest in their potential roles in the evolution and emergence of plant pathogenic bacteria. Xanthomonas citri pv. citri (Xci) is an interesting model of host specialization because of its pathogenic variants: pathotype A strains infect a wide range of Rutaceous species, whereas pathotype A*/A(W) strains have a host range restricted to Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) and alemow (Citrus macrophylla). Based on a collection of 55 strains representative of Xci worldwide diversity assessed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), we investigated the distribution of type III effectors (T3Es) in relation to host range. We examined the presence of 66 T3Es from xanthomonads in Xci and identified a repertoire of 28 effectors, 26 of which were shared by all Xci strains, whereas two (xopAG and xopC1) were present only in some A*/A(W) strains. We found that xopAG (=avrGf1) was present in all A(W) strains, but also in three A* strains genetically distant from A(W) , and that all xopAG-containing strains induced the hypersensitive response (HR) on grapefruit and sweet orange. The analysis of xopAD and xopAG suggested horizontal transfer between X. citri pv. bilvae, another citrus pathogen, and some Xci strains. A strains were genetically less diverse, induced identical phenotypic responses and possessed indistinguishable T3E repertoires. Conversely, A*/A(W) strains exhibited a wider genetic diversity in which clades correlated with geographical origin and T3E repertoire, but not with pathogenicity, according to T3E deletion experiments. Our data outline the importance of taking into account the heterogeneity of Xci A*/A(W) strains when analysing the mechanisms of host specialization.

  11. Host Protein BSL1 Associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR Effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune Receptor R2 to Mediate Disease Resistance[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G.O.; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.; Birch, Paul R.J.; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-01-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor. PMID:22885736

  12. Host protein BSL1 associates with Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR2 and the Solanum demissum Immune receptor R2 to mediate disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Diane G O; Breen, Susan; Win, Joe; Schornack, Sebastian; Hein, Ingo; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Champouret, Nicolas; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Birch, Paul R J; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to modulate plant immunity and promote host colonization. Plant nucleotide binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) immunoreceptors recognize specific pathogen effectors directly or indirectly. Little is known about how NB-LRR proteins recognize effectors of filamentous plant pathogens, such as Phytophthora infestans. AVR2 belongs to a family of 13 sequence-divergent P. infestans RXLR effectors that are differentially recognized by members of the R2 NB-LRR family in Solanum demissum. We report that the putative plant phosphatase BSU-LIKE PROTEIN1 (BSL1) is required for R2-mediated perception of AVR2 and resistance to P. infestans. AVR2 associates with BSL1 and mediates the interaction of BSL1 with R2 in planta, possibly through the formation of a ternary complex. Strains of P. infestans that are virulent on R2 potatoes express an unrecognized form, Avr2-like (referred to as A2l). A2L can still interact with BSL1 but does not promote the association of BSL1 with R2. Our findings show that recognition of the P. infestans AVR2 effector by the NB-LRR protein R2 requires the putative phosphatase BSL1. This reveals that, similar to effectors of phytopathogenic bacteria, recognition of filamentous pathogen effectors can be mediated via a host protein that interacts with both the effector and the NB-LRR immunoreceptor.

  13. Analysis of three Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri effector proteins in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins.

    PubMed

    Dunger, Germán; Garofalo, Cecilia G; Gottig, Natalia; Garavaglia, Betiana S; Rosa, María C Pereda; Farah, Chuck S; Orellano, Elena G; Ottado, Jorgelina

    2012-10-01

    Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri, the bacterium responsible for citrus canker, uses effector proteins secreted by a type III protein secretion system to colonize its hosts. Among the putative effector proteins identified for this bacterium, we focused on the analysis of the roles of AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090 in pathogenicity and their interactions with host plant proteins. Bacterial deletion mutants in avrXacE1, avrXacE2 and xac3090 were constructed and evaluated in pathogenicity assays. The avrXacE1 and avrXacE2 mutants presented lesions with larger necrotic areas relative to the wild-type strain when infiltrated in citrus leaves. Yeast two-hybrid studies were used to identify several plant proteins likely to interact with AvrXacE1, AvrXacE2 and Xac3090. We also assessed the localization of these effector proteins fused to green fluorescent protein in the plant cell, and observed that they co-localized to the subcellular spaces in which the plant proteins with which they interacted were predicted to be confined. Our results suggest that, although AvrXacE1 localizes to the plant cell nucleus, where it interacts with transcription factors and DNA-binding proteins, AvrXacE2 appears to be involved in lesion-stimulating disease 1-mediated cell death, and Xac3090 is directed to the chloroplast where its function remains to be clarified. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  14. Pseudomonas type III effector AvrPtoB induces plant disease susceptibility by inhibition of host programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitch, Robert B.; Kim, Young-Jin; Chen, Shaorong; Dickman, Martin B.; Martin, Gregory B.

    2003-01-01

    The AvrPtoB type III effector protein is conserved among diverse genera of plant pathogens suggesting it plays an important role in pathogenesis. Here we report that Pseudomonas AvrPtoB acts inside the plant cell to inhibit programmed cell death (PCD) initiated by the Pto and Cf9 disease resistance proteins and, remarkably, the pro-apoptotic mouse protein Bax. AvrPtoB also suppressed PCD in yeast, demonstrating that AvrPtoB functions as a cell death inhibitor across kingdoms. Using truncated AvrPtoB proteins, we identified distinct N- and C-terminal domains of AvrPtoB that are sufficient for host recognition and PCD inhibition, respectively. We also identified a novel resistance phenotype, Rsb, that is triggered by an AvrPtoB truncation disrupted in the anti-PCD domain. A Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strain with a chromosomal mutation in the AvrPtoB C-terminus elicited Rsb-mediated immunity in previously susceptible tomato plants and disease was restored when full-length AvrPtoB was expressed in trans. Thus, our results indicate that a type III effector can induce plant susceptibility to bacterial infection by inhibiting host PCD. PMID:12505984

  15. A novel Meloidogyne enterolobii effector MeTCTP promotes parasitism by suppressing programmed cell death in host plants.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kan; Chen, Jiansong; Lin, Borong; Wang, Jing; Sun, Fengxia; Hu, Lili; Liao, Jinling

    2017-01-01

    Meloidogyne enterolobii is one of the most important plant-parasitic nematodes that can overcome the Mi-1 resistance gene and damage many economically important crops. Translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) is a multifunctional protein that exists in various eukaryotes and plays an important role in parasitism. In this study, a novel M. enterolobii TCTP effector, named MeTCTP, was identified and functionally characterized. MeTCTP was specifically expressed within the dorsal gland and was up-regulated during M. enterolobii parasitism. Transient expression of MeTCTP in protoplasts from tomato roots showed that MeTCTP was localized in the cytoplasm of the host cells. Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants overexpressing MeTCTP were more susceptible to M. enterolobii infection than wild-type plants in a dose-dependent manner. By contrast, in planta RNA interference (RNAi) targeting MeTCTP suppressed the expression of MeTCTP in infecting nematodes and attenuated their parasitism. Furthermore, MeTCTP could suppress programmed cell death triggered by the pro-apoptotic protein BAX. These results demonstrate that MeTCTP is a novel plant-parasitic nematode effector that promotes parasitism, probably by suppressing programmed cell death in host plants. © 2016 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María I.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus. PMID:27900285

  17. A T4SS Effector Targets Host Cell Alpha-Enolase Contributing to Brucella abortus Intracellular Lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, María I; Morrone Seijo, Susana M; Guaimas, Francisco F; Comerci, Diego J

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus, the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, invades and replicates within cells inside a membrane-bound compartment known as the Brucella containing vacuole (BCV). After trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways, BCVs mature into endoplasmic reticulum-derived compartments permissive for bacterial replication. Brucella Type IV Secretion System (VirB) is a major virulence factor essential for the biogenesis of the replicative organelle. Upon infection, Brucella uses the VirB system to translocate effector proteins from the BCV into the host cell cytoplasm. Although the functions of many translocated proteins remain unknown, some of them have been demonstrated to modulate host cell signaling pathways to favor intracellular survival and replication. BPE123 (BAB2_0123) is a B. abortus VirB-translocated effector protein recently identified by our group whose function is yet unknown. In an attempt to identify host cell proteins interacting with BPE123, a pull-down assay was performed and human alpha-enolase (ENO-1) was identified by LC/MS-MS as a potential interaction partner of BPE123. These results were confirmed by immunoprecipitation assays. In bone-marrow derived macrophages infected with B. abortus, ENO-1 associates to BCVs in a BPE123-dependent manner, indicating that interaction with translocated BPE123 is also occurring during the intracellular phase of the bacterium. Furthermore, ENO-1 depletion by siRNA impaired B. abortus intracellular replication in HeLa cells, confirming a role for α-enolase during the infection process. Indeed, ENO-1 activity levels were enhanced upon B. abortus infection of THP-1 macrophagic cells, and this activation is highly dependent on BPE123. Taken together, these results suggest that interaction between BPE123 and host cell ENO-1 contributes to the intracellular lifestyle of B. abortus.

  18. Structural mechanism of host Rab1 activation by the bifunctional Legionella type IV effector SidM/DrrA

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongqun; Hu, Liyan; Zhou, Yan; Yao, Qing; Liu, Liping; Shao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens deliver effector proteins with diverse biochemical activities into host cells, thereby modulating various host functions. Legionella pneumophila hijacks host vesicle trafficking to avoid phagosome–lysosome fusion, a mechanism that is dependent on the Legionella Dot/Icm type IV secretion system. SidM/DrrA, a Legionella type IV effector, is important for the interactions of Legionella-containing vacuoles with host endoplasmic reticulum–derived vesicles. SidM is the only known protein that catalyzes both the exchange of GDP for GTP and GDI displacement from small GTPase Rab1. We determined the crystal structures of SidM alone (residues 317–647) and SidM (residues 193–550) in complex with nucleotide-free WT Rab1. The SidM structure contains an N-terminal helical domain with a potential new function, a Rab1-activation domain, and a C-terminal phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate–binding P4M domain. The Rab1-activation domain has extensive strong interactions mainly with Rab1 switch I and II regions that undergo substantial conformational changes on SidM binding. Mutations of switch-contacting residues in SidM attenuate both the nucleotide exchange and GDI displacement activities. Structural comparisons of Rab1 in the SidM complex with Rab1-GDP and Ypt1-GDP in the GDI complex identify key conformational changes that disrupt the nucleotide and GDI binding of Rab1. Further biochemical and structural analyses reveal a unique mechanism of coupled GDP release and GDI displacement likely triggered by the SidM-induced drastic displacement of switch I of Rab1. PMID:20176951

  19. Phenotypic analysis of apoplastic effectors from the phytopathogenic nematode, Globodera rostochiensis demonstrates that an expansin can induce and suppress host defenses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.) is an important pest of potato. Like other biotrophic pathogens, plant parasitic nematodes are presumed to employ effector proteins, secreted into the apoplast as well as the host cytoplasm to successfully infect their hosts. We have identifie...

  20. Broadly conserved fungal effector BEC1019 suppresses host cell death and enhances pathogen virulence in powdery mildew of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The interaction of barley, Hordeum vulgare L., with the biotrophic powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei, is an ideal model to address fundamental questions in host resistance and susceptibility. Effector proteins secreted by B. graminis act to inhibit, induce, or accelerate host pr...

  1. The role of effectors and host immunity in plant-necrotrophic fungal interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuli; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Jinling; Liu, Wende; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Fungal diseases pose constant threats to the global economy and food safety. As the largest group of plant fungal pathogens, necrotrophic fungi cause heavy crop losses worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of the interaction between necrotrophic fungi and plants are complex and involve sophisticated recognition and signaling networks. Here, we review recent findings on the roles of phytotoxin and proteinaceous effectors, pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and small RNAs from necrotrophic fungi. We also consider the functions of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), the receptor-like protein kinase BIK1, and epigenetic regulation in plant immunity to necrotrophic fungi.

  2. A competitive index assay identifies several Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector mutant strains with reduced fitness in host plants.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guidot, Alice; Barberis, Patrick; Beuzón, Carmen R; Genin, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, is a soil bacterium which can naturally infect a wide range of host plants through the root system. Pathogenicity relies on a type III secretion system which delivers a large set of approximately 75 type III effectors (T3E) into plant cells. On several plants, pathogenicity assays based on quantification of wilting symptoms failed to detect a significant contribution of R. solanacearum T3E in this process, thus revealing the collective effect of T3E in pathogenesis. We developed a mixed infection-based method with R. solanacearum to monitor bacterial fitness in plant leaf tissues as a virulence assay. This accurate and sensitive assay provides evidence that growth defects can be detected for T3E mutants: we identified 12 genes contributing to bacterial fitness in eggplant leaves and 3 of them were also implicated in bacterial fitness on two other hosts, tomato and bean. Contribution to fitness of several T3E appears to be host specific, and we show that some known avirulence determinants such as popP2 or avrA do provide competitive advantages on some susceptible host plants. In addition, this assay revealed that the efe gene, which directs the production of ethylene by bacteria in plant tissues, and hdfB, involved in the biosynthesis of the secondary metabolite 3-hydroxy-oxindole, are also required for optimal growth in plant leaf tissues.

  3. Propofol Increases Host Susceptibility to Microbial Infection by Reducing Subpopulations of Mature Immune Effector Cells at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Visvabharathy, Lavanya; Xayarath, Bobbi; Weinberg, Guy; Shilling, Rebecca A.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetics are known to modulate host immune responses, but separating the variables of surgery from anesthesia when analyzing hospital acquired infections is often difficult. Here, the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) was used to assess the impact of the common anesthetic propofol on host susceptibility to infection. Brief sedation of mice with physiologically relevant concentrations of propofol increased bacterial burdens in target organs by more than 10,000-fold relative to infected control animals. The adverse effects of propofol sedation on immune clearance of Lm persisted after recovery from sedation, as animals given the drug remained susceptible to infection for days following anesthesia. In contrast to propofol, sedation with alternative anesthetics such as ketamine/xylazine or pentobarbital did not increase susceptibility to systemic Lm infection. Propofol altered systemic cytokine and chemokine expression during infection, and prevented effective bacterial clearance by inhibiting the recruitment and/or activity of immune effector cells at sites of infection. Propofol exposure induced a marked reduction in marginal zone macrophages in the spleens of Lm infected mice, resulting in bacterial dissemination into deep tissue. Propofol also significantly increased mouse kidney abscess formation following infection with the common nosocomial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Taken together, these data indicate that even brief exposure to propofol severely compromises host resistance to microbial infection for days after recovery from sedation. PMID:26381144

  4. Role of Hcp, a type 6 secretion system effector, of Aeromonas hydrophila in modulating activation of host immune cells.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C; Kirtley, Michelle L; Chopra, Ashok K

    2010-12-01

    Recently, we reported that the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila SSU plays an important role in bacterial virulence in a mouse model, and immunization of animals with the T6SS effector haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) protected them against lethal infections with wild-type bacteria. Additionally, we showed that the mutant bacteria deleted for the vasH gene within the T6SS gene cluster did not express the hcp gene, while the vasK mutant could express and translocate Hcp, but was unable to secrete it into the extracellular milieu. Both of these A. hydrophila SSU mutants were readily phagocytosed by murine macrophages, pointing to the possible role of the secreted form of Hcp in the evasion of the host innate immunity. By using the ΔvasH mutant of A. hydrophila, our in vitro data showed that the addition of exogenous recombinant Hcp (rHcp) reduced bacterial uptake by macrophages. These results were substantiated by increased bacterial virulence when rHcp was added along with the ΔvasH mutant in a septicaemic mouse model of infection. Analysis of the cytokine profiling in the intraperitoneal lavage as well as activation of host cells after 4 h of infection with the ΔvasH mutant supplemented with rHcp indicated that this T6SS effector inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which could circumvent macrophage activation and maturation. This mechanism of innate immune evasion by Hcp possibly inhibited the recruitment of cellular immune components, which allowed bacterial multiplication and dissemination in animals, thereby leading to their mortality.

  5. Role of Hcp, a type 6 secretion system effector, of Aeromonas hydrophila in modulating activation of host immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Giovanni; Sierra, Johanna C.; Kirtley, Michelle L.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the type 6 secretion system (T6SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila SSU plays an important role in bacterial virulence in a mouse model, and immunization of animals with the T6SS effector haemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp) protected them against lethal infections with wild-type bacteria. Additionally, we showed that the mutant bacteria deleted for the vasH gene within the T6SS gene cluster did not express the hcp gene, while the vasK mutant could express and translocate Hcp, but was unable to secrete it into the extracellular milieu. Both of these A. hydrophila SSU mutants were readily phagocytosed by murine macrophages, pointing to the possible role of the secreted form of Hcp in the evasion of the host innate immunity. By using the ΔvasH mutant of A. hydrophila, our in vitro data showed that the addition of exogenous recombinant Hcp (rHcp) reduced bacterial uptake by macrophages. These results were substantiated by increased bacterial virulence when rHcp was added along with the ΔvasH mutant in a septicaemic mouse model of infection. Analysis of the cytokine profiling in the intraperitoneal lavage as well as activation of host cells after 4 h of infection with the ΔvasH mutant supplemented with rHcp indicated that this T6SS effector inhibited production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and induced immunosuppressive cytokines, such as interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-β, which could circumvent macrophage activation and maturation. This mechanism of innate immune evasion by Hcp possibly inhibited the recruitment of cellular immune components, which allowed bacterial multiplication and dissemination in animals, thereby leading to their mortality. PMID:20798163

  6. PTEX component HSP101 mediates export of diverse malaria effectors into host erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Beck, Josh R; Muralidharan, Vasant; Oksman, Anna; Goldberg, Daniel E

    2014-07-31

    To mediate its survival and virulence, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum exports hundreds of proteins into the host erythrocyte. To enter the host cell, exported proteins must cross the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) within which the parasite resides, but the mechanism remains unclear. A putative Plasmodium translocon of exported proteins (PTEX) has been suggested to be involved for at least one class of exported proteins; however, direct functional evidence for this has been elusive. Here we show that export across the PVM requires heat shock protein 101 (HSP101), a ClpB-like AAA+ ATPase component of PTEX. Using a chaperone auto-inhibition strategy, we achieved rapid, reversible ablation of HSP101 function, resulting in a nearly complete block in export with substrates accumulating in the vacuole in both asexual and sexual parasites. Surprisingly, this block extended to all classes of exported proteins, revealing HSP101-dependent translocation across the PVM as a convergent step in the multi-pathway export process. Under export-blocked conditions, association between HSP101 and other components of the PTEX complex was lost, indicating that the integrity of the complex is required for efficient protein export. Our results demonstrate an essential and universal role for HSP101 in protein export and provide strong evidence for PTEX function in protein translocation into the host cell.

  7. Allospecific CD4+ Effector Memory T Cells Do Not Induce Graft-versus-Host Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Wu, Jieying; Deoliveira, Divino; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.

    2012-01-01

    We studied whether allospecific CD4+ effector memory T cells (TEM) could induce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) using a novel GVHD model solely induced by CD4+ T cell receptor transgenic TEa cells. Allospecific TEM generated in a lymphopenic host bore a typical memory phenotype. Moreover, these cells were able to elicit a faster and more effective proliferative response upon challenge with alloantigen in vitro and to mediate “second-set” skin graft rejection in vivo. However, these allospecific TEM were unable to induce GVHD. Allospecific TEM recipients became tolerant to alloantigen as a result of clonal deletion. Even though allospecific TEM were able to respond to alloantigen initially, the expansion of these cells and inflammatory cytokine production during GVHD were dramatically decreased. The inability of allospecific TEM to sustain the alloresponse may be a result of enhanced activation induced cell death. These observations provide insights into how allospecific CD4+ TEM respond to alloantigen during GVHD and underscore the fundamental differences of alloresponses mediated by allospecific TEM in graft rejection and GVHD settings. PMID:22809867

  8. Nuclear receptor ERR alpha and coactivator PGC-1 beta are effectors of IFN-gamma-induced host defense.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Junichiro; Laganière, Josée; Mehl, Isaac R; Barish, Grant D; Chong, Ling-Wa; Li, Xiangli; Scheffler, Immo E; Mock, Dennis C; Bataille, Alain R; Robert, Francois; Lee, Chih-Hao; Giguère, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M

    2007-08-01

    Macrophage activation by the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a critical component of the host innate response to bacterial pathogenesis. However, the precise nature of the IFN-gamma-induced activation pathway is not known. Here we show using genome-wide expression and chromatin-binding profiling that IFN-gamma induces the expression of many nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial respiratory chain machinery via activation of the nuclear receptor ERR alpha (estrogen-related receptor alpha, NR3B1). Studies with macrophages lacking ERR alpha demonstrate that it is required for induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and efficient clearance of Listeria monocytogenes (LM) in response to IFN-gamma. As a result, mice lacking ERR alpha are susceptible to LM infection, a phenotype that is localized to bone marrow-derived cells. Furthermore, we found that IFN-gamma-induced activation of ERR alpha depends on coactivator PGC-1 beta (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 beta), which appears to be a direct target for the IFN-gamma/STAT-1 signaling cascade. Thus, ERR alpha and PGC-1 beta act together as a key effector of IFN-gamma-induced mitochondrial ROS production and host defense.

  9. Analysis of Putative Apoplastic Effectors from the Nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, and Identification of an Expansin-Like Protein That Can Induce and Suppress Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Côté, Olivier; Stare, Barbara Gerič; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, is an important pest of potato. Like other pathogens, plant parasitic nematodes are presumed to employ effector proteins, secreted into the apoplast as well as the host cytoplasm, to alter plant cellular functions and successfully infect their hosts. We have generated a library of ORFs encoding putative G. rostochiensis putative apoplastic effectors in vectors for expression in planta. These clones were assessed for morphological and developmental effects on plants as well as their ability to induce or suppress plant defenses. Several CLAVATA3/ESR-like proteins induced developmental phenotypes, whereas predicted cell wall-modifying proteins induced necrosis and chlorosis, consistent with roles in cell fate alteration and tissue invasion, respectively. When directed to the apoplast with a signal peptide, two effectors, an ubiquitin extension protein (GrUBCEP12) and an expansin-like protein (GrEXPB2), suppressed defense responses including NB-LRR signaling induced in the cytoplasm. GrEXPB2 also elicited defense response in species- and sequence-specific manner. Our results are consistent with the scenario whereby potato cyst nematodes secrete effectors that modulate host cell fate and metabolism as well as modifying host cell walls. Furthermore, we show a novel role for an apoplastic expansin-like protein in suppressing intra-cellular defense responses. PMID:25606855

  10. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production

    PubMed Central

    Pulliainen, Arto T.; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S.; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:22635269

  11. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiansong; Lin, Borong; Huang, Qiuling; Hu, Lili; Zhuo, Kan; Liao, Jinling

    2017-04-01

    Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM) and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections.

  12. Non-host Resistance Induced by the Xanthomonas Effector XopQ Is Widespread within the Genus Nicotiana and Functionally Depends on EDS1

    PubMed Central

    Adlung, Norman; Prochaska, Heike; Thieme, Sabine; Banik, Anne; Blüher, Doreen; John, Peter; Nagel, Oliver; Schulze, Sebastian; Gantner, Johannes; Delker, Carolin; Stuttmann, Johannes; Bonas, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Most Gram-negative plant pathogenic bacteria translocate effector proteins (T3Es) directly into plant cells via a conserved type III secretion system, which is essential for pathogenicity in susceptible plants. In resistant plants, recognition of some T3Es is mediated by corresponding resistance (R) genes or R proteins and induces effector triggered immunity (ETI) that often results in programmed cell death reactions. The identification of R genes and understanding their evolution/distribution bears great potential for the generation of resistant crop plants. We focus on T3Es from Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv), the causal agent of bacterial spot disease on pepper and tomato plants. Here, 86 Solanaceae lines mainly of the genus Nicotiana were screened for phenotypical reactions after Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of 21 different Xcv effectors to (i) identify new plant lines for T3E characterization, (ii) analyze conservation/evolution of putative R genes and (iii) identify promising plant lines as repertoire for R gene isolation. The effectors provoked different reactions on closely related plant lines indicative of a high variability and evolution rate of potential R genes. In some cases, putative R genes were conserved within a plant species but not within superordinate phylogenetical units. Interestingly, the effector XopQ was recognized by several Nicotiana spp. lines, and Xcv infection assays revealed that XopQ is a host range determinant in many Nicotiana species. Non-host resistance against Xcv and XopQ recognition in N. benthamiana required EDS1, strongly suggesting the presence of a TIR domain-containing XopQ-specific R protein in these plant lines. XopQ is a conserved effector among most xanthomonads, pointing out the XopQ-recognizing RxopQ as candidate for targeted crop improvement. PMID:27965697

  13. The Yersinia Virulence Factor YopM Hijacks Host Kinases to Inhibit Type III Effector-Triggered Activation of the Pyrin Inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Chung, Lawton K; Park, Yong Hwan; Zheng, Yueting; Brodsky, Igor E; Hearing, Patrick; Kastner, Daniel L; Chae, Jae Jin; Bliska, James B

    2016-09-14

    Pathogenic Yersinia, including Y. pestis, the agent of plague in humans, and Y. pseudotuberculosis, the related enteric pathogen, deliver virulence effectors into host cells via a prototypical type III secretion system to promote pathogenesis. These effectors, termed Yersinia outer proteins (Yops), modulate multiple host signaling responses. Studies in Y. pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis have shown that YopM suppresses infection-induced inflammasome activation; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we show that YopM specifically restricts the pyrin inflammasome, which is triggered by the RhoA-inactivating enzymatic activities of YopE and YopT, in Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected macrophages. The attenuation of a yopM mutant is fully reversed in pyrin knockout mice, demonstrating that YopM inhibits pyrin to promote virulence. Mechanistically, YopM recruits and activates the host kinases PRK1 and PRK2 to negatively regulate pyrin by phosphorylation. These results show how a virulence factor can hijack host kinases to inhibit effector-triggered pyrin inflammasome activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Broadly Conserved Fungal Effector BEC1019 Suppresses Host Cell Death and Enhances Pathogen Virulence in Powdery Mildew of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Whigham, Ehren; Qi, Shan; Mistry, Divya; Surana, Priyanka; Xu, Ruo; Fuerst, Gregory; Pliego, Clara; Bindschedler, Laurence V; Spanu, Pietro D; Dickerson, Julie A; Innes, Roger W; Nettleton, Dan; Bogdanove, Adam J; Wise, Roger P

    2015-09-01

    The interaction of barley, Hordeum vulgare L., with the powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei is a well-developed model to investigate resistance and susceptibility to obligate biotrophic pathogens. The 130-Mb Blumeria genome encodes approximately 540 predicted effectors that are hypothesized to suppress or induce host processes to promote colonization. Blumeria effector candidate (BEC)1019, a single-copy gene encoding a putative, secreted metalloprotease, is expressed in haustorial feeding structures, and host-induced gene silencing of BEC1019 restricts haustorial development in compatible interactions. Here, we show that Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing of BEC1019 significantly reduces fungal colonization of barley epidermal cells, demonstrating that BEC1019 plays a central role in virulence. In addition, delivery of BEC1019 to the host cytoplasm via Xanthomonas type III secretion suppresses cultivar nonspecific hypersensitive reaction (HR) induced by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola, as well as cultivar-specific HR induced by AvrPphB from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola. BEC1019 homologs are present in 96 of 241 sequenced fungal genomes, including plant pathogens, human pathogens, and free-living nonpathogens. Comparative analysis revealed variation at several amino acid positions that correlate with fungal lifestyle and several highly conserved, noncorrelated motifs. Site-directed mutagenesis of one of these, ETVIC, compromises the HR-suppressing activity of BEC1019. We postulate that BEC1019 represents an ancient, broadly important fungal protein family, members of which have evolved to function as effectors in plant and animal hosts.

  15. Phytophthora infestans effector AVR3a is essential for virulence and manipulates plant immunity by stabilizing host E3 ligase CMPG1.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Armstrong, Miles R; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Boevink, Petra C; Hein, Ingo; Taylor, Rosalind M; Zhendong, Tian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Vetukuri, Ramesh R; Harrower, Brian; Dixelius, Christina; Bryan, Glenn; Sadanandom, Ari; Whisson, Stephen C; Kamoun, Sophien; Birch, Paul R J

    2010-05-25

    Fungal and oomycete plant pathogens translocate effector proteins into host cells to establish infection. However, virulence targets and modes of action of their effectors are unknown. Effector AVR3a from potato blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans is translocated into host cells and occurs in two forms: AVR3a(KI), which is detected by potato resistance protein R3a, strongly suppresses infestin 1 (INF1)-triggered cell death (ICD), whereas AVR3a(EM), which evades recognition by R3a, weakly suppresses host ICD. Here we show that AVR3a interacts with and stabilizes host U-box E3 ligase CMPG1, which is required for ICD. In contrast, AVR3a(KI/Y147del), a mutant with a deleted C-terminal tyrosine residue that fails to suppress ICD, cannot interact with or stabilize CMPG1. CMPG1 is stabilized by the inhibitors MG132 and epoxomicin, indicating that it is degraded by the 26S proteasome. CMPG1 is degraded during ICD. However, it is stabilized by mutations in the U-box that prevent its E3 ligase activity. In stabilizing CMPG1, AVR3a thus modifies its normal activity. Remarkably, given the potential for hundreds of effector genes in the P. infestans genome, silencing Avr3a compromises P. infestans pathogenicity, suggesting that AVR3a is essential for virulence. Interestingly, Avr3a silencing can be complemented by in planta expression of Avr3a(KI) or Avr3a(EM) but not the Avr3a(KI/Y147del) mutant. Our data provide genetic evidence that AVR3a is an essential virulence factor that targets and stabilizes the plant E3 ligase CMPG1, potentially to prevent host cell death during the biotrophic phase of infection.

  16. Host-mediated gene silencing of a single effector gene from the potato pathogen Phytophthora infestans imparts partial resistance to late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Sanju, Suman; Siddappa, Sundaresha; Thakur, Aditi; Shukla, Pradeep K; Srivastava, Nidhi; Pattanayak, Debasis; Sharma, Sanjeev; Singh, B P

    2015-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has proved a powerful genetic tool for silencing genes in plants. Host-induced gene silencing of pathogen genes has provided a gene knockout strategy for a wide range of biotechnological applications. The RXLR effector Avr3a gene is largely responsible for virulence of oomycete plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans. In this study, we attempted to silence the Avr3a gene of P. infestans through RNAi technology. The P. infestans inoculation resulted in lower disease progression and a reduction in pathogen load, as demonstrated by disease scoring and quantification of pathogen biomass in terms of Pi08 repetitive elements, respectively. Transgenic plants induced moderate silencing of Avr3a, and the presence and/or expression of small interfering RNAs, as determined through Northern hybridization, indicated siRNA targeted against Avr3a conferred moderate resistance to P. infestans. The single effector gene did not provide complete resistance against P. infestans. Although the Avr3a effector gene could confer moderate resistance, for complete resistance, the cumulative effect of effector genes in addition to Avr3a needs to be considered. In this study, we demonstrated that host-induced RNAi is an effective strategy for functional genomics in oomycetes.

  17. Computational prediction of secretion systems and secretomes of Brucella: identification of novel type IV effectors and their interaction with the host.

    PubMed

    Sankarasubramanian, Jagadesan; Vishnu, Udayakumar S; Dinakaran, Vasudevan; Sridhar, Jayavel; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens that cause brucellosis in various mammals including humans. Brucella survive inside the host cells by forming vacuoles and subverting host defence systems. This study was aimed to predict the secretion systems and the secretomes of Brucella spp. from 39 complete genome sequences available in the databases. Furthermore, an attempt was made to identify the type IV secretion effectors and their interactions with host proteins. We predicted the secretion systems of Brucella by the KEGG pathway and SecReT4. Brucella secretomes and type IV effectors (T4SEs) were predicted through genome-wide screening using JVirGel and S4TE, respectively. Protein-protein interactions of Brucella T4SEs with their hosts were analyzed by HPIDB 2.0. Genes coding for Sec and Tat pathways of secretion and type I (T1SS), type IV (T4SS) and type V (T5SS) secretion systems were identified and they are conserved in all the species of Brucella. In addition to the well-known VirB operon coding for the type IV secretion system (T4SS), we have identified the presence of additional genes showing homology with T4SS of other organisms. On the whole, 10.26 to 14.94% of total proteomes were found to be either secreted (secretome) or membrane associated (membrane proteome). Approximately, 1.7 to 3.0% of total proteomes were identified as type IV secretion effectors (T4SEs). Prediction of protein-protein interactions showed 29 and 36 host-pathogen specific interactions between Bos taurus (cattle)-B. abortus and Ovis aries (sheep)-B. melitensis, respectively. Functional characterization of the predicted T4SEs and their interactions with their respective hosts may reveal the secrets of host specificity of Brucella.

  18. Effector Protein Cig2 Decreases Host Tolerance of Infection by Directing Constitutive Fusion of Autophagosomes with the Coxiella-Containing Vacuole

    PubMed Central

    Kohler, Lara J.; Reed, Shawna R.; Sarraf, Shireen A.; Arteaga, David D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coxiella burnetii replicates in an acidified lysosome-derived vacuole. Biogenesis of the Coxiella-containing vacuole (CCV) requires bacterial effector proteins delivered into host cells by the Dot/Icm secretion system. Genetic and cell biological analysis revealed that an effector protein called Cig2 promotes constitutive fusion of autophagosomes with the CCV to maintain this compartment in an autolysosomal stage of maturation. This distinguishes the CCV from other pathogen-containing vacuoles that are targeted by the host autophagy pathway, which typically confers host resistance to infection by delivering the pathogen to a toxic lysosomal environment. By maintaining the CCV in an autolysosomal stage of maturation, Cig2 enabled CCV homotypic fusion and enhanced bacterial virulence in the Galleria mellonella (wax moth) model of infection by a mechanism that decreases host tolerance. Thus, C. burnetii residence in an autolysosomal organelle alters host tolerance of infection, which indicates that Cig2-dependent manipulation of a lysosome-derived vacuole influences the host response to infection. PMID:27435465

  19. Transient activation of mucosal effector immune responses by resident intestinal bacteria in normal hosts is regulated by interleukin-10 signalling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Sartor, R Balfour; Huang, Kehe; Tonkonogy, Susan L

    2016-07-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is a key regulator of mucosal homeostasis. In the current study we investigated the early events after monoassociating germ-free (GF) wild-type (WT) mice with an Escherichia coli strain that we isolated previously from the caecal contents of a normal mouse housed under specific pathogen-free conditions. Our results show that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secreted by mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from both IL-10 deficient mice and WT mice, stimulated ex vivo with E. coli lysate, was dramatically higher at day 4 after monoassociation compared with IFN-γ secreted by cells from GF mice without E. coli colonization. Production of IFN-γ rapidly and progressively declined after colonization of WT but not IL-10-deficient mice. The E. coli lysate-stimulated WT MLN cells also produced IL-10 that peaked at day 4 and subsequently declined, but not as precipitously as IFN-γ. WT cells that express CD4, CD8 and NKp46 produced IFN-γ; WT CD4-positive cells and B cells produced IL-10. Recombinant IL-10 added to E. coli-stimulated MLN cell cultures inhibited IFN-γ secretion in a dose-dependent fashion. MLN cells from WT mice treated in vivo with neutralizing anti-IL-10 receptor antibody produced more IFN-γ compared with MLN cells from isotype control antibody-treated mice. These findings show that a resident E. coli that induces chronic colitis in monoassociated IL-10-deficient mice rapidly but transiently activates the effector immune system in normal hosts, in parallel with induction of protective IL-10 produced by B cells and CD4(+) cells that subsequently suppresses this response to mediate mucosal homeostasis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Overexpression of a Novel Biotrophy-Specific Colletotrichum truncatum Effector, CtNUDIX, in Hemibiotrophic Fungal Phytopathogens Causes Incompatibility with Their Host Plants

    PubMed Central

    Bhadauria, Vijai; Vandenberg, Albert; Selvaraj, Gopalan

    2013-01-01

    The hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum truncatum causes anthracnose disease on lentils and a few other grain legumes. It shows initial symptomless intracellular growth, where colonized host cells remain viable (biotrophy), and then switches to necrotrophic growth, killing the colonized host plant tissues. Here, we report a novel effector gene, CtNUDIX, from C. truncatum that is exclusively expressed during the late biotrophic phase (before the switch to necrotrophy) and elicits a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death in tobacco leaves transiently expressing the effector. CtNUDIX homologs, which contain a signal peptide and a Nudix hydrolase domain, may be unique to hemibiotrophic fungal and fungus-like plant pathogens. CtNUDIX lacking a signal peptide or a Nudix motif failed to induce cell death in tobacco. Expression of CtNUDIX:eGFP in tobacco suggested that the fusion protein might act on the host cell plasma membrane. Overexpression of CtNUDIX in C. truncatum and the rice blast pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, resulted in incompatibility with the hosts lentil and barley, respectively, by causing an HR-like response in infected host cells associated with the biotrophic invasive hyphae. These results suggest that C. truncatum and possibly M. oryzae elicit cell death to signal the transition from biotrophy to necrotrophy. PMID:22962277

  1. A novel Meloidogyne graminicola effector, MgGPP, is secreted into host cells and undergoes glycosylation in concert with proteolysis to suppress plant defenses and promote parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiuling; Hu, Lili; Zhuo, Kan

    2017-01-01

    Plant pathogen effectors can recruit the host post-translational machinery to mediate their post-translational modification (PTM) and regulate their activity to facilitate parasitism, but few studies have focused on this phenomenon in the field of plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study, we show that the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne graminicola has evolved a novel effector, MgGPP, that is exclusively expressed within the nematode subventral esophageal gland cells and up-regulated in the early parasitic stage of M. graminicola. The effector MgGPP plays a role in nematode parasitism. Transgenic rice lines expressing MgGPP become significantly more susceptible to M. graminicola infection than wild-type control plants, and conversely, in planta, the silencing of MgGPP through RNAi technology substantially increases the resistance of rice to M. graminicola. Significantly, we show that MgGPP is secreted into host plants and targeted to the ER, where the N-glycosylation and C-terminal proteolysis of MgGPP occur. C-terminal proteolysis promotes MgGPP to leave the ER, after which it is transported to the nucleus. In addition, N-glycosylation of MgGPP is required for suppressing the host response. The research data provide an intriguing example of in planta glycosylation in concert with proteolysis of a pathogen effector, which depict a novel mechanism by which parasitic nematodes could subjugate plant immunity and promote parasitism and may present a promising target for developing new strategies against nematode infections. PMID:28403192

  2. Lack of the programmed death-1 receptor renders host susceptible to enteric microbial infection through impairing the production of the mucosal natural killer cell effector molecules.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Frey, Blake F; Billeskov, Rolf; Singer, Steven M; Berzofsky, Jay A; Eckmann, Lars; Kagnoff, Martin F

    2016-03-01

    The programmed death-1 receptor is expressed on a wide range of immune effector cells, including T cells, natural killer T cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, and natural killer cells. In malignancies and chronic viral infections, increased expression of programmed death-1 by T cells is generally associated with a poor prognosis. However, its role in early host microbial defense at the intestinal mucosa is not well understood. We report that programmed death-1 expression is increased on conventional natural killer cells but not on CD4(+), CD8(+) or natural killer T cells, or CD11b(+) or CD11c(+) macrophages or dendritic cells after infection with the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Mice genetically deficient in programmed death-1 or treated with anti-programmed death-1 antibody were more susceptible to acute enteric and systemic infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Wild-type but not programmed death-1-deficient mice infected with Citrobacter rodentium showed significantly increased expression of the conventional mucosal NK cell effector molecules granzyme B and perforin. In contrast, natural killer cells from programmed death-1-deficient mice had impaired expression of those mediators. Consistent with programmed death-1 being important for intracellular expression of natural killer cell effector molecules, mice depleted of natural killer cells and perforin-deficient mice manifested increased susceptibility to acute enteric infection with Citrobacter rodentium. Our findings suggest that increased programmed death-1 signaling pathway expression by conventional natural killer cells promotes host protection at the intestinal mucosa during acute infection with a bacterial gut pathogen by enhancing the expression and production of important effectors of natural killer cell function.

  3. Quantification of disease expression conferred by three host gene-necrotrophic effector interactions in the wheat-Parastagonospora nodorum pathosystem

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB), which is a major foliar disease on wheat is caused by the necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum. The wheat-P. nodorum pathosystem involves the recognition of necrotrophic effectors (NEs) secreted by P. nodorum by corresponding wheat NE sensitivity genes. Recogni...

  4. Dual roles for the variable domain in protein trafficking and host-specific recognition of Heterodera glycines CLE effector proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean cyst nematodes (Heterodera glycines) produce secreted effector proteins that function as peptide mimics of plant CLAVATA3 / ESR (CLE)-like peptides probably involved in the developmental reprogramming of root cells to form specialized feeding cells called syncytia. The site of action and me...

  5. Translocated effectors of Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Young, Glenn M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, all known translocated effectors of Yersinia are delivered into host cells by type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Pathogenic Yersinia maintain the plasmid-encoded Ysc T3SS for the specific delivery of the well-studied Yop effectors. New horizons for effector biology have opened with the discovery of the Ysps of Y. enterocolitica Biovar 1B, which are translocated into host cells by the chromosome-endoded Ysa T3SS. The reported arsenal of effectors is likely to expand since genomic analysis has revealed gene-clusters in some Yersinia that code for other T3SSs. These efforts also revealed possible type VI secretion (T6S) systems, which may indicate translocation of effectors occurs by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19185531

  6. CRN13 candidate effectors from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens are DNA-binding proteins which trigger host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Garcés, Diana; Camborde, Laurent; Pel, Michiel J C; Jauneau, Alain; Martinez, Yves; Néant, Isabelle; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc; Dumas, Bernard; Gaulin, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    To successfully colonize their host, pathogens produce effectors that can interfere with host cellular processes. Here we investigated the function of CRN13 candidate effectors produced by plant pathogenic oomycetes and detected in the genome of the amphibian pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (BdCRN13). When expressed in Nicotiana, AeCRN13, from the legume root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, increases the susceptibility of the leaves to the oomycete Phytophthora capsici. When transiently expressed in amphibians or plant cells, AeCRN13 and BdCRN13 localize to the cell nuclei, triggering aberrant cell development and eventually causing cell death. Using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments in plant cells, we showed that both CRN13s interact with nuclear DNA and trigger plant DNA damage response (DDR). Mutating key amino acid residues in a predicted HNH-like endonuclease motif abolished the interaction of AeCRN13 with DNA, the induction of DDR and the enhancement of Nicotiana susceptibility to P. capsici. Finally, H2AX phosphorylation, a marker of DNA damage, and enhanced expression of genes involved in the DDR were observed in A. euteiches-infected Medicago truncatula roots. These results show that CRN13 from plant and animal eukaryotic pathogens promotes host susceptibility by targeting nuclear DNA and inducing DDR.

  7. Human Subtilase SKI-1/S1P Is a Master Regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a Potential Host Cell Target for Developing Indirect-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Andrea D.; Knecht, Wolfgang; Lazarov, Ina; Dixit, Surjit B.; Jean, François

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs). One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1) – or site-1 protease (S1P). SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP)/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow development

  8. Human subtilase SKI-1/S1P is a master regulator of the HCV Lifecycle and a potential host cell target for developing indirect-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Andrea D; Knecht, Wolfgang; Lazarov, Ina; Dixit, Surjit B; Jean, François

    2012-01-01

    HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver cancer and liver transplantation worldwide. Overstimulation of host lipid metabolism in the liver by HCV-encoded proteins during viral infection creates a favorable environment for virus propagation and pathogenesis. In this study, we hypothesize that targeting cellular enzymes acting as master regulators of lipid homeostasis could represent a powerful approach to developing a novel class of broad-spectrum antivirals against infection associated with human Flaviviridae viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV), whose assembly and pathogenesis depend on interaction with lipid droplets (LDs). One such master regulator of cholesterol metabolic pathways is the host subtilisin/kexin-isozyme-1 (SKI-1)--or site-1 protease (S1P). SKI-1/S1P plays a critical role in the proteolytic activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), which control expression of the key enzymes of cholesterol and fatty-acid biosynthesis. Here we report the development of a SKI-1/S1P-specific protein-based inhibitor and its application to blocking the SREBP signaling cascade. We demonstrate that SKI-1/S1P inhibition effectively blocks HCV from establishing infection in hepatoma cells. The inhibitory mechanism is associated with a dramatic reduction in the abundance of neutral lipids, LDs, and the LD marker: adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP)/perilipin 2. Reduction of LD formation inhibits virus assembly from infected cells. Importantly, we confirm that SKI-1/S1P is a key host factor for HCV infection by using a specific active, site-directed, small-molecule inhibitor of SKI-1/S1P: PF-429242. Our studies identify SKI-1/S1P as both a novel regulator of the HCV lifecycle and as a potential host-directed therapeutic target against HCV infection and liver steatosis. With identification of an increasing number of human viruses that use host LDs for infection, our results suggest that SKI-1/S1P inhibitors may allow development of

  9. Transcriptome analysis of the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. medicaginis during colonisation of resistant and susceptible Medicago truncatula hosts identifies differential pathogenicity profiles and novel candidate effectors.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Williams, Angela H; Garg, Gagan; Buck, Sally-Anne G; Singh, Karam B

    2016-11-03

    Pathogenic members of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex are responsible for vascular wilt disease on many important crops including legumes, where they can be one of the most destructive disease causing necrotrophic fungi. We previously developed a model legume-infecting pathosystem based on the reference legume Medicago truncatula and a pathogenic F. oxysporum forma specialis (f. sp.) medicaginis (Fom). To dissect the molecular pathogenicity arsenal used by this root-infecting pathogen, we sequenced its transcriptome during infection of a susceptible and resistant host accession. High coverage RNA-Seq of Fom infected root samples harvested from susceptible (DZA315) or resistant (A17) M. truncatula seedlings at early or later stages of infection (2 or 7 days post infection (dpi)) and from vegetative (in vitro) samples facilitated the identification of unique and overlapping sets of in planta differentially expressed genes. This included enrichment, particularly in DZA315 in planta up-regulated datasets, for proteins associated with sugar, protein and plant cell wall metabolism, membrane transport, nutrient uptake and oxidative processes. Genes encoding effector-like proteins were identified, including homologues of the F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Secreted In Xylem (SIX) proteins, and several novel candidate effectors based on predicted secretion, small protein size and high in-planta induced expression. The majority of the effector candidates contain no known protein domains but do share high similarity to predicted proteins predominantly from other F. oxysporum ff. spp. as well as other Fusaria (F. solani, F. fujikori, F. verticilloides, F. graminearum and F. pseudograminearum), and from another wilt pathogen of the same class, a Verticillium species. Overall, this suggests these novel effector candidates may play important roles in Fusaria and wilt pathogen virulence. Combining high coverage in planta RNA-Seq with knowledge of fungal pathogenicity

  10. Oomycetes, effectors, and all that jazz.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Tolga O; Schornack, Sebastian; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2012-08-01

    Plant pathogenic oomycetes secrete a diverse repertoire of effector proteins that modulate host innate immunity and enable parasitic infection. Understanding how effectors evolve, translocate and traffic inside host cells, and perturb host processes are major themes in the study of oomycete-plant interactions. The last year has seen important progress in the study of oomycete effectors with, notably, the elucidation of the 3D structures of five RXLR effectors, and novel insights into how cytoplasmic effectors subvert host cells. In this review, we discuss these and other recent advances and highlight the most important open questions in oomycete effector biology.

  11. Insect-induced effects on plants and possible effectors used by galling and leaf-mining insects to manipulate their host-plant.

    PubMed

    Giron, David; Huguet, Elisabeth; Stone, Graham N; Body, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    Gall-inducing insects are iconic examples in the manipulation and reprogramming of plant development, inducing spectacular morphological and physiological changes of host-plant tissues within which the insect feeds and grows. Despite decades of research, effectors involved in gall induction and basic mechanisms of gall formation remain unknown. Recent research suggests that some aspects of the plant manipulation shown by gall-inducers may be shared with other insect herbivorous life histories. Here, we illustrate similarities and contrasts by reviewing current knowledge of metabolic and morphological effects induced on plants by gall-inducing and leaf-mining insects, and ask whether leaf-miners can also be considered to be plant reprogrammers. We review key plant functions targeted by various plant reprogrammers, including plant-manipulating insects and nematodes, and functionally characterize insect herbivore-derived effectors to provide a broader understanding of possible mechanisms used in host-plant manipulation. Consequences of plant reprogramming in terms of ecology, coevolution and diversification of plant-manipulating insects are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Host-dependent control of early regulatory and effector T-cell differentiation underlies the genetic susceptibility of RAG2-deficient mouse strains to transfer colitis.

    PubMed

    Valatas, V; He, J; Rivollier, A; Kolios, G; Kitamura, K; Kelsall, B L

    2013-05-01

    De novo differentiation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (induced (i) Tregs) occurs preferentially in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT). We addressed the contribution of background genetic factors in affecting the balance of iTreg, T helper type 1 (Th1), and Th17 cell differentiation in GALT in vivo following the transfer of naive CD4(+)CD45RB(high) T cells to strains of RAG2-deficient mice with differential susceptibility to inflammatory colitis. iTregs represented up to 5% of CD4(+) T cells in mesenteric lymph nodes of less-susceptible C57BL/6 RAG2(-/-) mice compared with <1% in highly susceptible C57BL/10 RAG2(-/-) mice 2 weeks following T-cell transfer before the onset of colitis. Early Treg induction was correlated inversely with effector cell expansion and the severity of colitis development, was controlled primarily by host and not T-cell-dependent factors, and was strongly associated with interleukin-12 (IL-12)/23 production by host CD11c(+)CD103(+) dendritic cells. These data highlight the importance of genetic factors regulating IL-12/23 production in controlling the balance between iTreg differentiation and effector-pathogenic CD4(+) T-cell expansion in lymphopenic mice and indicate a direct role for iTregs in the regulation of colonic inflammation in vivo.

