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Sample records for host cytokine response

  1. Cytokines in the host response to mycotic agents.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J W; Wu-Hsieh, B A; Singer-Vermes, L M; Ferrante, A; Moser, S; Russo, M; Vaz, C A; Burger, E; Calich, V L; Kowanko, I C

    1994-01-01

    In summary, different approaches have been taken to understand cytokine responses to different fungal infections. Singer-Vermes and co-investigators indirectly examined cytokine responses to paracoccidioidomycosis by studying the types of cellular and humoral immune responses that were induced in resistant and susceptible mouse strains. Their results implicated Th1 cell responses in the resistant mouse strain and Th2 cell responses in the mouse strain susceptible to paracoccidioidomycosis. By measuring cytokine production and through cytokine depletion experiments, Wu-Hsieh showed that besides IFN gamma, TNF alpha was important in host defences against the intracellular pathogen, H. capsulatum. Both cytokines play important roles in the regulation of other cytokines. In histoplasmosis, the dynamics of the complex interactions amongst cytokines govern the efficiency of host clearance of the fungus from tissues. Ferrante and collaborators, examining TNF alpha and TNF alpha receptors on neutrophils presented data showing that TNF alpha plays an important role in the activation of neutrophils for anti-Candida activity. Through the detection of cytokine mRNAs with RT-PCR, Moser and co-workers found that cytokine mRNAs of macrophage origin were produced preferentially in the lungs of mice infected with Histoplasma or Blastomyces. A great challenge still lies ahead of us. It is well understood that the interactions of cytokines are extremely complex at the levels of the induction and expression of the immune responses as well as on effects on natural cellular defences. Work accomplished thus far has laid the ground work for future studies in the effort to dissect host cytokine responses and to understand the roles of cytokines in protection against fungal infections.

  2. Host and Environmental Factors Influencing Individual Human Cytokine Responses.

    PubMed

    Ter Horst, Rob; Jaeger, Martin; Smeekens, Sanne P; Oosting, Marije; Swertz, Morris A; Li, Yang; Kumar, Vinod; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Jansen, Anne F M; Lemmers, Heidi; Toenhake-Dijkstra, Helga; van Herwaarden, Antonius E; Janssen, Matthijs; van der Molen, Renate G; Joosten, Irma; Sweep, Fred C G J; Smit, Johannes W; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Koenders, Mieke M J F; Xavier, Ramnik J; van der Meer, Jos W M; Dinarello, Charles A; Pavelka, Norman; Wijmenga, Cisca; Notebaart, Richard A; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G

    2016-11-03

    Differences in susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases are determined by variability in immune responses. In three studies within the Human Functional Genomics Project, we assessed the effect of environmental and non-genetic host factors of the genetic make-up of the host and of the intestinal microbiome on the cytokine responses in humans. We analyzed the association of these factors with circulating mediators and with six cytokines after stimulation with 19 bacterial, fungal, viral, and non-microbial metabolic stimuli in 534 healthy subjects. In this first study, we show a strong impact of non-genetic host factors (e.g., age and gender) on cytokine production and circulating mediators. Additionally, annual seasonality is found to be an important environmental factor influencing cytokine production. Alpha-1-antitrypsin concentrations partially mediate the seasonality of cytokine responses, whereas the effect of vitamin D levels is limited. The complete dataset has been made publicly available as a comprehensive resource for future studies. PAPERCLIP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses

    PubMed Central

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn; Li, Jian; Wu, Jian; Qi, Yanwei; Eastman, Richard T.; Zilversmit, Martine; Nair, Sethu C.; Huaman, Maria Cecilia; Quinones, Mariam; Jiang, Hongying; Li, Na; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Kaneko, Osamu; Long, Carole A.; Su, Xin-zhuan

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CC) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12, and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosome 7 and 13 had significant (p < 0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5, and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (p = 0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection. PMID:24452266

  4. Plasmodium genetic loci linked to host cytokine and chemokine responses.

    PubMed

    Pattaradilokrat, S; Li, J; Wu, J; Qi, Y; Eastman, R T; Zilversmit, M; Nair, S C; Huaman, M C; Quinones, M; Jiang, H; Li, N; Zhu, J; Zhao, K; Kaneko, O; Long, C A; Su, X-z

    2014-01-01

    Both host and parasite factors contribute to disease severity of malaria infection; however, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the disease and the host-parasite interactions involved remain largely unresolved. To investigate the effects of parasite factors on host immune responses and pathogenesis, we measured levels of plasma cytokines/chemokines (CCs) and growth rates in mice infected with two Plasmodium yoelii strains having different virulence phenotypes and in progeny from a genetic cross of the two parasites. Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis linked levels of many CCs, particularly IL-1β, IP-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and MIG, and early parasite growth rate to loci on multiple parasite chromosomes, including chromosomes 7, 9, 10, 12 and 13. Comparison of the genome sequences spanning the mapped loci revealed various candidate genes. The loci on chromosomes 7 and 13 had significant (P<0.005) additive effects on IL-1β, IL-5 and IP-10 responses, and the chromosome 9 and 12 loci had significant (P=0.017) interaction. Infection of knockout mice showed critical roles of MCP-1 and IL-10 in parasitemia control and host mortality. These results provide important information for a better understanding of malaria pathogenesis and can be used to examine the role of these factors in human malaria infection.

  5. Review: nomenclature and biologic significance of cytokines involved in inflammation and the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Liles, W C; Van Voorhis, W C

    1995-12-01

    This is a brief review of 42 cytokines and interleukins that are involved inflammatory and immune responses. The cytokines are listed in tables organized as hematopoietic growth factors, interferons, lymphokines, monokines, chemokines, and other cytokines. Information on each cytokine includes the most commonly used abbreviations, the former or alternative names and abbreviations of the cytokines, the cells that form the major sources of production of the cytokines, the major biologic actions of the cytokines, and references to recent reviews or primary literature. Minor biologic actions and minor cellular sources of the cytokines may not be listed. This review should be useful as a quick reference guide to the cytokines and interleukins.

  6. Tunicate cytokine-like molecules and their involvement in host defense responses.

    PubMed

    Raftos, D; Nair, S

    2004-01-01

    Tunicates (ascidians or sea squirts) are a large group of invertebrate chordates that are closely related to vertebrates. Their critical phylogenetic position has stimulated substantial interest in their host defense ("immune") responses. Whilst this interest has generated a wealth of knowledge regarding the humoral and cellular mechanisms that undertake defensive responses, there is less known about the regulation of those reactions. This chapter focuses on three cellular responses (cell proliferation, phagocytosis and chemotaxis) that are known to be regulated by cytophilic humoral molecules. Some of the humoral factors that affect these responses have functional and physicochemical similarities to vertebrate cytokines, like interleukin-1. However, the only regulatory molecules that have been characterized at a molecular level bear far greater similarity to C-type lectins or complement components.

  7. Involvement of the Cytokine MIF in the Snail Host Immune Response to the Parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Baeza Garcia, Alvaro; Pierce, Raymond J.; Gourbal, Benjamin; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Colinet, Dominique; Reichhart, Jean-Marc; Dissous, Colette; Coustau, Christine

    2010-01-01

    We have identified and characterized a Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) family member in the Lophotrochozoan invertebrate, Biomphalaria glabrata, the snail intermediate host of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. In mammals, MIF is a widely expressed pleiotropic cytokine with potent pro-inflammatory properties that controls cell functions such as gene expression, proliferation or apoptosis. Here we show that the MIF protein from B. glabrata (BgMIF) is expressed in circulating immune defense cells (hemocytes) of the snail as well as in the B. glabrata embryonic (Bge) cell line that has hemocyte-like features. Recombinant BgMIF (rBgMIF) induced cell proliferation and inhibited NO-dependent p53-mediated apoptosis in Bge cells. Moreover, knock-down of BgMIF expression in Bge cells interfered with the in vitro encapsulation of S. mansoni sporocysts. Furthermore, the in vivo knock-down of BgMIF prevented the changes in circulating hemocyte populations that occur in response to an infection by S. mansoni miracidia and led to a significant increase in the parasite burden of the snails. These results provide the first functional evidence that a MIF ortholog is involved in an invertebrate immune response towards a parasitic infection and highlight the importance of cytokines in invertebrate-parasite interactions. PMID:20886098

  8. Host Cytokine Production, Lymphoproliferation, and Antibody Responses during the Course of Ancylostoma ceylanicum Infection in the Golden Syrian Hamster

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Susana; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Wu, Wenhui; Hotez, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    The Syrian Golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) has been used to model infections with the hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum. New molecular immunological reagents to measure cellular immune responses in hamsters were developed and used to determine the impact of A. ceylanicum hookworm infection on host cytokine responses and lymphoproliferation. Initial larval infection with 100 third-stage A. ceylanicum larvae resulted in predominant Th1 responses (upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines) that lasted for the duration of larval migration and continued up to 14 days postinfection (prepatency). Subsequently, development of larvae into egg-laying adult hookworms (patency) coincided with a switch to Th2 predominant responses (interleukin-4 [IL-4]) as well as a marked increase in IL-10 production. This switch also concurred with reduced host lymphoproliferative responses to hookworm antigens. The findings demonstrate a similarity in immune responses between hamsters and humans infected with hookworms, suggesting that hamsters will be a useful animal model species for examining host immunity to human hookworm infections. PMID:15908367

  9. Resistance to liver fluke infection in the natural sheep host is correlated with a type-1 cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Pleasance, J; Wiedosari, E; Raadsma, H W; Meeusen, E; Piedrafita, D

    2011-09-01

    Indonesian thin-tail (ITT) sheep can resist infection with Fasciola gigantica but not F. hepatica and presents an ideal model to investigate the mechanisms of liver fluke resistance in a natural host. This study examines the local and systemic immune responses of sheep during Fasciola infection and demonstrates that different anatomical tissues display distinct cytokine profiles consistent with liver fluke migration. The study also reveals a significant difference in the cytokine and antibody profiles of ITT sheep infected with F. gigantica compared with F. hepatica, with a higher ratio of IL-4/IFN-γ mRNA expression and specific IgG1/IgG2 antibodies strongly correlating with pathology. Interestingly, the significant type-1 cytokine profile occurred in the lymph node closest to the site of infection at a time when the effective immune response against F. gigantica liver flukes is thought to occur. When the same F. gigantica infection in the resistant ITT sheep was compared with the susceptible Merino breed, the resistant type-1 phenotype against liver fluke infection was only observed in the ITT sheep. These studies provide the first evidence to suggest that the induction of an early type-1 immune response in this natural sheep host may be responsible for the ability to resist liver fluke infection. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. The phenolic glycolipid of Mycobacterium tuberculosis differentially modulates the early host cytokine response but does not in itself confer hypervirulence.

    PubMed

    Sinsimer, Daniel; Huet, Gaelle; Manca, Claudia; Tsenova, Liana; Koo, Mi-Sun; Kurepina, Natalia; Kana, Bavesh; Mathema, Barun; Marras, Salvatore A E; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2008-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a diversity of potential virulence factors including complex branched lipids such as the phenolic glycolipid PGL-tb. PGL-tb expression by the clinical M. tuberculosis isolate HN878 has been associated with a less efficient Th1 response and increased virulence in mice and rabbits. It has been suggested that the W-Beijing family is the only group of M. tuberculosis strains with an intact pks1-15 gene, required for the synthesis of PGL-tb and capable of producing PGL-tb. We have found that some strains with an intact pks1-15 do not produce PGL-tb while others may produce a variant of PGL-tb. We examined the early host cytokine response to infection with these strains in vitro to better understand the effect of PGL-tb synthesis on immune responses. In addition, we generated a PGL-tb-producing H37Rv in order to determine the effect of PGL-tb production on the host immune response during infection by a strain normally devoid of PGL-tb synthesis. We observed that PGL-tb production by clinical M. tuberculosis isolates affected cytokine production differently depending on the background of the strain. Importantly, while ectopic PGL-tb production by H37Rv suppressed the induction of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in vitro in human monocytes, it did not lead to increased virulence in infected mice and rabbits. Collectively, our data indicate that, while PGL-tb may play a role in the immunogenicity and/or virulence of M. tuberculosis, it probably acts in concert with other bacterial factors which seem to be dependent on the background of the strain.

  11. The frustrated host response to Legionella pneumophila is bypassed by MyD88-dependent translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Asrat, Seblewongel; Dugan, Aisling S; Isberg, Ralph R

    2014-07-01

    Many pathogens, particularly those that require their host for survival, have devised mechanisms to subvert the host immune response in order to survive and replicate intracellularly. Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, promotes intracellular growth by translocating proteins into its host cytosol through its type IV protein secretion machinery. At least 5 of the bacterial translocated effectors interfere with the function of host cell elongation factors, blocking translation and causing the induction of a unique host cell transcriptional profile. In addition, L. pneumophila also interferes with translation initiation, by preventing cap-dependent translation in host cells. We demonstrate here that protein translation inhibition by L. pneumophila leads to a frustrated host MAP kinase response, where genes involved in the pathway are transcribed but fail to be translated due to the bacterium-induced protein synthesis inhibition. Surprisingly, few pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1α and IL-1β, bypass this inhibition and get synthesized in the presence of Legionella effectors. We show that the selective synthesis of these genes requires MyD88 signaling and takes place in both infected cells that harbor bacteria and neighboring bystander cells. Our findings offer a perspective of how host cells are able to cope with pathogen-encoded activities that disrupt normal cellular process and initiate a successful inflammatory response.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPE32 promotes cytokines production and host cell apoptosis through caspase cascade accompanying with enhanced ER stress response

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jie; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection, remains a grave global public health burden which claims the lives around two to three million annually. PE and PPE proteins, featured by the Pro-Glu (PE) or Pro-Pro-Glu (PPE) motifs at the conserved N-terminal domain, are abundant in the MTB genome. PPE32 can increase intracellular survival of mycobacteria through abnormally increase in cytokines production. PPE32 might subvert the macrophage immune response and thwart its bactericidal effect. THP-1 macrophages treated with PPE32 or infected with Mycobacterium smegmatis (MS) expression PPE32 showed increase of cytokines production and multiple hallmarks of apoptosis. We found that PPE32 significantly increases the expression of IL-12p40 and IL-32 through ERK1/2 signaling pathway. In addition, the cell viability of macrophage was inhibited after PPE32 stimulation. We noted that PPE32 induces cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-9, while inhibition of caspase activity significantly abrogates the PPE32-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, PPE32 treatment promotes endoplasmic reticulum stress related gene expression, suggesting ER stress might be responsible for PPE32-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27634911

  13. Differential IFN-γ and TNF-α driven cytokine response distinguishes acute infection of a metatherian host with Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Shannon L; Phalen, David N; McAllan, Bronwyn M; O'Meally, Denis; McAllister, Milton M; Ellis, John; Šlapeta, Jan

    2017-03-27

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum (both Apicomplexa) are closely related cyst-forming coccidian parasites that differ significantly in their host range and ability to cause disease. Unlike eutherian mammals, Australian marsupials (metatherian mammals) have long been thought to be highly susceptible to toxoplasmosis and neosporosis because of their historical isolation from the parasites. In this study, the carnivorous fat-tailed dunnart (Sminthopsis crassicaudata) was used as a disease model to investigate the immune response and susceptibility to infection of an Australian marsupial to T. gondii and N. caninum Disease outcome was more severe in N. caninum infected dunnarts than in T. gondii infected dunnarts, as shown by the severity of clinical and histopathological features of disease and a higher tissue parasite burden in the tissues evaluated. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) of spleens from infected dunnarts and mitogen-stimulated dunnart splenocytes was used to define the cytokine repertoire. Changes in mRNA expression during the time course of infection was measured using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) for key Th1 (IFNγ, TNFα), Th2 (IL-4, IL-6), and Th17 (IL-17A) cytokines. The results show qualitative differences in cytokine responses by the fat-tailed dunnart to infection with N. caninum and T. gondii Dunnarts infected with T. gondii were capable of mounting a more effective Th1 immune response than those infected with N. caninum, indicating the role of the immune response in the outcome scenarios of parasite infection in this marsupial mammal.

  14. Cytokines in Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Henden, Andrea S; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2015-05-15

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation whereby transplanted naive and marrow-derived T cells damage recipient tissue through similar mechanisms to those that allow destruction of malignant cells, the therapeutic intent of bone marrow transplantation. The manifestations and severity of GVHD are highly variable and are influenced by the proportions of naive cells maturing along regulatory T cell, Th1, Th2, or Th17 phenotypes. This maturation is largely influenced by local cytokines, which, in turn, activate transcription factors and drive development toward a dominant phenotype. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines exert direct effects on GVHD target tissues. Our knowledge of the role that cytokines play in orchestrating GVHD is expanding rapidly and parallels other infective and inflammatory conditions in which a predominant T cell signature is causative of pathology. Because a broad spectrum of cytokine therapies is now routinely used in clinical practice, they are increasingly relevant to transplant medicine. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Host Cytokine Responses of Pigeons Infected with Highly Pathogenic Thai Avian Influenza Viruses of Subtype H5N1 Isolated from Wild Birds

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Chaichoune, Kridsada; Patchimasiri, Tuangthong; Chakritbudsabong, Warunya; Prayoonwong, Natanan; Chaisilp, Natnapat; Wiriyarat, Witthawat; Parchariyanon, Sujira; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Uchida, Yuko; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of the H5N1 subtype has been reported to infect pigeons asymptomatically or induce mild symptoms. However, host immune responses of pigeons inoculated with HPAIVs have not been well documented. To assess host responses of pigeons against HPAIV infection, we compared lethality, viral distribution and mRNA expression of immune related genes of pigeons infected with two HPAIVs (A/Pigeon/Thailand/VSMU-7-NPT/2004; Pigeon04 and A/Tree sparrow/Ratchaburi/VSMU-16-RBR/2005; T.sparrow05) isolated from wild birds in Thailand. The survival experiment showed that 25% of pigeons died within 2 weeks after the inoculation of two HPAIVs or medium only, suggesting that these viruses did not cause lethal infection in pigeons. Pigeon04 replicated in the lungs more efficiently than T.sparrow05 and spread to multiple extrapulmonary organs such as the brain, spleen, liver, kidney and rectum on days 2, 5 and 9 post infection. No severe lesion was observed in the lungs infected with Pigeon04 as well as T.sparrow05 throughout the collection periods. Encephalitis was occasionally observed in Pigeon04- or T.sparrow05-infected brain, the severity, however was mostly mild. To analyze the expression of immune-related genes in the infected pigeons, we established a quantitative real-time PCR analysis for 14 genes of pigeons. On day 2 post infection, Pigeon04 induced mRNA expression of Mx1, PKR and OAS to a greater extent than T.sparrow05 in the lungs, however their expressions were not up-regulated concomitantly on day 5 post infection when the peak viral replication was observed. Expressions of TLR3, IFNα, IL6, IL8 and CCL5 in the lungs following infection with the two HPAIVs were low. In sum, Pigeon04 exhibited efficient replication in the lungs compared to T.sparrow05, but did not induce excessive host cytokine expressions. Our study has provided the first insight into host immune responses of pigeons against HPAIV infection. PMID:21826229

  16. Role of Host Cytokine Responses in the Pathogenesis of Avian H5N1 Influenza Viruses in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Szretter, Kristy J.; Gangappa, Shivaprakash; Lu, Xuihua; Smith, Chalanda; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Zaki, Sherif R.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2007-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza viruses are now widespread in poultry in Asia and have recently spread to some African and European countries. Interspecies transmission of these viruses to humans poses a major threat to public health. To better understand the basis of pathogenesis of H5N1 viruses, we have investigated the role of proinflammatory cytokines in transgenic mice deficient in interleukin-6 (IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), IL-1 receptor (IL-1R), or tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) by the use of two avian influenza A viruses isolated from humans, A/Hong Kong/483/97 (HK/483) and A/Hong Kong/486/97 (HK/486), which exhibit high and low lethality in mice, respectively. The course of disease and the extent of virus replication and spread in IL-6- and MIP-1α-deficient mice were not different from those observed in wild-type mice during acute infection with 1,000 50% mouse infective doses of either H5N1 virus. However, with HK/486 virus, IL-1R-deficient mice exhibited heightened morbidity and mortality due to infection, whereas no such differences were observed with the more virulent HK/483 virus. Furthermore, TNFR1-deficient mice exhibited significantly reduced morbidity following challenge with either H5N1 virus but no difference in viral replication and spread or ultimate disease outcome compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that TNF-α may contribute to morbidity during H5N1 influenza virus infection, while IL-1 may be important for effective virus clearance in nonlethal H5N1 disease. PMID:17182684

  17. An IkappaB homolog encoded by African swine fever virus provides a novel mechanism for downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine responses in host macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Powell, P P; Dixon, L K; Parkhouse, R M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines stimulate inflammatory defenses against viral infections. In order to evade host defenses, viruses have developed strategies to counteract antiviral cytokines. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large, double-stranded DNA virus that infects macrophages. This study demonstrates that ASFV effectively inhibited phorbol myristic acid-induced synthesis of antiviral, proinflammatory cytokines alpha interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-8 in infected macrophages as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase PCR. In contrast, levels of mRNA and protein for transforming growth factor beta, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, were increased by ASFV infection, suggesting that ASFV-induced inhibition of cytokine synthesis may be limited to cytokines activated by NFkappaB. An interleukin-8 promoter, containing an NFkappaB enhancer site, driving expression of a luciferase reporter gene was used to show that NFkappaB-dependent transcription was inhibited by the virus and by a cloned ASFV gene, A238L. This gene encodes a protein with homology to IkappaB, the inhibitor of NFkappaB. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that cells expressing the A238L gene inhibited NFkappaB binding to DNA. These results suggest that the A238L gene product interacts with NFkappaB to prevent transcription and downregulate proinflammatory cytokine production. This novel viral evasion strategy encoded in a single IkappaB-like protein may be capable of inhibiting most macrophage NFkappaB-dependent antiviral mechanisms and may provide insights into how ASFV causes a fatal hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and a persistent infection in the African warthog, which is its natural permissive host. PMID:8970976

  18. An IkappaB homolog encoded by African swine fever virus provides a novel mechanism for downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine responses in host macrophages.

    PubMed

    Powell, P P; Dixon, L K; Parkhouse, R M

    1996-12-01

    Cytokines stimulate inflammatory defenses against viral infections. In order to evade host defenses, viruses have developed strategies to counteract antiviral cytokines. African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large, double-stranded DNA virus that infects macrophages. This study demonstrates that ASFV effectively inhibited phorbol myristic acid-induced synthesis of antiviral, proinflammatory cytokines alpha interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-8 in infected macrophages as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcriptase PCR. In contrast, levels of mRNA and protein for transforming growth factor beta, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, were increased by ASFV infection, suggesting that ASFV-induced inhibition of cytokine synthesis may be limited to cytokines activated by NFkappaB. An interleukin-8 promoter, containing an NFkappaB enhancer site, driving expression of a luciferase reporter gene was used to show that NFkappaB-dependent transcription was inhibited by the virus and by a cloned ASFV gene, A238L. This gene encodes a protein with homology to IkappaB, the inhibitor of NFkappaB. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that cells expressing the A238L gene inhibited NFkappaB binding to DNA. These results suggest that the A238L gene product interacts with NFkappaB to prevent transcription and downregulate proinflammatory cytokine production. This novel viral evasion strategy encoded in a single IkappaB-like protein may be capable of inhibiting most macrophage NFkappaB-dependent antiviral mechanisms and may provide insights into how ASFV causes a fatal hemorrhagic disease of domestic pigs and a persistent infection in the African warthog, which is its natural permissive host.

  19. Cytokines in Radiobiological Responses: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Schaue, Dörthe; Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; McBride, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines function in many roles that are highly relevant to radiation research. This review focuses on how cytokines are structurally organized, how they are induced by radiation, and how they orchestrate mesenchymal, epithelial and immune cell interactions in irradiated tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are the major components of immediate early gene programs and as such can be rapidly activated after tissue irradiation. They converge with the effects of ionizing radiation in that both generate free radicals including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). “Self” molecules secreted or released from cells after irradiation feed the same paradigm by signaling for ROS and cytokine production. As a result, multilayered feedback control circuits can be generated that perpetuate the radiation tissue damage response. The pro-inflammatory phase persists until such times as perceived challenges to host integrity are eliminated. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory cytokines then act to restore homeostasis. The balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory forces may shift to and fro for a long time after radiation exposure, creating waves as the host tries to deal with persisting pathogenesis. Individual cytokines function within socially interconnected groups to direct these integrated cellular responses. They hunt in packs and form complex cytokine networks that are nested within each other so as to form mutually reinforcing or antagonistic forces. This yin-yang balance appears to have redox as a fulcrum. Because of their social organization, cytokines appear to have a considerable degree of redundancy and it follows that an elevated level of a specific cytokine in a disease situation or after irradiation does not necessarily implicate it causally in pathogenesis. In spite of this, “driver” cytokines are emerging in pathogenic situations that can clearly be targeted for therapeutic benefit, including in radiation settings. Cytokines can greatly

  20. Lack of a Role of Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 Toxin from Escherichia coli in Bacterial Pathogenicity and Host Cytokine Response in Infected Germfree Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Fournout, S.; Dozois, C. M.; Odin, M.; Desautels, C.; Pérès, S.; Hérault, F.; Daigle, F.; Segafredo, C.; Laffitte, J.; Oswald, E.; Fairbrother, J. M.; Oswald, I. P.

    2000-01-01

    the CNF1-producing strain, M623, is pathogenic and induces inflammatory cytokine expression in germfree, colostrum-deprived piglets. Nevertheless, in this model, the CNF1 toxin does not appear to be a major factor for pathogenicity or cytokine response, as demonstrated by the use of an isogenic cnf1 mutant. PMID:10639454

  1. Cytokines and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Van der Meide, P H; Schellekens, H

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines participate in many physiological processes including the regulation of immune and inflammatory responses. These effector molecules are produced transiently and locally controlling the amplitude and duration of the response. A variety of experiments has shown that excessive or insufficient production may significantly contribute to the pathophysiology of a range of diseases. Particularly cytokines released by CD4+ T cells at the onset of an immune response are thought to be decisive for pathological or physiological consequences. The meeting in Budapest was focussed on cytokines known to contribute to the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases and allograft rejection (e.g., IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-alpha, -beta, -gamma). A central role for IFN-gamma in autoimmunity was suggested by blocking experiments in vivo using monoclonal antibodies and soluble forms of the IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma SR). These agents ameliorated disease development in a variety of experimental autoimmune diseases in rodents. In a mouse model for the human disease Myasthenia gravis, IFN-alpha was found to reduce both the incidence and progression of the disease. Treatment of R. aurantiacus-infected mice with anti-IL-4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was reported to interfere with the regression of granulomas in spleen and liver, most likely through inadequate IL-4-mediated suppression of IFN-gamma production. In addition, it was shown that mice with disrupted IFN-gamma R genes died rapidly after infection with the BCG strain of M. bovis, whereas normal mice survived the infection. IL-12 was found to be the main inductor of IFN-gamma during the lethal Shwartzman reaction. TNF-alpha was identified as the principal cause of mortality after the second injection with LPS. In a variety of studies examining the role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of AIDS, much attention was given to the in vitro effects of HIV-1 and/or the HIV-1 viral membrane

  2. Kinetic and organ-specific patterns of cytokine expression in acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, K S; Allen, R D; Roths, J B; Sidman, C L

    1995-04-01

    Although many cytokines have been previously implicated in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), no study to date has comprehensively evaluated their expression over time or in different tissues affected by GVHD. Using a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR technique and a murine model of acute GVHD, we have evaluated the expression levels of mRNA for a wide range of cytokines in spleen, gut and liver tissues at weekly intervals after bone marrow transfer. The earliest cytokine responses seen were increases in IL-2, IL-10, IFN-gamma, MIP-1 alpha and TNF-alpha in the spleen, suggesting a primarily Th1 pathway. Other cytokines (IL-1 alpha, IL-10 and MIP-1 alpha) were persistently elevated in GVHD mice, but were variable depending on the tissue. These data demonstrate that a wide range of cytokines are involved in the GVHD response and that their kinetic pattern of expression is different in various affected tissues.

  3. The micronutrient zinc inhibits EAEC strain 042 adherence, biofilm formation, virulence gene expression, and epithelial cytokine responses benefiting the infected host

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Pedro; Bolick, David T; Roche, James K; Noronha, Francisco; Pinheiro, Caio; Kolling, Glynis L; Lima, Aldo; Guerrant, Richard L

    2013-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) is a major pathogen worldwide, associated with diarrheal disease in both children and adults, suggesting the need for new preventive and therapeutic treatments. We investigated the role of the micronutrient zinc in the pathogenesis of an E. coli strain associated with human disease. A variety of bacterial characteristics—growth in vitro, biofilm formation, adherence to IEC-6 epithelial cells, gene expression of putative EAEC virulence factors as well as EAEC-induced cytokine expression by HCT-8 cells—were quantified. At concentrations (≤ 0.05 mM) that did not alter EAEC growth (strain 042) but that are physiologic in serum, zinc markedly decreased the organism’s ability to form biofilm (P < 0.001), adhere to IEC-6 epithelial cells (P < 0.01), and express putative EAEC virulence factors (aggR, aap, aatA, virK) (P < 0.03). After exposure of the organism to zinc, the effect on virulence factor generation was prolonged (>3 h). Further, EAEC-induced IL-8 mRNA and protein secretion by HCT-8 epithelial cells were significantly reduced by 0.05 mM zinc (P < 0.03). Using an in vivo murine model of diet-induced zinc-deficiency, oral zinc supplementation (0.4 µg/mouse daily) administered after EAEC challenge (1010 CFU/mouse) significantly abrogated growth shortfalls (by >90%; P < 0.01); furthermore, stool shedding was reduced (days 9–11) but tissue burden of organisms in the intestine was unchanged. These findings suggest several potential mechanisms whereby physiological levels of zinc alter pathogenetic events in the bacterium (reducing biofilm formation, adherence to epithelium, virulence factor expression) as well as the bacterium’s effect on the epithelium (cytokine response to exposure to EAEC) to alter EAEC pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo. These effects may help explain and extend the benefits of zinc in childhood diarrhea and malnutrition. PMID:23958904

  4. MprAB Regulates the espA Operon in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Modulates ESX-1 Function and Host Cytokine Response

    PubMed Central

    Samten, Buka; Cao, Guangxiang; Wang, Xisheng; Tvinnereim, Amy R.; Chen, Xiu-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The ESX-1 secretion system exports the immunomodulatory protein ESAT-6 and other proteins important in the pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Components and substrates of ESX-1 are encoded at several loci, but the regulation of the encoding genes is only partially understood. In this study, we investigated the role of the MprAB two-component system in the regulation of ESX-1 activity. We determined that MprAB directly regulates the espA gene cluster, a locus necessary for ESX-1 function. Transcript mapping determined that the five genes in the cluster form an operon with two transcriptional start points, and several MprA binding sites were detected in the espA promoter. Expression analyses and promoter constructs indicated that MprAB represses the espA operon. However, the MprAB mutant Rv-D981 secreted lower levels of EspA, ESAT-6, and the ESX-1 substrate EspB than control strains. Secretion of CFP10, which is normally cosecreted with ESAT-6, was similar in Rv-D981 and control strains, further demonstrating aberrant ESX-1 activity in the mutant. ESAT-6 induces proinflammatory cytokines, and macrophages infected with Rv-D981 elicited lower levels of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), consistent with the reduced levels of ESAT-6. These findings indicate that MprAB modulates ESX-1 function and reveal a new role for MprAB in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:23104803

  5. Basophils, cytokines, and the allergic inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    DuBuske, L M

    1996-01-01

    Immediate allergic response has long been recognized to be related to the activation of mast cells by antigen. The role of the mast cells as producers of cytokines, however, has only more recently been extensively studied. The effect of TH2 lymphocytes in the inflammatory process is now well recognized in animal models. The central role of cytokines in the allergic inflammatory response is currently an area of intense clinical investigation. Cytokines influence production, migration, and activation of basophils. A wide array of cytokines is produced by mast cells upon initiation of the immediate allergic response. These cytokines influence a number of other different cells including basophils and eosinophils, and also activate lymphocytes, thus perpetuating allergic inflammation.

  6. Cytokines and Immune Responses in Murine Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Pascal J H; Lutgens, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the vessel wall characterized by activation of the innate immune system, with macrophages as the main players, as well as the adaptive immune system, characterized by a Th1-dominant immune response. Cytokines play a major role in the initiation and regulation of inflammation. In recent years, many studies have investigated the role of these molecules in experimental models of atherosclerosis. While some cytokines such as TNF or IFNγ clearly had atherogenic effects, others such as IL-10 were found to be atheroprotective. However, studies investigating the different cytokines in experimental atherosclerosis revealed that the cytokine system is complex with both disease stage-dependent and site-specific effects. In this review, we strive to provide an overview of the main cytokines involved in atherosclerosis and to shed light on their individual role during atherogenesis.

  7. Compartmentalized Cytokine Responses in Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Savva, Athina; Kersten, Brigit; Pistiki, Aikaterini; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Netea, Mihai G.; van der Meer, Jos W.; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Favorable treatment outcomes with TNF blockade led us to explore cytokine responses in hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Methods Blood monocytes of 120 patients and 24 healthy volunteers were subtyped by flow cytometry. Isolated blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated for cytokine production; this was repeated in 13 severe patients during treatment with etanercept. Cytokines in pus were measured. Results CD14brightCD16dim inflammatory monocytes and patrolling monocytes were increased in Hurley III patients. Cytokine production by stimulated PBMCs was low compared to controls but the cytokine gene copies did not differ, indicating post-translational inhibition. The low production of IL-17 was restored, when cells were incubated with adalimumab. In pus, high concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines were detected. Based on the patterns, six different cytokine profiles were discerned, which are potentially relevant for the choice of treatment. Clinical improvement with etanercept was predicted by increased production of IL-1β and IL-17 by PBMCs at week 8. Conclusions Findings indicate compartmentalized cytokine expression in HS; high in pus but suppressed in PBMCs. This is modulated through blockade of TNF. PMID:26091259

  8. Cytokines induce selective granulocyte chemotactic responses.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Erger, R A; Casale, T B

    1996-02-01

    Neutrophils, eosinophils and cytokines are important in allergic airway inflammatory responses. However, it is unclear how cytokines selectively influence neutrophils versus eosinophils to migrate to an inflammatory site. The cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-5, IL-8, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), are released subsequent to allergic reactions and affect both neutrophil and eosinophil functions. We studied whether these cytokines differed in capacity to induce human neutrophil versus eosinophil migration through naked filters and human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and human pulmonary type II-like epithelial (A549) cell monolayers grown on filters. Dose-response experiments using all barriers were performed for each granulocyte and cytokine. TGF-beta1 did not induce granulocyte migration. IL-5 induced eosinophil migration only through naked filters. IL-1alpha stimulated neutrophil migration through cellular barriers, but not through naked filters. TNF-alpha and GM-CSF induced neutrophil and eosinophil migration through filters, but only neutrophil migration through cellular monolayers. Only IL-8 induced significant neutrophil and eosinophil migration; however, there were clear-cut differences between the neutrophilotactic and eosinophilotactic responses through all barriers employed. Thus, our data show that these cytokines induce distinct chemotactic responses for neutrophils versus eosinophils. Moreover, by using relevant cellular barriers versus naked filters, our data better examines the capability of these cytokines to induce selective granulocyte migration to an inflammatory site in lung diseases such as asthma.

  9. A Trematode Parasite Derived Growth Factor Binds and Exerts Influences on Host Immune Functions via Host Cytokine Receptor Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Azad A.; Zolnierczyk, Katarzyna; Japa, Ornampai; Owen, Jonathan P.; Maddison, Ben C.; Hodgkinson, Jane E.; Gough, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    effector response targeting juvenile parasites which we demonstrate extends to an abrogation of the ADCC response. Thus suggesting that FhTLM is a stage specific evasion molecule that utilises host cytokine receptors. These findings are the first to clearly demonstrate the interaction of a helminth cytokine with a host receptor complex resulting in immune modifications that facilitate the non-protective chronic immune response which is characteristic of F. hepatica infection. PMID:27806135

  10. Host Intracellular Signaling Events and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Production in African Trypanosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kuriakose, Shiby M.; Singh, Rani; Uzonna, Jude E.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, possess specific molecules or proteins that are recognized by several host innate immune receptors, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling molecules and pathways. The magnitude and quality of these events significantly affect the outcome of infection. African trypanosomes, including Trypanosoma congolense, are capable of manipulating the host immune response, including the activity of macrophages, which are the key immune cells that contribute to the immunopathogenesis of African trypanosomiasis. Although it is known that immune hyperactivation and excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production are the hallmarks of African trypanosomiasis, the mechanisms through which these events are triggered are poorly defined. However, it is known that macrophages may play a significant role in these processes, because phagocytosis of trypanosomes by macrophages initiates intracellular signal transduction cascades that lead to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and alteration in cell function. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of the innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and transcription factors involved in T. congolense-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. It will reveal the existence of complex signaling events through which the parasite modulates the host immune response, thus identifying novel targets that could aid in designing strategies to effectively control the disease. PMID:27242788

  11. Early cytokine responses during intestinal parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, N; Goyal, P K; Mahida, Y R; Li, K F; Wakelin, D

    1998-01-01

    Infections with gastro-intestinal nematodes elicit immune and inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines released from T-helper type-2 (Th2) cells. In vitro assays of cells from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of experimentally infected rodents confirm that, after about 1 week, the dominant cytokine responses to mitogens and antigens are those associated with this Th-cell subset. Polarization of the Th response in this way implies an initial local cytokine environment that favours Th2 development. However, experimental infections with Trichinella spiralis and Nippostrongylus brasiliensis show that, within 2 days of worms reaching the intestine, MLN cells (MLNC) respond with a Th1 rather than a Th2 response [i.e. there is an increase in mRNA for the type 1 cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and mitogen-stimulated MLNC release IFN-gamma rather than interleukin-5 (IL-5)]. Antigen stimulation at this time does not elicit IFN-gamma release and the MLNC cannot adoptively transfer immunity. Within a few days the MLNC phenotype changes. There is a Th2 response (IL-5 release) to both mitogen and antigen stimulation and MLNC can adoptively transfer immunity. Early release of IFN-gamma is T-cell dependent, with CD4+ T cells playing the major role. The data are discussed in relation to factors regulating the mucosal response to invasion by parasites. PMID:9616376

  12. Mnk Kinases in Cytokine Signaling and Regulation of Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sonali; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2013-01-01

    The kinases Mnk1 and Mnk2 are activated downstream of the p38 MAPK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways. Extensive work over the years has shown that these kinases control phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) and regulate engagement of other effector elements, including hnRNPA1 and PSF. Mnk kinases are ubiquitously expressed and play critical roles in signaling for various cytokine receptors, while there is emerging evidence that they have important functions as mediators of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. In this review the mechanisms of activation of MNK pathways by cytokine receptors are addressed and their roles in diverse cytokine-dependent biological processes are reviewed. The clinical-translational implications of such work and the relevance of future development of specific MNK inhibitors for the treatment of malignancies and auto-immune disorders are discussed. PMID:23710261

  13. The interleukin-17 cytokine family: critical players in host defence and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rajita; Ramirez-Carrozzi, Vladimir; Sambandam, Arivazhagan

    2011-01-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines, IL-17A to IL-17F, are emerging as critical players in host defence responses and inflammatory diseases. Substantial data support the role of these proteins in innate and adaptive immunity. Of these family members, IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-17E have been the best studied. Both IL-17A and IL-17F contribute to the host response to extracellular bacteria and fungi, and IL-17E has been shown to play a role in parasitic infections. In addition, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies link these proteins to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and a number of therapeutic programmes targeting these family members are in clinical development. This review will highlight the cellular sources, receptors/target cells, and role in inflammation of these and the less-characterized family members, IL-17B, IL-17C and IL-17D. PMID:21726218

  14. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  15. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  16. Monitoring host responses to the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, Joshua S; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Elias, Joshua E

    2015-09-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) ecosystem is increasingly understood to be a fundamental component of health, and has been identified as a new focal point for diagnosing, correcting and preventing countless disorders. Shotgun DNA sequencing has emerged as the dominant technology for determining the genetic and microbial composition of the gut microbiota. This technology has linked microbiota dysbioses to numerous GI diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and allergy, and to non-GI diseases like autism and depression. The importance of establishing causality in the deterioration of the host-microbiota relationship is well appreciated; however, discovery of candidate molecules and pathways that underlie mechanisms remains a major challenge. Targeted approaches, transcriptional assays, cytokine panels and imaging analyses, applied to animals, have yielded important insight into host responses to the microbiota. However, non-invasive, hypothesis-independent means of measuring host responses in humans are necessary to keep pace with similarly unbiased sequencing efforts that monitor microbes. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has served this purpose in many other fields, but stool proteins exist in such diversity and dynamic range as to overwhelm conventional proteomics technologies. Focused analysis of host protein secretion into the gut lumen and monitoring proteome-level dynamics in stool provides a tractable route toward non-invasively evaluating dietary, microbial, surgical or pharmacological intervention efficacies. This review is intended to guide GI biologists and clinicians through the methods currently used to elucidate host responses in the gut, with a specific focus on mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics applied to the study of host protein dynamics within the GI ecosystem.

  17. The Role of Cytokine PF4 in the Antiviral Immune Response of Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yulei; Cao, Jiao; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    During viral infection in vertebrates, cytokines play important roles in the host defense against the virus. However, the function of cytokines in invertebrates has not been well characterized. In this study, shrimp cytokines involved in viral infection were screened using a cytokine antibody microarray. The results showed that three cytokines, the Fas receptor (Fas), platelet factor 4 (PF4) and interleukin-22 (IL-22), were significantly upregulated in the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-challenged shrimp, suggesting that these cytokines played positive regulatory roles in the immune response of shrimp against the virus. Further experiments revealed that PF4 had positive effects on the antiviral immunity of shrimp by enhancing the shrimp phagocytic activity and inhibiting the apoptotic activity of virus-infected hemocytes. Therefore, our study presented a novel mechanism of cytokines in the innate immunity of invertebrates. PMID:27631372

  18. [Cytokines in bone diseases. What is cytokine?].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yousuke; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2010-10-01

    Cytokines have an essential role for cell-cell communication. They can regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and function. Interaction of cell surface receptor with cytokines is necessary for control of physiological responses. Activation of cytokine receptors transduces specific signal in the receptor-expressing cells, resulting that cytokines can regulate specific cell population. Thus, cytokines contribute directly or indirectly to morphogenesis, host defense and immune response, play critical roles for homeostasis and development.

  19. Distinct cytokine pattern in response to different bacterial pathogens in human brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anamika; Prasad, Kashi Nath; Mishra, Priyanka; Singh, Aloukick Kumar; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Ojha, Bal Krishan

    2014-08-15

    Brain abscess is a focal suppurative process. Host inflammatory response in Gram type and specific bacteria has not been studied in brain abscess. A total of 57 brain abscess patients with monomicrobial infections were studied for Th1 (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL1-β), Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) and Th17 (IL-17, IL-23) cytokine response by reverse-transcriptase PCR and ELISA. Th1 and Th17 cytokines were significantly elevated in Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus intermedius) and Th2 cytokine (IL-10) in Gram negative (Bacteroides fragilis and Escherichia coli) infections (p<0.05). Cytokine levels were significantly higher in abscess than blood (p<0.001). Elevated levels of several inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL1-β, IL-17 and IL-23) were associated with the duration of symptoms; predisposing factors also influenced the levels of several cytokines. The expression of inflammatory cytokines in abscess was influenced by the bacterial pathogen, duration of symptoms and predisposing factors. Local milieu of brain plays significant role in secretion of various cytokines. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of cervicovaginal cytokine response to incident Chlamydia trachomatis infection among a prospective cohort of young women

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Loris Y.; Scott, Mark E.; Ma, Yifei; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Problem Animal, in vitro, and ex vivo studies have identified several cytokines involved in host immunity to genital Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection. However, in vivo cytokine responses are not well-described. Our objectives were to document cervicovaginal cytokine levels and intra-woman cytokine changes during incident CT in a prospective cohort. Methods From our prospective cohort, 62 women had incident CT, comprising a CT negative visit followed by a CT positive visit. At these visits, cytokine protein levels (IL-6, IL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, MIP-1α, RANTES, IFN-γ) were measured using cervicovaginal lavages and the MILLIPLEX™/Luminex® multiplex assay. Quartiles were defined for each cytokine from all 124 visits. Results At the group-level, RANTES was higher (p<0.01) at the CT positive visit than at baseline, but the other cytokines did not significantly differ. For intra-woman cytokine changes, women with a cytokine level that increased at least one quartile higher (going from baseline to the CT positive visit) ranged between 26–53%. Women with a cytokine level staying in the same quartile ranged between 32–48%. Women with a cytokine level that decreased at least one quartile lower ranged between 15–37%. Conclusions Intra-woman cervicovaginal cytokine changes during incident CT appear heterogeneous and may reflect differences in natural host immunity. PMID:25989718

  1. Host response, obesity, and oral health

    PubMed Central

    Słotwiński, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proper food choices are part of preventing or reducing the risk of dental caries and periodontal disease. A significant association has been proven between oral diseases and the incidence of systemic diseases. Obesity, just like smoking, is one of the major risk factors for oral disease and is a serious social problem that has reached epidemic proportions in many developed countries. The results of studies on periodontitis confirm the relationship between the values of body mass index (BMI) and the prevalence of periodontal diseases. Adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ and it performs many important functions in the body, such as thermal isolation and protection, storage, and secretion. Many cytokines are secreted proportionally to the amount of fat present and are actively involved in the metabolism of the whole system, including the functioning of the immune system. Therefore, obesity may alter the response of the host to the antigens derived from bacterial plaque, and thus cause disturbances in the inflammatory response in the course of periodontal disease. PMID:26557035

  2. Role of inflammatory cytokines in the response of solid cancers to photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai; Cecic, Ivana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    2001-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) elicits a strong acute inflammatory response that has both local and systemic (acute phase response) attributes. The insult mediated by PDT-induced oxidative stress at the targeted site triggers a complex multifactorial response engaging host defence mechanisms associated with the inflammatory process to participate in the eradication of the treated tumor. Inflammatory cytokines are important mediators of critical events in this process as they regulate the activity of inflammatory, endothelial and other cells. The initial stimulus for enhanced production and release of cytokines likely originates from several types of events, such as activated transcription factors and complement deposition. The PDT-induced complement activation appears to be directly linked to the enhanced expression of various cytokines, including chemokines such as KC (in mouse models), and classic inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α , IL-6 and IL-10. A variety of interventions that modulate the activity of particular cytokines performed in conjunction with PDT were shown to influence the therapy outcome. The treatments such as using blocking antibodies and local or systemic cytokine delivery may either reduce or dramatically improve the curative effect of PDT. The inflammatory and related cytokines that at present appear particularly interesting and merit further investigation for use as adjuvants to PDT are IL-3, IL-8, IL-15, TNF-α, IFN-γ, G-CSF and GM-CSF.

  3. Human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive cell walls of normal intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Chen, T; Isomäki, P; Rimpiläinen, M; Toivanen, P

    1999-01-01

    The normal microbiota plays an important role in the health of the host, but little is known of how the human immune system recognizes and responds to Gram-positive indigenous bacteria. We have investigated cytokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to Gram-positive cell walls (CW) derived from four common intestinal indigenous bacteria, Eubacterium aerofaciens (Eu.a.), Eubacterium limosum(Eu.l.), Lactobacillus casei(L.c.), and Lactobacillus fermentum (L.f.). Our results indicate that Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota can induce cytokine responses of the human PBMC. The profile, level and kinetics of these responses are similar to those induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or CW derived from a pathogen, Streptococcus pyogenes (S.p.). Bacterial CW are capable of inducing production of a proinflammatory cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and an anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, but not that of IL-4 or interferon-gamma (IFN-γ). Monocytes are the main cell population in PBMC to produce TNF-α and IL-10. Induction of cytokine secretion is serum-dependent; both CD14-dependent and -independent pathways are involved. These findings suggest that the human cytokine responses induced by Gram-positive CW of the normal intestinal microbiota are similar to those induced by LPS or Gram-positive CW of the pathogens. PMID:10540188

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Its Bacterial Components Influence the Cytokine Response in Thymocytes and Splenocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Corinna; Mausberg, Anne K.; Dehmel, Thomas; Kieseier, Bernd C.; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hofstetter, Harald H.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause many different diseases. The spectrum of such infections in general includes inflammation and bacterial sepsis. Hospital-acquired pneumonia, naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics, is associated with a particularly high mortality rate in mechanically ventilated patients. The pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa is complex and mediated by several virulence factors, as well as cell-associated factors. We have previously demonstrated that stimulation with different bacteria triggers the cytokine response of thymocytes. In this study, we investigated the effect of P. aeruginosa and its different components on the cytokine production of immature and mature immune cells. We found that the induced cytokine pattern in the thymus and the spleen after infections with P. aeruginosa is primarily mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of the outer cell membrane, but other components of the bacterium can influence the cytokine secretion as well. Stimulation with heat-killed P. aeruginosa and LPS does not influence the amount of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells but instead suppresses the emergence of Th17 cells. However, stimulation with P. aeruginosa or its components triggers the interleukin-17 (IL-17) response both in thymocytes and in splenocytes. We conclude that infections with P. aeruginosa affect the cytokine secretion of immature and mature cells and that IL-17 and Th17 cells play only a minor role in the development of pathological systemic inflammatory disease conditions during P. aeruginosa infections. Therefore, other inflammatory immune responses must be responsible for septic reactions of the host. PMID:26902726

  5. A Secreted MIF Cytokine Enables Aphid Feeding and Represses Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naessens, Elodie; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giordanengo, Philippe; Baron, Olga Lucia; Minet-Kebdani, Naïma; Keller, Harald; Coustau, Christine

    2015-07-20

    Aphids attack virtually all plant species and cause serious crop damages in agriculture. Despite their dramatic impact on food production, little is known about the molecular processes that allow aphids to exploit their host plants. To date, few aphid salivary proteins have been identified that are essential for aphid feeding, and their nature and function remain largely unknown. Here, we show that a macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is secreted in aphid saliva. In vertebrates, MIFs are important pro-inflammatory cytokines regulating immune responses. MIF proteins are also secreted by parasites of vertebrates, including nematodes, ticks, and protozoa, and participate in the modulation of host immune responses. The finding that a plant parasite secretes a MIF protein prompted us to question the role of the cytokine in the plant-aphid interaction. We show here that expression of MIF genes is crucial for aphid survival, fecundity, and feeding on a host plant. The ectopic expression of aphid MIFs in leaf tissues inhibits major plant immune responses, such as the expression of defense-related genes, callose deposition, and hypersensitive cell death. Functional complementation analyses in vivo allowed demonstrating that MIF1 is the member of the MIF protein family that allows aphids to exploit their host plants. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cytokine that is secreted by a parasite to modulate plant immune responses. Our findings suggest a so-far unsuspected conservation of infection strategies among parasites of animal and plant species.