  13. The Cyst Nematode Effector Protein 10A07 Targets and Recruits Host Posttranslational Machinery to Mediate Its Nuclear Trafficking and to Promote Parasitism in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Hewezi, Tarek; Juvale, Parijat S.; Piya, Sarbottam; Maier, Tom R.; Rambani, Aditi; Rice, J. Hollis; Mitchum, Melissa G.; Davis, Eric L.; Hussey, Richard S.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst nematodes synthesize and secrete effector proteins that are essential for parasitism. One such protein is the 10A07 effector from the sugar beet cyst nematode, Heterodera schachtii, which is exclusively expressed in the nematode dorsal gland cell during all nematode parasitic stages. Overexpression of H. schachtii 10A07 in Arabidopsis thaliana produced a hypersusceptible phenotype in response to H. schachtii infection along with developmental changes reminiscent of auxin effects. The 10A07 protein physically associates with a plant kinase and the IAA16 transcription factor in the cytoplasm and nucleus, respectively. The interacting plant kinase (IPK) phosphorylates 10A07 at Ser-144 and Ser-231 and mediates its trafficking from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocation to the nucleus is phosphorylation dependent since substitution of Ser-144 and Ser-231 by alanine resulted in exclusive cytoplasmic accumulation of 10A07. IPK and IAA16 are highly upregulated in the nematode-induced syncytium (feeding cells), and deliberate manipulations of their expression significantly alter plant susceptibility to H. schachtii in an additive fashion. An inactive variant of IPK functioned antagonistically to the wild-type IPK and caused a dominant-negative phenotype of reduced plant susceptibility. Thus, exploitation of host processes to the advantage of the parasites is one mechanism by which cyst nematodes promote parasitism of host plants. PMID:25715285

  14. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex

    SciTech Connect

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2013-04-01

    The structure of a SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex from Yersinia reveals the bacterial state of a protein that adopts different folds in the host and pathogen environments. Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH–YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called β-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the β-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the β-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed.

  15. Live cell imaging reveals novel functions of Salmonella enterica SPI2-T3SS effector proteins in remodeling of the host cell endosomal system.

    PubMed

    Rajashekar, Roopa; Liebl, David; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Liss, Viktoria; Hensel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular Salmonella enterica induce a massive remodeling of the endosomal system in infected host cells. One dramatic consequence of this interference is the induction of various extensive tubular aggregations of membrane vesicles, and tubules positive for late endosomal/lysosomal markers are referred to as Salmonella-induced filaments or SIF. SIF are highly dynamic in nature with extension and collapse velocities of 0.4-0.5 µm x sec-1. The induction of SIF depends on the function of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 (SPI2) encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) and a subset of effector proteins. In this study, we applied live cell imaging and electron microscopy to analyze the role of individual effector proteins in SIF morphology and dynamic properties of SIF. SIF in cells infected with sifB, sseJ, sseK1, sseK2, sseI, sseL, sspH1, sspH2, slrP, steC, gogB or pipB mutant strains showed a morphology and dynamics comparable to SIF induced by WT Salmonella. SIF were absent in cells infected with the sifA-deficient strain and live cell analyses allowed tracking of the loss of the SCV membrane of intracellular sifA Salmonella. In contrast to analyses in fixed cells, in living host cells SIF induced by sseF- or sseG-deficient strains were not discontinuous, but rather continuous and thinner in diameter. A very dramatic phenotype was observed for the pipB2-deficient strain that induced very bulky, non-dynamic aggregations of membrane vesicles. Our study underlines the requirement of the study of Salmonella-host interaction in living systems and reveals new phenotypes due to the intracellular activities of Salmonella.

  16. Effector proteins of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae alter the extracellular proteome of the host plant, Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kaffarnik, Florian A R; Jones, Alexandra M E; Rathjen, John P; Peck, Scott C

    2009-01-01

    In plants, potential pathogenic bacteria do not enter the host cell. Therefore, a large portion of the molecular interaction between microbial pathogen and host occurs in the extracellular space. To investigate potential mechanisms of disease resistance and susceptibility, we analyzed changes in the extracellular proteome, or secretome, using the Arabidopsis-Pseudomonas syringae pathosystem. This system provides the possibility to directly compare interactions resulting in basal resistance, susceptibility, and gene-specific resistance by using different genotypes of Pseudomonas on the same host. After infecting suspension-cultured cells of Arabidopsis with the Pseudomonas strain of interest, we isolated protein from the cell culture medium representing the secretome. After one-dimensional gel separation and in-gel digestion of proteins, we used iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) labeling in conjunction with LC-MS/MS to perform relative quantitative comparisons of the secretomes from each of these interactions. We obtained quantitative information from 45 Arabidopsis proteins that were present in all three biological experiments. We observed complex patterns of accumulation, ranging from proteins that decreased in abundance in the presence of all three bacterial strains to proteins that specifically increased or decreased during only one of the interactions. A particularly intriguing result was that the virulent bacteria (e.g. a susceptible interaction) caused the extracellular accumulation of a specific subset of host proteins lacking traditional signal peptides. These results indicate that the pathogen may manipulate host secretion to promote the successful invasion of plants.

  17. Host-selective toxins, Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxB, as necrotrophic effectors in the Pyrenophora tritici-repentis-wheat interaction.

    PubMed

    Ciuffetti, Lynda M; Manning, Viola A; Pandelova, Iovanna; Betts, Melania Figueroa; Martinez, J Patrick

    2010-09-01

    Host-selective toxins (HSTs) are effectors produced by some necrotrophic pathogenic fungi that typically confer the ability to cause disease. Often, diseases caused by pathogens that produce HSTs follow an inverse gene-for-gene model where toxin production is required for the ability to cause disease and a single locus in the host is responsible for toxin sensitivity and disease susceptibility. Pyrenophora tritici-repentis represents an ideal pathogen for studying the biological significance of such inverse gene-for-gene interactions, because it displays a complex race structure based on its production of multiple HSTs. Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxB are two proteinaceous HSTs produced by P. tritici-repentis that are structurally unrelated and appear to evoke different host responses, yet each toxin confers the ability to cause disease. This review will summarize the current knowledge of how these two dissimilar HSTs display distinct modes of action, yet each confers pathogenicity to P. tritici-repentis.

  18. Characterization of effector mechanisms at the host:parasite interface during the immune response to tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nirav; Kreider, Timothy; Urban, Joseph F.; Gause, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The protective immune response that develops following infection with many tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites is characterized by elevations in IL-4 and IL-13 and increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, granulocytes and macrophages. These cells accumulate at the site of infection and in many cases can mediate resistance to these large multicellular pathogens. Recent studies suggest novel potential mechanisms mediated by these immune cell populations through their differential activation and ability to stimulate production of novel effector molecules. These newly discovered protective mechanisms may provide novel strategies to develop immunotherapies and vaccines against this group of pathogens. In this review, we will examine recent studies elucidating mechanisms of host protection against three widely-used experimental murine models of tissue-dwelling intestinal nematode parasites: Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Trichuris muris and Trichinella spiralis. PMID:18804113

  19. Xenogeneic Graft-versus-Host-Disease in NOD-scid IL-2Rγnull Mice Display a T-Effector Memory Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Niwa; Flutter, Barry; Sanchez Rodriguez, Robert; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Barber, Linda D.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Nestle, Frank O.

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Graft-versus-Host Disease (GvHD) is a prevalent and potentially lethal complication that develops following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Humanized mouse models of xenogeneic-GvHD based upon immunodeficient strains injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC; “Hu-PBMC mice”) are important tools to study human immune function in vivo. The recent introduction of targeted deletions at the interleukin-2 common gamma chain (IL-2Rγnull), notably the NOD-scid IL-2Rγnull (NSG) and BALB/c-Rag2null IL-2Rγnull (BRG) mice, has led to improved human cell engraftment. Despite their widespread use, a comprehensive characterisation of engraftment and GvHD development in the Hu-PBMC NSG and BRG models has never been performed in parallel. We compared engrafted human lymphocyte populations in the peripheral blood, spleens, lymph nodes and bone marrow of these mice. Kinetics of engraftment differed between the two strains, in particular a significantly faster expansion of the human CD45+ compartment and higher engraftment levels of CD3+ T-cells were observed in NSG mice, which may explain the faster rate of GvHD development in this model. The pathogenesis of human GvHD involves anti-host effector cell reactivity and cutaneous tissue infiltration. Despite this, the presence of T-cell subsets and tissue homing markers has only recently been characterised in the peripheral blood of patients and has never been properly defined in Hu-PBMC models of GvHD. Engrafted human cells in NSG mice shows a prevalence of tissue homing cells with a T-effector memory (TEM) phenotype and high levels of cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) expression. Characterization of Hu-PBMC mice provides a strong preclinical platform for the application of novel immunotherapies targeting TEM-cell driven GvHD. PMID:22937164

  20. Influence of NleH effector expression, host genetics, and inflammation on Citrobacter rodentium colonization of mice.

    PubMed

    Feuerbacher, Leigh Ann; Hardwidge, Philip R

    2014-05-01

    The Escherichia coli NleH1 and NleH2 virulence proteins differentially regulate host transcription of innate immunity genes. The mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium encodes one NleH protein, which functions equivalently to E. coli NleH1. We examined the impact of host genetics and intestinal inflammation on the contribution of NleH to C. rodentium colonization of mice differing in LPS responsiveness. NleH expression was detrimental to C. rodentium in C57BL/10ScNJ mice, which do not mount LPS-induced inflammatory responses. This phenotype was reversed if inflammation was induced by chemical means. C. rodentium that expressed both E. coli NleH1 and NleH2 was hypervirulent in C3H/HeJ mice.

  1. Shigella effector IpaB-induced cholesterol relocation disrupts the Golgi complex and recycling network to inhibit host cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Mounier, Joëlle; Boncompain, Gaëlle; Senerovic, Lidija; Lagache, Thibault; Chrétien, Fabrice; Perez, Franck; Kolbe, Michael; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Sauvonnet, Nathalie

    2012-09-13

    Shigella infection causes destruction of the human colonic epithelial barrier. The Golgi network and recycling endosomes are essential for maintaining epithelial barrier function. Here we show that Shigella epithelial invasion induces fragmentation of the Golgi complex with consequent inhibition of both secretion and retrograde transport in the infected host cell. Shigella induces tubulation of the Rab11-positive compartment, thereby affecting cell surface receptor recycling. The molecular process underlying the observed damage to the Golgi complex and receptor recycling is a massive redistribution of plasma membrane cholesterol to the sites of Shigella entry. IpaB, a virulence factor of Shigella that is known to bind cholesterol, is necessary and sufficient to induce Golgi fragmentation and reorganization of the recycling compartment. Shigella infection-induced Golgi disorganization was also observed in vivo, suggesting that this mechanism affecting the sorting of cell surface molecules likely contributes to host epithelial barrier disruption associated with Shigella pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The Xanthomonas campestris type III effector XopJ targets the host cell proteasome to suppress salicylic-acid mediated plant defence.

    PubMed

    Üstün, Suayib; Bartetzko, Verena; Börnke, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) requires type III effector proteins (T3Es) for virulence. After translocation into the host cell, T3Es are thought to interact with components of host immunity to suppress defence responses. XopJ is a T3E protein from Xcv that interferes with plant immune responses; however, its host cellular target is unknown. Here we show that XopJ interacts with the proteasomal subunit RPT6 in yeast and in planta to inhibit proteasome activity. A C235A mutation within the catalytic triad of XopJ as well as a G2A exchange within the N-terminal myristoylation motif abolishes the ability of XopJ to inhibit the proteasome. Xcv ΔxopJ mutants are impaired in growth and display accelerated symptom development including tissue necrosis on susceptible pepper leaves. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the ability of the Xcv ΔxopJ to attenuate the development of leaf necrosis. The XopJ dependent delay of tissue degeneration correlates with reduced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and changes in defence- and senescence-associated gene expression. Necrosis upon infection with Xcv ΔxopJ was greatly reduced in pepper plants with reduced expression of NPR1, a central regulator of SA responses, demonstrating the involvement of SA-signalling in the development of XopJ dependent phenotypes. Our results suggest that XopJ-mediated inhibition of the proteasome interferes with SA-dependent defence response to attenuate onset of necrosis and to alter host transcription. A central role of the proteasome in plant defence is discussed.

  3. The Xanthomonas campestris Type III Effector XopJ Targets the Host Cell Proteasome to Suppress Salicylic-Acid Mediated Plant Defence

    PubMed Central

    Börnke, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) requires type III effector proteins (T3Es) for virulence. After translocation into the host cell, T3Es are thought to interact with components of host immunity to suppress defence responses. XopJ is a T3E protein from Xcv that interferes with plant immune responses; however, its host cellular target is unknown. Here we show that XopJ interacts with the proteasomal subunit RPT6 in yeast and in planta to inhibit proteasome activity. A C235A mutation within the catalytic triad of XopJ as well as a G2A exchange within the N-terminal myristoylation motif abolishes the ability of XopJ to inhibit the proteasome. Xcv ΔxopJ mutants are impaired in growth and display accelerated symptom development including tissue necrosis on susceptible pepper leaves. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 restored the ability of the Xcv ΔxopJ to attenuate the development of leaf necrosis. The XopJ dependent delay of tissue degeneration correlates with reduced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and changes in defence- and senescence-associated gene expression. Necrosis upon infection with Xcv ΔxopJ was greatly reduced in pepper plants with reduced expression of NPR1, a central regulator of SA responses, demonstrating the involvement of SA-signalling in the development of XopJ dependent phenotypes. Our results suggest that XopJ-mediated inhibition of the proteasome interferes with SA-dependent defence response to attenuate onset of necrosis and to alter host transcription. A central role of the proteasome in plant defence is discussed. PMID:23785289

  4. Filarial parasites develop faster and reproduce earlier in response to host immune effectors that determine filarial life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Babayan, Simon A; Read, Andrew F; Lawrence, Rachel A; Bain, Odile; Allen, Judith E

    2010-10-19

    Humans and other mammals mount vigorous immune assaults against helminth parasites, yet there are intriguing reports that the immune response can enhance rather than impair parasite development. It has been hypothesized that helminths, like many free-living organisms, should optimize their development and reproduction in response to cues predicting future life expectancy. However, immune-dependent development by helminth parasites has so far eluded such evolutionary explanation. By manipulating various arms of the immune response of experimental hosts, we show that filarial nematodes, the parasites responsible for debilitating diseases in humans like river blindness and elephantiasis, accelerate their development in response to the IL-5 driven eosinophilia they encounter when infecting a host. Consequently they produce microfilariae, their transmission stages, earlier and in greater numbers. Eosinophilia is a primary host determinant of filarial life expectancy, operating both at larval and at late adult stages in anatomically and temporally separate locations, and is implicated in vaccine-mediated protection. Filarial nematodes are therefore able to adjust their reproductive schedules in response to an environmental predictor of their probability of survival, as proposed by evolutionary theory, thereby mitigating the effects of the immune attack to which helminths are most susceptible. Enhancing protective immunity against filarial nematodes, for example through vaccination, may be less effective at reducing transmission than would be expected and may, at worst, lead to increased transmission and, hence, pathology.

  5. Host-Adaptation of Francisella tularensis Alters the Bacterium's Surface-Carbohydrates to Hinder Effectors of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zarrella, Tiffany M.; Singh, Anju; Bitsaktsis, Constantine; Rahman, Tabassum; Sahay, Bikash; Feustel, Paul J.; Gosselin, Edmund J.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Hazlett, Karsten R. O.

    2011-01-01

    Background The gram-negative bacterium Francisella tularensis survives in arthropods, fresh water amoeba, and mammals with both intracellular and extracellular phases and could reasonably be expected to express distinct phenotypes in these environments. The presence of a capsule on this bacterium has been controversial with some groups finding such a structure while other groups report that no capsule could be identified. Previously we reported in vitro culture conditions for this bacterium which, in contrast to typical methods, yielded a bacterial phenotype that mimics that of the bacterium's mammalian, extracellular phase. Methods/Findings SDS-PAGE and carbohydrate analysis of differentially-cultivated F. tularensis LVS revealed that bacteria displaying the host-adapted phenotype produce both longer polymers of LPS O-antigen (OAg) and additional HMW carbohydrates/glycoproteins that are reduced/absent in non-host-adapted bacteria. Analysis of wildtype and OAg-mutant bacteria indicated that the induced changes in surface carbohydrates involved both OAg and non-OAg species. To assess the impact of these HMW carbohydrates on the access of outer membrane constituents to antibody we used differentially-cultivated bacteria in vitro to immunoprecipitate antibodies directed against outer membrane moieties. We observed that the surface-carbohydrates induced during host–adaptation shield many outer membrane antigens from binding by antibody. Similar assays with normal mouse serum indicate that the induced HMW carbohydrates also impede complement deposition. Using an in vitro macrophage infection assay, we find that the bacterial HMW carbohydrate impedes TLR2-dependent, pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages. Lastly we show that upon host-adaptation, the human-virulent strain, F. tularensis SchuS4 also induces capsule production with the effect of reducing macrophage-activation and accelerating tularemia pathogenesis in mice. Conclusion F. tularensis undergoes

  6. Hammondia hammondi Harbors Functional Orthologs of the Host-Modulating Effectors GRA15 and ROP16 but Is Distinguished from Toxoplasma gondii by a Unique Transcriptional Profile

    PubMed Central

    Walzer, Katelyn A.; Wier, Gregory M.; Dam, Rachel A.; Srinivasan, Ananth R.; Borges, Adair L.; English, Elizabeth D.; Herrmann, Daland C.; Schares, Gereon; Dubey, Jitender P.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and its nearest extant relative, Hammondia hammondi, are phenotypically distinct despite their remarkable similarity in gene content, synteny, and functionality. To begin to identify genetic differences that might drive distinct infection phenotypes of T. gondii and H. hammondi, in the present study we (i) determined whether two known host-interacting proteins, dense granule protein 15 (GRA15) and rhoptry protein 16 (ROP16), were functionally conserved in H. hammondi and (ii) performed the first comparative transcriptional analysis of H. hammondi and T. gondii sporulated oocysts. We found that GRA15 and ROP16 from H. hammondi (HhGRA15 and HhROP16) modulate the host NF-κB and STAT6 pathways, respectively, when expressed heterologously in T. gondii. We also found the transcriptomes of H. hammondi and T. gondii to be highly distinct. Consistent with the spontaneous conversion of H. hammondi tachyzoites into bradyzoites both in vitro and in vivo, H. hammondi high-abundance transcripts are enriched for genes that are of greater abundance in T. gondii bradyzoites. We also identified genes that are of high transcript abundance in H. hammondi but are poorly expressed in multiple T. gondii life stages, suggesting that these genes are uniquely expressed in H. hammondi. Taken together, these data confirm the functional conservation of known T. gondii virulence effectors in H. hammondi and point to transcriptional differences as a potential source of the phenotypic differences between these species. PMID:25280815

  7. The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans mediates expression of the host gene HSVGT.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Gal; Manulis-Sasson, Shulamit; Chalupowicz, Laura; Teper, Doron; Yeheskel, Adva; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Sessa, Guido; Barash, Isaac

    2012-02-01

    The type III effector HsvG of the gall-forming Pantoea agglomerans pv. gypsophilae is a DNA-binding protein that is imported to the host nucleus and involved in host specificity. The DNA-binding region of HsvG was delineated to 266 amino acids located within a secondary structure region near the N-terminus of the protein but did not display any homology to canonical DNA-binding motifs. A binding site selection procedure was used to isolate a target gene of HsvG, named HSVGT, in Gypsophila paniculata. HSVGT is a predicted acidic protein of the DnaJ family with 244 amino acids. It harbors characteristic conserved motifs of a eukaryotic transcription factor, including a bipartite nuclear localization signal, zinc finger, and leucine zipper DNA-binding motifs. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated that HSVGT transcription is specifically induced in planta within 2 h after inoculation with the wild-type P. agglomerans pv. gypsophilae compared with the hsvG mutant. Induction of HSVGT reached a peak of sixfold at 4 h after inoculation and progressively declined thereafter. Gel-shift assay demonstrated that HsvG binds to the HSVGT promoter, indicating that HSVGT is a direct target of HsvG. Our results support the hypothesis that HsvG functions as a transcription factor in gypsophila.

  8. Mutations in the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Type III Secretion System Needle Protein, YscF, That Specifically Abrogate Effector Translocation into Host Cells▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Alison J.; Mecsas, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The trafficking of effectors, termed Yops, from Yersinia spp. into host cells is a multistep process that requires the type III secretion system (TTSS). The TTSS has three main structural parts: a base, a needle, and a translocon, which work together to ensure the polarized movement of Yops directly from the bacterial cytosol into the host cell cytosol. To understand the interactions that take place at the interface between the tip of the TTSS needle and the translocon, we developed a screen to identify mutations in the needle protein YscF that separated its function in secretion from its role in translocation. We identified 25 translocation-defective (TD) yscF mutants, which fall into five phenotypic classes. Some classes exhibit aberrant needle structure and/or reduced levels of Yop secretion, consistent with known functions for YscF. Strikingly, two yscF TD classes formed needles and secreted Yops normally but displayed distinct translocation defects. Class I yscF TD mutants showed diminished pore formation, suggesting incomplete pore insertion and/or assembly. Class II yscF TD mutants formed pores but showed nonpolar translocation, suggesting unstable needle-translocon interactions. These results indicate that YscF functions in Yop secretion and translocation can be genetically separated. Furthermore, the identification of YscF residues that are required for the assembly of the translocon and/or productive interactions with the translocon has allowed us to initiate the mapping of the needle-translocon interface. PMID:17071752

  9. Mutations in the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis type III secretion system needle protein, YscF, that specifically abrogate effector translocation into host cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alison J; Mecsas, Joan

    2007-01-01

    The trafficking of effectors, termed Yops, from Yersinia spp. into host cells is a multistep process that requires the type III secretion system (TTSS). The TTSS has three main structural parts: a base, a needle, and a translocon, which work together to ensure the polarized movement of Yops directly from the bacterial cytosol into the host cell cytosol. To understand the interactions that take place at the interface between the tip of the TTSS needle and the translocon, we developed a screen to identify mutations in the needle protein YscF that separated its function in secretion from its role in translocation. We identified 25 translocation-defective (TD) yscF mutants, which fall into five phenotypic classes. Some classes exhibit aberrant needle structure and/or reduced levels of Yop secretion, consistent with known functions for YscF. Strikingly, two yscF TD classes formed needles and secreted Yops normally but displayed distinct translocation defects. Class I yscF TD mutants showed diminished pore formation, suggesting incomplete pore insertion and/or assembly. Class II yscF TD mutants formed pores but showed nonpolar translocation, suggesting unstable needle-translocon interactions. These results indicate that YscF functions in Yop secretion and translocation can be genetically separated. Furthermore, the identification of YscF residues that are required for the assembly of the translocon and/or productive interactions with the translocon has allowed us to initiate the mapping of the needle-translocon interface.

  10. Magnaporthe oryzae effectors MoHEG13 and MoHEG16 interfere with host infection and MoHEG13 counteracts cell death caused by Magnaporthe-NLPs in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Mogga, Valerie; Delventhal, Rhoda; Weidenbach, Denise; Langer, Samantha; Bertram, Philipp M; Andresen, Karsten; Thines, Eckhard; Kroj, Thomas; Schaffrath, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    Adapted pathogens are able to modulate cell responses of their hosts most likely due to the activity of secreted effector molecules thereby enabling colonisation by ostensible nonhost pathogens. It is postulated that host and nonhost pathogens of a given plant species differ in their repertoire of secreted effector molecules that are able to suppress plant resistance. We pursued the strategy of identifying novel effectors of Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of blast disease, by comparing the infection process of closely related host vs. nonhost Magnaporthe species on barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). When both types of pathogen simultaneously attacked the same cell, the nonhost isolate became a successful pathogen possibly due to potent effectors secreted by the host isolate. Microarray studies led to a set of M. oryzae Hypothetical Effector Genes (MoHEGs) which were classified as Early- and LateMoHEGs according to the maximal transcript abundance during colonization of barley. Interestingly, orthologs of these MoHEGs from a nonhost pathogen were similarly regulated when investigated in a host situation, suggesting evolutionary conserved functions. Knockout mutants of MoHEG16 from the group of EarlyMoHEGs were less virulent on barley and microscopic studies revealed an attenuated transition from epidermal to mesophyll colonization. MoHEG13, a LateMoHEG, was shown to antagonize cell death induced by M. oryzae Necrosis-and ethylene-inducing-protein-1 (Nep1)-like proteins in Nicotiana benthamiana. MoHEG13 has a virulence function as a knockout mutant showed attenuated disease progression when inoculated on barley.

  11. Immunosuppressive Yersinia Effector YopM Binds DEAD Box Helicase DDX3 to Control Ribosomal S6 Kinase in the Nucleus of Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Berneking, Laura; Schnapp, Marie; Rumm, Andreas; Trasak, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam; Kikhney, Alexey G; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Buck, Friedrich; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Svergun, Dmitri I; Hentschke, Moritz; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) is a crucial immunosuppressive effector of the plaque agent Yersinia pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia species. YopM enters the nucleus of host cells but neither the mechanisms governing its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling nor its intranuclear activities are known. Here we identify the DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) as a novel interaction partner of Y. enterocolitica YopM and present the three-dimensional structure of a YopM:DDX3 complex. Knockdown of DDX3 or inhibition of the exportin chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) increased the nuclear level of YopM suggesting that YopM exploits DDX3 to exit the nucleus via the CRM1 export pathway. Increased nuclear YopM levels caused enhanced phosphorylation of Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (RSK1) in the nucleus. In Y. enterocolitica infected primary human macrophages YopM increased the level of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and this effect required interaction of YopM with RSK and was enhanced by blocking YopM's nuclear export. We propose that the DDX3/CRM1 mediated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of YopM determines the extent of phosphorylation of RSK in the nucleus to control transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines.

  12. Immunosuppressive Yersinia Effector YopM Binds DEAD Box Helicase DDX3 to Control Ribosomal S6 Kinase in the Nucleus of Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rumm, Andreas; Trasak, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Klaus; Alawi, Malik; Grundhoff, Adam; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Buck, Friedrich; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hentschke, Moritz; Aepfelbacher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) is a crucial immunosuppressive effector of the plaque agent Yersinia pestis and other pathogenic Yersinia species. YopM enters the nucleus of host cells but neither the mechanisms governing its nucleocytoplasmic shuttling nor its intranuclear activities are known. Here we identify the DEAD-box helicase 3 (DDX3) as a novel interaction partner of Y. enterocolitica YopM and present the three-dimensional structure of a YopM:DDX3 complex. Knockdown of DDX3 or inhibition of the exportin chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1) increased the nuclear level of YopM suggesting that YopM exploits DDX3 to exit the nucleus via the CRM1 export pathway. Increased nuclear YopM levels caused enhanced phosphorylation of Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (RSK1) in the nucleus. In Y. enterocolitica infected primary human macrophages YopM increased the level of Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA and this effect required interaction of YopM with RSK and was enhanced by blocking YopM's nuclear export. We propose that the DDX3/CRM1 mediated nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of YopM determines the extent of phosphorylation of RSK in the nucleus to control transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines. PMID:27300509

  13. The type III effectors of Xanthomonas.

    PubMed

    White, Frank F; Potnis, Neha; Jones, Jeffrey B; Koebnik, Ralf

    2009-11-01

    A review of type III effectors (T3 effectors) from strains of Xanthomonas reveals a growing list of candidate and known effectors based on functional assays and sequence and structural similarity searches of genomic data. We propose that the effectors and suspected effectors should be distributed into 39 so-called Xop groups reflecting sequence similarity. Some groups have structural motifs for putative enzymatic functions, and recent studies have provided considerable insight into the interaction with host factors in their function as mediators of virulence and elicitors of resistance for a few specific T3 effectors. Many groups are related to T3 effectors of plant and animal pathogenic bacteria, and several groups appear to have been exploited primarily by Xanthomonas species based on available data. At the same time, a relatively large number of candidate effectors remain to be examined in more detail with regard to their function within host cells.

  14. New Insights into the Roles of Host Gene-Necrotrophic Effector Interactions in Governing Susceptibility of Durum Wheat to Tan Spot and Septoria nodorum Blotch.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Simerjot K; Liu, Zhaohui; Overlander, Megan E; Zhang, Zengcui; Xu, Steven S; Friesen, Timothy L; Faris, Justin D

    2016-12-07

    Tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) are important diseases of wheat caused by the necrotrophic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Parastagonospora nodorum, respectively. The P. tritici-repentis necrotrophic effector (NE) Ptr ToxB causes tan spot when recognized by the Tsc2 gene. The NE ToxA is produced by both pathogens and has been associated with the development of both tan spot and SNB when recognized by the wheat Tsn1 gene. Most work to study these interactions has been conducted in common wheat, but little has been done in durum wheat. Here, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of a segregating biparental population indicated that the Tsc2-Ptr ToxB interaction plays a prominent role in the development of tan spot in durum. However, analysis of two biparental populations indicated that the Tsn1-ToxA interaction was not associated with the development of tan spot, but was strongly associated with the development of SNB. Pa. nodorum expressed ToxA at high levels in infected Tsn1 plants, whereas ToxA expression in P. tritici-repentis was barely detectable, suggesting that the differences in disease levels associated with the Tsn1-ToxA interaction were due to differences in pathogen expression of ToxA These and previous results together indicate that: (1) the effects of Tsn1-ToxA on tan spot in common wheat can range from nonsignificant to highly significant depending on the host genetic background; (2) Tsn1-ToxA is not a significant factor for tan spot development in durum wheat; and (3) Tsn1-ToxA plays a major role in SNB development in both common and durum wheat. Durum and common wheat breeders alike should strive to remove both Tsc2 and Tsn1 from their materials to achieve disease resistance.

  15. New Insights into the Roles of Host Gene-Necrotrophic Effector Interactions in Governing Susceptibility of Durum Wheat to Tan Spot and Septoria nodorum Blotch

    PubMed Central

    Virdi, Simerjot K.; Liu, Zhaohui; Overlander, Megan E.; Zhang, Zengcui; Xu, Steven S.; Friesen, Timothy L.; Faris, Justin D.

    2016-01-01

    Tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) are important diseases of wheat caused by the necrotrophic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Parastagonospora nodorum, respectively. The P. tritici-repentis necrotrophic effector (NE) Ptr ToxB causes tan spot when recognized by the Tsc2 gene. The NE ToxA is produced by both pathogens and has been associated with the development of both tan spot and SNB when recognized by the wheat Tsn1 gene. Most work to study these interactions has been conducted in common wheat, but little has been done in durum wheat. Here, quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis of a segregating biparental population indicated that the Tsc2-Ptr ToxB interaction plays a prominent role in the development of tan spot in durum. However, analysis of two biparental populations indicated that the Tsn1-ToxA interaction was not associated with the development of tan spot, but was strongly associated with the development of SNB. Pa. nodorum expressed ToxA at high levels in infected Tsn1 plants, whereas ToxA expression in P. tritici-repentis was barely detectable, suggesting that the differences in disease levels associated with the Tsn1-ToxA interaction were due to differences in pathogen expression of ToxA. These and previous results together indicate that: (1) the effects of Tsn1-ToxA on tan spot in common wheat can range from nonsignificant to highly significant depending on the host genetic background; (2) Tsn1-ToxA is not a significant factor for tan spot development in durum wheat; and (3) Tsn1-ToxA plays a major role in SNB development in both common and durum wheat. Durum and common wheat breeders alike should strive to remove both Tsc2 and Tsn1 from their materials to achieve disease resistance. PMID:27777262

  16. The lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a novel Phytophthora resistance component and a potential host target for a RXLR effector.

    PubMed

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-03-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar 'gain-of-susceptibility' phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process.

  17. The Lectin Receptor Kinase LecRK-I.9 Is a Novel Phytophthora Resistance Component and a Potential Host Target for a RXLR Effector

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Klaas; de Sain, Mara; Weide, Rob; Gouget, Anne; Klamer, Sofieke; Canut, Herve; Govers, Francine

    2011-01-01

    In plants, an active defense against biotrophic pathogens is dependent on a functional continuum between the cell wall (CW) and the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus anticipated that proteins maintaining this continuum also function in defense. The legume-like lectin receptor kinase LecRK-I.9 is a putative mediator of CW-PM adhesions in Arabidopsis and is known to bind in vitro to the Phytophthora infestans RXLR-dEER effector IPI-O via a RGD cell attachment motif present in IPI-O. Here we show that LecRK-I.9 is associated with the plasma membrane, and that two T-DNA insertions lines deficient in LecRK-I.9 (lecrk-I.9) have a ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype specifically towards the oomycete Phytophthora brassicae. Accordingly, overexpression of LecRK-I.9 leads to enhanced resistance to P. brassicae. A similar ‘gain-of-susceptibility’ phenotype was observed in transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing ipiO (35S-ipiO1). This phenocopy behavior was also observed with respect to other defense-related functions; lecrk-I.9 and 35S-ipiO1 were both disturbed in pathogen- and MAMP-triggered callose deposition. By site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the RGD cell attachment motif in IPI-O is not only essential for disrupting the CW-PM adhesions, but also for disease suppression. These results suggest that destabilizing the CW-PM continuum is one of the tactics used by Phytophthora to promote infection. As countermeasure the host may want to strengthen CW-PM adhesions and the novel Phytophthora resistance component LecRK-I.9 seems to function in this process. PMID:21483488

  18. Phosphorylation of HopQ1, a Type III Effector from Pseudomonas syringae, Creates a Binding Site for Host 14-3-3 Proteins1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Giska, Fabian; Lichocka, Małgorzata; Piechocki, Marcin; Dadlez, Michał; Schmelzer, Elmon; Hennig, Jacek; Krzymowska, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    HopQ1 (for Hrp outer protein Q), a type III effector secreted by Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola, is widely conserved among diverse genera of plant bacteria. It promotes the development of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). However, when this same effector is injected into Nicotiana benthamiana cells, it is recognized by the immune system and prevents infection. Although the ability to synthesize HopQ1 determines host specificity, the role it plays inside plant cells remains unexplored. Following transient expression in planta, HopQ1 was shown to copurify with host 14-3-3 proteins. The physical interaction between HopQ1 and 14-3-3a was confirmed in planta using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy technique. Moreover, mass spectrometric analyses detected specific phosphorylation of the canonical 14-3-3 binding site (RSXpSXP, where pS denotes phosphoserine) located in the amino-terminal region of HopQ1. Amino acid substitution within this motif abrogated the association and led to altered subcellular localization of HopQ1. In addition, the mutated HopQ1 protein showed reduced stability in planta. These data suggest that the association between host 14-3-3 proteins and HopQ1 is important for modulating the properties of this bacterial effector. PMID:23396834

  19. In Planta Processing and Glycosylation of a Nematode CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION-Like Effector and Its Interaction with a Host CLAVATA2-Like Receptor to Promote Parasitism1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shiyan; Lang, Ping; Chronis, Demosthenis; Zhang, Sheng; De Jong, Walter S.; Mitchum, Melissa G.

    2015-01-01

    Like other biotrophic plant pathogens, plant-parasitic nematodes secrete effector proteins into host cells to facilitate infection. Effector proteins that mimic plant CLAVATA3/ENDOSPERM SURROUNDING REGION-related (CLE) proteins have been identified in several cyst nematodes, including the potato cyst nematode (PCN); however, the mechanistic details of this cross-kingdom mimicry are poorly understood. Plant CLEs are posttranslationally modified and proteolytically processed to function as bioactive ligands critical to various aspects of plant development. Using ectopic expression coupled with nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we show that the in planta mature form of proGrCLE1, a multidomain CLE effector secreted by PCN during infection, is a 12-amino acid arabinosylated glycopeptide (named GrCLE1-1Hyp4,7g) with striking structural similarity to mature plant CLE peptides. This glycopeptide is more resistant to hydrolytic degradation and binds with higher affinity to a CLAVATA2-like receptor (StCLV2) from potato (Solanum tuberosum) than its nonglycosylated forms. We further show that StCLV2 is highly up-regulated at nematode infection sites and that transgenic potatoes with reduced StCLV2 expression are less susceptible to PCN infection, indicating that interference of the CLV2-mediated signaling pathway confers nematode resistance in crop plants. These results strongly suggest that phytonematodes have evolved to utilize host cellular posttranslational modification and processing machinery for the activation of CLE effectors following secretion into plant cells and highlight the significance of arabinosylation in regulating nematode CLE effector activity. Our finding also provides evidence that multidomain CLEs are modified and processed similarly to single-domain CLEs, adding new insight into CLE maturation in plants. PMID:25416475

  20. EffectorP: predicting fungal effector proteins from secretomes using machine learning.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Gardiner, Donald M; Dodds, Peter N; Tini, Francesco; Covarelli, Lorenzo; Singh, Karam B; Manners, John M; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2016-04-01

    Eukaryotic filamentous plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that modulate the host cell to facilitate infection. Computational effector candidate identification and subsequent functional characterization delivers valuable insights into plant-pathogen interactions. However, effector prediction in fungi has been challenging due to a lack of unifying sequence features such as conserved N-terminal sequence motifs. Fungal effectors are commonly predicted from secretomes based on criteria such as small size and cysteine-rich, which suffers from poor accuracy. We present EffectorP which pioneers the application of machine learning to fungal effector prediction. EffectorP improves fungal effector prediction from secretomes based on a robust signal of sequence-derived properties, achieving sensitivity and specificity of over 80%. Features that discriminate fungal effectors from secreted noneffectors are predominantly sequence length, molecular weight and protein net charge, as well as cysteine, serine and tryptophan content. We demonstrate that EffectorP is powerful when combined with in planta expression data for predicting high-priority effector candidates. EffectorP is the first prediction program for fungal effectors based on machine learning. Our findings will facilitate functional fungal effector studies and improve our understanding of effectors in plant-pathogen interactions. EffectorP is available at http://effectorp.csiro.au.

  1. A mutant with aberrant extracellular LcrV-YscF interactions fails to form pores and translocate Yop effector proteins but retains the ability to trigger Yop secretion in response to host cell contact.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Dana E; Murphy, Julia L; Davis, Alison J; Mecsas, Joan

    2013-05-01

    The plasmid-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS) of Yersinia spp. is responsible for the delivery of effector proteins into cells of the innate immune system, where these effectors disrupt the target cells' activity. Successful translocation of effectors into mammalian cells requires Yersinia to both insert a translocon into the host cell membrane and sense contact with host cells. To probe the events necessary for translocation, we investigated protein-protein interactions among TTSS components of the needle-translocon complex using a chemical cross-linking-based approach. We detected extracellular protein complexes containing YscF, LcrV, and YopD that were dependent upon needle formation. The formation of these complexes was evaluated in a secretion-competent but translocation-defective mutant, the YscFD28AD46A strain (expressing YscF with the mutations D28A and D46A). We found that one of the YscF and most of the LcrV and YopD cross-linked complexes were nearly absent in this mutant. Furthermore, the YscFD28AD46A strain did not support YopB insertion into mammalian membranes, supporting the idea that the LcrV tip complex is required for YopB insertion and translocon formation. However, the YscFD28AD46A strain did secrete Yops in the presence of host cells, indicating that a translocation-competent tip complex is not required to sense contact with host cells to trigger Yop secretion. In conclusion, in the absence of cross-linkable LcrV-YscF interactions, translocon insertion is abolished, but Yersinia still retains the ability to sense cell contact.

  2. A Mutant with Aberrant Extracellular LcrV-YscF Interactions Fails To Form Pores and Translocate Yop Effector Proteins but Retains the Ability To Trigger Yop Secretion in Response to Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Dana E.; Murphy, Julia L.; Davis, Alison J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasmid-encoded type three secretion system (TTSS) of Yersinia spp. is responsible for the delivery of effector proteins into cells of the innate immune system, where these effectors disrupt the target cells' activity. Successful translocation of effectors into mammalian cells requires Yersinia to both insert a translocon into the host cell membrane and sense contact with host cells. To probe the events necessary for translocation, we investigated protein-protein interactions among TTSS components of the needle-translocon complex using a chemical cross-linking-based approach. We detected extracellular protein complexes containing YscF, LcrV, and YopD that were dependent upon needle formation. The formation of these complexes was evaluated in a secretion-competent but translocation-defective mutant, the YscFD28AD46A strain (expressing YscF with the mutations D28A and D46A). We found that one of the YscF and most of the LcrV and YopD cross-linked complexes were nearly absent in this mutant. Furthermore, the YscFD28AD46A strain did not support YopB insertion into mammalian membranes, supporting the idea that the LcrV tip complex is required for YopB insertion and translocon formation. However, the YscFD28AD46A strain did secrete Yops in the presence of host cells, indicating that a translocation-competent tip complex is not required to sense contact with host cells to trigger Yop secretion. In conclusion, in the absence of cross-linkable LcrV-YscF interactions, translocon insertion is abolished, but Yersinia still retains the ability to sense cell contact. PMID:23475976

  3. The Bordetella Secreted Regulator BspR Is Translocated into the Nucleus of Host Cells via Its N-Terminal Moiety: Evaluation of Bacterial Effector Translocation by the Escherichia coli Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Akio; Nishimura, Ryutaro; Tanaka, Naomichi; Kurushima, Jun; Kuwae, Asaomi

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is genetically related to B. pertussis and B. parapertussis, which cause respiratory tract infections in humans. These pathogens possess a large number of virulence factors, including the type III secretion system (T3SS), which is required for the delivery of effectors into the host cells. In a previous study, we identified a transcriptional regulator, BspR, that is involved in the regulation of the T3SS-related genes in response to iron-starved conditions. A unique feature of BspR is that this regulator is secreted into the extracellular milieu via the T3SS. To further characterize the role of BspR in extracellular localization, we constructed various truncated derivatives of BspR and investigated their translocation into the host cells using conventional translocation assays. In this study, the effector translocation was evaluated by the T3SS of enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), since the exogenous expression of BspR triggers severe repression of the Bordetella T3SS expression. The results of the translocation assays using the EPEC T3SS showed that the N-terminal 150 amino acid (aa) residues of BspR are sufficient for translocation into the host cells in a T3SS-dependent manner. In addition, exogenous expression of BspR in HeLa cells demonstrated that the N-terminal 100 aa residues are involved in the nuclear localization. In contrast, the N-terminal 54 aa residues are sufficient for the extracellular secretion into the bacterial culture supernatant via the EPEC T3SS. Thus, BspR is not only a transcriptional regulator in bacteria cytosol, but also functions as an effector that translocates into the nuclei of infected host cells. PMID:26247360

  4. Role of EscU auto-cleavage in promoting type III effector translocation into host cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Type III secretion systems (T3SS) of bacterial pathogens coordinate effector protein injection into eukaryotic cells. The YscU/FlhB group of proteins comprises members associated with T3SS which undergo a specific auto-cleavage event at a conserved NPTH amino acid sequence. The crystal structure of the C-terminal portion of EscU from enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) suggests this auto-cleaving protein provides an interface for substrate interactions involved in type III secretion events. Results We demonstrate EscU must be auto-cleaved for bacteria to efficiently deliver type III effectors into infected cells. A non-cleaving EscU(N262A) variant supported very low levels of in vitro effector secretion. These effector proteins were not able to support EPEC infection of cultured HeLa cells. In contrast, EscU(P263A) was demonstrated to be partially auto-cleaved and moderately restored effector translocation and functionality during EPEC infection, revealing an intermediate phenotype. EscU auto-cleavage was not required for inner membrane association of the T3SS ATPase EscN or the ring forming protein EscJ. In contrast, in the absence of EscU auto-cleavage, inner membrane association of the multicargo type III secretion chaperone CesT was altered suggesting that EscU auto-cleavage supports docking of chaperone-effector complexes at the inner membrane. In support of this interpretation, evidence of novel effector protein breakdown products in secretion assays were linked to the non-cleaved status of EscU(N262A). Conclusions These data provide new insight into the role of EscU auto-cleavage in EPEC. The experimental data suggests that EscU auto-cleavage results in a suitable binding interface at the inner membrane that accommodates protein complexes during type III secretion events. The results also demonstrate that altered EPEC genetic backgrounds that display intermediate levels of effector secretion and translocation can be isolated and studied

  5. New insights into the roles of host gene-necrotrophic effector interactions in governing susceptibility of durum wheat to tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) are important diseases of wheat caused by the necrotrophic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Parastagonospora nodorum, respectively. The P. tritici-repentis necrotrophic effector (NE) Ptr ToxB causes tan spot when recognized by the Tsc2 gene. The NE To...

  6. Shigella flexneri T3SS effectors OspB and OspF target the nucleus to down-regulate the host inflammatory response via interactions with retinoblastoma protein

    PubMed Central

    Zurawski, Daniel V.; Mumy, Karen L.; Faherty, Christina S.; McCormick, Beth A.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary OspF, OspG, and IpaH9.8 are type III secretion system (T3SS) effectors of Shigella flexneri that down-regulate the host innate immune response. OspF modifies mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) transepithelial migration associated with Shigella invasion. OspF also localizes in the nucleus to mediate chromatin remodeling resulting in reduced transcription of inflammatory cytokines. We now report that OspB can be added to the set of S. flexneri T3SS effectors required to modulate the innate immune response. T84 cells infected with a ΔospB mutant resulted in reduced PMN transepithelial migration and MAPK signaling. Tagged versions of OspB localized with endosomes and the nucleus. Further, T84 cells infected with the ΔospB mutant showed increased levels of secreted IL-8 compared to wild-type infected cells. Both GST-OspB and GST-OspF co-precipitated retinoblastoma protein (Rb) from host cell lysates. Because ΔospB and ΔospF mutants share similar phenotypes, and OspB and OspF share a host binding partner, we propose that OspB and OspF facilitate the remodeling of chromatin via interactions with Rb resulting in diminished inflammatory cytokine production. The requirement of multiple T3SS effectors to modulate the innate immune response correlates to the complexity of the human immune system. PMID:19017275

  7. Epigenetic control of effectors in plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gijzen, Mark; Ishmael, Chelsea; Shrestha, Sirjana D

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogens display impressive versatility in adapting to host immune systems. Pathogen effector proteins facilitate disease but can become avirulence (Avr) factors when the host acquires discrete recognition capabilities that trigger immunity. The mechanisms that lead to changes to pathogen Avr factors that enable escape from host immunity are diverse, and include epigenetic switches that allow for reuse or recycling of effectors. This perspective outlines possibilities of how epigenetic control of Avr effector gene expression may have arisen and persisted in filamentous plant pathogens, and how it presents special problems for diagnosis and detection of specific pathogen strains or pathotypes.

  8. A functionally conserved Zn2 Cys6 binuclear cluster transcription factor class regulates necrotrophic effector gene expression and host-specific virulence of two major Pleosporales fungal pathogens of wheat.

    PubMed

    Rybak, Kasia; See, Pao Theen; Phan, Huyen T T; Syme, Robert A; Moffat, Caroline S; Oliver, Richard P; Tan, Kar-Chun

    2017-04-01

    The fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is the causal agent of Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat (Triticum aestivum). The interaction is mediated by multiple fungal necrotrophic effector-dominant host sensitivity gene interactions. The three best-characterized effector-sensitivity gene systems are SnToxA-Tsn1, SnTox1-Snn1 and SnTox3-Snn3. These effector genes are highly expressed during early infection, but expression decreases as the infection progresses to tissue necrosis and sporulation. However, the mechanism of regulation is unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized a gene, referred to as PnPf2, which encodes a putative zinc finger transcription factor. PnPf2 deletion resulted in the down-regulation of SnToxA and SnTox3 expression. Virulence on Tsn1 and Snn3 wheat cultivars was strongly reduced. The SnTox1-Snn1 interaction remained unaffected. Furthermore, we have also identified and deleted an orthologous PtrPf2 from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis which possesses a near-identical ToxA that was acquired from P. nodorum via horizontal gene transfer. PtrPf2 deletion also resulted in the down-regulation of PtrToxA expression and a near-complete loss of virulence on Tsn1 wheat. We have demonstrated, for the first time, evidence for a functionally conserved signalling component that plays a role in the regulation of a common/horizontally transferred effector found in two major fungal pathogens of wheat.

  9. Diversion at the ER: How Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into host erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Römisch, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is caused by parasites which live in host erythrocytes and remodel these cells to provide optimally for the parasites' needs by exporting effector proteins into the host cells. Eight years ago the discovery of a host cell targeting sequence present in both soluble and transmembrane  P. falciparum exported proteins generated a starting point for investigating the mechanism of parasite protein transport into infected erythrocytes. Since then many confusing facts about this targeting signal have emerged. In this paper, I try to make sense of them.

  10. A catalogue of the effector secretome of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Sophien

    2006-01-01

    The oomycetes form a phylogenetically distinct group of eukaryotic microorganisms that includes some of the most notorious pathogens of plants. Oomycetes accomplish parasitic colonization of plants by modulating host cell defenses through an array of disease effector proteins. The biology of effectors is poorly understood but tremendous progress has been made in recent years. This review classifies and catalogues the effector secretome of oomycetes. Two classes of effectors target distinct sites in the host plant: Apoplastic effectors are secreted into the plant extracellular space, and cytoplasmic effectors are translocated inside the plant cell, where they target different subcellular compartments. Considering that five species are undergoing genome sequencing and annotation, we are rapidly moving toward genome-wide catalogues of oomycete effectors. Already, it is evident that the effector secretome of pathogenic oomycetes is more complex than expected, with perhaps several hundred proteins dedicated to manipulating host cell structure and function.

  11. Depletion of tumor-induced regulatory T cells prior to reconstitution rescues enhanced priming of tumor-specific, therapeutic effector T cells in lymphopenic hosts

    PubMed Central

    Poehlein, Christian H.; Haley, Daniel; Walker, Edwin; Fox, Bernard A.

    2010-01-01

    We reported previously that vaccination of reconstituted-lymphopenic mice resulted in a higher frequency of tumor-specific effector T cells with therapeutic activity than vaccination of normal mice. Here we show that lymphopenic mice reconstituted with spleen cells from tumor-bearing mouse (TBM), a situation which resembles the clinical condition, failed to generate tumor-specific T cells with therapeutic efficacy. However, depletion of CD25+ Treg from the spleen cells of TBM restored tumor-specific priming and therapeutic efficacy. Adding back TBM CD25+ Treg to CD25- naïve and TBM donor T cells prior to reconstitution confirmed their suppressive role. CD25+ Treg from TBM prevented priming of tumor-specific T cells since subsequent depletion of CD4+ T cells did not restore therapeutic efficacy. This effect may not be antigen-specific as three histologically distinct tumors generated CD25+ Treg that could suppress the T cell immune response to a melanoma vaccine. Importantly, since ex vivo depletion of CD25+ Treg from TBM spleen cells prior to reconstitution and vaccination fully restored the generation of therapeutic effector T cells, even in animals with established tumor burden, we have initiated a translational clinical trial of this strategy in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:19839008

  12. Type VI Secretion Effectors: Methodologies and Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Yun-Wei; Lai, Erh-Min

    2017-01-01

    The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a nanomachine deployed by many Gram-negative bacteria as a weapon against eukaryotic hosts or prokaryotic competitors. It assembles into a bacteriophage tail-like structure that can transport effector proteins into the environment or target cells for competitive survival or pathogenesis. T6SS effectors have been identified by a variety of approaches, including knowledge/hypothesis-dependent and discovery-driven approaches. Here, we review and discuss the methods that have been used to identify T6SS effectors and the biological and biochemical functions of known effectors. On the basis of the nature and transport mechanisms of T6SS effectors, we further propose potential strategies that may be applicable to identify new T6SS effectors. PMID:28664151

  13. Orientia tsutsugamushi Ank9 is a multifunctional effector that utilizes a novel GRIP-like Golgi localization domain for Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum trafficking and interacts with host COPB2.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andrea R; Rodino, Kyle G; VieBrock, Lauren; Green, Ryan S; Tegels, Brittney K; Oliver, Lee D; Marconi, Richard T; Carlyon, Jason A

    2017-01-19

    Orientia tsutsugamushi causes scrub typhus, a potentially fatal infection that afflicts 1 million people annually. This obligate intracellular bacterium boasts one of the largest microbial arsenals of ankyrin repeat-containing protein (Ank) effectors, most of which target the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by undefined mechanisms. Ank9 is the only one proven to function during infection. Here, we demonstrate that Ank9 bears a motif that mimics the GRIP domain of eukaryotic golgins and is necessary and sufficient for its Golgi localization. Ank9 reaches the ER exclusively by retrograde trafficking from the Golgi. Consistent with this observation, it binds COPB2, a host protein that mediates Golgi-to-ER transport. Ank9 destabilizes the Golgi and ER in a Golgi localization domain-dependent manner and induces the activating transcription factor 4-dependent unfolded protein response. The Golgi is also destabilized in cells infected with O. tsutsugamushi or treated with COPB2 small interfering RNA. COPB2 reduction and/or the cellular events that it invokes, such as Golgi destabilization, benefit Orientia replication. Thus, Ank9 or bacterial negative modulation of COPB2 might contribute to the bacterium's intracellular replication. This report identifies a novel microbial Golgi localization domain, links Ank9 to the ability of O. tsutsugamushi to perturb Golgi structure, and describes the first mechanism by which any Orientia effector targets the secretory pathway.

  14. Repeat-containing protein effectors of plant-associated organisms

    PubMed Central

    Mesarich, Carl H.; Bowen, Joanna K.; Hamiaux, Cyril; Templeton, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-associated organisms, including microbes, nematodes, and insects, deliver effector proteins into the apoplast, vascular tissue, or cell cytoplasm of their prospective hosts. These effectors function to promote colonization, typically by altering host physiology or by modulating host immune responses. The same effectors however, can also trigger host immunity in the presence of cognate host immune receptor proteins, and thus prevent colonization. To circumvent effector-triggered immunity, or to further enhance host colonization, plant-associated organisms often rely on adaptive effector evolution. In recent years, it has become increasingly apparent that several effectors of plant-associated organisms are repeat-containing proteins (RCPs) that carry tandem or non-tandem arrays of an amino acid sequence or structural motif. In this review, we highlight the diverse roles that these repeat domains play in RCP effector function. We also draw attention to the potential role of these repeat domains in adaptive evolution with regards to RCP effector function and the evasion of effector-triggered immunity. The aim of this review is to increase the profile of RCP effectors from plant-associated organisms. PMID:26557126

  15. Dendritic Cell-Targeted Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Lillian; Delamarre, Lélia

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort, the development of effective vaccines inducing strong and durable T-cell responses against intracellular pathogens and cancer cells has remained a challenge. The initiation of effector CD8+ T-cell responses requires the presentation of peptides derived from internalized antigen on class I major histocompatibility complex molecules by dendritic cells (DCs) in a process called cross-presentation. A current strategy to enhance the effectiveness of vaccination is to deliver antigens directly to DCs. This is done via selective targeting of antigen using monoclonal antibodies directed against endocytic receptors on the surface of the DCs. In this review, we will discuss considerations relevant to the design of such vaccines: the existence of DC subsets with specialized functions, the impact of the antigen intracellular trafficking on cross-presentation, and the influence of maturation signals received by DCs on the outcome of the immune response. PMID:24910635

  16. Magnaporthe oryzae Effector AVR-Pii Helps to Establish Compatibility by Inhibition of the Rice NADP-Malic Enzyme Resulting in Disruption of Oxidative Burst and Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raksha; Dangol, Sarmina; Chen, Yafei; Choi, Jihyun; Cho, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Jea-Eun; Choi, Mi-Ok; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2016-05-31

    Plant disease resistance occurs as a hypersensitive response (HR) at the site of attempted pathogen invasion. This specific event is initiated in response to recognition of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and subsequent PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Both PTI and ETI mechanisms are tightly connected with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and disease resistance that involves distinct biphasic ROS production as one of its pivotal plant immune responses. This unique oxidative burst is strongly dependent on the resistant cultivars because a monophasic ROS burst is a hallmark of the susceptible cultivars. However, the cause of the differential ROS burst remains unknown. In the study here, we revealed the plausible underlying mechanism of the differential ROS burst through functional understanding of the Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) AVR effector, AVR-Pii. We performed yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening using AVR-Pii as bait and isolated rice NADP-malic enzyme2 (Os-NADP-ME2) as the rice target protein. To our surprise, deletion of the rice Os-NADP-ME2 gene in a resistant rice cultivar disrupted innate immunity against the rice blast fungus. Malic enzyme activity and inhibition studies demonstrated that AVR-Pii proteins specifically inhibit in vitro NADP-ME activity. Overall, we demonstrate that rice blast fungus, M. oryzae attenuates the host ROS burst via AVR-Pii-mediated inhibition of Os-NADP-ME2, which is indispensable in ROS metabolism for the innate immunity of rice. This characterization of the regulation of the host oxidative burst will help to elucidate how the products of AVR genes function associated with virulence of the pathogen.

  17. Magnaporthe oryzae Effector AVR-Pii Helps to Establish Compatibility by Inhibition of the Rice NADP-Malic Enzyme Resulting in Disruption of Oxidative Burst and Host Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Raksha; Dangol, Sarmina; Chen, Yafei; Choi, Jihyun; Cho, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Jea-Eun; Choi, Mi-Ok; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Plant disease resistance occurs as a hypersensitive response (HR) at the site of attempted pathogen invasion. This specific event is initiated in response to recognition of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and subsequent PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Both PTI and ETI mechanisms are tightly connected with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and disease resistance that involves distinct biphasic ROS production as one of its pivotal plant immune responses. This unique oxidative burst is strongly dependent on the resistant cultivars because a monophasic ROS burst is a hallmark of the susceptible cultivars. However, the cause of the differential ROS burst remains unknown. In the study here, we revealed the plausible underlying mechanism of the differential ROS burst through functional understanding of the Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) AVR effector, AVR-Pii. We performed yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening using AVR-Pii as bait and isolated rice NADP-malic enzyme2 (Os-NADP-ME2) as the rice target protein. To our surprise, deletion of the rice Os-NADP-ME2 gene in a resistant rice cultivar disrupted innate immunity against the rice blast fungus. Malic enzyme activity and inhibition studies demonstrated that AVR-Pii proteins specifically inhibit in vitro NADP-ME activity. Overall, we demonstrate that rice blast fungus, M. oryzae attenuates the host ROS burst via AVR-Pii-mediated inhibition of Os-NADP-ME2, which is indispensable in ROS metabolism for the innate immunity of rice. This characterization of the regulation of the host oxidative burst will help to elucidate how the products of AVR genes function associated with virulence of the pathogen. PMID:27126515

  18. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH–YopH chaperone–effector complex

    PubMed Central

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH–YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-­called β-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the β-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the β-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-­terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed. PMID:23519663

  19. Context-dependent protein folding of a virulence peptide in the bacterial and host environments: structure of an SycH-YopH chaperone-effector complex.

    PubMed

    Vujanac, Milos; Stebbins, C Erec

    2013-04-01

    Yersinia pestis injects numerous bacterial proteins into host cells through an organic nanomachine called the type 3 secretion system. One such substrate is the tyrosine phosphatase YopH, which requires an interaction with a cognate chaperone in order to be effectively injected. Here, the first crystal structure of a SycH-YopH complex is reported, determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure reveals the presence of (i) a nonglobular polypeptide in YopH, (ii) a so-called β-motif in YopH and (iii) a conserved hydrophobic patch in SycH that recognizes the β-motif. Biochemical studies establish that the β-motif is critical to the stability of this complex. Finally, since previous work has shown that the N-terminal portion of YopH adopts a globular fold that is functional in the host cell, aspects of how this polypeptide adopts radically different folds in the host and in the bacterial environments are analysed.

  20. Novel type III effectors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David; Satanower, Shirley; Simovitch, Michal; Belnik, Yana; Zehavi, Meital; Yerushalmi, Gal; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Pupko, Tal; Banin, Ehud

    2015-03-17

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic and acute infections in immunocompromised patients. Most P. aeruginosa strains encode an active type III secretion system (T3SS), utilized by the bacteria to deliver effector proteins from the bacterial cell directly into the cytoplasm of the host cell. Four T3SS effectors have been discovered and extensively studied in P. aeruginosa: ExoT, ExoS, ExoU, and ExoY. This is especially intriguing in light of P. aeruginosa's ability to infect a wide range of hosts. We therefore hypothesized that additional T3SS effectors that have not yet been discovered are encoded in the genome of P. aeruginosa. Here, we applied a machine learning classification algorithm to identify novel P. aeruginosa effectors. In this approach, various types of data are integrated to differentiate effectors from the rest of the open reading frames of the bacterial genome. Due to the lack of a sufficient learning set of positive effectors, our machine learning algorithm integrated genomic information from another Pseudomonas species and utilized dozens of features accounting for various aspects of the effector coding genes and their products. Twelve top-ranking predictions were experimentally tested for T3SS-specific translocation, leading to the discovery of two novel T3SS effectors. We demonstrate that these effectors are not part of the injection structural complex and report initial efforts toward their characterization. Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete toxic proteins, termed effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of the host cell. The activation of this secretion system is correlated with disease severity and patient death. Compared with many other T3SS-utilizing pathogenic bacteria, P. aeruginosa has a fairly limited arsenal of effectors that have been identified. This is in sharp contrast with the wide range of hosts that this bacterium can infect. The discovery of

  1. Die another day: molecular mechanisms of effector-triggered immunity elicited by type III secreted effector proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial pathogens inject type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into their hosts where they display dual roles depending on the host genotype. T3SEs promote bacterial virulence in susceptible hosts, and elicit immunity in resistant hosts. T3SEs are typically recognized when they modify a host ...

  2. Genomic analysis of 38 Legionella species identifies large and diverse effector repertoires.

    PubMed

    Burstein, David; Amaro, Francisco; Zusman, Tal; Lifshitz, Ziv; Cohen, Ofir; Gilbert, Jack A; Pupko, Tal; Shuman, Howard A; Segal, Gil

    2016-02-01

    Infection by the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila relies on the translocation of ∼ 300 virulence proteins, termed effectors, which manipulate host cell processes. However, almost no information exists regarding effectors in other Legionella pathogens. Here we sequenced, assembled and characterized the genomes of 38 Legionella species and predicted their effector repertoires using a previously validated machine learning approach. This analysis identified 5,885 predicted effectors. The effector repertoires of different Legionella species were found to be largely non-overlapping, and only seven core effectors were shared by all species studied. Species-specific effectors had atypically low GC content, suggesting exogenous acquisition, possibly from the natural protozoan hosts of these species. Furthermore, we detected numerous new conserved effector domains and discovered new domain combinations, which allowed the inference of as yet undescribed effector functions. The effector collection and network of domain architectures described here can serve as a roadmap for future studies of effector function and evolution.

  3. TCRVα usage by effector CD4+Vβ11+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease directed to minor histocompatibility antigens

    PubMed Central

    DiRienzo, Christine G.; Murphy, George F.; Friedman, Thea M.; Korngold, Robert

    2007-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) Vα (TRAV) and Vβ (TRBV) chains provide the T cell specificity for recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound antigens. However, there is limited information on the diversity of TRAV usage within an antigen response. Previous investigation of CD4+ T cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the minor histocompatibility antigen (miHA)-mismatched C57BL/6 (B6) -> BALB.B irradiated murine model determined that Vβ11+ T cells were involved in the severity of disease. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3)-size spectratype analysis of B6 Vβ11+ T cells from the spleens of recipient BALB.B mice undergoing GVHD indicated biased usage within the Vα6, 9, 13, 14, 18, and 22 families. In order to probe deeper into this limited Vα response, the current study was undertaken to further define TRAV-Jα (TRAJ) nucleotide sequences found in host-presensitized B6 Vβ11+ T cells proliferating in response to in vitro stimulation with BALB.B splenocytes. Using the nonpalindromic adaptor-PCR method, we found dominant usage of the TRAV13-TRAJ16 transcript combination. Then, using laser capture microdissection (LMD), we found use of the identical TRAV-TRAJ nucleotide sequence in areas dominated by infiltrating Vβ11+ CD4+ T cells during development of GVHD in both the rete-like prominences of the dorsal lingual epithelium and the ileal crypts of the small intestine. PMID:17317580

  4. T-cell receptor V(alpha) usage by effector CD4+Vbeta11+ T cells mediating graft-versus-host disease directed to minor histocompatibility antigens.

    PubMed

    DiRienzo, Christine G; Murphy, George F; Friedman, Thea M; Korngold, Robert

    2007-03-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) Valpha (TRAV) and Vbeta (TRBV) chains provide the T-cell specificity for recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-bound antigens. However, there is limited information on the diversity of TRAV use within an antigen response. Previous investigation of CD4(+) T-cell-mediated graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched C57BL/6 (B6)-->BALB.B irradiated murine model determined that Vbeta11(+) T cells were associated with disease severity. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3)-sized spectratype analysis of B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells from the spleens of recipient BALB.B mice undergoing GVHD indicated biased use within the V(alpha)6, 9, 13, 14, 18, and 22 families. To probe deeper into this limited V(alpha) response, the current study was undertaken to further define TRAV-Jalpha (TRAJ) nucleotide sequences found in host-presensitized B6 Vbeta11(+) T cells proliferating in response to in vitro stimulation with BALB.B splenocytes. Using the nonpalindromic adaptor PCR method, we found dominant use of the TRAV13-TRAJ16 transcript combination. Then, using laser capture microdissection, we found use of the identical TRAV-TRAJ nucleotide sequence in areas dominated by infiltrating Vbeta11(+) CD4(+) T cells during the development of GVHD in both the rete-like prominences of the dorsal lingual epithelium and the ileal crypts of the small intestine.

  5. The aspartyl protease TgASP5 mediates the export of the Toxoplasma GRA16 and GRA24 effectors into host cells.

    PubMed

    Curt-Varesano, Aurélie; Braun, Laurence; Ranquet, Caroline; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Bougdour, Alexandre

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species are obligatory intracellular parasites that export proteins into the infected cells in order to interfere with host-signalling pathways, acquire nutrients or evade host defense mechanisms. With regard to export mechanism, a wealth of information in Plasmodium spp. is available, while the mechanisms operating in T. gondii remain uncertain. The recent discovery of exported proteins in T. gondii, mainly represented by dense granule resident proteins, might explain this discrepancy and offers a unique opportunity to study the export mechanism in T. gondii. Here, we report that GRA16 export is mediated by two protein elements present in its N-terminal region. Because the first element contains a putative Plasmodium export element linear motif (RRLAE), we hypothesized that GRA16 export depended on a maturation process involving protein cleavage. Using both N- and C-terminal epitope tags, we provide evidence for protein proteolysis occurring in the N-terminus of GRA16. We show that TgASP5, the T. gondii homolog of Plasmodium plasmepsin V, is essential for GRA16 export and is directly responsible for its maturation in a Plasmodium export element-dependent manner. Interestingly, TgASP5 is also involved in GRA24 export, although the GRA24 maturation mechanism is TgASP5-independent. Our data reveal different modus operandi for protein export, in which TgASP5 should play multiple functions.

  6. Restriction of Human Cytomegalovirus Replication by ISG15, a Host Effector Regulated by cGAS-STING Double-Stranded-DNA Sensing.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Christopher; Mohr, Ian

    2017-05-01

    Accumulation of the interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) protein product, which is reversibly conjugated to numerous polypeptide targets, impacts the proteome and physiology of uninfected and infected cells. While many viruses, including human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), blunt host antiviral defenses by limiting ISG expression, the overall abundance of ISG15 monomer and protein conjugates rises in HCMV-infected cells. However, the molecular signals underlying ISG15 accumulation and whether the ISG15 polypeptide itself influences HCMV infection biology remain unknown. Here, we establish that the ISG15 gene product itself directly regulates HCMV replication and that its accumulation restricts productive virus growth. Although ISG15 monomer and protein conjugate accumulation was induced in cells infected with UV-inactivated HCMV, it was subsequently reduced, but not eliminated, by an immediate-early (IE) or early (E) virus-encoded function(s). Instead, HCMV-induced ISG15 monomer and protein conjugate accumulation was dependent upon the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), the innate immune adaptor STING, and interferon signaling. Significantly, dsDNA itself was sufficient to induce cGAS-, STING-, and interferon signaling-dependent ISG15 monomer and conjugate protein accumulation in uninfected cells. Accumulation of ISGylated proteins in uninfected cells treated with dsDNA was prevented by expressing the HCMV multifunctional IE1 transactivator. This demonstrates that expression of a single host interferon-stimulated gene, ISG15, restricts HCMV replication, and that IE1 is sufficient to blunt ISGylation in response to dsDNA sensing in uninfected cells. Moreover, it establishes that ISGylation modifies the proteomes of virus-infected and uninfected normal cells in response to cell-intrinsic dsDNA sensing dependent upon cGAS-STING.IMPORTANCE By antagonizing type I interferon production and action, many viruses, including human cytomegalovirus

  7. The rise of the undead:Pseudokinases as mediators of effector-triggered immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogens use effector proteins to suppress host immunity and promote infection. However, plants can recognize specific effectors and mount an effector-triggered immune response that suppresses pathogen growth. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III secreted effector proteins is broadly distributed in bac...

  8. Pseudomonas syringae Effector Avirulence Protein E Localizes to the Host Plasma Membrane and Down-Regulates the Expression of the NONRACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE1/HARPIN-INDUCED1-LIKE13 Gene Required for Antibacterial Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Xiu-Fang; Nomura, Kinya; Ding, Xinhua; Chen, Xujun; Wang, Kun; Aung, Kyaw; Uribe, Francisco; Rosa, Bruce; Yao, Jian; Chen, Jin; He, Sheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals deliver effector proteins into host cells to promote infection. Elucidation of how pathogen effector proteins function not only is critical for understanding bacterial pathogenesis but also provides a useful tool in discovering the functions of host genes. In this study, we characterized the Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 effector protein Avirulence Protein E (AvrE), the founding member of a widely distributed, yet functionally enigmatic, bacterial effector family. We show that AvrE is localized in the plasma membrane (PM) and PM-associated vesicle-like structures in the plant cell. AvrE contains two physically interacting domains, and the amino-terminal portion contains a PM-localization signal. Genome-wide microarray analysis indicates that AvrE, as well as the functionally redundant effector Hypersensitive response and pathogenicity-dependent Outer Protein M1, down-regulates the expression of the NONRACE-SPECIFIC DISEASE RESISTANCE1/HARPIN-INDUCED1-LIKE13 (NHL13) gene in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Mutational analysis shows that NHL13 is required for plant immunity, as the nhl13 mutant plant displayed enhanced disease susceptibility. Our results defined the action site of one of the most important bacterial virulence proteins in plants and the antibacterial immunity function of the NHL13 gene. PMID:26206852

  9. Effector proteins of rust fungi

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Joly, David L.; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi include many species that are devastating crop pathogens. To develop resistant plants, a better understanding of rust virulence factors, or effector proteins, is needed. Thus far, only six rust effector proteins have been described: AvrP123, AvrP4, AvrL567, AvrM, RTP1, and PGTAUSPE-10-1. Although some are well established model proteins used to investigate mechanisms of immune receptor activation (avirulence activities) or entry into plant cells, how they work inside host tissues to promote fungal growth remains unknown. The genome sequences of four rust fungi (two Melampsoraceae and two Pucciniaceae) have been analyzed so far. Genome-wide analyses of these species, as well as transcriptomics performed on a broader range of rust fungi, revealed hundreds of small secreted proteins considered as rust candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs). The rust community now needs high-throughput approaches (effectoromics) to accelerate effector discovery/characterization and to better understand how they function in planta. However, this task is challenging due to the non-amenability of rust pathosystems (obligate biotrophs infecting crop plants) to traditional molecular genetic approaches mainly due to difficulties in culturing these species in vitro. The use of heterologous approaches should be promoted in the future. PMID:25191335

  10. TGF-β-induced CD4+Foxp3+ T cells attenuate acute graft-versus-host disease by suppressing expansion and killing of effector CD8+ cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Jian; Lu, Ling; Chen, Maogen; Xu, Lili; Lan, Qin; Li, Qiang; Liu, Zhongmin; Chen, Guihua; Wang, Ping; Wang, Xuehao; Brand, David; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2014-10-01

    The use of TGF-β-induced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) T cells (induced regulatory T cells [iTregs]) is an important prevention and treatment strategy in autoimmune diseases and other disorders. However, the potential use of iTregs as a treatment modality for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) has not been realized because they may be unstable and less suppressive in this disease. We restudied the ability of iTregs to prevent and treat aGVHD in two mouse models. Our results showed that, as long as an appropriate iTreg-generation protocol is used, these iTregs consistently displayed a potent ability to control aGVHD development and reduce mortality in the aGVHD animal models. iTreg infusion markedly suppressed the engraftment of donor CD8(+) cells and CD4(+) cells, the expression of granzyme A and B, the cytotoxic effect of donor CD8(+) cells, and the production of T cell cytokines in aGVHD. Therefore, we conclude that as long as the correct methods for generating iTregs are used, they can prevent and even treat aGVHD. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  11. The rise of the undead: pseudokinases as mediators of effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Lo, Timothy; Bastedo, Patrick; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens use effector proteins to suppress host immunity and promote infection. However, plants can recognize specific effectors and mount an effector-triggered immune response that suppresses pathogen growth. The YopJ/HopZ family of type III secreted effector proteins is broadly distributed in bacterial pathogens of both animals and plants. These effectors can either suppress host immunity or elicit defense responses depending on the host genotype. In a recent report, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana pseudokinase ZED1 that is required for the recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a effector. Here we discuss the role of ZED1 in HopZ1a recognition, and present models of effector recognition in plants. We draw parallels between HopZ1a and YopJ effector proteins, and between ZED1 and other immunity-related kinases that can be targeted by pathogen effectors.

  12. RXLR effectors of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Morgan, William; Kamoun, Sophien

    2007-08-01

    Oomycetes are a phylogenetically distinct group of organisms that include some of the most devastating plant pathogens. Recent characterization of four oomycete Avr genes revealed that they encode effector proteins with a common modular structure, including a N-terminal conserved RXLR motif. Several lines of evidence initially indicated, with support from more recent works, that these Avr proteins are secreted by the pathogen and then translocated into the host cell during infection. In addition to elucidating the machinery required for host-cell transport, future works remain to determine the myriad virulence functions of oomycete RXLR effector proteins.

  13. Bacterial effector HopF2 interacts with AvrPto and suppresses Arabidopsis innate immunity at the plasma membrane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant pathogenic bacteria inject a cocktail of effector proteins into host plant cells to modulate the host immune response, thereby promoting pathogenicity. How or whether these effectors work cooperatively is largely unknown. The Pseudomonas syringae DC3000 effector HopF2 suppresses the host plan...

  14. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism.

    PubMed

    Mitchum, Melissa G; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J; Wang, Xiaohong; Elling, Axel A; Wubben, Martin; Davis, Eric L

    2013-09-01

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to modify host cells and ingest nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode effectors, with a particular focus on proteinaceous stylet-secreted effectors of sedentary endoparasitic phytonematodes, for which a wealth of information has surfaced in the past 10 yr. We provide an update on the effector repertoires of several of the most economically important genera of phytonematodes and discuss current approaches to dissecting their function. Lastly, we highlight the latest breakthroughs in effector discovery that promise to shed new light on effector diversity and function across the phylum Nematoda. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Nematode effector proteins: an emerging paradigm of parasitism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytonematodes use a stylet and secreted effectors to invade host tissues and extract nutrients to support their growth and development. The molecular function of nematode effectors is currently the subject of intense investigation. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of nematode ...

  16. Human Effector Memory T Helper Cells Engage with Mouse Macrophages and Cause Graft-versus-Host-Like Pathology in Skin of Humanized Mice Used in a Nonclinical Immunization Study.

    PubMed

    Sundarasetty, Balasai; Volk, Valery; Theobald, Sebastian J; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Schaudien, Dirk; Neuhaus, Vanessa; Figueiredo, Constanca; Schneider, Andreas; Gerasch, Laura; Mucci, Adele; Moritz, Thomas; von Kaisenberg, Constantin; Spineli, Loukia M; Sewald, Katherina; Braun, Armin; Weigt, Henning; Ganser, Arnold; Stripecke, Renata

    2017-06-01

    Humanized mice engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells and developing functional human T-cell adaptive responses are in critical demand to test human-specific therapeutics. We previously showed that humanized mice immunized with long-lived induced-dendritic cells loaded with the pp65 viral antigen (iDCpp65) exhibited a faster development and maturation of T cells. Herein, we evaluated these effects in a long-term (36 weeks) nonclinical model using two stem cell donors to assess efficacy and safety. Relative to baseline, iDCpp65 immunization boosted the output of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. No weight loss, human malignancies, or systemic graft-versus-host (GVH) disease were observed. However, for one reconstitution cohort, some mice immunized with iDCpp65 showed GVH-like signs on the skin. Histopathology analyses of the inflamed skin revealed intrafollicular and perifollicular human CD4(+) cells near F4/80(+) mouse macrophages around hair follicles. In spleen, CD4(+) cells formed large clusters surrounded by mouse macrophages. In plasma, high levels of human T helper 2-type inflammatory cytokines were detectable, which activated in vitro the STAT5 pathway of murine macrophages. Despite this inflammatory pattern, human CD8(+) T cells from mice with GVH reacted against the pp65 antigen in vitro. These results uncover a dynamic cross-species interaction between human memory T cells and mouse macrophages in the skin and lymphatic tissues of humanized mice. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellular Signaling Pathways and Posttranslational Modifications Mediated by Nematode Effector Proteins1

    PubMed Central

    Hewezi, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Plant-parasitic cyst and root-knot nematodes synthesize and secrete a suite of effector proteins into infected host cells and tissues. These effectors are the major virulence determinants mediating the transformation of normal root cells into specialized feeding structures. Compelling evidence indicates that these effectors directly hijack or manipulate refined host physiological processes to promote the successful parasitism of host plants. Here, we provide an update on recent progress in elucidating the molecular functions of nematode effectors. In particular, we emphasize how nematode effectors modify plant cell wall structure, mimic the activity of host proteins, alter auxin signaling, and subvert defense signaling and immune responses. In addition, we discuss the emerging evidence suggesting that nematode effectors target and recruit various components of host posttranslational machinery in order to perturb the host signaling networks required for immunity and to regulate their own activity and subcellular localization. PMID:26315856

  18. Secretion, delivery and function of oomycete effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Wawra, Stephan; Belmonte, Rodrigo; Löbach, Lars; Saraiva, Marcia; Willems, Ariane; van West, Pieter

    2012-12-01

    Oomycetes are responsible for multi-billion dollar damages in aquaculture, agriculture and forestry. One common strategy they share with most cellular disease agents is the secretion of effector proteins. Effectors are molecules that change host physiology by initiating and allowing an infection to develop. Oomycetes secrete both extracellular and intracellular effectors. Studying secretion, delivery and function of effectors will hopefully lead to alternative control measures, which is much needed as several chemicals to control plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes cannot be used anymore; due to resistance in the host, or because the control measures have been prohibited as a result of toxicity to the environment and/or consumers. Here the latest findings on oomycete effector secretion, delivery and function are discussed.

  19. End-effector microprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: automated structures assembly facility current control hierarchy; automated structures assembly facility purposed control hierarchy; end-effector software state transition diagram; block diagram for ideal install composite; and conclusions.

  20. Advanced Aerodynamic Control Effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Richard M.; Bauer, Steven X. S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1990 research program that focused on the development of advanced aerodynamic control effectors (AACE) for military aircraft has been reviewed and summarized. Data are presented for advanced planform, flow control, and surface contouring technologies. The data show significant increases in lift, reductions in drag, and increased control power, compared to typical aerodynamic designs. The results presented also highlighted the importance of planform selection in the design of a control effector suite. Planform data showed that dramatic increases in lift (greater than 25%) can be achieved with multiple wings and a sawtooth forebody. Passive porosity and micro drag generator control effector data showed control power levels exceeding that available from typical effectors (moving surfaces). Application of an advanced planform to a tailless concept showed benefits of similar magnitude as those observed in the generic studies.

  1. Erwinia amylovora effector protein Eop1 suppresses PAMP-triggered immunity in Malus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Erwinia amylovora (Ea) utilizes a type three secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into plant host cells. Several Ea effectors have been identified based on their sequence similarity to plant and animal bacterial pathogen effectors; however, the function of the majority of Ea effecto...

  2. Effector discovery in the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici.

    PubMed

    Mirzadi Gohari, Amir; Ware, Sarah B; Wittenberg, Alexander H J; Mehrabi, Rahim; Ben M'Barek, Sarrah; Verstappen, Els C P; van der Lee, Theo A J; Robert, Olivier; Schouten, Henk J; de Wit, Pierre P J G M; Kema, Gert H J

    2015-12-01

    Fungal plant pathogens, such as Zymoseptoria tritici (formerly known as Mycosphaerella graminicola), secrete repertoires of effectors to facilitate infection or trigger host defence mechanisms. The discovery and functional characterization of effectors provides valuable knowledge that can contribute to the design of new and effective disease management strategies. Here, we combined bioinformatics approaches with expression profiling during pathogenesis to identify candidate effectors of Z. tritici. In addition, a genetic approach was conducted to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) carrying putative effectors, enabling the validation of both complementary strategies for effector discovery. In planta expression profiling revealed that candidate effectors were up-regulated in successive waves corresponding to consecutive stages of pathogenesis, contrary to candidates identified by QTL mapping that were, overall, expressed at low levels. Functional analyses of two top candidate effectors (SSP15 and SSP18) showed their dispensability for Z. tritici pathogenesis. These analyses reveal that generally adopted criteria, such as protein size, cysteine residues and expression during pathogenesis, may preclude an unbiased effector discovery. Indeed, genetic mapping of genomic regions involved in specificity render alternative effector candidates that do not match the aforementioned criteria, but should nevertheless be considered as promising new leads for effectors that are crucial for the Z. tritici-wheat pathosystem. © 2015 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  3. Plant-Pathogen Effectors: Cellular Probes Interfering with Plant Defenses in Spatial and Temporal Manners

    PubMed Central

    Toruño, Tania Y.; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Coaker, Gitta

    2017-01-01

    Plants possess large arsenals of immune receptors capable of recognizing all pathogen classes. To cause disease, pathogenic organisms must be able to overcome physical barriers, suppress or evade immune perception, and derive nutrients from host tissues. Consequently, to facilitate some of these processes, pathogens secrete effector proteins that promote colonization. This review covers recent advances in the field of effector biology, focusing on conserved cellular processes targeted by effectors from diverse pathogens. The ability of effectors to facilitate pathogen entry into the host interior, suppress plant immune perception, and alter host physiology for pathogen benefit is discussed. Pathogens also deploy effectors in a spatial and temporal manner, depending on infection stage. Recent advances have also enhanced our understanding of effectors acting in specific plant organs and tissues. Effectors are excellent cellular probes that facilitate insight into biological processes as well as key points of vulnerability in plant immune signaling networks. PMID:27359369

  4. Measurement of Effector Protein Translocation Using Phosphorylatable Epitope Tags and Phospho-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bartra, Sara Schesser; Plano, Gregory V

    2017-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens employ specialized protein secretion machineries to directly inject anti-host proteins, termed effector proteins, into eukaryotic cells. Effector proteins carrying small phosphorylatable tags can be used to detect and quantify effector protein injection. Here, we describe the use of the ELK- and GSK-tags to detect the translocation of the Y. pestis YopE effector protein into RAW 264.7 macrophage-like cells using immunoblot analysis with phospho-specific antibodies.

  5. LOCALIZER: subcellular localization prediction of both plant and effector proteins in the plant cell

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; DeBoer, Kathleen; Petre, Benjamin; Gardiner, Donald M.; Singh, Karam B.; Dodds, Peter N.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector proteins and many operate inside plant cells to enable infection. Some effectors have been found to enter subcellular compartments by mimicking host targeting sequences. Although many computational methods exist to predict plant protein subcellular localization, they perform poorly for effectors. We introduce LOCALIZER for predicting plant and effector protein localization to chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclei. LOCALIZER shows greater prediction accuracy for chloroplast and mitochondrial targeting compared to other methods for 652 plant proteins. For 107 eukaryotic effectors, LOCALIZER outperforms other methods and predicts a previously unrecognized chloroplast transit peptide for the ToxA effector, which we show translocates into tobacco chloroplasts. Secretome-wide predictions and confocal microscopy reveal that rust fungi might have evolved multiple effectors that target chloroplasts or nuclei. LOCALIZER is the first method for predicting effector localisation in plants and is a valuable tool for prioritizing effector candidates for functional investigations. LOCALIZER is available at http://localizer.csiro.au/. PMID:28300209

  6. Genome-Scale Identification of Legionella pneumophila Effectors Using a Machine Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Zusman, Tal; Degtyar, Elena; Viner, Ram; Segal, Gil; Pupko, Tal

    2009-01-01

    A large number of highly pathogenic bacteria utilize secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into host cells. Using these effectors, the bacteria subvert host cell processes during infection. Legionella pneumophila translocates effectors via the Icm/Dot type-IV secretion system and to date, approximately 100 effectors have been identified by various experimental and computational techniques. Effector identification is a critical first step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis system in L. pneumophila as well as in other bacterial pathogens. Here, we formulate the task of effector identification as a classification problem: each L. pneumophila open reading frame (ORF) was classified as either effector or not. We computationally defined a set of features that best distinguish effectors from non-effectors. These features cover a wide range of characteristics including taxonomical dispersion, regulatory data, genomic organization, similarity to eukaryotic proteomes and more. Machine learning algorithms utilizing these features were then applied to classify all the ORFs within the L. pneumophila genome. Using this approach we were able to predict and experimentally validate 40 new effectors, reaching a success rate of above 90%. Increasing the number of validated effectors to around 140, we were able to gain novel insights into their characteristics. Effectors were found to have low G+C content, supporting the hypothesis that a large number of effectors originate via horizontal gene transfer, probably from their protozoan host. In addition, effectors were found to cluster in specific genomic regions. Finally, we were able to provide a novel description of the C-terminal translocation signal required for effector translocation by the Icm/Dot secretion system. To conclude, we have discovered 40 novel L. pneumophila effectors, predicted over a hundred additional highly probable effectors, and shown the applicability of machine learning algorithms for

  7. MARTX toxins as effector delivery platforms.

    PubMed

    Gavin, Hannah E; Satchell, Karla J F

    2015-12-01

    Bacteria frequently manipulate their host environment via delivery of microbial 'effector' proteins to the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. In the case of the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin, this phenomenon is accomplished by a single, >3500 amino acid polypeptide that carries information for secretion, translocation, autoprocessing and effector activity. MARTX toxins are secreted from bacteria by dedicated Type I secretion systems. The released MARTX toxins form pores in target eukaryotic cell membranes for the delivery of up to five cytopathic effectors, each of which disrupts a key cellular process. Targeted cellular processes include modulation or modification of small GTPases, manipulation of host cell signaling and disruption of cytoskeletal integrity. More recently, MARTX toxins have been shown to be capable of heterologous protein translocation. Found across multiple bacterial species and genera--frequently in pathogens lacking Type 3 or Type 4 secretion systems--MARTX toxins in multiple cases function as virulence factors. Innovative research at the intersection of toxin biology and bacterial genetics continues to elucidate the intricacies of the toxin as well as the cytotoxic mechanisms of its diverse effector collection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A systematic analysis of the RNA-targeting potential of secreted bacterial effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Caroline; Sharan, Malvika; Eulalio, Ana; Vogel, Jörg

    2017-08-24

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize specialized secretion systems to deliver proteins called effectors into eukaryotic cells for manipulation of host pathways. The vast majority of known effector targets are host proteins, whereas a potential targeting of host nucleic acids remains little explored. There is only one family of effectors known to target DNA directly, and effectors binding host RNA are unknown. Here, we take a two-pronged approach to search for RNA-binding effectors, combining biocomputational prediction of RNA-binding domains (RBDs) in a newly assembled comprehensive dataset of bacterial secreted proteins, and experimental screening for RNA binding in mammalian cells. Only a small subset of effectors were predicted to carry an RBD, indicating that if RNA targeting was common, it would likely involve new types of RBDs. Our experimental evaluation of effectors with predicted RBDs further argues for a general paucity of RNA binding activities amongst bacterial effectors. We obtained evidence that PipB2 and Lpg2844, effector proteins of Salmonella and Legionella species, respectively, may harbor novel biochemical activities. Our study presenting the first systematic evaluation of the RNA-targeting potential of bacterial effectors offers a basis for discussion of whether or not host RNA is a prominent target of secreted bacterial proteins.

  9. How filamentous pathogens co-opt plants; the ins and outs of eukaryotic effectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Research on effectors secreted by pathogens during host attack has dominated the field of molecular plant-microbe interactions over recent years. Functional analysis of type III secreted effectors that are injected by pathogenic bacteria into host cells has significantly advanced the field and demon...

  10. Homologous RXLR effectors from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Phytophthora sojae suppress immunity in distantly related plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Diverse pathogens secrete effector proteins into plant cells to manipulate host cellular processes. Oomycete pathogens contain very large complements of predicted effector genes defined by an RXLR host cell entry motif. The genome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, downy mildew of Arabidopsis) ...

  11. How Do Filamentous Pathogens Deliver Effector Proteins into Plant Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Petre, Benjamin; Kamoun, Sophien

    2014-01-01

    Fungal and oomycete plant parasites are among the most devastating pathogens of food crops. These microbes secrete effector proteins inside plant cells to manipulate host processes and facilitate colonization. How these effectors reach the host cytoplasm remains an unclear and debated area of plant research. In this article, we examine recent conflicting findings that have generated discussion in the field. We also highlight promising approaches based on studies of both parasite and host during infection. Ultimately, this knowledge may inform future broad spectrum strategies for protecting crops from such pathogens. PMID:24586116

  12. Pneumatic inflatable end effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, K. H.; Johnston, J. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The invention relates to an end effector device for robot or teleoperated type space vehicle which includes an inflatable balloon member carried on the end of tubular member which has a hollow center or conduit through which a suitable pressurized fluid is supplied. The device may be inserted into a variety of shaped openings or truss-type structures for handling in space.

  13. A Plethora of Virulence Strategies Hidden Behind Nuclear Targeting of Microbial Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Susana; Genin, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Plant immune responses depend on the ability to couple rapid recognition of the invading microbe to an efficient response. During evolution, plant pathogens have acquired the ability to deliver effector molecules inside host cells in order to manipulate cellular and molecular processes and establish pathogenicity. Following translocation into plant cells, microbial effectors may be addressed to different subcellular compartments. Intriguingly, a significant number of effector proteins from different pathogenic microorganisms, including viruses, oomycetes, fungi, nematodes, and bacteria, is targeted to the nucleus of host cells. In agreement with this observation, increasing evidence highlights the crucial role played by nuclear dynamics, and nucleocytoplasmic protein trafficking during a great variety of analyzed plant–pathogen interactions. Once in the nucleus, effector proteins are able to manipulate host transcription or directly subvert essential host components to promote virulence. Along these lines, it has been suggested that some effectors may affect histone packing and, thereby, chromatin configuration. In addition, microbial effectors may either directly activate transcription or target host transcription factors to alter their regular molecular functions. Alternatively, nuclear translocation of effectors may affect subcellular localization of their cognate resistance proteins in a process that is essential for resistance protein-mediated plant immunity. Here, we review recent progress in our field on the identification of microbial effectors that are targeted to the nucleus of host plant cells. In addition, we discuss different virulence strategies deployed by microbes, which have been uncovered through examination of the mechanisms that guide nuclear localization of effector proteins. PMID:22639625

  14. Structural basis for Rab1 de-AMPylation by the Legionella pneumophila effector SidD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Tascón, Igor; Neunuebel, M Ramona; Pallara, Chiara; Brady, Jacqueline; Kinch, Lisa N; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Rojas, Adriana L; Machner, Matthias P; Hierro, Aitor

    2013-01-01

    The covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to proteins, a process called AMPylation (adenylylation), has recently emerged as a novel theme in microbial pathogenesis. Although several AMPylating enzymes have been characterized, the only known virulence protein with de-AMPylation activity is SidD from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. SidD de-AMPylates mammalian Rab1, a small GTPase involved in secretory vesicle transport, thereby targeting the host protein for inactivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rab1 recognition and de-AMPylation by SidD are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the catalytic region of SidD at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a phosphatase-like fold with additional structural elements not present in generic PP2C-type phosphatases. The catalytic pocket contains a binuclear metal-binding site characteristic of hydrolytic metalloenzymes, with strong dependency on magnesium ions. Subsequent docking and molecular dynamics simulations between SidD and Rab1 revealed the interface contacts and the energetic contribution of key residues to the interaction. In conjunction with an extensive structure-based mutational analysis, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a remarkable adaptation of SidD to its host cell target Rab1 which explains how this effector confers specificity to the reaction it catalyses.

  15. Structural Basis for Rab1 De-AMPylation by the Legionella pneumophila Effector SidD

    PubMed Central

    Neunuebel, M. Ramona; Pallara, Chiara; Brady, Jacqueline; Kinch, Lisa N.; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Rojas, Adriana L.; Machner, Matthias P.; Hierro, Aitor

    2013-01-01

    The covalent attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to proteins, a process called AMPylation (adenylylation), has recently emerged as a novel theme in microbial pathogenesis. Although several AMPylating enzymes have been characterized, the only known virulence protein with de-AMPylation activity is SidD from the human pathogen Legionella pneumophila. SidD de-AMPylates mammalian Rab1, a small GTPase involved in secretory vesicle transport, thereby targeting the host protein for inactivation. The molecular mechanisms underlying Rab1 recognition and de-AMPylation by SidD are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structure of the catalytic region of SidD at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a phosphatase-like fold with additional structural elements not present in generic PP2C-type phosphatases. The catalytic pocket contains a binuclear metal-binding site characteristic of hydrolytic metalloenzymes, with strong dependency on magnesium ions. Subsequent docking and molecular dynamics simulations between SidD and Rab1 revealed the interface contacts and the energetic contribution of key residues to the interaction. In conjunction with an extensive structure-based mutational analysis, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence for a remarkable adaptation of SidD to its host cell target Rab1 which explains how this effector confers specificity to the reaction it catalyses. PMID:23696742

  16. Type III effector-mediated processes in Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Joris; Finlay, B Brett

    2012-06-01

    Salmonella is one of the most successful bacterial pathogens that infect humans in both developed and developing countries. In order to cause infection, Salmonella uses type III secretion systems to inject bacterial effector proteins into host cells. In the age of antibiotic resistance, researchers have been looking for new strategies to reduce Salmonella infection. To understand infection and to analyze type III secretion as a potential therapeutic target, research has focused on identification of effectors, characterization of effector functions and how they contribute to disease. Many effector-mediated processes have been identified that contribute to infection but thus far no specific treatment has been found. In this perspective we discuss our current understanding of effector-mediated processes and discuss new techniques and approaches that may help us to find a solution to this worldwide problem.

  17. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  18. Robotic end effector

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.

    1993-10-05

    An end effector is described for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gimbal with a probe, the gimbal holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gimbal and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion. 7 figures.

  19. Robotic end effector

    SciTech Connect

    Minichan, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of an end effector for use in probing a surface with a robotic arm. The end effector has a first portion that carries a gamble with a probe, the gamble holding the probe normal to the surface, and a second portion with a set of three shafts within a housing for urging the gamble and probe against the surface. The second portion contains a potentiometer connected by another shaft to the first portion to measure the position of the first portion with respect to the second so that the second portion can be moved to place and maintain the shafts at the midpoint of their travel. Then, as irregularities in the surface are encountered, the first portion can respond by moving closer to or farther from the second portion.

  20. Computational Prediction of Effector Proteins in Fungi: Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Sonah, Humira; Deshmukh, Rupesh K.; Bélanger, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Effector proteins are mostly secretory proteins that stimulate plant infection by manipulating the host response. Identifying fungal effector proteins and understanding their function is of great importance in efforts to curb losses to plant diseases. Recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies have facilitated the availability of several fungal genomes and 1000s of transcriptomes. As a result, the growing amount of genomic information has provided great opportunities to identify putative effector proteins in different fungal species. There is little consensus over the annotation and functionality of effector proteins, and mostly small secretory proteins are considered as effector proteins, a concept that tends to overestimate the number of proteins involved in a plant–pathogen interaction. With the characterization of Avr genes, criteria for computational prediction of effector proteins are becoming more efficient. There are 100s of tools available for the identification of conserved motifs, signature sequences and structural features in the proteins. Many pipelines and online servers, which combine several tools, are made available to perform genome-wide identification of effector proteins. In this review, available tools and pipelines, their strength and limitations for effective identification of fungal effector proteins are discussed. We also present an exhaustive list of classically secreted proteins along with their key conserved motifs found in 12 common plant pathogens (11 fungi and one oomycete) through an analytical pipeline. PMID:26904083

  1. Effector-triggered defence against apoplastic fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Henrik U.; Mitrousia, Georgia K.; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.; Fitt, Bruce D.L.

    2014-01-01

    R gene-mediated host resistance against apoplastic fungal pathogens is not adequately explained by the terms pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) or effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Therefore, it is proposed that this type of resistance is termed ‘effector-triggered defence’ (ETD). Unlike PTI and ETI, ETD is mediated by R genes encoding cell surface-localised receptor-like proteins (RLPs) that engage the receptor-like kinase SOBIR1. In contrast to this extracellular recognition, ETI is initiated by intracellular detection of pathogen effectors. ETI is usually associated with fast, hypersensitive host cell death, whereas ETD often triggers host cell death only after an elapsed period of endophytic pathogen growth. In this opinion, we focus on ETD responses against foliar fungal pathogens of crops. PMID:24856287

  2. Legionella pneumophila, armed to the hilt: justifying the largest arsenal of effectors in the bacterial world.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, Alexander W

    2016-02-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use dedicated translocation systems to deliver arsenals of effector proteins to their hosts. Once inside the host cytosol, these effectors modulate eukaryotic cell biology to acquire nutrients, block microbial degradation, subvert host defenses, and enable pathogen transmission to other hosts. Among all bacterial pathogens studied to date, the gram-negative pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, maintains the largest arsenal of effectors, with over 330 effector proteins translocated by the Dot/Icm type IVB translocation system. In this review, I will discuss some of the recent work on understanding the consequences of this large arsenal. I will also present several models that seek to explain how L. pneumophila has acquired and subsequently maintained so many more effectors than its peers.

  3. Deletions in the repertoire of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion effector genes reveal functional overlap among effectors

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Many bacterial pathogens of plants and animals disarm and remodel host cells by injecting large repertoires of effectors via the type III secretion system (T3SS). The repertoires of individual strains appear to function as robust systems that can tolerate loss of individual effectors with little or ...

  4. Parallel Evolution of a Type IV Secretion System in Radiating Lineages of the Host-Restricted Bacterial Pathogen Bartonella

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Philipp; Salzburger, Walter; Liesch, Marius; Chang, Chao-Chin; Maruyama, Soichi; Lanz, Christa; Calteau, Alexandra; Lajus, Aurélie; Médigue, Claudine; Schuster, Stephan C.; Dehio, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS), and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps), evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial pathogens

  5. Parallel evolution of a type IV secretion system in radiating lineages of the host-restricted bacterial pathogen Bartonella.