  6. Host immune response in returning travellers infected with malaria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clinical observations suggest that Canadian-born (CB) travellers are prone to more severe malaria, characterized by higher parasite density in the blood, and severe symptoms, such as cerebral malaria and renal failure, than foreign-born travellers (FB) from areas of malaria endemicity. It was hypothesized that host cytokine and chemokine responses differ significantly in CB versus FB patients returning with malaria, contributing to the courses of severity. A more detailed understanding of the profiles of cytokines, chemokines, and endothelial activation may be useful in developing biomarkers and novel therapeutic approaches for malaria. Materials and methods The patient population for the study (n = 186) was comprised of travellers returning to Toronto, Canada between 2007 and 2011. The patient blood samples’ cytokine, chemokine and angiopoietin concentrations were determined using cytokine multiplex assays, and ELISA assays. Results Significantly higher plasma cytokine levels of IL-12 (p40) were observed in CB compared to FB travellers, while epidermal growth factor (EGF) was observed to be higher in FB than CB travellers. Older travellers (55 years old or greater) with Plasmodium vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for IL-6 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) than other adults with P. vivax (ages 18–55). Patients with P. vivax infections had significantly higher mean cytokine levels for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and M-CSF than patients with Plasmodium falciparum. Angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2) was higher for patients infected with P. falciparum than P. vivax, especially when comparing just the FB groups. IL-12 (p40) was higher in FB patients with P. vivax compared to P. falciparum. Il-12 (p40) was also higher in patients infected with P. vivax than those infected with Plasmodium ovale. For patients travelling to West Africa, IFN-γ and IL-6 was lower than for patients who were in other regions of Africa

  7. Genome-Wide Analysis of Polymorphisms Associated with Cytokine Responses in Smallpox Vaccine Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Haralambieva, Iana H.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    The role that genetics plays in response to infection or disease is becoming increasingly clear as we learn more about immunogenetics and host-pathogen interactions. Here we report a genome-wide analysis of the effects of host genetic variation on cytokine responses to vaccinia virus stimulation in smallpox vaccine recipients. Our data show that vaccinia stimulation of immune individuals results in secretion of inflammatory and Th1 cytokines. We identified multiple SNPs significantly associated with variations in cytokine secretion. These SNPs are found in genes with known immune function, as well as in genes encoding for proteins involved in signal transduction, cytoskeleton, membrane channels and ion transport, as well as others with no previously identified connection to immune responses. The large number of significant SNP associations implies that cytokine secretion in response to vaccinia virus is a complex process controlled by multiple genes and gene families. Follow-up studies to replicate these findings and then pursue mechanistic studies will provide a greater understanding of how genetic variation influences vaccine responses. PMID:22610502

  8. Clinical associations of host genetic variations in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Belopolskaya, O B; Smelaya, T V; Moroz, V V; Golubev, A M; Salnikova, L E

    2015-06-01

    Host genetic variations may influence a changing profile of biochemical markers and outcome in patients with trauma/injury. The objective of this study was to assess clinical associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of cytokines in critically ill patients. A total of 430 patients were genotyped for SNPs in the genes of pro- (IL1B, IL6, IL8) and anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL10, IL13) cytokines. The main end-points were sepsis, mortality and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We evaluated the dynamic levels of bilirubin, blood urea nitrogen, creatine kinase, creatinine and lactate dehydrogenase in five points of measurements (between 1 and 14 days after admission) and correlated them with SNPs. High-producing alleles of proinflammatory cytokines protected patients against sepsis (IL1B -511A and IL8 -251A) and mortality (IL1B -511A). High-producing alleles of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL4 -589T and IL13 431A (144Gln) were less frequent in ARDS patients. The carriers of IL6 -174C/C genotypes were prone to the increased levels of biochemical markers and acute kidney and liver insufficiency. Genotype-dependent differences in the levels of biochemical indicators gradually increased to a maximal value on the 14th day after admission. These findings suggest that genetic variability in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines may contribute to different clinical phenotypes in patients at high risk of critical illness.

  9. Murine NK cell intrinsic cytokine-induced memory-like responses are maintained following homeostatic proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    Keppel, Molly P.; Yang, Liping; Cooper, Megan A.

    2013-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that innate immune NK cells exhibit memory-like properties with enhanced non-specific and specific recall responses. Cytokine activation alone of murine NK cells induces the differentiation of memory-like cells that are more likely to produce IFN-γ, a key NK cell cytokine important for activation of the immune response. Using an adoptive co-transfer system, we first show that cytokine-induced memory-like responses are NK intrinsic. However, engraftment of donor NK cells in NK-competent hosts is poor due to homeostatic control mechanisms. Therefore, we utilized alymphoid Rag- and common gamma chain (γc)-deficient mice as recipients and observed homeostatic expansion of co-transferred cytokine-activated and control donor NK cells. Despite proliferation of all cells, NK cells derived from those cells originally activated by cytokines retained an intrinsic enhanced capacity to produce IFN-γ when re-stimulated in vitro with cytokines or target cells. These NK cell memory-like responses persisted for at least 4 weeks in alymphoid hosts and 12 weeks in NK-competent hosts. These findings indicate that memory-like NK cells can readily self-renew and maintain enhanced function in a lymphopenic host for at least a month. PMID:23530145

  10. Cytokines are early diagnostic biomarkers of graft-versus-host disease in liver recipients.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xue-Qin; Chen, Xin-Hua; Sahebally, Zayd; Xu, Yu-Ning; Yin, Sheng-Yong; Wu, Li-Ming; Zheng, Shu-Sen

    2017-02-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with high mortality. Early diagnosis is essential to start treatment and to improve outcomes. Because of the inflammatory nature, we hypothesis that cytokine profile of patients with GVHD may serve as diagnostic markers. The present study was to evaluate the role of cytokine profile in the diagnosis of GVHD. An immunoassay was used to detect 29 cytokines simultaneously in the serum; the measuring sensitivity of all cytokines was pg/mL. Healthy subjects undergoing annual routine physical examinations served as negative controls; 23 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who had undergone liver transplantation (the LT group) comprised the test subjects. A total of 22 kidney recipients with biopsy-confirmed GVHD (the RT group) were included for comparison. HCC patients with radical surgery (the HCC group, n=22) served as positive control. The liver contents of the three cytokines, IL-2, IL-18, and IFN-gamma, were detected with immunohistochemistry. Serum granzyme B and perforin were measured by flow cytometry. Of the 29 cytokines, the levels of IL-2 and IL-18 were increased significantly in liver recipients with GVHD compared with healthy controls (P<0.05). The serum levels of these three cytokines in the healthy, HCC, LT, and RT groups were IL-2: 0.90+/-0.02, 4.14+/-0.61, 5.10+/-0.89, and 1.48+/-0.09 pg/mL; IL-18: 80.61+/-9.35, 109.51+/-10.93, 230.11+/-12.92, and 61.98+/-7.88 pg/mL; IFN-gamma: 24.06+/-3.88, 24.84+/-3.21, 40.37+/-5.88, and 15.33+/-4.72 pg/mL, respectively. Immunohistochemistry showed that these 3 cytokines expressions in the liver were parallel to the serum cytokine. After standard anti-GVHD treatment, the expressions of IL-2, IL-18, and IFN-gamma were decreased in the liver (P<0.05). Serum granzyme B and perforin were significantly increased in GVHD patients (P<0.05). IL-2, IL-18 and IFN-gamma were from liver and might serve as biomarkers for monitoring GVHD development and the effects of anti

  11. Cytokine/chemokine patterns connect host and viral characteristics with clinics during chronic hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Katsounas, Antonios; Trippler, Martin; Kottilil, Shyam; Lempicki, Richard A; Gerken, Guido; Schlaak, Joerg F

    2012-05-11

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, liver tissue pathology and HCV genotype are important determinants of clinical and/or treatment-related outcome. Although consistent epidemiological and/or molecular-biological clues derived from different studies on single virus-host interactions are meanwhile published, the in vivo transcriptional responses and cellular pathways affected in >1 key aspects of the disease or treatment process are far from being understood. Microarray analysis was performed in peripheral whole blood (PB) samples from 36 therapy-naïve HCV-infected patients with known liver histology. Linear regression analysis identified gene expression profiles significantly correlating (P < 0.015) with ≥1 out of 7 variables: sustained viral response (SVR), viral non-response (NR), end of treatment viral response (ETR), viral breakthrough (VB), HCV genotype (Gt. 1 vs. Gt. 2/3), stage of hepatic fibrosis [St. 0/1 vs. St. 2/3/4] and grade of hepatic inflammation (Gr. 0/1 vs. Gr. 2/3/4). Correlation values across all seven contrasts were considered for hierarchical clustering (HCL). A total of 1,697 genes showed ≥1 significant correlation results and genes involved in cell differentiation (183), immune response (53), and apoptosis (170) were leading fractions. HCL grouped the genes into six major clusters. Functional annotation analysis using DAVID (http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov) revealed that expression profiles that best linked these variables were highly enriched in cytokine/chemokine activity (Fisher-exact P < 0.0001) and specific biological module-centric algorithms finally led our focus on four out of fifty-three immune response genes: SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A (TNFRSF1A), and chemokine 'C-C motif' receptor 5 (CCR5). Of those, TNFRSF1A and CCR5 showed significant correlation with two out of seven variables based on microarray and

  12. Cytokine/chemokine patterns connect host and viral characteristics with clinics during chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, liver tissue pathology and HCV genotype are important determinants of clinical and/or treatment-related outcome. Although consistent epidemiological and/or molecular-biological clues derived from different studies on single virus-host interactions are meanwhile published, the in vivo transcriptional responses and cellular pathways affected in >1 key aspects of the disease or treatment process are far from being understood. Methods Microarray analysis was performed in peripheral whole blood (PB) samples from 36 therapy-naïve HCV-infected patients with known liver histology. Linear regression analysis identified gene expression profiles significantly correlating (P < 0.015) with ≥1 out of 7 variables: sustained viral response (SVR), viral non-response (NR), end of treatment viral response (ETR), viral breakthrough (VB), HCV genotype (Gt. 1 vs. Gt. 2/3), stage of hepatic fibrosis [St. 0/1 vs. St. 2/3/4] and grade of hepatic inflammation (Gr. 0/1 vs. Gr. 2/3/4). Correlation values across all seven contrasts were considered for hierarchical clustering (HCL). Results A total of 1,697 genes showed ≥1 significant correlation results and genes involved in cell differentiation (183), immune response (53), and apoptosis (170) were leading fractions. HCL grouped the genes into six major clusters. Functional annotation analysis using DAVID (http://david.abcc.ncifcrf.gov) revealed that expression profiles that best linked these variables were highly enriched in cytokine/chemokine activity (Fisher-exact P < 0.0001) and specific biological module-centric algorithms finally led our focus on four out of fifty-three immune response genes: SMAD family member 3 (SMAD3), interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP), tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A (TNFRSF1A), and chemokine ‘C-C motif’ receptor 5 (CCR5). Of those, TNFRSF1A and CCR5 showed significant correlation with two out of seven

  13. Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Impair Vitamin D-induced Host Defense in Cultured Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Schrumpf, Jasmijn A; Amatngalim, Gimano D; Veldkamp, Joris B; Verhoosel, Renate M; Ninaber, Dennis K; Ordonez, Soledad R; van der Does, Anne M; Haagsman, Henk P; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2017-02-23

    Vitamin D is a regulator of host defense against infections and induces expression of the antimicrobial peptide hCAP18/LL-37. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with chronic inflammatory lung diseases and respiratory infections. However, it is incompletely understood if and how (chronic) airway inflammation affects vitamin D metabolism and action. We hypothesized that long-term exposure of primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) to pro-inflammatory cytokines alters their vitamin D metabolism, antibacterial activity and expression of hCAP18/LL-37. To investigate this, PBEC were differentiated at the air-liquid interphase for 14 days in presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β (TNF-α/IL-1β), and subsequently exposed to vitamin D (inactive 25(OH)D3 and active 1,25(OH)2D3). Expression of hCAP18/LL-37, vitamin D receptor (VDR) and enzymes involved in vitamin D metabolism (CYP24A1 and CYP27B1) was determined using qPCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Furthermore, vitamin D-mediated antibacterial activity was assessed using non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). We found that TNF-α/IL-1β treatment reduced vitamin D-induced expression of hCAP18/LL-37 and killing of NTHi. In addition, CYP24A1 (a vitamin D-degrading enzyme) was increased by TNF-α/IL-1β, whereas CYP27B1 (that converts 25(OH)D3 to its active form) and VDR expression remained unaffected. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TNF-α/IL-1β-mediated induction of CYP24A1 was at least in part mediated by the transcription factor specific protein 1 (Sp1) and the EGFR-MAPK-pathway. These findings indicate that TNF-α/IL-1β decreases vitamin D-mediated antibacterial activity and hCAP18/LL-37 expression via induction of CYP24A1, and suggests that chronic inflammation impairs protective responses induced by vitamin D.

  14. Understanding the Inflammatory Cytokine Response in Pneumonia and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kellum, John A.; Kong, Lan; Fink, Mitchell P.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Yealy, Donald M.; Pinsky, Michael R.; Fine, Jonathan; Krichevsky, Alexander; Delude, Russell L.; Angus, Derek C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe sepsis is common and frequently fatal, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading cause. Although severe sepsis is often attributed to uncontrolled and unbalanced inflammation, evidence from humans with infection syndromes across the breadth of disease is lacking. In this study we describe the systemic cytokine response to pneumonia and determine if specific patterns, including the balance of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers, are associated with severe sepsis and death. Methods This is a cohort study of 1886 subjects hospitalized with CAP through the emergency departments in 28 US academic and community hospitals. We defined severe sepsis as CAP complicated by new-onset organ dysfunction, following international consensus conference criteria. We measured plasma tumor necrosis factor, IL-6 (interleukin 6), and IL-10 levels daily for the first week and weekly thereafter. Our main outcome measures were severe sepsis and 90-day mortality. Results A total of 583 patients developed severe sepsis (31%), of whom 149 died (26%). Systemic cytokine level elevation occurred in 82% of all subjects with CAP. Mean cytokine concentrations were highest at presentation, declined rapidly over the first few days, but remained elevated throughout the first week, beyond resolution of clinical signs of infection. Cytokine levels were highest in fatal severe sepsis and lowest in CAP with no severe sepsis. Unbalanced (high/low) cytokine patterns were unusual (4.6%) and not associated with decreased survival. Highest risk of death was with combined high levels of the proinflammatory IL-6 and anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine activity (hazard ratio, 20.5; 95% confidence interval, 10.8–39.0) (P<.001). Conclusions The circulating cytokine response to pneumonia is heterogeneous and continues for more than a week after presentation, with considerable overlap between those who do and do not develop severe sepsis. Unbalanced activation is uncommon, and

  15. Modeling Systems-Level Regulation of Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pilione, Mylisa; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Harvill, Eric T; Albert, Réka

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens are able to manipulate the signaling pathways responsible for the generation of host immune responses. Here we examine and model a respiratory infection system in which disruption of host immune functions or of bacterial factors changes the dynamics of the infection. We synthesize the network of interactions between host immune components and two closely related bacteria in the genus Bordetellae. We incorporate existing experimental information on the timing of immune regulatory events into a discrete dynamic model, and verify the model by comparing the effects of simulated disruptions to the experimental outcome of knockout mutations. Our model indicates that the infection time course of both Bordetellae can be separated into three distinct phases based on the most active immune processes. We compare and discuss the effect of the species-specific virulence factors on disrupting the immune response during their infection of naive, antibody-treated, diseased, or convalescent hosts. Our model offers predictions regarding cytokine regulation, key immune components, and clearance of secondary infections; we experimentally validate two of these predictions. This type of modeling provides new insights into the virulence, pathogenesis, and host adaptation of disease-causing microorganisms and allows systems-level analysis that is not always possible using traditional methods. PMID:17559300

  16. The host immune response to Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common infectious cause of healthcare-acquired diarrhoea. Outcomes of C. difficile colonization are varied, from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant colitis and death, due in part to the interplay between the pathogenic virulence factors of the bacterium and the counteractive immune responses of the host. Secreted toxins A and B are the major virulence factors of C. difficile and induce a profound inflammatory response by intoxicating intestinal epithelial cells causing proinflammatory cytokine release. Host cell necrosis, vascular permeability and neutrophil infiltration lead to an elevated white cell count, profuse diarrhoea and in severe cases, dehydration, hypoalbuminaemia and toxic megacolon. Other bacterial virulence factors, including surface layer proteins and flagella proteins, are detected by host cell surface signal molecules that trigger downstream cell-mediated immune pathways. Human studies have identified a role for serum and faecal immunoglobulin levels in protection from disease, but the recent development of a mouse model of CDI has enabled studies into the precise molecular interactions that trigger the immune response during infection. Key effector molecules have been identified that can drive towards a protective anti-inflammatory response or a damaging proinflammatory response. The limitations of current antimicrobial therapies for CDI have led to the development of both active and passive immunotherapies, none of which have, as yet been formally approved for CDI. However, recent advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of host immune protection against CDI may provide an exciting opportunity for novel therapeutic developments in the future. PMID:25165542

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis and the host response

    PubMed Central

    Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Cole, Stewart T.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Rubin, Eric; Nathan, Carl

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances reported at a recent international meeting highlight insights and controversies in the genetics of M. tuberculosis and the infected host, the nature of protective immune responses, adaptation of the bacillus to host-imposed stresses, animal models, and new techniques. PMID:15939785

  18. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  19. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  20. Cytokine response of human mononuclear cells induced by intestinal Clostridium species.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Elina; Keto, Joni; Nikkilä, Janne; Mättö, Jaana; Lähteenmäki, Kaarina

    2013-02-01

    Altered composition of intestinal microbiota has been associated with various immunological disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Although Clostridium species are major inhabitants of the intestinal tract, their interaction with the host immunological system is yet poorly characterized. In this study, cytokine responses of human monocytic cell line THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to six type strains representing common intestinal clostridial species were determined. The strains induced diverse cytokine responses in both THP-1 cells and PBMC. Clostridium perfringens was the most potent inducer of both tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), as compared to Clostridium histolyticum, Clostridium clostridioforme, Clostridium leptum, Clostridium sporosphaeroides and Blautia coccoides. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in PBMC was most efficiently stimulated by C. sporosphaeroides. The same PBMC preparations that responded strongly to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) also responded strongly to bacterial stimulation. This indicates that the level of responsiveness is an individual feature of mononuclear cell preparations, and that the overall cytokine response is composed by a combination of host factors and microbial structures affecting them. This work supports the idea that the composition of the intestinal clostridial population influences immune responses and is likely to play an important role in intestinal homeostasis.

  1. Tear cytokine response to multipurpose solutions for contact lenses

    PubMed Central

    Kalsow, Carolyn M; Reindel, William T; Merchea, Mohinder M; Bateman, Kirk M; Barr, Joseph T

    2013-01-01

    Purpose An increased risk of corneal infiltrative events has been noted with the use of certain contact lenses and multipurpose solutions (MPS). This study was designed to evaluate tear cytokine assay as a sensitive, objective, and quantitative measure of the ocular surface response to contact lens/MPS and to consider the assay’s clinical relevance in the context of other measures of ocular surface response. Methods Two MPS, ReNu® Fresh™ (RNF) and Opti-Free® RepleniSH (OFR), were used with daily wear silicone hydrogel contact lenses in a randomized, prospective crossover study involving 26 subjects. Clinical data collection (conjunctival hyperemia, ocular surface sensitivity, solution induced corneal staining (SICS) test score, and subjective responses) and tear cytokine assays were conducted masked. Responses were tracked as change from baseline throughout the experimental schedule. Results Similar response patterns for several inflammatory cytokines were seen throughout both phases: subjects who received OFR in Phase I had mean tear concentrations that were generally higher than those of the RNF Phase I group. OFR Phase I subjects had significant (P < 0.01) increases over baseline at day 1 and/or following washout for 13 cytokines (cc chemokine ligands [CCL] 3, CCL5, CCL11, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF], interferon [INF]-γ, interleukin [IL]-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, IL-15, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α). These changes were not observed in RNF Phase I subjects, even though SICS test scores increased. Phase I OFR subjects also had increased dryness, while RNF Phase I subjects had decreased bulbar hyperemia. No changes were detected with respect to limbal hyperemia or surface sensitivity thresholds. Conclusion The tear cytokine assay can detect and differentiate contact lens/MPS induced increases in inflammatory cytokines. Changes in cytokine levels were consistent with measurement of hyperemia and dryness but not with

  2. LPS priming potentiates and prolongs proinflammatory cytokine response to the trichothecene deoxynivalenol in the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-02-15

    Simultaneous exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) markedly amplifies induction of proinflammatory cytokine expression as well as IL-1-driven lymphocyte apoptosis by trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in the mouse. The purpose of this research was to test the hypothesis that LPS priming will sensitize a host to DON-induced proinflammatory cytokine induction and apoptosis. In mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg bw) ip. and treated 8 h later with DON po., the minimum DON doses for inducing IL-1{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha} serum proteins and splenic mRNAs were significantly lower than the DON doses required for vehicle-primed mice. LPS priming also decreased onset time and dramatically increased magnitude and duration of cytokine responses. LPS-primed mice maintained heightened sensitivity to DON for up to 24 h. LPS priming doses as low as 50 {mu}g/kg bw evoked sensitization. DNA fragmentation analysis and flow cytometry also revealed that mice primed with LPS (1 mg/kg) for 8 h and exposed to DON (12.5 mg/kg) exhibited massive thymocyte loss by apoptosis 12 h later compared to mice exposed to DON or LPS alone. LPS priming decreased DON-induced p38 and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that enhanced mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was not involved in increased cytokine responses. Taken together, exposure to LPS rendered mice highly susceptible to DON induction of cytokine expression and this correlated with increased apoptosis in the thymus.

  3. Spermine Inhibits Proinflammatory Cytokine Synthesis in Human Mononuclear Cells: A Counterregulatory Mechanism that Restrains the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Minghuang; Caragine, Theresa; Wang, Haichao; Cohen, Pamela S.; Botchkina, Galina; Soda, Kuniyasu; Bianchi, Marina; Ulrich, Peter; Cerami, Anthony; Sherry, Barbara; Tracey, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    The local production of proinflammatory cytokines mediates the host response to inflammation, infection, and injury, whereas an overexpression of these mediators can injure or kill the host. Recently, we identified a class of multivalent guanylhydrazone compounds that are effective inhibitors of proinflammatory cytokine synthesis in monocytes/macrophages. The structure of one such cationic molecule suggested a molecular mimicry with spermine, a ubiquitous endogenous biogenic amine that increases significantly at sites of inflammation and infection. Here, we addressed the hypothesis that spermine might counterregulate the innate immune response by downregulating the synthesis of potentially injurious cytokines. When spermine was added to cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), it effectively inhibited the synthesis of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin-1 (IL-1), IL-6, MIP-1α, and MIP-1β. The inhibition of cytokine synthesis was specific and reversible, with significant inhibition of TNF synthesis occurring even when spermine was added after LPS. The mechanism of spermine-mediated cytokine suppression was posttranscriptional and independent of polyamine oxidase activity. Local administration of spermine in vivo protected mice against the development of acute footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan. These results identify a distinct molecular counterregulatory role for spermine in downregulating the monocyte proinflammatory cytokine response. PMID:9151701

  4. Cytokines as biomarkers to monitoring the impact of multidrug therapy in immune response of leprosy patients.

    PubMed

    Cassirer-Costa, Fábio; Medeiros, Nayara I; Chaves, Ana T; Lyon, Sandra; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Ribeiro-Junior, Atvaldo F; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Rocha, Manoel O C; Gomes, Juliana A S

    2017-09-01

    Leprosy or Hansen's disease is a chronic infectious disease of the skin and nerves, caused by the intracellular bacilli Mycobacterium leprae. It is characterized by a spectrum of clinical forms depending on the host's immune response to M. leprae. Patients with tuberculoid (TT) leprosy have strong cell-mediated immunity (CMI) with elimination of the bacilli, whereas patients with lepromatous (LL) leprosy exhibit defective CMI to M. leprae. Despite advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of leprosy and the development of new therapeutic strategies, there is a need for the identification of biomarkers which be used for early diagnosis and to discrimination between different forms of the disease, as prognostic markers. Here, we analyzed the serum levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17A, IFN-γ and TNF in order to address the contribution of these cytokines in late phase of M. leprae infection, and the impact of multidrug therapy (MDT). Our results demonstrated that patients of LL group presented higher expression of serum levels of inflammatory cytokines before MDT, while TT patients presented a balance between inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. MDT changes the profile of serum cytokines in M. leprae infected patients, as evidenced by the cytokine network, especially in TT patients. LL patients displayed a multifaceted cytokine system characterized by strong connecting axes involving inflammatory/regulatory molecules, while TT patients showed low involvement of regulatory cytokines in network overall. Cytokines can be identified as good biomarkers of the impact of MDT on the immune system and the effectiveness of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Plasma cytokine levels predict response to corticosteroids in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Bentzer, Peter; Fjell, Chris; Walley, Keith R; Boyd, John; Russell, James A

    2016-12-01

    To investigate if plasma cytokine concentrations predict a beneficial response to corticosteroid treatment in septic shock patients. A cohort of septic shock patients in whom a panel of 39 cytokines had been measured at baseline (n = 363) was included. Patients who received corticosteroids were propensity score matched to non-corticosteroid-treated patients. An optimal threshold to identify responders to corticosteroid treatment for each cytokine was defined as the concentration above which the odds ratio for 28-day survival between corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients was highest. Propensity score matching partitioned 165 patients into 61 sets; each set contained matched corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients. For 13 plasma cytokines threshold concentrations were found where the odds ratio for survival between corticosteroid- and non-corticosteroid-treated patients was significant (P < 0.05). CD40 ligand was associated with the highest odds ratio and identified 21 % of the patients in the propensity score matched cohort as responders to corticosteroid treatment. Combinations of triplets of cytokines with a significant odds ratio, using the thresholds identified above, were tested to find a higher proportion of responders. IL3, IL6, and CCL4 identified 50 % of the patients in the propensity score matched cohort as responders to corticosteroid treatment. The odds ratio for 28-day survival was 19 (95 % CI 3.5-140, P = 0.02) with a concentration above threshold for a least one of these cytokines. Plasma concentration of selected cytokines is a potential predictive biomarker to identify septic shock patients that may benefit from treatment with corticosteroids.

  6. Neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes collaborate in generating an optimal cytokine response that protects against pulmonary Legionella pneumophila infection.

    PubMed

    Casson, Cierra N; Doerner, Jessica L; Copenhaver, Alan M; Ramirez, Jasmine; Holmgren, Alicia M; Boyer, Mark A; Siddarthan, Ingharan J; Rouhanifard, Sara H; Raj, Arjun; Shin, Sunny

    2017-04-01

    Early responses mounted by both tissue-resident and recruited innate immune cells are essential for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In particular, both neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. While neutrophils and monocytes produce bactericidal molecules, such as reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, both cell types are also capable of synthesizing overlapping sets of cytokines important for host defense. Whether neutrophils and monocytes perform redundant or non-redundant functions in the generation of anti-microbial cytokine responses remains elusive. Here, we sought to define the contributions of neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes to cytokine production and host defense during pulmonary infection with Legionella pneumophila, responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires' disease. We found that both neutrophils and monocytes are critical for host defense against L. pneumophila. Both monocytes and neutrophils contribute to maximal IL-12 and IFNγ responses, and monocytes are also required for TNF production. Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and γδ T cells are sources of IFNγ, and monocytes direct IFNγ production by these cell types. Thus, neutrophils and monocytes cooperate in eliciting an optimal cytokine response that promotes effective control of bacterial infection.

  7. Neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes collaborate in generating an optimal cytokine response that protects against pulmonary Legionella pneumophila infection

    PubMed Central

    Casson, Cierra N.; Doerner, Jessica L.; Copenhaver, Alan M.; Boyer, Mark A.; Siddarthan, Ingharan J.; Rouhanifard, Sara H.

    2017-01-01

    Early responses mounted by both tissue-resident and recruited innate immune cells are essential for host defense against bacterial pathogens. In particular, both neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes are rapidly recruited to sites of infection. While neutrophils and monocytes produce bactericidal molecules, such as reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, both cell types are also capable of synthesizing overlapping sets of cytokines important for host defense. Whether neutrophils and monocytes perform redundant or non-redundant functions in the generation of anti-microbial cytokine responses remains elusive. Here, we sought to define the contributions of neutrophils and Ly6Chi monocytes to cytokine production and host defense during pulmonary infection with Legionella pneumophila, responsible for the severe pneumonia Legionnaires’ disease. We found that both neutrophils and monocytes are critical for host defense against L. pneumophila. Both monocytes and neutrophils contribute to maximal IL-12 and IFNγ responses, and monocytes are also required for TNF production. Moreover, natural killer (NK) cells, NKT cells, and γδ T cells are sources of IFNγ, and monocytes direct IFNγ production by these cell types. Thus, neutrophils and monocytes cooperate in eliciting an optimal cytokine response that promotes effective control of bacterial infection. PMID:28384349

  8. Host cell autophagy in immune response to zoonotic infections.

    PubMed

    Skendros, Panagiotis; Mitroulis, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  9. Immune response to the cestode Hymenolepis nana: cytokine production during infection with eggs or cysts.

    PubMed

    Conchedda, M; Bortoletti, G; Gabriele, F; Wakelin, D; Palmas, C

    1997-03-01

    Analysis of cytokine production (IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5) by in vitro Con A-stimulated mesenteric lymph node cells measured daily after egg or cyst infection of mice with Hymenolepis nana showed that cytokine production varies during parasite development and between different host strains (BALB/c and C3H/He mice). Egg infection stimulates a rapid increase in IFN-gamma, independent of mouse strain. In addition, in BALB/c mice a Th2-like response (IL-4, IL-5 secretion) was stimulated 4-5 days p.i., when the parasites are thought to begin their lumenal phase. After infection with cysts significant increases in IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-5 were observed at the time when autoinfection with eggs is thought to occur. The level of IFN-gamma paralleled that seen after a primary egg infection. This suggests that there is a predominantly Th1-type response during the tissue phase of H. nana development and that, in BALB/c mice, a Th2 polarization occurs during the first few days of the lumenal phase. The cytokine patterns observed are discussed in relation to host responses during chronic helminth infection.

  10. Sepsis and cytokines: current status.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, T S; Christman, J W

    1996-07-01

    Sepsis is a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms resulting from excessive systemic host inflammatory response to infection. This inflammatory response is largely mediated by cytokines, which are released into the systemic circulation. Plasma concentrations of specific cytokines, TNF alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IL-8 are frequently elevated in human sepsis and cytokine concentrations correlate with severity and outcome of sepsis. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, soluble cytokine receptors, cytokine receptor antagonists and counter-inflammatory cytokines are also produced in large quantities in patients with sepsis; however, the specific role of these molecules in sepsis remains undefined. A complex interaction of cytokines and cytokine-neutralizing molecules probably determines the clinical presentation and course of sepsis. Intervening in this sequence of events to modify the host inflammatory responses may prove to be a beneficial treatment strategy for sepsis, but currently tested anticytokine therapies have been largely unsuccessful.

  11. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    PubMed

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor by promoting host immune response.

    PubMed

    Dong, Y; Richards, J-Ae; Gupta, R; Aung, P P; Emley, A; Kluger, Y; Dogra, S K; Mahalingam, M; Wajapeyee, N

    2014-09-18

    Cancer cells acquire several traits that allow for their survival and progression, including the ability to evade the host immune response. However, the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade host immune responses remain largely elusive. Here we study the phenomena of immune evasion in malignant melanoma cells. We find that the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is an important regulator of the host immune response against melanoma cells. Mechanistically, PTEN represses the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines by blocking the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway. In melanoma cells lacking PTEN, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activates the transcription of immunosuppressive cytokines in a PI3K-dependent manner. Furthermore, conditioned media from PTEN-deficient, patient-derived short-term melanoma cultures and established melanoma cell lines blocked the production of the interleukin-12 (IL-12) in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Inhibition of IL-12 production was rescued by restoring PTEN or using neutralizing antibodies against the immunosuppressive cytokines. Furthermore, we report that PTEN, as an alternative mechanism to promote the host immune response against cancer cells, represses the expression of programmed cell death 1 ligand, a known repressor of the host immune response. Finally, to establish the clinical significance of our results, we analyzed malignant melanoma patient samples with or without brisk host responses. These analyses confirmed that PTEN loss is associated with a higher percentage of malignant melanoma samples with non-brisk host responses compared with samples with brisk host responses. Collectively, these results establish that PTEN functions as a melanoma tumor suppressor in part by regulating the host immune response against melanoma cells and highlight the importance of assessing PTEN status before recruiting melanoma patients for immunotherapies.

  13. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host–pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections. PMID:25598340

  14. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  15. Host responses to the pathogen Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and beneficial microbes exhibit host sex specificity.

    PubMed

    Karunasena, Enusha; McMahon, K Wyatt; Chang, David; Brashears, Mindy M

    2014-08-01

    Differences between microbial pathogenesis in male and female hosts are well characterized in disease conditions connected to sexual transmission. However, limited biological insight is available on variances attributed to sex specificity in host-microbe interactions, and it is most often a minimized variable outside these transmission events. In this work, we studied two gut microbes-a pathogen, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and a probiotic, Lactobacillus animalis NP-51-and the interaction between each agent and the male and female gastrointestinal systems. This trial was conducted in BALB/c mice (n=5 per experimental group and per sex at a given time point), with analysis at four time points over 180 days. Host responses to M.avium subsp. paratuberculosis and L. animalis were sensitive to sex. Cytokines that were significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) betweenthe sexes included interleukin-1α/β (IL-1α/β), IL-17, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, and gamma interferon (IFN-) and were dependent on experimental conditions. However, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and IL-13/23 showed no sex specificity. A metabolomics study indicated a 0.5- to 2.0-fold (log2 scale) increase in short-chain fatty acids (butyrate and acetate) in males and greater increases in o-phosphocholine or histidine from female colon tissues; variances distinct to each sex were observed with age or long-term probiotic consumption. Two genera, Staphylococcus and Roseburia, were consistently overrepresented in females compared to males; other species were specific to one sex but fluctuated depending on experimental conditions. The differences observed suggest that male and female gut tissues and microbiota respond to newly introduced microorganisms differently and that gut-associated microorganisms with host immune system responses and metabolic activity are supported by biology distinct to the host sex.

  16. Pathogen-associated porin turns IL-10 competent B-1a cells toward proinflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Amlan Kanti; Sinha, Debolina; Biswas, Ratna; Biswas, Tapas

    2016-12-01

    Shigellosis is a major problem in the developing countries causing mortality and morbidity particularly among the children. Shigella spp. harbours the epithelial cells of the human colon to infect the host and spread the disease. We analyzed the response of B-1a cells, the major component of the mucosal immune system to porin of Shigella dysenteriae type 1. We show that porin while proliferating B-1a cells, deplete Siglec-G, the inhibitory molecule present on B-1a cells. Adjuvanticity of porin has been shown to govern innate signaling for promoting host adaptive immune response. Up-regulation of CD69 and CD40 denotes activation of the cells parallel to abrogation of Siglec-G. As a result of cell activation, porin stimulated the inflammatory cytokines of CD5(+) B-1a cells, otherwise rich in IL-10. The work shows B-1a cell responses promote the immunopotentiating activity of porin.

  17. Impaired NK cell antiviral cytokine response against influenza virus in small-for-gestational-age neonates

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinrong; Li, Hong; Mao, Huawei; Yu, Meixing; Yang, Fan; Feng, Ting; Fan, Yingying; Lu, Qiao; Shen, Chongyang; Yin, Zhongwei; Mao, Meng; Tu, Wenwei

    2013-01-01

    The neonates, particularly small-for-gestational-age (SGA) ones, are susceptible to various microbial infections. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of host innate immunity system and the main source of the inflammatory cytokines, which provide critical protection during the early phase of viral infections before the development of an appropriate adaptive immune response. However, little is known about the antiviral effects of NK cells in neonates especially the SGA population. Herein, a prospective descriptive study was performed to determine the differences of NK cell immunity among adults, appropriate-for gestational-age (AGA) and SGA neonates. Adults have much higher NK cell number in peripheral blood than that in cord blood from neonates. In response to influenza virus stimulation, neonatal NK cells, especially SGA baby cells, expressed significantly lower antiviral cytokines including perforin, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-α responses than adult NK cells. In addition, the antiviral cytokine responses of NK cells were positively correlated with neonatal birth weight. Our data suggested that the depressed antiviral activity and less frequency of NK cells are likely to be responsible for the high susceptibility to microbial infection in neonates, at least in part. Improving the function of innate immunity may provide a new way to defend virus infection. PMID:23872919

  18. Proteomic analysis of Fasciola hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) involved in interacting with host PBMCs and cytokines by shotgun LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Huang, Si-Yang; Yue, Dong-Mei; Wang, Jin-Lei; Wang, Yujian; Li, Xiangrui; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-02-01

    Fasciola hepatica is a helminth parasite with a worldwide distribution, which can cause chronic liver disease, fasciolosis, leading to economic losses in the livestock and public health in many countries. Control is mostly reliant on the use of drugs, and as a result, drug resistance has now emerged. The identification of F. hepatica genes involved in interaction between the parasite and host immune system is utmost important to elucidate the evasion mechanisms of the parasite and develop more effective strategies against fasciolosis. In this study, we aimed to identify molecules in F. hepatica excretory and secretory products (FhESPs) interacting with the host peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), Th1-like cytokines (IL2 and IFN-γ), and Th17-like cytokines (IL17) by Co-IP combined with tandem mass spectrometry. The results showed that 14, 16, and 9 proteins in FhESPs could bind with IL2, IL17, and IFN-γ, respectively, which indicated that adult F. hepatica may evade the host immune responses through directly interplaying with cytokines. In addition, nine proteins in FhESPs could adhere to PBMCs. Our findings provided potential targets as immuno-regulators, and will be helpful to elucidate the molecular basis of host-parasite interactions and search for new potential proteins as vaccine and drug target candidates.

  19. Host immune responses accelerate pathogen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Pankaj; Wang, Nian

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens face a hostile and often novel environment when infecting a new host, and adaptation is likely to be an important determinant of the success in colonization and establishment. We hypothesized that resistant hosts will impose stronger selection on pathogens than susceptible hosts, which should accelerate pathogen evolution through selection biased toward effector genes. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an experimental evolution study on Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) in a susceptible plant species and a resistant plant species. We performed 55 rounds of repeated reinoculation of Xcc through susceptible host grapefruit (isolates G1, G2, G3) and resistant host kumquat (isolates K1, K2, K3). Consequently, only K1 and K3 isolates lost their ability to elicit a hypersensitive response (HR) in kumquat. Illumina sequencing of the parental and descendant strains P, G1, G2, G3, K1, K2 and K3 revealed that fixed mutations were biased toward type three secretion system effectors in isolates K1 and K3. Parallel evolution was observed in the K1 and K3 strains, suggesting that the mutations result from selection rather than by random drift. Our results support our hypothesis and suggest that repeated infection of resistant hosts by pathogens should be prevented to avoid selecting for adaptive pathogens. PMID:24304673

  20. Moxibustion activates host defense against herpes simplex virus type I through augmentation of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuko; Itoi, Manami; Hamahashi, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Noriyuki; Mori, Kazuya; Morishita, Daisuke; Wada, Kumiko; Amagai, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    Moxibustion is a technique used in traditional oriental medicine, the aim of which is to cure and/or prevent illness by activating a person's ability for self-healing. In this study, we assessed how moxibustion would affect the immune system and whether it would augment protective immunity. Mice were treated with moxibustion at Zusanli (ST36) acupoints; we analyzed mortality and cytokine activity in sera after infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and cytokine gene expression in the skin and the spleen without a virus challenge. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment of BALB/c mice with moxibustion resulted in a marked increase in the survival rate after infection with lethal doses of HSV-1, and elevated serum levels of IL-1β and IFN-γ on days 1 and 6 post-infection with HSV-1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that moxibustion treatment augmented the expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, universal-IFN-α, MIP-1α, and TNF-α mRNA in the skin, and IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12p40, IL-15, u-IFN-α, MIP-1α, and TNF-α mRNA in the spleen. Moreover, moxibustion induces augmentation of natural killer cell activity. Collectively, our study demonstrates that moxibustion activates protective responses against HSV-1 infection through the activation of cytokine production including IFN, and of NK cells.

  1. Inhibition of host cell translation elongation by Legionella pneumophila blocks the host cell unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Hempstead, Andrew D; Isberg, Ralph R

    2015-12-08

    Cells of the innate immune system recognize bacterial pathogens by detecting common microbial patterns as well as pathogen-specific activities. One system that responds to these stimuli is the IRE1 branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a sensor of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Activation of IRE1, in the context of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, induces strong proinflammatory cytokine induction. We show here that Legionella pneumophila, an intravacuolar pathogen that replicates in an ER-associated compartment, blocks activation of the IRE1 pathway despite presenting pathogen products that stimulate this response. L. pneumophila TLR ligands induced the splicing of mRNA encoding XBP1s, the main target of IRE1 activity. L. pneumophila was able to inhibit both chemical and bacterial induction of XBP1 splicing via bacterial translocated proteins that interfere with host protein translation. A strain lacking five translocated translation elongation inhibitors was unable to block XBP1 splicing, but this could be rescued by expression of a single such inhibitor, consistent with limitation of the response by translation elongation inhibitors. Chemical inhibition of translation elongation blocked pattern recognition receptor-mediated XBP1 splicing, mimicking the effects of the bacterial translation inhibitors. In contrast, host cell-promoted inhibition of translation initiation in response to the pathogen was ineffective in blocking XBP1 splicing, demonstrating the need for the elongation inhibitors for protection from the UPR. The inhibition of host translation elongation may be a common strategy used by pathogens to limit the innate immune response by interfering with signaling via the UPR.

  2. Recent progress in understanding host immunity to Avian Coccidiosis: Role of IL-17 Family Cytokines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host-pathogen interaction leading to protection against coccidiosis is complex, involving many aspects of innate and adaptive immunity to intracellular parasites. Recent application of global gene expression microarray analysis to investigate gut innate immune response to Eimeria infections led to t...

  3. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a “diffuse sensory organ” that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this “pan-endocrine illness” is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death. PMID:25763364

  4. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  5. The Role of Virus Infection in Deregulating the Cytokine Response to Secondary Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Divya; Petes, Carlene; Gee, Katrina; Basta, Sameh

    2015-12-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are produced by macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) after infection to stimulate T helper (Th) cells, linking innate and adaptive immunity. Virus infections can deregulate the proinflammatory cytokine response like tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin (IL)-2, making the host more susceptible to secondary bacterial infections. Studies using various viruses such as lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, influenza A virus, and human immunodeficiency virus have revealed several intriguing mechanisms that account for the increased susceptibility to several prevalent bacterial infections. In particular, type I interferons induced during a virus infection have been observed to play a role in suppressing the production of some key antibacterial proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-23 and IL-17. Other suppressive mechanisms as a result of cytokine deregulation by viral infections include reduced function of immune cells such as DC, macrophage, natural killer, CD4(+), and CD8(+) T cells leading to impaired clearance of secondary bacterial infections. In this study, we highlight some of the immune mechanisms that become deregulated by viral infections, and can thus become defective during secondary bacterial infections.

  6. Inflammasomes in host response to protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Dario S; Lima-Junior, Djalma S

    2015-05-01

    Inflammasomes are multimeric complexes of proteins that are assembled in the host cell cytoplasm in response to specific stress signals or contamination of the cytoplasm by microbial molecules. The canonical inflammasomes are composed of at least three main components: an inflammatory caspase (caspase-1, caspase-11), an adapter molecule (such as ASC), and a sensor protein (such as NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRP12, NAIP1, NAIP2, NAIP5, or AIM2). The sensor molecule determines the inflammasome specificity by detecting specific microbial products or cell stress signals. Upon activation, these molecular platforms facilitate restriction of microbial replication and trigger an inflammatory form of cell death called pyroptosis, thus accounting for the genesis of inflammatory processes. Inflammasome activation has been widely reported in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, recent reports have highlighted the important role of the inflammasomes in the host response to the pathogenesis of infections caused by intracellular protozoan parasites. Herein, we review the activation and specific roles of inflammasomes in recognition and host responses to intracellular protozoan parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi, Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium spp., and Leishmania spp.

  7. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium’s ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  8. IL-35 Is a Novel Responsive Anti-inflammatory Cytokine — A New System of Categorizing Anti-inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinyuan; Mai, Jietang; Virtue, Anthony; Yin, Ying; Gong, Ren; Sha, Xiaojin; Gutchigian, Stefanie; Frisch, Andrew; Hodge, Imani; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    It remains unknown whether newly identified anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-35 (IL-35) is different from other anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in terms of inhibition of inflammation initiation and suppression of full-blown inflammation. Using experimental database mining and statistical analysis methods we developed, we examined the tissue expression profiles and regulatory mechanisms of IL-35 in comparison to other anti-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that in contrast to TGF-β, IL-35 is not constitutively expressed in human tissues but it is inducible in response to inflammatory stimuli. We also provide structural evidence that AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins and microRNAs target IL-35 subunit transcripts, by which IL-35 may achieve non-constitutive expression status. Furthermore, we propose a new system to categorize anti-inflammatory cytokines into two groups: (1) the house-keeping cytokines, such as TGF-β, inhibit the initiation of inflammation whereas (2) the responsive cytokines including IL-35 suppress inflammation in full-blown stage. Our in-depth analyses of molecular events that regulate the production of IL-35 as well as the new categorization system of anti-inflammatory cytokines are important for the design of new strategies of immune therapies. PMID:22438968

  9. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for

  10. Role of interleukin-12 family cytokines in the cellular response to mycobacterial disease.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, Patricia

    2010-05-01

    Interleukin (IL)-12 is a multifunctional cytokine acting as a key regulator of cell-mediated immune responses through the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into type 1 helper T cells (Th1) producing interferon-gamma. As our knowledge of IL-12 family members is rapidly growing, it will be important to specify their involvement in the regulation of mycobacterial infection. This article is a review of the current knowledge regarding the functions of the IL-12 family cytokines in the immune host defense system against mycobacteria. Specifically, this review aims to describe recent scientific evidence concerning the protective role of some members of the IL-12 family cytokines for the control of mycobacterial infection, as well as to summarize knowledge of the potential use of the IL-12 family members as potent adjuvants in the prevention and treatment of mycobacterial infectious diseases. In addition, recent data supporting the importance of the IL-12 family members in mycobacterial diseases in relation to Th17 function are discussed. This examination will help to improve our understanding of the immune response to mycobacterial infection and also improve vaccine design and immunotherapeutic intervention against tuberculosis.

  11. Inflammatory Response to Burn Trauma: Nicotine Attenuates Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Papst, S.; Reimers, K.; Stukenborg-Colsman, C.; Steinstraesser, L.; Vogt, P. M.; Kraft, T.; Niederbichler, A. D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The immune response to an inflammatory stimulus is balanced and orchestrated by stimulatory and inhibitory factors. After a thermal trauma, this balance is disturbed and an excessive immune reaction with increased production and release of proinflammatory cytokines results. The nicotine-stimulated anti-inflammatory reflex offsets this. The goal of this study was to verify that transdermal administration of nicotine downregulates proinflammatory cytokine release after burn trauma. Methods: A 30% total body surface area full-thickness rat burn model was used in Sprague Dawley rats (n = 35, male). The experimental animals were divided into a control group, a burn trauma group, a burn trauma group with additional nicotine treatment, and a sham + nicotine group with 5 experimental animals per group. The last 2 groups received a transdermal nicotine administration of 1.75 mg. The concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 were determined in homogenates of hearts, livers, and spleens 12 or 24 hours after burn trauma. Results: Experimental burn trauma resulted in a significant increase in cytokine levels in hearts, livers, and spleens. Nicotine treatment led to a decrease of the effect of the burn trauma with significantly lower concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 compared to the trauma group. Conclusions: This study confirms in a standardized burn model that stimulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is involved in the regulation of effectory molecules of the immune response. Looking at the results of our study, further experiments designed to explore and evaluate the potency and mechanisms of the immunomodulating effects of this receptor system are warranted. PMID:25671045

  12. Nasal cytokine responses to natural colds in asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Lewis, T C; Henderson, T A; Carpenter, A R; Ramirez, I A; McHenry, C L; Goldsmith, A M; Ren, X; Mentz, G B; Mukherjee, B; Robins, T G; Joiner, T A; Mohammad, L S; Nguyen, E R; Burns, M A; Burke, D T; Hershenson, M B

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms by which viruses induce asthma exacerbations are not well understood. We characterized fluctuations in nasal aspirate cytokines during naturally occurring respiratory viral infections in children with asthma. Sixteen children underwent home collections of nasal aspirates when they were without cold symptoms and again during self-reported respiratory illnesses. The presence of viral infection was ascertained by multiplex PCR. Cytokines were measured using multiplex immune assay. mRNA expression for selected markers of viral infection was measured using RT-PCR. A cumulative respiratory symptom score was calculated for each day of measurement. Generalized estimated equations were used to evaluate associations between viral infection and marker elevation, and between marker elevation and symptom score. The 16 patients completed a total of 37 weeks of assessment (15 'well' weeks; 22 self-assessed 'sick' weeks). Viral infections were detected in 3 of the 'well' weeks and 17 of the 'sick' weeks (10 rhinovirus, three coronavirus, two influenza A, two influenza B, two respiratory syncytial virus, one parainfluenza). Compared to virus-negative well weeks, nasal aspirate IFN-γ, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL5/RANTES, CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1β, CCL7/MCP-3, and CCL20/MIP3α protein levels increased during virus-positive sick weeks. Only a subset of cytokines (IFN-γ, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5, and CCL20) correlated with self-reported respiratory tract symptoms. While many aspirates were dilute and showed no mRNA signal, viral infection significantly increased the number of samples that were positive for IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, TLR3, RIG-I, and IRF7 mRNA. We conclude that in children with asthma, naturally occurring viral infections apparently induce a robust innate immune response including expression of specific chemokines, IFNs, and IFN-responsive genes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. New insights about host response to smallpox using microarray data

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Gustavo H; Simoes, Ana CQ; Souza, Estevao; Dias, Rodrigo A; Ospina, Raydonal; Venancio, Thiago M

    2007-01-01

    Background Smallpox is a lethal disease that was endemic in many parts of the world until eradicated by massive immunization. Due to its lethality, there are serious concerns about its use as a bioweapon. Here we analyze publicly available microarray data to further understand survival of smallpox infected macaques, using systems biology approaches. Our goal is to improve the knowledge about the progression of this disease. Results We used KEGG pathways annotations to define groups of genes (or modules), and subsequently compared them to macaque survival times. This technique provided additional insights about the host response to this disease, such as increased expression of the cytokines and ECM receptors in the individuals with higher survival times. These results could indicate that these gene groups could influence an effective response from the host to smallpox. Conclusion Macaques with higher survival times clearly express some specific pathways previously unidentified using regular gene-by-gene approaches. Our work also shows how third party analysis of public datasets can be important to support new hypotheses to relevant biological problems. PMID:17718913

  14. Current knowledge of host response in human tinea.

    PubMed

    Brasch, J

    2009-07-01

    Skin infection caused by dermatophytes is called tinea. In this short review, the known mechanisms and factors involved in human tinea and important for the host response are briefly delineated. To establish tinea, fungal propagules must attach to the skin, germinate and overcome the epidermal barrier. Keratinases and other enzymes are released in this process and host keratinocytes are activated. This is followed by an inflammatory response mediated by a plentitude of cytokines and receptors, comprising innate as well as acquired immunity, including neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, antibodies and T cells. Cellular defence mechanisms appear to be decisive for clearing of infection. Nails and hair follicles are the particular sites often invaded by dermatophytes that show distinctive patterns of infection. Nails are largely excluded from defence mechanisms and steroid hormones of the pilosebaceous units may have a particular effect on follicular infection. Fungal invasion of the dermis can cause granulomatous reactions. Immune reactions to dermatophytes may lead to sterile eruptions distant from the infected skin areas. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Th9 cytokines response and its possible implications in the immunopathogenesis of leprosy.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Jorge Rodrigues; Pagliari, Carla; de Almeida, Dandara Simone Maia; Barros, Luiz Fernando Lima; Carneiro, Francisca Regina Oliveira; Dias, Leonidas Braga; de Souza Aarão, Tinara Leila; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2017-06-01

    Leprosy is an infectious-contagious disease whose clinical evolution depends on the interaction of the infectious agent with the immune response of the host, leading to a clinical spectrum that ranges from lepromatous leprosy (susceptibility, LL) to tuberculoid leprosy (resistance, TT). The immune response profile will depend on the pattern of cytokine production and on the activity of macrophages during infection. Classically, the clinical evolution of leprosy has been associated with Th1/Th2 cytokine profiles, but the role of new cytokine profiles such as T helper 9 (Th9) remains to be elucidated. To evaluate the tissue expression profile of these cytokines, a cross-sectional study was conducted using a sample of 30 leprosy skin lesion biopsies obtained from patients with leprosy, 16 TT and 14 lepromatous LL. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant difference in interleukin (IL)-9, IL-4 transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and IL-10 levels between the two groups. IL-9 was more expressed in TT lesions compared with LL lesions. Higher expression of IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β was observed in LL compared with TT. IL-4, IL-10 and TGF-β tended to be negatively correlated with the expression of IL-9, indicating a possible antagonistic activity in tissue. The results suggest that Th9 lymphocytes may be involved in the response to Mycobacterium leprae, positively or negatively regulating microbicidal activity of the local immune system in the disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Lymphotropism and host responses during acute wild-type canine distemper virus infections in a highly susceptible natural host.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Andersen, Mads Klindt; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-09-01

    The mechanisms behind the in vivo virulence of immunosuppressive wild-type morbillivirus infections are still not fully understood. To investigate lymphotropism and host responses, we have selected the natural host model of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection in mink. This model displays multisystemic infection, similar to measles virus and rinderpest virus infections in their susceptible natural hosts. The wild-type CDVs investigated provoked marked virulence differences, inducing mild versus marked to severe acute disease. The mildly virulent wild-type virus induced transient lymphopenia, despite the development of massive infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exceeding that determined for the highly virulent wild-type virus, indicating an inverse relationship between acute virulence and the extent of viraemia in the investigated wild-type viruses. Single-cell cytokine production in PBMCs was investigated throughout the acute infections. We observed Th1- and Th2-type cytokine responses beginning in the prodromal phase, and late inflammatory responses were shared between the wild-type infections.