    PubMed

    Engel, Philipp; Salzburger, Walter; Liesch, Marius; Chang, Chao-Chin; Maruyama, Soichi; Lanz, Christa; Calteau, Alexandra; Lajus, Aurélie; Médigue, Claudine; Schuster, Stephan C; Dehio, Christoph

    2011-02-10

    Adaptive radiation is the rapid origination of multiple species from a single ancestor as the result of concurrent adaptation to disparate environments. This fundamental evolutionary process is considered to be responsible for the genesis of a great portion of the diversity of life. Bacteria have evolved enormous biological diversity by exploiting an exceptional range of environments, yet diversification of bacteria via adaptive radiation has been documented in a few cases only and the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here we show a compelling example of adaptive radiation in pathogenic bacteria and reveal their genetic basis. Our evolutionary genomic analyses of the α-proteobacterial genus Bartonella uncover two parallel adaptive radiations within these host-restricted mammalian pathogens. We identify a horizontally-acquired protein secretion system, which has evolved to target specific bacterial effector proteins into host cells as the evolutionary key innovation triggering these parallel adaptive radiations. We show that the functional versatility and adaptive potential of the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS), and thereby translocated Bartonella effector proteins (Beps), evolved in parallel in the two lineages prior to their radiations. Independent chromosomal fixation of the virB operon and consecutive rounds of lineage-specific bep gene duplications followed by their functional diversification characterize these parallel evolutionary trajectories. Whereas most Beps maintained their ancestral domain constitution, strikingly, a novel type of effector protein emerged convergently in both lineages. This resulted in similar arrays of host cell-targeted effector proteins in the two lineages of Bartonella as the basis of their independent radiation. The parallel molecular evolution of the VirB/Bep system displays a striking example of a key innovation involved in independent adaptive processes and the emergence of bacterial pathogens

  6. Structure Analysis Uncovers a Highly Diverse but Structurally Conserved Effector Family in Phytopathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Gracy, Jérome; Fournier, Elisabeth; Kroj, Thomas; Padilla, André

    2015-01-01

    Phytopathogenic ascomycete fungi possess huge effector repertoires that are dominated by hundreds of sequence-unrelated small secreted proteins. The molecular function of these effectors and the evolutionary mechanisms that generate this tremendous number of singleton genes are largely unknown. To get a deeper understanding of fungal effectors, we determined by NMR spectroscopy the 3-dimensional structures of the Magnaporthe oryzae effectors AVR1-CO39 and AVR-Pia. Despite a lack of sequence similarity, both proteins have very similar 6 β-sandwich structures that are stabilized in both cases by a disulfide bridge between 2 conserved cysteins located in similar positions of the proteins. Structural similarity searches revealed that AvrPiz-t, another effector from M. oryzae, and ToxB, an effector of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis have the same structures suggesting the existence of a family of sequence-unrelated but structurally conserved fungal effectors that we named MAX-effectors (Magnaporthe Avrs and ToxB like). Structure-informed pattern searches strengthened this hypothesis by identifying MAX-effector candidates in a broad range of ascomycete phytopathogens. Strong expansion of the MAX-effector family was detected in M. oryzae and M. grisea where they seem to be particularly important since they account for 5–10% of the effector repertoire and 50% of the cloned avirulence effectors. Expression analysis indicated that the majority of M. oryzae MAX-effectors are expressed specifically during early infection suggesting important functions during biotrophic host colonization. We hypothesize that the scenario observed for MAX-effectors can serve as a paradigm for ascomycete effector diversity and that the enormous number of sequence-unrelated ascomycete effectors may in fact belong to a restricted set of structurally conserved effector families. PMID:26506000

  7. Functional roles of effectors of plant-parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Haegeman, Annelies; Mantelin, Sophie; Jones, John T; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2012-01-15

    Plant pathogens have evolved a variety of different strategies that allow them to successfully infect their hosts. Plant-parasitic nematodes secrete numerous proteins into their hosts. These proteins, called effectors, have various functions in the plant cell. The most studied effectors to date are the plant cell wall degrading enzymes, which have an interesting evolutionary history since they are believed to have been acquired from bacteria or fungi by horizontal gene transfer. Extensive genome, transcriptome and proteome studies have shown that plant-parasitic nematodes secrete many additional effectors. The function of many of these is less clear although during the last decade, several research groups have determined the function of some of these effectors. Even though many effectors remain to be investigated, it has already become clear that they can have very diverse functions. Some are involved in suppression of plant defences, while others can specifically interact with plant signalling or hormone pathways to promote the formation of nematode feeding sites. In this review, the most recent progress in the understanding of the function of plant-parasitic nematode effectors is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effector-triggered immunity: from pathogen perception to robust defense.

    PubMed

    Cui, Haitao; Tsuda, Kenichi; Parker, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    In plant innate immunity, individual cells have the capacity to sense and respond to pathogen attack. Intracellular recognition mechanisms have evolved to intercept perturbations by pathogen virulence factors (effectors) early in host infection and convert it to rapid defense. One key to resistance success is a polymorphic family of intracellular nucleotide-binding/leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) receptors that detect effector interference in different parts of the cell. Effector-activated NLRs connect, in various ways, to a conserved basal resistance network in order to transcriptionally boost defense programs. Effector-triggered immunity displays remarkable robustness against pathogen disturbance, in part by employing compensatory mechanisms within the defense network. Also, the mobility of some NLRs and coordination of resistance pathways across cell compartments provides flexibility to fine-tune immune outputs. Furthermore, a number of NLRs function close to the nuclear chromatin by balancing actions of defense-repressing and defense-activating transcription factors to program cells dynamically for effective disease resistance.

  9. Two-axis angular effector

    DOEpatents

    Vaughn, Mark R.; Robinett, III, Rush D.; Phelan, John R.; Van Zuiden, Don M.

    1997-01-21

    A new class of coplanar two-axis angular effectors. These effectors combine a two-axis rotational joint analogous to a Cardan joint with linear actuators in a manner to produce a wider range of rotational motion about both axes defined by the joint. This new class of effectors also allows design of robotic manipulators having very high strength and efficiency. These effectors are particularly suited for remote operation in unknown surroundings, because of their extraordinary versatility. An immediate application is to the problems which arise in nuclear waste remediation.

  10. Metabolic priming by a secreted fungal effector.

    PubMed

    Djamei, Armin; Schipper, Kerstin; Rabe, Franziska; Ghosh, Anupama; Vincon, Volker; Kahnt, Jörg; Osorio, Sonia; Tohge, Takayuki; Fernie, Alisdair R; Feussner, Ivo; Feussner, Kirstin; Meinicke, Peter; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Schwarz, Heinz; Macek, Boris; Mann, Matthias; Kahmann, Regine

    2011-10-05

    Maize smut caused by the fungus Ustilago maydis is a widespread disease characterized by the development of large plant tumours. U. maydis is a biotrophic pathogen that requires living plant tissue for its development and establishes an intimate interaction zone between fungal hyphae and the plant plasma membrane. U. maydis actively suppresses plant defence responses by secreted protein effectors. Its effector repertoire comprises at least 386 genes mostly encoding proteins of unknown function and expressed exclusively during the biotrophic stage. The U. maydis secretome also contains about 150 proteins with probable roles in fungal nutrition, fungal cell wall modification and host penetration as well as proteins unlikely to act in the fungal-host interface like a chorismate mutase. Chorismate mutases are key enzymes of the shikimate pathway and catalyse the conversion of chorismate to prephenate, the precursor for tyrosine and phenylalanine synthesis. Root-knot nematodes inject a secreted chorismate mutase into plant cells likely to affect development. Here we show that the chorismate mutase Cmu1 secreted by U. maydis is a virulence factor. The enzyme is taken up by plant cells, can spread to neighbouring cells and changes the metabolic status of these cells through metabolic priming. Secreted chorismate mutases are found in many plant-associated microbes and might serve as general tools for host manipulation.

  11. Against friend and foe: type 6 effectors in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial secretion systems play critical roles in communication with neighboring bacteria and in the modulation of host immune responses via the secretion of small proteins called effectors. Several secretion systems have been identified and these are denoted types I-VII. Of these, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) and its effectors were only recently elucidated. Most studies on the role and significance of the T6SS and its effectors have focused on human pathogens. In this review, type 6 effectors from plant-associated beneficial and pathogenic bacteria are discussed, including effectors from Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Dickeya dadanti, Rhizobium leguminosarum, Pectobacterium atroseptium, Ralstonia solanacearum, Pseudomonas syringae, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Pseudomonas protegens. Type 6 effectors act in symbiosis, biofilm formation, virulence, and interbacterial competition. Understanding the impact of type 6 effectors on pathogenesis will contribute to the management of bacterial pathogens in crop plants by allowing the manipulation of intra and inter-specific interactions.

  12. Protein-Protein Interaction Assays with Effector-GFP Fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Petre, Benjamin; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank L H; Kamoun, Sophien

    2017-01-01

    Plant parasites secrete proteins known as effectors into host tissues to manipulate host cell structures and functions. One of the major goals in effector biology is to determine the host cell compartments and the protein complexes in which effectors accumulate. Here, we describe a five-step pipeline that we routinely use in our lab to achieve this goal, which consists of (1) Golden Gate assembly of pathogen effector-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions into binary vectors, (2) Agrobacterium-mediated heterologous protein expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells, (3) laser-scanning confocal microscopy assay, (4) anti-GFP coimmunoprecipitation-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (coIP/MS) assay, and (5) anti-GFP western blotting. This pipeline is suitable for rapid, cost-effective, and medium-throughput screening of pathogen effectors in planta.

  13. Manipulation of plant cells by cyst and root-knot nematode effectors.

    PubMed

    Hewezi, Tarek; Baum, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    A key feature of sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes is the release of effector proteins from their esophageal gland cells through their stylets into host roots. These proteinaceous stylet secretions have been shown to be crucial for successful parasitism by mediating the transition of normal root cells into specialized feeding sites and by negating plant defenses. Recent technical advances of purifying mRNA from esophageal gland cells of plant-parasitic nematodes coupled with emerging sequencing technologies is steadily expanding our knowledge of nematode effector repertoires. Host targets and biological activities of a number of nematode effectors are continuously being reported and, by now, a first picture of the complexity of sedentary nematode parasitism at the molecular level is starting to take shape. In this review, we highlight effector mechanisms that recently have been uncovered by studying the host-pathogen interaction. These mechanisms range from mediating susceptibility of host plants to the actual triggering of defense responses. In particular, we portray and discuss the mechanisms by which nematode effectors modify plant cell walls, negate host defense responses, alter auxin and polyamine signaling, mimic plant molecules, regulate stress signaling, and activate hypersensitive responses. Continuous molecular characterization of newly discovered nematode effectors will be needed to determine how these effectors orchestrate host signaling pathways and biological processes leading to successful parasitism.

  14. Effector Mechanisms of Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Aurélie; Varey, Emilie; Anegon, Ignacio; Cuturi, Maria-Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplantation appears today to be the best alternative to replace the loss of vital organs induced by various diseases. Transplants can, however, also be rejected by the recipient. In this review, we provide an overview of the mechanisms and the cells/molecules involved in acute and chronic rejections. T cells and B cells mainly control the antigen-specific rejection and act either as effector, regulatory, or memory cells. On the other hand, nonspecific cells such as endothelial cells, NK cells, macrophages, or polymorphonuclear cells are also crucial actors of transplant rejection. Last, beyond cells, the high contribution of antibodies, chemokines, and complement molecules in graft rejection is discussed in this article. The understanding of the different components involved in graft rejection is essential as some of them are used in the clinic as biomarkers to detect and quantify the level of rejection. PMID:24186491

  15. Identification and Characterisation CRN Effectors in Phytophthora capsici Shows Modularity and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Jupe, Julietta; Howden, Andrew J. M.; Morris, Jenny A.; Boevink, Petra C.; Hedley, Pete E.; Huitema, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora species secrete a large array of effectors during infection of their host plants. The Crinkler (CRN) gene family encodes a ubiquitous but understudied class of effectors with possible but as of yet unknown roles in infection. To appreciate CRN effector function in Phytophthora, we devised a simple Crn gene identification and annotation pipeline to improve effector prediction rates. We predicted 84 full-length CRN coding genes and assessed CRN effector domain diversity in sequenced Oomycete genomes. These analyses revealed evidence of CRN domain innovation in Phytophthora and expansion in the Peronosporales. We performed gene expression analyses to validate and define two classes of CRN effectors, each possibly contributing to infection at different stages. CRN localisation studies revealed that P. capsici CRN effector domains target the nucleus and accumulate in specific sub-nuclear compartments. Phenotypic analyses showed that few CRN domains induce necrosis when expressed in planta and that one cell death inducing effector, enhances P. capsici virulence on Nicotiana benthamiana. These results suggest that the CRN protein family form an important class of intracellular effectors that target the host nucleus during infection. These results combined with domain expansion in hemi-biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, suggests specific contributions to pathogen lifestyles. This work will bolster CRN identification efforts in other sequenced oomycete species and set the stage for future functional studies towards understanding CRN effector functions. PMID:23536880

  16. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds. PMID:28197148

  17. Avian Interferons and Their Antiviral Effectors.

    PubMed

    Santhakumar, Diwakar; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Munir, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) responses, mediated by a myriad of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), are the most profound innate immune responses against viruses. Cumulatively, these IFN effectors establish a multilayered antiviral state to safeguard the host against invading viral pathogens. Considerable genetic and functional characterizations of mammalian IFNs and their effectors have been made, and our understanding on the avian IFNs has started to expand. Similar to mammalian counterparts, three types of IFNs have been genetically characterized in most avian species with available annotated genomes. Intriguingly, chickens are capable of mounting potent innate immune responses upon various stimuli in the absence of essential components of IFN pathways including retinoic acid-inducible gene I, IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), and possibility IRF9. Understanding these unique properties of the chicken IFN system would propose valuable targets for the development of potential therapeutics for a broader range of viruses of both veterinary and zoonotic importance. This review outlines recent developments in the roles of avian IFNs and ISGs against viruses and highlights important areas of research toward our understanding of the antiviral functions of IFN effectors against viral infections in birds.

  18. Metal ions as enzyme effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medyantseva, El'vina P.; Vertlib, Margarita G.; Budnikov, German K.

    1998-03-01

    The role of metal ions as enzyme effectors is considered. Data on inhibitory and activating effects of metal ions are summarised. The dual character of action of the effectors depending on their concentration and the nature of the enzyme is highlighted. The analytical applications of these effects are discussed. The bibliography includes 66 references.

  19. Molecular determinants of resistance activation and suppression by Phytophthora infestans effector IPI-O

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The potato late blight pathogen, Phytophthora infestans, is able to rapidly evolve to overcome resistance genes. The pathogen accomplishes this by secreting an arsenal of proteins, termed effectors, that function to modify host cells. Although hundreds of candidate effectors have been identified in ...

  20. Differential expression of candidate salivary effector proteins in field collections of Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evidence is emerging that proteins secreted by gall forming plant-parasites are the effectors responsible for systemic changes in the host plant, such as galling and nutrient tissue formation. A large number of secreted salivary gland proteins (SSGPs) that are hypothesized to be the effectors respon...

  1. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis. PMID:26528442

  2. Type IV secretion system of Brucella spp. and its effectors.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuehua; Wang, Yufei; Li, Wengfeng; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Brucella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause infection in domestic and wild animals. They are often used as model organisms to study intracellular bacterial infections. Brucella VirB T4SS is a key virulence factor that plays important roles in mediating intracellular survival and manipulating host immune response to infection. In this review, we discuss the roles of Brucella VirB T4SS and 15 effectors that are proposed to be crucial for Brucella pathogenesis. VirB T4SS regulates the inflammation response and manipulates vesicle trafficking inside host cells. VirB T4SS also plays crucial roles in the inhibition of the host immune response and intracellular survival during infection. Here, we list the key molecular events in the intracellular life cycle of Brucella that are potentially targeted by the VirB T4SS effectors. Elucidating the functions of these effectors will help clarify the molecular role of T4SS during infection. Furthermore, studying the effectors secreted by Brucella spp. might provide insights into the mechanisms used by the bacteria to hijack the host signaling pathways and aid in the development of better vaccines and therapies against brucellosis.

  3. TAL effector-mediated susceptibility to bacterial blight of cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterial blight of cotton (BBC) caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Xcm) is a destructive disease that has recently re-emerged in the U.S. Xcm injects transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that directly induce the expression of host susceptibility (S) or resistance (R) genes. ...

  4. The Functions of Effector Proteins in Yersinia Virulence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linglin; Mei, Meng; Yu, Chan; Shen, Wenwen; Ma, Lixin; He, Jiewang; Yi, Li

    2016-01-01

    Yersinia species are bacterial pathogens that can cause plague and intestinal diseases after invading into human cells through the Three Secretion System (TTSS). The effect of pathogenesis is mediated by Yersinia outer proteins (Yop) and manifested as down-regulation of the cytokine genes expression by inhibiting nuclear factor-κ-gene binding (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In addition, its pathogenesis can also manipulate the disorder of host innate immune system and cell death such as apoptosis, pyroptosis, and autophagy. Among the Yersinia effector proteins, YopB and YopD assist the injection of other virulence effectors into the host cytoplasm, while YopE, YopH, YopJ, YopO, and YopT target on disrupting host cell signaling pathways in the host cytosols. Many efforts have been applied to reveal that intracellular proteins such as Rho-GTPase, and transmembrane receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) both play critical roles in Yersinia pathogenesis, establishing a connection between the pathogenic process and the signaling response. This review will mainly focus on how the effector proteins of Yersinia modulate the intrinsic signals in host cells and disturb the innate immunity of hosts through TTSS.

  5. The mast cell: a multifunctional effector cell.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico; Mallardi, Franco; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto

    2003-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are recognized key cells of type I hypersensitivity reactions. Several lines of evidence, however, indicate that MC not only express critical effector functions in classic IgE-associated allergic disorders, but also play important roles in host defence against parasites, bacteria and perhaps even viruses. Indeed, it is now clear that MC can contribute to host defence in the context of either acquired or innate immune responses through the release of a myriad of pro-inflammatory and immunoregulatory molecules and the expression of a wide spectrum of surface receptors for cytokines and chemokines. Moreover, there is growing evidence that MC exert distinct nonimmunological functions, playing a relevant role in tissue homeostasis, remodeling and fibrosis as well as in the processes of tissue angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a small insight into the biology of mast cells and their potential implications in human pathology.

  6. Microbe-independent entry of oomycete RxLR effectors and fungal RxLR-like effectors into plant and animal cells is specific and reproducible.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Brett M; Kale, Shiv D; Wang, Qunqing; Tao, Kai; Clark, Helen R; Drews, Kelly; Antignani, Vincenzo; Rumore, Amanda; Hayes, Tristan; Plett, Jonathan M; Fudal, Isabelle; Gu, Biao; Chen, Qinghe; Affeldt, Katharyn J; Berthier, Erwin; Fischer, Gregory J; Dou, Daolong; Shan, Weixing; Keller, Nancy P; Martin, Francis; Rouxel, Thierry; Lawrence, Christopher B

    2013-06-01

    A wide diversity of pathogens and mutualists of plant and animal hosts, including oomycetes and fungi, produce effector proteins that enter the cytoplasm of host cells. A major question has been whether or not entry by these effectors can occur independently of the microbe or requires machinery provided by the microbe. Numerous publications have documented that oomycete RxLR effectors and fungal RxLR-like effectors can enter plant and animal cells independent of the microbe. A recent reexamination of whether the RxLR domain of oomycete RxLR effectors is sufficient for microbe-independent entry into host cells concluded that the RxLR domains of Phytophthora infestans Avr3a and of P. sojae Avr1b alone are NOT sufficient to enable microbe-independent entry of proteins into host and nonhost plant and animal cells. Here, we present new, more detailed data that unambiguously demonstrate that the RxLR domain of Avr1b does show efficient and specific entry into soybean root cells and also into wheat leaf cells, at levels well above background nonspecific entry. We also summarize host cell entry experiments with a wide diversity of oomycete and fungal effectors with RxLR or RxLR-like motifs that have been independently carried out by the seven different labs that coauthored this letter. Finally we discuss possible technical reasons why specific cell entry may have been not detected by Wawra et al. (2013).

  7. SNARC Effect in Different Effectors.

    PubMed

    Hesse, Philipp N; Fiehler, Katja; Bremmer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The SNARC (spatial numerical association of response codes) effect, indicating that subjects react faster to the left for small numbers and to the right for large numbers, is used as evidence for the idea that humans use space to organize number representations. Previous studies compared the SNARC effect across sensory modalities within participants and concluded modality independence. So far, it is unknown what sensory-to-motor mappings are involved in generating the SNARC effect and whether these mappings are identical for different effectors within subjects. Hence, we tested whether the SNARC effect is effector specific. Participants performed an auditory parity judgment task and responded with three different effectors: finger (button release), eyes (saccades), and arm (pointing). The SNARC effect occurred in each effector but varied in strength across the effectors. Across subjects, we found a significant correlation of SNARC strength for finger and arm responses suggesting the use of a shared sensory-to-motor mapping. SNARC strength did not correlate, however, between finger and eyes or arm and eyes. An additional statistical analysis based on conditional probabilities provided further evidence for SNARC-effector specificity. Taken together, our results suggest that the sensory-to-motor mapping is not as tight as it would be expected if the SNARC effect was effector independent.

  8. Orbital maneuvering end effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an end effector device for grasping and maneuvering objects such as berthing handles of a space telescope. The device includes a V-shaped capture window defined as inclined surfaces in parallel face plates which converge toward a retainer recess in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess where latches lock handle in the recess. To align the capture window, plates may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base. Drive means is included in the form of a motor coupled with a harmonic drive speed reducer, which provides for slow movement of the fingers at a high torque so that large articles may be handled. Novelty of the invention is believed to reside in the combined intermeshing finger structure, drive means and the harmonic drive speed reducer, which features provide the required maneuverability and strength.

  9. Identification and functional analysis of secreted effectors from phytoparasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Sajid; Gupta, Vijai K; Goyal, Aakash K

    2016-03-21

    Plant parasitic nematodes develop an intimate and long-term feeding relationship with their host plants. They induce a multi-nucleate feeding site close to the vascular bundle in the roots of their host plant and remain sessile for the rest of their life. Nematode secretions, produced in the oesophageal glands and secreted through a hollow stylet into the host plant cytoplasm, are believed to play key role in pathogenesis. To combat these persistent pathogens, the identity and functional analysis of secreted effectors can serve as a key to devise durable control measures. In this review, we will recapitulate the knowledge over the identification and functional characterization of secreted nematode effector repertoire from phytoparasitic nematodes. Despite considerable efforts, the identity of genes encoding nematode secreted proteins has long been severely hampered because of their microscopic size, long generation time and obligate biotrophic nature. The methodologies such as bioinformatics, protein structure modeling, in situ hybridization microscopy, and protein-protein interaction have been used to identify and to attribute functions to the effectors. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi) has been instrumental to decipher the role of the genes encoding secreted effectors necessary for parasitism and genes attributed to normal development. Recent comparative and functional genomic approaches have accelerated the identification of effectors from phytoparasitic nematodes and offers opportunities to control these pathogens. Plant parasitic nematodes pose a serious threat to global food security of various economically important crops. There is a wealth of genomic and transcriptomic information available on plant parasitic nematodes and comparative genomics has identified many effectors. Bioengineering crops with dsRNA of phytonematode genes can disrupt the life cycle of parasitic nematodes and therefore holds great promise to develop resistant crops against plant

  10. Effector profiles distinguish formae speciales of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Peter; Fokkens, Like; Schmidt, Sarah M; Linmans, Jasper H J; Kistler, H Corby; Ma, Li-Jun; Rep, Martijn

    2016-11-01

    Formae speciales (ff.spp.) of the fungus Fusarium oxysporum are often polyphyletic within the species complex, making it impossible to identify them on the basis of conserved genes. However, sequences that determine host-specific pathogenicity may be expected to be similar between strains within the same forma specialis. Whole genome sequencing was performed on strains from five different ff.spp. (cucumerinum, niveum, melonis, radicis-cucumerinum and lycopersici). In each genome, genes for putative effectors were identified based on small size, secretion signal, and vicinity to a "miniature impala" transposable element. The candidate effector genes of all genomes were collected and the presence/absence patterns in each individual genome were clustered. Members of the same forma specialis turned out to group together, with cucurbit-infecting strains forming a supercluster separate from other ff.spp. Moreover, strains from different clonal lineages within the same forma specialis harbour identical effector gene sequences, supporting horizontal transfer of genetic material. These data offer new insight into the genetic basis of host specificity in the F. oxysporum species complex and show that (putative) effectors can be used to predict host specificity in F. oxysporum. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MorTAL Kombat: the story of defense against TAL effectors through loss-of-susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Mathilde; Pérez-Quintero, Alvaro L.; Lopez, Camilo; Szurek, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Many plant-pathogenic xanthomonads rely on Transcription Activator-Like (TAL) effectors to colonize their host. This particular family of type III effectors functions as specific plant transcription factors via a programmable DNA-binding domain. Upon binding to the promoters of plant disease susceptibility genes in a sequence-specific manner, the expression of these host genes is induced. However, plants have evolved specific strategies to counter the action of TAL effectors and confer resistance. One mechanism is to avoid the binding of TAL effectors by mutations of their DNA binding sites, resulting in resistance by loss-of-susceptibility. This article reviews our current knowledge of the susceptibility hubs targeted by Xanthomonas TAL effectors, possible evolutionary scenarios for plants to combat the pathogen with loss-of-function alleles, and how this knowledge can be used overall to develop new pathogen-informed breeding strategies and improve crop resistance. PMID:26236326

  12. Identification of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Transcript Sequences Expressed during Infection Reveals Isolate-Specific Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Adriana; Stassen, Joost H. M.; Seidl, Michael F.; Bautor, Jaqueline; Parker, Jane E.; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Biotrophic plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that are important for infection of the host. The aim of this study was to identify effectors of the downy mildew pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) that are expressed during infection of its natural host Arabidopsis thaliana. Infection-related transcripts were identified from Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from leaves of the susceptible Arabidopsis Ws eds1-1 mutant inoculated with the highly virulent Hpa isolate Waco9. Assembly of 6364 ESTs yielded 3729 unigenes, of which 2164 were Hpa-derived. From the translated Hpa unigenes, 198 predicted secreted proteins were identified. Of these, 75 were found to be Hpa-specific and six isolate Waco9-specific. Among 42 putative effectors identified there were three Elicitin-like proteins, 16 Cysteine-rich proteins and 18 host-translocated RXLR effectors. Sequencing of alleles in different Hpa isolates revealed that five RXLR genes show signatures of diversifying selection. Thus, EST analysis of Hpa-infected Arabidopsis is proving to be a powerful method for identifying pathogen effector candidates expressed during infection. Delivery of the Waco9-specific protein RXLR29 in planta revealed that this effector can suppress PAMP-triggered immunity and enhance disease susceptibility. We propose that differences in host colonization can be conditioned by isolate-specific effectors. PMID:21573066

  13. Hacker within! Ehrlichia chaffeensis Effector Driven Phagocyte Reprogramming Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Farris, Tierra; Luo, Tian; Mitra, Shubhajit; Zhu, Bing; McBride, Jere W.

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is a small, gram negative, obligately intracellular bacterium that preferentially infects mononuclear phagocytes. It is the etiologic agent of human monocytotropic ehrlichiosis (HME), an emerging life-threatening tick-borne zoonosis. Mechanisms by which E. chaffeensis establishes intracellular infection, and avoids host defenses are not well understood, but involve functionally relevant host-pathogen interactions associated with tandem and ankyrin repeat effector proteins. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underlie Ehrlichia host cellular reprogramming strategies that enable intracellular survival. PMID:27303657

  14. Evaluation of Secretion Prediction Highlights Differing Approaches Needed for Oomycete and Fungal Effectors.

    PubMed

    Sperschneider, Jana; Williams, Angela H; Hane, James K; Singh, Karam B; Taylor, Jennifer M

    2015-01-01

    The steadily increasing number of sequenced fungal and oomycete genomes has enabled detailed studies of how these eukaryotic microbes infect plants and cause devastating losses in food crops. During infection, fungal and oomycete pathogens secrete effector molecules which manipulate host plant cell processes to the pathogen's advantage. Proteinaceous effectors are synthesized intracellularly and must be externalized to interact with host cells. Computational prediction of secreted proteins from genomic sequences is an important technique to narrow down the candidate effector repertoire for subsequent experimental validation. In this study, we benchmark secretion prediction tools on experimentally validated fungal and oomycete effectors. We observe that for a set of fungal SwissProt protein sequences, SignalP 4 and the neural network predictors of SignalP 3 (D-score) and SignalP 2 perform best. For effector prediction in particular, the use of a sensitive method can be desirable to obtain the most complete candidate effector set. We show that the neural network predictors of SignalP 2 and 3, as well as TargetP were the most sensitive tools for fungal effector secretion prediction, whereas the hidden Markov model predictors of SignalP 2 and 3 were the most sensitive tools for oomycete effectors. Thus, previous versions of SignalP retain value for oomycete effector prediction, as the current version, SignalP 4, was unable to reliably predict the signal peptide of the oomycete Crinkler effectors in the test set. Our assessment of subcellular localization predictors shows that cytoplasmic effectors are often predicted as not extracellular. This limits the reliability of secretion predictions that depend on these tools. We present our assessment with a view to informing future pathogenomics studies and suggest revised pipelines for secretion prediction to obtain optimal effector predictions in fungi and oomycetes.

  15. Evaluation of Secretion Prediction Highlights Differing Approaches Needed for Oomycete and Fungal Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sperschneider, Jana; Williams, Angela H.; Hane, James K.; Singh, Karam B.; Taylor, Jennifer M.

    2015-01-01

    The steadily increasing number of sequenced fungal and oomycete genomes has enabled detailed studies of how these eukaryotic microbes infect plants and cause devastating losses in food crops. During infection, fungal and oomycete pathogens secrete effector molecules which manipulate host plant cell processes to the pathogen's advantage. Proteinaceous effectors are synthesized intracellularly and must be externalized to interact with host cells. Computational prediction of secreted proteins from genomic sequences is an important technique to narrow down the candidate effector repertoire for subsequent experimental validation. In this study, we benchmark secretion prediction tools on experimentally validated fungal and oomycete effectors. We observe that for a set of fungal SwissProt protein sequences, SignalP 4 and the neural network predictors of SignalP 3 (D-score) and SignalP 2 perform best. For effector prediction in particular, the use of a sensitive method can be desirable to obtain the most complete candidate effector set. We show that the neural network predictors of SignalP 2 and 3, as well as TargetP were the most sensitive tools for fungal effector secretion prediction, whereas the hidden Markov model predictors of SignalP 2 and 3 were the most sensitive tools for oomycete effectors. Thus, previous versions of SignalP retain value for oomycete effector prediction, as the current version, SignalP 4, was unable to reliably predict the signal peptide of the oomycete Crinkler effectors in the test set. Our assessment of subcellular localization predictors shows that cytoplasmic effectors are often predicted as not extracellular. This limits the reliability of secretion predictions that depend on these tools. We present our assessment with a view to informing future pathogenomics studies and suggest revised pipelines for secretion prediction to obtain optimal effector predictions in fungi and oomycetes. PMID:26779196

  16. Apicomplexans pulling the strings: manipulation of the host cell cytoskeleton dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Rita; Soares, Helena; Hemphill, Andrew; Leitão, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Invasive stages of apicomplexan parasites require a host cell to survive, proliferate and advance to the next life cycle stage. Once invasion is achieved, apicomplexans interact closely with the host cell cytoskeleton, but in many cases the different species have evolved distinct mechanisms and pathways to modulate the structural organization of cytoskeletal filaments. The host cell cytoskeleton is a complex network, largely, but not exclusively, composed of microtubules, actin microfilaments and intermediate filaments, all of which are modulated by associated proteins, and it is involved in diverse functions including maintenance of cell morphology and mechanical support, migration, signal transduction, nutrient uptake, membrane and organelle trafficking and cell division. The ability of apicomplexans to modulate the cytoskeleton to their own advantage is clearly beneficial. We here review different aspects of the interactions of apicomplexans with the three main cytoskeletal filament types, provide information on the currently known parasite effector proteins and respective host cell targets involved, and how these interactions modulate the host cell physiology. Some of these findings could provide novel targets that could be exploited for the development of preventive and/or therapeutic strategies.

  17. Effector proteins that modulate plant--insect interactions.

    PubMed

    Hogenhout, Saskia A; Bos, Jorunn I B

    2011-08-01

    Insect herbivores have highly diverse life cycles and feeding behaviors. They establish close interactions with their plant hosts and suppress plant defenses. Chewing herbivores evoke characteristic defense responses distinguishable from general mechanical damage. In addition, piercing-sucking hemipteran insects display typical feeding behavior that suggests active suppression of plant defense responses. Effectors that modulate plant defenses have been identified in the saliva of these insects. Tools for high-throughput effector identification and functional characterization have been developed. In addition, in some insect species it is possible to silence gene expression by RNAi. Together, this technological progress has enabled the identification of insect herbivore effectors and their targets that will lead to the development of novel strategies for pest resistances in plants.

  18. The type three secreted effector SipC regulates the trafficking of PERP during Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Hallstrom, Kelly N; McCormick, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium employs type III secreted effectors to induce cellular invasion and pathogenesis. We previously reported the secreted effector SipA is in part responsible for inducing the apical accumulation of the host membrane protein PERP, a host factor we have shown is key to the inflammatory response induced by Salmonella. We now report that the S. Typhimurium type III secreted effector SipC significantly contributes to PERP redistribution to the apical membrane surface. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating a role for SipC in directing the trafficking of a host membrane protein to the cell surface. In sum, facilitation of PERP trafficking appears to be a result of type III secreted effector-mediated recruitment of vesicles to the apical surface. Our study therefore reveals a new role for SipC, and builds upon previous reports suggesting recruitment of vesicles to the cell surface is important for Salmonella invasion.

  19. Current activities of the Yersinia effector protein YopM.

    PubMed

    Höfling, Sabrina; Grabowski, Benjamin; Norkowski, Stefanie; Schmidt, M Alexander; Rüter, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) belongs to the group of Yop effector proteins, which are highly conserved among pathogenic Yersinia species. During infection, the effectors are delivered into the host cell cytoplasm via the type 3 secretion system to subvert the host immune response and support the survival of Yersinia. In contrast to the other Yop effectors, YopM does not possess a known enzymatic activity and its molecular mechanism(s) of action remain(s) poorly understood. However, YopM was shown to promote colonization and dissemination of Yersinia, thus being crucial for the pathogen's virulence in vivo. Moreover, YopM interacts with several host cell proteins and might utilize them to execute its anti-inflammatory activities. The results obtained so far indicate that YopM is a multifunctional protein that counteracts the host immune defense by multiple activities, which are at least partially independent of each other. Finally, its functions seem to be also influenced by differences between the specific YopM isoforms expressed by Yersinia subspecies. In this review, we focus on the global as well as more specific contribution of YopM to virulence of Yersinia during infection and point out the various extra- and intracellular molecular functions of YopM. In addition, the novel cell-penetrating ability of recombinant YopM and its potential applications as a self-delivering immunomodulatory therapeutic will be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Natural Killer T Cell-Targeted Immunotherapy Mediating Long-term Memory Responses and Strong Antitumor Activity.

    PubMed

    Dashtsoodol, Nyambayar; Shigeura, Tomokuni; Tashiro, Takuya; Aihara, Minako; Chikanishi, Toshihiro; Okada, Hiromi; Hanada, Keigo; Sano, Hirokazu; Kurogi, Akihiko; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2017-01-01

    Current tumor therapies, including immunotherapies, focus on passive eradication or at least reduction of the tumor mass. However, cancer patients quite often suffer from tumor relapse or metastasis after such treatments. To overcome these problems, we have developed a natural killer T (NKT) cell-targeted immunotherapy focusing on active engagement of the patient's immune system, but not directly targeting the tumor cells themselves. NKT cells express an invariant antigen receptor α chain encoded by Trav11 (Vα14)-Traj18 (Jα18) gene segments in mice and TRAV10 (Vα24)-TRAJ18 (Jα18) in humans and recognize glycolipid ligand in conjunction with a monomorphic CD1d molecule. The NKT cells play a pivotal role in the orchestration of antitumor immune responses by mediating adjuvant effects that activate various antitumor effector cells of both innate and adaptive immune systems and also aid in establishing a long-term memory response. Here, we established NKT cell-targeted therapy using a newly discovered NKT cell glycolipid ligand, RK, which has a stronger capacity to stimulate both human and mouse NKT cells compared to previous NKT cell ligand. Moreover, RK mediates strong adjuvant effects in activating various effector cell types and establishes long-term memory responses, resulting in the continuous attack on the tumor that confers long-lasting and potent antitumor effects. Since the NKT cell ligand presented by the monomorphic CD1d can be used for all humans irrespective of HLA types, and also because NKT cell-targeted therapy does not directly target tumor cells, this therapy can potentially be applied to all cancer patients and any tumor types.

  1. Elucidating the Role of Effectors in Plant-Fungal Interactions: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Selin, Carrie; de Kievit, Teresa R.; Belmonte, Mark F.; Fernando, W. G. Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi have diverse growth lifestyles that support fungal colonization on plants. Successful colonization and infection for all lifestyles depends upon the ability to modify living host plants to sequester the necessary nutrients required for growth and reproduction. Secretion of virulence determinants referred to as “effectors” is assumed to be the key governing factor that determines host infection and colonization. Effector proteins are capable of suppressing plant defense responses and alter plant physiology to accommodate fungal invaders. This review focuses on effector molecules of biotrophic and hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic fungi, and the mechanism required for the release and uptake of effector molecules by the fungi and plant cells, respectively. We also place emphasis on the discovery of effectors, difficulties associated with predicting the effector repertoire, and fungal genomic features that have helped promote effector diversity leading to fungal evolution. We discuss the role of specific effectors found in biotrophic and hemibiotrophic fungi and examine how CRISPR/Cas9 technology may provide a new avenue for accelerating our ability in the discovery of fungal effector function. PMID:27199930

  2. Steady-State and Kinetics-Based Affinity Determination in Effector-Effector Target Interactions.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, André; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Dissecting the functional basis of pathogenicity and resistance in the context of plant innate immunity benefits greatly from detailed knowledge about biomolecular interactions, as both resistance and virulence depend on specific interactions between pathogen and host biomolecules. While in vivo systems provide biological context to host-pathogen interactions, these experiments typically cannot provide quantitative biochemical characterization of biomolecular interactions. However, in many cases, the biological function does not only depend on whether an interaction occurs at all, but rather on the "intensity" of the interaction, as quantified by affinity. Specifically, microbial effector proteins may bind more than one host target to exert virulence functions, and looking at these interactions more closely than would be possible in a purely black-and-white qualitative assay (as classically based on plant or yeast systems) can reveal new insights into the evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Recent advances in biomolecular interaction assays that can be performed in vitro allow quantification of binding events with ever greater fidelity and application range. Here, we describe assays based on microscale thermophoresis (MST) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Using these technologies allows affinity determination both in steady-state and in kinetic configurations, providing two conceptually independent pathways to arrive at quantitative affinity data describing the interactions of pathogen and host biomolecules.

  3. Interferon-inducible effector mechanisms in cell-autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    MacMicking, John D

    2012-04-25

    Interferons (IFNs) induce the expression of hundreds of genes as part of an elaborate antimicrobial programme designed to combat infection in all nucleated cells - a process termed cell-autonomous immunity. As described in this Review, recent genomic and subgenomic analyses have begun to assign functional properties to novel IFN-inducible effector proteins that restrict bacteria, protozoa and viruses in different subcellular compartments and at different stages of the pathogen life cycle. Several newly described host defence factors also participate in canonical oxidative and autophagic pathways by spatially coordinating their activities to enhance microbial killing. Together, these IFN-induced effector networks help to confer vertebrate host resistance to a vast and complex microbial world.

  4. Computational Predictions Provide Insights into the Biology of TAL Effector Target Sites

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Jan; Wolf, Annett; Reschke, Maik; Bonas, Ulla; Posch, Stefan; Boch, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open-source Java library

  5. Computational predictions provide insights into the biology of TAL effector target sites.

    PubMed

    Grau, Jan; Wolf, Annett; Reschke, Maik; Bonas, Ulla; Posch, Stefan; Boch, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors are injected into host plant cells by Xanthomonas bacteria to function as transcriptional activators for the benefit of the pathogen. The DNA binding domain of TAL effectors is composed of conserved amino acid repeat structures containing repeat-variable diresidues (RVDs) that determine DNA binding specificity. In this paper, we present TALgetter, a new approach for predicting TAL effector target sites based on a statistical model. In contrast to previous approaches, the parameters of TALgetter are estimated from training data computationally. We demonstrate that TALgetter successfully predicts known TAL effector target sites and often yields a greater number of predictions that are consistent with up-regulation in gene expression microarrays than an existing approach, Target Finder of the TALE-NT suite. We study the binding specificities estimated by TALgetter and approve that different RVDs are differently important for transcriptional activation. In subsequent studies, the predictions of TALgetter indicate a previously unreported positional preference of TAL effector target sites relative to the transcription start site. In addition, several TAL effectors are predicted to bind to the TATA-box, which might constitute one general mode of transcriptional activation by TAL effectors. Scrutinizing the predicted target sites of TALgetter, we propose several novel TAL effector virulence targets in rice and sweet orange. TAL-mediated induction of the candidates is supported by gene expression microarrays. Validity of these targets is also supported by functional analogy to known TAL effector targets, by an over-representation of TAL effector targets with similar function, or by a biological function related to pathogen infection. Hence, these predicted TAL effector virulence targets are promising candidates for studying the virulence function of TAL effectors. TALgetter is implemented as part of the open-source Java library

  6. Xanthomonas and the TAL Effectors: Nature's Molecular Biologist.

    PubMed

    White, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Agrobacterium, due to the transfer of T-DNA to the host genome, is known as nature's genetic engineer. Once again, bacteria have led the way to newfound riches in biotechnology. Xanthomonas has emerged as nature's molecular biologist as the functional domains of the sequence-specific DNA transcription factors known as TAL effectors were characterized and associated with the cognate disease susceptibility and resistance genes of plants.

  7. SnTox1, a Parastagonospora nodorum necrotrophic effector, is a dual function protein that facilitates infection while protecting from wheat-produced chitinases

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    All fungal plant pathogens produce effectors to manipulate the plant immune system to colonize and gain nutrients from the plant cell. Much is known about how fungal pathogens classified as biotrophs use effectors to interact with their hosts and how the host responds, however, less is known about ...

  8. The bacterial effectors EspG and EspG2 induce a destructive calpain activity that is kept in check by the co-delivered Tir effector

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Paul; Mühlen, Sabrina; Quitard, Sabine; Kenny, Brendan

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens deliver multiple effector proteins into eukaryotic cells to subvert host cellular processes and an emerging theme is the cooperation between different effectors. Here, we reveal that a fine balance exists between effectors that are delivered by enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) which, if perturbed can have marked consequences on the outcome of the infection. We show that absence of the EPEC effector Tir confers onto the bacterium a potent ability to destroy polarized intestinal epithelia through extensive host cell detachment. This process was dependent on the EPEC effectors EspG and EspG2 through their activation of the host cysteine protease calpain. EspG and EspG2 are shown to activate calpain during EPEC infection, which increases significantly in the absence of Tir – leading to rapid host cell loss and necrosis. These findings reveal a new function for EspG and EspG2 and show that Tir, independent of its bacterial ligand Intimin, is essential for maintaining the integrity of the epithelium during EPEC infection by keeping the destructive activity of EspG and EspG2 in check. PMID:20345487

  9. Conserved fungal LysM effector Ecp6 prevents chitin-triggered immunity in plants.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Ronnie; van Esse, H Peter; Kombrink, Anja; Shinya, Tomonori; Desaki, Yoshitake; Bours, Ralph; van der Krol, Sander; Shibuya, Naoto; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2010-08-20

    Multicellular organisms activate immunity upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Chitin is the major component of fungal cell walls, and chitin oligosaccharides act as PAMPs in plant and mammalian cells. Microbial pathogens deliver effector proteins to suppress PAMP-triggered host immunity and to establish infection. Here, we show that the LysM domain-containing effector protein Ecp6 of the fungal plant pathogen Cladosporium fulvum mediates virulence through perturbation of chitin-triggered host immunity. During infection, Ecp6 sequesters chitin oligosaccharides that are released from the cell walls of invading hyphae to prevent elicitation of host immunity. This may represent a common strategy of host immune suppression by fungal pathogens, because LysM effectors are widely conserved in the fungal kingdom.

  10. Improving a Gripper End Effector

    SciTech Connect

    Mullen, O Dennis; Smith, Christopher M.; Gervais, Kevin L.

    2001-01-31

    This paper discusses the improvement made to an existing four-bar linkage gripping end effector to adapt it for use in a current project. The actuating linkage was modified to yield higher jaw force overall and particularly in the critical range of jaw displacement

  11. Tomato immune receptor Ve1 recognizes effector of multiple fungal pathogens uncovered by genome and RNA sequencing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fungal plant pathogens secrete effector molecules to establish disease on their hosts, while plants in turn utilize immune receptors to intercept these effectors. The tomato immune receptor Ve1 governs resistance to race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungi Verticillium dahliae and V. alb...

  12. A secreted fungal effector of Glomus intraradices promotes symbiotic biotrophy.

    PubMed

    Kloppholz, Silke; Kuhn, Hannah; Requena, Natalia

    2011-07-26

    Biotrophic fungi interacting with plants establish long-term relationships with their hosts to fulfill their life cycles. In contrast to necrotrophs, they need to contend with the defense mechanisms of the plant to develop within the host and feed on living cells. It is generally accepted that microbial pathogens produce and deliver a myriad of effector proteins to hijack the cellular program of their hosts. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are the most widespread biotrophs of plant roots. We investigated whether AM fungi use effector proteins to short-circuit the plant defense program. Here we show that Glomus intraradices secretes a protein, SP7, that interacts with the pathogenesis-related transcription factor ERF19 in the plant nucleus. ERF19 is highly induced in roots by the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum trifolii as well as by several fungal extracts, but only transiently during mycorrhiza colonization. When constitutively expressed in roots, SP7 leads to higher mycorrhization while reducing the levels of C. trifolii-mediated defense responses. Furthermore, expression of SP7 in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae attenuates root decay symptoms. Taken together, these results suggest that SP7 is an effector that contributes to develop the biotrophic status of AM fungi in roots by counteracting the plant immune program.

  13. Structure of NS1A effector domain from the influenza A/Udorn/72 virus

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Robertus, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the effector domain of the influenza protein NS1, a validated antiviral drug target, has been solved in two space groups. The nonstructural protein NS1A from influenza virus is a multifunctional virulence factor and a potent inhibitor of host immunity. It has two functional domains: an N-terminal 73-amino-acid RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Here, the crystallographic structure of the NS1A effector domain of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus is presented. Structure comparison with the NS1 effector domain from mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus strain reveals a similar monomer conformation but a different dimer interface. Further analysis and evaluation shows that the dimer interface observed in the structure of the PR8 NS1 effector domain is likely to be a crystallographic packing effect. A hypothetical model of the intact NS1 dimer is presented.

  14. Mining novel effector proteins from the esophageal gland cells of Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Abubucker, Sahar; Maier, Tom R; Huang, Guozhong; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hussey, Richard S; Baum, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    Meloidogyne incognita is one of the most economically damaging plant pathogens in agriculture and horticulture. Identifying and characterizing the effector proteins which M. incognita secretes into its host plants during infection is an important step toward finding new ways to manage this pest. In this study, we have identified the cDNAs for 18 putative effectors (i.e., proteins that have the potential to facilitate M. incognita parasitism of host plants). These putative effectors are secretory proteins that do not contain transmembrane domains and whose genes are specifically expressed in the secretory gland cells of the nematode, indicating that they are likely secreted from the nematode through its stylet. We have determined that, in the plant cells, these putative effectors are likely to localize to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the transcripts of many of these novel effectors are specifically upregulated during different stages of the nematode's life cycle, indicating that they function at specific stages during M. incognita parasitism. The predicted proteins showed little to no homology to known proteins from free-living nematode species, suggesting that they evolved recently to support the parasitic lifestyle. On the other hand, several of the effectors are part of gene families within the M. incognita genome as well as that of M. hapla, which points to an important role that these putative effectors are playing in both parasites. With the discovery of these putative effectors, we have increased our knowledge of the effector repertoire utilized by root-knot nematodes to infect, feed on, and reproduce on their host plants. Future studies investigating the roles that these proteins play in planta will help mitigate the effects of this damaging pest.

  15. Mining novel effector proteins from the esophageal gland cells of Meloidogyne incognita

    PubMed Central

    Rutter, William B.; Hewezi, Tarek; Abubucker, Sahar; Maier, Tom R.; Huang, Guozhong; Mitreva, Makedonka; Hussey, Richard S.; Baum, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Meloidogyne incognita is one of the most economically damaging plant pathogens in agriculture and horticulture. Identifying and characterizing the effector proteins, which M. incognita secretes into its host plants during infection, is an important step towards finding new ways to manage this pest. In this study we have identified the cDNAs for 18 putative effectors, i.e., proteins that have the potential to facilitate M. incognita parasitism of host plants. These putative effectors are secretory proteins that do not contain transmembrane domains and whose genes are specifically expressed in the secretory gland cells of the nematode, indicating that they are likely secreted from the nematode through its stylet. We have determined that in the plant cells, these putative effectors are likely to localize to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, the transcripts of many of these novel effectors are specifically up-regulated during different stages of the nematode’s life cycle, indicating that they function at specific stages during M. incognita parasitism. The predicted proteins showed little to no homology to known proteins from free-living nematode species, suggesting that they evolved recently to support the parasitic lifestyle. On the other hand, several of the effectors are part of gene families within the M. incognita genome as well as that of Meloidogyne hapla, which points to an important role that these putative effectors are playing in both parasites. With the discovery of these putative effectors we have increased our knowledge of the effector repertoire utilized by root-knot nematodes to infect, feed, and reproduce on their host plants. Future studies investigating the roles these proteins play in planta will help mitigate the effects of this damaging pest. PMID:24875667

  16. Using Hierarchical Clustering of Secreted Protein Families to Classify and Rank Candidate Effectors of Rust Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Diane G. O.; Win, Joe; Cano, Liliana M.; Szabo, Les J.; Kamoun, Sophien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Rust fungi are obligate biotrophic pathogens that cause considerable damage on crop plants. Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici, the causal agent of wheat stem rust, and Melampsora larici-populina, the poplar leaf rust pathogen, have strong deleterious impacts on wheat and poplar wood production, respectively. Filamentous pathogens such as rust fungi secrete molecules called disease effectors that act as modulators of host cell physiology and can suppress or trigger host immunity. Current knowledge on effectors from other filamentous plant pathogens can be exploited for the characterisation of effectors in the genome of recently sequenced rust fungi. We designed a comprehensive in silico analysis pipeline to identify the putative effector repertoire from the genome of two plant pathogenic rust fungi. The pipeline is based on the observation that known effector proteins from filamentous pathogens have at least one of the following properties: (i) contain a secretion signal, (ii) are encoded by in planta induced genes, (iii) have similarity to haustorial proteins, (iv) are small and cysteine rich, (v) contain a known effector motif or a nuclear localization signal, (vi) are encoded by genes with long intergenic regions, (vii) contain internal repeats, and (viii) do not contain PFAM domains, except those associated with pathogenicity. We used Markov clustering and hierarchical clustering to classify protein families of rust pathogens and rank them according to their likelihood of being effectors. Using this approach, we identified eight families of candidate effectors that we consider of high value for functional characterization. This study revealed a diverse set of candidate effectors, including families of haustorial expressed secreted proteins and small cysteine-rich proteins. This comprehensive classification of candidate effectors from these devastating rust pathogens is an initial step towards probing plant germplasm for novel resistance components. PMID:22238666

  17. Effector-triggered post-translational modifications and their role in suppression of plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Howden, Andrew J. M.; Huitema, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Plant–pathogen interactions feature complex signaling exchanges between host and microbes that ultimately determine association outcomes. Plants deploy pattern recognition receptors to perceive pathogen-associated molecular patterns, mount pattern-triggered immunity (PTI), and fend off potential pathogens. In recent years an increasing number of defense-signaling components have been identified along with a mechanistic understanding of their regulation during immune responses. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are now thought to play a crucial role in regulating defense signaling. In a bid to suppress PTI and infect their host, pathogens have evolved large repertoires of effectors that trigger susceptibility and allow colonization of host tissues. While great progress has been made in elucidating defense-signaling networks in plants and the activities of effectors in immune suppression, a critical gap exists in our understanding of effector mechanism-of-action. Given the importance of PTMs in the regulation of defense signaling, we will explore the question: how do effectors modify the post-translational status of host proteins and thus interfere with host processes required for immunity? We will consider how emerging proteomics-based experimental strategies may help us answer this important question and ultimately open the pathogens’ effector black box. PMID:22811685

  18. Diverse evolutionary mechanisms shape the type III effector virulence factor repertoire in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed Central

    Rohmer, Laurence; Guttman, David S; Dangl, Jeffery L

    2004-01-01

    Many gram-negative pathogenic bacteria directly translocate effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells via type III delivery systems. Type III effector proteins are determinants of virulence on susceptible plant hosts; they are also the proteins that trigger specific disease resistance in resistant plant hosts. Evolution of type III effectors is dominated by competing forces: the likely requirement for conservation of virulence function, the avoidance of host defenses, and possible adaptation to new hosts. To understand the evolutionary history of type III effectors in Pseudomonas syringae, we searched for homologs to 44 known or candidate P. syringae type III effectors and two effector chaperones. We examined 24 gene families for distribution among bacterial species, amino acid sequence diversity, and features indicative of horizontal transfer. We assessed the role of diversifying and purifying selection in the evolution of these gene families. While some P. syringae type III effectors were acquired recently, others have evolved predominantly by descent. The majority of codons in most of these genes were subjected to purifying selection, suggesting selective pressure to maintain presumed virulence function. However, members of 7 families had domains subject to diversifying selection. PMID:15280247

  19. Adaptive evolution has targeted the C-terminal domain of the RXLR effectors of plant pathogenic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Win, Joe; Morgan, William; Bos, Jorunn; Krasileva, Ksenia V; Cano, Liliana M; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Ammar, Randa; Staskawicz, Brian J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2007-08-01

    Oomycete plant pathogens deliver effector proteins inside host cells to modulate plant defense circuitry and to enable parasitic colonization. These effectors are defined by a conserved motif, termed RXLR (for Arg, any amino acid, Leu, Arg), that is located downstream of the signal peptide and that has been implicated in host translocation. Because the phenotypes of RXLR effectors extend to plant cells, their genes are expected to be the direct target of the evolutionary forces that drive the antagonistic interplay between pathogen and host. We used the draft genome sequences of three oomycete plant pathogens, Phytophthora sojae, Phytophthora ramorum, and Hyaloperonospora parasitica, to generate genome-wide catalogs of RXLR effector genes and determine the extent to which these genes are under positive selection. These analyses revealed that the RXLR sequence is overrepresented and positionally constrained in the secretome of Phytophthora relative to other eukaryotes. The three examined plant pathogenic oomycetes carry complex and diverse sets of RXLR effector genes that have undergone relatively rapid birth and death evolution. We obtained robust evidence of positive selection in more than two-thirds of the examined paralog families of RXLR effectors. Positive selection has acted for the most part on the C-terminal region, consistent with the view that RXLR effectors are modular, with the N terminus involved in secretion and host translocation and the C-terminal domain dedicated to modulating host defenses inside plant cells.