  17. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance.

  18. Host Transcriptional Response to Ebola Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Speranza, Emily; Connor, John H

    2017-09-20

    Ebola virus disease (EVD) is a serious illness that causes severe disease in humans and non-human primates (NHPs) and has mortality rates up to 90%. EVD is caused by the Ebolavirus and currently there are no licensed therapeutics or vaccines to treat EVD. Due to its high mortality rates and potential as a bioterrorist weapon, a better understanding of the disease is of high priority. Multiparametric analysis techniques allow for a more complete understanding of a disease and the host response. Analysis of RNA species present in a sample can lead to a greater understanding of activation or suppression of different states of the immune response. Transcriptomic analyses such as microarrays and RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) have been important tools to better understand the global gene expression response to EVD. In this review, we outline the current knowledge gained by transcriptomic analysis of EVD.

  19. New aspects of the hormone and cytokine response to training.

    PubMed

    Steinacker, Jürgen M; Lormes, Werner; Reissnecker, Susanne; Liu, Yuefei

    2004-04-01

    Exercise training is associated with peripheral-cellular and central-cerebral processes, hormonal-neuronal regulation and transmission mechanisms. During the acute training response, peripheral cellular mechanisms are mainly metabolostatic to achieve energy supply and involve associated cytokine and hormonal reactions. Glycogen deficiency is associated with increased expression of local cytokines (interleukin-6, IL-6), decreased expression of glucose transporters, increased cortisol and decreased insulin secretion and beta-adrenergic stimulation. A nutrient-sensing signal of adipose tissue may be represented by leptin which, as for insulin, IL-6 and insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-I), has profound effects on the hypothalamus and is involved in the metabolic hormonal regulation of exercise and training. Muscle damage and repair processes may involve the expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g. tumour necrosis factor-alpha, TNF-alpha) and of stress proteins (e.g. heat shock protein 72). During overreaching and overtraining, a myopathy-like state is observed in skeletal muscle with depressed turnover of contractile proteins (e.g. in fast-type glycolytic fibres with a concomitant increase in slow type myosins). These alterations are influenced by exercise-induced hypercortisolism, and by decreased somatotropic hormones (e.g. IGF-I). The hypothalamus integrates various error signals (metabolic, hormonal, sensory afferents and central stimuli) and therefore pituitary releasing hormones represent the functional status of an athlete and long-term hypothalamic hormonal and sympathoadrenal downregulation are some of the prominent hormonal signs of prolonged overtraining and performance incompetence syndrome.

  20. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  1. PDT-induced inflammatory and host responses.

    PubMed

    Firczuk, Małgorzata; Nowis, Dominika; Gołąb, Jakub

    2011-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is used in the management of neoplastic and nonmalignant diseases. Its unique mechanisms of action include direct cytotoxic effects exerted towards tumor cells, destruction of tumor and peritumoral vasculature and induction of local acute inflammatory reaction. The latter develops in response to (1) damage to tumor and stromal cells that leads to the release of cell death-associated molecular patterns (CDAMs) or damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), (2) early vascular changes that include increased vascular permeability, vascular occlusion, and release of vasoactive and proinflammatory mediators, (3) activation of alternative pathway of complement leading to generation of potent chemotactic factors, and (4) induction of signaling cascades and transcription factors that trigger secretion of cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases, or adhesion molecules. The majority of studies indicate that induction of local inflammatory response contributes to the antitumor effects of PDT and facilitates development of systemic immunity. However, the degree of PDT-induced inflammation and its subsequent contribution to its antitumor efficacy depend on multiple parameters, such as chemical nature, concentration and subcellular localization of the photosensitizers, the spectral characteristics of the light source, light fluence and fluence rate, oxygenation level, and tumor type. Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms and development of therapeutic approaches modulating PDT-induced inflammation will be necessary to tailor this treatment to particular clinical conditions.

  2. Impact of host genetic polymorphisms on vaccine induced antibody response

    PubMed Central

    Linnik, Janina E.; Egli, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many host- and vaccine-specific factors modulate an antibody response. Host genetic polymorphisms, in particular, modulate the immune response in multiple ways on different scales. This review article describes how information on host genetic polymorphisms and corresponding immune cascades may be used to generate personalized vaccine strategies to optimize the antibody response. PMID:26809773

  3. Critical Role for Interleukin-25 in Host Protective Th2 Memory Response against Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri.

    PubMed

    Pei, Chenlin; Zhao, Chao; Wang, An-Jiang; Fan, Anya X; Grinchuk, Viktoriya; Smith, Allen; Sun, Rex; Xie, Yue; Lu, Nonghua; Urban, Joseph F; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Zhao, Aiping; Yang, Zhonghan

    2016-12-01

    Infection with parasitic nematodes, especially gastrointestinal geohelminths, affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and thus poses a major risk to global health. The host mechanism of defense against enteric nematode infection remains to be fully understood, but it involves a polarized type 2 immunity leading to alterations in intestinal function that facilitate worm expulsion. We investigated the role of interleukin-25 (IL-25) in host protection against Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri infection in mice. Our results showed that Il25 and its receptor subunit, Il17rb, were upregulated during a primary infection and a secondary challenge infection with H. polygyrus bakeri Genetic deletion of IL-25 (IL-25(-/-)) led to an attenuated type 2 cytokine response and increased worm fecundity in mice with a primary H. polygyrus bakeri infection. In addition, the full spectrum of the host memory response against a secondary infection with H. polygyrus bakeri was severely impaired in IL-25(-/-) mice, including delayed type 2 cytokine responses, an attenuated functional response of the intestinal smooth muscle and epithelium, diminished intestinal smooth muscle hypertrophy/hyperplasia, and impaired worm expulsion. Furthermore, exogenous administration of IL-25 restored the host protective memory response against H. polygyrus bakeri infection in IL-25(-/-) mice. These data demonstrate that IL-25 is critical for host protective immunity against H. polygyrus bakeri infection, highlighting its potential application as a therapeutic agent against parasitic nematode infection worldwide. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Biomarkers in Ocular Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease: Tear Cytokine- and Chemokine-Based Predictive Model.

    PubMed

    Cocho, Lidia; Fernández, Itziar; Calonge, Margarita; Martínez, Verónica; González-García, María J; Caballero, Dolores; López-Corral, Lucía; García-Vázquez, Carmen; Vázquez, Lourdes; Stern, Michael E; Enríquez-de-Salamanca, Amalia

    2016-02-01

    To develop a tear molecule level-based predictive model based on a panel of tear cytokines and their correlation with clinical features in ocular chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD). Twenty-two ocular cGVHD patients and 21 healthy subjects were evaluated in a controlled environmental research laboratory (CERLab). Clinical parameters were recorded, and tears were collected. Levels of 15 molecules (epidermal growth factor [EGF], IL receptor antagonist [IL-1Ra], IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8/CXCL8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-17A, interferon inducible protein [IP]-10/CXCL10, IFN-γ, VEGF, TNF-α, eotaxin 1, and regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES]) were measured by multiplex-bead assay and correlated with clinical parameters. Logistic regression was used to develop a predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was applied. Classification capacity was evaluated in a cohort of individuals with dry eye (DE) of other etiologies different from GVHD. Epidermal growth factor and IP-10/CXCL10 levels were significantly decreased in ocular cGVHD, positively correlating with tear production and stability and negatively correlating with symptoms, hyperemia, and vital staining. Interleukin-1Ra, IL-8/CXCL8, and IL-10 were significantly increased in ocular cGVHD, and the first two correlated positively with symptoms, hyperemia, and ocular surface integrity while negatively correlating with tear production and stability. Predictive models were generated, and the best panel was based on IL-8/CXCL8 and IP-10/CXCL10 tear levels along with age and sex, with an area under the receiving operating curve of 0.9004, sensitivity of 86.36%, and specificity of 95.24%. A predictive model based on tear levels of IL-8/CXCL8 and IP-10/CXCL10 resulted in optimal sensitivity and specificity. These results add further knowledge to the search for potential biomarkers in this devastating ocular inflammatory disease.

  5. Nasal cytokine responses to natural colds in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Toby C.; Henderson, Tiffany A.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; McHenry, Christina L.; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Ren, Xiaodan; Mentz, Graciela B.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Robins, Thomas G.; Joiner, Terence A.; Mohammad, Layla S.; Nguyen, Emily R.; Burns, Mark A.; Burke, David T.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which viruses induce asthma exacerbations are not well-understood. Objective We characterized fluctuations in nasal aspirate cytokines during naturally-occurring respiratory viral infections in children with asthma. Methods Sixteen children underwent home collections of nasal aspirates when they were without cold symptoms and again during self-reported respiratory illnesses. The presence of viral infection was ascertained by multiplex PCR. Cytokines were measured by multiplex immune assay. mRNA expression for selected markers of viral infection was measured by RT-PCR. A cumulative respiratory symptom score was calculated for each day of measurement. Generalized estimated equations were used to evaluate associations between viral infection and marker elevation, and between marker elevation and symptom score. Results The 16 patients completed a total of 37 weeks of assessment (15 “well” weeks; 22 self-assessed “sick” weeks). Viral infections were detected in three of the “well” weeks and 17 of the “sick” weeks (10 rhinovirus, 3 coronavirus, 2 influenza A, 2 influenza B, 2 respiratory syncytial virus, 1 parainfluenza). Compared to virus-negative well weeks, nasal aspirate IFN-γ, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL5/RANTES, CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1β, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP3α protein levels increased during virus-positive sick weeks. Only a subset of cytokines (IFN-γ, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5 and CCL20) correlated with self-reported respiratory tract symptoms. While many aspirates were dilute and showed no mRNA signal, viral infection significantly increased the number of samples that were positive for IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, TLR3, RIG-I and IRF7 mRNA. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance We conclude that, in children with asthma, naturally-occurring viral infections apparently induce a robust innate immune response including expression of specific chemokines, IFNs and IFN-responsive genes. PMID:23181789

  6. Endocrine and cytokine responses in humans with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rey, Adriana Del; Mahuad, Carolina V; Bozza, Verónica V; Bogue, Cristina; Farroni, Miguel A; Bay, María Luisa; Bottasso, Oscar A; Besedovsky, Hugo O

    2007-02-01

    Endocrine responses during chronic infections such as lung tuberculosis are poorly characterized. Hormonal changes are likely to occur since some of the cytokines produced during this disease could affect endocrine mechanisms that, in turn, influence the course of infectious/inflammatory processes. A main purpose of this work was to study endocrine responses involving pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and thyroid hormones in parallel to IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-6 levels in tuberculosis patients with different degree of pulmonary involvement. We have also studied whether products derived from peripheral immune cells obtained from the patients can affect the in vitro production of adrenal steroids. The population studied comprised HIV-negative newly diagnosed, untreated male patients with mild, moderate, and advanced lung tuberculosis, and matched, healthy controls. IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-6 levels were elevated in patients with tuberculosis. Dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone levels were profoundly decreased and growth hormone levels were markedly elevated in patients, in parallel to modest increases in cortisol, estradiol, prolactin, and thyroid hormone concentrations. Supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from the patients and stimulated in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens significantly inhibited dehydroepiandrosterone secretion by the human adrenal cell line NCI-H295-R. These results support the hypothesis that at least some of the endocrine changes observed in the patients may be mediated by endogenous cytokines. The endocrine profile of tuberculosis patients would favor a reduction of protective cell-mediated immunity and an exacerbation of inflammation leading to perpetuation of the lung injury and to the hypercatabolic condition that characterizes this disease.

  7. Complement and cytokine response in acute Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura

    PubMed Central

    Westwood, John-Paul; Langley, Kathryn; Heelas, Edward; Machin, Samuel J; Scully, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Complement dysregulation is key in the pathogenesis of atypical Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome (aHUS), but no clear role for complement has been identified in Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP). We aimed to assess complement activation and cytokine response in acute antibody-mediated TTP. Complement C3a and C5a and cytokines (interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor, interferon-γ and IL-17a) were measured in 20 acute TTP patients and 49 remission cases. Anti-ADAMTS13 immunoglobulin G (IgG) subtypes were measured in acute patients in order to study the association with complement activation. In acute TTP, median C3a and C5a were significantly elevated compared to remission, C3a 63·9 ng/ml vs. 38·2 ng/ml (P < 0·001) and C5a 16·4 ng/ml vs. 9·29 ng/ml (P < 0·001), respectively. Median IL-6 and IL-10 levels were significantly higher in the acute vs. remission groups, IL-6: 8 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P = 0·003), IL-10: 6 pg/ml vs. 2 pg/ml (P < 0·001). C3a levels correlated with both anti-ADAMTS13 IgG (rs = 0·604, P = 0·017) and IL-10 (rs = 0·692, P = 0·006). No anti-ADAMTS13 IgG subtype was associated with higher complement activation, but patients with the highest C3a levels had 3 or 4 IgG subtypes present. These results suggest complement anaphylatoxin levels are higher in acute TTP cases than in remission, and the complement response seen acutely may relate to anti-ADAMTS13 IgG antibody and IL-10 levels. PMID:24372446

  8. Trichuris suis ova therapy for allergic rhinitis does not affect allergen-specific cytokine responses despite a parasite-specific cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Bourke, C D; Mutapi, F; Nausch, N; Photiou, D M F; Poulsen, L K; Kristensen, B; Arnved, J; Rønborg, S; Roepstorff, A; Thamsborg, S; Kapel, C; Melbye, M; Bager, P

    2012-11-01

    Parasitic helminths have been shown to reduce inflammation in most experimental models of allergic disease, and this effect is mediated via cytokine responses. However, in humans, the effects of controlled helminth infection on cytokine responses during allergy have not been studied. The aim was to investigate whether infection with the nematode parasite Trichuris suis alters systemic cytokine levels, cellular cytokine responses to parasite antigens and pollen allergens and/or the cytokine profile of allergic individuals. In a randomized double-blinded placebo-controlled clinical trial (UMIN trial registry, Registration no. R000001298, Trial ID UMIN000001070, URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/map/english), adults with grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis received three weekly doses of 2500 Trichuris suis ova (n = 45) or placebo (n = 44) over 6 months. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10 and IL-13 were quantified via cytometric bead array in plasma. Cytokines, including active TGF-β, were also quantified in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultured with parasite antigens or pollen allergens before, during and after the grass pollen season for a sub-cohort of randomized participants (T. suis ova-treated, n = 12, Placebo-treated, n = 10). Helminth infection induced a Th2-polarized cytokine response comprising elevated plasma IL-5 and parasite-specific IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13, and a global shift in the profile of systemic cytokine responses. Infection also elicited high levels of the regulatory cytokine IL-10 in response to T. suis antigens. Despite increased production of T. suis-specific cytokines in T. suis ova-treated participants, allergen-specific cytokine responses during the grass pollen season and the global profile of PBMC cytokine responses were not affected by T. suis ova treatment. This study suggests that cytokines induced by Trichuris suis ova treatment do not alter allergic reactivity to pollen during the peak of allergic rhinitis

  9. Systems approach to characterizing cell signaling in host-pathogen response to staphylococcus toxin.

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosiano, J. J.; Gupta, G.; Gray, P. C.; Hush, D. R.; Fugate, M. L.; Cleland, T. J.; Roberts, R. M.; Hlavacek, W. S.; Smith, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    The mammalian immune system is capable of highly sensitive and specific responses when challenged by pathogens. It is believed that the human immune repertoire - the total number of distinct antigens that can be recognized - is between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 11}. The most specific responses are cell mediated and involve complex and subtle communications among the immune cells via small proteins known as cytokines. The details of host-pathogen response are exceedingly complex, involving both intracellular and extracellular mechanisms. These include the presentation of antigen by B cells to helper T cells and subsequent stimulation of signal transduction pathways and gene expression within both B and T-cell populations. These in turn lead to the secretion of cytokines and receptor expression. Intercellular cytokine signaling can trigger a host of immune responses including the proliferation and specialization of naive immune cells and the marshaling of effector cells to combat infection. In the ever-evolving game of threat and countermeasure played out by pathogens and their intended hosts, there are direct assaults aimed at subverting the immune system's ability to recognize antigens and respond effectively to challenge by pathogens. Staphylococcus is one of these. Staph bacteria secrete a variety of toxins known generically as superantigens. Superantigen molecules bind simultaneously to the MHC receptors of antigen presenting cells and the TCR receptors of helper T cells, locking them in place and leading to overstimulation. This strategy can effectively burn out the immune system in a matter of days.

  10. Host-response therapeutics for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Giannobile, William V

    2008-08-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by Gram-negative tooth-associated microbial biofilms that elicit a host response, with resultant osseous and soft tissue destruction. In response to endotoxins derived from periodontal pathogens, several osteoclast-related mediators target the destruction of alveolar bone and supporting connective tissues. Major drivers of this aggressive tissue destruction are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and other osteoclast-derived enzymes. This article focuses on the downstream factors of the osteoclast responsible for the degradation of bone and soft tissues around teeth and oral implants. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches that target MMP-2, -8, and -9 inhibition, such as MMP inhibitors, chemically modified tetracyclines, and subantimicrobial formulations of tetracycline analogues, are discussed. The use of rapid, chair-side tests of MMP activity, in particular for MMP-8 and bone collagen fragments, show strong potential as non-invasive measures of tissue health or disease. In addition, studies using other agents for the preservation of bone mass, such as bisphosphonates that inhibit osteoclast recruitment, are highlighted. The application of these bone-preservation strategies to periodontal management and treatment are discussed in the context of high-risk patients susceptible to disease reactivation or disease complications.

  11. Host-Response Therapeutics for Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giannobile, William V.

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by Gram-negative tooth-associated microbial biofilms that elicit a host response, with resultant osseous and soft tissue destruction. In response to endotoxins derived from periodontal pathogens, several osteoclast-related mediators target the destruction of alveolar bone and supporting connective tissues. Major drivers of this aggressive tissue destruction are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and other osteoclast-derived enzymes. This article focuses on the downstream factors of the osteoclast responsible for the degradation of bone and soft tissues around teeth and oral implants. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches that target MMP-2, -8, and -9 inhibition, such as MMP inhibitors, chemically modified tetracyclines, and subantimicrobial formulations of tetracycline analogues, are discussed. The use of rapid, chair-side tests of MMP activity, in particular for MMP-8 and bone collagen fragments, show strong potential as non-invasive measures of tissue health or disease. In addition, studies using other agents for the preservation of bone mass, such as bisphosphonates that inhibit osteoclast recruitment, are highlighted. The application of these bone-preservation strategies to periodontal management and treatment are discussed in the context of high-risk patients susceptible to disease reactivation or disease complications. PMID:18673015

  12. The protective role of endogenous cytokines in host resistance against an intragastric infection with Listeria monocytogenes in mice.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, S; Miura, T; Sasaki, S; Nakane, A

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated that endogenous cytokines including gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) play a protective role but that IL-4 plays a detrimental role in systemic Listeria monocytogenes infection in mice. The diverse roles of IL-10 have been reported in antilisterial resistance. In this paper, we studied the role of endogenous cytokines in host resistance against an intragastric infection with L. monocytogenes in mice. The expression of cytokine mRNAs including IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-6, or IL-10, which were amplified by reverse transcription-PCR, was observed in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes irrespective of L. monocytogenes infection. Increased numbers of L. monocytogenes were detected in the ileal contents of infected mice which received monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-4, IL-6, or IL-10. By contrast, mAbs against IL-4 or IL-6 showed little effect on the growth of L. monocytogenes in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs), spleen, and liver, but anti-IFN-gamma mAb and anti-TNF-alpha mAb suppressed the defense in these organs. Anti-IL-10 mAb enhanced bacterial elimination from the MLNs but not from the spleen or liver. These results suggest that the role of endogenous cytokines may differ between systemic and intestinal defenses.

  13. Cytokine response after severe RSV bronchiolitis in early life

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Mario; Schweiger, Toni; Yin-DeClue, Huiquing; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor P; Christie, Chandrika; Zheng, Jie; Cohen, Rebecca; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Strunk, Robert; Bacharier, Leonard B.

    2008-01-01

    Background Immune response following viral infection usually involves Th1-mediated response; however, severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection appears to be associated with the development of asthma, a Th2-predominant phenotype. Objective To understand the early and subsequent immunologic response to a serious RSV infection in children over time. Methods 206 previously healthy infants hospitalized with severe RSV bronchiolitis were enrolled in a prospective cohort called the RSV Bronchiolitis in Early Life (RBEL) study. Peripheral blood T cells were obtained immediately following RSV infection and at 2, 4 and 6 years of age, stimulated with PMA and ionomycin, and analyzed for interleukin (IL)-2, -4, and - 13 and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) by flow cytometry and real time PCR. Results 48% (n=97) of the children developed asthma (physician-diagnosed) and 48% (n=97) had eczema by age 6. 32% (n=48 of 150) developed allergic sensitization by 3 yrs of age. Children with asthma had lower IL-13 expression at 6 yrs of age than those without (p=0.001). IFN-γ, IL-2 and -4 levels did not differ by asthma or eczema status during follow-up (all p>0.05). Allergic sensitization was not associated with differences in cytokine levels during follow-up (all p>0.05). Conclusion Severe RSV infection early in life is associated with a high incidence of asthma and eczema. Contrary to expectations, subsequent immunologic development in those who developed asthma, eczema or allergic sensitization was not associated with a Th2 phenotype in the peripheral blood. PMID:18760461

  14. Early Cytokine Response to Infection with Pathogenic vs Non-Pathogenic Organisms in a Mouse Model of Endodontic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Stephens, Danielle; Kantarci, Alpdogan; Rittling, Susan R.

    2015-01-01

    Using the subcutaneous chamber model of infection, we showed previously that a mixture of four endodontic pathogens (EP: P. intermedia, F. nucleatum, S. intermedius and P. micra) are able to persist without clearance for up to seven days, while a non-pathogenic oral species, S. mitis, was substantially cleared in this time. Here we have compared the cytokine response inside the chambers against these microorganisms. A majority of cytokines tested (17/24) showed different patterns of expression. Several cytokines had a peak of expression at 2 h after infection in response to the EP, while none showed this pattern in S. mitis infections. Chemokines were uniformly present at similar or higher levels in response to S. mitis, with redundant expression of CXCR2 ligands, while several growth/survival factors were present at higher levels in EP infections. Protease activity expressed by EP may be responsible for the lower levels of some chemokines. T-cell associated cytokines were in general expressed at extremely low levels, and did not differ between the two infections. The inflammatory markers IL-6, IL-1α and IL1-β were expressed at similar levels in both infections at early times, while TNFα was preferentially present in S. mitis infections. In EP infected chambers, reciprocal changes in levels of IL-6 and IL-1α were observed at later times suggesting a switch in the inflammatory response. Analysis of the cytokine response to infection with the individual species from the EP mix suggests that P. intermedia drives this inflammatory switch. Together these results show a surprising level of divergence of the host response to pathogenic and non-pathogenic organisms associated with oral infections, and supports a dominant effect of P. intermedia in polymicrobial endodontic infections. PMID:26171605

  15. Systemic cytokine response to three bouts of eccentric exercise

    PubMed Central

    Cornish, Stephen M.; Johnson, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the changes in inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-1ß, IL-10, as well as muscle force, muscle soreness, thigh circumference, and range of motion in response to 3 bouts of eccentric knee extension. Ten males were recruited to participate. The participants performed eccentric exercise on 3 consecutive days on the knee extensors on the right leg separated by 24??h. Participants performed 6 sets of 10 repetitions of isokinetic eccentric knee extension at 120° per second. Blood was sampled before and after each exercise bout and 24?h after the final exercise bout. Muscle isometric force, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), thigh circumference, and range of motion were evaluated before and after each exercise bout and 24?h after the final exercise bout. There were no statistically significant differences noted for the changes in isometric strength, thigh circumference, and range of motion, or IL-6 over the 4 days (all p > 0.05). On the second day and third day there was a significant increase noted in DOMS as compared with baseline (p < 0.05). These results suggest that 3 consecutive days of eccentric exercise results in DOMS but does not produce a sustained systemic inflammatory reaction or changes in muscle function. PMID:24809007

  16. Deficiency in Th2 Cytokine Responses Exacerbate Orthopoxvirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakala, Isaac G.; Chaudhri, Geeta; Eldi, Preethi; Buller, R. Mark; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2015-01-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) causes mousepox in mice, a disease very similar to smallpox in humans. ECTV and variola virus (VARV), the agent of smallpox, are closely related orthopoxviruses. Mousepox is an excellent small animal model to study the genetic and immunologic basis for resistance and susceptibility of humans to smallpox. Resistance to mousepox is dependent on a strong polarized type 1 immune response, associated with robust natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses. In contrast, ECTV-susceptible mice generate a type 2 response, associated with weak NK cell, CTL and IFN-γ responses but robust IL-4 responses. Nonetheless, susceptible strains infected with mutant ECTV lacking virus-encoded IFN-γ binding protein (vIFN-γbp) (ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ) control virus replication through generation of type 1 response. Since the IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways polarize type 2/T helper 2 (Th2) responses with a corresponding suppression of IFN-γ production, we investigated whether the combined absence of vIFN-γbp, and one or more host genes involved in Th2 response development, influence generation of protective immunity. Most mutant mouse strains infected with wild-type (WT) virus succumbed to disease more rapidly than WT animals. Conversely, the disease outcome was significantly improved in WT mice infected with ECTV-IFN-γbpΔ but absence of IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways did not provide any added advantage. Deficiency in IL-13 or STAT-6 resulted in defective CTL responses, higher mortality rates and accelerated deaths. Deficiencies in IL-4/IL-13/STAT-6 signaling pathways significantly reduced the numbers of IFN-γ producing CD4 and CD8 T cells, indicating an absence of a switch to a Th1-like response. Factors contributing to susceptibility or resistance to mousepox are far more complex than a balance between Th1 and Th2 responses. PMID:25751266

  17. In Vivo Cytokine-Associated Responses to Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Schutte, RJ; Xie, L; Klitzman, B; Reichert, WM

    2008-01-01

    Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors were analyzed periodically over eight weeks from the wound exudate fluid surrounding biomaterials implanted subcutaneously within stainless steel mesh cages. TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α, IL-2, IL-6, IL-1β, VEGF, IL-4, and IL-10 were measured from exudate samples collected from cages containing specimens of polyethylene (PE), polyurethane (PU), or organo-tin polyvinyl chloride (ot-PVC). Empty cages served as negative controls, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) served as a positive control. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor concentrations decreased from the time of implantation to eight weeks post-implantation, and there was an overall increase in cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor production for material-containing cages compared to empty cages. However, cytokine production was only modestly affected by the different surface chemistries of the three implanted polymeric materials. PMID:18849070

  18. In vivo cytokine-associated responses to biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Robert J; Xie, Lola; Klitzman, Bruce; Reichert, William M

    2009-01-01

    Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors were analyzed periodically over eight weeks from the wound exudate fluid surrounding biomaterials implanted subcutaneously within stainless steel mesh cages. TNF-alpha, MCP-1, MIP-1alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IL-1beta, VEGF, IL-4, and IL-10 were measured from exudate samples collected from cages containing specimens of polyethylene (PE), polyurethane (PU), or organotin polyvinyl chloride (ot-PVC). Empty cages served as negative controls, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) served as a positive control. Cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor concentrations decreased from the time of implantation to eight weeks post-implantation, and there was an overall increase in cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor production for material-containing cages compared to empty cages. However, cytokine production was only modestly affected by the different surface chemistries of the three implanted polymeric materials.

  19. Systemic cytokine and interferon responsiveness Patterns in HIV and HCV mono and co-infections.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Joshi-Barve, Swati; Ghare, Smita; Barve, Shirish; Young, Mary; Plankey, Michael; Bordon, Jose

    2014-11-01

    The role of host response-related factors in the fast progression of liver disease in individuals co-infected with HIV and HCV viruses remains poorly understood. This study compared patterns of cytokines, caspase-1 activation, endotoxin exposure in plasma as well as interferon signaling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV/HCV co-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(+)), HCV mono-infected (HIV(-)/HCV(+)), HIV mono-infected (HIV(+)/HCV(-)) female patients and HIV- and HCV-uninfected women (HIV(-)/HCV(-)) who had enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). HIV(+)/HCV(+) women had higher plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as caspase-1 compared with other groups. Both HIV(+)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) women had significantly higher sCD14 levels compared with other groups. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HCV mono-infected patients had reduced levels of phosphorylation of STAT1 compared with other groups as well as lower basal levels of expression of the IFN-stimulated genes, OAS1, ISG15, and USP18 (UBP43). Basal expression of USP18, a functional antagonist of ISG15, as well as USP18/ISG15 ratios were increased in the HIV(+)/HCV(+) group compared with HIV(-)/HCV(+) and HIV(+)/HCV(-) groups. A more pronounced systemic inflammatory profile as well as increased expression ratios of USP18 to ISG15 may contribute to the more rapid progression of liver disease in HIV(+)/HCV(+) individuals.

  20. Using host response modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, M John; Donley, Timothy G

    2002-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of a complex interaction between microbial plaque, the host's inflammatory response to the plaque, and host modifying factors (e.g., smoking, diabetes, genetics) that may have an impact on the disease process. It is known that plaque initiates periodontal disease but that the host response is responsible for the destruction of periodontal tissues. This article describes why host response modifiers may be used to help control inflammation and tissue destruction as part of the initial phase of periodontal therapy in selected patient groups.

  1. Host response to synthetic mesh in women with mesh complications

    PubMed Central

    Nolfi, Alexis L.; Brown, Bryan N.; Liang, Rui; Palcsey, Stacy L.; Bonidie, Michael J.; Abramowitch, Steven D.; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite good anatomic and functional outcomes, urogynecologic polypropylene meshes that are used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence are associated with significant complications, most commonly mesh exposure and pain. Few studies have been performed that specifically focus on the host response to urogynecologic meshes. The macrophage has long been known to be the key cell type that mediates the foreign body response. Conceptually, macrophages that respond to a foreign body can be dichotomized broadly into M1 proinflammatory and M2 proremodeling subtypes. A prolonged M1 response is thought to result in chronic inflammation and the formation of foreign body giant cells with potential for ongoing tissue damage and destruction. Although a limited M2 predominant response is favorable for tissue integration and ingrowth, excessive M2 activity can lead to accelerated fibrillar matrix deposition and result in fibrosis and encapsulation of the mesh. OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to define and compare the macrophage response in patients who undergo mesh excision surgery for the indication of pain vs a mesh exposure. STUDY DESIGN Patients who were scheduled to undergo a surgical excision of mesh for pain or exposure at Magee-Womens Hospital were offered enrollment. Twenty-seven mesh-vagina complexes that were removed for the primary complaint of a mesh exposure (n = 15) vs pain in the absence of an exposure (n = 12) were compared with 30 full-thickness vaginal biopsy specimens from women who underwent benign gynecologic surgery without mesh. Macrophage M1 proinflammatory vs M2 proremodeling phenotypes were examined via immunofluorescent labeling for cell surface markers CD86 (M1) vs CD206 (M2) and M1 vs M2 cytokines via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The amount of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) proteolytic enzymes were quantified by zymography and substrate degradation assays, as an

  2. Modulation of the host response in the treatment of periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Golub, L M; Ryan, M E; Williams, R C

    1998-10-01

    Periodontitis has two distinct but interconnected etiologic components: periodontopathic bacteria adjacent to the periodontal tissues, and host-mediated connective tissue-destructive responses to the specific causative bacteria and their metabolic products. Although past and existing therapies have focused primarily on the causative microbial challenge, the host component of periodontal destruction has recently been intensely studied. New treatment strategies that focus on attenuating destructive host responses are emerging. Host modulatory agents, when used adjunctively, may enhance clinical therapeutic responses and make these responses more predictable in the susceptible host. The ongoing development of safe, effective pharmacotherapies that specifically target host response mechanisms, and the introduction of such pharmacotherapies as adjuncts to traditional, antimicrobial interventions may represent a new, integrated approach in the long-term treatment and management of this chronic disease.

  3. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses as correlates of treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Vanessa; Tebruegge, Marc; Zufferey, Christel; Germano, Susie; Forbes, Ben; Cosentino, Lucy; McBryde, Emma; Eisen, Damon; Robins-Browne, Roy; Street, Alan; Denholm, Justin; Curtis, Nigel

    2017-08-01

    A biomarker indicating successful tuberculosis (TB) therapy would assist in determining appropriate length of treatment. This study aimed to determine changes in mycobacteria-specific antigen-induced cytokine biomarkers in patients receiving therapy for latent or active TB, to identify biomarkers potentially correlating with treatment success. A total of 33 adults with active TB and 36 with latent TB were followed longitudinally over therapy. Whole blood stimulation assays using mycobacteria-specific antigens (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD) were done on samples obtained at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. Cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IP-10, MIP-1β, and TNF-α) in supernatants were measured by Luminex xMAP immunoassay. In active TB cases, median IL-1ra (with CFP-10 and with PPD stimulation), IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), MIP-1β (ESAT-6, PPD), and TNF-α (ESAT-6) responses declined significantly over the course of therapy. In latent TB cases, median IL-1ra (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD), IL-2 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), and IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6) responses declined significantly. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses change significantly over the course of therapy, and their kinetics in active TB differ from those observed in latent TB. In particular, mycobacteria-specific IL-1ra responses are potential correlates of successful therapy in both active and latent TB. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cigarette smoke impairs cytokine responses and BCG containment in alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl-Smit, Richard N; Binder, Anke; Meldau, Richard; Semple, Patricia L; Evans, Alicia; Smith, Peter; Bateman, Eric D; Dheda, Keertan

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a strong epidemiological link between smoking and tuberculosis (TB), but the association is confounded by socioeconomic and other factors. A direct relationship between cigarette smoke and poor treatment-related outcomes in patients with TB is therefore questionable. We investigated whether constituents of tobacco smoke impair mycobacterial host immune responses in vitro. Methodology Preparation of a cigarette smoke extract (CSE) from Marlboro Red cigarettes was standardised and reproducibility verified by mass spectroscopy. Macrophages were derived from peripheral blood monocytes (MDM) and alveolar macrophages from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from healthy non-smoking volunteers. Mycobacterial uptake (flow cytometric detection of fluorescence using green fluorescent protein-labelled BCG), cytokine responses (ELISA) and mycobacterial containment (colony forming units) was evaluated in both macrophage populations with and without co-culture with CSE, nicotine and a nicotine receptor blocker. Results Cigarette smoke failed to impair the uptake of mycobacteria by monocyte-derived or alveolar macrophages. CSE (vs no CSE) reduced the mean (SD) BCG-driven macrophage (MDM) interferon γ (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) responses by 56.4 (18.6)%, 67.0 (33.4)% and 77.7 (27.7)%, respectively (p<0.001). Nicotine alone impaired IL-10 and TNF-α production by 48.8 (37)% and 49 (50)%, respectively (p<0.05) through an α-7 nicotine receptor-independent mechanism. In 5-day cultures, CSE impaired mycobacterial (BCG) containment in both monocyte-derived and alveolar macrophages. Conclusions Cigarette smoke attenuates effector cytokine responses and impairs mycobacterial containment within infected human macrophages derived from the peripheral blood and alveolar compartments, thus supporting the hypothesis that cigarette smoke subverts mycobacteria-related immunity. PMID:24287167

  5. Proteomic Characterization of Host Response to Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Chromy, B; Perkins, J; Heidbrink, J; Gonzales, A; Murhpy, G; Fitch, J P; McCutchen-Maloney, S

    2004-05-11

    Host-pathogen interactions result in protein expression changes within both the host and the pathogen. Here, results from proteomic characterization of host response following exposure to Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and to two near neighbors, Y. pseudotuberculosis and Y. enterocolitica, are reported. Human monocyte-like cells were chosen as a model for macrophage immune response to pathogen exposure. Two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry was used to identify host proteins with differential expression following exposure to these three closely related Yersinia species. This comparative proteomic characterization of host response clearly shows that host protein expression patterns are distinct for the different pathogen exposures, and contributes to further understanding of Y. pestis virulence and host defense mechanisms. This work also lays the foundation for future studies aimed at defining biomarkers for presymptomatic detection of plague.

  6. Differences in Host Innate Responses among Coccidioides Isolates in a Murine Model of Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eric R G; David, Victoria R; Doyle, Adina L; Rajabi, Khadijeh; Kiefer, Jeffrey A; Pirrotte, Patrick; Barker, Bridget M

    2015-10-01

    Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii are soil-dwelling fungi and the causative agents of coccidioidomycosis, a mycosis endemic to certain semiarid regions in the Americas. The most common route of infection is by inhalation of airborne Coccidioides arthroconidia. Once a susceptible host inhales the conidia, a transition to mature endosporulated spherules can occur within the first 5 days of infection. For this study, we examined the host response in a murine model of coccidioidomycosis during a time period of infection that has not been well characterized. We collected lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from BALB/c mice that were infected with a C. immitis pure strain, a C. immitis hybrid strain, or a C. posadasii strain as well as uninfected mice. We compared the host responses to the Coccidioides strains used in this study by assessing the level of transcription of selected cytokine genes in lung tissues and characterized host and fungal proteins present in BALF. Host response varied depending on the Coccidioides strain that was used and did not appear to be overly robust. This study provides a foundation to begin to dissect the host immune response early in infection, to detect abundant Coccidioides proteins, and to develop diagnostics that target these early time points of infection.

  7. Response of host plants to periodical cicada oviposition damage.

    PubMed

    Flory, S Luke; Mattingly, W Brett

    2008-06-01

    Insect oviposition on plants is widespread across many systems, but studies on the response of host plants to oviposition damage are lacking. Although patterns of oviposition vary spatially and temporally, ovipositing insects that exhibit outbreak characteristics may have strong effects on host plants during peak abundance. Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.), in particular, may reduce the performance of host plants when they synchronously emerge in massive numbers to mate and oviposit on host plants. Here we provide the first experimental manipulation of host plant use by periodical cicadas to evaluate the impact of cicada oviposition on plant performance across a diversity of host species within an ecologically relevant setting. Using a randomized block design, we established a plantation of three native and three exotic host plant species common to the successional forests in which cicadas occur. During the emergence of Brood X in 2004, we employed a highly effective cicada exclusion treatment by netting half of the host plants within each block. We assessed multiple measures of host plant performance, including overall plant growth and the growth and reproduction of individual branches, across three growing seasons. Despite our thorough assessment of potential host plant responses to oviposition damage, cicada oviposition did not generally inhibit host plant performance. Oviposition densities on unnetted host plants were comparable to levels documented in other studies, reinforcing the ecological relevance of our results, which indicate that cicada oviposition damage did not generally reduce the performance of native or exotic host plants.

  8. Review of osteoimmunology and the host response in endodontic and periodontal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Dana T.; Oates, Thomas; Garlet, Gustavo P.

    2011-01-01

    Both lesions of endodontic origin and periodontal diseases involve the host response to bacteria and the formation of osteolytic lesions. Important for both is the upregulation of inflammatory cytokines that initiate and sustain the inflammatory response. Also important are chemokines that induce recruitment of leukocyte subsets and bone-resorptive factors that are largely produced by recruited inflammatory cells. However, there are differences also. Lesions of endodontic origin pose a particular challenge since that bacteria persist in a protected reservoir that is not readily accessible to the immune defenses. Thus, experiments in which the host response is inhibited in endodontic lesions tend to aggravate the formation of osteolytic lesions. In contrast, bacteria that invade the periodontium appear to be less problematic so that blocking arms of the host response tend to reduce the disease process. Interestingly, both lesions of endodontic origin and periodontitis exhibit inflammation that appears to inhibit bone formation. In periodontitis, the spatial location of the inflammation is likely to be important so that a host response that is restricted to a subepithelial space is associated with gingivitis, while a host response closer to bone is linked to bone resorption and periodontitis. However, the persistence of inflammation is also thought to be important in periodontitis since inflammation present during coupled bone formation may limit the capacity to repair the resorbed bone. PMID:21547019

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Targeting the Host Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of an acute vesicular disease affecting pigs, cattle and other domestic, and wild animals worldwide. The aim of the host interferon (IFN) response is to limit viral replication and spread. Detection of the viral genome and products by specialized cellular sensors initiates a signaling cascade that leads to a rapid antiviral response involving the secretion of type I- and type III-IFNs and other antiviral cytokines with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory functions. During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have acquired strategies to actively counteract host antiviral responses and the balance between innate response and viral antagonism may determine the outcome of disease and pathogenesis. FMDV proteases Lpro and 3C have been found to antagonize the host IFN response by a repertoire of mechanisms. Moreover, the putative role of other viral proteins in IFN antagonism is being recently unveiled, uncovering sophisticated immune evasion strategies different to those reported to date for other members of the Picornaviridae family. Here, we review the interplay between antiviral responses induced by FMDV infection and viral countermeasures to block them. Research on strategies used by viruses to modulate immunity will provide insights into the function of host pathways involved in defense against pathogens and will also lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to fight virus infections. PMID:28660175

  10. Mint3/Apba3 depletion ameliorates severe murine influenza pneumonia and macrophage cytokine production in response to the influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Fujita, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Hiroki J.; Hara, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Noritada; Murakami, Yoshinori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe pneumonia. Studies have suggested that excessive activation of the host immune system including macrophages is responsible for the severe pathologies mediated by IFV infection. Here, we focused on the X11 protein family member Mint3/Apba3, known to promote ATP production via glycolysis by activating hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in macrophages, and examined its roles in lung pathogenesis and anti-viral defence upon IFV infection. Mint3-deficient mice exhibited improved influenza pneumonia with reduced inflammatory cytokines/chemokine levels and neutrophil infiltration in the IFV-infected lungs without alteration in viral burden, type-I interferon production, or acquired immunity. In macrophages, Mint3 depletion attenuated NF-κB signalling and the resultant cytokine/chemokine production in response to IFV infection by increasing IκBα and activating the cellular energy sensor AMPK, respectively. Thus, Mint3 might represent one of the likely therapeutic targets for the treatment of severe influenza pneumonia without affecting host anti-viral defence through suppressing macrophage cytokine/chemokine production. PMID:27883071

  11. Metabolic host responses to infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Heesemann, Jürgen; Rudel, Thomas; Goebel, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacterial pathogens with mammalian hosts leads to a variety of physiological responses of the interacting partners aimed at an adaptation to the new situation. These responses include multiple metabolic changes in the affected host cells which are most obvious when the pathogen replicates within host cells as in case of intracellular bacterial pathogens. While the pathogen tries to deprive nutrients from the host cell, the host cell in return takes various metabolic countermeasures against the nutrient theft. During this conflicting interaction, the pathogen triggers metabolic host cell responses by means of common cell envelope components and specific virulence-associated factors. These host reactions generally promote replication of the pathogen. There is growing evidence that pathogen-specific factors may interfere in different ways with the complex regulatory network that controls the carbon and nitrogen metabolism of mammalian cells. The host cell defense answers include general metabolic reactions, like the generation of oxygen- and/or nitrogen-reactive species, and more specific measures aimed to prevent access to essential nutrients for the respective pathogen. Accurate results on metabolic host cell responses are often hampered by the use of cancer cell lines that already exhibit various de-regulated reactions in the primary carbon metabolism. Hence, there is an urgent need for cellular models that more closely reflect the in vivo infection conditions. The exact knowledge of the metabolic host cell responses may provide new interesting concepts for antibacterial therapies. PMID:23847769

  12. Outsmarting the host: bacteria modulating the immune response.

    PubMed

    Woolard, Matthew D; Frelinger, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria and their hosts have had a two-way conversation for millions of years. This interaction has led to many measure/counter-measure responses by the host and bacteria. The host immune response has developed many mechanisms to neutralize and remove pathogen bacteria. In turn pathogenic bacteria have developed mechanisms to alter and evade the host immune response. We will review some of the mechanisms utilized by bacteria to accomplish this goal. We will also examine the current state of understanding of Francisella tularensis mediated immune evasion.

  13. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Monica I.; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response. PMID:25742773

  14. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  15. INCONSISTENCIES BETWEEN CYTOKINE PROFILES, ANTIBODY RESPONSES, AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses has been proposed as a simple test to identify chemicals, such as low molecular weight diisocyanates, that pose a significant risk of occupational asthma. Previously, we reported cytokine mRNA profiles for dinitrochlorobenzene (DNC...

  16. CYTOKINE PROFILES DO NOT PREDICT ANTIBODY RESPONSES AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses following dermal exposure has been proposed as a test to identify chemicals that pose a risk of occupational asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that relative differences in cytokine profiles for dini...

  17. CYTOKINE PROFILES DO NOT PREDICT ANTIBODY RESPONSES AND RESPIRATORY HYPERRESPONSIVENESS FOLLOWING DERMAL EXPOSURE TO ISOCYANATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Cytokine profiling of local lymph node responses following dermal exposure has been proposed as a test to identify chemicals that pose a risk of occupational asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that relative differences in cytokine profiles for dini...

  18. Cytokine responses in the common cold and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Wine, Todd M; Alper, Cuneyt M

    2012-12-01

    Cytokines are a group of diverse molecules that influence the function of every organ system. They are most well studied in their effects on the immune system and their integral role in mediating inflammation. The common cold and otitis media are two such disease states, and much has been learned about the various effects of cytokines in each disease. Most often the viruses isolated include rhinovirus (RV), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), adenovirus, coronavirus, and picornavirus. Otitis media, sinusitis, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma exacerbation are commonly accepted as complications of viral upper respiratory tract infections. Furthermore, otitis media and upper respiratory infections are inextricably linked in that the majority (>70 %) of cases of acute otitis media occur as complications of the common cold. Cytokine polymorphisms have been associated with the severity of colds as well as the frequency of otitis media. This article attempts to update the reader on various studies that have recently been published regarding the role of cytokines in these two disease entities.

  19. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kimberly K; Hill, Terence E; Davis, Melissa N; Holbrook, Michael R; Freiberg, Alexander N

    2015-07-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection.

  20. Cytokine response in mouse bone marrow derived macrophages after infection with pathogenic and non-pathogenic Rift Valley fever virus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Kimberly K.; Hill, Terence E.; Davis, Melissa N.; Holbrook, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is the most pathogenic member of the genus Phlebovirus within the family Bunyaviridae, and can cause severe disease in humans and livestock. Until recently, limited information has been published on the cellular host response elicited by RVFV, particularly in macrophages and dendritic cells, which play critical roles in stimulating adaptive and innate immune responses to viral infection. In an effort to define the initial response of host immunomodulatory cells to infection, primary mouse bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were infected with the pathogenic RVFV strain ZH501, or attenuated strains MP-12 or MP-12 based Clone13 type (rMP12-C13 type), and cytokine secretion profiles examined. The secretion of T helper (Th)1-associated antiviral cytokines, chemokines and various interleukins increased rapidly after infection with the attenuated rMP12-C13 type RVFV, which lacks a functional NSs virulence gene. In comparison, infection with live-attenuated MP-12 encoding a functional NSs gene appeared to cause a delayed immune response, while pathogenic ZH501 ablates the immune response almost entirely. These data demonstrate that NSs can inhibit components of the BMDM antiviral response and supports previous work indicating that NSs can specifically regulate the type I interferon response in macrophages. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that genetic differences between ZH501 and MP-12 reduce the ability of MP-12 to inhibit antiviral signalling and subsequently reduce virulence in BMDM, demonstrating that viral components other than NSs play a critical role in regulating the host response to RVFV infection. PMID:25759029

  1. Host Responses in Tissue Repair and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Duffield, Jeremy S.; Lupher, Mark; Thannickal, Victor J.

    2013-01-01

    Myofibroblasts accumulate in the spaces between organ structures and produce extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, including collagen I. They are the primary “effector” cells in tissue remodeling and fibrosis. Previously, leukocyte progenitors termed fibrocytes and myofibroblasts generated from epithelial cells through epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were considered the primary sources of ECM-producing myofibroblasts in injured tissues. However, genetic fate mapping experiments suggest that mesenchyme-derived cells, known as resident fibroblasts, and pericytes are the primary precursors of scar-forming myofibroblasts, whereas epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and myeloid leukocytes contribute to fibrogenesis predominantly by producing key fibrogenic cytokines and by promoting cell-to-cell communication. Numerous cytokines derived from T cells, macrophages, and other myeloid cell populations are important drivers of myofibroblast differentiation. Monocyte-derived cell populations are key regulators of the fibrotic process: They act as a brake on the processes driving fibrogenesis, and they dismantle and degrade established fibrosis. We discuss the origins, modes of activation, and fate of myofibroblasts in various important fibrotic diseases and describe how manipulation of macrophage activation could help ameliorate fibrosis. PMID:23092186

  2. Polyfunctional responses by human T cells result from sequential release of cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qing; Bagheri, Neda; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Hafler, David A.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Love, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The release of cytokines by T cells defines a significant part of their functional activity in vivo, and their ability to produce multiple cytokines has been associated with beneficial immune responses. To date, time-integrated end-point measurements have obscured whether these polyfunctional states arise from the simultaneous or successive release of cytokines. Here, we used serial, time-dependent, single-cell analysis of primary human T cells to resolve the temporal dynamics of cytokine secretion from individual cells after activation ex vivo. We show that multifunctional, Th1-skewed cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-2, TNFα) are initiated asynchronously, but the ensuing dynamic trajectories of these responses evolve programmatically in a sequential manner. That is, cells predominantly release one of these cytokines at a time rather than maintain active secretion of multiple cytokines simultaneously. Furthermore, these dynamic trajectories are strongly associated with the various states of cell differentiation suggesting that transient programmatic activities of many individual T cells contribute to sustained, population-level responses. The trajectories of responses by single cells may also provide unique, time-dependent signatures for immune monitoring that are less compromised by the timing and duration of integrated measures. PMID:22160692

  3. Ex Vivo Host and Parasite Response to Antileishmanial Drugs and Immunomodulators

    PubMed Central

    McMahon-Pratt, Diane; Saravia, Nancy Gore

    2015-01-01

    Background Therapeutic response in infectious disease involves host as well as microbial determinants. Because the immune and inflammatory response to Leishmania (Viannia) species defines the outcome of infection and efficacy of treatment, immunomodulation is considered a promising therapeutic strategy. However, since Leishmania infection and antileishmanial drugs can themselves modulate drug transport, metabolism and/or immune responses, immunotherapeutic approaches require integrated assessment of host and parasite responses. Methodology To achieve an integrated assessment of current and innovative therapeutic strategies, we determined host and parasite responses to miltefosine and meglumine antimoniate alone and in combination with pentoxifylline or CpG 2006 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Parasite survival and secretion of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-13 were evaluated concomitantly in PBMCs infected with Luc-L. (V.) panamensis exposed to meglumine antimoniate (4, 8, 16, 32 and 64 μg SbV/mL) or miltefosine (2, 4, 8, 16 and 32 μM HePC). Concentrations of 4 μM of miltefosine and 8 μg SbV/mL were selected for evaluation in combination with immunomodulators based on the high but partial reduction of parasite burden by these antileishmanial concentrations without affecting cytokine secretion of infected PBMCs. Intracellular parasite survival was determined by luminometry and cytokine secretion measured by ELISA and multiplex assays. Principal Findings Anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines characteristic of L. (V.) panamensis infection were evaluable concomitantly with viability of Leishmania within monocyte-derived macrophages present in PBMC cultures. Both antileishmanial drugs reduced the parasite load of macrophages; miltefosine also suppressed IL-10 and IL-13 secretion in a dose dependent manner. Pentoxifylline did not affect parasite survival or alter antileishmanial effects of miltefosine or meglumine

  4. Cytokine Responses to Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium in Relation to Infection in a Co-endemic Focus in Northern Senegal

    PubMed Central

    Meurs, Lynn; Mbow, Moustapha; Boon, Nele; Vereecken, Kim; Amoah, Abena Serwaa; Labuda, Lucja A.; Dièye, Tandakha Ndiaye; Mboup, Souleymane; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Polman, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background In Africa, many areas are co-endemic for the two major Schistosoma species, S. mansoni and S. haematobium. Epidemiological studies have suggested that host immunological factors may play an important role in co-endemic areas. As yet, little is known about differences in host immune responses and possible immunological interactions between S. mansoni and S. haematobium in humans. The aim of this study was to analyze host cytokine responses to antigens from either species in a population from a co-endemic focus, and relate these to S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection. Methodology Whole blood cytokine responses were investigated in a population in the north of Senegal (n = 200). Blood was stimulated for 72 h with schistosomal egg and adult worm antigens of either Schistosoma species. IL-10, IL-5, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 production was determined in culture supernatants. A multivariate (i.e. multi-response) approach was used to allow a joint analysis of all cytokines in relation to Schistosoma infection. Principal Findings Schistosoma haematobium egg and worm antigens induced higher cytokine production, suggesting that S. haematobium may be more immunogenic than S. mansoni. However, both infections were strongly associated with similar, modified Th2 cytokine profiles. Conclusions/Significance This study is the first to compare S. mansoni and S. haematobium cytokine responses in one population residing in a co-endemic area. These findings are in line with previous epidemiological studies that also suggested S. haematobium egg and worm stages to be more immunogenic than those of S. mansoni. PMID:25101661

  5. Divergence in Olfactory Host Plant Preference in D. mojavensis in Response to Cactus Host Use

    PubMed Central

    Stensmyr, Marcus C.; Shann, Jodi; Hansson, Bill S.; Rollmann, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. In this study, we examine the evolution of host plant preferences in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that feeds and breeds on different cacti throughout its range. We show divergence in electrophysiological responses and olfactory behavior among populations with host plant shifts. Specifically, significant divergence was observed in the Mojave Desert population that specializes on barrel cactus. Differences were observed in electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organs and in behavioral responses to barrel cactus volatiles. Together our results suggest that the peripheral nervous system has changed in response to different ecological environments and that these changes likely contribute to divergence among D. mojavensis populations. PMID:23936137

  6. Divergence in olfactory host plant preference in D. mojavensis in response to cactus host use.

    PubMed

    Date, Priya; Dweck, Hany K M; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Shann, Jodi; Hansson, Bill S; Rollmann, Stephanie M

    2013-01-01

    Divergence in host adaptive traits has been well studied from an ecological and evolutionary perspective, but identification of the proximate mechanisms underlying such divergence is less well understood. Behavioral preferences for host plants are often mediated by olfaction and shifts in preference may be accompanied by changes in the olfactory system. In this study, we examine the evolution of host plant preferences in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis that feeds and breeds on different cacti throughout its range. We show divergence in electrophysiological responses and olfactory behavior among populations with host plant shifts. Specifically, significant divergence was observed in the Mojave Desert population that specializes on barrel cactus. Differences were observed in electrophysiological responses of the olfactory organs and in behavioral responses to barrel cactus volatiles. Together our results suggest that the peripheral nervous system has changed in response to different ecological environments and that these changes likely contribute to divergence among D. mojavensis populations.

  7. Cytokine and Chemokine Responses of Lung Exposed to Surrogate Viral and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Teresa A; Trammell, Rita A; Randle, Michelle; Barrett, Sarah; Toth, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    The use of in vitro models of complex in vivo systems has yielded many insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie normal and pathologic physiology. However although the reduced complexity of these models is advantageous with regard to some research questions, the simplification may obscure or eliminate key influences that occur in vivo. We sought to examine this possibility with regard to the lung's response to infection, which may be inherent to resident lung cells or related to the systemic response to pulmonary infection. We used the inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and B6.129S2-IL6tm1Kopf, which differ in their response to inflammatory and infectious challenges, to assess in vivo responses of lung to surrogate viral and bacterial infection and compared these with responses of cultured lung slices and human A549 cells. Pulmonary cytokine concentrations were measured both after in vivo inoculation of mice and in vitro exposure of lung slices and A549 cells to surrogate viral and bacterial infections. The data indicate similarities and differences in early lung responses to in vivo compared with in vitro exposure to these inflammatory substances. Therefore, resident cells in the lung appear to respond to some challenges in a strain-independent manner, whereas some stimuli may elicit recruitment of peripheral inflammatory cells that generate the subsequent response in a genotype-related manner. These results add to the body of information pointing to host genotype as a crucial factor in mediating the severity of microbial infections and demonstrate that some of these effects may not be apparent in vitro. PMID:23582418

  8. Inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Cerami, A

    1992-01-01

    The immune system produces cytokines and other humoral factors to protect the host when threatened by inflammatory agents, microbial invasion, or injury. In some cases this complex defense network successfully restores normal homeostasis, but at other times the overproduction of immunoregulatory mediators may actually prove deleterious to the host. Some examples of immune system-mediated injury have been extensively investigated including anaphylactic shock, autoimmune disease, and immune complex disorders. More recently it has become clear that the cytokine cachectin/tumor necrosis factor (TNF) occupies a key role in the pathophysiology associated with diverse inflammatory states and other serious illnesses including septic shock and cachexia. For example, when cachectin/TNF is produced by resident macrophages during early microbial infection, it mediates an inflammatory response that may alienate and repel the attacking organisms. If the infection spreads, however, the subsequent release of large quantities of cachectin/TNF into the circulation may be catastrophic and trigger a state of lethal shock. These toxic effects occur by direct action of TNF on host cells and by the interaction with a cascade of other endogenous mediators including interleukin-1 and interferon-gamma. The biology of cachectin/TNF will be reviewed, along with the potential for modulating the effects of this pluripotent molecule in a variety of pathologic states.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE_PGRS18 enhances the intracellular survival of M. smegmatis via altering host macrophage cytokine profiling and attenuating the cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenmin; Deng, Wanyan; Zeng, Jie; Ren, Sai; Ali, Md Kaisar; Gu, Yinzhong; Li, Yangyuling; Xie, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis PE/PPE family proteins, named after the presence of conserved PE (Pro-Glu) and PPE (Pro-Pro-Glu) domains at N-terminal, are prevalent in M. tuberculosis genome. The function of most PE/PPE family proteins remains elusive. To characterize the function of PE_PGRS18, the encoding gene was heterologously expressed in M. smegmatis, a nonpathogenic mycobacterium. The recombinant PE_PGRS18 is cell wall associated. M. smegmatis PE_PGRS18 recombinant showed differential response to stresses and altered the production of host cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, IL-12p40 and IL-10, as well as enhanced survival within macrophages largely via attenuating the apoptosis of macrophages. In summary, the study firstly unveiled the role of PE_PGRS18 in physiology and pathogenesis of mycobacterium.

  10. Coccidioidomycosis: Host Response and Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Rebecca A.; Magee, D. Mitchell

    2004-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is caused by the dimorphic fungi in the genus Coccidioides. These fungi live as mycelia in the soil of desert areas of the American Southwest, and when the infectious spores, the arthroconidia, are inhaled, they convert into the parasitic spherule/endospore phase. Most infections are mild, but these organisms are frank pathogens and can cause severe lethal disease in fully immunocompetent individuals. While there is increased risk of disseminated disease in certain racial groups and immunocompromised persons, the fact that there are hosts who contain the initial infection and exhibit long-term immunity to reinfection supports the hypothesis that a vaccine against these pathogens is feasible. Multiple studies have shown that protective immunity against primary disease is associated with T-helper 1 (Th-1)-associated immune responses. The single best vaccine in animal models, formalin-killed spherules (FKS), was tested in a human trial but was not found to be significantly protective. This result has prompted studies to better define immunodominant Coccidioides antigen with the thought that a subunit vaccine would be protective. These efforts have defined multiple candidates, but the single best individual immunogen is the protein termed antigen 2/proline-rich antigen (Ag2/PRA). Studies in multiple laboratories have shown that Ag2/PRA as both protein and genetic vaccines provides significant protection against mice challenged systemically with Coccidioides. Unfortunately, compared to the FKS vaccine, it is significantly less protective as measured by both assays of reduction in fungal CFU and assays of survival. The capacity of Ag2/PRA to induce only partial protection was emphasized when animals were challenged intranasally. Thus, there is a need to define new candidates to create a multivalent vaccine to increase the effectiveness of Ag2/PRA. Efforts of genomic screening using expression library immunization or bioinformatic approaches to identify

  11. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  12. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  13. Cytokine response in crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ergönül, Önder; Şeref, Ceren; Eren, Şebnem; Çelikbaş, Aysel; Baykam, Nurcan; Dokuzoğuz, Başak; Gönen, Mehmet; Can, Füsun

    2017-10-01

    We described the predictive role of cytokines in fatality of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (CCHFV) infection by using daily clinical sera samples. Consequent serum samples of the selected patients in different severity groups and healthy controls were examined by using human cytokine 17-plex assay. We included 12 (23%) mild, 30 (58%) moderate, 10 (19%) severe patients, and 10 healthy volunteers. The mean age of the patients was 52 (sd 15), 52% were female. Forty-six patients (88%) received ribavirin. During disease course, the median levels of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-10/12, IFN-γ, MCP-1, and MIP-1b were found to be significantly higher among CCHF patients than the healthy controls. Within the first 5 days after onset of disease, among the fatal cases, the median levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were found to be significantly higher than the survived ones (Fig. 3), and MCP-1 was elevated among fatal cases, but statistical significance was not detected. In receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, IL-8 (92%), IL-6 (92%), MCP-1 (79%) were found to be the most significant cytokines in predicting the fatality rates in the early period of the disease (5 days). IL-6 and IL-8 can predict the poor outcome, within the first 5 days of disease course. Elevated IL-6 and IL-8 levels within first 5 days could be used as prognostic markers. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Variability in Tuberculosis Granuloma T Cell Responses Exists, but a Balance of Pro- and Anti-inflammatory Cytokines Is Associated with Sterilization

    PubMed Central

    Gideon, Hannah Priyadarshini; Phuah, JiaYao; Myers, Amy J.; Bryson, Bryan D.; Rodgers, Mark A.; Coleman, M. Teresa; Maiello, Pauline; Rutledge, Tara; Marino, Simeone; Fortune, Sarah M.; Kirschner, Denise E.; Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2015-01-01

    Lung granulomas are the pathologic hallmark of tuberculosis (TB). T cells are a major cellular component of TB lung granulomas and are known to play an important role in containment of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. We used cynomolgus macaques, a non-human primate model that recapitulates human TB with clinically active disease, latent infection or early infection, to understand functional characteristics and dynamics of T cells in individual granulomas. We sought to correlate T cell cytokine response and bacterial burden of each granuloma, as well as granuloma and systemic responses in individual animals. Our results support that each granuloma within an individual host is independent with respect to total cell numbers, proportion of T cells, pattern of cytokine response, and bacterial burden. The spectrum of these components overlaps greatly amongst animals with different clinical status, indicating that a diversity of granulomas exists within an individual host. On average only about 8% of T cells from granulomas respond with cytokine production after stimulation with Mtb specific antigens, and few “multi-functional” T cells were observed. However, granulomas were found to be “multi-functional” with respect to the combinations of functional T cells that were identified among lesions from individual animals. Although the responses generally overlapped, sterile granulomas had modestly higher frequencies of T cells making IL-17, TNF and any of T-1 (IFN-γ, IL-2, or TNF) and/or T-17 (IL-17) cytokines than non-sterile granulomas. An inverse correlation was observed between bacterial burden with TNF and T-1/T-17 responses in individual granulomas, and a combinatorial analysis of pair-wise cytokine responses indicated that granulomas with T cells producing both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-10 and IL-17) were associated with clearance of Mtb. Preliminary evaluation suggests that systemic responses in the blood do not accurately

  15. A conserved flagellar pocket exposed high mannose moiety is used by African trypanosomes as a host cytokine binding molecule.

    PubMed

    Magez, S; Radwanska, M; Stijlemans, B; Xong, H V; Pays, E; De Baetselier, P

    2001-09-07

    Trypanosomes use antigenic variation of their variant-specific surface glycoprotein (VSG) coat as defense against the host immune system. However, in order to sustain their growth, they need to expose conserved epitopes, allowing host macromolecule binding and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Here we show that Trypanosoma brucei uses the conserved chitobiose-oligomannose (GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9)) moieties of its VSG as a binding ligand for tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a host cytokine with lectin-like properties. As endocytosis in trypanosomes is restricted to the flagellar pocket, we show that soluble flagellar pocket extracts, and in particular soluble VSG, inhibit the binding of (125)I-TNF to trypanosomes. The interaction between TNF and VSG is confirmed by affinity chromatography, biosensor, and dot-blot affinity measurements, and soluble VSG inhibition of TNF-mediated trypanolysis. In all approaches, removal of N-linked carbohydrates abrogates the TNF-VSG interaction. In addition, synthetic high mannose oligosaccharides can block TNF-VSG interactions, and a VSG glycopeptide carrying the GlcNAc(2)-Man(5-9) moiety is shown to inhibit TNF-mediated trypanosome killing in mixed parasite/macrophage cell cultures. Together, these results support the observation that TNF plays a role in growth control of trypanosomes and, moreover, suggest that, by the use of conserved VSG carbohydrates as lectin-binding epitopes, trypanosomes can limit the necessity to express large numbers of invariant surface exposed receptors.

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Co-operonic PE32/PPE65 Proteins Alter Host Immune Responses by Hampering Th1 Response

    PubMed Central

    Khubaib, Mohd; Sheikh, Javaid A.; Pandey, Saurabh; Srikanth, Battu; Bhuwan, Manish; Khan, Nooruddin; Hasnain, Seyed E.; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.

    2016-01-01

    PE/PPE genes, present in cluster with ESAT-6 like genes, are suspected to have a role in antigenic variation and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Their roles in immune evasion and immune modulation of host are also well documented. We present evidence that PE32/PPE65 present within the RD8 region are co-operonic, co-transcribed, and co-translated, and play role in modulating host immune responses. Experiments with macrophage cell lines revealed that this protein complex suppresses pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 whereas also inducing high expression of anti-inflammatory IL-10. Immunization of mice with these recombinant proteins dampens an effective Th1 response as evident from reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 producing CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. IgG sub-typing from serum of immunized mice revealed high levels of IgG1 when compared with IgG2a and IgG2b. Further IgG1/IgG2a ratio clearly demonstrated that the protein complex manipulates the host immune response favorable to the pathogen. Our results demonstrate that the co-transcribed and co-translated PE32 and PPE65 antigens are involved specifically in modulating anti-mycobacterial host immune response by hampering Th1 response. PMID:27242739

  17. Allelic variation on murine chromosome 11 modifies host inflammatory responses and resistance to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Terra, Jill K; France, Bryan; Cote, Christopher K; Jenkins, Amy; Bozue, Joel A; Welkos, Susan L; Bhargava, Ragini; Ho, Chi-Lee; Mehrabian, Margarete; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; LeVine, Steven M; Bradley, Kenneth A

    2011-12-01

    Anthrax is a potentially fatal disease resulting from infection with Bacillus anthracis. The outcome of infection is influenced by pathogen-encoded virulence factors such as lethal toxin (LT), as well as by genetic variation within the host. To identify host genes controlling susceptibility to anthrax, a library of congenic mice consisting of strains with homozygous chromosomal segments from the LT-responsive CAST/Ei strain introgressed on a LT-resistant C57BL/6 (B6) background was screened for response to LT. Three congenic strains containing CAST/Ei regions of chromosome 11 were identified that displayed a rapid inflammatory response to LT similar to, but more severe than that driven by a LT-responsive allele of the inflammasome constituent NRLP1B. Importantly, increased response to LT in congenic mice correlated with greater resistance to infection by the Sterne strain of B. anthracis. The genomic region controlling the inflammatory response to LT was mapped to 66.36-74.67 Mb on chromosome 11, a region that encodes the LT-responsive CAST/Ei allele of Nlrp1b. However, known downstream effects of NLRP1B activation, including macrophage pyroptosis, cytokine release, and leukocyte infiltration could not fully explain the response to LT or the resistance to B. anthracis Sterne in congenic mice. Further, the exacerbated response in congenic mice is inherited in a recessive manner while the Nlrp1b-mediated response to LT is dominant. Finally, congenic mice displayed increased responsiveness in a model of sepsis compared with B6 mice. In total, these data suggest that allelic variation of one or more chromosome 11 genes in addition to Nlrp1b controls the severity of host response to multiple inflammatory stimuli and contributes to resistance to B. anthracis Sterne. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis revealed 25 genes within this region as high priority candidates for contributing to the host response to LT.

  18. Impact of influenza vaccine formulation with a detailed analysis of the cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Szyszko, E; Brokstad, K; Cox, R J; Hovden, A-O; Madhun, A; Haaheim, L R

    2006-11-01

    Vaccination provides the most effective method of limiting the impact of influenza. Inactivated influenza vaccines are available in three formulations and more information needs to be generated on how antigen presented in different vaccine formulations influences the subsequent immune response. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of two different influenza vaccine formulations on the resulting antibody and cytokine responses and compared these responses with influenza infection. Mice were vaccinated intramuscularly with one or two doses of whole or split virus vaccine or alternatively intranasally infected with influenza virus. Lymphocytes were isolated from spleen cells and stimulated in vitro for 24 or 72 h for analysis of cytokine profile at the gene expression and at the protein level. Additionally, whole blood was collected and the serum antibody response investigated by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We found that one dose of whole virus vaccine induced higher antibody and cytokine responses and thus was more immunogenic in unprimed mice than split virus vaccine. Whole virus vaccine induced a strong IFN-gamma (type 1) immune response after one dose of vaccine and a more mixed cytokine response after the second dose. Split virus vaccine induced a type 2 response, particularly after two vaccine doses. Our results show that two doses of vaccine (both vaccine formulation) were more effective in induction of Th2 type of cytokines and thus indicate that both the formulation and also the number of vaccine doses substantially influences the magnitude and quality of the immune response.

  19. The relative impact of bacterial virulence and host genetic background on cytokine expression during Mycobacterium avium infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Castro, A G; Minóprio, P; Appelberg, R

    1995-01-01

    Resistance to Mycobacterium avium depends on both genetically encoded macrophage functions and acquired T-cell immunity. Cytokines may play a role in either type of resistance. We studied the expression of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4 and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in naturally susceptible BALB/c (Bcgs) and naturally resistant C.D2 (Bcgr) congenic mice infected with two strains of M. avium (one highly virulent and another of low virulence). We observed that cytokine expression patterns correlated better with the virulence of the micro-organism than with the genetic background of the host. The control of the infection by the low virulence strain in either mouse strain was associated with an increased expression of IFN-gamma and IL-2. Only Bcgs mice infected with a virulent strain of M. avium were unable to restrict bacterial growth. An increased expression of IL-4, early during infection, was detected in the course of the latter infection but played no role in determining the susceptibility to infection. Neutralization of IFN-gamma or IL-2 with specific monoclonal antibodies led to an exacerbation of the infection in Bcgr mice by the two strains of M. avium and in Bcgs mice infected with the low virulence strain of M. avium. PMID:7558149

  20. Defensins attenuate cytokine responses yet enhance antibody responses to Porphyromonas gingivalis adhesins in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohlgraf, Karl G; Ackermann, Abbey; Lu, Xiaoying; Burnell, Kindra; Bélanger, Myriam; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Xie, Hua; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Brogden, Kim A

    2010-01-01

    Aim Our aim is to assess the ability of human neutrophil peptide α-defensins (HNPs) and human β-defensins (HBDs) to attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses and enhance antibody responses to recombinant hemagglutinin B (rHagB) or recombinant fimbrillin A (rFimA) from Porphyromonas gingivalis 381 in mice. Materials & methods In the first study, C57BL/6 mice were given 10 μg rHagB or rFimA without and with 1 μg HNP1, HNP2, HBD1, HBD2 or HBD3. At 24 h, mice were euthanized and cytokine concentrations were determined in nasal wash fluid (NWF), bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, saliva and serum. In the second study, C57BL/6 mice were given 10 μg rHagB or rFimA without and with 1 μg HNPs or HBDs similarly on days 0, 7 and 14. At 21 days, mice were euthanized and rHagB- and rFimA-specific antibody responses were determined in NWF, bronchoalveolar lavage fluids, saliva and serum. Results Mice given rHagB + HNP2, rHagB + HBD1 and rHagB + HBD3 produced significantly lower (p < 0.05) IL-6 responses than mice given rHagB alone. Mice given rHagB + HNP1, rHagB + HNP2, rHagB + HBD1 and rHagB + HBD3 produced significantly lower (p < 0.05) keratinocyte-derived chemokine responses than mice given rHagB alone. Mice given rFimA produced very low levels of IL-6 and only moderate levels of keratinocyte-derived chemokine in NWF that were not attenuated by prior incubation of rFimA with any defensin. Mice given rHagB + HNP1 produced a significantly higher (p < 0.05) serum IgG antibody response than mice given rHagB alone and mice given rFimA + HNP2 produced a higher, but not significant, antibody response. Conclusion The ability of HNPs and HBDs to attenuate proinflammatory cytokine responses in murine NWF and enhance IgG antibody responses in serum was dependent upon both the defensin and antigen of P. gingivalis. PMID:20020833

  1. Cytokine and Growth Factor Responses After Radiotherapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Gaber, M. Waleed

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the time course and clinical significance of cytokines and peptide growth factors in pediatric patients with ependymoma treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We measured 15 cytokines and growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-{gamma}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-{alpha}) from 30 patients before RT and 2 and 24 h, weekly for 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the initiation of RT. Two longitudinal models for the trend of log-transformed measurements were fitted, one during treatment and one through 12 months. Results: During RT, log IL-8 declined at a rate of -0.10389/wk (p = 0.0068). The rate of decline was greater (p = 0.028) for patients with an infratentorial tumor location. The decline in IL-8 after RT was significant when stratified by infratentorial tumor location (p = 0.0345) and more than one surgical procedure (p = 0.0272). During RT, the decline in log VEGF was significant when stratified by the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After RT, the log VEGF declined significantly at a rate of -0.06207/mo. The decline was significant for males (p = 0.0222), supratentorial tumors (p = 0.0158), one surgical procedure (p = 0.0222), no ventriculoperitoneal shunt (p = 0.0005), and the absence of treatment failure (p = 0.0028). Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 declined significantly during RT and the decline differed according to tumor location. The angiogenesis factor VEGF declined significantly during the 12 months after RT. The decline was greater in males, those without a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and in those with favorable disease factors, including one surgical procedure, supratentorial tumor location, and

  2. Relation between stress and cytokine responses in inner-city mothers.

    PubMed

    Gruenberg, David A; Wright, Rosalind J; Visness, Cynthia M; Jaffee, Katy F; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Cruikshank, William W; Kattan, Meyer; Sandel, Megan T; Wood, Robert A; Gern, James E

    2015-11-01

    Women in poor urban neighborhoods have high rates of stress and allergic diseases, but whether stress or stress correlates such as depression promote inflammatory and type 2 cytokine responses is unknown. To examine associations among external stressors, perceived stress, depression, and peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine responses of mothers enrolled in the Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma Study and test the hypothesis that stress would be positively associated with type 2 and selected proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-8) responses. Questionnaire data from mothers living in 4 inner cities included information about external stress, stress perception, and depression. The external stress domains (interpersonal problems, housing, and neighborhood stress) were combined into a Composite Stressor score. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated ex vivo and cytokine responses to innate, adaptive, and polyclonal immune stimuli were compared with stress and depression scores for 469 of the 606 study participants. There were no significant positive associations between Composite Stressor scores, perceived stress, or depression scores and proinflammatory or type 2 cytokine responses, and these findings were not modified by allergy or asthma status. There were some modest associations with individual stressors and cytokine responses, but no consistent relations were noted. Depression was associated with decreased responses to some stimuli, particularly dust mite. Composite measurements of stressors, perceived stress, or depression were not positively related to proinflammatory or type 2 cytokine responses in these young urban women. These data do not support the hypothesis that these factors promote cytokine responses associated with allergy. ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT00114881. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Association of O-Antigen Serotype with the Magnitude of Initial Systemic Cytokine Responses and Persistence in the Urinary Tract

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Dennis J.; Patel, Ashay S.; Mohamed, Ahmad; Storm, Douglas W.; Singh, Chandra; Li, Birong; Zhang, Jingwen; Koff, Stephen A.; Jayanthi, Venkata R.; Mason, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common ailments requiring both short-term and prophylactic antibiotic therapies. Progression of infection from the bladder to the kidney is associated with more severe clinical symptoms (e.g., fever and vomiting) as well as with dangerous disease sequelae (e.g., renal scaring and sepsis). Host-pathogen interactions that promote bacterial ascent to the kidney are not completely understood. Prior studies indicate that the magnitude of proinflammatory cytokine elicitation in vitro by clinical isolates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) inversely correlates with the severity of clinical disease. Therefore, we hypothesize that the magnitude of initial proinflammatory responses during infection defines the course and severity of disease. Clinical UPEC isolates obtained from patients with a nonfebrile UTI elicited high systemic proinflammatory responses early during experimental UTI in a murine model and were attenuated in bladder and kidney persistence. Conversely, UPEC isolates obtained from patients with febrile UTI elicited low systemic proinflammatory responses early during experimental UTI and exhibited prolonged persistence in the bladder and kidney. Soluble factors in the supernatant from saturated cultures as well as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serotype correlated with the magnitude of proinflammatory responses in vitro. Our data suggest that the structure of the O-antigen sugar moiety of the LPS may determine the strength of cytokine induction by epithelial cells. Moreover, the course and severity of disease appear to be the consequence of the magnitude of initial cytokines produced by the bladder epithelium during infection. IMPORTANCE The specific host-pathogen interactions that determine the extent and course of disease are not completely understood. Our studies demonstrate that modest changes in the magnitude of cytokine production observed using in vitro models of infection translate into

  4. Association of O-Antigen Serotype with the Magnitude of Initial Systemic Cytokine Responses and Persistence in the Urinary Tract.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Dennis J; Patel, Ashay S; Mohamed, Ahmad; Storm, Douglas W; Singh, Chandra; Li, Birong; Zhang, Jingwen; Koff, Stephen A; Jayanthi, Venkata R; Mason, Kevin M; Justice, Sheryl S

    2016-01-11

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common ailments requiring both short-term and prophylactic antibiotic therapies. Progression of infection from the bladder to the kidney is associated with more severe clinical symptoms (e.g., fever and vomiting) as well as with dangerous disease sequelae (e.g., renal scaring and sepsis). Host-pathogen interactions that promote bacterial ascent to the kidney are not completely understood. Prior studies indicate that the magnitude of proinflammatory cytokine elicitation in vitro by clinical isolates of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) inversely correlates with the severity of clinical disease. Therefore, we hypothesize that the magnitude of initial proinflammatory responses during infection defines the course and severity of disease. Clinical UPEC isolates obtained from patients with a nonfebrile UTI elicited high systemic proinflammatory responses early during experimental UTI in a murine model and were attenuated in bladder and kidney persistence. Conversely, UPEC isolates obtained from patients with febrile UTI elicited low systemic proinflammatory responses early during experimental UTI and exhibited prolonged persistence in the bladder and kidney. Soluble factors in the supernatant from saturated cultures as well as the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) serotype correlated with the magnitude of proinflammatory responses in vitro. Our data suggest that the structure of the O-antigen sugar moiety of the LPS may determine the strength of cytokine induction by epithelial cells. Moreover, the course and severity of disease appear to be the consequence of the magnitude of initial cytokines produced by the bladder epithelium during infection. The specific host-pathogen interactions that determine the extent and course of disease are not completely understood. Our studies demonstrate that modest changes in the magnitude of cytokine production observed using in vitro models of infection translate into significant

  5. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir recruits cellular SHP-2 through ITIM motifs to suppress host immune response.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dapeng; Quan, Heming; Wang, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Haipeng; Chen, Jianxia; Cao, Xuetao; Ge, Baoxue

    2013-09-01

    Immune responses to pathogens are regulated by immune receptors containing either an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) or an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The important diarrheal pathogen enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) require delivery and insertion of the bacterial translocated intimin receptor (Tir) into the host plasma membrane for pedestal formation. The C-terminal region of Tir, encompassing Y483 and Y511, shares sequence similarity with cellular ITIMs. Here, we show that EPEC Tir suppresses the production of inflammatory cytokines by recruitment of SHP-2 and subsequent deubiquitination of TRAF6 in an ITIM dependent manner. Our findings revealed a novel mechanism by which the EPEC utilize its ITIM motifs to suppress and evade the host innate immune response, which could lead to the development of novel therapeutics to prevent bacterial infection.

  6. Exploiting host compensatory responses: the 'must' of manipulation?

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Roche, Benjamin; Poulin, Robert; Hurd, Hilary; Renaud, François; Thomas, Frédéric

    2008-10-01

    Parasite-induced alterations of the host phenotype have been reported in many systems. These changes are traditionally categorized into three kinds of phenomena: secondary outcomes of infection with no adaptive value, host adaptations that reduce the detrimental consequences of infection and parasitic adaptations that facilitate transmission. However, this categorization is a simple view, and host modifications should be considered as co-evolved traits, rather than a total takeover. Here, we present a novel scenario of manipulation, which has considerable potential to resolve issues that are specific to the evolution of behavioural alterations induced by parasites. It is proposed that certain parasites affect fitness-related traits in their hosts to trigger host compensatory responses because these responses can meet the transmission objectives of parasites.

  7. Serum Cytokine Levels in Major Depressive Disorder and Its Role in Antidepressant Response

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Woojae; Lim, Shinn-Won; Woo, Hye In; Park, Jin Hong; Shim, Sanghong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cytokines have been reported to have key roles in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, much less is known about cytokines in MDD and antidepressant treatment due to the diversity of cytokines and the heterogeneity of depression. We investigated the levels of cytokines in patients with MDD compared with healthy subjects and their associations with antidepressant response. Methods We investigated the changes of several cytokines (eotaxin, sCD40L, IL-8, MCP-1alpha, TNF-alpha, INF-gamma and MIP-1alpha) by Luminex assay in 66 patients with MDD and 22 healthy controls. The antidepressant response was assessed by 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Results We found the levels of sCD40L (p=0.001), IL-8 (p=0.004) and MCP-1 (p=0.03) of healthy controls were significantly higher than those of depressive patients. However, the level of eotaxin and TNF-alpha were not associated with MDD. In addition, we found the level of MCP-1 was significantly changed after antidepressant treatment (p=0.01). Conclusion These findings suggest the roles of cytokines in MDD are complex, and could vary according to the individual characteristics of each patient. Further studies regarding the relationship between cytokines and MDD will be required. PMID:27909456

  8. Rapid Detection of Neutrophil Oxidative Burst Capacity is Predictive of Whole Blood Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Vernon, Philip J.; Schaub, Leasha J.; Dallelucca, Jurandir J.; Pusateri, Anthony E.; Sheppard, Forest R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Maladaptive immune responses, particularly cytokine and chemokine-driven, are a significant contributor to the deleterious inflammation present in many types of injury and infection. Widely available applications to rapidly assess individual inflammatory capacity could permit identification of patients at risk for exacerbated immune responses and guide therapy. Here we evaluate neutrophil oxidative burst (NOX) capacity measured by plate reader to immuno-type Rhesus Macaques as an acute strategy to rapidly detect inflammatory capacity and predict maladaptive immune responses as assayed by cytokine array. Methods Whole blood was collected from anesthetized Rhesus Macaques (n = 25) and analyzed for plasma cytokine secretion (23-plex Luminex assay) and NOX capacity. For cytokine secretion, paired samples were either unstimulated or ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated (100μg/mL/24h). NOX capacity was measured in dihydrorhodamine-123 loaded samples following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin treatment. Pearson’s test was utilized to correlate NOX capacity with cytokine secretion, p<0.05 considered significant. Results LPS stimulation induced secretion of the inflammatory molecules G-CSF, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12/23(p40), IL-18, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and TNFα. Although values were variable, several cytokines correlated with NOX capacity, p-values≤0.0001. Specifically, IL-1β (r = 0.66), IL-6 (r = 0.74), the Th1-polarizing cytokine IL-12/23(p40) (r = 0.78), and TNFα (r = 0.76) were strongly associated with NOX. Conclusion NOX capacity correlated with Th1-polarizing cytokine secretion, indicating its ability to rapidly predict inflammatory responses. These data suggest that NOX capacity may quickly identify patients at risk for maladaptive immune responses and who may benefit from immuno-modulatory therapies. Future studies will assess the in-vivo predictive value of NOX in animal models of immune-mediated pathologies. PMID

  9. Regulation of local host-mediated anti-tumor mechanisms by cytokines: direct and indirect effects on leukocyte recruitment and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, M.; McCormick, K. L.; Volker, K.; Ortaldo, J. R.; Wigginton, J. M.; Brunda, M. J.; Wiltrout, R. H.; Fogler, W. E.

    1997-01-01

    The regulation of tumor growth by cytokine-induced alterations in host effector cell recruitment and activation is intimately associated with leukocyte adhesion and angiogenic modulation. In the present study, we have developed a novel tumor model to investigate this complex series of events in response to cytokine administration. Gelatin sponges containing recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (rhFGFb) and B16F10 melanoma cells were implanted onto the serosal surface of the left lateral hepatic lobe in syngeneic C57BL/6 mice. The tumor model was characterized by progressive tumor growth initially localized within the sponge and the subsequent development of peritoneal carcinomatosis. Microscopic examination of the sponge matrix revealed well developed tumor-associated vascular structures and areas of endothelial cell activation as evidenced by leukocyte margination. Treatment of mice 3 days after sponge implantation with a therapeutic regimen consisting of pulse recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) combined with recombinant murine interleukin-12 (rmIL-12) resulted in a marked hepatic mononuclear infiltrate and inhibition of tumor growth. In contrast to the control group, sponges from mice treated with rhIL-2/rmIL-12 demonstrated an overall lack of cellularity and vascular structure. The regimen of rhIL-2 in combination with rmIL-12 was equally effective against gelatin sponge implants of rhFGFb/B16F10 melanoma in SCID mice treated with anti-asialo-GM1 in the absence of a mononuclear infiltration, suggesting that T, B, and/or NK cells were not the principal mediators of the anti-tumor response in this tumor model. The absence of vascularity within the sponge after treatment suggests that a potential mechanism of rhIL-2/rmIL-12 anti-tumor activity is the inhibition of neovascular growth associated with the establishment of tumor lesions. This potential mechanism could be dissociated from the known activities of these two cytokines to induce the

  10. Cytokine profiles show heterogeneity of interferon-β response in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Hegen, Harald; Adrianto, Indra; Lessard, Christopher J.; Millonig, Alban; Bertolotto, Antonio; Comabella, Manuel; Giovannoni, Gavin; Guger, Michael; Hoelzl, Martina; Khalil, Michael; Fazekas, Franz; Killestein, Joep; Lindberg, Raija L.P.; Malucchi, Simona; Mehling, Matthias; Montalban, Xavier; Rudzki, Dagmar; Schautzer, Franz; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Deisenhammer, Florian; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate serum cytokine profiles for their utility to determine the heterogeneous responses to interferon (IFN)–β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: Patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) or clinically isolated syndrome receiving de novo IFN-β treatment were included in this prospective, observational study. Number of relapses and changes in disability were assessed 2 years prior to and 2 years after initiation of treatment. Sera were collected at baseline and after 3 months on therapy. Cytokine levels in sera were assessed by Luminex multiplex assays. Baseline cytokine profiles were grouped by hierarchical clustering analysis. Demographic features, changes in cytokines, and clinical outcome were then assessed in the clustered patient groups. Results: A total of 157 patients were included in the study and clustered into 6 distinct subsets by baseline cytokine profiles. These subsets differed significantly in their clinical and biological response to IFN-β therapy. Two subsets were associated with patients who responded poorly to therapy. Two other subsets, associated with a good response to therapy, showed a significant reduction in relapse rates and no worsening of disability. Each subset also had differential changes in cytokine levels after 3 months of IFN-β treatment. Conclusions: There is heterogeneity in the immunologic pathways of the RRMS population, which correlates with IFN-β response. PMID:26894205

  11. Alveolar macrophage cytokine response to air pollution particles: Oxidant mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Imrich, Amy; Ning Yaoyu; Lawrence, Joy; Coull, Brent; Gitin, Elena; Knutson, Mitchell; Kobzik, Lester . E-mail: lkobzik@hsph.harvard.edu

    2007-02-01

    Alveolar macrophages (AMs) primed with LPS and treated with concentrated ambient air particles (CAPs) showed enhanced release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and provide an in vitro model for the amplified effects of air pollution particles seen in people with preexisting lung disease. To investigate the mechanism(s) by which CAPs mediate TNF release in primed rat AMs, we first tested the effect of a panel of antioxidants. N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (20 mM), dimethyl thiourea (20 mM) and catalase (5 {mu}M) significantly inhibited TNF release by primed AMs incubated with CAPs. Conversely, when LPS-primed AMs were treated with CAPs in the presence of exogenous oxidants (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by glucose oxidase, 10 {mu}M/h), TNF release and cell toxicity was significantly increased. The soluble fraction of CAPs suspensions caused most of the increased bioactivity in the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The metal chelator deferoxamine (DFO) strongly inhibited the interaction of the soluble fraction with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but had no effect on the bioactivity of the insoluble CAPs fraction. We conclude that CAPs can mediate their effects in primed AMs by acting on oxidant-sensitive cytokine release in at least two distinct ways. In the primed cell, insoluble components of PM mediate enhanced TNF production that is H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-dependent (catalase-sensitive) yet independent of iron (DFO-insensitive). In the presence of exogenous H{sub 2}O{sub 2} released by AMs, PMNs, or other lung cells within an inflamed alveolar milieu, soluble iron released from air particles can also mediate cytokine release and cell toxicity.

  12. Immunopathology and cytokine responses in commercial broiler chickens with gangrenous dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangxing; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Lee, Kyung Woo; Lee, Sung Hyen; Park, Myeong Seon; Jang, Seung I; Bauchan, Gary R; Gay, Cyril G; Ritter, G Donald; Bautista, Daniel A; Siragusa, Gregory R

    2010-08-01

    Gangrenous dermatitis (GD) is an emerging disease of increasing economic importance in poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium septicum and Clostridium perfringens type A. Lack of a reproducible disease model has been a major obstacle in understanding the immunopathology of GD. To gain better understanding of host-pathogen interactions in GD infection, we evaluated various immune parameters in two groups of birds from a recent commercial outbreak of GD, the first showing typical disease signs and pathological lesions (GD-like birds) and the second lacking clinical signs (GD-free birds). Our results revealed that GD-like birds showed: reduced T-cell and B-cell mitogen-stimulated lymphoproliferation; higher levels of serum nitric oxide and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein; greater numbers of K55(+), K1(+), CD8(+), and MHC class II(+) intradermal lymphocytes, and increased K55(+), K1(+), CD8(+), TCR1(+), TCR2(+), Bu1(+), and MHC class II(+) intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes; and increased levels of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in skin compared with GD-free chickens. These results provide the first evidence of altered systemic and local (skin and intestine) immune responses in GD pathogenesis in chickens.

  13. Host response to respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    PubMed

    Arruvito, Lourdes; Raiden, Silvina; Geffner, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection is the leading cause of bronchiolitis and hospitalization in young infants and causes 100, 000-200, 000 deaths annually. There is still no licensed vaccine against RSV infection and the therapeutic options are mainly supportive. Despite almost six decades of research, important knowledge gaps remain with respect to the characterization of immune mechanisms responsible for protection and pathogenesis, as well as to the identification of risk factors that predict the severity of infection. Observations made in mouse models and young children suggest that the early innate immune response plays a major role in the pathogenesis of bronchiolitis due to RSV infection. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the role of the adaptive immune response mediated by TH1, TH2, TH17, regulatory T cells, and CD8 T cells in the pathogenesis and resolution of RSV infection. Moreover, investigations performed in the last years have made important contributions to our knowledge of the immune response in young children, the principal risk group for severe disease. A comprehensive understanding of how the protective and deleterious immune response during the course of RSV infection is induced in young children remains a challenge over the coming years.

  14. Preterm Infants Have Deficient Monocyte and Lymphocyte Cytokine Responses to Group B Streptococcus▿

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Andrew J.; Curtis, Samantha; Strunk, Tobias; Riley, Karen; Liyanage, Khemanganee; Prescott, Susan; Doherty, Dorota; Simmer, Karen; Richmond, Peter; Burgner, David

    2011-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) is an important cause of early- and late-onset sepsis in the newborn. Preterm infants have markedly increased susceptibility and worse outcomes, but their immunological responses to GBS are poorly defined. We compared mononuclear cell and whole-blood cytokine responses to heat-killed GBS (HKGBS) of preterm infants (gestational age [GA], 26 to 33 weeks), term infants, and healthy adults. We investigated the kinetics and cell source of induced cytokines and quantified HKGBS phagocytosis. HKGBS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) secretion was significantly impaired in preterm infants compared to that in term infants and adults. These cytokines were predominantly monocytic in origin, and production was intrinsically linked to HKGBS phagocytosis. Very preterm infants (GA, <30 weeks) had fewer cytokine-producing monocytes, but nonopsonic phagocytosis ability was comparable to that for term infants and adults. Exogenous complement supplementation increased phagocytosis in all groups, as well as the proportion of preterm monocytes producing IL-6, but for very preterm infants, responses were still deficient. Similar defective preterm monocyte responses were observed in fresh whole cord blood stimulated with live GBS. Lymphocyte-associated cytokines were significantly deficient for both preterm and term infants compared to levels for adults. These findings indicate that a subset of preterm monocytes do not respond to GBS, a defect compounded by generalized weaker lymphocyte responses in newborns. Together these deficient responses may increase the susceptibility of preterm infants to GBS infection. PMID:21300777

  15. Biofilm and planktonic Enterococcus faecalis elicit different responses from host phagocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daw, Kasturee; Baghdayan, Arto S; Awasthi, Shanjana; Shankar, Nathan

    2012-07-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is a commensal organism of the gastrointestinal tract but can also cause serious opportunistic infections. In addition to high levels of antibiotic resistance, the ability to form biofilms on abiotic surfaces and on in-dwelling devices within the host complicates treatment strategies and successful outcomes of antibiotic therapy. Despite rapid advances made in recent years in understanding the genomics and virulence of this organism, much remains to be learned regarding the host response to enterococcal infections. In this study, we investigated the interaction of RAW264.7 macrophages and JAWS II dendritic cells with biofilm and planktonic E. faecalis, in vitro. Specifically, we compared phagocytosis, intracellular survival, secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, and the activation and maturation of phagocytes. Our results revealed that both macrophages and dendritic cells phagocytize biofilm mode cells at levels equal to or better than their planktonic counterparts. Internalized biofilm bacteria showed relatively greater survival at 24 h in macrophages than in dendritic cells and led to slightly higher expression of phagocyte activation markers. Macrophages infected with biofilm cells also secreted lower levels of proinflammatory cytokines studied. Overall, these results suggest that biofilm E. faecalis may be better adapted to overcome host defenses in vivo. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulation of Host Epithelial Responses to Cryptosporidium Infection by MicroRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ming, Zhenping; Zhou, Rui; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2016-12-15

    Cryptosporidium species infect the gastrointestinal epithelium and other mucosal surfaces of vertebrate hosts. Epithelial cells provide the first line of defense against Cryptosporidium infection and play a critical role in the initiation, regulation, and resolution of both innate and adaptive immune reactions. Host miRNAs in mammalian cells have been shown to play crucial roles in cellular responses to infection by diverse pathogens, including viruses, parasites, and bacteria. Given the absence of RNAi machinery in Cryptosporidium, lack of miRNA expression in the parasite, and minimal invasion nature of infection, Cryptosporidium infection provides an ideal model for exploring miRNA-mediated epithelial cell defense, relevant to infection of mucosal epithelial cells by pathogens in general. Increasing evidence supports that miRNAs may modulate many stages of epithelial responses following Cryptosporidium infection, including activation of the intracellular signaling pathways, production of antimicrobial molecules, expression of cytokines/chemokines, release of epithelial cell-derived exosomes, and feedback regulation of immune homeostasis. On the other hand, this parasite may have developed strategies to modulate host miRNA-mediated cellular function for immune evasion. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances on miRNA regulation of epithelial responses to Cryptosporidium infection, with an emphasis on host defense and parasite immune evasion. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. IL-37 (IL-1F7) the newest anti-inflammatory cytokine which suppresses immune responses and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tete, S; Tripodi, D; Rosati, M; Conti, F; Maccauro, G; Saggini, A; Cianchetti, E; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Toniato, E; Castellani, M L; Conti, P; Theoharides, T C

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukins, chemokines and interferons are immunomodulating and inflammatory agents, characterized by considerable redundancy, in that many cytokines appear to share similar functions. Virtually all nucleated cells, but especially epithelial cells and macrophages, are potent producers of cytokines. The objective of this study is to review the detailed mechanism of action and the biological profiles of IL-37, the newest anti-inflammatory cytokine. This review focuses on IL-37, a key cytokine in regulating inflammatory responses, mainly by inhibiting the expression, production and function of proinflammatory cytokines: IL-1 family pro-inflammatory effects are markedly suppressed by IL-37.

  18. Preserved ex vivo inflammatory status and cytokine responses in naturally long-lived mice

    PubMed Central

    Arranz, Lorena; Lord, Janet M.

    2010-01-01

    Preserved immune cell function has been reported in mice that achieve extreme longevity. Since cytokines are major modulators of immune responses, we aimed to determine the levels of 21 cytokines secreted ex vivo by peritoneal leukocytes cultured under basal- and mitogen- (conconavalin A (ConA) and LPS) stimulated conditions in middle-aged (44 ± 4 weeks), old (69 ± 4 weeks), very old (92 ± 4 weeks), and extreme long-lived (125 ± 4 weeks) ICR (CD1) female mice. The secretion of cytokines was measured by multiplex luminometry. Increased basal levels of proinflammatory IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12 (p70), IFN-γ, and TNF-α were seen in the old and very old animals, accompanied by decreased IL-10. In contrast, the extreme long-lived mice maintained the overall cytokine profile of middle-aged mice, though the basal secretion of IL-2, IL-9, IL-10, IL-13, and IL-12 (p40) was raised. Under LPS- and/or ConA-stimulated conditions, leukocytes from old and very old animals showed a significantly impaired response with respect to secretion of Th1 cytokines IL-3, IL-12p70, IFN-γ, and TNF-α; Th2 cytokines IL-6, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13; and the regulatory cytokines IL-2, IL-5, and IL-17. Extreme long-lived mice preserved the middle-aged-like cytokine profile, with the most striking effect seen for the IL-2 response to ConA, which was minimal in the old and very old mice but increased with respect to the middle-aged level in extreme long-lived mice. Chemokine responses in regard to KC, MCP-1, MIP1β, and RANTES were more variable, though similar secretion of LPS-induced KC and MCP-1 and ConA-induced MCP-1, MIP-1β, and RANTES was found in long-lived and middle-aged mice. Thus, extreme long-lived animals showed only a minimal inflammatory profile, much lower than the old and very old groups and also lower than the middle-aged, which is likely mediated by the increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. This was coupled to a robust response to immune stimuli

  19. Modulation of host signaling and cellular responses by Chlamydia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of host cell signaling and cellular functions is key to intracellular survival of pathogenic bacteria. Intracellular growth has several advantages e.g. escape from the humoral immune response and access to a stable nutrient rich environment. Growth in such a preferred niche comes at the price of an ongoing competition between the bacteria and the host as well as other microbes that compete for the very same host resources. This requires specialization and constant evolution of dedicated systems for adhesion, invasion and accommodation. Interestingly, obligate intracellular bacteria of the order Chlamydiales have evolved an impressive degree of control over several important host cell functions. In this review we summarize how Chlamydia controls its host cell with a special focus on signal transduction and cellular modulation. PMID:24267514

  20. Cytokine responses in camels (Camelus bactrianus) vaccinated with Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine.

    PubMed

    Odbileg, Raadan; Purevtseren, Byambaa; Gantsetseg, Dorj; Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Buyannemekh, Tumurjav; Galmandakh, Zagd; Erdenebaatar, Janchivdorj; Konnai, Satoru; Onuma, Misao; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2008-02-01

    In the present study, we determined the levels of cytokines produced by camel (Camelus bactrianus) peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in response to live attenuated Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S19 vaccine. Seven camels were vaccinated with commercial B. abortus S19 vaccine, and their cytokine responses were determined using a real-time PCR assay. Cytokine responses to B. abortus S19 were examined at 6 hr, 48 hr and 1, 2 and 3 weeks post-vaccination. Serological tests were performed to further confirm these immune responses. The results revealed that IFN-gamma and IL-6 were upregulated during the first week post-vaccination. Low level expressions of IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, TNFalpha and IL-10 and no expression of IL-2 and IL-4 were observed compared with the control camels. The findings showed that B. abortus stimulates cell-mediated immunity by directly activating camel Th1 cells to secrete IFN-gamma. This quantification of cytokine expression in camels is essential for understanding of Camelidae disease development and protective immune responses. This is the first report of in vivo camel cytokine quantification after vaccination.