  20. A functional genomics approach identifies candidate effectors from the aphid species Myzus persicae (green peach aphid).

    PubMed

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Prince, David; Pitino, Marco; Maffei, Massimo E; Win, Joe; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2010-11-18

    Aphids are amongst the most devastating sap-feeding insects of plants. Like most plant parasites, aphids require intimate associations with their host plants to gain access to nutrients. Aphid feeding induces responses such as clogging of phloem sieve elements and callose formation, which are suppressed by unknown molecules, probably proteins, in aphid saliva. Therefore, it is likely that aphids, like plant pathogens, deliver proteins (effectors) inside their hosts to modulate host cell processes, suppress plant defenses, and promote infestation. We exploited publicly available aphid salivary gland expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to apply a functional genomics approach for identification of candidate effectors from Myzus persicae (green peach aphid), based on common features of plant pathogen effectors. A total of 48 effector candidates were identified, cloned, and subjected to transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana to assay for elicitation of a phenotype, suppression of the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP)-mediated oxidative burst, and effects on aphid reproductive performance. We identified one candidate effector, Mp10, which specifically induced chlorosis and local cell death in N. benthamiana and conferred avirulence to recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) expressing Mp10, PVX-Mp10, in N. tabacum, indicating that this protein may trigger plant defenses. The ubiquitin-ligase associated protein SGT1 was required for the Mp10-mediated chlorosis response in N. benthamiana. Mp10 also suppressed the oxidative burst induced by flg22, but not by chitin. Aphid fecundity assays revealed that in planta overexpression of Mp10 and Mp42 reduced aphid fecundity, whereas another effector candidate, MpC002, enhanced aphid fecundity. Thus, these results suggest that, although Mp10 suppresses flg22-triggered immunity, it triggers a defense response, resulting in an overall decrease in aphid performance in the fecundity assays. Overall, we identified aphid

  1. Two Fis Regulators Directly Repress the Expression of Numerous Effector-Encoding Genes in Legionella pneumophila

    PubMed Central

    Zusman, Tal; Speiser, Yariv

    2014-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular human pathogen that utilizes the Icm/Dot type IVB secretion system to translocate a large repertoire of effectors into host cells. For most of these effectors, there is no information regarding their regulation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the involvement of the three L. pneumophila Fis homologs in the regulation of effector-encoding genes. Deletion mutants constructed in the genes encoding the three Fis regulators revealed that Fis1 (lpg0542 gene) and Fis3 (lpg1743) but not Fis2 (lpg1370) are partially required for intracellular growth of L. pneumophila in Acanthamoeba castellanii. To identify pathogenesis-related genes directly regulated by Fis, we established a novel in vivo system which resulted in the discovery of numerous effector-encoding genes directly regulated by Fis. Further examination of these genes revealed that Fis1 and Fis3 repress the level of expression of effector-encoding genes during exponential phase. Three groups of effector-encoding genes were identified: (i) effectors regulated mainly by Fis1, (ii) effectors regulated mainly by Fis3, and (iii) effectors regulated by both Fis1 and Fis3. Examination of the upstream regulatory region of all of these effector-encoding genes revealed multiple putative Fis regulatory elements, and site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that a few of these sites constitute part of a repressor binding element. Furthermore, gel mobility shift assays demonstrated the direct relation between the Fis1 and Fis3 regulators and these regulatory elements. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that two of the three L. pneumophila Fis regulators directly repress the expression of Icm/Dot effector-encoding genes. PMID:25225276

  2. The Tomato Prf Complex Is a Molecular Trap for Bacterial Effectors Based on Pto Transphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ntoukakis, Vardis; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Mucyn, Tatiana S.; Gutierrez, Jose R.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Rathjen, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The major virulence strategy of phytopathogenic bacteria is to secrete effector proteins into the host cell to target the immune machinery. AvrPto and AvrPtoB are two such effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, which disable an overlapping range of kinases in Arabidopsis and Tomato. Both effectors target surface-localized receptor-kinases to avoid bacterial recognition. In turn, tomato has evolved an intracellular effector-recognition complex composed of the NB-LRR protein Prf and the Pto kinase. Structural analyses have shown that the most important interaction surface for AvrPto and AvrPtoB is the Pto P+1 loop. AvrPto is an inhibitor of Pto kinase activity, but paradoxically, this kinase activity is a prerequisite for defense activation by AvrPto. Here using biochemical approaches we show that disruption of Pto P+1 loop stimulates phosphorylation in trans, which is possible because the Pto/Prf complex is oligomeric. Both P+1 loop disruption and transphosphorylation are necessary for signalling. Thus, effector perturbation of one kinase molecule in the complex activates another. Hence, the Pto/Prf complex is a sophisticated molecular trap for effectors that target protein kinases, an essential aspect of the pathogen's virulence strategy. The data presented here give a clear view of why bacterial virulence and host recognition mechanisms are so often related and how the slowly evolving host is able to keep pace with the faster-evolving pathogen. PMID:23382672

  3. The tomato Prf complex is a molecular trap for bacterial effectors based on Pto transphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ntoukakis, Vardis; Balmuth, Alexi L; Mucyn, Tatiana S; Gutierrez, Jose R; Jones, Alexandra M E; Rathjen, John P

    2013-01-01

    The major virulence strategy of phytopathogenic bacteria is to secrete effector proteins into the host cell to target the immune machinery. AvrPto and AvrPtoB are two such effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, which disable an overlapping range of kinases in Arabidopsis and Tomato. Both effectors target surface-localized receptor-kinases to avoid bacterial recognition. In turn, tomato has evolved an intracellular effector-recognition complex composed of the NB-LRR protein Prf and the Pto kinase. Structural analyses have shown that the most important interaction surface for AvrPto and AvrPtoB is the Pto P+1 loop. AvrPto is an inhibitor of Pto kinase activity, but paradoxically, this kinase activity is a prerequisite for defense activation by AvrPto. Here using biochemical approaches we show that disruption of Pto P+1 loop stimulates phosphorylation in trans, which is possible because the Pto/Prf complex is oligomeric. Both P+1 loop disruption and transphosphorylation are necessary for signalling. Thus, effector perturbation of one kinase molecule in the complex activates another. Hence, the Pto/Prf complex is a sophisticated molecular trap for effectors that target protein kinases, an essential aspect of the pathogen's virulence strategy. The data presented here give a clear view of why bacterial virulence and host recognition mechanisms are so often related and how the slowly evolving host is able to keep pace with the faster-evolving pathogen.

  4. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; Tainer, John A.

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  5. The Salmonella type III secretion system virulence effector forms a new hexameric chaperone assembly for export of effector/chaperone complexes

    DOE PAGES

    Tsai, Chi -Lin; Burkinshaw, Brianne J.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.; ...

    2014-12-08

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase.

  6. The Salmonella Type III Secretion System Virulence Effector Forms a New Hexameric Chaperone Assembly for Export of Effector/Chaperone Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Burkinshaw, Brianne J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria hijack eukaryotic cells by injecting virulence effectors into host cytosol with a type III secretion system (T3SS). Effectors are targeted with their cognate chaperones to hexameric T3SS ATPase at the bacterial membrane's cytosolic face. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, Roblin et al. (P. Roblin, F. Dewitte, V. Villeret, E. G. Biondi, and C. Bompard, J Bacteriol 197:688–698, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02294-14) show that the T3SS chaperone SigE of Salmonella can form hexameric rings rather than dimers when bound to its cognate effector, SopB, implying a novel multimeric association for chaperone/effector complexes with their ATPase. PMID:25488302

  7. Effector proteins support the asymmetric apportioning of Salmonella during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaya; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Méresse, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella-infected cells are characterized by the presence of intra-cellular membranous tubules that emerge from bacterial vacuoles and extend along microtubules. The formation of Salmonella-induced tubules depends on the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS-2) that translocates bacterial effector proteins inside host cells. Effector proteins have enzymatic activities or allow for hijacking of cellular functions. The role of Salmonella-induced tubules in virulence remains unclear but their absence is correlated with virulence defects. This study describes the presence of inter-cellular tubules that arise between daughter cells during cytokinesis. Inter-cellular tubules connect bacterial vacuoles originally present in the parent cell and that have been apportioned between daughters. Their formation requires a functional T3SS-2 and effector proteins. Our data establish a correlation between the formation of inter-cellular tubules and the asymmetric distribution of bacterial vacuoles in daughters. Thus, by manipulating the distribution of bacteria in cytokinetic cells, Salmonella T3SS-2 effector proteins may increase bacterial spreading and the systemic character of the infection. PMID:27046257

  8. Dexterous end effector flight demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Edward L.; Monford, Leo G.

    1994-01-01

    The Dexterous End Effector Flight Experiment is a flight demonstration of newly developed equipment and methods which make for more dexterous manipulation of robotic arms. The following concepts are to be demonstrated: The Force Torque Sensor is a six axis load cell located at the end of the RMS which displays load data to the operator on the orbiter CCTV monitor. TRAC is a target system which provides six axis positional information to the operator. It has the characteristic of having high sensitivity to attitude misalignment while being flat. AUTO-TRAC is a variation of TRAC in which a computer analyzes a target, displays translational and attitude misalignment information, and provides cues to the operator for corrective inputs. The Magnetic End Effector is a fault tolerant end effector which grapples payloads using magnetic attraction. The Carrier Latch Assembly is a fault tolerant payload carrier, which uses mechanical latches and/or magnetic attraction to hold small payloads during launch/landing and to release payloads as desired. The flight experiment goals and objectives are explained. The experiment equipment is described, and the tasks to be performed during the demonstration are discussed.

  9. In planta expression or delivery of potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae effectors Me10 and Me23 enhances aphid fecundity.

    PubMed

    Atamian, Hagop S; Chaudhary, Ritu; Cin, Valeriano Dal; Bao, Ergude; Girke, Thomas; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between aphids and their host plants seem to be analogous to those of plant-microbial pathogens. Unlike microbial pathogen effectors, little is known about aphid effectors and their ability to interfere with host immunity. To date, only three functional aphid effectors have been reported. To identify potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae) effectors, we developed a salivary gland transcriptome using Illumina technology. We generated 85 million Illumina reads from salivary glands and assembled them into 646 contigs. Ab initio sequence analysis predicted secretion signal peptides in 24% of these sequences, suggesting that they might be secreted into the plant during aphid feeding. Eight of these candidate effectors with secretion signal peptides were functionally characterized using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Two candidate effectors, Me10 and Me23, increased aphid fecundity, suggesting their ability to suppress N. benthamiana defenses. Five of these candidate effectors, including Me10 and Me23, were also analyzed in tomato by delivering them through the Pseudomonas syringae type three secretion system. In tomato, only Me10 increased aphid fecundity. This work identified two additional aphid effectors with ability to manipulate the host for their advantage.

  10. Mutualistic Co-evolution of Type III Effector Genes in Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuan; Creason, Allison L.; Thireault, Caitlin A.; Sachs, Joel L.; Chang, Jeff H.

    2013-01-01

    Two diametric paradigms have been proposed to model the molecular co-evolution of microbial mutualists and their eukaryotic hosts. In one, mutualist and host exhibit an antagonistic arms race and each partner evolves rapidly to maximize their own fitness from the interaction at potential expense of the other. In the opposing model, conflicts between mutualist and host are largely resolved and the interaction is characterized by evolutionary stasis. We tested these opposing frameworks in two lineages of mutualistic rhizobia, Sinorhizobium fredii and Bradyrhizobium japonicum. To examine genes demonstrably important for host-interactions we coupled the mining of genome sequences to a comprehensive functional screen for type III effector genes, which are necessary for many Gram-negative pathogens to infect their hosts. We demonstrate that the rhizobial type III effector genes exhibit a surprisingly high degree of conservation in content and sequence that is in contrast to those of a well characterized plant pathogenic species. This type III effector gene conservation is particularly striking in the context of the relatively high genome-wide diversity of rhizobia. The evolution of rhizobial type III effectors is inconsistent with the molecular arms race paradigm. Instead, our results reveal that these loci are relatively static in rhizobial lineages and suggest that fitness conflicts between rhizobia mutualists and their host plants have been largely resolved. PMID:23468637

  11. The Arabidopsis ZED1 pseudokinase is required for ZAR1-mediated immunity induced by the Pseudomonas syringae type III effector HopZ1a

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant and animal pathogenic bacteria can suppress host immunity by injecting type III secreted effector (T3SE) proteins into host cells (1-5). However, T3SEs can also elicit host immunity if the host has evolved a means to recognize the presence or activity of specific T3SEs (6). The diverse YopJ/Ho...

  12. Evidence for acquisition of virulence effectors in pathogenic chytrids.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guiling; Yang, Zefeng; Kosch, Tiffany; Summers, Kyle; Huang, Jinling

    2011-07-08

    The decline in amphibian populations across the world is frequently linked to the infection of the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). This is particularly perplexing because Bd was only recently discovered in 1999 and no chytrid fungus had previously been identified as a vertebrate pathogen. In this study, we show that two large families of known virulence effector genes, crinkler (CRN) proteins and serine peptidases, were acquired by Bd from oomycete pathogens and bacteria, respectively. These two families have been duplicated after their acquisition by Bd. Additional selection analyses indicate that both families evolved under strong positive selection, suggesting that they are involved in the adaptation of Bd to its hosts. We propose that the acquisition of virulence effectors, in combination with habitat disruption and climate change, may have driven the Bd epidemics and the decline in amphibian populations. This finding provides a starting point for biochemical investigations of chytridiomycosis.

  13. Active Flow Effectors for Noise and Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    New flow effector technology for separation control and enhanced mixing is based upon shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) technology. The technology allows for variable shape control of aircraft structures through actively deformable surfaces. The flow effectors are made by embedding shape memory alloy actuator material in a composite structure. When thermally actuated, the flow effector def1ects into or out of the flow in a prescribed manner to enhance mixing or induce separation for a variety of applications, including aeroacoustic noise reduction, drag reduction, and f1ight control. The active flow effectors were developed for noise reduction as an alternative to fixed-configuration effectors, such as static chevrons, that cannot be optimized for airframe installation effects or variable operating conditions and cannot be retracted for off-design or fail-safe conditions. Benefits include: Increased vehicle control, overall efficiency, and reduced noise throughout all f1ight regimes, Reduced flow noise, Reduced drag, Simplicity of design and fabrication, Simplicity of control through direct current stimulation, autonomous re sponse to environmental heating, fast re sponse, and a high degree of geometric stability. The concept involves embedding prestrained SMA actuators on one side of the chevron neutral axis in order to generate a thermal moment and def1ect the structure out of plane when heated. The force developed in the host structure during def1ection and the aerodynamic load is used for returning the structure to the retracted position. The chevron design is highly scalable and versatile, and easily affords active and/or autonomous (environmental) control. The technology offers wide-ranging market applications, including aerospace, automotive, and any application that requires flow separation or noise control.

  14. Effector identification in the lettuce downy mildew Bremia lactucae by massively parallel transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Joost H M; Seidl, Michael F; Vergeer, Pim W J; Nijman, Isaäc J; Snel, Berend; Cuppen, Edwin; Van den Ackerveken, Guido

    2012-09-01

    Lettuce downy mildew (Bremia lactucae) is a rapidly adapting oomycete pathogen affecting commercial lettuce cultivation. Oomycetes are known to use a diverse arsenal of secreted proteins (effectors) to manipulate their hosts. Two classes of effector are known to be translocated by the host: the RXLRs and Crinklers. To gain insight into the repertoire of effectors used by B. lactucae to manipulate its host, we performed massively parallel sequencing of cDNA derived from B. lactucae spores and infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedlings. From over 2.3 million 454 GS FLX reads, 59 618 contigs were assembled representing both plant and pathogen transcripts. Of these, 19 663 contigs were determined to be of B. lactucae origin as they matched pathogen genome sequences (SOLiD) that were obtained from >270 million reads of spore-derived genomic DNA. After correction of cDNA sequencing errors with SOLiD data, translation into protein models and filtering, 16 372 protein models remained, 1023 of which were predicted to be secreted. This secretome included elicitins, necrosis and ethylene-inducing peptide 1-like proteins, glucanase inhibitors and lectins, and was enriched in cysteine-rich proteins. Candidate host-translocated effectors included 78 protein models with RXLR effector features. In addition, we found indications for an unknown number of Crinkler-like sequences. Similarity clustering of secreted proteins revealed additional effector candidates. We provide a first look at the transcriptome of B. lactucae and its encoded effector arsenal. © 2012 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2012 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  15. Warfare between Host Immunity and Bacterial Weapons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Manda; Lai, Erh-Min

    2017-01-11

    Bacterial pathogens deploy protein secretion systems to facilitate infection and colonization of their hosts. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Chen et al. (2017) report a new role for a type VI secretion effector in promoting bacterial colonization by preventing inflammasome activation induced by a type III secretion system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Diverse Secreted Effectors Are Required for Salmonella Persistence in a Mouse Infection Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kidwai, Afshan S.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-08-12

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes typhoid-like disease in mice and is a model of typhoid fever in humans. One of the hallmarks of typhoid is persistence, the ability of the bacteria to survive in the host weeks after infection. Virulence factors called effectors facilitate this process by direct transfer to the cytoplasm of infected cells thereby subverting cellular processes. Secretion of effectors to the cell cytoplasm takes place through multiple routes, including two separate type III secretion (T3SS) apparati as well as outer membrane vesicles. The two T3SS are encoded on separate pathogenicity islands, SPI-1 and -2, with SPI-1 more strongly associated with the intestinal phase of infection, and SPI-2 with the systemic phase. Both T3SS are required for persistence, but the effectors required have not been systematically evaluated. In this study, mutations in 48 described effectors were tested for persistence. We replaced each effector with a specific DNA barcode sequence by allelic exchange and co-infected with a wild-type reference to calculate the ratio of wild-type parent to mutant at different times after infection. The competitive index (CI) was determined by quantitative PCR in which primers that correspond to the barcode were used for amplification. Mutations in all but seven effectors reduced persistence demonstrating that most effectors were required. One exception was CigR, a recently discovered effector that is widely conserved throughout enteric bacteria. Deletion of cigR increased lethality, suggesting that it may be an anti-virulence factor. The fact that almost all Salmonella effectors are required for persistence argues against redundant functions. This is different from effector repertoires in other intracellular pathogens such as Legionella.

  17. The genome sequence and effector complement of the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini

    PubMed Central

    Nemri, Adnane; Saunders, Diane G. O.; Anderson, Claire; Upadhyaya, Narayana M.; Win, Joe; Lawrence, Gregory J.; Jones, David A.; Kamoun, Sophien; Ellis, Jeffrey G.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi cause serious yield reductions on crops, including wheat, barley, soybean, coffee, and represent real threats to global food security. Of these fungi, the flax rust pathogen Melampsora lini has been developed most extensively over the past 80 years as a model to understand the molecular mechanisms that underpin pathogenesis. During infection, M. lini secretes virulence effectors to promote disease. The number of these effectors, their function and their degree of conservation across rust fungal species is unknown. To assess this, we sequenced and assembled de novo the genome of M. lini isolate CH5 into 21,130 scaffolds spanning 189 Mbp (scaffold N50 of 31 kbp). Global analysis of the DNA sequence revealed that repetitive elements, primarily retrotransposons, make up at least 45% of the genome. Using ab initio predictions, transcriptome data and homology searches, we identified 16,271 putative protein-coding genes. An analysis pipeline was then implemented to predict the effector complement of M. lini and compare it to that of the poplar rust, wheat stem rust and wheat stripe rust pathogens to identify conserved and species-specific effector candidates. Previous knowledge of four cloned M. lini avirulence effector proteins and two basidiomycete effectors was used to optimize parameters of the effector prediction pipeline. Markov clustering based on sequence similarity was performed to group effector candidates from all four rust pathogens. Clusters containing at least one member from M. lini were further analyzed and prioritized based on features including expression in isolated haustoria and infected leaf tissue and conservation across rust species. Herein, we describe 200 of 940 clusters that ranked highest on our priority list, representing 725 flax rust candidate effectors. Our findings on this important model rust species provide insight into how effectors of rust fungi are conserved across species and how they may act to promote infection on their

  18. MITEs in the promoters of effector genes allow prediction of novel virulence genes in Fusarium oxysporum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f.sp.lycopersici (Fol) has accessory, lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes that can be transferred horizontally between strains. A single LS chromosome in the Fol4287 reference strain harbors all known Fol effector genes. Transfer of this pathogenicity chromosome confers virulence to a previously non-pathogenic recipient strain. We hypothesize that expression and evolution of effector genes is influenced by their genomic context. Results To gain a better understanding of the genomic context of the effector genes, we manually curated the annotated genes on the pathogenicity chromosome and identified and classified transposable elements. Both retro- and DNA transposons are present with no particular overrepresented class. Retrotransposons appear evenly distributed over the chromosome, while DNA transposons tend to concentrate in large chromosomal subregions. In general, genes on the pathogenicity chromosome are dispersed within the repeat landscape. Effector genes are present within subregions enriched for DNA transposons. A miniature Impala (mimp) is always present in their promoters. Although promoter deletion studies of two effector gene loci did not reveal a direct function of the mimp for gene expression, we were able to use proximity to a mimp as a criterion to identify new effector gene candidates. Through xylem sap proteomics we confirmed that several of these candidates encode proteins secreted during plant infection. Conclusions Effector genes in Fol reside in characteristic subregions on a pathogenicity chromosome. Their genomic context allowed us to develop a method for the successful identification of novel effector genes. Since our approach is not based on effector gene similarity, but on unique genomic features, it can easily be extended to identify effector genes in Fo strains with different host specificities. PMID:23432788

  19. A Phytophthora sojae effector suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated immunity by stabilizing plant Binding immunoglobulin Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Maofeng; Guo, Baodian; Li, Haiyang; Yang, Bo; Wang, Haonan; Kong, Guanghui; Zhao, Yao; Xu, Huawei; Wang, Yan; Ye, Wenwu; Dong, Suomeng; Qiao, Yongli; Tyler, Brett M.; Ma, Wenbo; Wang, Yuanchao

    2016-01-01

    Phytophthora pathogens secrete an array of specific effector proteins to manipulate host innate immunity to promote pathogen colonization. However, little is known about the host targets of effectors and the specific mechanisms by which effectors increase susceptibility. Here we report that the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae uses an essential effector PsAvh262 to stabilize endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-luminal binding immunoglobulin proteins (BiPs), which act as negative regulators of plant resistance to Phytophthora. By stabilizing BiPs, PsAvh262 suppresses ER stress-triggered cell death and facilitates Phytophthora infection. The direct targeting of ER stress regulators may represent a common mechanism of host manipulation by microbes. PMID:27256489

  20. Development of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell-targeted protein cages.

    PubMed

    Toita, Riki; Murata, Masaharu; Tabata, Shigekazu; Abe, Kana; Narahara, Sayoko; Piao, Jing Shu; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Hashizume, Makoto

    2012-07-18

    We described herein a human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell-targeted protein cage for which the HCC-binding peptide termed SP94 was modified at the surface of a naturally occurred heat shock protein (Hsp) cage. Six types of HCC-targeted Hsp cages were chemically synthesized using two types of heterobifunctional linker (SM(PEG)(n)) with different lengths and two types of SP94 peptide, which contained a unique Cys residue at the N- or C-terminus of the peptide. These Hsp cages were characterized using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-ToF MS) analyses, sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurement. Fluorescence microscopic observations revealed that all the engineered protein cages bind selectively to HCC cells but not to the other cell lines tested (including normal liver cell). Moreover, the number of SP94 peptides on Hsp cages, conjugation site of SP94 peptide, and linker length between a Hsp cage and a SP94 peptide had important effects upon the binding of engineered Hsp cages to HCC cells. An engineered Hsp cage conjugated to the N-terminus of SP94 peptide via a longer linker molecule and containing high SP94 peptide levels showed greater binding toward HCC cells. Surprisingly, through optimization of these three factors, up to 10-fold greater affinity toward HCC cells was achieved. These results are critically important not only for the development of HCC cell-targeting devices using SP94 peptide, but also to create other cell-targeting materials that utilize other peptide ligands.

  1. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-12-29

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy.

  2. Cancer stem cell targeted therapy: progress amid controversies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Gantier, Michael P.; Hou, Yingchun; Wang, Li; Li, Yong; Shamaileh, Hadi Al; Yin, Wang; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhao, Xinhan; Duan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although cancer stem cells have been well characterized in numerous malignancies, the fundamental characteristics of this group of cells, however, have been challenged by some recent observations: cancer stem cells may not necessary to be rare within tumors; cancer stem cells and non-cancer stem cells may undergo reversible phenotypic changes; and the cancer stem cells phenotype can vary substantially between patients. Here the current status and progresses of cancer stem cells theory is illustrated and via providing a panoramic view of cancer therapy, we addressed the recent controversies regarding the feasibility of cancer stem cells targeted anti-cancer therapy. PMID:26496035

  3. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  4. Modulation of innate immunity by Toxoplasma gondii virulence effectors

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Christopher A.; Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    Preface Toxoplasma gondii is a common parasite of animals and humans that can cause serious opportunistic infections. However, the majority of infections are asymptomatic possibly because the organism has co-evolved with its many vertebrate hosts and has developed multiple strategies to persist asymptomatically for the lifetime of the host. Over the past two decades, infection studies in the mouse, combined with forward genetic approaches aimed at unraveling the molecular basis of infection, have revealed that T. gondii virulence is mediated, in part, by secretion of effector proteins into the host cell during invasion. Here, we review recent advances that illustrate how these virulence factors disarm innate immunity and promote survival of the parasite. PMID:23070557

  5. Functional dissection of SseF, a membrane-integral effector protein of intracellular Salmonella enterica.

    PubMed

    Müller, Petra; Chikkaballi, Deepak; Hensel, Michael

    2012-01-01

    During intracellular life, the bacterial pathogen Salmonella enterica translocates a complex cocktail of effector proteins by means of the SPI2-encoded type III secretions system. The effectors jointly modify the endosomal system and vesicular transport in host cells. SseF and SseG are two effectors encoded by genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 2 and both effector associate with endosomal membranes and microtubules and are involved in the formation of Salmonella-induced filaments. Our previous deletional analyses identified protein domains of SseF required for the effector function. Here we present a detailed mutational analysis that identifies a short hydrophobic motif as functionally essential. We demonstrate that SseF and SseG are still functional if translocated as a single fusion protein, but also mediate effector function if translocated in cells co-infected with sseF and sseG strains. SseF has characteristics of an integral membrane protein after translocation into host cells.

  6. SPRYSEC Effectors: A Versatile Protein-Binding Platform to Disrupt Plant Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Granados, Amalia; Petrescu, Andrei-José; Goverse, Aska; Smant, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infections by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes are a major threat to important food crops all over the world. These roundworms manipulate host plant cell morphology and physiology to establish sophisticated feeding structures. Key modifications to plant cells during their transition into feeding structures are largely attributed to the activity of effectors secreted by the nematodes. The SPRYSEC effectors were initially identified in the potato cyst nematodes Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida, and are characterized by a single SPRY domain, a non-catalytic domain present in modular proteins with different functions. The SPRY domain is wide-spread among eukaryotes and thought to be involved in mediating protein–protein interactions. Thus far, the SPRY domain is only reported as a functional domain in effectors of plant-parasitic nematodes, but not of other plant pathogens. SPRYSEC effectors have been implicated in both suppression and activation of plant immunity, but other possible roles in nematode virulence remain undefined. Here, we review the latest reports on the structure, function, and sequence diversity of SPRYSEC effectors, which provide support for a model featuring these effectors as a versatile protein-binding platform for the nematodes to target a wide range of host proteins during parasitism. PMID:27812363

  7. Marker for type VI secretion system effectors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Kinch, Lisa N.; Trudgian, David C.; Guo, Xiaofeng; Klimko, John A.; Grishin, Nick V.; Mirzaei, Hamid; Orth, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria use diverse mechanisms to kill, manipulate, and compete with other cells. The recently discovered type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in bacterial pathogens and used to deliver virulence effector proteins into target cells. Using comparative proteomics, we identified two previously unidentified T6SS effectors that contained a conserved motif. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that this N-terminal motif, named MIX (marker for type six effectors), is found in numerous polymorphic bacterial proteins that are primarily located in the T6SS genome neighborhood. We demonstrate that several MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors and that they are not required for T6SS activity. Thus, we propose that MIX-containing proteins are T6SS effectors. Our findings allow for the identification of numerous uncharacterized T6SS effectors that will undoubtedly lead to the discovery of new biological mechanisms. PMID:24927539

  8. The Cell Death Triggered by the Nuclear Localized RxLR Effector PITG_22798 from Phytophthora infestans Is Suppressed by the Effector AVR3b.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Yajuan; Zhou, Jing; Du, Juan; Hou, Juan; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Haixia; Tian, Zhendong; Xie, Conghua

    2017-02-14

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, potentially secrete many RxLR effector proteins into plant cells to modulate plant immune responses and promote colonization. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these RxLR effectors suppress plant immune responses are largely unknown. Here we describe an RxLR effector PITG_22798 (Gene accession: XM_002998349) that was upregulated during early infection of potato by P. infestans. By employment of agroinfiltration, we observed that PITG_22798 triggers cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. Confocal microscopic examination showed that PITG_22798-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) located in the host nucleus when expressed transiently in N. benthamiana leaves. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) domain of PITG_22798 is important for nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activity. Sequence alignment and transient expression showed that PITG_22798 from diverse P. infestans isolates are conserved, and transient expression of PITG_22798 enhances P. infestans colonization of N. benthamiana leaves, which suggests that PITG_22798 contributes to P. infestans infection. PITG_22798-triggered cell death is dependent on SGT1-mediated signaling and is suppressed by the P. infestans avirulence effector 3b (AVR3b). The present research provides a clue for further investigation of how P. infestans effector PITG_22798 associates with and modulates host immunity.

  9. The Cell Death Triggered by the Nuclear Localized RxLR Effector PITG_22798 from Phytophthora infestans Is Suppressed by the Effector AVR3b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyang; Ren, Yajuan; Zhou, Jing; Du, Juan; Hou, Juan; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Haixia; Tian, Zhendong; Xie, Conghua

    2017-01-01

    Phytopathogenic oomycetes, such as Phytophthora infestans, potentially secrete many RxLR effector proteins into plant cells to modulate plant immune responses and promote colonization. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these RxLR effectors suppress plant immune responses are largely unknown. Here we describe an RxLR effector PITG_22798 (Gene accession: XM_002998349) that was upregulated during early infection of potato by P. infestans. By employment of agroinfiltration, we observed that PITG_22798 triggers cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana. Confocal microscopic examination showed that PITG_22798-GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) located in the host nucleus when expressed transiently in N. benthamiana leaves. A nuclear localization signal (NLS) domain of PITG_22798 is important for nuclear localization and cell death-inducing activity. Sequence alignment and transient expression showed that PITG_22798 from diverse P. infestans isolates are conserved, and transient expression of PITG_22798 enhances P. infestans colonization of N. benthamiana leaves, which suggests that PITG_22798 contributes to P. infestans infection. PITG_22798-triggered cell death is dependent on SGT1-mediated signaling and is suppressed by the P. infestans avirulence effector 3b (AVR3b). The present research provides a clue for further investigation of how P. infestans effector PITG_22798 associates with and modulates host immunity. PMID:28216607

  10. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease.

    PubMed

    Boevink, Petra C; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R J

    2016-01-29

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c-1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease.

  11. A Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector targets plant PP1c isoforms that promote late blight disease

    PubMed Central

    Boevink, Petra C.; Wang, Xiaodan; McLellan, Hazel; He, Qin; Naqvi, Shaista; Armstrong, Miles R.; Zhang, Wei; Hein, Ingo; Gilroy, Eleanor M.; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogens deliver effectors to alter host processes. Knowledge of how effectors target and manipulate host proteins is critical to understand crop disease. Here, we show that in planta expression of the RXLR effector Pi04314 enhances leaf colonization by Phytophthora infestans via activity in the host nucleus and attenuates induction of jasmonic and salicylic acid-responsive genes. Pi04314 interacts with three host protein phosphatase 1 catalytic (PP1c) isoforms, causing their re-localization from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm. Re-localization of PP1c-1 also occurs during infection and is dependent on an R/KVxF motif in the effector. Silencing the PP1c isoforms or overexpression of a phosphatase-dead PP1c-1 mutant attenuates infection, demonstrating that host PP1c activity is required for disease. Moreover, expression of PP1c–1mut abolishes enhanced leaf colonization mediated by in planta Pi04314 expression. We argue that PP1c isoforms are susceptibility factors forming holoenzymes with Pi04314 to promote late blight disease. PMID:26822079

  12. Type III secretion chaperones of Pseudomonas syringae protect effectors from Lon-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana C; Hutcheson, Steven W

    2005-02-01

    The hrp type III secretion system (TTSS) of Pseudomonas syringae translocates effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. Proteolysis of HrpR by Lon has been shown to negatively regulate the hrp TTSS. The inability to bypass Lon-associated effects on the regulatory system by ectopic expression of the known regulators suggested a second site of action for Lon in TTSS-dependent effector secretion. In this study we report that TTSS-dependent effectors are subject to the proteolytic degradation that appears to be rate-limiting to secretion. The half-lives of the effectors AvrPto, AvrRpt2, HopPsyA, HopPsyB1, HopPtoB2, HopPsyV1, HopPtoG and HopPtoM were substantially higher in bacteria lacking Lon. TTSS-dependent secretion of several effectors was enhanced from Lon mutants. A primary role for chaperones appears to be protection of effectors from Lon-associated degradation prior to secretion. When coexpressed with their cognate chaperone, HopPsyB1, HopPsyV1 and HopPtoM were at least 10 times more stable in strains expressing Lon. Distinct Lon-targeting and chaperone-binding domains were identified in HopPtoM. The results imply that Lon is involved at two distinct levels in the regulation of the P. syringae TTSS: regulation of assembly of the secreton and modulation of effector secretion.

  13. A massive expansion of effector genes underlies gall-formation in the wheat pest Mayetiola destructor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chaoyang; Escalante, Lucio Navarro; Chen, Hang; Benatti, Thiago R; Qu, Jiaxin; Chellapilla, Sanjay; Waterhouse, Robert M; Wheeler, David; Andersson, Martin N; Bao, Riyue; Batterton, Matthew; Behura, Susanta K; Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Caragea, Doina; Carolan, James C; Coyle, Marcus; El-Bouhssini, Mustapha; Francisco, Liezl; Friedrich, Markus; Gill, Navdeep; Grace, Tony; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Han, Yi; Hauser, Frank; Herndon, Nicolae; Holder, Michael; Ioannidis, Panagiotis; Jackson, LaRonda; Javaid, Mehwish; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Johnson, Alisha J; Kalra, Divya; Korchina, Viktoriya; Kovar, Christie L; Lara, Fremiet; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Xuming; Löfstedt, Christer; Mata, Robert; Mathew, Tittu; Muzny, Donna M; Nagar, Swapnil; Nazareth, Lynne V; Okwuonu, Geoffrey; Ongeri, Fiona; Perales, Lora; Peterson, Brittany F; Pu, Ling-Ling; Robertson, Hugh M; Schemerhorn, Brandon J; Scherer, Steven E; Shreve, Jacob T; Simmons, DeNard; Subramanyam, Subhashree; Thornton, Rebecca L; Xue, Kun; Weissenberger, George M; Williams, Christie E; Worley, Kim C; Zhu, Dianhui; Zhu, Yiming; Harris, Marion O; Shukle, Richard H; Werren, John H; Zdobnov, Evgeny M; Chen, Ming-Shun; Brown, Susan J; Stuart, Jeffery J; Richards, Stephen

    2015-03-02

    Gall-forming arthropods are highly specialized herbivores that, in combination with their hosts, produce extended phenotypes with unique morphologies [1]. Many are economically important, and others have improved our understanding of ecology and adaptive radiation [2]. However, the mechanisms that these arthropods use to induce plant galls are poorly understood. We sequenced the genome of the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor; Diptera: Cecidomyiidae), a plant parasitic gall midge and a pest of wheat (Triticum spp.), with the aim of identifying genic modifications that contribute to its plant-parasitic lifestyle. Among several adaptive modifications, we discovered an expansive reservoir of potential effector proteins. Nearly 5% of the 20,163 predicted gene models matched putative effector gene transcripts present in the M. destructor larval salivary gland. Another 466 putative effectors were discovered among the genes that have no sequence similarities in other organisms. The largest known arthropod gene family (family SSGP-71) was also discovered within the effector reservoir. SSGP-71 proteins lack sequence homologies to other proteins, but their structures resemble both ubiquitin E3 ligases in plants and E3-ligase-mimicking effectors in plant pathogenic bacteria. SSGP-71 proteins and wheat Skp proteins interact in vivo. Mutations in different SSGP-71 genes avoid the effector-triggered immunity that is directed by the wheat resistance genes H6 and H9. Results point to effectors as the agents responsible for arthropod-induced plant gall formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Space Station end effector strategy study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katzberg, Stephen J.; Jensen, Robert L.; Willshire, Kelli F.; Satterthwaite, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a study are presented for terminology definition, identification of functional requirements, technolgy assessment, and proposed end effector development strategies for the Space Station Program. The study is composed of a survey of available or under-developed end effector technology, identification of requirements from baselined Space Station documents, a comparative assessment of the match between technology and requirements, and recommended strategies for end effector development for the Space Station Program.

  15. B-cell targeted therapeutics in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    B lymphocytes are the source of humoral immunity and are thus a critical component of the adaptive immune system. However, B cells can also be pathogenic and the origin of disease. Deregulated B-cell function has been implicated in several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. B cells contribute to pathological immune responses through the secretion of cytokines, costimulation of T cells, antigen presentation, and the production of autoantibodies. DNA-and RNA-containing immune complexes can also induce the production of type I interferons, which further promotes the inflammatory response. B-cell depletion with the CD20 antibody rituximab has provided clinical proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response can result in significant benefit to patients. Consequently, the interest in B-cell targeted therapies has greatly increased in recent years and a number of new biologics exploiting various mechanisms are now in clinical development. This review provides an overview on current developments in the area of B-cell targeted therapies by describing molecules and subpopulations that currently offer themselves as therapeutic targets, the different strategies to target B cells currently under investigation as well as an update on the status of novel therapeutics in clinical development. Emerging data from clinical trials are providing critical insight regarding the role of B cells and autoantibodies in various autoimmune conditions and will guide the development of more efficacious therapeutics and better patient selection. PMID:23566679

  16. Human immune cell targeting of protein nanoparticles - caveospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Joshua J.; Yuen, Daniel; Rae, James; Johnston, Angus P. R.; Parton, Robert G.; Kent, Stephen J.; de Rose, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to transform vaccine and drug delivery through protection of payloads from both metabolism and off-target effects, while facilitating specific delivery of cargo to immune cells. However, evaluation of immune cell nanoparticle targeting is conventionally restricted to monocultured cell line models. We generated human caveolin-1 nanoparticles, termed caveospheres, which were efficiently functionalized with monoclonal antibodies. Using this platform, we investigated CD4+ T cell and CD20+ B cell targeting within physiological mixtures of primary human blood immune cells using flow cytometry, imaging flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Antibody-functionalization enhanced caveosphere binding to targeted immune cells (6.6 to 43.9-fold) within mixed populations and in the presence of protein-containing fluids. Moreover, targeting caveospheres to CCR5 enabled caveosphere internalization by non-phagocytic CD4+ T cells--an important therapeutic target for HIV treatment. This efficient and flexible system of immune cell-targeted caveosphere nanoparticles holds promise for the development of advanced immunotherapeutics and vaccines.

  17. Identification and Characterisation of a Hyper-Variable Apoplastic Effector Gene Family of the Potato Cyst Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J.; Jones, John T.; Urwin, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes are obligate biotrophs that modify host root tissues, using a suite of effector proteins to create and maintain a feeding site that is their sole source of nutrition. Using assumptions about the characteristics of genes involved in plant-nematode biotrophic interactions to inform the identification strategy, we provide a description and characterisation of a novel group of hyper-variable extracellular effectors termed HYP, from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. HYP effectors comprise a large gene family, with a modular structure, and have unparalleled diversity between individuals of the same population: no two nematodes tested had the same genetic complement of HYP effectors. Individuals vary in the number, size, and type of effector subfamilies. HYP effectors are expressed throughout the biotrophic stages in large secretory cells associated with the amphids of parasitic stage nematodes as confirmed by in situ hybridisation. The encoded proteins are secreted into the host roots where they are detectable by immunochemistry in the apoplasm, between the anterior end of the nematode and the feeding site. We have identified HYP effectors in three genera of plant parasitic nematodes capable of infecting a broad range of mono- and dicotyledon crop species. In planta RNAi targeted to all members of the effector family causes a reduction in successful parasitism. PMID:25255291

  18. Identification and characterisation of a hyper-variable apoplastic effector gene family of the potato cyst nematodes.

    PubMed

    Eves-van den Akker, Sebastian; Lilley, Catherine J; Jones, John T; Urwin, Peter E

    2014-09-01

    Sedentary endoparasitic nematodes are obligate biotrophs that modify host root tissues, using a suite of effector proteins to create and maintain a feeding site that is their sole source of nutrition. Using assumptions about the characteristics of genes involved in plant-nematode biotrophic interactions to inform the identification strategy, we provide a description and characterisation of a novel group of hyper-variable extracellular effectors termed HYP, from the potato cyst nematode Globodera pallida. HYP effectors comprise a large gene family, with a modular structure, and have unparalleled diversity between individuals of the same population: no two nematodes tested had the same genetic complement of HYP effectors. Individuals vary in the number, size, and type of effector subfamilies. HYP effectors are expressed throughout the biotrophic stages in large secretory cells associated with the amphids of parasitic stage nematodes as confirmed by in situ hybridisation. The encoded proteins are secreted into the host roots where they are detectable by immunochemistry in the apoplasm, between the anterior end of the nematode and the feeding site. We have identified HYP effectors in three genera of plant parasitic nematodes capable of infecting a broad range of mono- and dicotyledon crop species. In planta RNAi targeted to all members of the effector family causes a reduction in successful parasitism.

  19. Effector diversification within compartments of the Leptosphaeria maculans genome affected by Repeat-Induced Point mutations.

    PubMed

    Rouxel, Thierry; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Hane, James K; Hoede, Claire; van de Wouw, Angela P; Couloux, Arnaud; Dominguez, Victoria; Anthouard, Véronique; Bally, Pascal; Bourras, Salim; Cozijnsen, Anton J; Ciuffetti, Lynda M; Degrave, Alexandre; Dilmaghani, Azita; Duret, Laurent; Fudal, Isabelle; Goodwin, Stephen B; Gout, Lilian; Glaser, Nicolas; Linglin, Juliette; Kema, Gert H J; Lapalu, Nicolas; Lawrence, Christopher B; May, Kim; Meyer, Michel; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Poulain, Julie; Schoch, Conrad L; Simon, Adeline; Spatafora, Joseph W; Stachowiak, Anna; Turgeon, B Gillian; Tyler, Brett M; Vincent, Delphine; Weissenbach, Jean; Amselem, Joëlle; Quesneville, Hadi; Oliver, Richard P; Wincker, Patrick; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Howlett, Barbara J

    2011-02-15

    Fungi are of primary ecological, biotechnological and economic importance. Many fundamental biological processes that are shared by animals and fungi are studied in fungi due to their experimental tractability. Many fungi are pathogens or mutualists and are model systems to analyse effector genes and their mechanisms of diversification. In this study, we report the genome sequence of the phytopathogenic ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans and characterize its repertoire of protein effectors. The L. maculans genome has an unusual bipartite structure with alternating distinct guanine and cytosine-equilibrated and adenine and thymine (AT)-rich blocks of homogenous nucleotide composition. The AT-rich blocks comprise one-third of the genome and contain effector genes and families of transposable elements, both of which are affected by repeat-induced point mutation, a fungal-specific genome defence mechanism. This genomic environment for effectors promotes rapid sequence diversification and underpins the evolutionary potential of the fungus to adapt rapidly to novel host-derived constraints.

  20. From GFP to β-lactamase: advancing intact cell imaging for toxins and effectors

    PubMed Central

    Zuverink, Madison; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2015-01-01

    Canonical reporters such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and luciferase have assisted researchers in probing cellular pathways and processes. Prior research in pathogenesis depended on sensitivity of biochemical and biophysical techniques to identify effectors and elucidate entry mechanisms. Recently, the β-lactamase (βlac) reporter system has advanced toxin and effector reporting by permitting measurement of βlac delivery into the cytosol or host βlac expression in intact cells. βlac measurement in cells was facilitated by the development of the fluorogenic substrate, CCF2-AM, to identify novel effectors, target cells, and domains involved in bacterial pathogenesis. The assay is also adaptable for high-throughput screening of small molecule inhibitors against toxins, providing information on mechanism and potential therapeutic agents. The versatility and limitations of the βlac reporter system as applied to toxins and effectors are discussed in this review. PMID:26500183

  1. The role of effectors in nonhost resistance to filamentous plant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Stam, Remco; Mantelin, Sophie; McLellan, Hazel; Thilliez, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most plants are resistant to a wide range of phytopathogens. However, mechanisms contributing to this so-called nonhost resistance (NHR) are poorly understood. Besides constitutive defenses, plants have developed two layers of inducible defense systems. Plant innate immunity relies on recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In compatible interactions, pathogenicity effector molecules secreted by the invader can suppress host defense responses and facilitate the infection process. Additionally, plants have evolved pathogen-specific resistance mechanisms based on recognition of these effectors, which causes secondary defense responses. The current effector-driven hypothesis is that NHR in plants that are distantly related to the host plant is triggered by PAMP recognition that cannot be efficiently suppressed by the pathogen, whereas in more closely related species, nonhost recognition of effectors would play a crucial role. In this review we give an overview of current knowledge of the role of effector molecules in host and NHR and place these findings in the context of the model. We focus on examples from filamentous pathogens (fungi and oomycetes), discuss their implications for the field of plant-pathogen interactions and relevance in plant breeding strategies for development of durable resistance in crops. PMID:25426123

  2. The role of effectors in nonhost resistance to filamentous plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Stam, Remco; Mantelin, Sophie; McLellan, Hazel; Thilliez, Gaëtan

    2014-01-01

    In nature, most plants are resistant to a wide range of phytopathogens. However, mechanisms contributing to this so-called nonhost resistance (NHR) are poorly understood. Besides constitutive defenses, plants have developed two layers of inducible defense systems. Plant innate immunity relies on recognition of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In compatible interactions, pathogenicity effector molecules secreted by the invader can suppress host defense responses and facilitate the infection process. Additionally, plants have evolved pathogen-specific resistance mechanisms based on recognition of these effectors, which causes secondary defense responses. The current effector-driven hypothesis is that NHR in plants that are distantly related to the host plant is triggered by PAMP recognition that cannot be efficiently suppressed by the pathogen, whereas in more closely related species, nonhost recognition of effectors would play a crucial role. In this review we give an overview of current knowledge of the role of effector molecules in host and NHR and place these findings in the context of the model. We focus on examples from filamentous pathogens (fungi and oomycetes), discuss their implications for the field of plant-pathogen interactions and relevance in plant breeding strategies for development of durable resistance in crops.