  1. In vitro lymphoproliferative response and cytokine production in mice with experimental disseminated candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi, Ali Reza; Shokri, Hojjatollah; Eshghi, Shahin

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Systemic candidiasis is an infection of Candida albicans (C. albicans) causing disseminated disease and sepsis, invariably when host defenses are compromised. We investigated the histopathological changes as well as the lymphoproliferative responses and cytokine production of splenic cells after stimulation with Concanavalin A (Con A) and Pokeweed mitogen (PWM) in mice with disseminated candidiasis. Materials and Methods: Lymphoproliferative responses were stimulated in vitro with Con A (1 µg/ml) and PWM (1 µg/ml) mitogens in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 media, and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin-4 (IL-4) in the supernatants was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The results revealed that C. albicans organisms multiplied to a greater extent in the kidneys than in the liver and spleen of infected mice. The most predominant forms of C. albicans in different parts of the kidneys were yeast mixed with hyphal forms. Infected mice had a significantly increased proliferative response when splenocytes were stimulated with PWM (2.0±0.16) and Con A (1.9±0.19) (P<0.05). PWM and Con A-stimulated production of IFN-γ significantly tended to be higher in infected mice (PWM: 68.4±14.0 pg/ml; Con A: 53.7±17.3 pg/ml) when compared to controls (P<0.05). Stimulation with PWM and Con A showed no differences in IL-4 production between infected mice and controls. Conclusion: These findings demonstrated a significant increase in both cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in supernatants of PWM and Con A- stimulated splenocyte cultures obtained from mice with disseminated candidiasis. PMID:28293397

  2. Apoptosis and pro-inflammatory cytokine response of mast cells induced by influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Meng, Di; Wei, Tangting; Zhang, Siyi; Hu, Yanxin; Wang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of the influenza A virus has been investigated heavily, and both the inflammatory response and apoptosis have been found to have a definitive role in this process. The results of studies performed by the present and other groups have indicated that mast cells may play a role in the severity of the disease. To further investigate cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, apoptosis and inflammatory response were studied in mouse mastocytoma cell line P815. This is the first study to demonstrate that H1N1 (A/WSN/33), H5N1 (A/Chicken/Henan/1/04), and H7N2 (A/Chicken/Hebei/2/02) influenza viruses can induce mast cell apoptosis. They were found to do this mainly through the mitochondria/cytochrome c-mediated intrinsic pathway, and the activation of caspase 8-mediated extrinsic pathway was here found to be weak. Two pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 homology domain 3 (BH3) -only molecules Bim and Puma appeared to be involved in the apoptotic pathways. When virus-induced apoptosis was inhibited in P815 cells using pan-caspase (Z-VAD-fmk) and caspase-9 (Z-LEHD-fmk) inhibitors, the replication of these three subtypes of viruses was suppressed and the secretions of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including IL-6, IL-18, TNF-α, and MCP-1, decreased. The results of this study may further understanding of the role of mast cells in host defense and pathogenesis of influenza virus. They may also facilitate the development of novel therapeutic aids against influenza virus infection.

  3. Delineation of Diverse Macrophage Activation Programs in Response to Intracellular Parasites and Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyi; Kim, Charles C.; Batra, Sajeev; McKerrow, James H.; Loke, P'ng

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability to reside and proliferate in macrophages is characteristic of several infectious agents that are of major importance to public health, including the intracellular parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (the etiological agent of Chagas disease) and Leishmania species (etiological agents of Kala-Azar and cutaneous leishmaniasis). Although recent studies have elucidated some of the ways macrophages respond to these pathogens, the relationships between activation programs elicited by these pathogens and the macrophage activation programs elicited by bacterial pathogens and cytokines have not been delineated. Methodology/Principal Findings To provide a global perspective on the relationships between macrophage activation programs and to understand how certain pathogens circumvent them, we used transcriptional profiling by genome-wide microarray analysis to compare the responses of mouse macrophages following exposure to the intracellular parasites T. cruzi and Leishmania mexicana, the bacterial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the cytokines IFNG, TNF, IFNB, IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17. We found that LPS induced a classical activation state that resembled macrophage stimulation by the Th1 cytokines IFNG and TNF. However, infection by the protozoan pathogen L. mexicana produced so few transcriptional changes that the infected macrophages were almost indistinguishable from uninfected cells. T. cruzi activated macrophages produced a transcriptional signature characterized by the induction of interferon-stimulated genes by 24 h post-infection. Despite this delayed IFN response by T. cruzi, the transcriptional response of macrophages infected by the kinetoplastid pathogens more closely resembled the transcriptional response of macrophages stimulated by the cytokines IL-4, IL-10, and IL-17 than macrophages stimulated by Th1 cytokines. Conclusions/Significance This study provides global gene expression data for a diverse set of biologically significant pathogens and

  4. Staphylococcus aureus strategies to evade the host acquired immune response.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus aureus poses a significant public-health problem. Infection caused by S. aureus can manifest as acute or long-lasting persistent diseases that are often refractory to antibiotic and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To develop more effective strategies for preventing or treating these infections, it is crucial to understand why the immune response is incapable to eradicate the bacterium. When S. aureus first infect the host, there is a robust activation of the host innate immune responses. Generally, S. aureus can survive this initial interaction due to the expression of a wide array of virulence factors that interfere with the host innate immune defenses. After this initial interaction the acquired immune response is the arm of the host defenses that will try to clear the pathogen. However, S. aureus is capable of maintaining infection in the host even in the presence of a robust antigen-specific immune response. Thus, understanding the mechanisms underlying the ability of S. aureus to escape immune surveillance by the acquired immune response will help uncover potentially important targets for the development of immune-based adjunctive therapies and more efficient vaccines. There are several lines of evidence that lead us to believe that S. aureus can directly or indirectly disable the acquired immune response. This review will discuss the different immune evasion strategies used by S. aureus to modulate the different components of the acquired immune defenses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Excessive Cytokine Response to Rapid Proliferation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Leads to Fatal Systemic Capillary Leakage in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kuribayashi, Saya; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Isoda, Norikazu; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Sunden, Yuji; Umemura, Takashi; Nakajima, Noriko; Hasegawa, Hideki; Kida, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) cause lethal infection in chickens. Severe cases of HPAIV infections have been also reported in mammals, including humans. In both mammals and birds, the relationship between host cytokine response to the infection with HPAIVs and lethal outcome has not been well understood. In the present study, the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses A/turkey/Italy/4580/1999 (H7N1) (Ty/Italy) and A/chicken/Netherlands/2586/2003 (H7N7) (Ck/NL) and the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) A/chicken/Ibaraki/1/2005 (H5N2) (Ck/Ibaraki) were intranasally inoculated into chickens. Ty/Italy replicated more extensively than Ck/NL in systemic tissues of the chickens, especially in the brain, and induced excessive mRNA expression of inflammatory and antiviral cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-α) in proportion to its proliferation. Using in situ hybridization, IL-6 mRNA was detected mainly in microglial nodules in the brain of the chickens infected with Ty/Italy. Capillary leakage assessed by Evans blue staining was observed in multiple organs, especially in the brains of the chickens infected with Ty/Italy, and was not observed in those infected with Ck/NL. In contrast, LPAIV caused only local infection in the chickens, with neither apparent cytokine expression nor capillary leakage in any tissue of the chickens. The present results indicate that an excessive cytokine response is induced by rapid and extensive proliferation of HPAIV and causes fatal multiple organ failure in chickens. PMID:23874602

  6. Host attachment, invasion, and stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines by Campylobacter concisus and other non-Campylobacter jejuni Campylobacter species.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Leach, Steven T; Nahidi, Lily; Lu, Hao K; Norman, Jennifer; Day, Andrew S; Zhang, Li; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-12-15

    Campylobacter concisus and other non-Campylobacter jejuni Campylobacter species have been implicated in the initiation of gastrointestinal diseases. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between these bacteria and the human intestinal epithelium and immune cells. The ability of C. concisus, Campylobacter showae, Campylobacter hominis, and Bacteroides ureolyticus to invade epithelial cells was examined using scanning electron microscopy and gentamicin protection assays. Proinflammatory cytokines generated by epithelial and immune cells in response to these bacteria were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ussing Chamber, immunofluorescent stain, and Western blot were used to further elucidate the impact of C. concisus on intestinal barrier integrity and functions. Attachment of non-C. jejuni Campylobacter species to Caco-2 or HT-29 cells was mediated by flagellum-dependent and/or -independent processes. C. concisus was able to invade Caco-2 cells, generate a membrane-ruffling effect on the epithelial surface on entry, and damage epithelial barrier functions by preferential attachment to the cell-cell junctions. Proinflammatory cytokine profiles exhibited by epithelial cells, monocytes, and macrophages in response to C. concisus and other non-C. jejuni Campylobacter species were species and strain specific. These findings demonstrate that C. concisus and other non-C. jejuni Campylobacter species may play a role in initiating gastrointestinal diseases.

  7. Cytokines as effectors and predictors of responses in the treatment of bladder cancer by bacillus Calmette-Guérin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxuan; Dowell, Alexander C; Patel, Prashant; Viney, Richard P; Foster, Michael C; Porfiri, Emilio; James, Nicholas D; Bryan, Richard T

    2014-06-01

    The most effective intravesical treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is instillation of live Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). BCG stimulates the release of cytokines, contributing directly or indirectly to its effectiveness. However, the function of specific cytokines is not well understood. We have undertaken a nonsystematic review of primary evidence regarding cytokine detection, activation and response in BCG patients. Cytokines IL-2, IL-8 and TNF-α appear to be essential for effective BCG therapy and nonrecurrence, while IL-10 may have an inhibitory effect on BCG responses. IL-2, IL-8, TRAIL and TNF-α are potentially predictive of response to BCG. Alterations in genes encoding cytokines may also affect responses. There are significant data showing the association of certain cytokines with successful BCG treatment, and which may be useful predictive markers. Isolating those cytokines mediating efficacy may hold the key to ameliorating BCG's side effects and improving efficacy and patient compliance.

  8. Host Th1/Th2 immune response to Taenia solium cyst antigens in relation to cyst burden of neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Tharmalingam, J; Prabhakar, A T; Gangadaran, P; Dorny, P; Vercruysse, J; Geldhof, P; Rajshekhar, V; Alexander, M; Oommen, A

    2016-10-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), Taenia solium larval infection of the brain, is an important cause of acquired seizures in endemic countries, which relate to number, location and degenerating cysts in the brain. Multicyst infections are common in endemic countries although single-cyst infection prevails in India. Single-cyst infections in an endemic country suggest a role for host immunity limiting the infection. This study examined ex vivo CD4(+) T cells and in vitro Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to T. solium cyst antigens of peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy subjects from endemic and nonendemic regions and of single- and multicyst-infected patients for association with cyst burden of NCC. T. solium cyst antigens elicited a Th1 cytokine response in healthy subjects of T. solium-endemic and T. solium-non-endemic regions and those with single-cyst infections and a Th2 cytokine response from subjects with multicyst neurocysticercosis. Multicyst neurocysticercosis subjects also exhibited low levels of effector memory CD4(+) T cells. Th1 cytokine response of T. solium exposure and low infectious loads may aid in limiting cyst number. Th2 cytokines and low effector T cells may enable multiple-cyst infections to establish and persist.

  9. Local immune responses and systemic cytokine responses in zoster: relationship to the development of postherpetic neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    ZAK-PRELICH, M; MCKENZIE, R C; SYSA-JEDRZEJOWSKA, A; NORVAL, M

    2003-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox) as the primary infection and zoster (shingles) on reactivation from latency, often many years later. One of the most common and most severe sequela of zoster is postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Apart from age, factors which predispose towards PHN are unknown. In the present study, the concentration of a variety of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in the serum of 30 zoster patients at the time of the acute disease were correlated with the subsequent development of PHN in nine of these patients, but no association was found. In addition, although some cytokines such as IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-8 were slightly raised in the zoster group compared with a group of normal healthy subjects of a similar age distribution, these differences only verged on significance. Antibody titres to VZV were raised in the zoster group compared with the controls but these did not differ between the patients who developed PHN and those who did not. Biopsies of zoster lesions were collected from nine patients. There were significantly fewer infiltrating lymphocytes in the lesions of the three patients who subsequently developed PHN compared with the six who did not, although the expression of the neuropeptide, substance P, did not differ between the two groups. It is possible that the poor inflammatory response at the time of the acute zoster may result in less effective containment of the VZV and more damage in the dermatome, thus contributing to the persistence of the neuralgia. PMID:12562395

  10. Host response of platelet-activating factor receptor-deficient mice during pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Weijer, Sebastiaan; Leemans, Jaklien C; Florquin, Sandrine; Shimizu, Takao; Ishii, Satoshi; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a phospholipid with potent, diverse actions, which has been implicated as an important mediator in host defence against several intracellular pathogens. To determine the role of PAF in host defence in pulmonary tuberculosis, PAF receptor-deficient (PAFR−/−) and wild-type (PAFR+/+) mice were infected intranasally with a virulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Mycobacterial outgrowth in lungs and liver did not differ significantly between PAFR−/− and PAFR+/+ mice at 2 or 6 weeks postinfection. After 28 weeks, 86% of PAFR−/− mice and 79% of PAFR+/+ mice had died (non-significant). In addition, both mouse strains were indistinguishable with respect to histopathology, the recruitment and activation of lymphocytes, and cytokine concentrations in the lung. These data suggest that PAF is not involved in the protective immune response to tuberculosis. PMID:12871222

  11. Murine graft-versus-host disease induced using interferon-γ-deficient grafts features antibodies to double-stranded DNA, T helper 2-type cytokines and hypereosinophilia

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, Cynthia A; Bradley, David S; Fischer, Jacqie M M; Hayglass, Kent T; Gartner, John G

    2002-01-01

    Acute, lethal graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) develops in B6D2F1 hybrid recipients of wild-type, C57BL/6, parental strain grafts; however, when interferon-γ (IFN-γ) gene knockout (gko) donors are used, the disease is prolonged and associated with a higher level of engraftment, particularly of T cells. Lesions containing large, mixed cellular infiltrates develop in the skin, liver, pancreas, salivary gland, lung and kidney. In our current study, we wished to determine whether GvHD features a preponderance of T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines in the absence of donor-derived IFN-γ, and whether autoantibody production, commonly associated with chronic GvHD, also occurs. Because mitogen responsiveness is consistently suppressed in mice with acute GvHD, we wished to measure this response in recipients of IFN-γ gko grafts. Our findings indicate that spleen cells from the latter produce interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 in culture, but respond poorly to concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Their sera contain anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA), some of which are specific for double-stranded (ds)DNA and are predominantly immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG1. We also noted the presence of numerous eosinophils in the infiltrates developing within the target organs. In some respects, this syndrome bears resemblance to both systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and chronic GvHD. However, histological evidence of glomerulonephritis is lacking and proteinuria fails to develop in recipients of IFN-γ gko grafts, suggesting that IFN-γ may be necessary for the development of lupus nephritis. On a broader scope, our findings underscore the importance of IFN-γ in the pathogenetic mechanism of GvHD, and demonstrate that the absence of this cytokine promotes the development of chronic GvHD and autoimmunity. PMID:11849316

  12. Prediction of graft-versus-host disease: a biomarker panel based on lymphocytes and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Budde, Holger; Papert, Susanne; Maas, Jens-Holger; Reichardt, Holger M; Wulf, Gerald; Hasenkamp, Justin; Riggert, Joachim; Legler, Tobias J

    2017-07-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) still belongs to the major challenges after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Immune-suppressive therapy against GvHD is a double-edged sword due to risk of infections and relapse. The ability to adapt prophylactic treatment according to the probability of severe GvHD would be an essential advantage for the patients. We analyzed different biomarkers for their potential to predict the development of GvHD in 28 patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT. Blood was taken once directly after hematopoietic engraftment. In this study, patients were monitored for 12 months after HSCT for the occurrence of acute GvHD or acute/chronic GvHD overlap syndrome. Soluble IL-2 receptor and CD4/CD8 T cell ratio were independently associated with the occurrence of GvHD in the observation period. However, the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve with 0.90 was observed when a 5-parameter biomarker score based on CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD19(-) CD21(+) precursor B cells, CD4/CD8 T cell ratio, and soluble IL-2 receptor was used to predict GvHD. In addition, CD8(+) T cell levels above 2.3% of all mononuclear cells after engraftment may predict relapse-free survival at least for 12 months. In summary, we found a new biomarker panel for prediction of GvHD which is featured by established laboratory assays and high statistical significance. In order to introduce the biomarker panel into routine clinical protocols, we suggest performing a larger multi-center study.

  13. Identification of Lactobacillus plantarum genes modulating the cytokine response of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modulation of the immune system is one of the most plausible mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotic bacteria on human health. Presently, the specific probiotic cell products responsible for immunomodulation are largely unknown. In this study, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of strains of the Lactobacillus plantarum species were investigated to identify genes of L. plantarum with the potential to influence the amounts of cytokines interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and the ratio of IL-10/IL-12 produced by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results A total of 42 Lactobacillus plantarum strains isolated from diverse environmental and human sources were evaluated for their capacity to stimulate cytokine production in PBMCs. The L. plantarum strains induced the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 over an average 14-fold range and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 over an average 16-fold range. Comparisons of the strain-specific cytokine responses of PBMCs to comparative genome hybridization profiles obtained with L. plantarum WCFS1 DNA microarrays (also termed gene-trait matching) resulted in the identification of 6 candidate genetic loci with immunomodulatory capacities. These loci included genes encoding an N-acetyl-glucosamine/galactosamine phosphotransferase system, the LamBDCA quorum sensing system, and components of the plantaricin (bacteriocin) biosynthesis and transport pathway. Deletion of these genes in L. plantarum WCFS1 resulted in growth phase-dependent changes in the PBMC IL-10 and IL-12 cytokine profiles compared with wild-type cells. Conclusions The altered PBMC cytokine profiles obtained with the L. plantarum WCFS1 mutants were in good agreement with the predictions made by gene-trait matching for the 42 L. plantarum strains. This study therefore resulted in the identification of genes present in certain strains of L. plantarum which might be responsible for the stimulation of anti

  14. Monocyte cytokine synthesis in response to extracellular cell stress proteins suggests these proteins exhibit network behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Frank; Steptoe, Andrew; Thompson, Stephen; Henderson, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Human peripheral blood monocytes were exposed to single or pairs of cell stress proteins (CSPs), specifically Hsp10, Hsp27, Hsp60 and Hsp70-the former two having anti-inflammatory actions while the latter pair being assumed to be pro-inflammatory in activity. This study was to test if these proteins exhibited any network behaviour. To control for possible lipopolysaccharide contamination, polymyxin B was used. Surprisingly, at concentrations higher than 1 μg/ml, polymyxin B itself could induce cytokine synthesis. A number of commercial sources of the molecular chaperones were tested, and marked variations in monocyte cytokine synthesis were found. All four CSPs stimulated the same profile of IL-1/IL-6 synthesis and IL-10/TNF-α synthesis although the kinetics of production of these two pairs of cytokines were very different. A key question was whether extracellular molecular chaperones exhibited network behaviour. To test this, monocytes were cultured with suboptimal concentrations of single CSP and pairs of CSP to look for additive, synergistic or antagonistic cell responses. The major finding was that pairs of molecular chaperones, including chaperones thought to stimulate monocyte cytokine synthesis, could produce significant antagonistic cellular responses. This demonstrates that extracellular CSPs constitute an additional potent layer within the complex cytokine network and furthermore suggests that monocytes have evolved to dampen their immune responses upon exposure to extracellular networks of CSPs-perhaps as a mechanism for protecting cells against detrimental cellular stress responses.

  15. Modeling the NF-κB mediated inflammatory response predicts cytokine waves in tissue

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Waves propagating in "excitable media" is a reliable way to transmit signals in space. A fascinating example where living cells comprise such a medium is Dictyostelium D. which propagates waves of chemoattractant to attract distant cells. While neutrophils chemotax in a similar fashion as Dictyostelium D., it is unclear if chemoattractant waves exist in mammalian tissues and what mechanisms could propagate them. Results We propose that chemoattractant cytokine waves may naturally develop as a result of NF-κB response. Using a heuristic mathematical model of NF-κB-like circuits coupled in space we show that the known characteristics of NF-κB response favor cytokine waves. Conclusions While the propagating wave of cytokines is generally beneficial for inflammation resolution, our model predicts that there exist special conditions that can cause chronic inflammation and re-occurrence of acute inflammatory response. PMID:21771307

  16. NLRP12 negatively regulates proinflammatory cytokine production and host defense against Brucella abortus.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Tatiana N; Gomes, Marco Túlio R; Oliveira, Luciana S; Campos, Priscila C; Machado, Gabriela G; Oliveira, Sergio C

    2017-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of brucellosis, which causes abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever in humans. This bacterium infects and proliferates mainly in macrophages and dendritic cells, where it is recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including Nod-like receptors (NLRs). Our group recently demonstrated the role of AIM2 and NLRP3 in Brucella recognition. Here, we investigated the participation of NLRP12 in innate immune response to B. abortus. We show that NLRP12 inhibits the early production of IL-12 by bone marrow-derived macrophages upon B. abortus infection. We also observed that NLRP12 suppresses in vitro NF-κB and MAPK signaling in response to Brucella. Moreover, we show that NLRP12 modulates caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in B. abortus infected-macrophages. Furthermore, we show that mice lacking NLRP12 are more resistant in the early stages of B. abortus infection: NLRP12(-/-) infected-mice have reduced bacterial burdens in the spleens and increased production of IFN-γ and IL-1β compared with wild-type controls. In addition, NLRP12 deficiency leads to reduction in granuloma number and size in mouse livers. Altogether, our findings suggest that NLRP12 plays an important role in negatively regulating the early inflammatory responses against B. abortus.

  17. Differential Biphasic Transcriptional Host Response Associated with Coevolution of Hemagglutinin Quasispecies of Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Himanshu; Seidel, Nora; Blaess, Markus F.; Claus, Ralf A.; Linde, Joerg; Slevogt, Hortense; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Guthke, Reinhard; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Severe influenza associated with strong symptoms and lung inflammation can be caused by intra-host evolution of quasispecies with aspartic acid or glycine in hemagglutinin position 222 (HA-222D/G; H1 numbering). To gain insights into the dynamics of host response to this coevolution and to identify key mechanisms contributing to copathogenesis, the lung transcriptional response of BALB/c mice infected with an A(H1N1)pdm09 isolate consisting HA-222D/G quasispecies was analyzed from days 1 to 12 post infection (p.i). At day 2 p.i. 968 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected. The DEG number declined to 359 at day 4 and reached 1001 at day 7 p.i. prior to recovery. Interestingly, a biphasic expression profile was shown for the majority of these genes. Cytokine assays confirmed these results on protein level exemplarily for two key inflammatory cytokines, interferon gamma and interleukin 6. Using a reverse engineering strategy, a regulatory network was inferred to hypothetically explain the biphasic pattern for selected DEGs. Known regulatory interactions were extracted by Pathway Studio 9.0 and integrated during network inference. The hypothetic gene regulatory network revealed a positive feedback loop of Ifng, Stat1, and Tlr3 gene signaling that was triggered by the HA-G222 variant and correlated with a clinical symptom score indicating disease severity. PMID:27536272

  18. TNFα Impairs Rhabdoviral Clearance by Inhibiting the Host Autophagic Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Francisco J.; López-Muñoz, Azucena; Tyrkalska, Sylwia D.; Candel, Sergio; García-Moreno, Diana; Falco, Alberto; Meseguer, José

    2016-01-01

    TNFα is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine with a key role in the activation of the immune system to fight viral infections. Despite its antiviral role, a few viruses might utilize the host produced TNFα to their benefit. Some recent reports have shown that anti-TNFα therapies could be utilized to treat certain viral infections. However, the underlying mechanisms by which TNFα can favor virus replication have not been identified. Here, a rhabdoviral infection model in zebrafish allowed us to identify the mechanism of action by which Tnfa has a deleterious role for the host to combat certain viral infections. Our results demonstrate that Tnfa signals through its receptor Tnfr2 to enhance viral replication. Mechanistically, Tnfa does not affect viral adhesion and delivery from endosomes to the cytosol. In addition, the host interferon response was also unaffected by Tnfa levels. However, Tnfa blocks the host autophagic response, which is required for viral clearance. This mechanism of action provides new therapeutic targets for the treatment of SVCV-infected fish, and advances our understanding of the previously enigmatic deleterious role of TNFα in certain viral infections. PMID:27351838

  19. Extracellular Vesicles Deliver Host and Virus RNA and Regulate Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Kouwaki, Takahisa; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system plays a crucial role in controlling viral infection. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors, sense viral components called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and trigger signals to induce innate immune responses. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, deliver functional RNA and mediate intercellular communications. Recent studies have revealed that EVs released from virus-infected cells deliver viral RNA to dendritic cells and macrophages, thereby activating PRRs in recipient cells, which results in the expression of type I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, EVs transfer not only viral RNA but also host microRNAs to recipient cells. Recently, infection of hepatocytes with hepatitis B virus (HBV) was shown to affect microRNA levels in EVs released from virus-infected cells, leading to attenuation of host innate immune response. This suggests that the virus utilizes the EVs and host microRNAs to counteract the antiviral innate immune responses. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to the role of EVs in antiviral innate immune responses. PMID:28335522

  20. Extracellular Vesicles Deliver Host and Virus RNA and Regulate Innate Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Kouwaki, Takahisa; Okamoto, Masaaki; Tsukamoto, Hirotake; Fukushima, Yoshimi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-20

    The innate immune system plays a crucial role in controlling viral infection. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors, sense viral components called pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and trigger signals to induce innate immune responses. Extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, deliver functional RNA and mediate intercellular communications. Recent studies have revealed that EVs released from virus-infected cells deliver viral RNA to dendritic cells and macrophages, thereby activating PRRs in recipient cells, which results in the expression of type I interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokines. On the other hand, EVs transfer not only viral RNA but also host microRNAs to recipient cells. Recently, infection of hepatocytes with hepatitis B virus (HBV) was shown to affect microRNA levels in EVs released from virus-infected cells, leading to attenuation of host innate immune response. This suggests that the virus utilizes the EVs and host microRNAs to counteract the antiviral innate immune responses. In this review, we summarize recent findings related to the role of EVs in antiviral innate immune responses.

  1. Arenavirus evasion of host anti-viral responses.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Melissa; Salvato, Maria

    2012-10-17

    The innate response to infection by an Old World arenavirus is initiated and mediated by extracellular and intracellular receptors, and effector molecules. In response, the invading virus has evolved to inhibit these responses and create the best environment possible for replication and spread. Here, we will discuss both the host's response to infection with data from human infection and lessons learned from animal models, as well as the multitude of ways the virus combats the resulting immune response. Finally, we will highlight recent work identifying TLR2 as an innate sensor for arenaviruses and how the TLR2-dependent response differs depending on the pathogenicity of the strain.

  2. Adjuvant effect of Asparagus racemosus Willd. derived saponins in antibody production, allergic response and pro-inflammatory cytokine modulation.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nimisha; Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Pandey, Pallavi; Patel, Dinesh Kumar; Banerjee, Suchitra; Darokar, Mahendra Pandurang; Pal, Anirban

    2017-02-01

    The study manifests the immunoadjuvant potential of saponin rich fraction from Asparagus racemosus in terms of cellular and humoral immune response that can be exploited against microbial infections. Asparagus racemosus (AR) has been attributed as an adaptogen and rasayana in traditional medication systems for enhancing the host defence mechanism. Spectrophotometric and HPTLC analysis ensured the presence of saponins. The saponin rich fractions were tested for immunoadjuvant property in ovalbumin immunised mice for the humoral response, quantified in terms of prolonged antibody production upto a duration of 56days. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF) were estimated for the cellular immune response in LPS stimulated primary murine macrophages. The safety evaluation in terms of cytotoxicity and allergic response has also been evaluated through in-vitro (MTT) and in-vivo (IgE) respectively. ARS significantly inhibited the pro-inflammatory cytokines, in LPS stimulated murine macrophages with no intrinsic cytotoxicity. The significant increase in IgG production infers the utility of ARS for prolonged humoral response. Further, the antigen specific response of IL-12 at early stage and IgE titres also suggests the generation of cellular immune response and low allergic reaction respectively, as compared to conventional adjuvants. IL-6 and TNF fluctuations in LPS stimulated and non-stimulated macrophages along with IgG and IL-12 also confirmed the Th1/Th2 modulating effect of ARS. The study indicates potential effect of ARS as an adjuvant for the stimulation of cellular immune response in addition to generating a sustained adaptive response without any adverse effects paving way for further validation with pathogenic organisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Th1 and Th17 hypercytokinemia as early host response signature in severe pandemic influenza

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Human host immune response following infection with the new variant of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (nvH1N1) is poorly understood. We utilize here systemic cytokine and antibody levels in evaluating differences in early immune response in both mild and severe patients infected with nvH1N1. Methods We profiled 29 cytokines and chemokines and evaluated the haemagglutination inhibition activity as quantitative and qualitative measurements of host immune responses in serum obtained during the first five days after symptoms onset, in two cohorts of nvH1N1 infected patients. Severe patients required hospitalization (n = 20), due to respiratory insufficiency (10 of them were admitted to the intensive care unit), while mild patients had exclusively flu-like symptoms (n = 15). A group of healthy donors was included as control (n = 15). Differences in levels of mediators between groups were assessed by using the non parametric U-Mann Whitney test. Association between variables was determined by calculating the Spearman correlation coefficient. Viral load was performed in serum by using real-time PCR targeting the neuraminidase gene. Results Increased levels of innate-immunity mediators (IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1β), and the absence of anti-nvH1N1 antibodies, characterized the early response to nvH1N1 infection in both hospitalized and mild patients. High systemic levels of type-II interferon (IFN-γ) and also of a group of mediators involved in the development of T-helper 17 (IL-8, IL-9, IL-17, IL-6) and T-helper 1 (TNF-α, IL-15, IL-12p70) responses were exclusively found in hospitalized patients. IL-15, IL-12p70, IL-6 constituted a hallmark of critical illness in our study. A significant inverse association was found between IL-6, IL-8 and PaO2 in critical patients. Conclusions While infection with the nvH1N1 induces a typical innate response in both mild and severe patients, severe disease with respiratory involvement is characterized by early secretion of Th17

  4. Assessment of Transcriptional Activity of Borrelia burgdorferi and Host Cytokine Genes During Early and Late Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sunlian; Barthold, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Differential gene expression by Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes during mammalian infection facilitates their dissemination as well as immune evasion. Modulation of gene transcription in response to host immunity has been documented with the outer surface protein C, but the influence of transcription of other genes is largely unknown. A low-density array (LDA) was developed to study transcriptional activity of 43 B. burgdorferi genes and 19 host genes that may be involved in various host–agent interactions. Gene transcription in heart, joint, and muscle tissue was compared in immunocompetent C3H and immunodeficient C3H-scid mice during early (3 weeks) and late (2 months) B. burgdorferi infection. Among all tissue types, levels of relative transcription of over 80% of B. burgdorferi genes tested were one- to nine-fold less in C3H mice compared to C3H-scid mice. At the later time point, all genes were transcribed in C3H-scid mice, whereas transcription of 16 genes out of 43 tested was not detected in analyzed tissues of C3H mice. Our data suggest that during infection of immunocompetent mice, a majority of B. burgdorferi genes tested are downregulated in response to acquired host immunity. LDA revealed variable patterns of host gene expression in different tissues and at different intervals in infected mice. Higher levels of relative expression for IL-10 during both early and late infection were detected in heart base, and it was unchanged in the tibiotarsal joint. Comparative analysis of B. burgdorferi and host genes transcriptional activity revealed that increased flaB mRNA during early infection was followed by increases of CCL7, CCL8, interleukin-10 (IL-10), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in all assessed tissue types. LDA represents a valuable approach for sensitive and quantitative gene transcription profiling and for understanding Lyme borreliosis. PMID:23930938

  5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Derived from Grand Multigravidae Display a Distinct Cytokine Profile in Response to P. falciparum Infected Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Louise E.; Hasang, Wina; Umbers, Alexandra J.; Forbes, Emily K.; Ome, Maria; Unger, Holger W.; Mueller, Ivo; Siba, Peter M.; Jaworowski, Anthony; Rogerson, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunopathology of placental malaria is most significant in women in their first pregnancy especially in endemic areas, due to a lack of protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum, which is acquired in successive pregnancies. In some studies (but not all), grand multigravidae (defined as 5 or more pregnancies, G5–7) are more susceptible to poor birth outcomes associated with malaria compared to earlier gravidities. By comparing peripheral cellular responses in primigravidae (G1), women in their second to fourth pregnancy (G2–4) and grand multigravidae we sought to identify key components of the dysregulated immune response. PBMC were exposed to CS2-infected erythrocytes (IE) opsonised with autologous plasma or unopsonised IE, and cytokine and chemokine secretion was measured. Higher levels of opsonising antibody were present in plasma derived from multigravid compared to primigravid women. Significant differences in the levels of cytokines and chemokines secreted in response to IE were observed. Less IL-10, IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF but more CXCL8, CCL8, IFNγ and CXCL10 were detected in G5–7 compared to G2–4 women. Our study provides fresh insight into the modulation of peripheral blood cell function and effects on the balance between host protection and immunopathology during placental malaria infection. PMID:24465935

  6. Reservoir Host Immune Responses to Emerging Zoonotic Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mandl, Judith N.; Ahmed, Rafi; Barreiro, Luis B.; Daszak, Peter; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Feinberg, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic viruses, such as HIV, Ebola virus, coronaviruses, influenza A viruses, hantaviruses, or henipaviruses, can result in profound pathology in humans. In contrast, populations of the reservoir hosts of zoonotic pathogens often appear to tolerate these infections with little evidence of disease. Why are viruses more dangerous in one species than another? Immunological studies investigating quantitative and qualitative differences in the host-virus equilibrium in animal reservoirs will be key to answering this question, informing new approaches for treating and preventing zoonotic diseases. Integrating an understanding of host immune responses with epidemiological, ecological, and evolutionary insights into viral emergence will shed light on mechanisms that minimize fitness costs associated with viral infection, facilitate transmission to other hosts, and underlie the association of specific reservoir hosts with multiple emerging viruses. Reservoir host studies provide a rich opportunity for elucidating fundamental immunological processes and their underlying genetic basis, in the context of distinct physiological and metabolic constraints that contribute to host resistance and disease tolerance. PMID:25533784

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia induce distinct host responses.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Kevin W; McDunn, Jonathan E; Clark, Andrew T; Dunne, W Michael; Dixon, David J; Turnbull, Isaiah R; Dipasco, Peter J; Osberghaus, William F; Sherman, Benjamin; Martin, James R; Walter, Michael J; Cobb, J Perren; Buchman, Timothy G; Hotchkiss, Richard S; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2010-01-01

    Pathogens that cause pneumonia may be treated in a targeted fashion by antibiotics, but if this therapy fails, then treatment involves only nonspecific supportive measures, independent of the inciting infection. The purpose of this study was to determine whether host response is similar after disparate infections with similar mortalities. Prospective, randomized controlled study. Animal laboratory in a university medical center. Pneumonia was induced in FVB/N mice by either Streptococcus pneumoniae or two different concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Plasma and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from septic animals was assayed by a microarray immunoassay measuring 18 inflammatory mediators at multiple time points. The host response was dependent on the causative organism as well as kinetics of mortality, but the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses were independent of inoculum concentration or degree of bacteremia. Pneumonia caused by different concentrations of the same bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also yielded distinct inflammatory responses; however, inflammatory mediator expression did not directly track the severity of infection. For all infections, the host response was compartmentalized, with markedly different concentrations of inflammatory mediators in the systemic circulation and the lungs. Hierarchical clustering analysis resulted in the identification of five distinct clusters of the host response to bacterial infection. Principal components analysis correlated pulmonary macrophage inflammatory peptide-2 and interleukin-10 with progression of infection, whereas elevated plasma tumor necrosis factor sr2 and macrophage chemotactic peptide-1 were indicative of fulminant disease with >90% mortality within 48 hrs. Septic mice have distinct local and systemic responses to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Targeting specific host inflammatory responses induced by distinct bacterial infections could represent a

  8. Host-Selective Toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Induce Common Responses Associated with Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Pandelova, Iovanna; Figueroa, Melania; Wilhelm, Larry J.; Manning, Viola A.; Mankaney, Aakash N.; Mockler, Todd C.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.

    2012-01-01

    Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr), a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs) necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA) and Ptr ToxB (ToxB), are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death. PMID:22792250

  9. TLR9 Activation Dampens the Early Inflammatory Response to Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Impacting Host Survival

    PubMed Central

    Menino, João Filipe; Saraiva, Margarida; Gomes-Alves, Ana G.; Lobo-Silva, Diogo; Sturme, Mark; Gomes-Rezende, Jéssica; Saraiva, Ana Laura; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Cunha, Cristina; Carvalho, Agostinho; Romani, Luigina; Pedrosa, Jorge; Castro, António Gil; Rodrigues, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis causes paracoccidioidomycosis, one of the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. Thus, understanding the characteristics of the protective immune response to P. brasiliensis is of interest, as it may reveal targets for disease control. The initiation of the immune response relies on the activation of pattern recognition receptors, among which are TLRs. Both TLR2 and TLR4 have been implicated in the recognition of P. brasiliensis and regulation of the immune response. However, the role of TLR9 during the infection by this fungus remains unclear. Methodology/Principal findings We used in vitro and in vivo models of infection by P. brasiliensis, comparing wild type and TLR9 deficient (−/−) mice, to assess the contribution of TLR9 on cytokine induction, phagocytosis and outcome of infection. We show that TLR9 recognizes either the yeast form or DNA from P. brasiliensis by stimulating the expression/production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by bone marrow derived macrophages, also increasing their phagocytic ability. We further show that TLR9 plays a protective role early after intravenous infection with P. brasiliensis, as infected TLR9−/− mice died at higher rate during the first 48 hours post infection than wild type mice. Moreover, TLR9−/− mice presented tissue damage and increased expression of several cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-6. The increased pattern of cytokine expression was also observed during intraperitoneal infection of TLR9−/− mice, with enhanced recruitment of neutrophils. The phenotype of TLR9−/− hosts observed during the early stages of P. brasiliensis infection was reverted upon a transient, 48 hours post-infection, neutrophil depletion. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest that TLR9 activation plays an early protective role against P. brasiliensis, by avoiding a deregulated type of inflammatory response associated to neutrophils that may lead to tissue damage. Thus

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization: Modulation of Host Immune Response and Impact on Human Vaccine Design

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Aisling F.; Leech, John M.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    In apparent contrast to its invasive potential Staphylococcus aureus colonizes the anterior nares of 20–80% of the human population. The relationship between host and microbe appears particularly individualized and colonization status seems somehow predetermined. After decolonization, persistent carriers often become re-colonized with their prior S. aureus strain, whereas non-carriers resist experimental colonization. Efforts to identify factors facilitating colonization have thus far largely focused on the microorganism rather than on the human host. The host responds to S. aureus nasal colonization via local expression of anti-microbial peptides, lipids, and cytokines. Interplay with the co-existing microbiota also influences colonization and immune regulation. Transient or persistent S. aureus colonization induces specific systemic immune responses. Humoral responses are the most studied of these and little is known of cellular responses induced by colonization. Intriguingly, colonized patients who develop bacteremia may have a lower S. aureus-attributable mortality than their non-colonized counterparts. This could imply a staphylococcal-specific immune “priming” or immunomodulation occurring as a consequence of colonization and impacting on the outcome of infection. This has yet to be fully explored. An effective vaccine remains elusive. Anti-S. aureus vaccine strategies may need to drive both humoral and cellular immune responses to confer efficient protection. Understanding the influence of colonization on adaptive response is essential to intelligent vaccine design, and may determine the efficacy of vaccine-mediated immunity. Clinical trials should consider colonization status and the resulting impact of this on individual patient responses. We urgently need an increased appreciation of colonization and its modulation of host immunity. PMID:24409186

  11. Impaired Cytokine Responses to Epstein-Barr Virus Antigens in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Patients.

    PubMed

    Draborg, Anette Holck; Sandhu, Noreen; Larsen, Nanna; Lisander Larsen, Janni; Jacobsen, Søren; Houen, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed cytokine responses against latent and lytic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls (HCs) to obtain an overview of the distinctive immune regulatory response in SLE patients and to expand the previously determined impaired EBV-directed T-cell response. The concentrations of 14 cytokines (IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL10, IL12, IL17, IL18, IL1β, IFNγ, TNFα, TNFβ, TGFβ, and GM-CSF) were quantified upon stimulation of whole blood with latent state antigen EBNA1, lytic cycle antigen EBV-EA/D, and the superantigen SEB. To avoid results affected by lack of lymphocytes, we focused on SLE patients with normal levels. Decreased induction of IL12, IFNγ, IL17, and IL6 upon EBNA1 stimulation and that of IFNγ, IL6, TNFβ, IL1β, and GM-CSF upon EBV-EA/D stimulation were detected in SLE patients compared to HCs. IFNγ responses, especially, were shown to be reduced. Induction of several cytokines was furthermore impaired in SLE patients upon SEB stimulation, but no difference was observed in basic levels. Results substantiate the previously proposed impaired regulation of the immune response against latent and lytic cycle EBV infection in SLE patients without lymphopenia. Furthermore, results indicate general dysfunction of leukocytes and their cytokine regulations in SLE patients.

  12. Lactobacillus acidophilus and L. reuteri modulate cytokine responses in gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, M. S. P.; Zhang, W.; Wen, K.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Saif, L. J.; Yousef, A. E.; Yuan, L.

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been shown to alleviate inflammation, enhance the immunogenicity of rotavirus vaccines, or reduce the severity of rotavirus diarrhoea. Although the mechanisms are not clear, the differential Th1/Th2/Th3-driving capacities and modulating effects on cytokine production of different LAB strains may be the key. Our goal was to delineate the influence of combining two probiotic strains L. acidophilus and L. reuteri on the development of cytokine responses in neonatal gnotobiotic pigs infected with human rotavirus (HRV). We demonstrated that HRV alone, or HRV plus LAB, but not LAB alone, initiated serum cytokine responses, as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-10 at post-inoculation day (PID) 2 in the HRV only and LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs. Peak cytokine responses coincided with the peak of HRV replication. LAB further enhanced the Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses to HRV infection as indicated by significantly higher concentrations of IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-4 and IL-10 in the LAB+HRV+ pigs compared to the LAB-HRV+ pigs. The LAB+HRV+ pigs maintained relatively constant concentrations of TGF-β compared to the HRV only group which had a significant increase at PID 2 and decrease at PID 7, suggesting a regulatory role of LAB in maintaining gut homeostasis. At PID 28, cytokine secreting cell (CSC) responses, measured by ELISpot, showed increased Th1 (IL-12, IFN-γ) CSC numbers in the LAB+HRV+ and LAB-HRV+ groups compared to LAB only and LAB-HRV- pigs, with significantly increased IL-12 CSCs in spleen and PBMCs and IFN-γ CSCs in spleen of the LAB+HRV+ group. Thus, HRV infection alone, but not LAB alone was effective in inducing cytokine responses but LAB significantly enhanced both Th1 and Th2 cytokines in HRV-infected pigs. LAB may also help to maintain immunological homeostasis during HRV infection by regulating TGF-β production. PMID:22348907

  13. Interleukin 10 inhibits pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and killing of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Bianca; Rinchai, Darawan; Kewcharoenwong, Chidchamai; Nithichanon, Arnone; Biggart, Rachael; Hawrylowicz, Catherine M.; Bancroft, Gregory J.; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana

    2017-01-01

    Melioidosis, caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei, is endemic in northeastern Thailand and Northern Australia. Severe septicemic melioidosis is associated with high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and is correlated with poor clinical outcomes. IL-10 is an immunoregulatory cytokine, which in other infections can control the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, but its role in melioidosis has not been addressed. Here, whole blood of healthy seropositive individuals (n = 75), living in N. E. Thailand was co-cultured with B. pseudomallei and production of IL-10 and IFN-γ detected and the cellular sources identified. CD3− CD14+ monocytes were the main source of IL-10. Neutralization of IL-10 increased IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α production and improved bacteria killing. IFN-γ production and microbicidal activity were impaired in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). In contrast, IL-10 production was unimpaired in individuals with DM, resulting in an IL-10 dominant cytokine balance. Neutralization of IL-10 restored the IFN-γ response of individuals with DM to similar levels observed in healthy individuals and improved killing of B. pseudomallei in vitro. These results demonstrate that monocyte derived IL-10 acts to inhibit potentially protective cell mediated immune responses against B. pseudomallei, but may also moderate the pathological effects of excessive cytokine production during sepsis. PMID:28216665

  14. Cytokine and chemokine responses after exposure to ionizing radiation: Implications for the astronauts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laiakis, Evagelia C.; Baulch, Janet E.; Morgan, William F.

    For individuals traveling in space, exposure to space radiation is unavoidable. Since adequate shielding against radiation exposure is not practical, other strategies for protecting the astronauts must be developed. Radiation is also an important therapeutic and diagnostic tool, and evidence from the clinical and experimental settings now shows a firm connection between radiation exposure and changes in cytokine and chemokine levels. These small proteins can be pro- or anti-inflammatory in nature and the balance between those two effects can be altered easily because of exogenous stresses such as radiation. The challenge to identify a common perpetrator, however, lies in the fact that the cytokines that are produced vary based on radiation dose, type of radiation, and the cell types that are exposed. Based on current knowledge, special treatments have successfully been designed by implementing administration of proteins, antibodies, and drugs that counteract some of the harmful effects of radiation. Although these treatments show promising results in animal studies, it has been difficult to transfer those practices to the human situation. Further understanding of the mechanisms by which cytokines are triggered through radiation exposure and how those proteins interact with one another may permit the generation of novel strategies for radiation protection from the damaging effects of radiation. Here, we review evidence for the connection between cytokines and the radiation response and speculate on strategies by which modulating cytokine responses may protect astronauts against the detrimental effects of ionizing radiations.

  15. Response surface methodology to determine optimal cytokine responses in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells after smallpox vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Jenna E.; Dhiman, Neelam; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Vierkant, Robert A.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Feasibility, amount of sample aliquots, processing time and cost are critical considerations for optimizing and conducting assays for large-population based studies. Well designed statistical approaches that quickly identify optimal conditions for a given assay could assist efficient completion of the laboratory assays for such studies. For example, assessment of the profile of secreted cytokines is important in understanding the immune response after vaccination. To characterize the cytokine immune response following smallpox vaccination, PBMC obtained from recently vaccinated subjects were stimulated with varying doses of live or UV-inactivated vaccinia virus and cultured for up to 8 days. In this paper, we describe a novel statistical method to identify optimal operating conditions for length in culture and virus MOI in order to measure a panel of secreted Th1, Th2, and inflammatory cytokines. This statistical method is comprised of two components. It first identifies a subset of the possible time in culture by virus MOI combinations to be studied. It then utilizes response surface analysis techniques to predict the optimal operating conditions for the measurement of each secreted cytokine. This method was applied, and the predicted optimal combinations of length in culture and virus MOI for maximum vaccinia-specific cytokine secretion were identified. The use of the response surface methodology can be applied to the optimization of other laboratory assays; especially when the number of PBMC available limits the testing of all possible combinations of parameters. PMID:19038260

  16. Intermittent preventive treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine does not modify plasma cytokines and chemokines or intracellular cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum in Mozambican Children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cytokines and chemokines are key mediators of anti-malarial immunity. We evaluated whether Intermittent Preventive Treatment in infants with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine (IPTi-SP) had an effect on the acquisition of these cellular immune responses in Mozambican children. Multiple cytokines and chemokines were quantified in plasma by luminex, and antigen-specific cytokine production in whole blood was determined by intracellular cytokine staining and flow cytometry, at ages 5, 9, 12 and 24 months. Results IPTi-SP did not significantly affect the proportion of CD3+ cells producing IFN-γ, IL-4 or IL-10. Overall, plasma cytokine or chemokine concentrations did not differ between treatment groups. Th1 and pro-inflammatory responses were higher than Th2 and anti-inflammatory responses, respectively, and IFN-γ:IL-4 ratios were higher for placebo than for SP recipients. Levels of cytokines and chemokines varied according to age, declining from 5 to 9 months. Plasma concentrations of IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13 were associated with current infection or prior malaria episodes. Higher frequencies of IFN-γ and IL-10 producing CD3+ cells and elevated IL-10, IFN-γ, MCP-1 and IL-13 in plasma were individually associated with increased malaria incidence, at different time points. When all markers were analyzed together, only higher IL-17 at 12 months was associated with lower incidence of malaria up to 24 months. Conclusions Our work has confirmed that IPTi-SP does not negatively affect the development of cellular immune response during early childhood. This study has also provided new insights as to how these cytokine responses are acquired upon age and exposure to P. falciparum, as well as their associations with malaria susceptibility. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00209795 PMID:22280502

  17. Sand fly saliva: effects on host immune response and Leishmania transmission.

    PubMed

    Rohousová, Iva; Volf, Petr

    2006-09-01

    The feeding success of sand flies (Diptera: Phlebotominae) is linked to the vast array of pharmacological substances in their saliva, which interferes with the host haemostasis and immune response. Modification of feeding site plays also an important role in Leishmania transmission. In naive hosts, co-inoculation of saliva and Leishmania parasites increases the chance of successful transmission. Disease exacerbation seems to be associated with enhanced production of type 2 cytokines and selective inhibition of some macrophage functions including the production of NO and H202. On the other hand, hosts repeatedly exposed to sand fly bites develop anti-saliva immune response that results in a protection against Leishmania infection. This led to a new interesting approach to anti-Leishmania vaccine--using salivary components to block parasite transmission. The review is therefore focused on the interactions that run between immunomodulatory molecules in sand fly saliva and host immune response, with the impact on Leishmania infection development. Recent studies revealed that saliva-based vaccine for leishmaniasis might be effective and feasible, however, several questions still require to be solved. The knowledge based on experimental mouse model cannot be fully extrapolated to dogs or humans and due to differences in salivary antigens between sand fly species the protective effect is species-specific. On the other hand, the specificity of salivary antigens enables the use of anti-saliva antibodies for monitoring the exposure of hosts to sand fly bites and might be used as a marker of risks for Leishmania transmission in endemic areas.

  18. Altered Responses to Homeostatic Cytokines in Patients with Idiopathic CD4 Lymphocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Mouthon, Luc; Landires, Ivan; Rohrlich, Pierre; Pestre, Vincent; Thèze, Jacques; Lortholary, Olivier; Chakrabarti, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia (ICL) is a rare immune deficiency characterized by a protracted CD4+ T cell loss of unknown etiology and by the occurrence of opportunistic infections similar to those seen in AIDS. We investigated whether a defect in responses to cytokines that control CD4+ T cell homeostasis could play a role in ICL. Immunophenotype and signaling responses to interleukin-7 (IL-7), IL-2, and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) were analyzed by flow cytometry in CD4+ T cells from 15 ICL patients and 15 healthy blood donors. The induction of phospho-STAT5 after IL-7 stimulation was decreased in memory CD4+ T cells of some ICL patients, which correlated with a decreased expression of the IL-7Rα receptor chain (R = 0.74, p<0.005) and with lower CD4+ T cell counts (R = 0.69, p<0.005). IL-2 responses were also impaired, both in the Treg and conventional memory subsets. Decreased IL-2 responses correlated with decreased IL-7 responses (R = 0.75, p<0.005), pointing to combined defects that may significantly perturb CD4+ T cell homeostasis in a subset of ICL patients. Unexpectedly, responses to the IL-7-related cytokine TSLP were increased in ICL patients, while they remained barely detectable in healthy controls. TSLP responses correlated inversely with IL-7 responses (R = −0.41; p<0.05), suggesting a cross-regulation between the two cytokine systems. In conclusion, IL-7 and IL-2 signaling are impaired in ICL, which may account for the loss of CD4+ T cell homeostasis. Increased TSLP responses point to a compensatory homeostatic mechanism that may mitigate defects in γc cytokine responses. PMID:23383227

  19. Modulation of the host response in periodontal therapy.

    PubMed

    Oringer, Richard J

    2002-04-01

    This paper was prepared by the Research, Science, and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology to provide the dental profession an overview of current and potential methods to modulate the host response in the treatment of periodontal diseases. Specifically, it discusses components of periodontal disease pathogenesis (i.e., immune and inflammatory responses, excessive production of matrix metalloproteinases and arachidonic acid metabolites, and regulation of bone metabolism) and their modulation.

  20. Intestinal Myofibroblasts Produce Nitric Oxide in Response to Combinatorial Cytokine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    WU, JIANFENG; CHITAPANARUX, TANED; CHEN, YISHI; SOON, RUSSELL K.; YEE, HAL F.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients display elevated levels of intraluminal nitric oxide (NO). NO can react with other molecules to form toxic compounds, which has led to the idea that NO may be an important mediator of IBD. However, the cellular source of NO and how its production is regulated in the intestine are unclear. In this study we aimed to determine if intestinal myofibroblasts produce NO in response to the IBD-associated cytokines IL-1β, TNFα, and IFNγ. Intestinal myofibroblasts were isolated from mice and found to express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA, but not endothelial NOS or neuronal NOS. Individual treatment of myofibroblasts with IL-1β, TNFα, or IFNγ had no effect on NO production, but stimulation with combinations of these cytokines synergistically increased iNOS mRNA and protein expression. Treatment with TNFα or IFNγ increased cell surface expression of IFNγRI or TNFRII, respectively, suggesting that these cytokines act in concert to prime NO production by myofibroblasts. Impairment of NF-κB activity with a small molecule inhibitor was sufficient to prevent increased expression of IFNγRI or TNFRII, and inhibition of Akt, JAK/STAT, or NF-κB blocked nearly all NO production induced by combinatorial cytokine treatment. These data indicate that intestinal myofibroblasts require stimulation by multiple cytokines to produce NO and that these cytokines act through a novel pathway involving reciprocal cytokine receptor regulation and signaling by Akt, JAK/STAT, and NF-κB. PMID:22833357

  1. Host Response Dynamics Following Lethal Infection of Rhesus Macaques With Zaire ebolavirus

    PubMed Central

    Rockx, Barry; Marzi, Andrea; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Brining, Douglas; LaCasse, Rachel A.; Gardner, Don; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-01-01

    To gain further insight into the interdependent pathogenic processes in Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), we have examined the dynamics of host responses in individual rhesus macaques infected with Zaire ebolavirus over the entire disease course. Examination of coagulation parameters revealed that decreased coagulation inhibitor activity triggered severe coagulopathy as indicated by prolonged coagulation times and decreased fibrinogen levels. This has been proposed as one of the significant mechanisms underlying disseminated intravascular coagulation in EHF patients. Furthermore, monitoring of expression levels for cytokines/chemokines suggested a mixed anti-inflammatory response syndrome (MARS), which indicates that a catastrophic uncontrolled immunological status contributes to the development of fatal hemorrhagic fever. These results highlight the pathological analogies between EHF and severe sepsis and not only contribute to our understanding of the pathogenic process, but will also help to establish novel postexposure treatment modalities. PMID:21987781

  2. Engineering biomaterials surfaces to modulate the host response.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Mei, Yan; Hadjesfandiari, Narges; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2014-12-01

    Undesirable host response is responsible for the surface induced thrombus generation, activation of the complement system and the inflammatory reactions by the blood-contacting biomaterials. The surface interaction of biomaterials with different blood components is thought to be the critical factor that dictates the host response to biomaterials. Surface engineering can be utilized as a method to enhance the biocompatibility and tailor the biological response to biomaterials. This review provides a brief account of various polymer brush based approaches used for biomaterials surface modification, both passive and bioactive, to make the material surfaces biocompatible and antibacterial. Initially we discuss the utilization of polymer brushes with different structure and chemistry as a novel strategy to design the surface non-fouling that passively prevent the subsequent biological responses. Further we explore the utility of different bioactive agents including peptides, carbohydrates and proteins which can be conjugated the polymer brush to make the surface actively interact with the body and modulate the host response. A number of such avenues have also been explored in this review.

  3. Complement Activation Correlates With Disease Severity and Contributes to Cytokine Responses in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

    PubMed

    Berg, Aase; Otterdal, Kari; Patel, Sam; Gonca, Miguel; David, Catarina; Dalen, Ingvild; Nymo, Stig; Nilsson, Margareta; Nordling, Sofia; Magnusson, Peetra U; Ueland, Thor; Prato, Mauro; Giribaldi, Giuliana; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Aukrust, Pål; Langeland, Nina; Nilsson, Per H

    2015-12-01

    The impact of complement activation and its possible relation to cytokine responses during malaria pathology was investigated in plasma samples from patients with confirmed Plasmodium falciparum malaria and in human whole-blood specimens stimulated with malaria-relevant agents ex vivo. Complement was significantly activated in the malaria cohort, compared with healthy controls, and was positively correlated with disease severity and with certain cytokines, in particular interleukin 8 (IL-8)/CXCL8. This was confirmed in ex vivo-stimulated blood specimens, in which complement inhibition significantly reduced IL-8/CXCL8 release. P. falciparum malaria is associated with systemic complement activation and complement-dependent release of inflammatory cytokines, of which IL-8/CXCL8 is particularly prominent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Oral inflammation, a role for antimicrobial peptide modulation of cytokine and chemokine responses.

    PubMed

    Brogden, Kim A; Johnson, Georgia K; Vincent, Steven D; Abbasi, Taher; Vali, Shireen

    2013-10-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation commonly occurs throughout the oral cavity. The most common causes are physical damage and microbial infections, and less frequently immune reactions and malignant changes. All of these processes result in the induction of antimicrobial peptides, chemokines and cytokines that lead to cellular infiltrates, a vascular response, tissue destruction and cellular proliferation. A fascinating concept developing in the current literature suggests that antimicrobial peptides modulate the production of chemokines, cytokines and other cellular mediators and that this may have a larger ramification as an underlying mechanism mediating inflammation. Here, we propose that the ability of antimicrobial peptides to induce chemokines and anti-inflammatory or proinflammatory cytokines plays an important role in the early events of oral inflammation and may be a target for the prevention or treatment of oral inflammatory conditions.

  5. Cytokine Response of Cultured Skeletal Muscle Cells Stimulated with Proinflammatory Factors Depends on Differentiation Stage

    PubMed Central

    Podbregar, Matej; Lainscak, Mitja; Prelovsek, Oja; Mars, Tomaz

    2013-01-01

    Myoblast proliferation and myotube formation are critical early events in skeletal muscle regeneration. The attending inflammation and cytokine signaling are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle cell proliferation and differentiation. Secretion of muscle-derived cytokines upon exposure to inflammatory factors may depend on the differentiation stage of regenerating muscle cells. Cultured human myoblasts and myotubes were exposed to 24-hour treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6), a major muscle-derived cytokine, and interleukin 1 (IL-1), an important regulator of inflammatory response, was measured 24 hours after termination of TNF-α or LPS treatment. Myoblasts pretreated with TNF-α or LPS displayed robustly increased IL-6 secretion during the 24-hour period after removal of treatments, while IL-1 secretion remained unaltered. IL-6 secretion was also increased in myotubes, but the response was less pronounced compared with myoblasts. In contrast to myoblasts, IL-1 secretion was markedly stimulated in LPS-pretreated myotubes. We demonstrate that preceding exposure to inflammatory factors stimulates a prolonged upregulation of muscle-derived IL-6 and/or IL-1 in cultured skeletal muscle cells. Our findings also indicate that cytokine response to inflammatory factors in regenerating skeletal muscle partially depends on the differentiation stage of myogenic cells. PMID:23509435

  6. Red Blood Cell Supernatant Potentiates LPS-Induced Proinflammatory Cytokine Response From Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nydam, Trevor L.; Clarke, Jason H.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C.; McCarter, Martin D.

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion has an immunomodulatory capacity on its recipients through accumulation of immunologically active substances with blood storage, and prestorage leukoreduction reduces many of these mediators. We investigated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to packed red blood cell (PRBC) supernatants from leukoreduced (LR) or non-leukoreduced (NLR) units with variable duration of storage. PRBC units were collected with or without leukoreduction on Day 0 before routine storage. The plasma fraction (supernatant) was isolated from LR and NLR units after 1 day (D1) or 42 days (D42) of storage and exposed to PBMCs versus control media for 24 h, then with LPS for an additional 24 h. Cell supernatants were analyzed for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α by cytokine bead array. IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 were significantly elevated in PRBC groups versus control. D42 NLR PRBC supernatant significantly increased secretion of IL-1β and IL-6 compared to D1 NLR PRBC supernatant. LR significantly attenuated the cytokine response of IL-1β. Thus, PRBC supernatant potentiates proinflammatory LPS-induced cytokine secretion from PBMCs. This response is accentuated with storage duration and partially attenuated with leukoreduction. These findings may partially explain the immune activation seen clinically after blood transfusion. PMID:19441884

  7. Cytokine profiles in tears accompanying the secondary conjunctival responses induced by nasal allergy.

    PubMed

    Pelikan, Zdenek

    2014-02-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) occurs either in a primary form, due to the allergic reaction localized in the conjunctivae or in a secondary form, induced by an allergic reaction initiated primarily in the nasal mucosa. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cytokine profiles in tears associated with the secondary conjunctival response (SCR) types. In 47 AC patients developing 16 immediate (SICR; p < 0.01), 20 late (SLCR; p < 0.001) and 11 delayed (SDYCR; p < 0.05) responses to nasal provocation tests (NPTs) with allergens, the NPTs were repeated and combined with recording of cytokine concentrations in the tears. The SCRs were associated with significant concentration changes of particular cytokines in tears (p < 0.05) as follows: (1): SICRs: interleukin (IL)-3, IL-4, IL-10 and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); (2) SLCRs: IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF); and (3) SDYCRs: IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, interferon gamma, G-CSF and tumor necrosis factor alpha. No significant cytokine changes were recorded in tears during the phosphate-buffered saline controls or negative SCRs. Different cytokine profiles in the tears accompanying the immediate, late and delayed types of SCR, induced by nasal allergy, would indicate involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms in the particular SCR types. The low cytokine concentrations in tears recorded during the SCRs may suggest their origin from the nasal mucosa. These results emphasize the diagnostic value of NPTs with allergens combined with monitoring of various ocular features in patients suffering from the secondary form of AC. These results may also have an impact on the therapeutical approach to this clinical entity.

  8. Candidemia-induced pediatric sepsis and its association with free radicals, nitric oxide, and cytokine level in host.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Kumar, Abhai; Singh, Smita; Tilak, Ragini

    2015-04-01

    Candida species has become the seventh most frequent causal microorganisms of nosocomial sepsis. Prematurity and low birth weights are strongly associated with the development of neonatal nosocomial bloodstream infections. Candida albicans has been the species most often associated with neonatal infections, but recently, there has been a changing pattern in the isolates recovered from neonates with invasive candidiasis, which poses resistance to the existing class of azoles such as fluconazole antifungals along with cross resistance to newer triazoles, which results in a therapeutic challenge in invasive fungal infections causing high incidence of mortality. Candida species was isolated from blood of neonates and children younger than 15 years admitted to hospital and susceptible for Candida-induced sepsis. Polymerase chain reaction-based identification and confirmation of individual Candida species were done using DNA sequencing. Antibiotic susceptibility assay and resistance pattern for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin were done for all the isolates. Furthermore, the change in free radical, cytokine release, and nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide release from polymorphonuclear leukocytes isolated from control and pediatric sepsis cases were also performed. The present study probably for the first time reports the change in increasing incidence of nonalbicans Candida-induced sepsis in neonates and children admitted to the intensive care unit of hospital, and current antibiotics load posing resistance for antifungal treatment strategy and provide serious threats in future treatment. The increase in free radicals in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and increase in expression of nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide release in Candida-infected pediatric sepsis cases underlie the role of host factor in dissemination and invasiveness of infection from exogenous sources and pathogenesis of systemic inflammation during sepsis. Copyright

  9. Host Responses to Intestinal Microbial Antigens in Gluten-Sensitive Mice

    PubMed Central

    Natividad, Jane M.; Huang, Xianxi; Slack, Emma; Jury, Jennifer; Sanz, Yolanda; David, Chella; Denou, Emmanuel; Yang, Pinchang; Murray, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Excessive uptake of commensal bacterial antigens through a permeable intestinal barrier may influence host responses to specific antigen in a genetically predisposed host. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intestinal barrier dysfunction induced by indomethacin treatment affects the host response to intestinal microbiota in gluten-sensitized HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice. Methodology/Principal Findings HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice were sensitized with gluten, and gavaged with indomethacin plus gluten. Intestinal permeability was assessed by Ussing chamber; epithelial cell (EC) ultra-structure by electron microscopy; RNA expression of genes coding for junctional proteins by Q-real-time PCR; immune response by in-vitro antigen-specific T-cell proliferation and cytokine analysis by cytometric bead array; intestinal microbiota by fluorescence in situ hybridization and analysis of systemic antibodies against intestinal microbiota by surface staining of live bacteria with serum followed by FACS analysis. Indomethacin led to a more pronounced increase in intestinal permeability in gluten-sensitized mice. These changes were accompanied by severe EC damage, decreased E-cadherin RNA level, elevated IFN-γ in splenocyte culture supernatant, and production of significant IgM antibody against intestinal microbiota. Conclusion Indomethacin potentiates barrier dysfunction and EC injury induced by gluten, affects systemic IFN-γ production and the host response to intestinal microbiota antigens in HLA-DQ8/HCD4 mice. The results suggest that environmental factors that alter the intestinal barrier may predispose individuals to an increased susceptibility to gluten through a bystander immune activation to intestinal microbiota. PMID:19649259

  10. Complement factor H interferes with Mycobacterium bovis BCG entry into macrophages and modulates the pro-inflammatory cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Munirah; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Carroll, Maria V; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an accomplished intracellular pathogen, particularly within the macrophage and this is of the utmost importance in the host-pathogen stand-off observed in the granuloma during latent tuberculosis. Contact with innate immune molecules is one of the primary interactions that can occur with the pathogen M. tuberculosis once inhaled. Complement proteins may play a role in facilitating M. tuberculosis interactions with macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that factor H, a complement regulatory protein that down-regulates complement alternative pathway activation, binds directly to the model organism M. bovis BCG. Binding of factor H reaches saturation at 5-10μg of factor H/ml, well below the plasma level. C4 binding protein (C4BP) competed with factor H for binding to mycobacteria. Factor H was also found to inhibit uptake of M. bovis BCG by THP-1 macrophage cells in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time qPCR analysis showed stark differential responses of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines during the early stages of phagocytosis, as evident from elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6, and a concomitant decrease in IL-10, TGF-β and IL-12 levels, when THP-1:BCG interaction took place in the presence of factor H. Our results suggest that factor H can interfere with mycobacterial entry into macrophages and modulate inflammatory cytokine responses, particularly during the initial stages of infection, thus affecting the extracellular survival of the pathogen. Our results offer novel insights into complement activation-independent functions of factor H during the host-pathogen interaction in tuberculosis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of host immune responses in Ebola virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2014-06-01

    Ebola causes highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans with no licensed countermeasures. Its virulence can be attributed to several immunoevasion mechanisms: an early inhibition of innate immunity started by the downregulation of type I interferon, epitope masking and subversion of the adaptive humoural immunity by secreting a truncated form of the viral glycoprotein. Deficiencies in specific and non-specific antiviral responses result in unrestricted viral replication and dissemination in the host, causing death typically within 10 days after the appearance of symptoms. This review summarizes the host immune response to Ebola infection, and highlights the short- and long-term immune responses crucial for protection, which holds implications for the design of future vaccines and therapeutics.

  12. Characterization of the host inflammatory response following implantation of prolapse mesh in rhesus macaque

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Bryan N.; Mani, Deepa; Nolfi, Ms. Alexis L.; Liang, Rui; Abramowitch, Steve; Moalli, Pamela A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the predominant cell type (macrophage, T-lymphocyte, B-lymphocyte, mast cell) within the area of implantation of the prototypical polypropylene mesh, Gynemesh PS (Ethicon); and to determine the phenotypic profile (M1 pro-inflammatory, M2 anti-inflammatory) of the macrophage response to three different polypropylene meshes: Gynemesh PS (Ethicon), and two lower weight, higher porosity meshes, UltraPro (Ethicon) and Restorelle (Coloplast). Study Design Sacrocolpopexy was performed following hysterectomy in rhesus macaques. Sham-operated animals served as controls. At 12 weeks post-surgery, the vagina-mesh complex was excised and the host inflammatory response was evaluated. Hematoxylin and eosin was used to perform routine histomorphologic evaluation. Identification of leukocyte (CD45+) subsets was performed by immunolabeling for CD68 (macrophage), CD3 (T-lymphocyte), CD20 (B-lymphocyte), and CD117 (mast cell). M1 and M2 macrophage subsets were identified using immunolabeling (CD86+ and CD206+, respectively), and further evaluation was performed using ELISA for two M1 (TNF-α and IL-12) and two M2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines. Results Histomorphologic evaluation showed a dense cellular response surrounding each mesh fiber. CD45+ leukocytes accounted for 21.4±5.4% of total cells within the peri-mesh area captured in a 20× field, with macrophages as the predominant luekocyte subset (10.5±3.9% of total cells) followed by T-lymphocytes (7.3±1.7%), B-lymphocytes (3.0±1.2%), and mast cells (0.2±0.2%). The response was observed to be more diffuse with increasing distance from the fiber surface. Few leukocytes of any type were observed in sham-operated animals. Immunolabeling revealed polarization of the macrophage response towards the M1 phenotype in all mesh groups. However, the ratio of M2:M1 macrophages was increased in the fiber area in UltraPro (P=0.033) and Restorelle (P=0.016) compared to Gynemesh PS. In addition, a shift towards increased

  13. Environmental Mold and Mycotoxin Exposures Elicit Specific Cytokine and Chemokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H.; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M.; Donaghey, Thomas C.; Molina, Ramon M.; Thompson, Khristy J.; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S.; Brain, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Methods and Findings Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation

  14. Environmental mold and mycotoxin exposures elicit specific cytokine and chemokine responses.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Molina, Ramon M; Thompson, Khristy J; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation-inducing environmental agents.

  15. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response.

    PubMed

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten; Menge, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains.

  16. Coxiella burnetii Infects Primary Bovine Macrophages and Limits Their Host Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Sobotta, Katharina; Hillarius, Kirstin; Mager, Marvin; Kerner, Katharina; Heydel, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Although domestic ruminants have long been recognized as the main source of human Q fever, little is known about the lifestyle that the obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium Coxiella burnetii adopts in its animal host. Because macrophages are considered natural target cells of the pathogen, we established primary bovine monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) as an in vitro infection model to study reservoir host-pathogen interactions at the cellular level. In addition, bovine alveolar macrophages were included to take cell type peculiarities at a host entry site into account. Cell cultures were inoculated with the virulent strain Nine Mile I (NMI; phase I) or the avirulent strain Nine Mile II (NMII; phase II). Macrophages from both sources internalized NMI and NMII. MDM were particularly permissive for NMI internalization, but NMI and NMII replicated with similar kinetics in these cells. MDM responded to inoculation with a general upregulation of Th1-related cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) early on (3 h postinfection). However, inflammatory responses rapidly declined when C. burnetii replication started. C. burnetii infection inhibited translation and release of IL-1β and vastly failed to stimulate increased expression of activation markers, such as CD40, CD80, CD86, and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Such capability of limiting proinflammatory responses may help Coxiella to protect itself from clearance by the host immune system. The findings provide the first detailed insight into C. burnetii-macrophage interactions in ruminants and may serve as a basis for assessing the virulence and the host adaptation of C. burnetii strains. PMID:27021246

  17. Host response to Clostridium difficile infection: Diagnostics and detection.

    PubMed

    Usacheva, Elena A; Jin, Jian-P; Peterson, Lance R

    2016-12-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant healthcare concern worldwide, and C. difficile is recognised as the most frequent aetiological agent of infectious healthcare-associated diarrhoea in hospitalised adult patients. The clinical manifestation of CDI varies from self-limited diarrhoea to life-threatening colitis. Such a broad disease spectrum can be explained by the impact of host factors. Currently, a complex CDI aetiology is widely accepted, acknowledging the interaction between bacteria and the host. C. difficile strains producing clostridial toxins A and B are considered toxigenic and can cause disease; those not producing the toxins are non-pathogenic. A person colonised with a toxigenic strain will not necessarily develop CDI. It is imperative to recognise patients with active disease from those only colonised with this pathogen and to implement appropriate treatment. This can be achieved by diagnostics that rely on host factors specific to CDI. This review will focus on major aspects of CDI pathogenesis and molecular mechanisms, describing host factors in disease progression and assessment of the host response in order to facilitate the development of CDI-specific diagnostics.

  18. Drug Resistant Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Different Genotypes Exhibit Differential Host Responses in THP-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Pampi; Kulkarni, Savita; Rajan, Ramakrishna; Sainis, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) persistently infects and survives within the host macrophages. Substantial genotypic variation exists among MTB strains which correlate with their interactions with the host. The present study was designed to establish a correlation, if any, between infection and induction of innate immune response by genetically diverse drug resistant MTB isolates from India. For this purpose, three clinical isolates from ancient and modern lineages, along with H37Ra and H37Rv were evaluated for intracellular growth, phagocytic index, induction of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis following infection in THP-1 cell line. A wide variation in the induction of cytokines was revealed subsequent to infection with different strains. EAI-5 strain from ancient lineage 1, induced higher proinflammatory responses, higher apoptosis and moderate intracellular growth compared to other strains, in contrast, for Beijing strain of modern lineage 2, all three parameters were lowest among the clinical isolates. Further, the responses induced by LAM-6 from modern lineage 4 were at a moderate level, similar to the laboratory strain H37Rv which also belongs to lineage 4. Thus, these profiles were specific to their respective lineages and/or genotypes and independent of their drug resistance status. Further, a positive correlation, among TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-12 induced in infected THP-1 cells was demonstrated. In addition, induction of all pro-inflammatory cytokines correlated well with the host cell apoptosis. A positive correlation was observed between phagocytic index in the category of ‘>10 bacilli/cell’ and induction of apoptosis, only for virulent strains, indicating that initial accumulation of MTB strains inside the host cell may be an important determining factor for different innate responses. PMID:23667550

  19. Host responses to Plasmodium yoelii hepatic stages: a paradigm in host-parasite interaction.

    PubMed

    Lau, A O; Sacci, J B; Azad, A F

    2001-02-01

    The liver stage of malaria, caused by the genus Plasmodium, is clinically silent, but immunologically significant. Ample evidence exists for an effective CD8(+) T cell response to this stage as well as the involvement of gammadeltaT cells and NK1.1(int) cells in immunized animal models. In contrast, there is little information concerning responses in a naive host. Here we report that several host gene expressions in the liver, spleen, and kidney of BALB/c mice are altered during the liver stage of Plasmodium yoelii infection. Really interesting new gene 3 (Ring3), semaphorin subclass 4 member G, glutamylcysteine synthetase, and p45 NF erythroid 2 were all up-regulated 24 h after infection with P. yoelii. Semaphorin subclass 4 member G expression was elevated in the kidney, whereas Ring3 was elevated in both spleen and kidney. The expression of TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma) were down-regulated in all three tissues tested except in infected spleen where IFN-gamma was elevated. P. yoelii-related host gene changes were compared with those in Toxoplasma gondii-infected livers. Ring3 expression increased 5-fold over control values, whereas expression of the other transcripts remained unchanged. TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma expressions were increased in the Toxoplasma-infected livers. The uniform increase of Ring3 expression in both Plasmodium- and Toxoplasma-infected livers suggests an innate immune response against parasitic infections, whereas the other gene expression changes are consistent with Plasmodium parasite-specific responses. Taken together, these changes suggest the immune responses to P. yoelii infection are both parasite and organ specific.

  20. Cytokine and chemokine responses to helminth and protozoan parasites and to fungus and mite allergens in neonates, children, adults, and the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian J; Komander, Karl; Hegewald, Jana; Huang, Xiangsheng; Gantin, Richard G; Soboslay, Peter T; Agossou, Abram; Banla, Meba; Köhler, Carsten

    2013-07-15

    In rural sub-Saharan Africa, endemic populations are often infected concurrently with several intestinal and intravascular helminth and protozoan parasites. A specific, balanced and, to an extent, protective immunity will develop over time in response to repeated parasite encounters, with immune responses initially being poorly adapted and non-protective. The cellular production of pro-inflammatory and regulatory cytokines and chemokines in response to helminth, protozoan antigens and ubiquitous allergens were studied in neonates, children, adults and the elderly. In children schistosomiasis prevailed (33%) while hookworm and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar was found in up to half of adults and the elderly. Mansonella perstans filariasis was only present in adults (24%) and the elderly (25%). Two or more parasite infections were diagnosed in 41% of children, while such polyparasitism was present in 34% and 38% of adults and the elderly. Cytokine and chemokine production was distinctively inducible by parasite antigens; pro-inflammatory Th2-type cytokine IL-19 was activated by Entamoeba and Ascaris antigens, being low in neonates and children while IL-19 production enhanced "stepwise" in adults and elderly. In contrast, highest production of MIP-1delta/CCL15 was present in neonates and children and inducible by Entamoeba-specific antigens only. Adults and the elderly had enhanced regulatory IL-27 cytokine responses, with Th2-type chemokines (MCP-4/CCL13, Eotaxin-2/CCL24) and cytokines (IL-33) being notably inducible by helminth- and Entamoeba-specific antigens and fungus-derived allergens. The lower cellular responsiveness in neonates and children highlighted the development of a parasite-specific cellular response profile in response to repeated episodes of exposure and re-infection. Following repeated exposure to parasites, and as a consequence of host inability to prevent or eliminate intestinal helminth or protozoa infections, a repertoire of immune responses

  1. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  2. Different cytokine response of primary colonic epithelial cells to commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jing-Gang; Cruickshank, Sheena-Margaret; Singh, Joy-Carmelina-Indira; Farrar, Mark; Lodge, James-Peter-Alan; Felsburg, Peter-John; Carding, Simon-Richard

    2005-06-14

    To determine if primary murine colonic epithelial cells (CEC) respond to commensal bacteria and discriminate between different types of bacteria. A novel CEC: bacteria co-culture system was used to compare the ability of the colonic commensal bacteria, Bacteroides ovatus, E. coli (SLF) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) to modulate production of different cytokines (n = 15) by primary CEC. Antibody staining and flow cytometry were used to investigate Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression by CEC directly ex vivo and TLR responsiveness was determined by examining the ability of TLR ligands to influence CEC cytokine production. Primary CEC constitutively expressed functional TLR2 and TLR4. Cultured in complete medium alone, CEC secreted IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10 the levels of which were significantly increased upon addition of the TLR ligands peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to the commensal bacteria induced or up-regulated different patterns of cytokine production and secretion. E. coli induced production of MIP-1alpha/beta and betadefensin3 whereas B. ovatus and L. rhamnosus exclusively induced MCP-1 and MIP-2alpha expression, respectively. TNFalpha, RANTES and MEC were induced or up-regulated in response to some but not all of the bacteria whereas ENA78 and IP-10 were up-regulated in response to all bacteria. Evidence of bacterial interference and suppression of cytokine production was obtained from mixed bacterial: CEC co-cultures. Probiotic LGG suppressed E. coli- and B. ovatus-induced cytokine mRNA accumulation and protein secretion. These observations demonstrate the ability of primary CEC to respond to and discriminate between different strains of commensal bacteria and identify a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria (LGG) may exert anti-inflammatory effects in vivo.

  3. Different cytokine response of primary colonic epithelial cells to commensal bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jing-Gang; Cruickshank, Sheena Margaret; Singh, Joy Carmelina Indira; Farrar, Mark; Lodge, James Peter Alan; Felsburg, Peter John; Carding, Simon Richard

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine if primary murine colonic epithelial cells (CEC) respond to commensal bacteria and discriminate between different types of bacteria. METHODS: A novel CEC: bacteria co-culture system was used to compare the ability of the colonic commensal bacteria, Bacteroides ovatus, E. coli (SLF) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LGG) to modulate production of different cytokines (n = 15) by primary CEC. Antibody staining and flow cytometry were used to investigate Toll-like receptor (TLR) expression by CEC directly ex vivo and TLR responsiveness was determined by examining the ability of TLR ligands to influence CEC cytokine production. RESULTS: Primary CEC constitutively expressed functional TLR2 and TLR4. Cultured in complete medium alone, CEC secreted IL-6, MCP-1 and IP-10 the levels of which were significantly increased upon addition of the TLR ligands peptidoglycan (PGN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exposure to the commensal bacteria induced or up-regulated different patterns of cytokine production and secretion. E. coli induced production of MIP-1α/β and β defensin3 whereas B. ovatus and L. rhamnosus exclusively induced MCP-1 and MIP-2α expression, respectively. TNFα, RANTES and MEC were induced or up-regulated in response to some but not all of the bacteria whereas ENA78 and IP-10 were up-regulated in response to all bacteria. Evidence of bacterial interference and suppression of cytokine production was obtained from mixed bacterial: CEC co-cultures. Probiotic LGG suppressed E. coli- and B. ovatus-induced cytokine mRNA accumulation and protein secretion. CONCLUSION: These observations demonstrate the ability of primary CEC to respond to and discriminate between different strains of commensal bacteria and identify a mechanism by which probiotic bacteria (LGG) may exert anti-inflammatory effects in vivo. PMID:15948242

  4. Air pollution-related metals induce differential cytokine responses in bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Låg, M; Øvrevik, J; Totlandsdal, A I; Lilleaas, E M; Thormodsæter, A; Holme, J A; Schwarze, P E; Refsnes, M

    2016-10-01

    Different transition metals have been shown to induce inflammatory responses in lung. We have compared eight different metal ions with regard to cytokine responses, cytotoxicity and signalling mechanisms in a human lung epithelial cell model (BEAS-2B). Among the metal ions tested, there were large differences with respect to pro-inflammatory potential. Exposure to Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced CXCL8 and IL-6 release at concentrations below 100μM, and Mn(2+) and Ni(2+) at concentrations above 200μM. In contrast, VO4(3-), Cu(2+) and Fe(2+) did not induce any significant increase of these cytokines. An expression array of 20 inflammatory relevant genes also showed a marked up-regulation of CXCL10, IL-10, IL-13 and CSF2 by one or more of the metal ions. The most potent metals, Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) induced highest levels of oxidative activity, and ROS appeared to be central in their CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Activation of the MAPK p38 seemed to be a critical mediator. However, the NF-κB pathway appeared predominately to be involved only in Zn(2+)- and As(3+)-induced CXCL8 and IL-6 responses. Thus, the most potent metals Cd(2+), Zn(2+) and As(3+) seemed to induce a similar pattern for the cytokine responses, and with some exceptions, via similar signalling mechanisms.

  5. Equine herpesvirus type 1 modulates inflammatory host immune response genes in equine endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Stephanie; Barsova, Jekaterina; Campos, Isabel; Frampton, Arthur R

    2016-08-30

    Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM), a disease caused by equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1), is characterized by severe inflammation, thrombosis, and hypoxia in central nervous system (CNS) endothelial cells, which can result in a spectrum of clinical signs including urinary incontinence, ataxia, and paralysis. Strains of EHV-1 that contain a single point mutation within the viral DNA polymerase (nucleotide A2254>G2254: amino acid N752→D752) are isolated from EHM afflicted horses at higher frequencies than EHV-1 strains that do not harbor this mutation. Due to the correlation between the DNA Pol mutation and EHM disease, EHV-1 strains that contain the mutation have been designated as neurologic. In this study, we measured virus replication, cell to cell spread efficacy, and host inflammatory responses in equine endothelial cells infected with 12 different strains of EHV-1. Two strains, T953 (Ohio 2003) (neurologic) and Kentucky A (KyA) (non-neurologic), have well described disease phenotypes while the remaining strains used in this study are classified as neurologic or non-neurologic based solely on the presence or absence of the DNA pol mutation, respectively. Results show that the neurologic strains do not replicate better or spread more efficiently in endothelial cells. Also, the majority of the host inflammatory genes were modulated similarly regardless of EHV-1 genotype. Analyses of host gene expression showed that a subset of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including the CXCR3 ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, as well as CCL5, IL-6 and TNF-α were consistently up-regulated in endothelial cells infected with each EHV-1 strain. The identification of specific pro-inflammatory cytokines in endothelial cells that are modulated by EHV-1 provides further insight into the factors that contribute to the immunopathology observed after infection and may also reveal new targets for disease intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Host Response to Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infections of Current Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Ian M.

    2014-01-01

    The nontuberculous mycobacteria are a large group of acid-fast bacteria that are very widely distributed in the environment. While Mycobacterium avium was once regarded as innocuous, its high frequency as a cause of disseminated disease in HIV-positive individuals illustrated its potential as a pathogen. Much more recently, there is growing evidence that the incidence of M. avium and related nontuberculous species is increasing in immunocompetent individuals. The same has been observed for M. abscessus infections, which are very difficult to treat; accordingly, this review focuses primarily on these two important pathogens. Like the host response to M. tuberculosis infections, the host response to these infections is of the TH1 type but there are some subtle and as-yet-unexplained differences. PMID:24914222

  7. Cytokine Release Patterns in Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) of T-Cells with Dendritic Cells (DC) Generated from AML Blasts Contribute to Predict anti-Leukaemic T-Cell Reactions and Patients' Response to Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fischbacher, Dorothea; Merle, Marion; Liepert, Anja; Grabrucker, Christine; Kroell, Tanja; Kremser, Andreas; Dreyßig, Julia; Freudenreich, Markus; Schuster, Friedhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kraemer, Doris; Koehne, Claus-Henning; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Schmid, Christoph; Schmetzer, Helga Maria

    To enlighten interactions between autologous, allogeneic or T-cells from patients after stem cell transplantation with leukaemia-derived-dendritic-cells containing dendritic cells or blast containing mononuclear cells (n = 21, respectively), we determined cytokine-concentrations (interleukin 2, 4, 6, 10, tumor-necrosis-factor-α, interferon-γ) in supernatants of mixed-lymphocyte-culture and in serum (n = 16) of 20 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and three patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by cytometric-bead-assay. We correlated our data with lytic capabilities of stimulated T-cells in a fluorolysis-assay and clinical data: Dendritic-cell-/mononuclear-cell-stimulation of T-cells resulted in increased cytokine-levels in culture-medium compared to serum. There were no significant differences between cytokine-patterns of cases with/without lytic T-cell-activity, response to immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation/donor-lymphocyte-infusion) or graft-versus-host-disease. However, some predictive cytokine-cut-off-values for antileukaemic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease could be defined. Cytokine-profiles alone, without functional assays, are no useful tool to predict antileukaemic T-cell-function, although they can indicate lytic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease.

  8. Subfornical Organ Mediates Sympathetic and Hemodynamic Responses to Blood-borne Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G.; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) act upon the brain to increase blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate blood brain barrier (BBB), and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a BBB, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery (ICA) injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean BP (MBP), HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to ICA TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in MBP, HR and RSNA in response to intravenous (IV) injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses. PMID:23670302

  9. Subfornical organ mediates sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to blood-borne proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shun-Guang; Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Beltz, Terry G; Yu, Yang; Johnson, Alan Kim; Felder, Robert B

    2013-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines play an important role in regulating autonomic and cardiovascular function in hypertension and heart failure. Peripherally administered proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), act on the brain to increase blood pressure, heart rate, and sympathetic nerve activity. These molecules are too large to penetrate the blood-brain barrier, and so the mechanisms by which they elicit these responses remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain circumventricular organ that lacks a blood-brain barrier, plays a major role in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic responses to circulating proinflammatory cytokines. Intracarotid artery injection of TNF-α (200 ng) or IL-1β (200 ng) dramatically increased mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with sham lesions of the SFO (SFO-s). These excitatory responses to intracarotid artery TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly attenuated in SFO-lesioned (SFO-x) rats. Similarly, the increases in mean blood pressure, heart rate, and renal sympathetic nerve activity in response to intravenous injections of TNF-α (500 ng) or IL-1β (500 ng) in SFO-s rats were significantly reduced in the SFO-x rats. Immunofluorescent staining revealed a dense distribution of the p55 TNF-α receptor and the IL-1 receptor accessory protein, a subunit of the IL-1 receptor, in the SFO. These data suggest that SFO is a predominant site in the brain at which circulating proinflammatory cytokines act to elicit cardiovascular and sympathetic responses.

  10. Spatiotemporal phosphoprotein distribution and associated cytokine response of a traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Han, Alice A; Currie, Holly N; Loos, Matthew S; Vrana, Julie A; Fabyanic, Emily B; Prediger, Maren S; Boyd, Jonathan W

    2016-03-01

    Molecular mechanisms of wound healing have been extensively characterized, providing a better understanding of the processes involved in wound repair and offering advances in treatment methods. Both spatial and temporal investigations of injury biomarkers have helped to pinpoint significant time points and locations during the recovery process, which may be vital in managing the injury and making the appropriate diagnosis. This study addresses spatial and temporal differences of phosphoproteins found in skeletal muscle tissue following a traumatic femur fracture, which were further compared to co-localized cytokine responses. In particular, several proteins (Akt, ERK, c-Jun, CREB, JNK, MEK1, and p38) and post-translational phosphorylations (p-Akt, p-c-Jun, p-CREB, p-ERK1/2, p-MEK1, p-p38, p-GSK3α/β, p-HSP27, p-p70S6K, and p-STAT3) associated with inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling were found to exhibit significant spatial and temporal differences in response to the traumatic injury. Quadratic discriminant analysis of all measured responses, including cytokine concentrations from previously published findings, was used to classify temporal and spatial observations at high predictive rates, further confirming that distinct spatiotemporal distributions for total protein, phosphorylation signaling, and cytokine (IL-1α, IL-1ß, IL2, IL6, TNF-α, and MIP-1α) responses exist. Finally, phosphoprotein measurements were found to be significantly correlated to cytokine concentrations, suggesting coordinated intracellular and extracellular activity during crucial periods of repair. This study represents a first attempt to monitor and assess integrated changes in extracellular and intracellular signaling in response to a traumatic injury in muscle tissues, which may provide a framework for future research to improve both our understanding of wounds and their treatment options.

  11. Pili-like proteins of Akkermansia muciniphila modulate host immune responses and gut barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Reunanen, Justus; Meijerink, Marjolein; Pietilä, Taija E.; Kainulainen, Veera; Klievink, Judith; Huuskonen, Laura; Aalvink, Steven; Skurnik, Mikael; Boeren, Sjef; Satokari, Reetta; Mercenier, Annick; Palva, Airi; Smidt, Hauke; de Vos, Willem M.; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Gut barrier function is key in maintaining a balanced response between the host and its microbiome. The microbiota can modulate changes in gut barrier as well as metabolic and inflammatory responses. This highly complex system involves numerous microbiota-derived factors. The gut symbiont Akkermansia muciniphila is positively correlated with a lean phenotype, reduced body weight gain, amelioration of metabolic responses and restoration of gut barrier function by modulation of mucus layer thickness. However, the molecular mechanisms behind its metabolic and immunological regulatory properties are unexplored. Herein, we identify a highly abundant outer membrane pili-like protein of A. muciniphila MucT that is directly involved in immune regulation and enhancement of trans-epithelial resistance. The purified Amuc_1100 protein and enrichments containing all its associated proteins induced production of specific cytokines through activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4. This mainly leads to high levels of IL-10 similar to those induced by the other beneficial immune suppressive microorganisms such as Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 and Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Together these results indicate that outer membrane protein composition and particularly the newly identified highly abundant pili-like protein Amuc_1100 of A. muciniphila are involved in host immunological homeostasis at the gut mucosa, and improvement of gut barrier function. PMID:28249045

  12. Kinetics of Disease Progression and Host Response in a Rat Model of Bubonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease. PMID:15855643

  13. Kinetics of disease progression and host response in a rat model of bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease.

  14. At the Bench: Helicobacter pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardbower, Dana M.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Given that ∼50% of the global population is infected with this pathogen, there is great impetus to elucidate underlying causes that mediate progression from infection to cancer. Recent evidence suggests that H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and oxidative stress create an environment conducive to DNA damage and tissue injury. DNA damage leads to genetic instability and eventually, neoplastic transformation. Pathogen-encoded virulence factors induce a robust but futile immune response and alter host pathways that lower the threshold for carcinogenesis, including DNA damage repair, polyamine synthesis and catabolism, antioxidant responses, and cytokine production. Collectively, such dysregulation creates a protumorigenic microenvironment within the stomach. This review seeks to address each of these aspects of H. pylori infection and to call attention to areas of particular interest within this field of research. This review also seeks to prioritize areas of translational research related to H. pylori-induced gastric cancer based on insights garnered from basic research in this field. See related review by Dalal and Moss, At the Bedside: H. pylori, dysregulated host responses, DNA damage, and gastric cancer. PMID:24868089

  15. Host response to Brucella infection: review and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Elfaki, Mohamed G; Alaidan, Alwaleed Abdullah; Al-Hokail, Abdullah Abdulrahman

    2015-07-30

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic and contagious infectious disease caused by infection with Brucella species. The infecting brucellae are capable of causing a devastating multi-organ disease in humans with serious health complications. The pathogenesis of Brucella infection is influenced largely by host factors, Brucella species/strain, and the ability of invading brucellae to survive and replicate within mononuclear phagocytic cells, preferentially macrophages (Mf). Consequently, the course of human infection may appear as an acute fatal or progress into chronic debilitating infection with periodical episodes that leads to bacteremia and death. The existence of brucellae inside Mf represents one of the strategies used by Brucella to evade the host immune response and is responsible for treatment failure in certain human populations treated with anti-Brucella drugs. Moreover, the persistence of brucellae inside Mf complicates the diagnosis and may affect the host cell signaling pathways with consequent alterations in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, there is an urgent need to pursue the development of novel drugs and/or vaccine targets against human brucellosis using high throughput technologies in genomics, proteomics, and immunology.

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus--viral biology and the host response.

    PubMed

    Hacking, D; Hull, J

    2002-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most important cause of respiratory tract infection in infants. We have an incomplete understanding of the reasons why some infants are more severely affected by RSV than others. There is no effective antiviral treatment for the infection. Advances in our understanding of the biology of RSV, particularly in relation to the attachment protein G and the fusion protein F, have revealed potential targets for new antiviral therapies and vaccine development. In response to RSV infection an intense inflammatory response is triggered, mediated initially by the infected airway epithelial cells. Cell mediated responses are important in controlling the extent of infection and in viral clearance. Humoral responses are important in protection. There is early evidence that genetic variation of the host response can influence the outcome of RSV-induced bronchiolitis.

  17. Hematopoietic cytokines.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Donald

    2008-01-15

    The production of hematopoietic cells is under the tight control of a group of hematopoietic cytokines. Each cytokine has multiple actions mediated by receptors whose cytoplasmic domains contain specialized regions initiating the various responses-survival, proliferation, differentiation commitment, maturation, and functional activation. Individual cytokines can be lineage specific or can regulate cells in multiple lineages, and for some cell types, such as stem cells or megakaryocyte progenitors, the simultaneous action of multiple cytokines is required for proliferative responses. The same cytokines control basal and emergency hematopoietic cell proliferation. Three cytokines, erythropoietin, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, have now been in routine clinical use to stimulate cell production and in total have been used in the management of many millions of patients. In this little review, discussion will be restricted to those cytokines well established as influencing the production of hematopoietic cells and will exclude newer candidate regulators and those active on lymphoid cells. As requested, this account will describe the cytokines in a historical manner, using a sequential format of discovery, understanding, validation, and puzzlement, a sequence that reflects the evolving views on these cytokines over the past 50 years.

  18. Cytokine and cytokine receptor genes of the adaptive immune response are differentially associated with breast cancer risk in American women of African and European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Quan, Lei; Gong, Zhihong; Yao, Song; Bandera, Elisa V; Zirpoli, Gary; Hwang, Helena; Roberts, Michelle; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Sucheston, Lara; Pawlish, Karen; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Cabasag, Citadel; Coignet, Jean-Gabriel; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2014-03-15

    Disparities in breast cancer biology are evident between American women of African ancestry (AA) and European ancestry (EA) and may be due, in part, to differences in immune function. To assess the potential role of constitutional host immunity on breast carcinogenesis, we tested associations between breast cancer risk and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 cytokine-related genes of the adaptive immune system using 650 EA (n = 335 cases) and 864 AA (n = 458 cases) women from the Women's Circle of Health Study (WCHS). With additional participant accrual to the WCHS, promising SNPs from the initial analysis were evaluated in a larger sample size (1,307 EAs and 1,365 AAs). Multivariate logistic regression found SNPs in genes important for T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity (IFNGR2 rs1059293, IL15RA rs2296135, LTA rs1041981), Th2 immunity (IL4R rs1801275), and T regulatory cell-mediated immunosuppression (TGFB1 rs1800469) associated with breast cancer risk, mainly among AAs. The combined effect of these five SNPs was highly significant among AAs (P-trend = 0.0005). When stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) status, LTA rs1041981 was associated with ER-positive breast cancers among EAs and marginally among AAs. Only among AA women, IL15 rs10833 and IL15RA rs2296135 were associated with ER-positive tumors, and IL12RB1 rs375947, IL15 rs10833 and TGFB1 rs1800469 were associated with ER-negative tumors. Our study systematically identified genetic variants in the adaptive immune response pathway associated with breast cancer risk, which appears to differ by ancestry groups, menopausal status and ER status.

  19. SARS coronavirus pathogenesis: host innate immune responses and viral antagonism of interferon.

    PubMed

    Totura, Allison L; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-06-01

    SARS-CoV is a pathogenic coronavirus that emerged from a zoonotic reservoir, leading to global dissemination of the virus. The association SARS-CoV with aberrant cytokine, chemokine, and Interferon Stimulated Gene (ISG) responses in patients provided evidence that SARS-CoV pathogenesis is at least partially controlled by innate immune signaling. Utilizing models for SARS-CoV infection, key components of innate immune signaling pathways have been identified as protective factors against SARS-CoV disease, including STAT1 and MyD88. Gene transcription signatures unique to SARS-CoV disease states have been identified, but host factors that regulate exacerbated disease phenotypes still remain largely undetermined. SARS-CoV encodes several proteins that modulate innate immune signaling through the antagonism of the induction of Interferon and by avoidance of ISG effector functions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Microbial translocation, the innate cytokine response, and HIV-1 disease progression in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Redd, Andrew D.; Dabitao, Djeneba; Bream, Jay H.; Charvat, Blake; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kiwanuka, Noah; Lutalo, Tom; Kigozi, Godfrey; Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Gamiel, Jordyn; Neal, Jessica D.; Oliver, Amy E.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Sewankambo, Nelson; Reynolds, Steven J.; Wawer, Maria J.; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald H.; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Reports from the United States have demonstrated that elevated markers of microbial translocation from the gut may be found in chronic and advanced HIV-1 infection and are associated with an increase in immune activation. However, this phenomenon's role in HIV-1 disease in Africa is unknown. This study examined the longitudinal relationship between microbial translocation and circulating inflammatory cytokine responses in a cohort of people with varying rates of HIV-1 disease progression in Rakai, Uganda. Multiple markers for microbial translocation (lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin antibody, and sCD14) did not change significantly during HIV-1 disease progression. Moreover, circulating immunoreactive cytokine levels either decreased or remained virtually unchanged throughout disease progression. These data suggest that microbial translocation and its subsequent inflammatory immune response do not have a causal relationship with HIV-1 disease progression in Africa. PMID:19357303

  1. Building the interaction interfaces: host responses upon infection with microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Akihiro; Hayashi, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Research fields of plant symbiosis and plant immunity were relatively ignorant with each other until a little while ago. Recently, however, increasing intercommunications between those two fields have begun to provide novel aspects and knowledge for understanding relationships between plants and microorganisms. Here, we review recent reports on plant-microbe interactions, focusing on the infection processes, in order to elucidate plant cellular responses that are triggered by both symbionts and pathogens. Highlighting the core elements of host responses over biotic interactions will provide insights into general mechanisms of plant-microbe interactions.

  2. Biomaterials and host versus graft response: A short review

    PubMed Central

    Velnar, Tomaz; Bunc, Gorazd; Klobucar, Robert; Gradisnik, Lidija

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterials and biotechnology are increasing becoming an important area in modern medicine. The main aim in this area is the development of materials, which are biocompatible to normal tissue. Tissue-implant interactions with molecular, biological and cellular characteristics at the implant-tissue interface are important for the use and development of implants. Implantation may cause an inflammatory and immune response in tissue, foreign body reaction, systemic toxicity and imminent infection. Tissue-implant interactions determine the implant life-period. The aims of the study are to consider the biological response to implants. Biomaterials and host reactions to implants and their mechanisms are also briefly discussed. PMID:26894284

  3. A fatal cytokine-induced systemic inflammatory response reveals a critical role for NK cells.

    PubMed

    Carson, W E; Yu, H; Dierksheide, J; Pfeffer, K; Bouchard, P; Clark, R; Durbin, J; Baldwin, A S; Peschon, J; Johnson, P R; Ku, G; Baumann, H; Caligiuri, M A

    1999-04-15

    The mechanism of cytokine-induced shock remains poorly understood. The combination of IL-2 and IL-12 has synergistic antitumor activity in vivo, yet has been associated with significant toxicity. We examined the effects of IL-2 plus IL-12 in a murine model and found that the daily, simultaneous administration of IL-2 and IL-12 resulted in shock and 100% mortality within 4 to 12 days depending on the strain employed. Mice treated with IL-2 plus IL-12 exhibited NK cell apoptosis, pulmonary edema, degenerative lesions of the gastrointestinal tract, and elevated serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and acute phase reactants. The actions of TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, macrophage-inflammatory protein-1alpha, IL-1, IL-1-converting enzyme, Fas, perforin, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and STAT1 did not contribute to the observed toxicity, nor did B or T cells. However, toxicity and death from treatment with IL-2 plus IL-12 could be completely abrogated by elimination of NK cells. These results suggest that the fatal systemic inflammatory response induced by this cytokine treatment is critically dependent upon NK cells, but does not appear to be mediated by the known effector molecules of this cellular compartment. These data may provide insight into the pathogenesis of cytokine-induced shock in humans.

  4. Chemokine-cytokine cross-talk. The ELR+ CXC chemokine LIX (CXCL5) amplifies a proinflammatory cytokine response via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-NF-kappa B pathway.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekar, Bysani; Melby, Peter C; Sarau, Henry M; Raveendran, Muthuswamy; Perla, Rao P; Marelli-Berg, Federica M; Dulin, Nickolai O; Singh, Ishwar S

    2003-02-14

    It is well established that cytokines can induce the production of chemokines, but the role of chemokines in the regulation of cytokine expression has not been fully investigated. Exposure of rat cardiac-derived endothelial cells (CDEC) to lipopolysaccharide-induced CXC chemokine (LIX), and to a lesser extent to KC and MIP-2, activated NF-kappaB and induced kappaB-driven promoter activity. LIX did not activate Oct-1. LIX-induced interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha promoter activity, and up-regulated mRNA expression. Increased transcription and mRNA stability both contributed to cytokine expression. LIX-mediated cytokine gene transcription was inhibited by interleukin-10. Transient overexpression of kinase-deficient NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) and IkappaB kinase (IKK), and dominant negative IkappaB significantly inhibited LIX-mediated NF-kappaB activation in rat CDEC. Inhibition of G(i) protein-coupled signal transduction, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and the 26 S proteasome significantly inhibited LIX-mediated NF-kappaB activation and cytokine gene transcription. Blocking CXCR2 attenuated LIX-mediated kappaB activation and kappaB-driven promoter activity in rat CDEC that express both CXCR1 and -2, and abrogated its activation in mouse CDEC that express only CXCR2. These results indicate that LIX activates NF-kappaB and induces kappaB-responsive proinflammatory cytokines via either CXCR1 or CXCR2, and involved phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, NIK, IKK, and IkappaB. Thus, in addition to attracting and activating neutrophils, the ELR(+) CXC chemokines amplify the inflammatory cascade, stimulating local production of cytokines that have negative inotropic and proapoptotic effects.