  3. Intrinsic Disorder in Pathogen Effectors: Protein Flexibility as an Evolutionary Hallmark in a Molecular Arms Race[W

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Macarena; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Ott, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Effector proteins represent a refined mechanism of bacterial pathogens to overcome plants’ innate immune systems. These modular proteins often manipulate host physiology by directly interfering with immune signaling of plant cells. Even if host cells have developed efficient strategies to perceive the presence of pathogenic microbes and to recognize intracellular effector activity, it remains an open question why only few effectors are recognized directly by plant resistance proteins. Based on in-silico genome-wide surveys and a reevaluation of published structural data, we estimated that bacterial effectors of phytopathogens are highly enriched in long-disordered regions (>50 residues). These structurally flexible segments have no secondary structure under physiological conditions but can fold in a stimulus-dependent manner (e.g., during protein–protein interactions). The high abundance of intrinsic disorder in effectors strongly suggests positive evolutionary selection of this structural feature and highlights the dynamic nature of these proteins. We postulate that such structural flexibility may be essential for (1) effector translocation, (2) evasion of the innate immune system, and (3) host function mimicry. The study of these dynamical regions will greatly complement current structural approaches to understand the molecular mechanisms of these proteins and may help in the prediction of new effectors. PMID:24038649

  4. Genetic analysis of the individual contribution to virulence of the type III effector inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zumaquero, Adela; Gonzalez-Plaza, Juan J; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Rufián, José S; Beuzón, Carmen R

    2012-01-01

    Several reports have recently contributed to determine the effector inventory of the sequenced strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) 1448a. However, the contribution to virulence of most of these effectors remains to be established. Genetic analysis of the contribution to virulence of individual P. syringae effectors has been traditionally hindered by the lack of phenotypes of the corresponding knockout mutants, largely attributed to a high degree of functional redundancy within their effector inventories. In support of this notion, effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 have been classified into redundant effector groups (REGs), analysing virulence of polymutants in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. However, using competitive index (CI) as a virulence assay, we were able to establish the individual contribution of AvrPto1(Pto) (DC3000) to Pto DC3000 virulence in tomato, its natural host, even though typically, contribution to virulence of AvrPto1 is only shown in strains also lacking AvrPtoB (also called HopAB2), a member of its REG. This report raised the possibility that even effectors targeting the same defence signalling pathway may have an individual contribution to virulence, and pointed out to CI assays as the means to establish such a contribution for individual effectors. In this work, we have analysed the individual contribution to virulence of the majority of previously uncharacterised Pph 1448a effectors, by monitoring the development of disease symptoms and determining the CI of single knockout mutants at different stages of growth within bean, its natural host. Despite their potential functional redundancy, we have found individual contributions to virulence for six out of the fifteen effectors analysed. In addition, we have analysed the functional relationships between effectors displaying individual contribution to virulence, highlighting the diversity that these relationships may present, and the interest of

  5. Genetic Analysis of the Individual Contribution to Virulence of the Type III Effector Inventory of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Plaza, Juan J.; Ortiz-Martín, Inmaculada; Rufián, José S.; Beuzón, Carmen R.

    2012-01-01

    Several reports have recently contributed to determine the effector inventory of the sequenced strain Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Pph) 1448a. However, the contribution to virulence of most of these effectors remains to be established. Genetic analysis of the contribution to virulence of individual P. syringae effectors has been traditionally hindered by the lack of phenotypes of the corresponding knockout mutants, largely attributed to a high degree of functional redundancy within their effector inventories. In support of this notion, effectors from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 have been classified into redundant effector groups (REGs), analysing virulence of polymutants in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. However, using competitive index (CI) as a virulence assay, we were able to establish the individual contribution of AvrPto1PtoDC3000 to Pto DC3000 virulence in tomato, its natural host, even though typically, contribution to virulence of AvrPto1 is only shown in strains also lacking AvrPtoB (also called HopAB2), a member of its REG. This report raised the possibility that even effectors targeting the same defence signalling pathway may have an individual contribution to virulence, and pointed out to CI assays as the means to establish such a contribution for individual effectors. In this work, we have analysed the individual contribution to virulence of the majority of previously uncharacterised Pph 1448a effectors, by monitoring the development of disease symptoms and determining the CI of single knockout mutants at different stages of growth within bean, its natural host. Despite their potential functional redundancy, we have found individual contributions to virulence for six out of the fifteen effectors analysed. In addition, we have analysed the functional relationships between effectors displaying individual contribution to virulence, highlighting the diversity that these relationships may present, and the interest of

  6. Homologous RXLR effectors from Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis and Phytophthora sojae suppress immunity in distantly related plants.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ryan G; Casady, Megan S; Fee, Rachel A; Vaughan, Martha M; Deb, Devdutta; Fedkenheuer, Kevin; Huffaker, Alisa; Schmelz, Eric A; Tyler, Brett M; McDowell, John M

    2012-12-01

    Diverse pathogens secrete effector proteins into plant cells to manipulate host cellular processes. Oomycete pathogens contain large complements of predicted effector genes defined by an RXLR host cell entry motif. The genome of Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa, downy mildew of Arabidopsis) contains at least 134 candidate RXLR effector genes. Only a small subset of these genes is conserved in related oomycetes from the Phytophthora genus. Here, we describe a comparative functional characterization of the Hpa RXLR effector gene HaRxL96 and a homologous gene, PsAvh163, from the Glycine max (soybean) pathogen Phytophthora sojae. HaRxL96 and PsAvh163 are induced during the early stages of infection and carry a functional RXLR motif that is sufficient for protein uptake into plant cells. Both effectors can suppress immune responses in soybean. HaRxL96 suppresses immunity in Nicotiana benthamiana, whereas PsAvh163 induces an HR-like cell death response in Nicotiana that is dependent on RAR1 and Hsp90.1. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing HaRxL96 or PsAvh163 exhibit elevated susceptibility to virulent and avirulent Hpa, as well as decreased callose deposition in response to non-pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae. Both effectors interfere with defense marker gene induction, but do not affect salicylic acid biosynthesis. Together, these experiments demonstrate that evolutionarily conserved effectors from different oomycete species can suppress immunity in plant species that are divergent from the source pathogen's host. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Telepresence Master Glove Controller For Dexterous Robotic End-Effectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowler, A. M.; Joyce, R. R.; Britt, J. P.

    1987-03-01

    This paper describes recent research in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA's Ames Research Center to develop a glove-like, control and data-recording device (DataGlove) that records and transmits to a host computerin real time, and at appropriate resolution, a numeric data-record of a user's hand/finger shape and dynamics. System configuration and performance specifications are detailed, and current research is discussed investigating its applications in operator control of dexterous robotic end-effectors and for use as a human factors research tool in evaluation of operator hand function requirements and performance in other specialized task environments.

  8. Telepresence master glove controller for dexterous robotic end-effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Scott S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes recent research in the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division at NASA's Ames Research Center to develop a glove-like, control and data-recording device (DataGlove) that records and transmits to a host computer in real time, and at appropriate resolution, a numeric data-record of a user's hand/finger shape and dynamics. System configuration and performance specifications are detailed, and current research is discussed investigating its applications in operator control of dexterous robotic end-effectors and for use as a human factors research tool in evaluation of operator hand function requirements and performance in other specialized task environments.

  9. Complement--tapping into new sites and effector systems.

    PubMed

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaelle; Kemper, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Complement is traditionally known to be a system of serum proteins that provide protection against pathogens through direct cell lysis and the mobilization of innate and adaptive immunity. However, recent work indicates that the complement system has additional physiological roles beyond those in host defence. In this Opinion article, we describe the new modes and locations of complement activation that enable it to interact with other cell effector systems, such as growth factor receptors, inflammasomes and metabolic pathways. We propose that the location of complement activation dictates its function.

  10. Orbital maneuvering vehicle end effectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Forbes, John C. (Inventor); Barnes, Wayne L. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An end effector device (A) for grasping and holding an article such as a handle (18) of a space telescope is disclosed. The device includes a V-shaped capture window (74) defined as inclined surfaces (76, 78) in parallel face plates (22, 24) which converge toward a retainer recess (54) in which the handle is retained. A pivotal finger (30) meshes with a pair of pivoted fingers (26, 28) which rotate in counterrotation. The fingers rotate to pull a handle within the capture window into recess (54) where latches (50) lock handle (18) in the recess. To align the capture window, plates (22, 24) may be cocked plus or minus five degrees on base (64).

  11. Pathogen effectors and plant immunity determine specialization of the blast fungus to rice subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jingjing; Huang, Huichuan; Meusnier, Isabelle; Adreit, Henri; Ducasse, Aurélie; Bonnot, François; Pan, Lei; He, Xiahong; Kroj, Thomas; Fournier, Elisabeth; Tharreau, Didier; Gladieux, Pierre; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how fungi specialize on their plant host is crucial for developing sustainable disease control. A traditional, centuries-old rice agro-system of the Yuanyang terraces was used as a model to show that virulence effectors of the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzaeh play a key role in its specialization on locally grown indica or japonica local rice subspecies. Our results have indicated that major differences in several components of basal immunity and effector-triggered immunity of the japonica and indica rice varieties are associated with specialization of M. oryzae. These differences thus play a key role in determining M. oryzae host specificity and may limit the spread of the pathogen within the Yuanyang agro-system. Specifically, the AVR-Pia effector has been identified as a possible determinant of the specialization of M. oryzae to local japonica rice. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19377.001 PMID:28008850

  12. Metalloprotease type III effectors that specifically cleave JNK and NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Baruch, Kobi; Gur-Arie, Lihi; Nadler, Chen; Koby, Simi; Yerushalmi, Gal; Ben-Neriah, Yinon; Yogev, Orli; Shaulian, Eitan; Guttman, Chen; Zarivach, Raz; Rosenshine, Ilan

    2011-01-01

    Two major arms of the inflammatory response are the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. Here, we show that enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) employs the type III secretion system to target these two signalling arms by injecting host cells with two effector proteins, NleC and NleD. We provide evidence that NleC and NleD are Zn-dependent endopeptidases that specifically clip and inactivate RelA (p65) and JNK, respectively, thus blocking NF-κB and AP-1 activation. We show that NleC and NleD co-operate and complement other EPEC effectors in accomplishing maximal inhibition of IL-8 secretion. This is a remarkable example of a pathogen using multiple effectors to manipulate systematically the host inflammatory response signalling network. PMID:21113130

  13. Electroporation of Functional Bacterial Effectors into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Brown, Roslyn N.

    2015-01-01

    The study of protein interactions in the context of living cells can generate critical information about localization, dynamics, and interacting partners. This information is particularly valuable in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Many pathogen proteins function within host cells in a variety of way such as, enabling evasion of the host immune system and survival within the intracellular environment. To study these pathogen-protein host-cell interactions, several approaches are commonly used, including: in vivo infection with a strain expressing a tagged or mutant protein, or introduction of pathogen genes via transfection or transduction. Each of these approaches has advantages and disadvantages. We sought a means to directly introduce exogenous proteins into cells. Electroporation is commonly used to introduce nucleic acids into cells, but has been more rarely applied to proteins although the biophysical basis is exactly the same. A standard electroporator was used to introduce affinity-tagged bacterial effectors into mammalian cells. Human epithelial and mouse macrophage cells were cultured by traditional methods, detached, and placed in 0.4 cm gap electroporation cuvettes with an exogenous bacterial pathogen protein of interest (e.g. Salmonella Typhimurium GtgE). After electroporation (0.3 kV) and a short (4 hr) recovery period, intracellular protein was verified by fluorescently labeling the protein via its affinity tag and examining spatial and temporal distribution by confocal microscopy. The electroporated protein was also shown to be functional inside the cell and capable of correct subcellular trafficking and protein-protein interaction. While the exogenous proteins tended to accumulate on the surface of the cells, the electroporated samples had large increases in intracellular effector concentration relative to incubation alone. The protocol is simple and fast enough to be done in a parallel fashion, allowing for high

  14. Electroporation of functional bacterial effectors into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sontag, Ryan L; Mihai, Cosmin; Orr, Galya; Savchenko, Alexei; Skarina, Tatiana; Cui, Hong; Cort, John R; Adkins, Joshua N; Brown, Roslyn N

    2015-01-19

    The study of protein interactions in the context of living cells can generate critical information about localization, dynamics, and interacting partners. This information is particularly valuable in the context of host-pathogen interactions. Many pathogen proteins function within host cells in a variety of way such as, enabling evasion of the host immune system and survival within the intracellular environment. To study these pathogen-protein host-cell interactions, several approaches are commonly used, including: in vivo infection with a strain expressing a tagged or mutant protein, or introduction of pathogen genes via transfection or transduction. Each of these approaches has advantages and disadvantages. We sought a means to directly introduce exogenous proteins into cells. Electroporation is commonly used to introduce nucleic acids into cells, but has been more rarely applied to proteins although the biophysical basis is exactly the same. A standard electroporator was used to introduce affinity-tagged bacterial effectors into mammalian cells. Human epithelial and mouse macrophage cells were cultured by traditional methods, detached, and placed in 0.4 cm gap electroporation cuvettes with an exogenous bacterial pathogen protein of interest (e.g. Salmonella Typhimurium GtgE). After electroporation (0.3 kV) and a short (4 hr) recovery period, intracellular protein was verified by fluorescently labeling the protein via its affinity tag and examining spatial and temporal distribution by confocal microscopy. The electroporated protein was also shown to be functional inside the cell and capable of correct subcellular trafficking and protein-protein interaction. While the exogenous proteins tended to accumulate on the surface of the cells, the electroporated samples had large increases in intracellular effector concentration relative to incubation alone. The protocol is simple and fast enough to be done in a parallel fashion, allowing for high

  15. Structural and Functional Studies Indicate That the EPEC Effector, EspG, Directly Binds p21-Activated Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Germane, Katherine L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.

    2011-09-20

    Bacterial pathogens secrete effectors into their hosts that subvert host defenses and redirect host processes. EspG is a type three secretion effector with a disputed function that is found in enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. Here we show that EspG is structurally similar to VirA, a Shigella virulence factor; EspG has a large, conserved pocket on its surface; EspG binds directly to the amino-terminal inhibitory domain of human p21-activated kinase (PAK); and mutations to conserved residues in the surface pocket disrupt the interaction with PAK.

  16. The wheat Snn7 gene confers susceptibility upon recognition of the Parastagonospora nodorum necrotrophic effector SnTox7

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parastagonospora nodorum is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes the disease Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) on wheat. The fungus produces necrotrophic effectors (NEs), that when recognized by corresponding host genes, cause cell death, which ultimately leads to disease. To date, eight host ge...

  17. Generating Cell Targeting Aptamers for Nanotheranostics Using Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yifan; Chen, Guang; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Wu, Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Lian; Liu, Chao; You, Mingxu; Wang, Jie; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and understanding changes in cell conditions on the molecular level is of great importance for the accurate diagnosis and timely therapy of diseases. Cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), a foundational technology used to generate highly-specific, cell-targeting aptamers, has been increasingly employed in studies of molecular medicine, including biomarker discovery and early diagnosis/targeting therapy of cancer. In this review, we begin with a mechanical description of the cell-SELEX process, covering aptamer selection, identification and identification, and aptamer characterization; following this introduction is a comprehensive discussion of the potential for aptamers as targeting moieties in the construction of various nanotheranostics. Challenges and prospects for cell-SELEX and aptamer-based nanotheranostic are also discussed. PMID:27375791

  18. A perspective on B-cell-targeting therapy for SLE

    PubMed Central

    Looney, R. John; Anolik, Jennifer; Sanz, Inaki

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, large controlled trials have tested several new agents for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Unfortunately, none of these trials has met its primary outcome. This does not mean progress has not been made. In fact, a great deal has been learned about doing clinical trials in lupus and about the biological and clinical effects of the drugs being tested. Many of these drugs were designed to target B cells directly, e.g., rituximab, belimumab, epratuzumab, and transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor–immunoglobulin (TACI–Ig). The enthusiasm for targeting B cells derives from substantial evidence showing the critical role of B cells in murine models of SLE, as well promising results from multiple open trials with rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes B cells (Martin and Chan in Immunity 20(5):517–527, 2004; Sobel et al. in J Exp Med 173:1441–1449, 1991; Silverman and Weisman in Arthritis Rheum 48:1484–1492, 2003; Silverman in Arthritis Rheum 52(4):1342, 2005; Shlomchik et al. in Nat Rev Immunol 1:147–153, 2001; Looney et al. in Arthritis Rheum 50:2580–2589, 2004; Lu et al. in Arthritis Rheum 61(4):482–487, 2009; Saito et al. in Lupus 12(10):798–800, 2003; van Vollenhoven et al. in Scand J Rheumatol 33(6):423–427, 2004; Sfikakis et al. Arthritis Rheum 52(2):501–513, 2005). Why have the controlled trials of B-cell-targeting therapies failed to demonstrate efficacy? Were there flaws in design or execution of these trials? Or, were promising animal studies and open trials misleading, as so often happens? This perspective discusses the current state of B-cell-targeting therapies for human lupus and the future development of these therapies. PMID:19669389

  19. Characterization of effectors from Fusarium graminearum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), which reduces crop yield and quality by producing various mycotoxins. Effectors play an important role in the pathogenesis of many bacterial and fungal pathogens. In this study, 26 effector candidates were selected for investiga...

  20. Code-assisted discovery of TAL effector targets in bacterial leaf streak of rice reveals contrast with bacterial blight and a novel susceptibility gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors found in Xanthomonas spp. promote bacterial growth and plant susceptibility by binding specific DNA sequences or, effector-binding elements (EBEs), and inducing host gene expression. In this study, we have found substantially different transcriptional pro...

  1. Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato DC3000 Type III secretion effector polymutants reveal an interplay between hopAD1 and AvrPtoB

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The model pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 suppresses the two-tiered innate immune system of plants by injecting a complex repertoire of effector proteins into host cells via the type III secretion system. The model effector AvrPtoB has multiple domains and plant protein interactors i...

  2. In planta processing and glycosylation of a nematode CLE effector and its interaction with a CLV2-like receptor to promote parasitism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Like other biotrophic plant pathogens, plant-parasitic nematodes secrete effector proteins into host cells to facilitate infection. Effector proteins that mimic plant CLAVATA3/ESR (CLE)-like proteins have been identified in several cyst nematodes including the potato cyst nematode (PCN); however, th...

  3. Identification of candidate effector proteins potentially involved in Fusarium graminearum-wheat interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pathogen-derived small secreted cysteine-rich proteins (SSCPs) are known to be a common source of fungal effectors that trigger resistance or susceptibility in specific host plants. This group of proteins has not been well studied in Fusarium graminearum, the primary cause of Fusarium head blight (...

  4. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ Type III Effector Family in Aribidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE) proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found i...

  5. The effector AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta.

    PubMed

    Shidore, Teja; Broeckling, Corey D; Kirkwood, Jay S; Long, John J; Miao, Jiamin; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E; Triplett, Lindsay R

    2017-06-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals employ type III secreted effectors to suppress innate immunity. Most characterized effectors work through modification of host proteins or transcriptional regulators, although a few are known to modify small molecule targets. The Xanthomonas type III secreted avirulence factor AvrRxo1 is a structural homolog of the zeta toxin family of sugar-nucleotide kinases that suppresses bacterial growth. AvrRxo1 was recently reported to phosphorylate the central metabolite and signaling molecule NAD in vitro, suggesting that the effector might enhance bacterial virulence on plants through manipulation of primary metabolic pathways. In this study, we determine that AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta, and that its kinase catalytic sites are necessary for its toxic and resistance-triggering phenotypes. A global metabolomics approach was used to independently identify 3'-NADP as the sole detectable product of AvrRxo1 expression in yeast and bacteria, and NAD kinase activity was confirmed in vitro. 3'-NADP accumulated upon transient expression of AvrRxo1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and in rice leaves infected with avrRxo1-expressing strains of X. oryzae. Mutation of the catalytic aspartic acid residue D193 abolished AvrRxo1 kinase activity and several phenotypes of AvrRxo1, including toxicity in yeast, bacteria, and plants, suppression of the flg22-triggered ROS burst, and ability to trigger an R gene-mediated hypersensitive response. A mutation in the Walker A ATP-binding motif abolished the toxicity of AvrRxo1, but did not abolish the 3'-NADP production, virulence enhancement, ROS suppression, or HR-triggering phenotypes of AvrRxo1. These results demonstrate that a type III effector targets the central metabolite and redox carrier NAD in planta, and that this catalytic activity is required for toxicity and suppression of the ROS burst.

  6. The effector AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta

    PubMed Central

    Long, John J.; Zhao, Bingyu; Leach, Jan E.

    2017-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals employ type III secreted effectors to suppress innate immunity. Most characterized effectors work through modification of host proteins or transcriptional regulators, although a few are known to modify small molecule targets. The Xanthomonas type III secreted avirulence factor AvrRxo1 is a structural homolog of the zeta toxin family of sugar-nucleotide kinases that suppresses bacterial growth. AvrRxo1 was recently reported to phosphorylate the central metabolite and signaling molecule NAD in vitro, suggesting that the effector might enhance bacterial virulence on plants through manipulation of primary metabolic pathways. In this study, we determine that AvrRxo1 phosphorylates NAD in planta, and that its kinase catalytic sites are necessary for its toxic and resistance-triggering phenotypes. A global metabolomics approach was used to independently identify 3’-NADP as the sole detectable product of AvrRxo1 expression in yeast and bacteria, and NAD kinase activity was confirmed in vitro. 3’-NADP accumulated upon transient expression of AvrRxo1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and in rice leaves infected with avrRxo1-expressing strains of X. oryzae. Mutation of the catalytic aspartic acid residue D193 abolished AvrRxo1 kinase activity and several phenotypes of AvrRxo1, including toxicity in yeast, bacteria, and plants, suppression of the flg22-triggered ROS burst, and ability to trigger an R gene-mediated hypersensitive response. A mutation in the Walker A ATP-binding motif abolished the toxicity of AvrRxo1, but did not abolish the 3’-NADP production, virulence enhancement, ROS suppression, or HR-triggering phenotypes of AvrRxo1. These results demonstrate that a type III effector targets the central metabolite and redox carrier NAD in planta, and that this catalytic activity is required for toxicity and suppression of the ROS burst. PMID:28628666

  7. Targeting of plant pattern recognition receptor-triggered immunity by bacterial type-III secretion system effectors.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2015-02-01

    During infection, microbes are detected by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), leading to an innate immune response that prevents microbial ingress. Therefore, successful pathogens must evade or inhibit PRR-triggered immunity to cause disease. In the past decade, a number of type-III secretion system effector (T3Es) proteins from plant pathogenic bacteria have been shown to suppress this layer of innate immunity. More recently, the detailed mechanisms of action have been defined for several of these effectors. Interestingly, effectors display a wide array of virulence targets, being able to prevent activation of immune receptors and to hijack immune signaling pathways. Besides being a fascinating example of pathogen-host co-evolution, effectors have also emerged as valuable tools to dissect important biological processes in host cells.

  8. Targeted Disruption of Chlamydia trachomatis Invasion by in Trans Expression of Dominant Negative Tarp Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Parrett, Christopher J.; Lenoci, Robert V.; Nguyen, Brenda; Russell, Lauren; Jewett, Travis J.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis invasion of eukaryotic host cells is facilitated, in part, by the type III secreted effector protein, Tarp. The role of Tarp in chlamydiae entry of host cells is supported by molecular approaches that examined recombinant Tarp or Tarp effectors expressed within heterologous systems. A major limitation in the ability to study the contribution of Tarp to chlamydial invasion of host cells was the prior absence of genetic tools for chlamydiae. Based on our knowledge of Tarp domain structure and function along with the introduction of genetic approaches in C. trachomatis, we hypothesized that Tarp function could be disrupted in vivo by the introduction of dominant negative mutant alleles. We provide evidence that transformed C. trachomatis produced epitope tagged Tarp, which was secreted into the host cell during invasion. We examined the effects of domain specific Tarp mutations on chlamydial invasion and growth and demonstrate that C. trachomatis clones harboring engineered Tarp mutants lacking either the actin binding domain or the phosphorylation domain had reduced levels of invasion into host cells. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for the critical role of Tarp in C. trachomatis pathogenesis and indicate that chlamydial invasion of host cells can be attenuated via the introduction of engineered dominant negative type three effectors. PMID:27602332

  9. Targeted Disruption of Chlamydia trachomatis Invasion by in Trans Expression of Dominant Negative Tarp Effectors.

    PubMed

    Parrett, Christopher J; Lenoci, Robert V; Nguyen, Brenda; Russell, Lauren; Jewett, Travis J

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis invasion of eukaryotic host cells is facilitated, in part, by the type III secreted effector protein, Tarp. The role of Tarp in chlamydiae entry of host cells is supported by molecular approaches that examined recombinant Tarp or Tarp effectors expressed within heterologous systems. A major limitation in the ability to study the contribution of Tarp to chlamydial invasion of host cells was the prior absence of genetic tools for chlamydiae. Based on our knowledge of Tarp domain structure and function along with the introduction of genetic approaches in C. trachomatis, we hypothesized that Tarp function could be disrupted in vivo by the introduction of dominant negative mutant alleles. We provide evidence that transformed C. trachomatis produced epitope tagged Tarp, which was secreted into the host cell during invasion. We examined the effects of domain specific Tarp mutations on chlamydial invasion and growth and demonstrate that C. trachomatis clones harboring engineered Tarp mutants lacking either the actin binding domain or the phosphorylation domain had reduced levels of invasion into host cells. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for the critical role of Tarp in C. trachomatis pathogenesis and indicate that chlamydial invasion of host cells can be attenuated via the introduction of engineered dominant negative type three effectors.

  10. ROBOTIC TANK INSPECTION END EFFECTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Rachel Landry

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this contract between Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) was to provide a tool for the DOE to inspect the inside tank walls of underground radioactive waste storage tanks in their tank farms. Some of these tanks are suspected to have leaks, but the harsh nature of the environment within the tanks precludes human inspection of tank walls. As a result of these conditions only a few inspection methods can fulfill this task. Of the methods available, OSS chose to pursue Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM), because it does not require clean surfaces for inspection, nor any contact with the Surface being inspected, and introduces no extra by-products in the inspection process (no coupling fluids or residues are left behind). The tool produced by OSS is the Robotic Tank Inspection End Effector (RTIEE), which is initially deployed on the tip of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA). The RTEE combines ACFM with a color video camera for both electromagnetic and visual inspection The complete package consists of an end effector, its corresponding electronics and software, and a user's manual to guide the operator through an inspection. The system has both coarse and fine inspection modes and allows the user to catalog defects and suspected areas of leakage in a database for further examination, which may lead to emptying the tank for repair, decommissioning, etc.. The following is an updated report to OSS document OSS-21100-7002, which was submitted in 1995. During the course of the contract, two related subtasks arose, the Wall and Coating Thickness Sensor and the Vacuum Scarifying and Sampling Tool Assembly. The first of these subtasks was intended to evaluate the corrosion and wall thinning of 55-gallon steel drums. The second was retrieved and characterized the waste material trapped inside the annulus region of the underground tanks on the DOE's tank farms. While these subtasks were derived from the original intent of

  11. Intervention of Phytohormone Pathways by Pathogen Effectors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kazan, Kemal; Lyons, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The constant struggle between plants and microbes has driven the evolution of multiple defense strategies in the host as well as offense strategies in the pathogen. To defend themselves from pathogen attack, plants often rely on elaborate signaling networks regulated by phytohormones. In turn, pathogens have adopted innovative strategies to manipulate phytohormone-regulated defenses. Tactics frequently employed by plant pathogens involve hijacking, evading, or disrupting hormone signaling pathways and/or crosstalk. As reviewed here, this is achieved mechanistically via pathogen-derived molecules known as effectors, which target phytohormone receptors, transcriptional activators and repressors, and other components of phytohormone signaling in the host plant. Herbivores and sap-sucking insects employ obligate pathogens such as viruses, phytoplasma, or symbiotic bacteria to intervene with phytohormone-regulated defenses. Overall, an improved understanding of phytohormone intervention strategies employed by pests and pathogens during their interactions with plants will ultimately lead to the development of new crop protection strategies. PMID:24920334

  12. Secretion of Rhoptry and Dense Granule Effector Proteins by Nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii Uracil Auxotrophs Controls the Development of Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Sanders, Kiah L; Rommereim, Leah M; Guevara, Rebekah B; Bzik, David J

    2016-07-01

    Nonreplicating type I uracil auxotrophic mutants of Toxoplasma gondii possess a potent ability to activate therapeutic immunity to established solid tumors by reversing immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Here we engineered targeted deletions of parasite secreted effector proteins using a genetically tractable Δku80 vaccine strain to show that the secretion of specific rhoptry (ROP) and dense granule (GRA) proteins by uracil auxotrophic mutants of T. gondii in conjunction with host cell invasion activates antitumor immunity through host responses involving CD8α+ dendritic cells, the IL-12/interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) TH1 axis, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Deletion of parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) associated proteins ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35 or ROP38, intravacuolar network associated dense granule proteins GRA2 or GRA12, and GRA24 which traffics past the PVM to the host cell nucleus severely abrogated the antitumor response. In contrast, deletion of other secreted effector molecules such as GRA15, GRA16, or ROP16 that manipulate host cell signaling and transcriptional pathways, or deletion of PVM associated ROP21 or GRA3 molecules did not affect the antitumor activity. Association of ROP18 with the PVM was found to be essential for the development of the antitumor responses. Surprisingly, the ROP18 kinase activity required for resistance to IFN-γ activated host innate immunity related GTPases and virulence was not essential for the antitumor response. These data show that PVM functions of parasite secreted effector molecules, including ROP18, manipulate host cell responses through ROP18 kinase virulence independent mechanisms to activate potent antitumor responses. Our results demonstrate that PVM associated rhoptry effector proteins secreted prior to host cell invasion and dense granule effector proteins localized to the intravacuolar network and host nucleus that are secreted after host cell invasion coordinately control the

  13. Secretion of Rhoptry and Dense Granule Effector Proteins by Nonreplicating Toxoplasma gondii Uracil Auxotrophs Controls the Development of Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Sanders, Kiah L.; Rommereim, Leah M.; Bzik, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Nonreplicating type I uracil auxotrophic mutants of Toxoplasma gondii possess a potent ability to activate therapeutic immunity to established solid tumors by reversing immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment. Here we engineered targeted deletions of parasite secreted effector proteins using a genetically tractable Δku80 vaccine strain to show that the secretion of specific rhoptry (ROP) and dense granule (GRA) proteins by uracil auxotrophic mutants of T. gondii in conjunction with host cell invasion activates antitumor immunity through host responses involving CD8α+ dendritic cells, the IL-12/interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) TH1 axis, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Deletion of parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) associated proteins ROP5, ROP17, ROP18, ROP35 or ROP38, intravacuolar network associated dense granule proteins GRA2 or GRA12, and GRA24 which traffics past the PVM to the host cell nucleus severely abrogated the antitumor response. In contrast, deletion of other secreted effector molecules such as GRA15, GRA16, or ROP16 that manipulate host cell signaling and transcriptional pathways, or deletion of PVM associated ROP21 or GRA3 molecules did not affect the antitumor activity. Association of ROP18 with the PVM was found to be essential for the development of the antitumor responses. Surprisingly, the ROP18 kinase activity required for resistance to IFN-γ activated host innate immunity related GTPases and virulence was not essential for the antitumor response. These data show that PVM functions of parasite secreted effector molecules, including ROP18, manipulate host cell responses through ROP18 kinase virulence independent mechanisms to activate potent antitumor responses. Our results demonstrate that PVM associated rhoptry effector proteins secreted prior to host cell invasion and dense granule effector proteins localized to the intravacuolar network and host nucleus that are secreted after host cell invasion coordinately control the

  14. Translocation of surface-localized effectors in type III secretion

    PubMed Central

    Edgren, Tomas; Wang-Edgren, Helen; Rosqvist, Roland; Fahlgren, Anna; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Fallman, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic Yersinia species suppress the host immune response by using a plasmid-encoded type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate virulence proteins into the cytosol of the target cells. T3SS-dependent protein translocation is believed to occur in one step from the bacterial cytosol to the target-cell cytoplasm through a conduit created by the T3SS upon target cell contact. Here, we report that T3SS substrates on the surface of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are translocated into target cells. Upon host cell contact, purified YopH coated on Y. pseudotuberculosis was specifically and rapidly translocated across the target-cell membrane, which led to a physiological response in the infected cell. In addition, translocation of externally added YopH required a functional T3SS and a specific translocation domain in the effector protein. Efficient, T3SS-dependent translocation of purified YopH added in vitro was also observed when using coated Salmonella typhimurium strains, which implies that T3SS-mediated translocation of extracellular effector proteins is conserved among T3SS-dependent pathogens. Our results demonstrate that polarized T3SS-dependent translocation of proteins can be achieved through an intermediate extracellular step that can be reconstituted in vitro. These results indicate that translocation can occur by a different mechanism from the assumed single-step conduit model. PMID:21220342

  15. Shigella IpaH Family Effectors as a Versatile Model for Studying Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2015-01-01

    Shigella spp. are highly adapted human pathogens that cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis). Via the type III secretion system (T3SS), Shigella deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) that are responsible for pathogenesis, with functions including pyroptosis, invasion of the epithelial cells, intracellular survival, and evasion of host immune responses. Intriguingly, T3SS effector activity and strategies are not unique to Shigella, but are shared by many other bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Therefore, studying Shigella T3SS effectors will not only improve our understanding of bacterial infection systems, but also provide a molecular basis for developing live bacterial vaccines and antibacterial drugs. One of Shigella T3SS effectors, IpaH family proteins, which have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and are widely conserved among other bacterial pathogens, are very relevant because they promote bacterial survival by triggering cell death and modulating the host immune responses. Here, we describe selected examples of Shigella pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on the roles of IpaH family effectors, which shed new light on bacterial survival strategies and provide clues about how to overcome bacterial infections.

  16. Transient Expression of Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus Effector Induces Cell Death in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Pitino, Marco; Armstrong, Cheryl M.; Cano, Liliana M.; Duan, Yongping

    2016-01-01

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus “Las” is a phloem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, and the most prevalent species of Liberibacter associated with citrus huanglongbing (HLB), a devastating disease of citrus worldwide. Although, the complete sequence of the Las genome provides the basis for studying functional genomics of Las and molecular mechanisms of Las-plant interactions, the functional characterization of Las effectors remains a slow process since remains to be cultured. Like other plant pathogens, Las may deliver effector proteins into host cells and modulate a variety of host cellular functions for their infection progression. In this study, we identified 16 putative Las effectors via bioinformatics, and transiently expressed them in Nicotiana benthamiana. Diverse subcellular localization with different shapes and aggregation patterns of the effector candidates were revealed by UV- microscopy after transient expression in leaf tissue. Intriguingly, one of the 16 candidates, Las5315mp (mature protein), was localized in the chloroplast and induced cell death at 3 days post inoculation (dpi) in N. benthamiana. Moreover, Las5315mp induced strong callose deposition in plant cells. This study provides new insights into the localizations and potential roles of these Las effectors in planta. PMID:27458468

  17. The Barley Powdery Mildew Effector Candidates CSEP0081 and CSEP0254 Promote Fungal Infection Success

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ali Abdurehim; Pedersen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Effectors play significant roles in the success of pathogens. Recent advances in genome sequencing have revealed arrays of effectors and effector candidates from a wide range of plant pathogens. Yet, the vast majority of them remain uncharacterized. Among the ~500 Candidate Secreted Effector Proteins (CSEPs) predicted from the barley powdery mildew fungal genome, only a few have been studied and shown to have a function in virulence. Here, we provide evidence that CSEP0081 and CSEP0254 contribute to infection by the fungus. This was studied using Host-Induced Gene Silencing (HIGS), where independent silencing of the transcripts for these CSEPs significantly reduced the fungal penetration and haustoria formation rate. Both CSEPs are likely required during and after the formation of haustoria, in which their transcripts were found to be differentially expressed, rather than in epiphytic tissue. When expressed in barley leaf epidermal cells, both CSEPs appears to move freely between the cytosol and the nucleus, suggesting that their host targets locate in these cellular compartments. Collectively, our data suggest that, in addition to the previously reported effectors, the barley powdery mildew fungus utilizes these two CSEPs as virulence factors to enhance infection. PMID:27322386

  18. Shigella IpaH Family Effectors as a Versatile Model for Studying Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    Shigella spp. are highly adapted human pathogens that cause bacillary dysentery (shigellosis). Via the type III secretion system (T3SS), Shigella deliver a subset of virulence proteins (effectors) that are responsible for pathogenesis, with functions including pyroptosis, invasion of the epithelial cells, intracellular survival, and evasion of host immune responses. Intriguingly, T3SS effector activity and strategies are not unique to Shigella, but are shared by many other bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella, Yersinia, and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC). Therefore, studying Shigella T3SS effectors will not only improve our understanding of bacterial infection systems, but also provide a molecular basis for developing live bacterial vaccines and antibacterial drugs. One of Shigella T3SS effectors, IpaH family proteins, which have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity and are widely conserved among other bacterial pathogens, are very relevant because they promote bacterial survival by triggering cell death and modulating the host immune responses. Here, we describe selected examples of Shigella pathogenesis, with particular emphasis on the roles of IpaH family effectors, which shed new light on bacterial survival strategies and provide clues about how to overcome bacterial infections. PMID:26779450

  19. Using Population and Comparative Genomics to Understand the Genetic Basis of Effector-Driven Fungal Pathogen Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Plissonneau, Clémence; Benevenuto, Juliana; Mohd-Assaad, Norfarhan; Fouché, Simone; Hartmann, Fanny E.; Croll, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Epidemics caused by fungal plant pathogens pose a major threat to agro-ecosystems and impact global food security. High-throughput sequencing enabled major advances in understanding how pathogens cause disease on crops. Hundreds of fungal genomes are now available and analyzing these genomes highlighted the key role of effector genes in disease. Effectors are small secreted proteins that enhance infection by manipulating host metabolism. Fungal genomes carry 100s of putative effector genes, but the lack of homology among effector genes, even for closely related species, challenges evolutionary and functional analyses. Furthermore, effector genes are often found in rapidly evolving chromosome compartments which are difficult to assemble. We review how population and comparative genomics toolsets can be combined to address these challenges. We highlight studies that associated genome-scale polymorphisms with pathogen lifestyles and adaptation to different environments. We show how genome-wide association studies can be used to identify effectors and other pathogenicity-related genes underlying rapid adaptation. We also discuss how the compartmentalization of fungal genomes into core and accessory regions shapes the evolution of effector genes. We argue that an understanding of genome evolution provides important insight into the trajectory of host-pathogen co-evolution. PMID:28217138

  20. Using Population and Comparative Genomics to Understand the Genetic Basis of Effector-Driven Fungal Pathogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Plissonneau, Clémence; Benevenuto, Juliana; Mohd-Assaad, Norfarhan; Fouché, Simone; Hartmann, Fanny E; Croll, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Epidemics caused by fungal plant pathogens pose a major threat to agro-ecosystems and impact global food security. High-throughput sequencing enabled major advances in understanding how pathogens cause disease on crops. Hundreds of fungal genomes are now available and analyzing these genomes highlighted the key role of effector genes in disease. Effectors are small secreted proteins that enhance infection by manipulating host metabolism. Fungal genomes carry 100s of putative effector genes, but the lack of homology among effector genes, even for closely related species, challenges evolutionary and functional analyses. Furthermore, effector genes are often found in rapidly evolving chromosome compartments which are difficult to assemble. We review how population and comparative genomics toolsets can be combined to address these challenges. We highlight studies that associated genome-scale polymorphisms with pathogen lifestyles and adaptation to different environments. We show how genome-wide association studies can be used to identify effectors and other pathogenicity-related genes underlying rapid adaptation. We also discuss how the compartmentalization of fungal genomes into core and accessory regions shapes the evolution of effector genes. We argue that an understanding of genome evolution provides important insight into the trajectory of host-pathogen co-evolution.

  1. Computational prediction of type III and IV secreted effectors in Gram-negative bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Corrigan, Abigail L.; Peterson, Elena S.; Oehmen, Christopher S.; Niemann, George; Cambronne, Eric; Sharp, Danna; Adkins, Joshua N.; Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the methods employed by four recent papers that described novel methods for computational prediction of secreted effectors from type III and IV secretion systems in Gram-negative bacteria. The results of the studies in terms of performance at accurately predicting secreted effectors and similarities found between secretion signals that may reflect biologically relevant features for recognition. We discuss the web-based tools for secreted effector prediction described in these studies and announce the availability of our tool, the SIEVEserver (http://www.biopilot.org). Finally, we assess the accuracy of the three type III effector prediction methods on a small set of proteins not known prior to the development of these tools that we have recently discovered and validated using both experimental and computational approaches. Our comparison shows that all methods use similar approaches and, in general arrive at similar conclusions. We discuss the possibility of an order-dependent motif in the secretion signal, which was a point of disagreement in the studies. Our results show that there may be classes of effectors in which the signal has a loosely defined motif, and others in which secretion is dependent only on compositional biases. Computational prediction of secreted effectors from protein sequences represents an important step toward better understanding the interaction between pathogens and hosts.

  2. Effector-Mining in the Poplar Rust Fungus Melampsora larici-populina Secretome

    PubMed Central

    Lorrain, Cécile; Hecker, Arnaud; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    The poplar leaf rust fungus, Melampsora larici-populina has been established as a tree-microbe interaction model. Understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling infection by pathogens appears essential for durable management of tree plantations. In biotrophic plant-parasites, effectors are known to condition host cell colonization. Thus, investigation of candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs) is a major goal in the poplar–poplar rust interaction. Unlike oomycetes, fungal effectors do not share conserved motifs and candidate prediction relies on a set of a priori criteria established from reported bona fide effectors. Secretome prediction, genome-wide analysis of gene families and transcriptomics of M. larici-populina have led to catalogs of more than a thousand secreted proteins. Automatized effector-mining pipelines hold great promise for rapid and systematic identification and prioritization of CSEPs for functional characterization. In this review, we report on and discuss the current status of the poplar rust fungus secretome and prediction of candidate effectors from this species. PMID:26697026

  3. Oxysterols and Their Cellular Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Béaslas, Olivier; Nissilä, Eija

    2012-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized 27-carbon cholesterol derivatives or by-products of cholesterol biosynthesis, with a spectrum of biologic activities. Several oxysterols have cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic activities, the ability to interfere with the lateral domain organization, and packing of membrane lipids. These properties may account for their suggested roles in the pathology of diseases such as atherosclerosis, age-onset macular degeneration and Alzheimer’s disease. Oxysterols also have the capacity to induce inflammatory responses and play roles in cell differentiation processes. The functions of oxysterols as intermediates in the synthesis of bile acids and steroid hormones, and as readily transportable forms of sterol, are well established. Furthermore, their actions as endogenous regulators of gene expression in lipid metabolism via liver X receptors and the Insig (insulin-induced gene) proteins have been investigated in detail. The cytoplasmic oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) homologues form a group of oxysterol/cholesterol sensors that has recently attracted a lot of attention. However, their mode of action is, as yet, poorly understood. Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors (ROR) α and γ, and Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) have been identified as novel oxysterol receptors, revealing new physiologic oxysterol effector mechanisms in development, metabolism, and immunity, and evoking enhanced interest in these compounds in the field of biomedicine. PMID:24970128

  4. Salmonellae interactions with host processes.

    PubMed

    LaRock, Doris L; Chaudhary, Anu; Miller, Samuel I

    2015-04-01

    Salmonellae invasion and intracellular replication within host cells result in a range of diseases, including gastroenteritis, bacteraemia, enteric fever and focal infections. In recent years, considerable progress has been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that salmonellae use to alter host cell physiology; through the delivery of effector proteins with specific activities and through the modulation of defence and stress response pathways. In this Review, we summarize our current knowledge of the complex interplay between bacterial and host factors that leads to inflammation, disease and, in most cases, control of the infection by its animal hosts, with a particular focus on Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium. We also highlight gaps in our knowledge of the contributions of salmonellae and the host to disease pathogenesis, and we suggest future avenues for further study.

  5. A genetic screen to isolate type III effectors translocated into pepper cells during Xanthomonas infection

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Anne Roden, Branids Belt, Jason Barzel Ross, Thomas Tachibana, Joe Vargas, Mary Beth Mudgett

    2004-11-23

    The bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) uses a type III secretion system (TTSS) to translocate effector proteins into host plant cells. The TTSS is required for Xcv colonization, yet the identity of many proteins translocated through this apparatus is not known. We used a genetic screen to functionally identify Xcv TTSS effectors. A transposon 5 (Tn5)-based transposon construct including the coding sequence for the Xcv AvrBs2 effector devoid of its TTSS signal was randomly inserted into the Xcv genome. Insertion of the avrBs2 reporter gene into Xcv genes coding for proteins containing a functional TTSS signal peptide resulted in the creation of chimeric TTSS effector::AvrBs2 fusion proteins. Xcv strains containing these fusions translocated the AvrBs2 reporter in a TTSS-dependent manner into resistant BS2 pepper cells during infection, activating the avrBs2-dependent hypersensitive response (HR). We isolated seven chimeric fusion proteins and designated the identified TTSS effectors as Xanthomonas outer proteins (Xops). Translocation of each Xop was confirmed by using the calmodulin-dependent adenylate cydase reporter assay. Three xop genes are Xanthomonas spp.-specific, whereas homologs for the rest are found in other phytopathogenic bacteria. XopF1 and XopF2 define an effector gene family in Xcv. XopN contains a eukaryotic protein fold repeat and is required for full Xcv pathogenicity in pepper and tomato. The translocated effectors identified in this work expand our knowledge of the diversity of proteins that Xcv uses to manipulate its hosts.

  6. Wheat PR-1 proteins are targeted by necrotrophic pathogen effector proteins.

    PubMed

    Breen, Susan; Williams, Simon J; Winterberg, Britta; Kobe, Bostjan; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have identified that proteinaceous effectors secreted by Parastagonospora nodorum are required to cause disease on wheat. These effectors interact in a gene-for-gene manner with host-dominant susceptibilty loci, resulting in disease. However, whilst the requirement of these effectors for infection is clear, their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. A yeast-two-hybrid library approach was used to search for wheat proteins that interacted with the necrotrophic effector SnTox3. Using this strategy we indentified an interaction between SnTox3 and the wheat pathogenicity-related protein TaPR-1-1, and confirmed it by in-planta co-immunprecipitation. PR-1 proteins represent a large family (23 in wheat) of proteins that are upregulated early in the defence response; however, their function remains ellusive. Interestingly, the P. nodorum effector SnToxA has recently been shown to interact specifically with TaPR-1-5. Our analysis of the SnTox3-TaPR-1 interaction demonstrated that SnTox3 can interact with a broader range of TaPR-1 proteins. Based on these data we utilised homology modeling to predict, and validate, regions on TaPR-1 proteins that are likely to be involved in the SnTox3 interaction. Precipitating from this work, we identified that a PR-1-derived defence signalling peptide from the C-terminus of TaPR-1-1, known as CAPE1, enhanced the infection of wheat by P. nodorum in an SnTox3-dependent manner, but played no role in ToxA-mediated disease. Collectively, our data suggest that P. nodorum has evolved unique effectors that target a common host-protein involved in host defence, albeit with different mechanisms and potentially outcomes.

  7. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  8. Cell-targeting antibodies in immunity to Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Schmaljohn, Alan; Lewis, George K.

    2016-01-01

    As the 2014–15 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa evolved from emergency to lesson, developers of both vaccines and therapeutic antibodies were left with the puzzlement of what kinds of anti-Ebola antibodies are predictably desirable in treating the afflicted, and what antibodies might account for the specific and lasting protection elicited by the more effective vaccines. The facile answer in virology is that neutralizing antibody (NAb) is desired and required. However, with Ebola and other filoviruses (as with many prior viral examples), there are multiple discordances in which neutralizing antibodies fail to protect animals, and others in which antibody-mediated protection is observed in the absence of measured virus neutralization. Explanation presumably resides in the protective role of antibodies that bind and functionally ‘target’ virus-infected cells, here called ‘cell-targeting antibody’, or CTAb. To be clear, many NAbs are also CTAbs, and in the case of Ebola the great majority of NAbs are likely CTAbs. Isotype, glycosylation, and other features of CTAbs are likely crucial in their capacity to mediate protection. Overall, results and analysis invite an increasingly complex view of antibody-mediated immunity to enveloped viruses. PMID:27005312

  9. Viral Capsid DNA Aptamer Conjugates as Multivalent Cell Targeting Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Gary J.; Hsiao, Sonny C.; Carrico, Zachary M.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamers offer significant potential as convenient and evolvable targeting groups for drug delivery. To attach them to the surface of a genome-free viral capsid carrier, an efficient oxidative coupling strategy has been developed. The method involves the periodate-mediated reaction of phenylene diamine substituted oligonucleotides with aniline groups installed on the outer surface of the capsid shells. Up to 60 DNA strands can be attached to each viral capsid with no apparent loss of base-pairing capabilities or protein stability. The ability of the capsids to bind specific cellular targets was demonstrated through the attachment of a 41-nucleotide sequence that targets a tyrosine kinase receptor on Jurkat T cells. After the installation of a fluorescent dye on the capsid interior, capsids bearing the cell-targeting sequence showed significant levels of binding to the cells relative to control samples. Colocalization experiments using confocal microscopy indicated that the capsids were endocytosed and trafficked to lysosomes for degradation. These observations suggest that aptamer-labeled capsids could be used for the targeted drug delivery of acid-labile prodrugs that would be preferentially released upon lysosomal acidification. PMID:19603808

  10. Actin Cytoskeleton Manipulation by Effector Proteins Secreted by Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli Pathotypes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-Garcia, Fernando; Serapio-Palacios, Antonio; Ugalde-Silva, Paul; Tapia-Pastrana, Gabriela; Chavez-Dueñas, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure necessary for cell and tissue organization, including the maintenance of epithelial barriers. Disruption of the epithelial barrier coincides with alterations of the actin cytoskeleton in several disease states. These disruptions primarily affect the paracellular space, which is normally regulated by tight junctions. Thereby, the actin cytoskeleton is a common and recurring target of bacterial virulence factors. In order to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton, bacteria secrete and inject toxins and effectors to hijack the host cell machinery, which interferes with host-cell pathways and with a number of actin binding proteins. An interesting model to study actin manipulation by bacterial effectors is Escherichia coli since due to its genome plasticity it has acquired diverse genetic mobile elements, which allow having different E. coli varieties in one bacterial species. These E. coli pathotypes, including intracellular and extracellular bacteria, interact with epithelial cells, and their interactions depend on a specific combination of virulence factors. In this paper we focus on E. coli effectors that mimic host cell proteins to manipulate the actin cytoskeleton. The study of bacterial effector-cytoskeleton interaction will contribute not only to the comprehension of the molecular causes of infectious diseases but also to increase our knowledge of cell biology. PMID:23509714

  11. Suppression of rice immunity by Xanthomonas oryzae type III effector Xoo2875.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ishikawa, Kazuya; Yoshimura, Yuya; Tsuge, Seiji; Kawasaki, Tsutomu

    2013-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae delivers effector proteins into host cells through a type III secretion system to inhibit host immune responses, but how these effectors suppress host immunity is largely unknown. Here we found that Xoo2875, one of the effectors of X. oryzae, strongly inhibited host resistance to X. oryzae. Transgenic rice plants expressing Xoo2875 exhibited semi-dwarfism and a reduction in Brassinolide-dependent laminar inclination, characteristics of brassinosteroid (BR)-insensitive mutants caused by mutations of the BR receptor. A yeast two-hybrid experiment indicated that Xoo2875 interacted with OsBAK1, an essential component of both microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) and BR receptors, suggesting that the virulent activity of Xoo2875 is mediated by inhibition of OsBAK1. Expression of Xoo2875 in Arabidopsis cells activated host immune responses, suggesting the presence of intracellular immune receptors that recognize Xoo2875. Because Xoo2875 homologs are highly conserved in Xanthomonas species, the development of Xoo2875-induced immunity is probably a useful strategy to avoid pathogen invasion.

  12. Identification of Phakopsora pachyrhizi Candidate Effectors with Virulence Activity in a Distantly Related Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    Kunjeti, Sridhara G.; Iyer, Geeta; Johnson, Ebony; Li, Eric; Broglie, Karen E.; Rauscher, Gilda; Rairdan, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Phakopsora pachyrhizi is the causal agent of Asian Soybean Rust, a disease that causes enormous economic losses, most markedly in South America. P. pachyrhizi is a biotrophic pathogen that utilizes specialized feeding structures called haustoria to colonize its hosts. In rusts and other filamentous plant pathogens, haustoria have been shown to secrete effector proteins into their hosts to permit successful completion of their life cycle. We have constructed a cDNA library from P. pachyrhizi haustoria using paramagnetic bead-based methodology and have identified 35 P. pachyrhizi candidate effector (CE) genes from this library which are described here. In addition, we quantified the transcript expression pattern of six of these genes and show that two of these CEs are able to greatly increase the susceptibility of Nicotiana benthamiana to Phytophthora infestans. This strongly suggests that these genes play an important role in P. pachyrhizi virulence on its hosts. PMID:27014295

  13. Interactions between effectors linked to serotonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Berg, K A; Maayani, S; Clarke, W P

    1998-12-15

    In general, there are two types of interactions between effector signaling pathways. "Homologous" interactions are those that occur within a receptor system to alter its own responsiveness, for example the loss of responsiveness (desensitization) that can occur upon agonist occupancy of a receptor. "Heterologous" interactions are those that occur between different receptor systems where the responsiveness of one receptor system is regulated (positively or negatively) by activation of another receptor system (i.e., "cross-talk"). Many, if not all receptors, couple to multiple cellular effector pathways and alterations in the responsiveness of a receptor system can be effector pathway-dependent which underscores the importance of studying each effector coupled to a receptor. Regulation of receptor system responsiveness, and consequently the efficacy of drugs, is a highly dynamic process. Perhaps by exploiting these interactions, new targets for pharmacotherapy may be uncovered which will provide for increased efficacy and specificity of drug action.

  14. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silcox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  15. Jet Engine Exhaust Nozzle Flow Effector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Silox, Richard J. (Inventor); Buehrle, Ralph D. (Inventor); Cagle, Christopher M. (Inventor); Cabell, Randolph H. (Inventor); Hilton, George C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A jet engine exhaust nozzle flow effector is a chevron formed with a radius of curvature with surfaces of the flow effector being defined and opposing one another. At least one shape memory alloy (SMA) member is embedded in the chevron closer to one of the chevron's opposing surfaces and substantially spanning from at least a portion of the chevron's root to the chevron's tip.

  16. Code-Assisted Discovery of TAL Effector Targets in Bacterial Leaf Streak of Rice Reveals Contrast with Bacterial Blight and a Novel Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Cernadas, Raul A.; Doyle, Erin L.; Niño-Liu, David O.; Wilkins, Katherine E.; Bancroft, Timothy; Wang, Li; Schmidt, Clarice L.; Caldo, Rico; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P.; Bogdanove, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial leaf streak of rice, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is an increasingly important yield constraint in this staple crop. A mesophyll colonizer, Xoc differs from X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), which invades xylem to cause bacterial blight of rice. Both produce multiple distinct TAL effectors, type III-delivered proteins that transactivate effector-specific host genes. A TAL effector finds its target(s) via a partially degenerate code whereby the modular effector amino acid sequence identifies nucleotide sequences to which the protein binds. Virulence contributions of some Xoo TAL effectors have been shown, and their relevant targets, susceptibility (S) genes, identified, but the role of TAL effectors in leaf streak is uncharacterized. We used host transcript profiling to compare leaf streak to blight and to probe functions of Xoc TAL effectors. We found that Xoc and Xoo induce almost completely different host transcriptional changes. Roughly one in three genes upregulated by the pathogens is preceded by a candidate TAL effector binding element. Experimental analysis of the 44 such genes predicted to be Xoc TAL effector targets verified nearly half, and identified most others as false predictions. None of the Xoc targets is a known bacterial blight S gene. Mutational analysis revealed that Tal2g, which activates two genes, contributes to lesion expansion and bacterial exudation. Use of designer TAL effectors discriminated a sulfate transporter gene as the S gene. Across all targets, basal expression tended to be higher than genome-average, and induction moderate. Finally, machine learning applied to real vs. falsely predicted targets yielded a classifier that recalled 92% of the real targets with 88% precision, providing a tool for better target prediction in the future. Our study expands the number of known TAL effector targets, identifies a new class of S gene, and improves our ability to predict functional targeting. PMID:24586171

  17. Code-assisted discovery of TAL effector targets in bacterial leaf streak of rice reveals contrast with bacterial blight and a novel susceptibility gene.

    PubMed

    Cernadas, Raul A; Doyle, Erin L; Niño-Liu, David O; Wilkins, Katherine E; Bancroft, Timothy; Wang, Li; Schmidt, Clarice L; Caldo, Rico; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P; Bogdanove, Adam J

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial leaf streak of rice, caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola (Xoc) is an increasingly important yield constraint in this staple crop. A mesophyll colonizer, Xoc differs from X. oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), which invades xylem to cause bacterial blight of rice. Both produce multiple distinct TAL effectors, type III-delivered proteins that transactivate effector-specific host genes. A TAL effector finds its target(s) via a partially degenerate code whereby the modular effector amino acid sequence identifies nucleotide sequences to which the protein binds. Virulence contributions of some Xoo TAL effectors have been shown, and their relevant targets, susceptibility (S) genes, identified, but the role of TAL effectors in leaf streak is uncharacterized. We used host transcript profiling to compare leaf streak to blight and to probe functions of Xoc TAL effectors. We found that Xoc and Xoo induce almost completely different host transcriptional changes. Roughly one in three genes upregulated by the pathogens is preceded by a candidate TAL effector binding element. Experimental analysis of the 44 such genes predicted to be Xoc TAL effector targets verified nearly half, and identified most others as false predictions. None of the Xoc targets is a known bacterial blight S gene. Mutational analysis revealed that Tal2g, which activates two genes, contributes to lesion expansion and bacterial exudation. Use of designer TAL effectors discriminated a sulfate transporter gene as the S gene. Across all targets, basal expression tended to be higher than genome-average, and induction moderate. Finally, machine learning applied to real vs. falsely predicted targets yielded a classifier that recalled 92% of the real targets with 88% precision, providing a tool for better target prediction in the future. Our study expands the number of known TAL effector targets, identifies a new class of S gene, and improves our ability to predict functional targeting.

  18. Applying Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to Examine Effector Translocation Efficiency by Coxiella burnetii during siRNA Silencing.

    PubMed

    Newton, Patrice; Latomanski, Eleanor A; Newton, Hayley J

    2016-07-06

    Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, is an intracellular pathogen that relies on a Type IV Dot/Icm Secretion System to establish a replicative niche. A cohort of effectors are translocated through this system into the host cell to manipulate host processes and allow the establishment of a unique lysosome-derived vacuole for replication. The method presented here involves the combination of two well-established techniques: specific gene silencing using siRNA and measurement of effector translocation using a FRET-based substrate that relies on β-lactamase activity. Applying these two approaches, we can begin to understand the role of host factors in bacterial secretion system function and effector translocation. In this study we examined the role of Rab5A and Rab7A, both important regulators of the endocytic trafficking pathway. We demonstrate that silencing the expression of either protein results in a decrease in effector translocation efficiency. These methods can be easily modified to examine other intracellular and extracellular pathogens that also utilize secretion systems. In this way, a global picture of host factors involved in bacterial effector translocation may be revealed.

  19. Identification and Characterization of Putative Translocated Effector Proteins of the Edwardsiella ictaluri Type III Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Dubytska, Lidiya P.; Rogge, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Edwardsiella ictaluri, a major pathogen in channel catfish aquaculture, encodes a type III secretion system (T3SS) that is essential for intracellular replication and virulence. Previous work identified three putative T3SS effectors in E. ictaluri, and in silico analysis of the E. ictaluri genome identified six additional putative effectors, all located on the chromosome outside the T3SS pathogenicity island. To establish active translocation by the T3SS, we constructed translational fusions of each effector to the amino-terminal adenylate cyclase (AC) domain of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin CyaA. When translocated through the membrane of the Edwardsiella-containing vacuole (ECV), the cyclic AMP produced by the AC domain in the presence of calmodulin in the host cell cytoplasm can be measured. Results showed that all nine effectors were translocated from E. ictaluri in the ECV to the cytoplasm of the host cells in the wild-type strain but not in a T3SS mutant, indicating that translocation is dependent on the T3SS machinery. This confirms that the E. ictaluri T3SS is similar to the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 T3SS in that it translocates effectors through the membrane of the bacterial vacuole directly into the host cell cytoplasm. Additional work demonstrated that both initial acidification and subsequent neutralization of the ECV were necessary for effector translocation, except for two of them that did not require neutralization. Single-gene mutants constructed for seven of the individual effectors were all attenuated for replication in CCO cells, but only three were replication deficient in head kidney-derived macrophages (HKDM). IMPORTANCE The bacterial pathogen Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia of catfish (ESC), an economically significant disease of farm-raised channel catfish. Commercial catfish production accounts for the majority of the total fin fish aquaculture in the United States, with almost 300,000

  20. The C-terminal half of Phytophthora infestans RXLR effector AVR3a is sufficient to trigger R3a-mediated hypersensitivity and suppress INF1-induced cell death in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Young, Carolyn; Cakir, Cahid; Huitema, Edgar; Win, Joe; Armstrong, Miles R; Birch, Paul R J; Kamoun, Sophien

    2006-10-01

    The RXLR cytoplasmic effector AVR3a of Phytophthora infestans confers avirulence on potato plants carrying the R3a gene. Two alleles of Avr3a encode secreted proteins that differ in only three amino acid residues, two of which are in the mature protein. Avirulent isolates carry the Avr3a allele, which encodes AVR3aKI (containing amino acids C19, K80 and I103), whereas virulent isolates express only the virulence allele avr3a, encoding AVR3aEM (S19, E80 and M103). Only the AVR3aKI protein is recognized inside the plant cytoplasm where it triggers R3a-mediated hypersensitivity. Similar to other oomycete avirulence proteins, AVR3aKI carries a signal peptide followed by a conserved motif centered on the consensus RXLR sequence that is functionally similar to a host cell-targeting signal of malaria parasites. The interaction between Avr3a and R3a can be reconstructed by their transient co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. We exploited the N. benthamiana experimental system to further characterize the Avr3a-R3a interaction. R3a activation by AVR3aKI is dependent on the ubiquitin ligase-associated protein SGT1 and heat-shock protein HSP90. The AVR3aKI and AVR3aEM proteins are equally stable in planta, suggesting that the difference in R3a-mediated death cannot be attributed to AVR3aEM protein instability. AVR3aKI is able to suppress cell death induced by the elicitin INF1 of P. infestans, suggesting a possible virulence function for this protein. Structure-function experiments indicated that the 75-amino acid C-terminal half of AVR3aKI, which excludes the RXLR region, is sufficient for avirulence and suppression functions, consistent with the view that the N-terminal region of AVR3aKI and other RXLR effectors is involved in secretion and targeting but is not required for effector activity. We also found that both polymorphic amino acids, K80 and I103, of mature AVR3a contribute to the effector functions.

  1. Deployment of the Burkholderia glumae type III secretion system as an efficient tool for translocating pathogen effectors to monocot cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shailendra; Sharma, Shiveta; Hirabuchi, Akiko; Yoshida, Kentaro; Fujisaki, Koki; Ito, Akiko; Uemura, Aiko; Terauchi, Ryohei; Kamoun, Sophien; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Jones, Jonathan D G; Saitoh, Hiromasa

    2013-05-01

    Genome sequences of plant fungal pathogens have enabled the identification of effectors that cooperatively modulate the cellular environment for successful fungal growth and suppress host defense. Identification and characterization of novel effector proteins are crucial for understanding pathogen virulence and host-plant defense mechanisms. Previous reports indicate that the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 type III secretion system (T3SS) can be used to study how non-bacterial effectors manipulate dicot plant cell function using the effector detector vector (pEDV) system. Here we report a pEDV-based effector delivery system in which the T3SS of Burkholderia glumae, an emerging rice pathogen, is used to translocate the AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii effectors of the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae to rice cytoplasm. The translocated AVR-Pik and AVR-Pii showed avirulence activity when tested in rice cultivars containing the cognate R genes. AVR-Pik reduced and delayed the hypersensitive response triggered by B. glumae in the non-host plant Nicotiana benthamiana, indicative of an immunosuppressive virulence activity. AVR proteins fused with fluorescent protein and nuclear localization signal were delivered by B. glumae T3SS and observed in the nuclei of infected cells in rice, wheat, barley and N. benthamiana. Our bacterial T3SS-enabled eukaryotic effector delivery and subcellular localization assays provide a useful method for identifying and studying effector functions in monocot plants. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The Machinery at Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites Contributes to Spatial Regulation of Multiple Legionella Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hubber, Andree; Arasaki, Kohei; Nakatsu, Fubito; Hardiman, Camille; Lambright, David; De Camilli, Pietro; Nagai, Hiroki; Roy, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    The Dot/Icm system of the intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila has the capacity to deliver over 270 effector proteins into host cells during infection. Important questions remain as to spatial and temporal mechanisms used to regulate such a large array of virulence determinants after they have been delivered into host cells. Here we investigated several L. pneumophila effector proteins that contain a conserved phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P)-binding domain first described in the effector DrrA (SidM). This PI4P binding domain was essential for the localization of effectors to the early L. pneumophila-containing vacuole (LCV), and DrrA-mediated recruitment of Rab1 to the LCV required PI4P-binding activity. It was found that the host cell machinery that regulates sites of contact between the plasma membrane (PM) and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) modulates PI4P dynamics on the LCV to control localization of these effectors. Specifically, phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIα (PI4KIIIα) was important for generating a PI4P signature that enabled L. pneumophila effectors to localize to the PM-derived vacuole, and the ER-associated phosphatase Sac1 was involved in metabolizing the PI4P on the vacuole to promote the dissociation of effectors. A defect in L. pneumophila replication in macrophages deficient in PI4KIIIα was observed, highlighting that a PM-derived PI4P signature is critical for biogenesis of a vacuole that supports intracellular multiplication of L. pneumophila. These data indicate that PI4P metabolism by enzymes controlling PM-ER contact sites regulate the association of L. pneumophila effectors to coordinate early stages of vacuole biogenesis. PMID:24992562

  3. A systems biology perspective on plant-microbe interactions: biochemical and structural targets of pathogen effectors.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Leighton; Birch, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Plants have biochemical defences against stresses from predators, parasites and pathogens. In this review we discuss the interaction of plant defences with microbial pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and oomycetes, and viruses. We examine principles of complex dynamic networks that allow identification of network components that are differentially and predictably sensitive to perturbation, thus making them likely effector targets. We relate these principles to recent developments in our understanding of known effector targets in plant-pathogen systems, and propose a systems-level framework for the interpretation and modelling of host-microbe interactions mediated by effectors. We describe this framework briefly, and conclude by discussing useful experimental approaches for populating this framework.

  4. Mining the human gut microbiota for effector strains that shape the immune system.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Philip P; Faith, Jeremiah J; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-06-19

    The gut microbiota codevelops with the immune system beginning at birth. Mining the microbiota for bacterial strains responsible for shaping the structure and dynamic operations of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system represents a formidable combinatorial problem but one that needs to be overcome to advance mechanistic understanding of microbial community and immune system coregulation and to develop new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches that promote health. Here, we discuss a scalable, less biased approach for identifying effector strains in complex microbial communities that impact immune function. The approach begins by identifying uncultured human fecal microbiota samples that transmit immune phenotypes to germ-free mice. Clonally arrayed sequenced collections of bacterial strains are constructed from representative donor microbiota. If the collection transmits phenotypes, effector strains are identified by testing randomly generated subsets with overlapping membership in individually housed germ-free animals. Detailed mechanistic studies of effector strain-host interactions can then be performed.

  5. EssD, a Nuclease Effector of the Staphylococcus aureus ESS Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ohr, Ryan Jay; Anderson, Mark; Shi, Miaomiao; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Specialized secretion systems of bacteria evolved for selective advantage, either killing microbial competitors or implementing effector functions during parasitism. Earlier work characterized the ESAT-6 secretion system (ESS) of Staphylococcus aureus and demonstrated its contribution to persistent staphylococcal infection of vertebrate hosts. Here, we identify a novel secreted effector of the ESS pathway, EssD, that functions as a nuclease and cleaves DNA but not RNA. EssI, a protein of the DUF600 family, binds EssD to block its nuclease activity in the staphylococcal cytoplasm. An essD knockout mutant or a variant lacking nuclease activity, essD(L546P), elicited a diminished interleukin-12 (IL-12) cytokine response following bloodstream infection of mice, suggesting that the effector function of EssD stimulates immune signaling to support the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections.

  6. CD152 (CTLA-4) regulates effector functions of CD8+ T lymphocytes by repressing Eomesodermin.

    PubMed

    Hegel, Johannes K; Knieke, Karin; Kolar, Paula; Reiner, Steven L; Brunner-Weinzierl, Monika C

    2009-03-01

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes are required for effective host defense against pathogens and also for mediating effector responses against uncontrolled proliferating self-tissues. In this study, we determine that individual CD8(+) T cells are tightly controlled in their effector functions by CD152 (CTLA-4). We demonstrate that signals induced by CD152 reduce the frequency of IFN-gamma and granzyme B expressing CD8(+) T cells independently of the transcription factors T-bet or cKrox by selectively inhibiting accumulation of Eomesodermin mRNA and protein. Ectopic expression of Eomesodermin reversed the CD152-mediated inhibition of effector molecule production. Additionally, enhanced cytotoxicity of individual CD8(+) T cells differentiated in the absence of CD152 signaling was determined in vivo. These novel insights extend our understanding of how immune responses of CD8(+) T cells are selectively modulated.

  7. Xanthomonas euvesicatoria type III effector XopQ interacts with tomato and pepper 14-3-3 isoforms to suppress effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Teper, Doron; Salomon, Dor; Sunitha, Sukumaran; Kim, Jung-Gun; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Sessa, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Effector-triggered immunity (ETI) to host-adapted pathogens is associated with rapid cell death at the infection site. The plant-pathogenic bacterium Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) interferes with plant cellular processes by injecting effector proteins into host cells through the type III secretion system. Here, we show that the Xcv effector XopQ suppresses cell death induced by components of the ETI-associated MAP kinase cascade MAPKKKα MEK2/SIPK and by several R/avr gene pairs. Inactivation of xopQ by insertional mutagenesis revealed that this effector inhibits ETI-associated cell death induced by avirulent Xcv in resistant pepper (Capsicum annuum), and enhances bacterial growth in resistant pepper and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Using protein-protein interaction studies in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and in planta, we identified the tomato 14-3-3 isoform SlTFT4 and homologs from other plant species as XopQ interactors. A mutation in the putative 14-3-3 binding site of XopQ impaired interaction of the effector with CaTFT4 in yeast and its virulence function in planta. Consistent with a role in ETI, TFT4 mRNA abundance increased during the incompatible interaction of tomato and pepper with Xcv. Silencing of NbTFT4 in Nicotiana benthamiana significantly reduced cell death induced by MAPKKKα. In addition, silencing of CaTFT4 in pepper delayed the appearance of ETI-associated cell death and enhanced growth of virulent and avirulent Xcv, demonstrating the requirement of TFT4 for plant immunity to Xcv. Our results suggest that the XopQ virulence function is to suppress ETI and immunity-associated cell death by interacting with TFT4, which is an important component of ETI and a bona fide target of XopQ.

  8. Hijacking Host Cell Highways: Manipulation of the Host Actin Cytoskeleton by Obligate Intracellular Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Colonne, Punsiri M; Winchell, Caylin G; Voth, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens replicate within eukaryotic cells and display unique adaptations that support key infection events including invasion, replication, immune evasion, and dissemination. From invasion to dissemination, all stages of the intracellular bacterial life cycle share the same three-dimensional cytosolic space containing the host cytoskeleton. For successful infection and replication, many pathogens hijack the cytoskeleton using effector proteins introduced into the host cytosol by specialized secretion systems. A subset of effectors contains eukaryotic-like motifs that mimic host proteins to exploit signaling and modify specific cytoskeletal components such as actin and microtubules. Cytoskeletal rearrangement promotes numerous events that are beneficial to the pathogen, including internalization of bacteria, structural support for bacteria-containing vacuoles, altered vesicular trafficking, actin-dependent bacterial movement, and pathogen dissemination. This review highlights a diverse group of obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that manipulate the host cytoskeleton to thrive within eukaryotic cells and discusses underlying molecular mechanisms that promote these dynamic host-pathogen interactions.

  9. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TAL effectors PthA“s” and PthC“s” of the citrus canker bacteria Xanthomonas citri (Xc) and Xanthomonas aurantifolii pathotype C (XaC), respectively, are poorly characterized. Of particular interest, XaC causes canker disease in its host lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), but triggers a defense response in sweet orange. Results Based on, 1) the TAL effector-DNA binding code, 2) gene expression data of Xc and XaC-infiltrated sweet orange leaves, and 3) citrus hypocotyls transformed with PthA2, PthA4 or PthC1, we have identified a collection of Citrus sinensis genes potentially targeted by Xc and XaC TAL effectors. Our results suggest that similar with other strains of Xanthomonas TAL effectors, PthA2 and PthA4, and PthC1 to some extent, functionally converge. In particular, towards induction of genes involved in the auxin and gibberellin synthesis and response, cell division, and defense response. We also present evidence indicating that the TAL effectors act as transcriptional repressors and that the best scoring predicted DNA targets of PthA“s” and PthC“s” in citrus promoters predominantly overlap with or localize near to TATA boxes of core promoters, supporting the idea that TAL effectors interact with the host basal transcriptional machinery to recruit the RNA pol II and start transcription. Conclusions The identification of PthA“s” and PthC“s” targets, such as the LOB (LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARY) and CCNBS genes that we report here, is key for the understanding

  10. Identification of putative TAL effector targets of the citrus canker pathogens shows functional convergence underlying disease development and defense response.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Andre L A; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Abe, Valeria Y; de Oliveira, Maria L P; Domingues, Mariane N; Silva, Jaqueline C; Cernadas, Raul A; Benedetti, Celso E

    2014-02-25

    Transcriptional activator-like (TAL) effectors, formerly known as the AvrBs3/PthA protein family, are DNA-binding effectors broadly found in Xanthomonas spp. that transactivate host genes upon injection via the bacterial type three-secretion system. Biologically relevant targets of TAL effectors, i.e. host genes whose induction is vital to establish a compatible interaction, have been reported for xanthomonads that colonize rice and pepper; however, citrus genes modulated by the TAL effectors PthA"s" and PthC"s" of the citrus canker bacteria Xanthomonas citri (Xc) and Xanthomonas aurantifolii pathotype C (XaC), respectively, are poorly characterized. Of particular interest, XaC causes canker disease in its host lemon (Citrus aurantifolia), but triggers a defense response in sweet orange. Based on, 1) the TAL effector-DNA binding code, 2) gene expression data of Xc and XaC-infiltrated sweet orange leaves, and 3) citrus hypocotyls transformed with PthA2, PthA4 or PthC1, we have identified a collection of Citrus sinensis genes potentially targeted by Xc and XaC TAL effectors. Our results suggest that similar with other strains of Xanthomonas TAL effectors, PthA2 and PthA4, and PthC1 to some extent, functionally converge. In particular, towards induction of genes involved in the auxin and gibberellin synthesis and response, cell division, and defense response. We also present evidence indicating that the TAL effectors act as transcriptional repressors and that the best scoring predicted DNA targets of PthA"s" and PthC"s" in citrus promoters predominantly overlap with or localize near to TATA boxes of core promoters, supporting the idea that TAL effectors interact with the host basal transcriptional machinery to recruit the RNA pol II and start transcription. The identification of PthA"s" and PthC"s" targets, such as the LOB (lateral organ boundary) and CCNBS genes that we report here, is key for the understanding of the canker symptoms development during host

  11. Transcription Factors Encoded on Core and Accessory Chromosomes of Fusarium oxysporum Induce Expression of Effector Genes

    PubMed Central

    van der Does, H. Charlotte; Schmidt, Sarah M.; Langereis, Léon; Hughes, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins secreted by pathogens during host colonization largely determine the outcome of pathogen-host interactions and are commonly called ‘effectors’. In fungal plant pathogens, coordinated transcriptional up-regulation of effector genes is a key feature of pathogenesis and effectors are often encoded in genomic regions with distinct repeat content, histone code and rate of evolution. In the tomato pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), effector genes reside on one of four accessory chromosomes, known as the ‘pathogenicity’ chromosome, which can be exchanged between strains through horizontal transfer. The three other accessory chromosomes in the Fol reference strain may also be important for virulence towards tomato. Expression of effector genes in Fol is highly up-regulated upon infection and requires Sge1, a transcription factor encoded on the core genome. Interestingly, the pathogenicity chromosome itself contains 13 predicted transcription factor genes and for all except one, there is a homolog on the core genome. We determined DNA binding specificity for nine transcription factors using oligonucleotide arrays. The binding sites for homologous transcription factors were highly similar, suggesting that extensive neofunctionalization of DNA binding specificity has not occurred. Several DNA binding sites are enriched on accessory chromosomes, and expression of FTF1, its core homolog FTF2 and SGE1 from a constitutive promoter can induce expression of effector genes. The DNA binding sites of only these three transcription factors are enriched among genes up-regulated during infection. We further show that Ftf1, Ftf2 and Sge1 can activate transcription from their binding sites in yeast. RNAseq analysis revealed that in strains with constitutive expression of FTF1, FTF2 or SGE1, expression of a similar set of plant-responsive genes on the pathogenicity chromosome is induced, including most effector genes. We conclude that the Fol

  12. A Diverse Repertoire of CD4 T Cells Targets the Immediate-Early 1 Protein of Human Cytomegalovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ameres, Stefanie; Liang, Xiaoling; Wiesner, Martina; Mautner, Josef; Moosmann, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    T-cell responses to the immediate-early 1 (IE-1) protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are associated with protection from viral disease. Thus, IE-1 is a promising target for immunotherapy. CD8 T-cell responses to IE-1 are generally strong. In contrast, CD4 T-cell responses to IE-1 were described to be comparatively infrequent or undetectable in HCMV carriers, and information on their target epitopes and their function has been limited. To analyze the repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells, we expanded them from healthy donors with autologous IE-1-expressing mini-Epstein–Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines and established IE-1-specific CD4 T-cell clones. Clones from seven out of seven HCMV-positive donors recognized endogenously processed IE-1 epitopes restricted through HLA-DR, DQ, or DP. Three to seven IE-1 epitopes were recognized per donor. Cumulatively, about 27 different HLA/peptide class II complexes were recognized by 117 IE-1-specific clones. Our results suggest that a highly diversified repertoire of IE-1-specific CD4 T cells targeting multiple epitopes is usually present in healthy HCMV carriers. Therefore, multiepitope approaches to immunomonitoring and immunotherapy will make optimal use of this potentially important class of HCMV-specific effector cells. PMID:26635812

  13. Bacterial Internalization, Localization, and Effectors Shape the Epithelial Immune Response during Shigella flexneri Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lippmann, Juliane; Gwinner, Frederik; Rey, Camille; Tamir, Uyanga; Law, Helen K. W.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular pathogens are differentially sensed by the compartmentalized host immune system. Nevertheless, gene expression studies of infected cells commonly average the immune responses, neglecting the precise pathogen localization. To overcome this limitation, we dissected the transcriptional immune response to Shigella flexneri across different infection stages in bulk and single cells. This identified six distinct transcriptional profiles characterizing the dynamic, multilayered host response in both bystander and infected cells. These profiles were regulated by external and internal danger signals, as well as whether bacteria were membrane bound or cytosolic. We found that bacterial internalization triggers a complex, effector-independent response in bystander cells, possibly to compensate for the undermined host gene expression in infected cells caused by bacterial effectors, particularly OspF. Single-cell analysis revealed an important bacterial strategy to subvert host responses in infected cells, demonstrating that OspF disrupts concomitant gene expression of proinflammatory, apoptosis, and stress pathways within cells. This study points to novel mechanisms through which bacterial internalization, localization, and injected effectors orchestrate immune response transcriptional signatures. PMID:26123804

  14. Phytoplasma Effector SAP54 Induces Indeterminate Leaf-Like Flower Development in Arabidopsis Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Allyson M.; Sugio, Akiko; Makarova, Olga V.; Findlay, Kim C.; Grieve, Victoria M.; Tóth, Réka; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Hogenhout, Saskia A.

    2011-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial plant pathogens that cause considerable damage to a diverse range of agricultural crops globally. Symptoms induced in infected plants suggest that these phytopathogens may modulate developmental processes within the plant host. We report herein that Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches’ Broom (AY-WB) readily infects the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia, inducing symptoms that are characteristic of phytoplasma infection, such as the production of green leaf-like flowers (virescence and phyllody) and increased formation of stems and branches (witches’ broom). We found that the majority of genes encoding secreted AY-WB proteins (SAPs), which are candidate effector proteins, are expressed in Arabidopsis and the AY-WB insect vector Macrosteles quadrilineatus (Hemiptera; Cicadellidae). To identify which of these effector proteins induce symptoms of phyllody and virescence, we individually expressed the effector genes in Arabidopsis. From this screen, we have identified a novel AY-WB effector protein, SAP54, that alters floral development, resulting in the production of leaf-like flowers that are similar to those produced by plants infected with this phytoplasma. This study offers novel insight into the effector profile of an insect-transmitted plant pathogen and reports to our knowledge the first example of a microbial pathogen effector protein that targets flower development in a host. PMID:21849514

  15. Infection assays in Arabidopsis reveal candidate effectors from the poplar rust fungus that promote susceptibility to bacteria and oomycete pathogens.

    PubMed

    Germain, Hugo; Joly, David L; Mireault, Caroline; Plourde, Mélodie B; Letanneur, Claire; Stewart, Donald; Morency, Marie-Josée; Petre, Benjamin; Duplessis, Sébastien; Séguin, Armand

    2016-11-21

    Fungi of the Pucciniales order cause rust diseases which, altogether, affect thousands of plant species worldwide and pose a major threat to several crops. How rust effectors-virulence proteins delivered into infected tissues to modulate host functions-contribute to pathogen virulence remains poorly understood. Melampsora larici-populina is a devastating and widespread rust pathogen of poplar, and its genome encodes 1184 identified small secreted proteins that could potentially act as effectors. Here, following specific criteria, we selected 16 candidate effector proteins and characterized their virulence activities and subcellular localizations in the leaf cells of Arabidopsis thaliana. Infection assays using bacterial (Pseudomonas syringae) and oomycete (Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis) pathogens revealed subsets of candidate effectors that enhanced or decreased pathogen leaf colonization. Confocal imaging of green fluorescent protein-tagged candidate effectors constitutively expressed in stable transgenic plants revealed that some protein fusions specifically accumulate in nuclei, chloroplasts, plasmodesmata and punctate cytosolic structures. Altogether, our analysis suggests that rust fungal candidate effectors target distinct cellular components in host cells to promote parasitic growth.

  16. Identification of novel Xanthomonas euvesicatoria type III effector proteins by a machine-learning approach.

    PubMed

    Teper, Doron; Burstein, David; Salomon, Dor; Gershovitz, Michael; Pupko, Tal; Sessa, Guido

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xcv) is the causal agent of bacterial spot disease in pepper and tomato. Xcv pathogenicity depends on a type III secretion (T3S) system that delivers effector proteins into host cells to suppress plant immunity and promote disease. The pool of known Xcv effectors includes approximately 30 proteins, most identified in the 85-10 strain by various experimental and computational techniques. To identify additional Xcv 85-10 effectors, we applied a genome-wide machine-learning approach, in which all open reading frames (ORFs) were scored according to their propensity to encode effectors. Scoring was based on a large set of features, including genomic organization, taxonomic dispersion, hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp)-dependent expression, 5' regulatory sequences, amino acid composition bias and GC content. Thirty-six predicted effectors were tested for translocation into plant cells using the hypersensitive response (HR)-inducing domain of AvrBs2 as a reporter. Seven proteins (XopAU, XopAV, XopAW, XopAP, XopAX, XopAK and XopAD) harboured a functional translocation signal and their translocation relied on the HrpF translocon, indicating that they are bona fide T3S effectors. Remarkably, four belong to novel effector families. Inactivation of the xopAP gene reduced the severity of disease symptoms in infected plants. A decrease in cell death and chlorophyll content was observed in pepper leaves inoculated with the xopAP mutant when compared with the wild-type strain. However, populations of the xopAP mutant in infected leaves were similar in size to those of wild-type bacteria, suggesting that the reduction in virulence was not caused by impaired bacterial growth.

  17. Candidate effectors contribute to race differentiation and virulence of the lentil anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum lentis.

    PubMed

    Bhadauria, Vijai; MacLachlan, Ron; Pozniak, Curtis; Banniza, Sabine

    2015-08-22

    The hemibiotroph Colletotrichum lentis, causative agent of anthracnose on Lens culinaris (lentil) was recently described as a new species. During its interaction with the host plant, C. lentis likely secretes numerous effector proteins, including toxins to alter the plant's innate immunity, thereby gaining access to the host tissues for nutrition and reproduction. In silico analysis of 2000 ESTs generated from C. lentis-infected lentil leaf tissues identified 15 candidate effectors. In planta infection stage-specific gene expression waves among candidate effectors were revealed for the appressorial penetration phase, biotrophic phase and necrotrophic phase. No sign of positive selection pressure [ω (dN/dS) < 1] in effectors was detected at the intraspecific level. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the ORF of candidate effector ClCE6, used to develop a KASPar marker, differentiated perfectly between pathogenic race 0 and race 1 isolates when tested on 52 isolates arbitrarily selected from a large culture collection representing the western Canadian population of C. lentis. Furthermore, an EST encoding argininosuccinate lyase (Arg) was identified as a bacterial gene. A toxin protein ClToxB was further characterized as a potential host-specific toxin through heterologous in planta expression. The knock-down of ClToxB transcripts by RNAi resulted in reduced virulence, suggesting that ClToxB is a virulence factor. In silico analysis of the ClToxB sequence and comparative genomics revealed that ToxB is unlikely a foreign gene in the C. lentis genome. Incongruency between established species relationships and that established based on gene sequence data confirmed ToxB arose through evolution from a common ancestor, whereas the bacterial gene Arg identified in C. lentis was horizontally transferred from bacteria. EST mining and expression profiling revealed a set of in planta expressed candidate effectors. We developed a KASPar assay using effector polymorphism to

  18. Uptake of the Fusarium Effector Avr2 by Tomato Is Not a Cell Autonomous Event

    PubMed Central

    Di, Xiaotang; Gomila, Jo; Ma, Lisong; van den Burg, Harrold A.; Takken, Frank L. W.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens secrete effector proteins to manipulate the host for their own proliferation. Currently it is unclear whether the uptake of effector proteins from extracellular spaces is a host autonomous process. We study this process using the Avr2 effector protein from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol). Avr2 is an important virulence factor that is secreted into the xylem sap of tomato following infection. Besides that, it is also an avirulence factor triggering immune responses in plants carrying the I-2 resistance gene. Recognition of Avr2 by I-2 occurs inside the plant nucleus. Here, we show that pathogenicity of an Avr2 knockout Fusarium (FolΔAvr2) strain is fully complemented on transgenic tomato lines that express either a secreted (Avr2) or cytosolic Avr2 (ΔspAvr2) protein, indicating that Avr2 exerts its virulence functions inside the host cells. Furthermore, our data imply that secreted Avr2 is taken up from the extracellular spaces in the presence of the fungus. Grafting studies were performed in which scions of I-2 tomato plants were grafted onto either a ΔspAvr2 or on an Avr2 rootstock. Although the Avr2 protein could readily be detected in the xylem sap of the grafted plant tissues, no I-2-mediated immune responses were induced suggesting that I-2-expressing tomato cells cannot autonomously take up the effector protein from the xylem sap. Additionally, ΔspAvr2 and Avr2 plants were crossed with I-2 plants. Whereas ΔspAvr2/I-2 F1 plants showed a constitutive immune response, immunity was not triggered in the Avr2/I-2 plants confirming that Avr2 is not autonomously taken up from the extracellular spaces to trigger I-2. Intriguingly, infiltration of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in leaves of Avr2/I-2 plants triggered I-2 mediated cell death, which indicates that Agrobacterium triggers effector uptake. To test whether, besides Fol, effector uptake could also be induced by other fungal pathogens the ΔspAvr2 and Avr2 transgenic lines were inoculated

  19. End effector with astronaut foot restraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The combination of a foot restraint platform designed primarily for use by an astronaut being rigidly and permanently attached to an end effector which is suitable for attachment to the manipulator arm of a remote manipulating system is described. The foot restraint platform is attached by a brace to the end effector at a location away from the grappling interface of the end effector. The platform comprises a support plate provided with a pair of stirrups for receiving the toe portion of an astronaut's boots when standing on the platform and a pair of heel retainers in the form of raised members which are fixed to the surface of the platform and located to provide abutment surfaces for abutting engagement with the heels of the astronaut's boots when his toes are in the stirrups. The heel retainers preclude a backward sliding movement of the feet on the platform and instead require a lifting of the heels in order to extract the feet. The brace for attaching the foot restraint platform to the end effector may include a pivot or swivel joint to permit various orientations of the platform with respect to the end effector.

  20. Bacterial Effector Nanoparticles as Breast Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Herrera Estrada, Lina; Padmore, Trudy J; Champion, Julie A

    2016-03-07

    Bacterial pathogens trigger cell death by a variety of mechanisms, including injection of effector proteins. Effector proteins have great potential as anticancer agents because they efficiently subvert a variety of eukaryotic signaling pathways involved in cancer development, drug resistance, and metastasis. In breast cancer, MAPK and NFκB pathways are known to be dysregulated. YopJ, an effector from Yersinia pestis, downregulates MAPK and NFκB pathways to induce cell death in specific cell types. We expressed YopJ in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase (GST), forming self-assembled protein nanoparticles with diameters of 100 nm. YopJ-GST nanoparticles efficiently delivered protein to cells, replacing the need for the pathogen secretion mechanism for effector delivery to cells. These nanoparticles induced dose and time dependent death in SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. After 72 h, 97% of cells died, significantly more than with the same molar dose of doxorubicin. Treatment with sublethal doses of nanoparticles decreased cell migration in vitro and downregulated the MAPK ERK 1/2 pathway, which has been correlated to metastasis. Exposure to a panel of breast cancer cell lines showed that YopJ-GST nanoparticles are cytotoxic to different subtypes, including doxorubicin resistant cells. However, they were not cytotoxic to NIH/3T3 fibroblasts or HeLa cells. Thus, YopJ-GST nanoparticles demonstrate the potential of effector proteins as breast cancer therapeutics with selective cytotoxicity and the capacity to decrease metastatic predictive behaviors.

  1. Probing the cellular effects of bacterial effector proteins with the Yersinia toolbox.

    PubMed

    Wölke, Stefan; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    The type 3 secretion system (T3SS) is a powerful bacterial nanomachine that is able to modify the host cellular immune defense in favor of the pathogen by injection of effector proteins. In this regard, cellular Rho GTPases such as Rac1, RhoA or Cdc42 are targeted by a large group of T3SS effectors by mimicking cellular guanine exchange factors or GTPase-activating proteins. However, functional analysis of one type of T3SS effector that is translocated by bacterial pathogens is challenging because the T3SS effector repertoire can comprise a large number of proteins with redundant or interfering functions. Therefore, we developed the Yersinia toolbox to either analyze singular effector proteins of Yersinia spp. or different bacterial species in the context of bacterial T3SS injection into cells. Here, we focus on the WxxxE guanine exchange factor mimetic proteins IpgB1, IpgB2 and Map, which activate Rac1, RhoA or Cdc42, respectively, as well as the Rho GTPase inactivators YopE (a GTPase-activating mimetic protein) and YopT (cysteine protease), to generate a toolbox module for Rho GTPase manipulation.

  2. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-01-01

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. PMID:26039925

  3. A Phytophthora sojae cytoplasmic effector mediates disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meixiang; Ahmed Rajput, Nasir; Shen, Danyu; Sun, Peng; Zeng, Wentao; Liu, Tingli; Juma Mafurah, Joseph; Dou, Daolong

    2015-06-03

    Each oomycete pathogen encodes a large number of effectors. Some effectors can be used in crop disease resistance breeding, such as to accelerate R gene cloning and utilisation. Since cytoplasmic effectors may cause acute physiological changes in host cells at very low concentrations, we assume that some of these effectors can serve as functional genes for transgenic plants. Here, we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that express a Phytophthora sojae CRN (crinkling and necrosis) effector, PsCRN115. We showed that its expression did not significantly affect the growth and development of N. benthamiana, but significantly improved disease resistance and tolerance to salt and drought stresses. Furthermore, we found that expression of heat-shock-protein and cytochrome-P450 encoding genes were unregulated in PsCRN115-transgenic N. benthamiana based on digital gene expression profiling analyses, suggesting the increased plant defence may be achieved by upregulation of these stress-related genes in transgenic plants. Thus, PsCRN115 may be used to improve plant tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  4. A Secreted Effector Protein of Ustilago maydis Guides Maize Leaf Cells to Form Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Redkar, Amey; Hoser, Rafal; Schilling, Lena; Zechmann, Bernd; Krzymowska, Magdalena; Walbot, Virginia; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis infects all aerial organs of maize (Zea mays) and induces tumors in the plant tissues. U. maydis deploys many effector proteins to manipulate its host. Previously, deletion analysis demonstrated that several effectors have important functions in inducing tumor expansion specifically in maize leaves. Here, we present the functional characterization of the effector See1 (Seedling efficient effector1). See1 is required for the reactivation of plant DNA synthesis, which is crucial for tumor progression in leaf cells. By contrast, See1 does not affect tumor formation in immature tassel floral tissues, where maize cell proliferation occurs independent of fungal infection. See1 interacts with a maize homolog of SGT1 (Suppressor of G2 allele of skp1), a factor acting in cell cycle progression in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and an important component of plant and human innate immunity. See1 interferes with the MAPK-triggered phosphorylation of maize SGT1 at a monocot-specific phosphorylation site. We propose that See1 interferes with SGT1 activity, resulting in both modulation of immune responses and reactivation of DNA synthesis in leaf cells. This identifies See1 as a fungal effector that directly and specifically contributes to the formation of leaf tumors in maize. PMID:25888589

  5. Fluorescent reporter analysis revealed the timing and localization of AVR-Pia expression, an avirulence effector of Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Sornkom, Worawan; Miki, Shinsuke; Takeuchi, Saori; Abe, Ayumi; Asano, Kozo; Sone, Teruo

    2016-08-16

    In order to facilitate infection, the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae secretes an abundance of proteins, including avirulence effectors, to diminish its host's defences. Avirulence effectors are recognized by host resistance proteins and trigger the host's hypersensitive response, which is a rapid and effective form of innate plant immunity. An understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of such interactions is crucial for the development of strategies to control disease. However, the expression and secretion of certain effector proteins, such as AVR-Pia, have yet to be reported. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) revealed that AVR-Pia was only expressed during infection. Fluorescently labelled AVR-Pia indicated that AVR-Pia expression was induced during appressorial differentiation in the cells of both rice and onion, as well as in a penetration-deficient (Δpls1) mutant capable of developing melanized appressoria, but unable to penetrate host cells, suggesting that AVR-Pia expression is independent of fungal penetration. Using live-cell imaging, we also documented the co-localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled AVR-Pia and monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP)-labelled PWL2, which indicates that AVR-Pia accumulates in biotrophic interfacial complexes before being delivered to the plant cytosol. Together, these results suggest that AVR-Pia is a cytoplasmic effector that is expressed at the onset of appressorial differentiation and is translocated to the biotrophic interfacial complex, and then into the host's cytoplasm.

  6. Effector Polymorphisms of the Sunflower Downy Mildew Pathogen Plasmopara halstedii and Their Use to Identify Pathotypes from Field Isolates.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Quentin; Bordat, Amandine; Sallet, Erika; Pouilly, Nicolas; Carrere, Sébastien; Roux, Fabrice; Vincourt, Patrick; Godiard, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    The obligate biotroph oomycete Plasmopara halstedii causes downy mildew on sunflower crop, Helianthus annuus. The breakdown of several Pl resistance genes used in sunflower hybrids over the last 25 years came along with the appearance of new Pl. halstedii isolates showing modified virulence profiles. In oomycetes, two classes of effector proteins, key players of pathogen virulence, are translocated into the host: RXLR and CRN effectors. We identified 54 putative CRN or RXLR effector genes from transcriptomic data and analyzed their genetic diversity in seven Pl. halstedii pathotypes representative of the species variability. Pl. halstedii effector genes were on average more polymorphic at both the nucleic and protein levels than random non-effector genes, suggesting a potential adaptive dynamics of pathogen virulence over the last 25 years. Twenty-two KASP (Competitive Allele Specific PCR) markers designed on polymorphic effector genes were genotyped on 35 isolates belonging to 14 Pl. halstedii pathotypes. Polymorphism analysis based on eight KASP markers aims at proposing a determination key suitable to classify the eight multi-isolate pathotypes into six groups. This is the first report of a molecular marker set able to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes based on the polymorphism of pathogenicity effectors. Compared to phenotypic tests handling living spores used until now to discriminate Pl. halstedii pathotypes, this set of molecular markers constitutes a first step in faster pathotype diagnosis of Pl. halstedii isolates. Hence, emerging sunflower downy mildew isolates could be more rapidly characterized and thus, assessment of plant resistance breakdown under field conditions should be improved.