  5. Host Response to Probiotics Determined by Nutritional Status of Rotavirus-infected Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Saulnier, Delphine M.; Blutt, Sarah E.; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Riehle, Kevin P.; Major, Angela M.; Venable, Susan F.; Barrish, James P.; Finegold, Milton J.; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Conner, Margaret E.; Versalovic, James

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Beneficial microbes and probiotics are promising agents for the prevention and treatment of enteric and diarrheal diseases in children; however, little is known about their in vivo mechanisms of action. We used a neonatal mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea to gain insight into how probiotics ameliorate acute gastroenteritis. Methods Rotavirus-infected mice were treated with 1 of 2 strains of human-derived Lactobacillus reuteri. We assessed intestinal microbiome composition with 16S metagenomic sequencing, enterocyte migration and proliferation with 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine, and antibody and cytokine concentrations with multiplex analyses of intestinal explant cultures. Results Probiotics reduced diarrhea duration, improved intestinal histopathology, and enhanced intestinal microbiome richness and phylogenetic diversity. The magnitude of reduction of diarrhea by probiotics was strain specific and influenced by nutritional status. L reuteri DSM 17938 reduced diarrhea duration by 0, 1, and 2 days in underweight, normal weight, and overweight pups, respectively. The magnitude of reduction of diarrhea duration correlated with increased enterocyte proliferation and migration. Strain ATCC PTA 6475 reduced diarrhea duration by 1 day in all of the mice without increasing enterocyte proliferation. Both probiotic strains decreased concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, including macrophage inflammatory protein-1α and interleukin-1β, in all of the animals, and increased rotavirus-specific antibodies in all but the underweight animals. Body weight also influenced the host response to rotavirus, in terms of diarrhea duration, enterocyte turnover, and antibody production. Conclusions These data suggest that probiotic enhancement of enterocyte proliferation, villus repopulation, and virus-specific antibodies may contribute to diarrhea resolution, and that nutritional status influences the host response to both beneficial microbes and pathogens. PMID:22343914

  6. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Kimberly A; Jiang, Xiaowen; Stephensen, Charles B

    2013-04-30

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10(+) cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vaccination. Blood was drawn before, 3, 7, 14, and 28days after vaccination and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were cultured for 7days with TT, negative control (diluent), and a positive control (Staphylococcus enterotoxin B [SEB]). Activation markers (CD25 and CD69) were measured after 44h (n=8), cytokines in supernatant after 3 and 7days, and intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) of proliferated cells (identified by dye dilution) after 7days (n=6). Vaccination increased TT-specific expression of CD25 and CD69 on CD3(+)CD4(+) lymphocytes, and TT-specific proliferation at 7, 14 and 28days post vaccination. Vaccination induced TT-specific Th1 (IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2) Th2 (IL-13, IL-5, and IL-4), Th17 (IL-17A) and IL-10(+) cells as measured by ICS. TT-specific Th1 cells were the most abundant (12-15% of all TT-specific CD4(+) T-cells) while IL10(+) (1.8%) Th17 (1.1%) and Th2 cells (0.2-0.6%) were less abundant. TT-specific cytokine concentrations in PBMC supernatants followed the same pattern where a TT-specific IL-9 response was also seen. In conclusion, TT booster vaccination induced a broad T-helper cell response. This method of evaluating cytokine phenotypes may be useful in examining the impact of nutrition and environmental conditions on the plasticity of T-helper cell memory responses.

  7. Gene Expression Profile of Human Cytokines in Response to B.pseudomallei Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-19

    during 68 exposure to soil and contaminated water. Nevertheless inhalation of aerosolized 69 bacteria during extreme weather events such as rainfall and...definitive tests. Bacteria were resuscitated by subculture onto 134 5% blood agar and incubated for 24 h at 37 °C to give single colony growth for all 135...IL17 and other Th17 cytokines are linked to the response against extra-cellular 214 bacteria , pathogenesis of diverse autoimmune and inflammatory

  8. The enhancement of arbovirus transmission and disease by mosquito saliva is associated with modulation of the host immune response

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Bradley S.; Higgs, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Arthropod-borne viruses have emerged as a major human health concern. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes are the cause of the most serious and widespread arbovirus diseases worldwide and are ubiquitous in both feral and urban settings. Arboviruses, including dengue and West Nile virus are injected into vertebrates within mosquito saliva during mosquito feeding. Mosquito saliva contains anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules that facilitate the acquisition of a blood-meal. Collectively, studies investigating the effects of mosquito saliva on the vertebrate immune response suggest that at high concentrations salivary proteins are immmunosuppressive, whereas lower concentrations modulate the immune response; specifically, TH1 and antiviral cytokines are down-regulated, while TH2 cytokines are unaffected or amplified. As a consequence, mosquito saliva can impair the anti-viral immune response thus affecting viral infectiousness and host survival. Mounting evidence suggests that this is a mechanism whereby arbovirus pathogenicity is enhanced. In a range of disease models, including various hosts, mosquito species, and arthropod-borne viruses, mosquito saliva and/or feeding is associated with a potentiation of virus infection. Compared to arbovirus infection initiated in absence of the mosquito or its saliva, infection including mosquito saliva leads to an increase in virus transmission, host susceptibility, viraemia, disease progression, and mortality. PMID:18342898

  9. Predictive cytokine biomarkers of clinical response to glatiramer acetate therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, R M; Kaufman, M; Balashov, K E; Ito, K; Buyske, S; Dhib-Jalbut, S

    2016-11-15

    A prospective study of 62 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) treated with Glatiramer acetate (GA) was conducted to evaluate the value of baseline and treatment-modulated cytokines in predicting the clinical response to the drug after 2years of therapy. There were 32 responders and 30 non-responders. GA upregulated Th2/regulatory cytokines and inhibited Th1 cytokines in sera or PBMC supernatants 3 and 6months into treatment. We found two prognostic models with clinical utility. A model based on IL-18 at baseline, the change in TNFa from baseline to 3months, the change in IL-4 from baseline to 6months, and the change in the log of the ratio of TNFa/IL-4 from baseline to 6months had an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.80. A high IL-18 level at baseline and a reduction of TNF-alpha over time are associated with a response to GA. Although the study identified predictive biomarkers of clinical response to GA, the results will need to be validated in other data sets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An Appropriate Modulation of Lymphoproliferative Response and Cytokine Release as Possible Contributors to Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Martínez de Toda, Irene; Vida, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    The decrease in the proliferative response of lymphocytes is one of the most evident among the age-related changes of the immune system. This has been linked to a higher risk of mortality in both humans and experimental animals. However, long-lived individuals, in spite of optimally maintaining most of the functions of the immune system, also seem to show an impaired proliferative response. Thus, it was hypothesized that these individuals may have distinct evolution times in this proliferation and a different modulatory capacity through their cytokine release profiles. An individualized longitudinal study was performed on female ICR-CD1 mice, starting at the adult age (40 weeks old), analyzing the proliferation of peritoneal leukocytes at different ages in both basal conditions and in the presence of the mitogen Concanavalin A, for 4, 24 and 48 h of culture. The cytokine secretions (IL-2, IL-17, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) in the same cultures were also studied. Long-lived mice show a high proliferative capacity after short incubation times and, despite experiencing a functional decline when they are old, are able to compensate this decrease with an appropriate modulation of the lymphoproliferative response and cytokine release. This could explain their elevated resistance to infections and high longevity. PMID:28737707

  11. Cytokines and immune surveillance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1993-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. Among the parameters shown, by us and others, to be affected is the production of interferons. Interferons are a family of cytokines that are antiviral and play a major role in regulating immune responses that control resistance to infection. Alterations in interferon and other cytokine production and activity could result in changes in immunity and a possible compromise of host defenses against both opportunistic and external infections. The purpose of the present study is to further explore the effects of space flight on cytokines and cytokine-directed immunological function.

  12. Infection of Burkholderia cepacia Induces Homeostatic Responses in the Host for Their Prolonged Survival: The Microarray Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Thimma, Jaikumar; Hashim, Onn Haji; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia is an opportunistic human pathogen associated with life-threatening pulmonary infections in immunocompromised individuals. Pathogenesis of B. cepacia infection involves adherence, colonisation, invasion, survival and persistence in the host. In addition, B. cepacia are also known to secrete factors, which are associated with virulence in the pathogenesis of the infection. In this study, the host factor that may be the cause of the infection was elucidated in human epithelial cell line, A549, that was exposed to live B. cepacia (mid-log phase) and its secretory proteins (mid-log and early-stationary phases) using the Illumina Human Ref-8 microarray platform. The non-infection A549 cells were used as a control. Expression of the host genes that are related to apoptosis, inflammation and cell cycle as well as metabolic pathways were differentially regulated during the infection. Apoptosis of the host cells and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be inhibited by both live B. cepacia and its secretory proteins. In contrast, the host cell cycle and metabolic processes, particularly glycolysis/glycogenesis and fatty acid metabolism were transcriptionally up-regulated during the infection. Our microarray analysis provided preliminary insights into mechanisms of B. cepacia pathogenesis. The understanding of host response to an infection would provide novel therapeutic targets both for enhancing the host’s defences and repressing detrimental responses induced by the invading pathogen. PMID:24116227

  13. Legionella suppresses the host unfolded protein response via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Treacy-Abarca, Sean; Mukherjee, Shaeri

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular pathogen, Legionella pneumophila, secretes ∼300 effector proteins to modulate the host environment. Given the intimate interaction between L. pneumophila and the endoplasmic reticulum, we investigated the role of the host unfolded protein response (UPR) during L. pneumophila infection. Interestingly, we show that the host identifies L. pneumophila infection as a form of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the sensor pATF6 is processed to generate pATF6(N), a transcriptional activator of downstream UPR genes. However, L. pneumophila is able to suppress the UPR and block the translation of prototypical UPR genes, BiP and CHOP. Furthermore, biochemical studies reveal that L. pneumophila uses two effectors (Lgt1 and Lgt2) to inhibit the splicing of XBP1u mRNA to spliced XBP1 (XBP1s), an UPR response regulator. Thus, we demonstrate that L. pneumophila is able to inhibit the UPR by multiple mechanisms including blocking XBP1u splicing and causing translational repression. This observation highlights the utility of L. pneumophila as a powerful tool for studying a critical protein homeostasis regulator. PMID:26219498

  14. Intestinal cytokine response after gut ischemia: role of gut barrier failure.

    PubMed Central

    Grotz, M R; Deitch, E A; Ding, J; Xu, D; Huang, Q; Regel, G

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of intestinal ischemia with and without a reperfusion injury on intestinal cytokine production and gut permeability. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: In humans and in animal models, the gut has been implicated as a cytokine-producing organ after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-type injuries. Because of the limitations of in vivo models, it has been difficult to demonstrate directly that the gut releases cytokines after an I/R injury or whether there is a relation between the magnitude of the ischemic process and the cytokine response. METHODS: Ileal mucosal membranes from rats subjected to sham or 45 or 75 min of superior mesenteric occlusion (SMAO) or 45 minutes of SMAO and 30 minutes of reperfusion (SMAO 45/30) were mounted in the Ussing chamber system. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 were serially measured in the mucosal and serosal reservoirs of the Ussing system, as was mucosal permeability as reflected by the passage of bacteria or phenol red across the ileal membrane. In a second group of experiments, Escherichia coli C25 was added to the mucosal reservoir to determine if the cytokine response would be increased. RESULTS: Mucosal and serosal levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha were equally increased after SMAO, with the highest levels in the 75-minute SMAO group. The highest levels of interleukin-6 were found in rats subjected to 75 minutes of SMAO or SMAO 45/30; the serosal levels of interleukin-6 were four to sixfold higher than the mucosal levels. The addition of E. coli C25 resulted in a significant increase in the amount of interleukin-6 or tumor necrosis factor-alpha recovered from the mucosal reservoir. Increased ileal membrane permeability was observed only in rats subjected to 75 minutes of SMAO or SMAO 45/30. CONCLUSION: These results directly document that the levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 released from the gut increase after an ischemic or I/R injury, such as SMAO, and

  15. Cytokine, Antibody and Proliferative Cellular Responses Elicited by Taenia solium Calreticulin upon Experimental Infection in Hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis. PMID:25811778

  16. Cytokine, antibody and proliferative cellular responses elicited by Taenia solium calreticulin upon experimental infection in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Mendlovic, Fela; Cruz-Rivera, Mayra; Ávila, Guillermina; Vaughan, Gilberto; Flisser, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Taenia solium causes two diseases in humans, cysticercosis and taeniosis. Tapeworm carriers are the main risk factor for neurocysticercosis. Limited information is available about the immune response elicited by the adult parasite, particularly the induction of Th2 responses, frequently associated to helminth infections. Calreticulin is a ubiquitous, multifunctional protein involved in cellular calcium homeostasis, which has been suggested to play a role in the regulation of immune responses. In this work, we assessed the effect of recombinant T. solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) on the cytokine, humoral and cellular responses upon experimental infection in Syrian Golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Animals were infected with T. solium cysticerci and euthanized at different times after infection. Specific serum antibodies, proliferative responses in mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen cells, as well as cytokines messenger RNA (mRNA) were analyzed. The results showed that one third of the infected animals elicited anti-rTsCRT IgG antibodies. Interestingly, mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from either infected or non-infected animals did not proliferate upon in vitro stimulation with rTsCRT. Additionally, stimulation with a tapeworm crude extract resulted in increased expression of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA. Upon stimulation, rTsCRT increased the expression levels of IL-10 in spleen and MLN cells from uninfected and infected hamsters. The results showed that rTsCRT favors a Th2-biased immune response characterized by the induction of IL-10 in mucosal and systemic lymphoid organs. Here we provide the first data on the cytokine, antibody and cellular responses to rTsCRT upon in vitro stimulation during taeniasis.

  17. Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench modulates human T-cell cytokine response.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Lin, Hong; Lau, Clara B S; Kennelly, Edward J; Cassileth, Barrie R; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna

    2014-03-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the composition of a neutral and weakly acidic water-soluble extract from Echinacea purpurea (L.) Moench (EchNWA) previously shown to modify murine influenza infection, and to assess immunomodulatory effects on human T-cells. EchNWA extract from fresh aerial parts was extracted with water, ethanolic precipitation, and size-exclusion chromatography. The chemical profile of EchNWA was characterized by chromatography (size-exclusion, HPLC, GC-MS), and small molecule fingerprint analysis performed by HPLC-PDA. Jurkat T-cells at high and low cell density were pretreated or not with doses of EchNWA, followed by activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus ionomycin (PMA+I). Interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon gamma (IFNg) cytokine secretions were measured by multi-cytokine luminex technology. Results showed that EchNWA contains 80% polysaccharides, predominantly a 10kDa entity; phenolic compounds, cynarin, cichoric and caftaric acids, but no detectable alkylamides. Cytokine production required stimulation and was lower after PMA+I activation in high-density compared to low-density conditions. EchNWA mediated a strong dose-dependent enhancement of high-density T-cell production of IL-2 and IFNg response to PMA+I. EchNWA alone did not stimulate T-cells. EchNWA enhanced mean fluorescence intensity of IL-2 in Jurkat T-cells activated by PMA+1 or ionomycin alone. Conversely EchNWA mediated modest but significant suppression of IFNg response and reduced the percentage of CD25+ T-cells under low-density conditions. Conclusions are that EchNWA polysaccharides, but not phenolic compounds have dose-related adjuvant effects on human T-cell cytokine responses characterized by enhancing and suppressive effects that are regulated by T-cell density.

  18. Involvement of three mechanisms in the alteration of cytokine responses by sodium methyldithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@LSUHSC.edu; Fan, Ruping; Zheng, Qiang

    2006-06-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is the third most abundantly used conventional pesticide in the U.S. We recently reported that it alters the induction of cytokine production mediated though Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 at relevant dosages in mice. Its chemical properties and evidence from the literature suggest thee potential mechanisms of action for this compound. It could either act as a free radical scavenger (by means of its free S{sup -}group) or promote oxidation by breaking down to form methylisothiocyanate, which can deplete glutathione. It is a potent copper chelator and may affect the availability of copper to a number of copper-dependent enzymes (including some signaling molecules). SMD induces a classical neuroendocrine stress response characterized by elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, which could affect cytokine production. Although each of these mechanisms could potentially contribute to altered cytokine responses, direct evidence is lacking. The present study was conducted to obtain such evidence. The role of redox balance was investigated by pretreating mice with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which increases cellular glutathione concentrations, before administration of SMD. NAC exacerbated the SMD-induced suppression of IL-12 and the SMD-induced enhancement of IL-10 in the serum. The role of copper chelation was investigated by comparing the effects of SMD with an equimolar dose to SMD that was administered in the form of a copper chelation complex. Addition of copper significantly decreased the action of SMD on IL-12 production but not on IL-10 production. The role of the stress response was investigated by pretreating mice with antagonists of corticosterone and catecholamines. This treatment partially prevented the action of SMD on IL-10 and IL-12 in the peritoneal fluid. The results suggest that all of the proposed mechanisms have some role in the alteration of cytokine production by SMD.

  19. Host Cell Responses to Persistent Mycoplasmas - Different Stages in Infection of HeLa Cells with Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of

  20. Host cell responses to persistent mycoplasmas--different stages in infection of HeLa cells with Mycoplasma hominis.

    PubMed

    Hopfe, Miriam; Deenen, René; Degrandi, Daniel; Köhrer, Karl; Henrich, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis is a facultative human pathogen primarily associated with bacterial vaginosis and pelvic inflammatory disease, but it is also able to spread to other sites, leading to arthritis or, in neonates, meningitis. With a minimal set of 537 annotated genes, M. hominis is the second smallest self-replicating mycoplasma and thus an ideal model organism for studying the effects of an infectious agent on its host more closely. M. hominis adherence, colonisation and invasion of HeLa cells were characterised in a time-course study using scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy and microarray-based analysis of the HeLa cell transcriptome. At 4 h post infection, cytoadherence of M. hominis to the HeLa cell surface was accompanied by differential regulation of 723 host genes (>2 fold change in expression). Genes associated with immune responses and signal transduction pathways were mainly affected and components involved in cell-cycle regulation, growth and death were highly upregulated. At 48 h post infection, when mycoplasma invasion started, 1588 host genes were differentially expressed and expression of genes for lysosome-specific proteins associated with bacterial lysis was detected. In a chronically infected HeLa cell line (2 weeks), the proportion of intracellular mycoplasmas reached a maximum of 10% and M. hominis-filled protrusions of the host cell membrane were seen by confocal microscopy, suggesting exocytotic dissemination. Of the 1972 regulated host genes, components of the ECM-receptor interaction pathway and phagosome-related integrins were markedly increased. The immune response was quite different to that at the beginning of infection, with a prominent induction of IL1B gene expression, affecting pathways of MAPK signalling, and genes connected with cytokine-cytokine interactions and apoptosis. These data show for the first time the complex, time-dependent reaction of the host directed at mycoplasmal clearance and the counter measures of

  1. Genetic dissection of host immune response in pneumonia development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Smelaya, Tamara V.; Belopolskaya, Olesya B.; Smirnova, Svetlana V.; Kuzovlev, Artem N.; Moroz, Viktor V.; Golubev, Arkadiy M.; Pabalan, Noel A.; Salnikova, Lyubov E.

    2016-01-01

    The role of host genetic variation in pneumonia development and outcome is poorly understood. We studied common polymorphisms in the genes of proinflammatory cytokines (IL6 rs1800795, IL8 rs4073, IL1B rs16944), anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL10 rs1800896, IL4 rs2243250, IL13 rs20541) and toll-like receptors (TLR2 rs5743708 and rs4696480, TLR4 rs4986791, TLR9 rs352139, rs5743836 and rs187084) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) (390 cases, 203 controls) and nosocomial pneumonia (355 cases, 216 controls). Experimental data were included in a series of 11 meta-analyses and eight subset analyses related to pneumonia susceptibility and outcome. TLR2 rs5743708 minor genotype appeared to be associated with CAP/Legionnaires’ disease/pneumococcal disease. In CAP patients, the IL6 rs1800795-C allele was associated with severe sepsis/septic shock/severe systemic inflammatory response, while the IL10 rs1800896-A allele protected against the development of these critical conditions. To contribute to deciphering of the above results, we performed an in silico analysis and a qualitative synthesis of literature data addressing basal and stimulated genotype-specific expression level. This data together with database information on transcription factors’ affinity changes caused by SNPs in putative promoter regions, the results of linkage disequilibrium analysis along with SNPs functional annotations supported assumptions about the complexity underlying the revealed associations. PMID:27725770

  2. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Kelli L.; Cahill, Bethaney K.; Dilello, Sarah K.; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N.; Albertí, Sebastián

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. PMID:26666932

  3. Porin Loss Impacts the Host Inflammatory Response to Outer Membrane Vesicles of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Turner, Kelli L; Cahill, Bethaney K; Dilello, Sarah K; Gutel, Dedra; Brunson, Debra N; Albertí, Sebastián; Ellis, Terri N

    2015-12-14

    Antibiotic-resistant strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae often exhibit porin loss. In this study, we investigated how porin loss impacted the composition of secreted outer membrane vesicles as well as their ability to trigger proinflammatory cytokine secretion by macrophages. We hypothesize that porin loss associated with antibiotic resistance will directly impact both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells. Using clonally related clinical isolates of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Klebsiella pneumoniae with different patterns of porin expression, we demonstrated that altered expression of OmpK35 and OmpK36 results in broad alterations to the protein profile of secreted vesicles. Additionally, the level of OmpA incorporation was elevated in strains lacking a single porin. Porin loss significantly impacted macrophage inflammatory responses to purified vesicles. Outer membrane vesicles lacking both OmpK35 and OmpK36 elicited significantly lower levels of proinflammatory cytokine secretion than vesicles from strains expressing one or both porins. These data demonstrate that antibiotic resistance-associated porin loss has a broad and significant effect on both the composition of outer membrane vesicles and their interactions with phagocytic cells, which may impact bacterial survival and inflammatory reactions in the host. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Cruzipain, a major Trypanosoma cruzi antigen, conditions the host immune response in favor of parasite.

    PubMed

    Giordanengo, Laura; Guiñazú, Natalia; Stempin, Cinthia; Fretes, Ricardo; Cerbán, Fabio; Gea, Susana

    2002-04-01

    We recently demonstrated that humoral immune response to cruzipain, a major antigen of Trypanosoma cruzi parasite, is implicated in the pathogenesis of experimental Chagas' disease. In the present study, the spleen cell phenotype and the cytokine profile induced by cruzipain in immunized mice were analyzed. The results showed that cruzipain increases the number of spleen cells with large size and granularity. Splenocyte populations with CD19(+), Mac-1(+), Gr-1(+) and CD11c(+) positive surface markers significantly increased in immune mice compared to controls ones. Histological study revealed the presence of high number of megacariocyte and granulocyte-macrophage progenitors, indicating extramedullary hemopoiesis in spleens of immune mice. The finding of high levels of IL-4, IL5 and IL-10 and low levels of IFN-gamma and IL-12 in supernatants of immune cells stimulated with cruzipain indicates a preferential activation of T2 type cells in immune animals. To investigate the role of innate immunity cells, the classical and alternative metabolic pathways of spleen macrophages from immune mice stimulated by cruzipain were also studied. The results showed an increase of urea associated with a decrease of nitrite levels, suggesting that cruzipain up-regulates the arginase way. Therefore, cruzipain leads to T2 type cytokine profile which may enhance the arginase via in the macrophages promoting a susceptible mechanism to infection. Thus, we postulate that during T. cruzi infection, cruzipain could be used by the parasite to spread inside the host.

  5. Differential Host Response, Rather Than Early Viral Replication Efficiency, Correlates with Pathogenicity Caused by Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Askovich, Peter S.; Sanders, Catherine J.; Rosenberger, Carrie M.; Diercks, Alan H.; Dash, Pradyot; Navarro, Garnet; Vogel, Peter; Doherty, Peter C.; Thomas, Paul G.; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses exhibit large, strain-dependent differences in pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. Although the characteristics of severe disease, including uncontrolled viral replication, infection of the lower airway, and highly inflammatory cytokine responses have been extensively documented, the specific virulence mechanisms that distinguish highly pathogenic strains remain elusive. In this study, we focused on the early events in influenza infection, measuring the growth rate of three strains of varying pathogenicity in the mouse airway epithelium and simultaneously examining the global host transcriptional response over the first 24 hours. Although all strains replicated equally rapidly over the first viral life-cycle, their growth rates in both lung and tracheal tissue strongly diverged at later times, resulting in nearly 10-fold differences in viral load by 24 hours following infection. We identified separate networks of genes in both the lung and tracheal tissues whose rapid up-regulation at early time points by specific strains correlated with a reduced viral replication rate of those strains. The set of early-induced genes in the lung that led to viral growth restriction is enriched for both NF-κB binding site motifs and members of the TREM1 and IL-17 signaling pathways, suggesting that rapid, NF-κB –mediated activation of these pathways may contribute to control of viral replication. Because influenza infection extending into the lung generally results in severe disease, early activation of these pathways may be one factor distinguishing high- and low-pathogenicity strains. PMID:24073225

  6. Differential host response, rather than early viral replication efficiency, correlates with pathogenicity caused by influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Askovich, Peter S; Sanders, Catherine J; Rosenberger, Carrie M; Diercks, Alan H; Dash, Pradyot; Navarro, Garnet; Vogel, Peter; Doherty, Peter C; Thomas, Paul G; Aderem, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Influenza viruses exhibit large, strain-dependent differences in pathogenicity in mammalian hosts. Although the characteristics of severe disease, including uncontrolled viral replication, infection of the lower airway, and highly inflammatory cytokine responses have been extensively documented, the specific virulence mechanisms that distinguish highly pathogenic strains remain elusive. In this study, we focused on the early events in influenza infection, measuring the growth rate of three strains of varying pathogenicity in the mouse airway epithelium and simultaneously examining the global host transcriptional response over the first 24 hours. Although all strains replicated equally rapidly over the first viral life-cycle, their growth rates in both lung and tracheal tissue strongly diverged at later times, resulting in nearly 10-fold differences in viral load by 24 hours following infection. We identified separate networks of genes in both the lung and tracheal tissues whose rapid up-regulation at early time points by specific strains correlated with a reduced viral replication rate of those strains. The set of early-induced genes in the lung that led to viral growth restriction is enriched for both NF-κB binding site motifs and members of the TREM1 and IL-17 signaling pathways, suggesting that rapid, NF-κB -mediated activation of these pathways may contribute to control of viral replication. Because influenza infection extending into the lung generally results in severe disease, early activation of these pathways may be one factor distinguishing high- and low-pathogenicity strains.

  7. Effect of space flight on cytokine production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    Space flight has been shown to alter many immunological responses. Among those affected are the production of cytokines, Cytokines are the messengers of the immune system that facilitate communication among cells that allow the interaction among cells leading to the development of immune responses. Included among the cytokines are the interferons, interleukins, and colony stimulating factors. Cytokines also facilitate communication between the immune system and other body systems, such as the neuroendocrine and musculoskeletal systems. Some cytokines also have direct protective effects on the host, such as interferon, which can inhibit the replication of viruses. Studies in both humans and animals indicate that models of space flight as well as actual space flight alter the production and action of cytokines. Included among these changes are altered interferon production, altered responsiveness of bone marrow cells to granulocyte/monocyte-colony stimulating factor, but no alteration in the production of interleukin-3. This suggests that there are selective effects of space flight on immune responses, i.e. not all cytokines are affected in the same fashion by space flight. Tissue culture studies also suggest that there may be direct effects of space flight on the cells responsible for cytokine production and action. The results of the above study indicate that the effects of space flight on cytokines may be a fundamental mechanism by which space flight not only affects immune responses, but also other biological systems of the human.

  8. Early cytokine and antibody responses against Coxiella burnetii in aerosol infection of BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Schoffelen, Teske; Self, Joshua S.; Fitzpatrick, Kelly A.; Netea, Mihai G.; van Deuren, Marcel; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kersh, Gilbert J.

    2016-01-01

    Coxiella burnetii, a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium, can give rise to Q fever in humans and is transmitted mainly by inhalation of infected aerosols from animal reservoirs. Serology is commonly used to diagnose Q fever, but the early cellular immune response –i.e. C. burnetii-specific interferon(IFN)-γ production in response to antigen challenge– might be an additional diagnostic. Detection of IFN-γ responses has been used to identify past and chronic Q fever infections, but the IFN-γ response in acute Q fever has not been described. By challenging immunocompetent BALB/c mice with aerosols containing phase I C. burnetii, the timing and extent of IFN-γ recall responses was evaluated in an acute C. burnetii infection. Other cytokines were also measured in an effort to identify other potential diagnostic markers. The data show that after initial expansion of bacteria first in lungs and then in other tissues, the infection was cleared from day 10 onwards as reflected by the decreasing number of bacteria. The antigen-induced IFN-γ production by splenocytes coincided with emergence of IgM phase II-antibodies at day 10 post-infection, and preceded appearance of IgG-antibodies. This was accompanied by the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, KC and IP-10, followed by MCP-1, but not by IL-1β and TNF-α, and only very low production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. These data suggest that analysis of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses could be a useful tool for diagnosis of acute Q-fever. Moreover, the current model of C.burnetii infection could be used to give new insights into immunological factors that predispose to development of persistent infection. PMID:25618420

  9. Distinct Th1- and Th2-Type prenatal cytokine responses to Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte invasion ligands.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Indu; Mungai, Peter; Muchiri, Eric; Ouma, John; Sharma, Shobhona; Kazura, James W; King, Christopher L

    2005-06-01

    Prenatal immunity to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite proteins involved in erythrocyte invasion may contribute to the partial protection against malaria that is acquired during infancy in areas of stable malaria transmission. We examined newborn and maternal cytokine and antibody responses to merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1), ribosomal phosphoprotein P0 (PfP0), and region II of erythrocyte binding antigen-175 (EBA-175) in infant-mother pairs in Kenya. Overall, 82 of 167 (50%), 106 of 176 (60%), and 38 of 84 (45%) cord blood lymphocytes (CBL) from newborns produced one or more cytokines in response to MSP-1, PfP0, and EBA-175, respectively. Newborns of primigravid and/or malaria-infected women were more likely to have antigen-responsive CBL than were newborns of multigravid and/or uninfected women at delivery. Newborn cytokine responses did not match those of their mothers and fell into three distinct categories, Th1 (21 of 55 CBL donors produced only gamma interferon and/or interleukin 2 [IL-2]), Th2 (21 of 55 produced only IL-5 and/or IL-13), and mixed Th1/Th2 (13 of 55). Newborns produced more IL-10 than adults. High and low levels of cord blood IL-12 p70 production induced by anti-CD40 activation were associated with malaria-specific Th1 and Th2 responses, respectively. Antigen-responsive CBL in some newborns were detected only after depletion of IL-10-secreting CD8 cells with enrichment for CD4 cells. These data indicate that prenatal sensitization to blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum occurs frequently in areas where malaria is holoendemic. Modulation of this immunity, possibly by maternal parity and malaria, may affect the acquisition of protective immunity against malaria during infancy.

  10. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-09-02

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3(+)CD4(+), and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14(+) cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells.

  11. Race and sex-based differences in cytokine immune responses to smallpox vaccine in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Haralambieva, Iana H; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Kennedy, Richard B; Larrabee, Beth R; Shane Pankratz, V; Poland, Gregory A

    2013-10-01

    We assessed the effects of sex, race and ethnicity on smallpox vaccine-induced immune responses in 1071 armed forces members after primary Dryvax(®) smallpox vaccination, including 790 males and 281 females; 580 Caucasians, 217 African-Americans, and 217 Hispanics. Analysis of vaccinia-specific cytokine responses revealed that Caucasians had higher total IFNγ ELISPOT responses (median 57 spot-forming units/SFUs per 200,000 cells, p=0.01) and CD8(+)IFNγ ELISPOT responses (12 SFUs, p<0.001) than African-Americans (51 and 4 SFUs, respectively) and Hispanics (47 and 8 SFUs, respectively). Similarly, Caucasians secreted higher levels of vaccinia-specific IL-2 (p=0.003) and IFNα (p<0.001) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Males had higher total IFNγ ELISPOT responses (median 55 SFUs) compared to females (41 SFUs, p<0.001). We observed statistically significant sex-related differences in the secretion of IL-2 (p<0.001), IL-1β (p<0.001) and IL-10 (p=0.017). These data suggest that vaccinia-specific cytokine responses following primary smallpox vaccination are significantly influenced by race and sex of vaccinees. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Race and Sex-Based Differences in Cytokine Immune Responses to Smallpox Vaccine in Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Haralambieva, Iana H.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Larrabee, Beth R.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Poland, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the effects of sex, race and ethnicity on smallpox vaccine-induced immune responses in 1,071 armed forces members after primary Dryvax® smallpox vaccination, including 790 males and 281 females; 580 Caucasians, 217 African-Americans, and 217 Hispanics. Analysis of vaccinia-specific cytokine responses revealed that Caucasians had higher total IFNγ ELISPOT responses (median 57 spot-forming units/SFUs per 200,000 cells, p=0.01) and CD8+IFNγ ELISPOT responses (12 SFUs, p<0.001) than African-Americans (51 and 4 SFUs, respectively) and Hispanics (47 and 8 SFUs, respectively). Similarly, Caucasians secreted higher levels of vaccinia-specific IL-2 (p=0.003) and IFNα (p<0.001) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. Males had higher total IFNγ ELISPOT responses (median 55 SFUs) compared to females (41 SFUs, p<0.001). We observed statistically significant sex-related differences in the secretion of IL-2 (p<0.001), IL-1β (p<0.001) and IL-10 (p=0.017). These data suggest that vaccinia-specific cytokine responses following primary smallpox vaccination are significantly influenced by race and sex of vaccinees. PMID:23806267

  13. Enhanced immune response of MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions depends on cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jing; Chen, Xinchun; An, Hongjuan; Yang, Bingfen; Zhang, Fuping; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2016-01-01

    The functions of MAIT cells at the site of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans are still largely unknown. In this study, the phenotypes and immune response of MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions and peripheral blood were investigated. MAIT cells in tuberculous pleural effusions had greatly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17F and granzyme B response compared with those in peripheral blood. The level of IFN-γ response in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions was inversely correlated with the extent of tuberculosis infection (p = 0.0006). To determine whether cytokines drive the immune responses of MAIT cells at the site of tuberculosis infection, the role of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15 and IL-18 was investigated. Blockade of IL-2, IL-12 or IL-18 led to significantly reduced production of IFN-γ and/or granzyme B in MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions. Majority of IL-2-producing cells (94.50%) in tuberculous pleural effusions had phenotype of CD3+CD4+, and most IL-12p40-producing cells (91.39%) were CD14+ cells. MAIT cells had significantly elevated expression of γc receptor which correlated with enhanced immune responses of MAIT cells. It is concluded that MAIT cells from tuberculous pleural effusions exhibited highly elevated immune response to Mtb antigens, which are controlled by cytokines produced by innate/adaptive immune cells. PMID:27586092

  14. [Clinical Applications of Peripheral Markers of Response in Antidepressant Treatment: Neurotrophins and Cytokines].

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Constanza Mendoza

    2012-03-01

    Explanatory theories of depression have advanced in recent decades from the monoaminergic hypothesis to neurogenesis alterations to the neurohormonal hypothesis that includes the dysfunction of the inflammatory response. Currently there is a growing interest in the development of biomarkers that can contribute to diagnosis and proper treatment. To describe the role of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cytokines in the pathophysiology of depressive disorder in addition to reviewing and analyzing evidence about their clinical application as biomarkers of antidepressant therapy. Relevant data research in several databases. In recent years evidence of alterations in neurogenesis mediated by the expression of BDNF in the hippocampus in the pathophysiology of depression has increased and there is ample evidence that BDNF is a marker of the diagnosis of depressive disorder and also of treatment effectiveness. There is little information about other neurotrophins. There has also been increased interest in relation to depression as an "inflammatory disease" and the link with cytokines in its pathogenesis. Evidence has been found for the usefulness of some cytokines especially IL-1 (interleukin 1), IL-6 (interleukin 6), and TNF (tumor necrosis factor) as biomarkers of antidepressant drug response in humans. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of the cytokine response in human monocytes by mycobacterium leprae phenolic glycolipid-1.

    PubMed

    Manca, Claudia; Peixoto, Blas; Malaga, Wladimir; Guilhot, Christophe; Kaplan, Gilla

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic but treatable infectious disease caused by the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae. M. leprae cell wall is characterized by a unique phenolic glycolipid-1 (PGL-1) reported to have several immune functions. We have examined the role of PGL-1 in the modulation of monocyte cytokine/chemokine production in naive human monocytes. PGL-1 in its purified form or expressed in a recombinant Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Colmette-Guérin (BCG) background (rBCG-PGL-1) was tested. We found that PGL-1 selectively modulated the induction of specific monocyte cytokines and chemokines and, when used as prestimulus, exerted priming and/or inhibitory effects on the induction of selected cytokines/chemokines in response to a second stimulus. Taken together, the results of this study support a modulatory role for PGL-1 in the innate immune response to M. leprae. Thus, PGL-1 may play an important role in the development of the anergic clinical forms of disease and in tissue damage seen in lepromatous patients and during the reactional states of leprosy.

  16. Intestinal cytokine response of commercial source broiler chicks to Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Fasina, Y O; Holt, P S; Moran, E T; Moore, R W; Conner, D E; McKee, S R

    2008-07-01

    Development of molecular-based immunotherapeutic strategies for controlling Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) infection in poultry requires a better understanding of intestinal and cecal cytokine responses. Accordingly, an experiment was conducted to measure changes in intestinal cytokine expression when commercial source broiler chickens were challenged with a nalidixic acid-resistant ST. Ross broiler chicks were nonchallenged with ST (control treatment) or challenged by orally giving 7.8 x 10(6) cfu at 4 d of age (STC treatment). Each treatment consisted of 4 replicate pens with 14 chicks per pen. Expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interferon-gamma, and antiinflammatory interleukin (IL)-10 were determined at 5 and 10 d postchallenge (PC). Intestinal flushes were also collected from each treatment at 7 d PC to estimate IgA and IgG. Results showed an upregulation in IL-1beta mRNA in STC chicks at 5 d PC. By 10 d PC, the expression of IL-1beta was further increased and accompanied by an upregulation of IL-6 and interferon-gamma mRNA, whereas IL-10 mRNA expression decreased. It was concluded that ST induced an intestinal mucosal inflammatory response in commercial source broiler chicks less than 2 wk of age.

  17. Inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E, cholesterol, and oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Candore, Giuseppina; Bulati, Matteo; Caruso, Calogero; Castiglia, Laura; Colonna-Romano, Giuseppina; Di Bona, Danilo; Duro, Giovanni; Lio, Domenico; Matranga, Domenica; Pellicanò, Mariavaleria; Rizzo, Claudia; Scapagnini, Giovanni; Vasto, Sonya

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a heterogeneous and progressive neurodegenerative disease, which in Western society mainly accounts for senile dementia. Today many countries have rising aging populations and are facing an increased prevalence of age-related diseases, such as AD, with increasing health-care costs. Understanding the pathophysiology process of AD plays a prominent role in new strategies for extending the health of the elderly population. Considering the future epidemic of AD, prevention and treatment are important goals of ongoing research. However, a better understanding of AD pathophysiology must be accomplished to make this objective feasible. In this paper, we review some hot topics concerning AD pathophysiology that have an important impact on therapeutic perspectives. Hence, we have focused our attention on inflammation, cytokines, immune response, apolipoprotein E (APOE), cholesterol, oxidative stress, as well as exploring the related therapeutic possibilities, i.e., nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, cytokine blocking antibodies, immunotherapy, diet, and curcumin.

  18. Reduced ratio of protective versus proinflammatory cytokine responses to commensal bacteria in HLA-B27 transgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    DIELEMAN, L A; HOENTJEN, F; QIAN, B-F; SPRENGERS, D; TJWA, E; TORRES, M F; TORRICE, C D; SARTOR, R B; TONKONOGY, S L

    2004-01-01

    Germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats do not develop colitis, but colonization with specific pathogen-free (SPF) bacteria induces colitis accompanied by immune activation. To study host-dependent immune responses to commensal caecal bacteria we investigated cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells from HLA-B27 TG versus nontransgenic (non-TG) littermates after in vitro stimulation with caecal bacterial lysates (CBL). Supernatants from CBL-stimulated unseparated T- or B- cell-depleted MLN cells from HLA-B27 TG and non-TG littermates were analysed for IFN-γ, IL-12, TNF, IL-10 and TGF-β production. Our results show that unfractionated TG MLN cells stimulated with CBL produced more IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF than did non-TG MLN cells. In contrast, CBL-stimulated non-TG MLN cells produced more IL-10 and TGF-β. T cell depletion abolished IFN-γ and decreased IL-12 production, but did not affect IL-10 and TGF-β production. Conversely, neither IL-10 nor TGF-β was produced in cultures of B cell-depleted MLN. In addition, CD4+ T cells enriched from MLN of HLA-B27 TG but not from non-TG rats produced IFN-γ when cocultured with CBL-pulsed antigen presenting cells from non-TG rats. Interestingly, IL-10 and TGF-β, but not IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF were produced by MLN cells from germ-free TG rats. These results indicate that the colitis that develops in SPF HLA-B27 TG rats is accompanied by activation of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells that respond to commensal bacteria. However, B cell cytokine production in response to components of commensal intestinal microorganisms occurs in the absence of intestinal inflammation. PMID:15030511

  19. Immunohistochemical study and mRNA cytokine profile of the local immune response in cattle naturally infected with Calicophoron daubneyi.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Miguel; Manga-González, Yolanda; Benavides, Julio; González-Lanza, M Camino; Giráldez, Francisco Javier; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Fernández, Miguel; Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Castaño, Pablo; Royo, Marcos; Ortega-Mora, Luis M; Pérez, Valentín; Ferreras, M Carmen

    2015-11-30

    In order to recognize the local immune response of the definitive host to Calicophoron daubneyi natural infection, an immunohistochemical study was carried out in the reticulum and rumen in 49 naturally infected cattle. The role of cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10 interleukins and IFN-γ) in the activation of specific defence mechanisms was evaluated by reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assays to study cytokine mRNA expression. In all infected animals, CD3+ T lymphocytes seemed to be the main element of the inflammatory infiltrate in the reticular and ruminal lamina propria at the point of the parasite adhesion. Intraepithelial globule leukocytes also showed immunolabelling for CD3. Most CD3+ cells also expressed CD4 (T cell helper) antigen although sporadic CD8+-cytotoxic lymphocytes were observed. Local expression of IFN-γ was observed in damaged papillae at the site of parasite attachment and in scattered cells in the lamina propria. B cells (CD79αcy+, CD45+ and IgG+) were found constantly in relation to lymphoid aggregates. MAC387 was expressed in squamous epithelium and in macrophages of the lamina propria of affected papillae. Macrophages in this location also stained positively for CD163 and CD68. Intraepithelial Langerhans cells and macrophages located in the lamina propria showed immunopositivity for MHCII in the affected areas. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed a statistical significant increase of IFN-γ, and IL-10 expression (p<0.01) in the rumen associated with the presence of flukes. These findings suggest a predominant Th1 polarized local immune response with the probable involvement of Th regulatory cells in cattle C. daubneyi natural infection.

  20. Ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone alter cytokine responses, but not Toll-like receptors, to Salmonella infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Anuforom, Olachi; Wallace, Graham R; Buckner, Michelle M C; Piddock, Laura J V

    2016-07-01

    Antibiotics that enhance host natural defences to infection offer an alternative approach to treating infections. However, mechanisms underlying such processes are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant concentrations of two antibiotics on bacterial interactions with murine macrophages. Adhesion of Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 to and invasion by Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 of antibiotic-treated or untreated J774 murine macrophages were measured using a tissue culture infection model. Expression of genes central to the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling pathway of macrophages infected with Salmonella was analysed using the RT(2) Profiler PCR Array. Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Adhesion of Salmonella Typhimurium SL1344 to J774 macrophage monolayers was increased when macrophages were exposed to ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone, while invasion was decreased by ciprofloxacin. Expression of IL-1β and TNF-α mRNA was greater in SL1344-infected macrophages that had been treated with ciprofloxacin or ceftriaxone than in macrophages exposed to antibiotics alone or SL1344 alone. TLR mRNA was down-regulated by SL1344 infection, a response that was not altered by antibiotic pretreatment. Clinically relevant concentrations of two antibiotics differentially enhanced the response of immune cells and their interaction with bacteria, increasing bacterial adhesion to macrophages and increasing cytokine production. As increased expression of IL-1β fosters apoptosis of Salmonella-infected macrophages and clearance by neutrophils, the immunomodulatory potential of these antibiotics may explain, in part, why these two drugs continue to be used to treat salmonellosis successfully. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L.; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E.; Deak, Terrence

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31–33 days of age) and adult (69–71 days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250 µg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3 hr later for measurement of blood EtOH concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. EtOH challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression were significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 expression elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults

  2. Male adolescent rats display blunted cytokine responses in the CNS after acute ethanol or lipopolysaccharide exposure.

    PubMed

    Doremus-Fitzwater, Tamara L; Gano, Anny; Paniccia, Jacqueline E; Deak, Terrence

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol induces widespread changes in cytokine expression, with recent data from our laboratory having demonstrated that, during acute ethanol intoxication, adult rats exhibit consistent increases in interleukin (IL)-6 mRNA expression in several brain regions, while showing reductions in IL-1 and TNFα expression. Given evidence indicating that adolescence may be an ontogenetic period in which some neuroimmune processes and cells may not yet have fully matured, the purpose of the current experiments was to examine potential age differences in the central cytokine response of adolescent (P31-33days of age) and adult (69-71days of age) rats to either an acute immune (lipopolysaccharide; LPS) or non-immune challenge (ethanol). In Experiment 1, male Sprague-Dawley rats were given an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either sterile saline, LPS (250μg/kg), or ethanol (4-g/kg), and then trunk blood and brain tissue were collected 3h later for measurement of blood ethanol concentrations (BECs), plasma endotoxin, and central mRNA expression of several immune-related gene targets. In Experiment 2, the response to intragastrically (i.g.) administered ethanol was examined and compared to animals given tap water (i.g.). Results showed that LPS stimulated robust increases in expression of IL-1, IL-6, TNFα, and IκBα in the hippocampus, PVN, and amygdala, and that these increases were generally less pronounced in adolescents relative to adults. Following an i.p. ethanol challenge, IL-6 and IκBα expression was significantly increased in both ages in the PVN and amygdala, and adults exhibited even greater increases in IκBα than adolescents. I.g. administration of ethanol also increased IL-6 and IκBα expression in all three brain regions, with hippocampal IL-6 elevated even more so in adults compared to adolescents. Furthermore, assessment of plasma endotoxin concentrations revealed (i) whereas robust increases in plasma endotoxin were observed in adults injected with LPS

  3. SURFACE CHEMISTRY INFLUENCE IMPLANT MEDIATED HOST TISSUE RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Shwetha; Bhattacharyya, Dhiman; Padukudru, Chandana; Timmons, Richard B.; Tang, Liping

    2011-01-01

    Implant-mediated fibrotic reactions are detrimental to the performance of encapsulated cells, implanted drug release devices and sensors. To improve the implant function and longevity, research has emphasized altering cellular responses. Although material surface functional groups have been shown to be potent in affecting cellular activity in vitro and short term in vivo responses, these groups appear to have little influence on long-term in vivo fibrotic reactions, possibly as a result of insufficient interactions between recruited host cells and functional groups on the implants. To maximize the influence of functionality on cells, and to mimic drug release microspheres, functionalized micron-sized particles were created and tested for their ability in modulating tissue responses to biomaterial implants. In this work, the surfaces of polypropylene particles were controllably coated with four different functional groups, specifically –OH, -NH2, -CFx and –COOH, using a radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization technique. The effect of these surface functionalities on host tissue responses were then evaluated using a mice subcutaneous implantation model. Major differences were observed in contrasting tissue response to the different chemistries. Surfaces with –OH and –NH2 surface groups induced the thickest fibrous capsule accompanied with the greatest cellular infiltration into the implants. In contrast, surfaces with –CFx and –COOH exhibited the least inflammatory/fibrotic responses and cellular infiltrations. The present results clearly demonstrate that, by increasing the available functionalized surface area and spatial distribution, the effect of surface chemistry on tissue reactivity can be substantially enhanced. PMID:18022841

  4. Cytokine response signatures in disease progression and development of severe clinical outcomes for leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Eliana A G; Hagan, José E; Ribeiro, Guilherme S; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Montgomery, Ruth R; Shaw, Albert C; Ko, Albert I; Reis, Mitermayer G

    2013-01-01

    The role of the immune response in influencing leptospirosis clinical outcomes is not yet well understood. We hypothesized that acute-phase serum cytokine responses may play a role in disease progression, risk for death, and severe pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome (SPHS). We performed a case-control study design to compare cytokine profiles in patients with mild and severe forms of leptospirosis. Among patients hospitalized with severe disease, we compared those with fatal and nonfatal outcomes. During active outpatient and hospital-based surveillance we prospectively enrolled 172 patients, 23 with mild disease (outpatient) and 149 with severe leptospirosis (hospitalized). Circulating concentrations of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at the time of patient presentation were measured using a multiplex bead array assay. Concentrations of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-17A, and TNF-α were significantly higher (P<0.05) in severe disease compared to mild disease. Among severe patients, levels of IL-6 (P<0.001), IL-8 (P = 0.0049) and IL-10 (P<0.001), were higher in fatal compared to non-fatal cases. High levels of IL-6 and IL-10 were independently associated (P<0.05) with case fatality after adjustment for age and days of symptoms. IL-6 levels were higher (P = 0.0519) among fatal cases who developed SPHS than among who did not. This study shows that severe cases of leptospirosis are differentiated from mild disease by a "cytokine storm" process, and that IL-6 and IL-10 may play an immunopathogenic role in the development of life-threatening outcomes in human leptospirosis.