  7. Brucella Modulates Secretory Trafficking via Multiple Type IV Secretion Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Myeni, Sebenzile; Child, Robert; Ng, Tony W.; Kupko, John J.; Wehrly, Tara D.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Knodler, Leigh A.; Celli, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular pathogenic bacterium Brucella generates a replicative vacuole (rBCV) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum via subversion of the host cell secretory pathway. rBCV biogenesis requires the expression of the Type IV secretion system (T4SS) VirB, which is thought to translocate effector proteins that modulate membrane trafficking along the endocytic and secretory pathways. To date, only a few T4SS substrates have been identified, whose molecular functions remain unknown. Here, we used an in silico screen to identify putative T4SS effector candidate proteins using criteria such as limited homology in other bacterial genera, the presence of features similar to known VirB T4SS effectors, GC content and presence of eukaryotic-like motifs. Using β-lactamase and CyaA adenylate cyclase reporter assays, we identified eleven proteins translocated into host cells by Brucella, five in a VirB T4SS-dependent manner, namely BAB1_0678 (BspA), BAB1_0712 (BspB), BAB1_0847 (BspC), BAB1_1671 (BspE) and BAB1_1948 (BspF). A subset of the translocated proteins targeted secretory pathway compartments when ectopically expressed in HeLa cells, and the VirB effectors BspA, BspB and BspF inhibited protein secretion. Brucella infection also impaired host protein secretion in a process requiring BspA, BspB and BspF. Single or combined deletions of bspA, bspB and bspF affected Brucella ability to replicate in macrophages and persist in the liver of infected mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Brucella modulates secretory trafficking via multiple T4SS effector proteins that likely act coordinately to promote Brucella pathogenesis. PMID:23950720

  8. Dendritic cell targeting vaccine for HPV-associated cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Wenjie; Duluc, Dorothée; Joo, HyeMee; Oh, SangKon

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are major antigen presenting cells that can efficiently prime and activate cellular immune responses. Delivering antigens to in vivo DCs has thus been considered as a promising strategy that could allow us to mount T cell-mediated therapeutic immunity against cancers in patients. Successful development of such types of cancer vaccines that can target in vivo DCs, however, requires a series of outstanding questions that need to be addressed. These include the proper selection of which DC surface receptors, specific DC subsets and DC activators that can further enhance the efficacy of vaccines by promoting effector T cell infiltration and retention in tumors and their actions against tumors. Supplementing these areas of research with additional strategies that can counteract tumor immune evasion mechanisms is also expected to enhance the efficacy of such therapeutic vaccines against cancers. After more than a decade of study, we have concluded that antigen targeting to DCs via CD40 to evoke cellular responses is more efficient than targeting antigens to the same types of DCs via eleven other DC surface receptors tested. In recent work, we have further demonstrated that a prototype vaccine (anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7, a recombinant fusion protein of anti-human CD40 and HPV16.E6/7 protein) for HPV16-associated cancers can efficiently activate HPV16.E6/7-specific T cells, particularly CD8+ T cells, from the blood of HPV16+ head-and-neck cancer patients. Moreover, anti-CD40-HPV16.E6/7 plus poly(I:C) can mount potent therapeutic immunity against TC-1 tumor expressing HPV16.E6/7 protein in human CD40 transgenic mice. In this manuscript, we thus highlight our recent findings for the development of novel CD40 targeting immunotherapeutic vaccines for HPV16-associated malignancies. In addition, we further discuss several of key questions that still remain to be addressed for enhancing therapeutic immunity elicited by our prototype vaccine against HPV16

  9. SecretEPDB: a comprehensive web-based resource for secreted effector proteins of the bacterial types III, IV and VI secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    An, Yi; Wang, Jiawei; Li, Chen; Revote, Jerico; Zhang, Yang; Naderer, Thomas; Hayashida, Morihiro; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Webb, Geoffrey I.; Lithgow, Trevor; Song, Jiangning

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria translocate effector molecules to host cells through highly evolved secretion systems. By definition, the function of these effector proteins is to manipulate host cell biology and the sequence, structural and functional annotations of these effector proteins will provide a better understanding of how bacterial secretion systems promote bacterial survival and virulence. Here we developed a knowledgebase, termed SecretEPDB (Bacterial Secreted Effector Protein DataBase), for effector proteins of type III secretion system (T3SS), type IV secretion system (T4SS) and type VI secretion system (T6SS). SecretEPDB provides enriched annotations of the aforementioned three classes of effector proteins by manually extracting and integrating structural and functional information from currently available databases and the literature. The database is conservative and strictly curated to ensure that every effector protein entry is supported by experimental evidence that demonstrates it is secreted by a T3SS, T4SS or T6SS. The annotations of effector proteins documented in SecretEPDB are provided in terms of protein characteristics, protein function, protein secondary structure, Pfam domains, metabolic pathway and evolutionary details. It is our hope that this integrated knowledgebase will serve as a useful resource for biological investigation and the generation of new hypotheses for research efforts aimed at bacterial secretion systems. PMID:28112271

  10. Secreted Effectors Encoded within and outside of the Francisella Pathogenicity Island Promote Intramacrophage Growth.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Aria; Kim, Jungyun; Walls, Alexandra C; Ledvina, Hannah E; Miller, Cheryl N; Ramsey, Kathryn M; Whitney, John C; Radey, Matthew C; Peterson, S Brook; Ruhland, Brittany R; Tran, Bao Q; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R; Dove, Simon L; Celli, Jean; Veesler, David; Mougous, Joseph D

    2016-11-09

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Francisella tularensis causes tularemia, a zoonosis that can be fatal. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) encoded by the Francisella pathogenicity island (FPI) is critical for the virulence of this organism. Existing studies suggest that the complete repertoire of T6SS effectors delivered to host cells is encoded by the FPI. Using a proteome-wide approach, we discovered that the FPI-encoded T6SS exports at least three effectors encoded outside of the island. These proteins share features with virulence determinants of other pathogens, and we provide evidence that they can contribute to intramacrophage growth. The remaining proteins that we identified are encoded within the FPI. Two of these FPI-encoded proteins constitute effectors, whereas the others form a unique complex required for core function of the T6SS apparatus. The discovery of secreted effectors mediating interactions between Francisella and its host significantly advances our understanding of the pathogenesis of this organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular senescence and its effector programs

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Sadaie, Mahito; Hoare, Matthew; Narita, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response that accompanies stable exit from the cell cycle. Classically, senescence, particularly in human cells, involves the p53 and p16/Rb pathways, and often both of these tumor suppressor pathways need to be abrogated to bypass senescence. In parallel, a number of effector mechanisms of senescence have been identified and characterized. These studies suggest that senescence is a collective phenotype of these multiple effectors, and their intensity and combination can be different depending on triggers and cell types, conferring a complex and diverse nature to senescence. Series of studies on senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in particular have revealed various layers of functionality of senescent cells in vivo. Here we discuss some key features of senescence effectors and attempt to functionally link them when it is possible. PMID:24449267

  12. NOD-like receptor cooperativity in effector-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Griebel, Thomas; Maekawa, Takaki; Parker, Jane E

    2014-11-01

    Intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are basic elements of innate immunity in plants and animals. Whereas animal NLRs react to conserved microbe- or damage-associated molecular patterns, plant NLRs intercept the actions of diverse pathogen virulence factors (effectors). In this review, we discuss recent genetic and molecular evidence for functional NLR pairs, and discuss the significance of NLR self-association and heteromeric NLR assemblies in the triggering of downstream signaling pathways. We highlight the versatility and impact of cooperating NLR pairs that combine pathogen sensing with the initiation of defense signaling in both plant and animal immunity. We propose that different NLR receptor molecular configurations provide opportunities for fine-tuning resistance pathways and enhancing the host's pathogen recognition spectrum to keep pace with rapidly evolving microbial populations.

  13. Effector functions of pathogenic Yersinia species.

    PubMed

    Aepfelbacher, Martin; Trasak, Claudia; Ruckdeschel, Klaus

    2007-09-01

    Pathogenic species of the genus Yersinia suppress and reorient the immune system to infect lymphatic tissues, inner organs and at times also the vasculature. For this purpose yersiniae employ a type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins (Yersinia outer proteins; Yops) into immune cells. Yops often exert unique biochemical activities for modulating the activity of Rho GTP-binding proteins, focal adhesion proteins, inflammatory pathways and cell survival/apoptosis. In this review we will put emphasis on the biochemistry, cell- and infection biology of Yersinia effector Yops.

  14. Glycan-Based Cell Targeting To Modulate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Johannssen, Timo; Lepenies, Bernd

    2017-04-01

    Glycosylation is an integral post-translational modification present in more than half of all eukaryotic proteins. It affects key protein functions, including folding, stability, and immunogenicity. Glycoengineering approaches, such as the use of bacterial N-glycosylation systems, or expression systems, including yeasts, insect cells, and mammalian cells, have enabled access to defined and homogenous glycoproteins. Given that glycan structures on proteins can be recognized by host lectin receptors, they may facilitate cell-specific targeting and immune modulation. Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) expressed by antigen-presenting cells are attractive targets to shape immune responses. Multivalent glycan display on nanoparticles, liposomes, or dendrimers has successfully enabled CLR targeting. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to access defined glycan structures and highlight CLR targeting approaches for immune modulation.

  15. Interfering TAL effectors of Xanthomonas oryzae neutralize R-gene-mediated plant disease resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhiyuan; Ji, Chonghui; Liu, Bo; Zou, Lifang; Chen, Gongyou; Yang, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria of the genus Xanthomonas possess transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) that activate transcription of disease susceptibility genes in the host, inducing a state of disease. Here we report that some isolates of the rice pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae use truncated versions of TALEs (which we term interfering TALEs, or iTALEs) to overcome disease resistance. In comparison with typical TALEs, iTALEs lack a transcription activation domain but retain nuclear localization motifs and are expressed from genes that were previously considered pseudogenes. We show that the rice gene Xa1, encoding a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein, confers resistance against X. oryzae isolates by recognizing multiple TALEs. However, the iTALEs present in many isolates interfere with the otherwise broad-spectrum resistance conferred by Xa1. Our findings illustrate how bacterial effectors that trigger disease resistance in the host can evolve to interfere with the resistance process and, thus, promote disease. PMID:27811915

  16. BtpB, a novel Brucella TIR-containing effector protein with immune modulatory functions.

    PubMed

    Salcedo, Suzana P; Marchesini, María I; Degos, Clara; Terwagne, Matthieu; Von Bargen, Kristine; Lepidi, Hubert; Herrmann, Claudia K; Santos Lacerda, Thais L; Imbert, Paul R C; Pierre, Philippe; Alexopoulou, Lena; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Comerci, Diego J; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Several bacterial pathogens have TIR domain-containing proteins that contribute to their pathogenesis. We identified a second TIR-containing protein in Brucella spp. that we have designated BtpB. We show it is a potent inhibitor of TLR signaling, probably via MyD88. BtpB is a novel Brucella effector that is translocated into host cells and interferes with activation of dendritic cells. In vivo mouse studies revealed that BtpB is contributing to virulence and control of local inflammatory responses with relevance in the establishment of chronic brucellosis. Together, our results show that BtpB is a novel Brucella effector that plays a major role in the modulation of host innate immune response during infection.

  17. A translocator-specific export signal establishes the translocator-effector secretion hierarchy that is important for type III secretion system function.

    PubMed

    Tomalka, Amanda G; Stopford, Charles M; Lee, Pei-Chung; Rietsch, Arne

    2012-12-01

    Type III secretion systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to directly deliver effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. To accomplish this, bacteria secrete translocator proteins that form a pore in the host-cell membrane through which the effector proteins are then introduced into the host cell. Evidence from multiple systems indicates that the pore-forming translocator proteins are exported before effectors, but how this secretion hierarchy is established is unclear. Here we used the Pseudomonas aeruginosa translocator protein PopD as a model to identify its export signals. The N-terminal secretion signal and chaperone, PcrH, are required for export under all conditions. Two novel signals in PopD, one proximal to the chaperone binding site and one at the very C-terminus of the protein, are required for export of PopD before effector proteins. These novel export signals establish the translocator-effector secretion hierarchy, which in turn, is critical for the delivery of effectors into host cells. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. A translocator-specific export signal establishes the translocator-effector secretion hierarchy that is important for type III secretion system function

    PubMed Central

    Tomalka, Amanda G.; Stopford, Charles M.; Lee, Pei-Chung; Rietsch, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Summary Type III secretion systems are used by many Gram-negative pathogens to directly deliver effector proteins into the cytoplasm of host cells. To accomplish this, bacteria secrete translocator proteins that form a pore in the host-cell membrane through which the effector proteins are then introduced into the host cell. Evidence from multiple systems indicates that the pore-forming translocator proteins are exported before effectors, but how this secretion hierarchy is established is unclear. Here we used the P. aeruginosa translocator protein PopD as a model to identify its export signals. The amino-terminal secretion signal and chaperone, PcrH, are required for export under all conditions. Two novel signals in PopD, one proximal to the chaperone-binding site and one at the very C-terminus of the protein, are required for export of PopD before effector proteins. These novel export signals establish the translocator-effector secretion hierarchy, which in turn, is critical for the delivery of effectors into host cells. PMID:23121689

  19. Bacterial Effector Activates Jasmonate Signaling by Directly Targeting JAZ Transcriptional Repressors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shushu; Yao, Jian; Ma, Ka-Wai; Zhou, Huanbin; Song, Jikui; He, Sheng Yang; Ma, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacterial pathogens deliver a variety of virulence proteins through the type III secretion system (T3SS) directly into the host cytoplasm. These type III secreted effectors (T3SEs) play an essential role in bacterial infection, mainly by targeting host immunity. However, the molecular basis of their functionalities remains largely enigmatic. Here, we show that the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE HopZ1a, a member of the widely distributed YopJ effector family, directly interacts with jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ) proteins through the conserved Jas domain in plant hosts. JAZs are transcription repressors of jasmonate (JA)-responsive genes and major components of the jasmonate receptor complex. Upon interaction, JAZs can be acetylated by HopZ1a through a putative acetyltransferase activity. Importantly, P. syringae producing the wild-type, but not a catalytic mutant of HopZ1a, promotes the degradation of HopZ1-interacting JAZs and activates JA signaling during bacterial infection. Furthermore, HopZ1a could partially rescue the virulence defect of a P. syringae mutant that lacks the production of coronatine, a JA-mimicking phytotoxin produced by a few P. syringae strains. These results highlight a novel example by which a bacterial effector directly manipulates the core regulators of phytohormone signaling to facilitate infection. The targeting of JAZ repressors by both coronatine toxin and HopZ1 effector suggests that the JA receptor complex is potentially a major hub of host targets for bacterial pathogens. PMID:24204266

  20. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  1. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  2. Kinematic evaluation of end effector design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Gary W.

    1992-09-01

    The complex, many degree-of-freedom end effectors at the leading edge of technology would be unusable in the sea bottom research environment. Simpler designs are required to provide adequate reliability for subsea use. This work examines selection of end effector designs to achieve optimum grasping ability with minimal mechanical complexity. A new method of calculating grasp stability is developed, incorporating elements of previous works in the field. Programs are developed which evaluate the ability of different end effector configurations to grasp representative objects (a cube, sphere, and infinite cylinder). End effector designs considered had circular palms with fingers located at the periphery, oriented so that each pointed to the center of the palm. The program tested configurations of from 1 to 4 fingers and from 1 to 3 links per finger. Three sets of finger proportions were considered: equal length links, half length links, and anthropomorphic proportions. The 2 finger, 2 link per finger configuration was determined to be the optimum design, and the half length proportions were selected as the best set of proportions.

  3. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  4. Cellular effector mechanisms against Plasmodium liver stages.

    PubMed

    Frevert, Ute; Nardin, Elizabeth

    2008-10-01

    Advances in our understanding of the molecular and cell biology of the malaria parasite have led to new vaccine development efforts resulting in a pipeline of over 40 candidates undergoing clinical phase I-III trials. Vaccine-induced CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for pre-erythrocytic stage antigens have been found to express cytolytic and multi-cytokine effector functions that support a key role for these T cells within the hepatic environment. However, little is known of the cellular interactions that occur during the effector phase in which the intracellular hepatic stage of the parasite is targeted and destroyed. This review focuses on cell biological aspects of the interaction between malaria-specific effector cells and the various antigen-presenting cells that are known to exist within the liver, including hepatocytes, dendritic cells, Kupffer cells, stellate cells and sinusoidal endothelia. Considering the unique immune properties of the liver, it is conceivable that these different hepatic antigen-presenting cells fulfil distinct but complementary roles during the effector phase against Plasmodium liver stages.

  5. Minimal mimicry: mere effector matching induces preference.

    PubMed

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually performed. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants moved either their arms or legs, and watched avatars that moved either their arms or legs, respectively, without any instructions to mimic. The executed movements themselves and their pace were completely different between participants (fast circular movements) and targets (slow linear movements). Participants preferred avatars that moved the same body part as they did over avatars that moved a different body part. In Experiment 3, using human targets and differently paced movements, movement similarity was manipulated in addition to effector overlap (moving forward-backward or sideways with arms or legs, respectively). Only effector matching, but not movement matching, influenced preference ratings. These findings suggest that mere effector overlap is sufficient to trigger preference by mimicry.

  6. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  7. Coevolution between a family of parasite virulence effectors and a class of LINE-1 retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Soledad; Vigouroux, Marielle; Pedersen, Carsten; Skamnioti, Pari; Thordal-Christensen, Hans; Micali, Cristina; Brown, James K M; Ridout, Christopher J

    2009-10-15

    Parasites are able to evolve rapidly and overcome host defense mechanisms, but the molecular basis of this adaptation is poorly understood. Powdery mildew fungi (Erysiphales, Ascomycota) are obligate biotrophic parasites infecting nearly 10,000 plant genera. They obtain their nutrients from host plants through specialized feeding structures known as haustoria. We previously identified the AVR(k1) powdery mildew-specific gene family encoding effectors that contribute to the successful establishment of haustoria. Here, we report the extensive proliferation of the AVR(k1) gene family throughout the genome of B. graminis, with sequences diverging in formae speciales adapted to infect different hosts. Also, importantly, we have discovered that the effectors have coevolved with a particular family of LINE-1 retrotransposons, named TE1a. The coevolution of these two entities indicates a mutual benefit to the association, which could ultimately contribute to parasite adaptation and success. We propose that the association would benefit 1) the powdery mildew fungus, by providing a mechanism for amplifying and diversifying effectors and 2) the associated retrotransposons, by providing a basis for their maintenance through selection in the fungal genome.

  8. Aeromonas salmonicida Ati2 is an effector protein of the type three secretion system.

    PubMed

    Dallaire-Dufresne, Stéphanie; Barbeau, Xavier; Sarty, Darren; Tanaka, Katherine H; Denoncourt, Alix M; Lagüe, Patrick; Reith, Michael E; Charette, Steve J

    2013-09-01

    The bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida, a fish pathogen, uses the type three secretion system (TTSS) to inject effector proteins into host cells to promote the infection. The study of the genome of A. salmonicida has revealed the existence of Ati2, a potential TTSS effector protein. In the present study, a structure-function analysis of Ati2 has been done to determine its role in the virulence of A. salmonicida. Biochemical assays revealed that Ati2 is secreted into the medium in a TTSS-dependent manner. Protein sequence analyses, molecular modelling and biochemical assays demonstrated that Ati2 is an inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase, which hydrolyses PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 in a way similar to VPA0450, a protein from Vibrio parahaemolyticus having high sequence similarity with Ati2. Mutants of Ati2 with altered amino acids at two different locations in the catalytic site displayed no phosphatase activity. Wild-type and mutant forms of Ati2 were cloned into expression systems for Dictyostelium discoideum, a soil amoeba used as an alternative host to study A. salmonicida virulence. Expression tests allowed us to demonstrate that Ati2 is toxic for the host cell in a catalytic-dependent manner. Finally, this study demonstrated the existence of a new TTSS effector protein in A. salmonicida.

  9. Duplications and losses in gene families of rust pathogens highlight putative effectors

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Amanda L.; Smith, Katherine E.; Feau, Nicolas; Martin, Francis M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hamelin, Richard; Nelson, C. Dana; Burleigh, J. Gordon; Davis, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Rust fungi are a group of fungal pathogens that cause some of the world's most destructive diseases of trees and crops. A shared characteristic among rust fungi is obligate biotrophy, the inability to complete a lifecycle without a host. This dependence on a host species likely affects patterns of gene expansion, contraction, and innovation within rust pathogen genomes. The establishment of disease by biotrophic pathogens is reliant upon effector proteins that are encoded in the fungal genome and secreted from the pathogen into the host's cell apoplast or within the cells. This study uses a comparative genomic approach to elucidate putative effectors and determine their evolutionary histories. We used OrthoMCL to identify nearly 20,000 gene families in proteomes of 16 diverse fungal species, which include 15 basidiomycetes and one ascomycete. We inferred patterns of duplication and loss for each gene family and identified families with distinctive patterns of expansion/contraction associated with the evolution of rust fungal genomes. To recognize potential contributors for the unique features of rust pathogens, we identified families harboring secreted proteins that: (i) arose or expanded in rust pathogens relative to other fungi, or (ii) contracted or were lost in rust fungal genomes. While the origin of rust fungi appears to be associated with considerable gene loss, there are many gene duplications associated with each sampled rust fungal genome. We also highlight two putative effector gene families that have expanded in Cqf that we hypothesize have roles in pathogenicity. PMID:25018762

  10. Analysis of Globodera rostochiensis effectors reveals conserved functions of SPRYSEC proteins in suppressing and eliciting plant immune responses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCNs), including Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.), are important pests of potato. Plant parasitic nematodes produce multiple effector proteins, secreted from their stylets, to successfully infect their hosts. These include proteins that are delivered to the apoplast, as well as...

  11. Genes conferring sensitivity to stagonospora nodorum necrotrophic effectors in stagonospora nodorum blotch-susceptible U.S. wheat cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Stagonospora nodorum is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes Stagonospora nodorum blotch (SNB), a yield- and quality-reducing disease of wheat. S. nodorum produces a set of necrotrophic effectors (NEs) that interact with the products of host sensitivity genes to cause cell death and increased...

  12. SnTox3 Acts in Effector Triggered Susceptibility to Induce Disease on Wheat Carrying the Snn3 Gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The necrotrophic fungus Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple proteinaceous host-selective toxins (HSTs) which act as effectors of pathogenicity. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of the SnTox3-producing gene, designated SnTox3, as well as the initial characteriz...

  13. Mathematical analysis of cell-target encounter rates in three dimensions. Effect of chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Charnick, S B; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-05-01

    Efficient and rapid immune response upon challenge by an infectious agent is vital to host defense. The encounter of leukocytes (white blood cells of the immune system) with their targets is the first step in this response. Analysis of the kinetics of this process is essential not only to understanding dynamic behavior of the immune response, but also to elucidating the consequences of many leukocyte functional abnormalities. The motion of leukocytes in the presence of targets typically involves a directed, or chemotactic component. These immune cells orient the direction of their motion in the presence of gradients in chemical attractants generated by pathogens. Fisher and Lauffenburger (1987. Biophys. J. 51:705-716) developed a model for macrophage/bacterium encounter in two dimensions which includes chemotaxis, and applied it to the particular system of alveolar macrophages (phagocytic leukocytes on the lung surface). Their model showed that macrophage/target encounter is likely the rate-limiting step in clearance of bacteria from the lung surface (Fisher, E. S., D. A. Lauffenburger, and R. P. Daniele. 1988. Am. Rev. Resp. Dis. 137:1129-1134). We have extended this model to analyze the effects of cell motility properties and geometric parameters on cell-target encounter in three dimensions. The differential equation governing encounter time in three dimensions is essentially the same as that in two dimensions, except for changed probability values. Our results show that more highly directed motion is necessary in three dimensions to achieve substantially decreased encounter times than in two dimensions, because of the increased search dimensionality. These general results were applied to the particular system of neutrophils operating in three dimensions in response to a bacterial challenge in connective tissue. Our results provide a plausible rationalization for both the chemotactic and chemokinetic behavior observed in neutrophils. That is, these cells exhibit

  14. Functionally redundant RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans act at different steps to suppress early flg22-triggered immunity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzi; McLellan, Hazel; Fraiture, Malou; Liu, Xiaoyu; Boevink, Petra C; Gilroy, Eleanor M; Chen, Ying; Kandel, Kabindra; Sessa, Guido; Birch, Paul R J; Brunner, Frédéric

    2014-04-01

    Genome sequences of several economically important phytopathogenic oomycetes have revealed the presence of large families of so-called RXLR effectors. Functional screens have identified RXLR effector repertoires that either compromise or induce plant defense responses. However, limited information is available about the molecular mechanisms underlying the modes of action of these effectors in planta. The perception of highly conserved pathogen- or microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs), such as flg22, triggers converging signaling pathways recruiting MAP kinase cascades and inducing transcriptional re-programming, yielding a generic anti-microbial response. We used a highly synchronizable, pathogen-free protoplast-based assay to identify a set of RXLR effectors from Phytophthora infestans (PiRXLRs), the causal agent of potato and tomato light blight that manipulate early stages of flg22-triggered signaling. Of thirty-three tested PiRXLR effector candidates, eight, called Suppressor of early Flg22-induced Immune response (SFI), significantly suppressed flg22-dependent activation of a reporter gene under control of a typical MAMP-inducible promoter (pFRK1-Luc) in tomato protoplasts. We extended our analysis to Arabidopsis thaliana, a non-host plant species of P. infestans. From the aforementioned eight SFI effectors, three appeared to share similar functions in both Arabidopsis and tomato by suppressing transcriptional activation of flg22-induced marker genes downstream of post-translational MAP kinase activation. A further three effectors interfere with MAMP signaling at, or upstream of, the MAP kinase cascade in tomato, but not in Arabidopsis. Transient expression of the SFI effectors in Nicotiana benthamiana enhances susceptibility to P. infestans and, for the most potent effector, SFI1, nuclear localization is required for both suppression of MAMP signaling and virulence function. The present study provides a framework to decipher the molecular

  15. Metabolic effectors secreted by bacterial pathogens: essential facilitators of plastid endosymbiosis?

    PubMed

    Ball, Steven G; Subtil, Agathe; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Moustafa, Ahmed; Weber, Andreas P M; Gehre, Lena; Colleoni, Christophe; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Cenci, Ugo; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway.

  16. Metabolic Effectors Secreted by Bacterial Pathogens: Essential Facilitators of Plastid Endosymbiosis?[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Steven G.; Subtil, Agathe; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Moustafa, Ahmed; Weber, Andreas P.M.; Gehre, Lena; Colleoni, Christophe; Arias, Maria-Cecilia; Cenci, Ugo; Dauvillée, David

    2013-01-01

    Under the endosymbiont hypothesis, over a billion years ago a heterotrophic eukaryote entered into a symbiotic relationship with a cyanobacterium (the cyanobiont). This partnership culminated in the plastid that has spread to forms as diverse as plants and diatoms. However, why primary plastid acquisition has not been repeated multiple times remains unclear. Here, we report a possible answer to this question by showing that primary plastid endosymbiosis was likely to have been primed by the secretion in the host cytosol of effector proteins from intracellular Chlamydiales pathogens. We provide evidence suggesting that the cyanobiont might have rescued its afflicted host by feeding photosynthetic carbon into a chlamydia-controlled assimilation pathway. PMID:23371946

  17. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M. L.; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R.; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVRa gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVRa genes and identified AVRa1 and AVRa13, encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVRa1 and AVRa13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVRA1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVRA1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVRA1. Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation. PMID:27702901

  18. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M L; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-10-18

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVRa gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVRa genes and identified AVRa1 and AVRa13, encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVRa1 and AVRa13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVRA1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVRA1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVRA1 Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation.

  19. Salmonella - at home in the host cell.

    PubMed

    Malik-Kale, Preeti; Jolly, Carrie E; Lathrop, Stephanie; Winfree, Seth; Luterbach, Courtney; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica has developed an array of sophisticated tools to manipulate the host cell and establish an intracellular niche, for successful propagation as a facultative intracellular pathogen. While Salmonella exerts diverse effects on its host cell, only the cell biology of the classic "trigger"-mediated invasion process and the subsequent development of the Salmonella-containing vacuole have been investigated extensively. These processes are dependent on cohorts of effector proteins translocated into host cells by two type III secretion systems (T3SS), although T3SS-independent mechanisms of entry may be important for invasion of certain host cell types. Recent studies into the intracellular lifestyle of Salmonella have provided new insights into the mechanisms used by this pathogen to modulate its intracellular environment. Here we discuss current knowledge of Salmonella-host interactions including invasion and establishment of an intracellular niche within the host.

  20. The RAS-Effector Interface: Isoform-Specific Differences in the Effector Binding Regions

    PubMed Central

    Nakhaeizadeh, Hossein; Amin, Ehsan; Nakhaei-Rad, Saeideh; Dvorsky, Radovan; Ahmadian, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    RAS effectors specifically interact with the GTP-bound form of RAS in response to extracellular signals and link them to downstream signaling pathways. The molecular nature of effector interaction by RAS is well-studied but yet still incompletely understood in a comprehensive and systematic way. Here, structure-function relationships in the interaction between different RAS proteins and various effectors were investigated in detail by combining our in vitro data with in silico data. Equilibrium dissociation constants were determined for the binding of HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, RRAS1 and RRAS2 to both the RAS binding (RB) domain of CRAF and PI3Kα, and the RAS association (RA) domain of RASSF5, RALGDS and PLCε, respectively, using fluorescence polarization. An interaction matrix, constructed on the basis of available crystal structures, allowed identification of hotspots as critical determinants for RAS-effector interaction. New insights provided by this study are the dissection of the identified hotspots in five distinct regions (R1 to R5) in spite of high sequence variability not only between, but also within, RB/RA domain-containing effectors proteins. Finally, we propose that intermolecular β-sheet interaction in R1 is a central recognition region while R3 may determine specific contacts of RAS versus RRAS isoforms with effectors. PMID:27936046

  1. Phytophthora infestans effector AVRblb2 prevents secretion of a plant immune protease at the haustorial interface

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Tolga O.; Schornack, Sebastian; Win, Joe; Shindo, Takayuki; Ilyas, Muhammad; Oliva, Ricardo; Cano, Liliana M.; Jones, Alexandra M. E.; Huitema, Edgar; van der Hoorn, Renier A. L.; Kamoun, Sophien

    2011-01-01

    In response to pathogen attack, plant cells secrete antimicrobial molecules at the site of infection. However, how plant pathogens interfere with defense-related focal secretion remains poorly known. Here we show that the host-translocated RXLR-type effector protein AVRblb2 of the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans focally accumulates around haustoria, specialized infection structures that form inside plant cells, and promotes virulence by interfering with the execution of host defenses. AVRblb2 significantly enhances susceptibility of host plants to P. infestans by targeting the host papain-like cysteine protease C14 and specifically preventing its secretion into the apoplast. Plants altered in C14 expression were significantly affected in susceptibility to P. infestans in a manner consistent with a positive role of C14 in plant immunity. Our findings point to a unique counterdefense strategy that plant pathogens use to neutralize secreted host defense proteases. Effectors, such as AVRblb2, can be used as molecular probes to dissect focal immune responses at pathogen penetration sites. PMID:22143776

  2. Visualizing the Translocation and Localization of Bacterial Type III Effector Proteins by Using a Genetically Encoded Reporter System.

    PubMed

    Gawthorne, Jayde A; Audry, Laurent; McQuitty, Claire; Dean, Paul; Christie, John M; Enninga, Jost; Roe, Andrew J

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) effector proteins are critical determinants of infection for many animal and plant pathogens. However, monitoring of the translocation and delivery of these important virulence determinants has proved to be technically challenging. Here, we used a genetically engineered LOV (light-oxygen-voltage) sensing domain derivative to monitor the expression, translocation, and localization of bacterial T3SS effectors. We found the Escherichia coli O157:H7 bacterial effector fusion Tir-LOV was functional following its translocation and localized to the host cell membrane in discrete foci, demonstrating that LOV-based reporters can be used to visualize the effector translocation with minimal manipulation and interference. Further evidence for the versatility of the reporter was demonstrated by fusing LOV to the C terminus of the Shigella flexneri effector IpaB. IpaB-LOV localized preferentially at bacterial poles before translocation. We observed the rapid translocation of IpaB-LOV in a T3SS-dependent manner into host cells, where it localized at the bacterial entry site within membrane ruffles.

  3. Rafts can trigger contact-mediated secretion of bacterial effectors via a lipid-based mechanism.

    PubMed

    van der Goot, Françoise G; Tran van Nhieu, Guy; Allaoui, Abdelmounaaïm; Sansonetti, Phillipe; Lafont, Frank

    2004-11-12

    Infection by the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Shigella flexneri depends on its ability to invade host cells. Bacterial engulfment requires a functional type III secretion system (TTSS) allowing the translocation into host cells of bacterial effectors that activate cell-signaling cascades. We demonstrated previously that specialized lipid membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids (rafts) are involved during early steps of invasion, namely in binding and host cell entry. In this study, we addressed the issue of contact-mediated secretion by the TTSS. We show that contact-mediated and TTSS-induced hemolysis depend on the presence of cholesterol on the host cell surface. We found that purified detergent resistant membranes were able to activate TTSS. Finally, we found that artificial liposomes, devoid of proteins, were able to activate the TTSS but only when their composition mimicked that of lipid rafts. Altogether, these data indicate that specific lipid packing can trigger contact-mediated secretion by S. flexneri.

  4. Roadmap for future research on plant pathogen effectors.

    PubMed

    Alfano, James R

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial and eukaryotic plant pathogens deliver effector proteins into plant cells to promote pathogenesis. Bacterial pathogens containing type III protein secretion systems are known to inject many of these effectors into plant cells. More recently, oomycete pathogens have been shown to possess a large family of effectors containing the RXLR motif, and many effectors are also being discovered in fungal pathogens. Although effector activities are largely unknown, at least a subset suppress plant immunity. A plethora of new plant pathogen genomes that will soon be available thanks to next-generation sequencing technologies will allow the identification of many more effectors. This article summarizes the key approaches used to identify plant pathogen effectors, many of which will continue to be useful for future effector discovery. Thus, it can be viewed as a 'roadmap' for effector and effector target identification. Because effectors can be used as tools to elucidate components of innate immunity, advances in our understanding of effectors and their targets should lead to improvements in agriculture.

  5. Evolutionary selection of new breast cancer cell-targeting peptides and phages with the cell-targeting peptides fully displayed on the major coat and their effects on actin dynamics during cell internalization

    PubMed Central

    Abbineni, Gopal; Modali, Sita; Safiejko-Mroczka, Barbara; Petrenko, Valery A.; Mao, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    Filamentous phage as a bacteria-specific virus can be conjugated with an anti-cancer drug and has been proposed to serve as a carrier to deliver drugs to cancer cells for targeted therapy. However, how cell-targeting filamentous phage alone affects cancer cell biology is unclear. Phage libraries provide an inexhaustible reservoir of new ligands against tumor cells and tissues that have potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer treatment. Some of these identified ligands might stimulate various cell responses. Here we identified new cell internalizing peptides (and the phages with such peptides fused to each of ~3900 copies of their major coat protein) using landscape phage libraries and for the first time investigated the actin dynamics when selected phages are internalized into the SKBR-3 breast cancer cells. Our results show that phages harboring VSSTQDFP and DGSIPWST peptides could selectively internalize into the SKBR-3 breast cancer cells with high affinity, and also show rapid involvement of membrane ruffling and re-arrangements of actin cytoskeleton during the phage entry. The actin dynamics was studied by using live cell and fluorescence imaging. The cell-targeting phages were found to enter breast cancer cells through energy dependent mechanism and phage entry interferes with actin dynamics, resulting in reorganization of actin filaments and increased membrane rufflings in SKBR-3 cells. These results suggest that, when phage enters epithelial cells, it triggers transient changes in the host cell actin cytoskeleton. This study also shows that using multivalent phage libraries considerably increases the repertoire of available cell-internalizing ligands with potential applications in targeted drug delivery, imaging, molecular monitoring and profiling of breast cancer cells. PMID:20735141

  6. Pteromalus puparum venom impairs host cellular immune responses by decreasing expression of its scavenger receptor gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Although there is a rich literature on these systems, parasitoid immune-disabling mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Here we ...

  7. The Piriformospora indica effector PIIN_08944 promotes the mutualistic Sebacinalean symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Akum, Fidele N.; Steinbrenner, Jens; Biedenkopf, Dagmar; Imani, Jafargholi; Kogel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic and mutualistic microbes actively suppress plant defense by secreting effector proteins to manipulate the host responses for their own benefit. Current knowledge about fungal effectors has been mainly derived from biotrophic and hemibiotrophic plant pathogenic fungi and oomycetes with restricted host range. We studied colonization strategies of the root endophytic basidiomycete Piriformospora indica that colonizes a wide range of plant species thereby establishing long-term mutualistic relationships. The release of P. indica’s genome helped to identify hundreds of genes coding for candidate effectors and provides an opportunity to investigate the role of those proteins in a mutualistic symbiosis. We demonstrate that the candidate effector PIIN_08944 plays a crucial role during fungal colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots. PIIN_08944 expression was detected during chlamydospore germination, and fungal deletion mutants (PiΔ08944) showed delayed root colonization. Constitutive over-expression of PIIN_08944 in Arabidopsis rescued the delayed colonization phenotype of the deletion mutant. PIIN_08944-expressing Arabidopsis showed a reduced expression of flg22-induced marker genes of pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) and the salicylic acid (SA) defense pathway, and expression of PIIN_08944 in barley reduced the burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) triggered by flg22 and chitin. These data suggest that PIIN_08944 contributes to root colonization by P. indica by interfering with SA-mediated basal immune responses of the host plant. Consistent with this, PIIN_08944-expressing Arabidopsis also supported the growth of the biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis while growth of the necrotrophic fungi Botrytis cinerea on Arabidopsis and Fusarium graminearum on barley was not affected. PMID:26579156

  8. From pathogen genomes to host plant processes: the power of plant parasitic oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Pais, Marina; Win, Joe; Yoshida, Kentaro; Etherington, Graham J; Cano, Liliana M; Raffaele, Sylvain; Banfield, Mark J; Jones, Alex; Kamoun, Sophien; Saunders, Diane G O

    2013-06-28

    Recent pathogenomic research on plant parasitic oomycete effector function and plant host responses has resulted in major conceptual advances in plant pathology, which has been possible thanks to the availability of genome sequences.

  9. From pathogen genomes to host plant processes: the power of plant parasitic oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Recent pathogenomic research on plant parasitic oomycete effector function and plant host responses has resulted in major conceptual advances in plant pathology, which has been possible thanks to the availability of genome sequences. PMID:23809564

  10. The Type III Secretion Translocation Pore Senses Host Cell Contact

    PubMed Central

    Armentrout, Erin I.; Rietsch, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Type III secretion systems (T3SS) are nano-syringes used by a wide range of Gram-negative pathogens to promote infection by directly injecting effector proteins into targeted host cells. Translocation of effectors is triggered by host-cell contact and requires assembly of a pore in the host-cell plasma membrane, which consists of two translocator proteins. Our understanding of the translocation pore, how it is assembled in the host cell membrane and its precise role in effector translocation, is extremely limited. Here we use a genetic technique to identify protein-protein contacts between pore-forming translocator proteins, as well as the T3SS needle-tip, that are critical for translocon function. The data help establish the orientation of the translocator proteins in the host cell membrane. Analysis of translocon function in mutants that break these contacts demonstrates that an interaction between the pore-forming translocator PopD and the needle-tip is required for sensing host cell contact. Moreover, tethering PopD at a dimer interface also specifically prevents host-cell sensing, arguing that the translocation pore is actively involved in detecting host cell contact. The work presented here therefore establishes a signal transduction pathway for sensing host cell contact that is initiated by a conformational change in the translocation pore, and is subsequently transmitted to the base of the apparatus via a specific contact between the pore and the T3SS needle-tip. PMID:27022930

  11. Alternative Splicing of a Multi-Drug Transporter from Pseudoperonospora cubensis Generates an RXLR Effector Protein That Elicits a Rapid Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Savory, Elizabeth A.; Zou, Cheng; Adhikari, Bishwo N.; Hamilton, John P.; Buell, C. Robin; Shiu, Shin-Han; Day, Brad

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoperonospora cubensis, an obligate oomycete pathogen, is the causal agent of cucurbit downy mildew, a foliar disease of global economic importance. Similar to other oomycete plant pathogens, Ps. cubensis has a suite of RXLR and RXLR-like effector proteins, which likely function as virulence or avirulence determinants during the course of host infection. Using in silico analyses, we identified 271 candidate effector proteins within the Ps. cubensis genome with variable RXLR motifs. In extending this analysis, we present the functional characterization of one Ps. cubensis effector protein, RXLR protein 1 (PscRXLR1), and its closest Phytophthora infestans ortholog, PITG_17484, a member of the Drug/Metabolite Transporter (DMT) superfamily. To assess if such effector-non-effector pairs are common among oomycete plant pathogens, we examined the relationship(s) among putative ortholog pairs in Ps. cubensis and P. infestans. Of 271 predicted Ps. cubensis effector proteins, only 109 (41%) had a putative ortholog in P. infestans and evolutionary rate analysis of these orthologs shows that they are evolving significantly faster than most other genes. We found that PscRXLR1 was up-regulated during the early stages of infection of plants, and, moreover, that heterologous expression of PscRXLR1 in Nicotiana benthamiana elicits a rapid necrosis. More interestingly, we also demonstrate that PscRXLR1 arises as a product of alternative splicing, making this the first example of an alternative splicing event in plant pathogenic oomycetes transforming a non-effector gene to a functional effector protein. Taken together, these data suggest a role for PscRXLR1 in pathogenicity, and, in total, our data provide a basis for comparative analysis of candidate effector proteins and their non-effector orthologs as a means of understanding function and evolutionary history of pathogen effectors. PMID:22496844

  12. Natural effector T lymphocytes in normal mice.

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, P; Larsson, E L; Forni, L; Bandeira, A; Coutinho, A

    1985-01-01

    The "natural" T-cell activity in normal unimmunized mice was studied. By double-parameter fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis, it was found that 5-10% of all splenic Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ lymphocytes are large, of which more than half are in mitotic cycle. In contrast with small resting cells of the same phenotype, activated (large) T cells isolated from normal mice are functional effector cells: L3T4+ large cells induce normal B lymphocytes into proliferation and antibody secretion, while large Lyt-2+ cells efficiently suppress B-lymphocyte responses. No effector cell cytolytic activity could be detected among naturally activated T cells. The significance of these findings for the internal activity in the normal immune system is discussed. PMID:2933744

  13. Novel Control Effectors for Truss Braced Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Edward V.; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Joshi, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    At cruise flight conditions very high aspect ratio/low sweep truss braced wings (TBW) may be subject to design requirements that distinguish them from more highly swept cantilevered wings. High aspect ratio, short chord length and relative thinness of the airfoil sections all contribute to relatively low wing torsional stiffness. This may lead to aeroelastic issues such as aileron reversal and low flutter margins. In order to counteract these issues, high aspect ratio/low sweep wings may need to carry additional high speed control effectors to operate when outboard ailerons are in reversal and/or must carry additional structural weight to enhance torsional stiffness. The novel control effector evaluated in this study is a variable sweep raked wing tip with an aileron control surface. Forward sweep of the tip allows the aileron to align closely with the torsional axis of the wing and operate in a conventional fashion. Aft sweep of the tip creates a large moment arm from the aileron to the wing torsional axis greatly enhancing aileron reversal. The novelty comes from using this enhanced and controllable aileron reversal effect to provide roll control authority by acting as a servo tab and providing roll control through intentional twist of the wing. In this case the reduced torsional stiffness of the wing becomes an advantage to be exploited. The study results show that the novel control effector concept does provide roll control as described, but only for a restricted class of TBW aircraft configurations. For the configuration studied (long range, dual aisle, Mach 0.85 cruise) the novel control effector provides significant benefits including up to 12% reduction in fuel burn.

  14. Impact of end effector technology on telemanipulation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Szakaly, Z.; Ohm, T.

    1990-01-01

    Generic requirements for end effector design are briefly summarized as derived from generic functional and operational requirements. Included is a brief summary of terms and definitions related to end effector technology. The second part contains a brief overview of end effector technology work as JPL during the past ten years, with emphasis on the evolution of new mechanical, sensing and control capabilities of end effectors. The third and major part is devoted to the description of current end effector technology. The ongoing work addresses mechanical, sensing and control details with emphasis on mechanical ruggedness, increased resolution in sensing, and close electronic and control integration with overall telemanipulator control system.

  15. Intragenic Recombination Has a Critical Role on the Evolution of Legionella pneumophila Virulence-Related Effector sidJ

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Joana; Teixeira, Paulo Gonçalves; d'Avó, Ana Filipa; Júnior, Célio Santos; Veríssimo, António

    2014-01-01

    SidJ is a Dot/Icm effector involved in the trafficking or retention of ER-derived vesicles to Legionella pneumophila vacuoles whose mutation causes an observable growth defect, both in macrophage and amoeba hosts. Given the crucial role of this effector in L. pneumophila virulence we investigated the mechanisms shaping its molecular evolution. The alignment of SidJ sequences revealed several alleles with amino acid variations that may influence the protein properties. The identification of HGT events and the detection of balancing selection operating on sidJ evolution emerge as a clear result. Evidence suggests that intragenic recombination is an important strategy in the evolutionary adaptive process playing an active role on sidJ genetic plasticity. This pattern of evolution is in accordance with the life style of L. pneumophila as a broad host-range pathogen by preventing host-specialization and contributing to the resilience of the species. PMID:25299187

  16. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa type VI secretion phospholipase D effector targets both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Waterfield, Nicholas R; Yang, Jian; Yang, Guowei; Jin, Qi

    2014-05-14

    Widely found in animal and plant-associated proteobacteria, type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are potentially capable of facilitating diverse interactions with eukaryotes and/or other bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes three distinct T6SS haemolysin coregulated protein (Hcp) secretion islands (H1, H2, and H3-T6SS), each involved in different aspects of the bacterium's interaction with other organisms. Here we describe the characterization of a P. aeruginosa H3-T6SS-dependent phospholipase D effector, PldB, and its three tightly linked cognate immunity proteins. PldB targets the periplasm of prokaryotic cells and exerts an antibacterial activity. Surprisingly, PldB also facilitates intracellular invasion of host eukaryotic cells by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, revealing it to be a trans-kingdom effector. Our findings imply a potentially widespread T6SS-mediated mechanism, which deploys a single phospholipase effector to influence both prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic hosts.

  17. Phytophthora effector targets a novel component of small RNA pathway in plants to promote infection

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Yongli; Shi, Jinxia; Zhai, Yi; Hou, Yingnan; Ma, Wenbo

    2015-01-01

    A broad range of parasites rely on the functions of effector proteins to subvert host immune response and facilitate disease development. The notorious Phytophthora pathogens evolved effectors with RNA silencing suppression activity to promote infection in plant hosts. Here we report that the Phytophthora Suppressor of RNA Silencing 1 (PSR1) can bind to an evolutionarily conserved nuclear protein containing the aspartate–glutamate–alanine–histidine-box RNA helicase domain in plants. This protein, designated PSR1-Interacting Protein 1 (PINP1), regulates the accumulation of both microRNAs and endogenous small interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis. A null mutation of PINP1 causes embryonic lethality, and silencing of PINP1 leads to developmental defects and hypersusceptibility to Phytophthora infection. These phenotypes are reminiscent of transgenic plants expressing PSR1, supporting PINP1 as a direct virulence target of PSR1. We further demonstrate that the localization of the Dicer-like 1 protein complex is impaired in the nucleus of PINP1-silenced or PSR1-expressing cells, indicating that PINP1 may facilitate small RNA processing by affecting the assembly of dicing complexes. A similar function of PINP1 homologous genes in development and immunity was also observed in Nicotiana benthamiana. These findings highlight PINP1 as a previously unidentified component of RNA silencing that regulates distinct classes of small RNAs in plants. Importantly, Phytophthora has evolved effectors to target PINP1 in order to promote infection. PMID:25902521

  18. Secretion Systems Used by Bacteria to Subvert Host Functions.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Chiara; Fronzes, Rémi

    2017-09-06

    In this review we examine the use of secretion systems by bacteria to subvert host functions. Bacteria have evolved multiple systems to interact with and overcome their eukaryotic host and other prokaryotes. Secretion systems are required for the release of several effectors through the bacterial membrane(s) into the extracellular space or directly into the cytoplasm of the host. We review the secretion systems of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and describe briefly the structural composition of the seven secretion systems that have been associated with increased virulence through subversion of host functions. Some of the effects of such systems on eukaryotic host processes have been studied extensively. We also describe the best-characterized effectors of each secretion system to give an overview of the molecular mechanisms employed by bacteria to hide from the immune system and convert eukaryotic cells into optimal ecological niches for their replication.

  19. Expression Profiling during Arabidopsis/Downy Mildew Interaction Reveals a Highly-Expressed Effector That Attenuates Responses to Salicylic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Shuta; Caillaud, Marie-Cécile; Furzer, Oliver J.; Ishaque, Naveed; Wirthmueller, Lennart; Fabro, Georgina; Shirasu, Ken; Jones, Jonathan D. G.

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved strong innate immunity mechanisms, but successful pathogens evade or suppress plant immunity via effectors delivered into the plant cell. Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew on Arabidopsis thaliana, and a genome sequence is available for isolate Emoy2. Here, we exploit the availability of genome sequences for Hpa and Arabidopsis to measure gene-expression changes in both Hpa and Arabidopsis simultaneously during infection. Using a high-throughput cDNA tag sequencing method, we reveal expression patterns of Hpa predicted effectors and Arabidopsis genes in compatible and incompatible interactions, and promoter elements associated with Hpa genes expressed during infection. By resequencing Hpa isolate Waco9, we found it evades Arabidopsis resistance gene RPP1 through deletion of the cognate recognized effector ATR1. Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes including PR1 were activated not only at early time points in the incompatible interaction but also at late time points in the compatible interaction. By histochemical analysis, we found that Hpa suppresses SA-inducible PR1 expression, specifically in the haustoriated cells into which host-translocated effectors are delivered, but not in non-haustoriated adjacent cells. Finally, we found a highly-expressed Hpa effector candidate that suppresses responsiveness to SA. As this approach can be easily applied to host-pathogen interactions for which both host and pathogen genome sequences are available, this work opens the door towards transcriptome studies in infection biology that should help unravel pathogen infection strategies and the mechanisms by which host defense responses are overcome. PMID:25329884

  20. A resistance locus in the American heirloom rice variety Carolina Gold Select is triggered by TAL effectors with diverse predicted targets and is effective against African strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzicola

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Lindsay R.; Cohen, Stephen P.; Heffelfinger, Christopher; Schmidt, Clarice L.; Huerta, Alejandra; Tekete, Cheick; Verdier, Valerie; Bogdanove, Adam J.; Leach, Jan E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The rice pathogens Xanthomonas oryzae pathovar (pv.) oryzae and pv. oryzicola produce numerous transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors that increase bacterial virulence by activating expression of host susceptibility genes. Rice resistance mechanisms against TAL effectors include polymorphisms that prevent effector binding to susceptibility gene promoters, or that allow effector activation of resistance genes. This study identifies, in the heirloom variety Carolina Gold Select, a third mechanism of rice resistance involving TAL effectors. This resistance manifests through strong suppression of disease development in response to diverse TAL effectors from both X. oryzae pathovars. The resistance can be triggered by an effector with only 3.5 central repeats, is independent of the composition of the repeat variable diresidues that determine TAL effector binding specificity, and is independent of the transcriptional activation domain. We determined that the resistance is conferred by a single dominant locus, designated Xo1, that maps to a 1.09 Mbp fragment on chromosome 4. The Xo1 interval also confers complete resistance to the strains in the African clade of X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, representing the first dominant resistance locus against bacterial leaf streak in rice. The strong phenotypic similarity between the TAL effector triggered resistance conferred by Xo1 and that conferred by the tomato resistance gene Bs4 suggests that monocots and dicots share an ancient or convergently evolved mechanism to recognize analogous TAL effector epitopes. PMID:27197779

  1. A type III effector antagonises death receptor signalling during bacterial gut infection

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jaclyn S; Giogha, Cristina; Ong, Sze Ying; Kennedy, Catherine L; Kelly, Michelle; Robinson, Keith S; Wong, Tania; Mansell, Ashley; Riedmaier, Patrice; Oates, Clare VL; Zaid, Ali; Mühlen, Sabrina; Crepin, Valerie F; Marches, Olivier; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas A; O’Reilly, Lorraine A; Bankovacki, Aleksandra; Nachbur, Ueli; Infusini, Giuseppe; Webb, Andrew I; Silke, John; Strasser, Andreas; Frankel, Gad; Hartland, Elizabeth L

    2013-01-01

    Successful infection by enteric bacterial pathogens depends on the ability of the bacteria to colonise the gut, replicate in host tissues and disseminate to other hosts. Pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and enteropathogenic and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EPEC and EHEC), utilise a type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver virulence effector proteins into host cells during infection that promote colonisation and interfere with antimicrobial host responses 1-3. Here we report that the T3SS effector NleB1 from EPEC binds to host cell death domain containing proteins and thereby inhibits death receptor signalling. Protein interaction studies identified FADD, TRADD and RIPK1 as binding partners of NleB1. NleB1 expressed ectopically or injected by the bacterial T3SS prevented Fas ligand or TNF-induced formation of the canonical death inducing signalling complex (DISC) and proteolytic activation of caspase-8, an essential step in death receptor induced apoptosis. This inhibition depended on the N-GlcNAc transferase activity of NleB1, which specifically modified Arg117 in the death domain of FADD. The importance of the death receptor apoptotic pathway to host defence was demonstrated using mice deficient in the FAS signalling pathway, which showed delayed clearance of the EPEC-like mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium and reversion to virulence of an nleB mutant. The activity of NleB suggests that EPEC and other attaching and effacing (A/E) pathogens antagonise death receptor induced apoptosis of infected cells, thereby blocking a major antimicrobial host response. PMID:24025841

  2. The Salmonella