  5. Capture of cytokine-responsive genes (NACA and RBM3) using a gene trap approach.

    PubMed

    Baghdoyan, S; Dubreuil, P; Eberlé, F; Gomez, S

    2000-06-15

    We have developed a gene trap approach to select specific cytokine receptor/ligand responsive genes in the cell line TF-1. This cell line exhibits a dependency on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) or interleukin-3 (IL-3) and responds to interleukin-5 (IL-5). In an attempt to detect genes modulated by one of these factors, cells were infected with the Rosabetageo retrovirus in the presence of GM-CSF, IL-3, or IL-5 and clones were selected for retroviral integration on the basis of G418 resistance. Housekeeping and cytokine-regulated trapped genes were then differentiated on the basis of G418 resistance versus sensitivity in the presence of the different cytokines. To determine the reliability of this screen, DNA sequences upstream of the proviral integration site were identified by 5' rapid amplification of DNA ends polymerase chain reaction (RACE PCR) from selected GM-CSF-treated and -infected clones. Comparison of the sequences with those in the Genbank database revealed that 2 sequences correspond to known genes: NACA and RBM3. NACA was recently defined as a coactivator of c-jun-mediated transcription factors in osteoblasts, and RBM3 as a protein from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein family. Data from transcriptional analysis of these 2 genes in TF-1 cells showed a specific up-regulation by GM-CSF. Both transcripts were also found to be up-regulated in purified CD34(+) cells, suggesting their involvement in proliferative processes during hematopoiesis. Interestingly, down-regulation was observed during monocytic differentiation of TF-1 cells, suggesting their extinction could contribute to monocytic lineage development. This study demonstrates that this gene trap approach is a useful method for identifying novel, specific cytokine-responsive genes that are involved in the regulation of hematopoiesis. (Blood. 2000;95:3750-3757)

  6. High Smad7 sustains inflammatory cytokine response in refractory coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Sedda, Silvia; De Simone, Veronica; Marafini, Irene; Bevivino, Gerolamo; Izzo, Roberta; Paoluzi, Omero Alessandro; Colantoni, Alfredo; Ortenzi, Angela; Giuffrida, Paolo; Corazza, Gino R; Vanoli, Alessandro; Di Sabatino, Antonio; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2017-03-01

    Refractory coeliac disease (RCD) is a form of coeliac disease (CD) resistant to gluten-free diet and associated with elevated risk of complications. Many effector cytokines over-produced in the gut of patients with RCD are supposed to amplify the tissue-destructive immune response, but it remains unclear if the RCD-associated mucosal inflammation is sustained by defects in counter-regulatory mechanisms. The aim of the present study was to determine whether RCD-related inflammation is marked by high Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 ) activity. Smad7 was evaluated in duodenal biopsy samples of patients with RCD, patients with active CD, patients with inactive CD and healthy controls by Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR. In the same samples, TGF-β1 and phosphorylated (p)-Smad2/3 were evaluated by ELISA and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was evaluated in RCD samples cultured with Smad7 sense or antisense oligonucleotide. Smad7 protein, but not RNA, expression was increased in RCD compared with active and inactive CD patients and healthy controls and this was associated with defective TGF-β1 signalling, as marked by diminished p-Smad2/3 expression. TGF-β1 protein content did not differ among groups. Knockdown of Smad7 in RCD biopsy samples reduced interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α expression. In conclusion, in RCD, high Smad7 associates with defective TGF-β1 signalling and sustains inflammatory cytokine production. These results indicate a novel mechanism by which the mucosal cytokine response is amplified in RCD and suggest that targeting Smad7 can be therapeutically useful in RCD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Stimulation of the host immune response by photodynamic therapy (PDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollnick, Sandra O.; Kabingu, Edith; Kousis, Philaretos C.; Henderson, Barbara W.

    2004-07-01

    The tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves a complex interplay between direct cytotoxicity to the tumor cells and secondary damage as a result of the effects of PDT on the vasculature and stimulation of the host inflammatory response. Pre-clinical and clinical studies have suggested that the combination of direct and indirect effects of PDT culminate in an activation of host anti-tumor immune responses. We have begun to examine the direct effects of PDT on tumor immunogenicity and have made the novel discovery that PDT treatment of tumor cells in vitro enhances tumor cell immunogenicity. We have further demonstrated that the increase in tumor cell immunogenicity by PDT can be correlated with the ability of PDT-generated tumor cell lysates to stimulate dendritic cell maturation and activation. The mechanisms by which PDT is able to enhance tumor cell immunogenicity and stimulate dendritic cell maturation and activation is unclear, however our finding suggest that alterations in tumor immunogenicity correlate with enhanced release of dendritic cell stimulating factors such as heat shock proteins.

  8. The host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    McRae, K M; Stear, M J; Good, B; Keane, O M

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infection represents a major threat to the health, welfare and productivity of sheep populations worldwide. Infected lambs have a reduced ability to absorb nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in morbidity and occasional mortality. The current chemo-dominant approach to nematode control is considered unsustainable due to the increasing incidence of anthelmintic resistance. In addition, there is growing consumer demand for food products from animals not subjected to chemical treatment. Future mechanisms of nematode control must rely on alternative, sustainable strategies such as vaccination or selective breeding of resistant animals. Such strategies take advantage of the host's natural immune response to nematodes. The ability to resist gastrointestinal nematode infection is considered to be dependent on the development of a protective acquired immune response, although the precise immune mechanisms involved in initiating this process remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, current knowledge on the innate and acquired host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep and the development of immunity is reviewed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fibrinogen adsorption and host tissue responses to plasma functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tang, L; Wu, Y; Timmons, R B

    1998-10-01

    The physical and chemical characteristics of material surfaces are thought to play important roles in biomaterial-mediated tissue responses. To understand the importance of discrete biomaterial chemical characteristics in modifying host tissue responses, we constructed surfaces bearing different functional groups using radio frequency glow discharge plasma polymerization. Surfaces evaluated included those having high concentrations of -OH, -NH2, -CF3, and siloxyl groups. These surfaces and polyethylene terephthalate controls were used to assess the importance of particular physicochemical characteristics in surface:protein:cell interactions both in vitro and in vivo. The results obtained show that surface functionalities do significantly affect both the adsorption and "denaturation" of adsorbed fibrinogen (which is an important mediator of inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants). In addition, these surfaces provoke different degrees of acute inflammatory responses. Interestingly, the amounts of "denatured" fibrinogen that spontaneously accumulate on the individual surfaces correlate closely with the extent of biomaterial-mediated inflammation. These results suggest that surfaces that tend to "irreversibly" bind fibrinogen prompt greater acute inflammatory responses. Unexpectedly, all test surfaces except those bearing a siloxyl group engender relatively similar biomaterial-mediated fibrotic responses. Thus surface functionalities alone may not be sufficient to affect subsequent fibrotic responses.

  10. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  11. Cellular proliferation and cytokine responses of murine macrophage cell line J774A.1 to polymethylmethacrylate and cobalt-chrome alloy particles.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, A; Shelburne, C E; Gibbons, D F

    1998-12-15

    Wear debris from orthopedic joint implants have been postulated to initiate a cascade of complex cellular events that results in aseptic loosening of the prosthesis and eventually in loss of function of the device. The impact of biomaterials used in these devices on host inflammatory response has not been examined extensively. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and cobalt-chrome alloy (CoCr) are biomaterials widely used in orthopedic implant devices. Macrophages are an important component of the host inflammatory response, and we have examined the effect of PMMA and CoCr particles on the murine macrophage cell line J774A.1. Our objective was to obtain a comprehensive analysis of the particle-macrophage interaction, and we examined a number of basic biological responses of the J774A.1 cell line, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cytokines secreted into the culture supernatant (TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, IL-6, and IL-12) and mRNA expression of the cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, IL-6, IFN-alpha, M-CSF, and TGF-beta) in response to PMMA and CoCr particles. Our results indicate that the relative contribution of PMMA and CoCr particles in J774A.1 activation is negligible, and we observed a change in metabolic activity of J774A.1 cells only at higher concentrations of CoCr particles.

  12. Effect of immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotides on host responses and the establishment of Brugia pahangi in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    PubMed

    Chirgwin, Sharon R; Nowling, Jena M; Coleman, Sharon U; Klei, Thomas R

    2003-06-01

    Infection of humans with filarial parasites has long been associated with the maintenance of a dominant Th2-type host immune response. This is reflected by increases in interleukin (IL)-4- and IL-5-producing T cells, elevated immunoglobulin (Ig)E and IgG4 levels, and a pronounced eosinophilia. The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) is permissive for the filarial nematodes Brugia malayi and B. pahangi. As in humans, persistent microfilaremic infections of gerbils with Brugia spp. results in increases in Th2 cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-5. The association of dominant Th2 cytokine profiles with the maintenance of infection suggests that the introduction of Brugia spp. into a strongly Th1-biased environment may adversely affect parasite establishment. Indeed, studies conducted in mice with B. malayi suggest that depleting Th1 effectors such as interferon (IFN)-gamma and nitric oxide results in increased worm recoveries. In the present studies, the Mongolian gerbil was used as a model to investigate the effect of a dominant Th1 cytokine environment on the establishment of B. pahangi. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of immunostimulatory oligodeoxynucleotide (IS ODN) induced the production of IFN-gamma in the peritoneal exudate cells and spleen of gerbils. The presence of IFN-gamma at the time of B. pahangi infection did result in an altered host immune response to B. pahangi. Gerbils that received IS ODN before i.p. B. pahangi infections showed lower levels of the Th2-type cytokines IL-4 and IL-5, compared with animals that received B. pahangi alone (0 + Bp). This alteration in cytokine profile, however, did not alter the establishment or development of B. pahangi in the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, there was no difference in the granulomatous response of gerbils to soluble adult B. pahangi antigen bound to beads embolized in their lungs, regardless of treatment group, suggesting that IL-4 and IL-5 are not essential contributors to the systemic host

  13. Hot water immersion induces an acute cytokine response in cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Leicht, C A; Kouda, K; Umemoto, Y; Banno, M; Kinoshita, T; Moriki, T; Nakamura, T; Bishop, N C; Goosey-Tolfrey, V L; Tajima, F

    2015-11-01

    The dysfunctional sympathetic nervous system in individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) impairs adrenergic responses and may, therefore, contribute to the blunted post-exercise cytokine response. The purpose of this study was to investigate an alternative way to exercise to induce an acute cytokine response by passive core temperature elevation in CSCI. Seven male participants with a motor complete CSCI and 8 male able-bodied controls were immersed for 60 min in water set at a temperature 2 °C above the individuals' resting oesophageal temperature. Blood was collected pre, post, and every hour up to 4 h post-immersion. Hot water immersion resulted in an IL-6 plasma concentration mean increase of 133 ± 144 % in both groups (P = 0.001). On a group level, IL-6 plasma concentrations were 68 ± 38 % higher in CSCI (P = 0.06). In both groups, IL-8 increased by 14 ± 11 % (P = 0.02) and IL-1ra by 18 ± 17 % (P = 0.05). Catecholamine plasma concentrations were significantly reduced in CSCI (P < 0.05) and did not increase following immersion. Passive elevation of core temperature acutely elevates IL-6, IL-8 and IL-1ra in CSCI despite a blunted adrenergic response, which is in contrast to earlier exercise interventions in CSCI. The present study lays the foundation for future studies to explore water immersion as an alternative to exercise to induce an acute cytokine response in CSCI.

  14. Human papillomavirus infections: epidemiology, pathogenesis, and host immune response.

    PubMed

    Tyring, S K

    2000-07-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are ubiquitous and often cause lesions on the skin that come to the attention of the dermatologist. Skin lesions, or warts, often occur on the hands or soles of the feet and can cause embarrassment or discomfort. Genital HPV infections are transmitted by sexual contact. Infections associated with some HPV types have a high risk of progressing to carcinoma. This review discusses the molecular biology and genetics of human papillomaviruses and provides an overview of the virology, pathology, clinical manifestations, and host immune response to infection.

  15. Differences in the inflammatory plasma cytokine response following two elite female soccer games separated by a 72-h recovery.

    PubMed

    Andersson, H; Bøhn, S K; Raastad, T; Paulsen, G; Blomhoff, R; Kadi, F

    2010-10-01

    We investigated changes in a large battery of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in elite female soccer players following two 90-min games separated by a 72-h active or passive recovery. Blood samples were taken from 10 players before, within 15-20 min, 21, 45 and 69 h after the first game and within 15-20 min after the second game. The leukocyte count was analyzed, together with several plasma pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, using a multiplex bead array system. After the first and second game, the total leukocytes and neutrophils increased significantly. Likewise, increases (P<0.05) in pro-inflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-12, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ (INF-γ), IL-17], chemokines [monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), IL-8 and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG)], anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2R, IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-10, IL-13, INF-α) and the mixed cytokine IL-6 were observed. Leukocyte and cytokine levels were normalized within 21 h. Active recovery (low-intensity exercises) did not affect the cytokine responses. A dampened cytokine response was observed after the second game as only IL-12, IL-6, MCP-1, IL-8 and MIG increased (P<0.05). In conclusion, a robust pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine response occurs after the first but not the second soccer game. The implications of the dampened cytokine response in female players after the second game are unknown. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of the temporal host response to skin infestation with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infestation of ovine skin with the ectoparasitic mite Psoroptes ovis results in a rapid cutaneous immune response, leading to the crusted skin lesions characteristic of sheep scab. Little is known regarding the mechanisms by which such a profound inflammatory response is instigated and to identify novel vaccine and drug targets a better understanding of the host-parasite relationship is essential. The main objective of this study was to perform a combined network and pathway analysis of the in vivo skin response to infestation with P. ovis to gain a clearer understanding of the mechanisms and signalling pathways involved. Results Infestation with P. ovis resulted in differential expression of 1,552 genes over a 24 hour time course. Clustering by peak gene expression enabled classification of genes into temporally related groupings. Network and pathway analysis of clusters identified key signalling pathways involved in the host response to infestation. The analysis implicated a number of genes with roles in allergy and inflammation, including pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL1A, IL1B, IL6, IL8 and TNF) and factors involved in immune cell activation and recruitment (SELE, SELL, SELP, ICAM1, CSF2, CSF3, CCL2 and CXCL2). The analysis also highlighted the influence of the transcription factors NF-kB and AP-1 in the early pro-inflammatory response, and demonstrated a bias towards a Th2 type immune response. Conclusions This study has provided novel insights into the signalling mechanisms leading to the development of a pro-inflammatory response in sheep scab, whilst providing crucial information regarding the nature of mite factors that may trigger this response. It has enabled the elucidation of the temporal patterns by which the immune system is regulated following exposure to P. ovis, providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying lesion development. This study has improved our existing knowledge of the host response to P. ovis, including the

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Requires Phosphate-Responsive Gene Regulation To Resist Host Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Leistikow, Rachel L.; Kirksey, Meghan A.; Voskuil, Martin I.; McKinney, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis persists in the tissues of mammalian hosts despite inducing a robust immune response dominated by the macrophage-activating cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ). We identified the M. tuberculosis phosphate-specific transport (Pst) system component PstA1 as a factor required to resist IFN-γ-dependent immunity. A ΔpstA1 mutant was fully virulent in IFN-γ−/− mice but attenuated in wild-type (WT) mice and mice lacking specific IFN-γ-inducible immune mechanisms: nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), phagosome-associated p47 GTPase (Irgm1), or phagocyte oxidase (phox). These phenotypes suggest that ΔpstA1 bacteria are sensitized to an IFN-γ-dependent immune mechanism(s) other than NOS2, Irgm1, or phox. In other species, the Pst system has a secondary role as a negative regulator of phosphate starvation-responsive gene expression through an interaction with a two-component signal transduction system. In M. tuberculosis, we found that ΔpstA1 bacteria exhibited dysregulated gene expression during growth in phosphate-rich medium that was mediated by the two-component sensor kinase/response regulator system SenX3-RegX3. Remarkably, deletion of the regX3 gene suppressed the replication and virulence defects of ΔpstA1 bacteria in NOS2−/− mice, suggesting that M. tuberculosis requires the Pst system to negatively regulate activity of RegX3 in response to available phosphate in vivo. We therefore speculate that inorganic phosphate is readily available during replication in the lung and is an important signal controlling M. tuberculosis gene expression via the Pst-SenX3-RegX3 signal transduction system. Inability to sense this environmental signal, due to Pst deficiency, results in dysregulation of gene expression and sensitization of the bacteria to the host immune response. PMID:23132496

  18. Cytokines, prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the regulation of stress-response systems.

    PubMed

    Gądek-Michalska, Anna; Tadeusz, Joanna; Rachwalska, Paulina; Bugajski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is accepted as one of the fundamental biological mechanisms that underlie major depression. This hyperactivity is caused by diminished feedback inhibition of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced reduction of HPA axis signaling and increased corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) secretion from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and extra-hypothalamic neurons. During chronic stress-induced inhibition of systemic feedback, cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor (GR) levels were significantly changed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus, both structures known to be deeply involved in the pathogenesis of depression. Cytokines secreted by both immune and non-immune cells can markedly affect neurotransmission within regulatory brain circuits related to the expression of emotions; cytokines may also induce hormonal changes similar to those observed following exposure to stress. Proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are implicated in the etiologies of clinical depression and anxiety disorders. Prolonged stress responses and cytokines impair neuronal plasticity and stimulation of neurotransmission. Exposure to acute stress and IL-1β markedly increased IL-1β levels in the PFC, hippocampus and hypothalamus, as well as overall HPA axis activity. Repeated stress sensitized the HPA axis response to IL-1β. Inflammatory responses in the brain contribute to cellular damage associated with neuropsychiatric diseases related to stress. Physical, psychological or combined-stress conditions evoke a proinflammatory response in the brain and other systems, characterized by a complex release of several inflammatory mediators including cytokines, prostanoids, nitric oxide (NO) and transcription factors. Induced CRH release involves IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-α, for stimulation adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release from the anterior

  19. Relationship of basal heart rate variability to in vivo cytokine responses after endotoxin exposure.

    PubMed

    Jan, Badar U; Coyle, Susette M; Macor, Marie A; Reddell, Michael; Calvano, Steve E; Lowry, Stephen F

    2010-04-01

    Autonomic inputs from the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, as measured by heart rate variability (HRV), have been reported to correlate to the severity injury and responses to infectious challenge among critically ill patients. In addition, parasympathetic/vagal activity has been shown experimentally to exert anti-inflammatory effects via attenuation of splanchnic tissue TNF-alpha production. We sought to define the influence of gender on HRV responses to in vivo endotoxin challenge in healthy humans and to determine if baseline HRV parameters correlated with endotoxin-mediated circulating cytokine responses. Young (<30 years of age), healthy subjects (n = 30) received endotoxin (2 ng/kg), and HRV and blood samples were obtained serially thereafter. Plasma cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and HRV parameters were determined by analysis of serial 5-min epochs of heart rate monitoring. In addition, calculation of multiscale entropy deriving from cardiac monitoring data was performed. The influence of factors such as gender, body mass index, and resting heart rate on HRV after endotoxin exposure was assessed. We found that gender, body mass index, or resting heart rate did not significantly alter the HRV response after endotoxin exposure. Using entropy analysis, we observed that females had significantly higher entropy values at 24 h after endotoxin exposure. Using a serially sampling protocol for cytokine determination, we found a significant correlation of several baseline HRV parameters (percentage of interval differences of successive interbeat intervals more than 50 ms, r = 0.42, P < 0.05; high-frequency variability, r = 0.4, P < 0.05; and low-frequency/high-frequency ratio, r = -0.43, P < 0.05) on TNF-alpha release after endotoxin exposure.

  20. Dynamics of the microbiota in response to host infection.

    PubMed

    Belzer, Clara; Gerber, Georg K; Roeselers, Guus; Delaney, Mary; DuBois, Andrea; Liu, Qing; Belavusava, Vera; Yeliseyev, Vladimir; Houseman, Andres; Onderdonk, Andrew; Cavanaugh, Colleen; Bry, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal studies of the microbiota are important for discovering changes in microbial communities that affect the host. The complexity of these ecosystems requires rigorous integrated experimental and computational methods to identify temporal signatures that promote physiologic or pathophysiologic responses in vivo. Employing a murine model of infectious colitis with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium, we generated a 2-month time-series of 16S rDNA gene profiles, and quantitatively cultured commensals, from multiple intestinal sites in infected and uninfected mice. We developed a computational framework to discover time-varying signatures for individual taxa, and to automatically group signatures to identify microbial sub-communities within the larger gut ecosystem that demonstrate common behaviors. Application of this model to the 16S rDNA dataset revealed dynamic alterations in the microbiota at multiple levels of resolution, from effects on systems-level metrics to changes across anatomic sites for individual taxa and species. These analyses revealed unique, time-dependent microbial signatures associated with host responses at different stages of colitis. Signatures included a Mucispirillum OTU associated with early disruption of the colonic surface mucus layer, prior to the onset of symptomatic colitis, and members of the Clostridiales and Lactobacillales that increased with successful resolution of inflammation, after clearance of the pathogen. Quantitative culture data validated findings for predominant species, further refining and strengthening model predictions. These findings provide new insights into the complex behaviors found within host ecosystems, and define several time-dependent microbial signatures that may be leveraged in studies of other infectious or inflammatory conditions.

  1. Examination of epithelial tissue cytokine response to natural peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) infection in sheep and goats by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Atmaca, H T; Kul, O

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate expression of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and iNOS in lingual, buccal mucosa and lung epithelial tissue using immunoperoxidase technique and to compare with the tissues of control animals. The tissues used in the study were collected from 17 PPRV-affected and 5 healthy sheep and goats. In PPRV positive animals, the lungs, lingual and buccal mucosa had significantly higher iNOS, IFN-γ and TNF-α expressions compared to control group animals. There was no significant difference between PPRV positive and control groups for IL-4 and IL-10 expressions of epithelial tissues. In conclusion, the epithelial tissues infected by PPRV showed significant iNOS, IFN-γ and TNF-α expressions and they might play an important role in the initiation and regulation of cytokine response, as they take place in the first host barrier to be in contact with PPRV. It is suggested that the more epithelial damage produced by PPRV the more cytokine response may result in the infected epithelial cells. The first demonstration of iNOS expression and epithelial cytokine response to PPRV in natural cases is important because it may contribute to an early initiation of systemic immunity against PPRV infection, in addition to direct elimination of the virus during the initial epithelial phase of the infection.

  2. Kinetics of cytokine profile in response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Streptococcus pyogenes activated cells.

    PubMed

    Verma, Vivek; Kumar, Parveen; Dhanda, Rakesh Singh; Yadav, Manisha

    2016-06-01

    The infection of epithelial cells is a necessary step for Mycobacterium bovis BCG dissemination, but the mechanism of mycobacterial epithelial interactions is not completely understood. Similarly, Streptococcus pyogenes is a strictly human pathogen that favorably colonizes the skin and the pharynx. Effective cytokine secretion is essential in order to fabricate a suitable inflammatory response against an infection. In this data article, the cytokine profile in BCG and S. pyogenes activated THP-1 cell line in media after the acute phase of infection by ELISA is described. The interleukin-8 level was increased in response to both BCG and S. pyogenes, but was quite prominent after 24 h and further increased upto 72 h post infection. On the other hand, an increase in IL-6 response to S. pyogenes was observed while there was no response to BCG even after 48 h of infection. A low level of TNF-α was detected upon BCG and S. pyogenes infection.

  3. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE PATHOLOGY AS A HOST RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by dementia and neuropathologically by accumulation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Identification of their constituents in the mid 1980s led to an exponential expansion of knowledge pertaining to metabolic pathways of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, in terms of normal human physiology and pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. Forgotten is the fact that our experience with AD pathology is based on end-stage lesions that have an imperfect correlation with clinical dementia in terms of lesion burden and affected brain region, and that the an AD is based on lesions that also occur in cognitively intact elderly. Attempts at addressing this fundamental defect now focus on toxic intermediates, namely Aβ oligomers, and their potential direct involvement of the synapse. Current thinking on AD pathology includes the concept that hallmark lesions may be non-toxic- something we have long been suggesting. We favor the interpretation that AD pathology represents a host response to an upstream pathophysiological process, and targeting lesions, including toxic intermediates, will not likely be beneficial so long as the host response is directly deleterious. Therefore, renewed efforts directed at basic age-related processes, such as oxidative stress and/or inflammatory mediators, are warranted. PMID:18520771

  4. Plant surface wax affects parasitoid's response to host footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostás, Michael; Ruf, Daniel; Zabka, Vanessa; Hildebrandt, Ulrich

    2008-10-01

    The plant surface is the substrate upon which herbivorous insects and natural enemies meet and thus represents the stage for interactions between the three trophic levels. Plant surfaces are covered by an epicuticular wax layer which is highly variable depending on species, cultivar or plant part. Differences in wax chemistry may modulate ecological interactions. We explored whether caterpillars of Spodoptera frugiperda, when walking over a plant surface, leave a chemical trail (kairomones) that can be detected by the parasitoid Cotesia marginiventris. Chemistry and micromorphology of cuticular waxes of two barley eceriferum wax mutants ( cer-za.126, cer-yp.949) and wild-type cv. Bonus (wt) were assessed. The plants were then used to investigate potential surface effects on the detectability of caterpillar kairomones. Here we provide evidence that C. marginiventris responds to chemical footprints of its host. Parasitoids were able to detect the kairomone on wild-type plants and on both cer mutants but the response to cer-yp.949 (reduced wax, high aldehyde fraction) was less pronounced. Experiments with caterpillar-treated wt and mutant leaves offered simultaneously, confirmed this observation: no difference in wasp response was found when wt was tested against cer-za.126 (reduced wax, wt-like chemical composition) but wt was significantly more attractive than cer-yp.949. This demonstrates for the first time that the wax layer can modulate the detectability of host kairomones.

  5. Host response to laparoscopic surgery: mechanisms and clinical correlates

    PubMed Central

    Hackam, David J.; Rotstein, Ori D.

    1998-01-01

    Minimal access surgery has revolutionized the treatment of a variety of surgical diseases, partly because it is associated with less patient morbidity than nonlaparoscopic surgical procedures. Emerging evidence suggests that alteration in the host response after laparoscopic procedures has significantly contributed to the improved postoperative course. Laparoscopy modulates both afferent stimuli (including tissue trauma, pain and wound size) and efferent responses (via neuroendocrine, metabolic, immunologic and cardiorespiratory systems). These effects lead to a decrease in postoperative pain, fever and disability. Laparoscopy mediates these effects through reduced wound size, the activities of endotoxin and immunomodulatory actions of the insufflated gas, resulting in impaired macrophage activity. Although clearly beneficial in reducing postoperative morbidity after elective surgery, this immunosuppression could increase the risk of complications during procedures for infection or neoplasia. PMID:9575992

  6. Oxidative stress modulates the cytokine response of differentiated Th17 and Th1 cells.

    PubMed

    Abimannan, Thiruvaimozhi; Peroumal, Doureradjou; Parida, Jyoti R; Barik, Prakash K; Padhan, Prasanta; Devadas, Satish

    2016-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is critical in T helper (Th) cell differentiation; however its role in differentiated Th cell functions is unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of oxidative stress on the effector functions of in vitro differentiated mouse Th17 and Th1 cells or CD4(+) T cells from patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis using pro-oxidants plumbagin (PB) and hydrogen peroxide. We found that in mouse Th cells, non-toxic concentration of pro-oxidants inhibited reactivation induced expression of IL-17A in Th17 and IFN-γ in Th1 cells by reducing the expression of their respective TFs, RORγt and T-bet. Interestingly, in both the subsets, PB increased the expression of IL-4 by enhancing reactivation induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We further investigated the cytokine modulatory effect of PB on CD4(+) T cells isolated from PBMCs of patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, a well-known Th17 and or Th1 mediated disease. In human CD4(+) T cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis patients, PB reduced the frequencies of IL-17A(+) (Th17), IFN(-)γ(+) (Th1) and IL-17A(+)/IFN(-)γ(+) (Th17/1) cells and also inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) an antioxidant completely reversed PB mediated cytokine modulatory effects in both mouse and human cells indicating a direct role for ROS. Together our data suggest that oxidative microenvironment can alter cytokine response of terminally differentiated cells and thus altering intracellular ROS could be a potential way to target Th17 and Th1 cells in autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Winter Day Lengths Enhance T Lymphocyte Phenotypes, Inhibit Cytokine Responses, and Attenuate Behavioral Symptoms of Infection in Laboratory Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Kampf-Lassin, August; Yee, Jason R.; Galang, Jerome; McMaster, Nicholas; Kay, Leslie M.

    2009-01-01

    Annual variations in day length (photoperiod) trigger changes in the immune and reproductive system of seasonally-breeding animals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether photoperiodic changes in immunity depend on concurrent photoperiodic responses in the reproductive system, or whether immunological responses to photoperiod occur independent of reproductive responses. Here we report photoperiodic changes in enumerative, functional, and behavioral aspects of the immune system, and in immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, in reproductively non-photoperiodic Wistar rats. T-cell numbers (CD3+, CD8+, CD8+CD25+, CD4+CD25+) were higher in the blood of rats housed in short as opposed to long day lengths for 10 weeks. Following a simulated bacterial infection (E. coli LPS; 125 μg/kg) the severity of several acute-phase sickness behaviors (anorexia, cachexia, neophobia, and social withdrawal) were attenuated in short days. LPS-stimulated IL-1β and IL-6 production were comparable between photoperiods, but plasma TNFα was higher in long-day relative to short-day rats. In addition, corticosterone concentrations were higher in short-day relative to long-day rats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that photoperiodic regulation of the immune system can occur entirely independently of photoperiodic regulation of the reproductive system. In the absence of concurrent reproductive responses, short days increase the numbers of leukocytes capable of immunosurveillance and inhibition of inflammatory responses, increase proinflammatory cytokine production, increase immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, and ultimately attenuate behavioral responses to infection. Seasonal changes in the host immune system, endocrine system, and behavior may contribute to the seasonal variability in disease outcomes, even in reproductively non-photoperiodic mammals. PMID:17728099

  8. Winter day lengths enhance T lymphocyte phenotypes, inhibit cytokine responses, and attenuate behavioral symptoms of infection in laboratory rats.

    PubMed

    Prendergast, Brian J; Kampf-Lassin, August; Yee, Jason R; Galang, Jerome; McMaster, Nicholas; Kay, Leslie M

    2007-11-01

    Annual variations in day length (photoperiod) trigger changes in the immune and reproductive system of seasonally-breeding animals. The purpose of this study was to determine whether photoperiodic changes in immunity depend on concurrent photoperiodic responses in the reproductive system, or whether immunological responses to photoperiod occur independent of reproductive responses. Here we report photoperiodic changes in enumerative, functional, and behavioral aspects of the immune system, and in immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, in reproductively non-photoperiodic Wistar rats. T-cell numbers (CD3+, CD8+, CD8+CD25+, CD4+CD25+) were higher in the blood of rats housed in short as opposed to long-day lengths for 10 weeks. Following a simulated bacterial infection (Escherichia coli LPS; 125 microg/kg) the severity of several acute-phase sickness behaviors (anorexia, cachexia, neophobia, and social withdrawal) were attenuated in short days. LPS-stimulated IL-1beta and IL-6 production were comparable between photoperiods, but plasma TNFalpha was higher in long-day relative to short-day rats. In addition, corticosterone concentrations were higher in short-day relative to long-day rats. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that photoperiodic regulation of the immune system can occur entirely independently of photoperiodic regulation of the reproductive system. In the absence of concurrent reproductive responses, short days increase the numbers of leukocytes capable of immunosurveillance and inhibition of inflammatory responses, increase proinflammatory cytokine production, increase immunomodulatory glucocorticoid secretion, and ultimately attenuate behavioral responses to infection. Seasonal changes in the host immune system, endocrine system, and behavior may contribute to the seasonal variability in disease outcomes, even in reproductively non-photoperiodic mammals.

  9. Differential cytokine response in interstitial fluid in skin and serum during experimental inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nedrebø, Torbjørn; Reed, Rolf K; Jonsson, Roland; Berg, Ansgar; Wiig, Helge

    2004-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) are important mediators produced during inflammation. We hypothesized that the pro-inflammatory cytokine response in the interstitial fluid (IF) is different from that in serum, and we aimed at quantifying the amount of TNF-α and IL-1β in the IF. By centrifugation of rat skin at < 424 g pure IF is extracted. Using ELISA such fluid was analysed for cytokines in back and/or paw skin of pentobarbital-anaesthetized rats, after either induction of endotoxaemia or ischaemia–reperfusion (I/R) injury. During endotoxaemia, TNF-α increased in the IF from 0 in control to 640 ± 100 pg ml−1 (mean ±s.e.m.) after 90 min, with the serum concentration being 5–10 times higher at all time points. The response pattern of IL-1β after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge differed greatly from that of TNF-α with a large increase in IF from 390 ± 90 to 28 000 ± 1500 pg ml−1 after 210 min, and a significantly smaller increase in serum (600 ± 45 pg ml−1). During reperfusion of the hind paw after 2 h of ischaemia, there was a gradual increase of TNF-α in both IF of the paw skin and serum after 3 min of reperfusion. Both declined after 20 min. The pattern for IL-1β differed, increasing significantly less in serum (25 ± 15 pg ml−1 after 20 min of reperfusion) than in the IF (1100 ± 200 pg ml−1). Immunostaining of the inflamed tissues showed increased expression of the two cytokines in cells of both epidermis and dermis compared to controls. Subdermal injections of TNF-α and IL-1β at the same concentrations found in IF after LPS infusion affected interstitial fluid pressure significantly. Local TNF-α production dominates after I/R injury, whereas in endotoxaemia systemic production predominates. For IL-1β local production dominates in both conditions. Thus, there is a differential pattern of cytokine production and the current method allows the study of the role of cytokines in IF during different

  10. Heroin Use Is Associated with Suppressed Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Response after LPS Exposure in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Indrati, Agnes; Utami, Fitri; Soedarmo, Suharyani; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Netea, Mihai G.; van Crevel, Reinout; Wisaksana, Rudi; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-01-01

    Background Opioid use is associated with increased incidence of infectious diseases. Although experimental studies have shown that opioids affect various functions of immune cells, only limited data are available from human studies. Drug use is an important risk factor for HIV transmission; however no data are available whether heroin and/or methadone modulate immune response. Therefore, we examined the effect of heroin and methadone use among HIV-infected individuals on the production of cytokines after ex vivo stimulation with various pathogens. Methods Treatment naïve HIV-infected individuals from Indonesia were recruited. Several cohorts of individuals were recruited: 1) using heroin 2) receiving methadone opioid substitution 3) using heroin over 1 year ago and 4) controls (never used opioids). Whole blood was stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Candida albicans and LPS for 24 to 48 hours. Cytokine production (IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, IFN-α, IFN-γ and TNF-α) was determined using multiplex beads assay. Results Among 82 individuals, the cytokine levels in unstimulated samples did not differ between groups. Overall, heroin users had significantly lower cytokine response after exposure to LPS (p<0.05). After stimulation with either M. tuberculosis or C. albicans the cytokine production of all groups were comparable. Conclusion The cytokine production after exposure to LPS is significantly down-regulated in HIV-infected heroin users. Interesting, methadone use did not suppress cytokine response, which could have implications guidelines of opioid substitution. PMID:25830312

  11. Early dynamics of T helper cell cytokines and T regulatory cells in response to treatment of active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Feruglio, S L; Tonby, K; Kvale, D; Dyrhol-Riise, A M

    2015-03-01

    Biomarkers that can identify tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as markers for efficient therapy are requested. We have studied T cell cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and degranulation (CD107a) as well as subsets of CD4(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs ) after in-vitro Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen stimulation [early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6, culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, antigen 85 (Ag85)] in 32 patients with active tuberculosis (TB) disease throughout 24 weeks of effective TB treatment. A significant decline in the fraction of Mtb-specific total IFN-γ and single IFN-γ-producing T cells was already observed after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas the pool of single IL-2(+) cells increased over time for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The Treg subsets CD25(high) CD127(low) , CD25(high) CD147(++) and CD25(high) CD127(low) CD161(+) expanded significantly after Mtb antigen stimulation in vitro at all time-points, whereas the CD25(high) CD127(low) CD39(+) Tregs remained unchanged. The fraction of CD25(high) CD127(low) Tregs increased after 8 weeks of treatment. Thus, we revealed an opposing shift of Tregs and intracellular cytokine production during treatment. This may indicate that functional signatures of the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can serve as immunological correlates of early curative host responses. Whether such signatures can be used as biomarkers in monitoring and follow-up of TB treatment needs to be explored further.

  12. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the immune responses to BCG and DTwP vaccines.

    PubMed

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Maszewska, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Karolina; Szpakowski, Piotr; Wawrocki, Sebastian; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Rudnicka, Wiesława

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and pertussis vaccines have been found to be insufficient and their further improvement is required. In order to develop improved vaccines, a better understanding of the main pathways involved in the host's protective immunity to the pathogens is crucial. We address the question as to whether the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production might affect the host responses to BCG and diphtheria-tetanus toxoids-whole cell pertussis (DTwP) vaccines. The study population consisted of 118 healthy people, age range 18-30 years, who had been subjected to BCG and DTwP vaccination according to the state policy. Tuberculin skin testing (TST) revealed a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD (purified protein derivative) in 53% volunteers. The variability in development of the BCG-driven DTH to tuberculin prompted us to address a question as to whether Th1/Th2 polarization is involved in the lack of skin responsiveness to PPD. PPD-stimulated blood lymphocytes from TST(+) participants produced significantly more IFN-γ and less IL-10 than lymphocytes from TST(-) volunteers. However, TST(-) volunteers' sera contained more anti-pertussis IgG but not anti-diphtheria toxin IgG. Mycobacterial antigens and particularly PPD induced a higher expression of HLA-DR and co-stimulatory CD80 receptors on DCs from TST(+) than TST(-) participants. BCG but not PPD pulsed DCs from TST(-) volunteers produced significantly more IL-10. Mycobacterial antigen stimulated DCs from TST(+) volunteers induced a more intense IFN-γ production in co-cultures with autologous lymphocytes than the cells from TST(-) participants. Differences among the types of dendritic cell activities contribute to development of tuberculin reactivity in BCG vaccinated volunteers.

  13. Cytokine expression in response to root canal infection in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Maciel, K F; Neves de Brito, L C; Tavares, W L F; Moreira, G; Nicoli, J R; Vieira, L Q; Ribeiro Sobrinho, A P

    2012-04-01

    To examine cytokine expression profiles during periapical lesion development in response to synergetic human pathogens in a gnotobiotic mouse model. Human strains of Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus prevotii were inoculated into the root canals of germ-free mice in either mono- or bi-association. Animals were killed 7 and 14 days after infection, and periapical tissues were collected. mRNA expression of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), IL-10, IL-4 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) was assessed using real-time PCR. Levene's test was used to assess the equality of variance of the data, whereas a t-test for independent samples was used to evaluate the significance of the differences between groups (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was up-regulated by F. nucleatum during the acute (day 7) and chronic phase (day 14) of periapical lesion development. However, in bi-infection the expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α were effectively absent at both time-points. RANKL mRNA expression was down-regulated during dual infection at the chronic phase. As IL-4 expression was similar at both time-points, IL-4 does not appear to be involved in the periapical response to these bacterial strains. IL-10 was up-regulated during the chronic phase by mono-infection with either F. nucleatum or P. prevotii. Dual infection increased TGF-β mRNA expression on day 7, which paralleled the decrease in IFN-γ and TNF-α mRNA levels at the same time-point. F. nucleatum increased TGF-β mRNA expression during the chronic phase. Cytokine profiles depend on the nature of the bacterial challenge. Both TGF-β and IL-10 appeared to be regulating the proinflammatory cytokine responses at both time-points of the periapical immune response. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  14. Thrombocytopenia is associated with a dysregulated host response in critically ill sepsis patients.

    PubMed

    Claushuis, Theodora A M; van Vught, Lonneke A; Scicluna, Brendon P; Wiewel, Maryse A; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Ong, David S Y; Cremer, Olaf L; Horn, Janneke; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bonten, Marc J; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-06-16

    Preclinical studies have suggested that platelets influence the host response during sepsis. We sought to assess the association of admission thrombocytopenia with the presentation, outcome, and host response in patients with sepsis. Nine hundred thirty-one consecutive sepsis patients were stratified according to platelet counts (very low <50 × 10(9)/L, intermediate-low 50 × 10(9) to 99 × 10(9)/L, low 100 × 10(9) to 149 × 10(9)/L, or normal 150 × 10(9) to 399 × 10(9)/L) on admission to the intensive care unit. Sepsis patients with platelet counts <50 × 10(9)/L and 50 × 10(9) to 99 × 10(9)/L presented with higher Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation scores and more shock. Both levels of thrombocytopenia were independently associated with increased 30-day mortality (hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals 2.00 [1.32-3.05] and 1.72 [1.22-2.44], respectively). To account for baseline differences besides platelet counts, propensity matching was performed, after which the association between thrombocytopenia and the host response was tested, as evaluated by measuring 17 plasma biomarkers indicative of activation and/or dysregulation of pathways implicated in sepsis pathogenesis and by whole genome blood leukocyte expression profiling. In the propensity matched cohort, platelet counts < 50 × 10(9)/L were associated with increased cytokine levels and enhanced endothelial cell activation. All thrombocytopenic groups showed evidence of impaired vascular integrity, whereas coagulation activation was similar between groups. Blood microarray analysis revealed a distinct gene expression pattern in sepsis patients with <50 × 10(9)/L platelets, showing reduced signaling in leukocyte adhesion and diapedesis and increased complement signaling. These data show that admission thrombocytopenia is associated with enhanced mortality and a more disturbed host response during sepsis independent of disease severity, thereby providing clinical validity to animal

  15. EssE Promotes Staphylococcus aureus ESS-Dependent Protein Secretion To Modify Host Immune Responses during Infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark; Ohr, Ryan Jay; Aly, Khaled A; Nocadello, Salvatore; Kim, Hwan K; Schneewind, Chloe E; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, an invasive pathogen of humans and animals, requires a specialized ESS pathway to secrete proteins (EsxA, EsxB, EsxC, and EsxD) during infection. Expression of ess genes is required for S. aureus establishment of persistent abscess lesions following bloodstream infection; however, the mechanisms whereby effectors of the ESS pathway implement their virulence strategies were heretofore not known. Here, we show that EssE forms a complex with other members of the ESS secretion pathway and its substrates, promoting the secretion of EsxA, EsxB, EsxC, EsxD, and EssD. During bloodstream infection of mice, the S. aureus essE mutant displays defects in host cytokine responses, specifically in the production of interleukin-12 (IL-12) (p40/p70) and the suppression of RANTES (CCL5), activators of TH1 T cell responses and immune cell chemotaxis, respectively. Thus, essE-mediated secretion of protein effectors via the ESS pathway may enable S. aureus to manipulate host immune responses by modifying the production of cytokines.

  16. Vitamin D inhibits the occurrence of experimental cerebral malaria in mice by suppressing the host inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiyue; Yan, Juan; Zhu, Xiaotong; Wang, Qinghui; Pang, Wei; Qi, Zanmei; Wang, Meilian; Luo, Enjie; Parker, Daniel M.; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Cui, Liwang; Cao, Yaming

    2014-01-01

    In animal models of experimental cerebral malaria (ECM), neuropathology is associated with an overwhelming inflammatory response and sequestration of leucocytes and parasite-infected red blood cells in the brain. Here we explored the effect of vitamin D (VD, cholecalciferol) treatment on host immunity and outcome of ECM in C57BL/6 mice during Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection. We observed that oral administration of VD both before and after PbA infection completely protected mice from ECM. VD administration significantly dampened the inducible systemic inflammatory responses with reduced circulating cytokines IFN-γ and TNF and decreased expression of these cytokines by the spleen cells. Meanwhile, VD also resulted in decreased expression of the chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 and cytoadhesion molecules (ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD36) in the brain, leading to reduced accumulation of pathogenic T cells in the brain and ultimately substantial improvement of the blood-brain barriers of PbA-infected mice. In addition, VD inhibited the differentiation, activation and maturation of splenic dendritic cells. Meanwhile, regulatory T cells and IL-10 expression levels were upregulated upon VD treatment. These data collectively demonstrated the suppressive function of VD on host inflammatory responses, which provides significant survival benefits in the murine ECM model. PMID:24965778

  17. Envelope specific T cell responses & cytokine profiles in chikungunya patients hospitalized with different clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Anuradha S.; Tandale, Babasaheb V.; Balaji, Saravana S.; Hundekar, Supriya L.; Ramdasi, Ashwini Y.; Arankalle, Vidya A.

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Since the 2006 massive outbreaks, chikungunya (CHIK) is a major public health concern in India. The aim of this study was to assess envelope specific immune responses in patients with chikungunya infection. Methods: This study included 46 hospitalized patients with chikungunya virus infection (encephalitis, n=22, other systemic involvement, OSI, n=12, classical, n=12) and six controls from Ahmedabad city, Gujarat, India. T cell responses and the levels of Th1, pro/ anti-inflammatory cytokines against the CHIK virus envelope antigens were assessed by lymphocyte proliferation assay and by cytometric bead array in flow cytometry, respectively. Results: Lymphoproliferative response was uniform among the patients. Comparisons of cytokines revealed significantly higher levels of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 in encephalitis, OSI and classical patients versus controls. The levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were higher in classical patients categories compared to the controls. Interferon (IFN)-γ levels were lower in encephalitis patients versus control. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings showed recognition of T cell epitopes on the envelope region of chikungunya virus by all patient categories. Lower level of IFN-γ may be associated with the severity of disease in these patients. PMID:25900956

  18. T cells translate individual, quantal activation into collective, analog cytokine responses via time-integrated feedbacks

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Karen E; Barik, Debashis; Voisinne, Guillaume; Malandro, Nicole; Hathorn, Matthew M; Cotari, Jesse W; Vogel, Robert; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd; Krichevsky, Oleg; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Variability within isogenic T cell populations yields heterogeneous ‘local’ signaling responses to shared antigenic stimuli, but responding clones may communicate ‘global’ antigen load through paracrine messengers, such as cytokines. Such coordination of individual cell responses within multicellular populations is critical for accurate collective reactions to shared environmental cues. However, cytokine production may saturate as a function of antigen input, or be dominated by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells. Surprisingly, we found that T cells scale their collective output of IL-2 to total antigen input over a large dynamic range, independently of population size. Through experimental quantitation and computational modeling, we demonstrate that this scaling is enforced by an inhibitory cross-talk between antigen and IL-2 signaling, and a nonlinear acceleration of IL-2 secretion per cell. Our study reveals how time-integration of these regulatory loops within individual cell signaling generates scaled collective responses and can be leveraged for immune monitoring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01944.001 PMID:24719192

  19. T cells translate individual, quantal activation into collective, analog cytokine responses via time-integrated feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Tkach, Karen E; Barik, Debashis; Voisinne, Guillaume; Malandro, Nicole; Hathorn, Matthew M; Cotari, Jesse W; Vogel, Robert; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd; Krichevsky, Oleg; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2014-04-09

    Variability within isogenic T cell populations yields heterogeneous 'local' signaling responses to shared antigenic stimuli, but responding clones may communicate 'global' antigen load through paracrine messengers, such as cytokines. Such coordination of individual cell responses within multicellular populations is critical for accurate collective reactions to shared environmental cues. However, cytokine production may saturate as a function of antigen input, or be dominated by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells. Surprisingly, we found that T cells scale their collective output of IL-2 to total antigen input over a large dynamic range, independently of population size. Through experimental quantitation and computational modeling, we demonstrate that this scaling is enforced by an inhibitory cross-talk between antigen and IL-2 signaling, and a nonlinear acceleration of IL-2 secretion per cell. Our study reveals how time-integration of these regulatory loops within individual cell signaling generates scaled collective responses and can be leveraged for immune monitoring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01944.001.

  20. Granzymes A and K differentially potentiate LPS-induced cytokine response

    PubMed Central

    Wensink, Annette C; Kok, Helena M; Meeldijk, Jan; Fermie, Job; Froelich, Christopher J; Hack, C Erik; Bovenschen, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases that, upon release from cytotoxic cells, induce apoptosis in tumor cells and virally infected cells. In addition, a role of granzymes in inflammation is emerging. Recently, we have demonstrated that extracellular granzyme K (GrK) potentiates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine response from monocytes. GrK interacts with LPS, disaggregates LPS micelles, and stimulates LPS-CD14 binding and Toll-like receptor signaling. Here we show that human GrA also potentiates cytokine responses in human monocytes initiated by LPS or Gram-negative bacteria. Similar to GrK, this effect is independent of GrA catalytic activity. Unlike GrK, however, GrA does not bind to LPS, has little influence on LPS micelle disaggregation, and does not augment LPS-CD14 complex formation. We conclude that GrA and GrK differentially modulate LPS-Toll-like receptor signaling in monocytes, suggesting functional redundancy among cytotoxic lymphocyte proteases in the anti-bacterial innate immune response. PMID:28028441

  1. Human cytokine responses to coronary artery bypass grafting with and without cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Strüber, M; Cremer, J T; Gohrbandt, B; Hagl, C; Jankowski, M; Völker, B; Rückoldt, H; Martin, M; Haverich, A

    1999-10-01

    Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) is associated with a systemic inflammatory response. This has been attributed to cytokine release caused by extracorporeal circulation and myocardial ischemia. This study compares the inflammatory response after CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass and after minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting (MIDCABG) without cardiopulmonary bypass. Cytokine release and complement activation (interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2, complement factor C3a, and C1 esterase inhibitor) were determined in 24 patients before and after CABG or MIDCABG. The maximum body temperature, chest drainage, and fluid balance were recorded for 24 hours after operation. Release of interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2 was significantly higher (p < or = 0.005) in the CABG group than the MIDCABG group just after operation. After 24 hours, a significant increase in interleukin-6 was also found in the MIDCABG group (p = 0.001) compared with preoperative value. Body temperature and fluid balance were significantly higher after CABG (p < or = 0.001). Minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass grafting represents a less traumatizing technique of surgical revascularization. The reduction in the inflammatory response may be advantageous for patients with a high degree of comorbidity.

  2. Mycobacterial Dormancy Systems and Host Responses in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Peddireddy, Vidyullatha; Doddam, Sankara Narayana; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by the intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), claims more than 1.5 million lives worldwide annually. Despite promulgation of multipronged strategies to prevent and control TB, there is no significant downfall occurring in the number of new cases, and adding to this is the relapse of the disease due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance and the ability of Mtb to remain dormant after primary infection. The pathology of Mtb is complex and largely attributed to immune-evading strategies that this pathogen adopts to establish primary infection, its persistence in the host, and reactivation of pathogenicity under favorable conditions. In this review, we present various biochemical, immunological, and genetic strategies unleashed by Mtb inside the host for its survival. The bacterium enables itself to establish a niche by evading immune recognition via resorting to masking, establishment of dormancy by manipulating immune receptor responses, altering innate immune cell fate, enhancing granuloma formation, and developing antibiotic tolerance. Besides these, the regulatory entities, such as DosR and its regulon, encompassing various putative effector proteins play a vital role in maintaining the dormant nature of this pathogen. Further, reactivation of Mtb allows relapse of the disease and is favored by the genes of the Rtf family and the conditions that suppress the immune system of the host. Identification of target genes and characterizing the function of their respective antigens involved in primary infection, dormancy, and reactivation would likely provide vital clues to design novel drugs and/or vaccines for the control of dormant TB. PMID:28261197

  3. The Surface-Associated Exopolysaccharide of Bifidobacterium longum 35624 Plays an Essential Role in Dampening Host Proinflammatory Responses and Repressing Local TH17 Responses.

    PubMed

    Schiavi, Elisa; Gleinser, Marita; Molloy, Evelyn; Groeger, David; Frei, Remo; Ferstl, Ruth; Rodriguez-Perez, Noelia; Ziegler, Mario; Grant, Ray; Moriarty, Thomas Fintan; Plattner, Stephan; Healy, Selena; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; Akdis, Cezmi A; Roper, Jennifer; Altmann, Friedrich; van Sinderen, Douwe; O'Mahony, Liam

    2016-12-15

    The immune-modulating properties of certain bifidobacterial strains, such as Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624 (B. longum 35624), have been well described, although the strain-specific molecular characteristics associated with such immune-regulatory activity are not well defined. It has previously been demonstrated that B. longum 35624 produces a cell surface exopolysaccharide (sEPS), and in this study, we investigated the role played by this exopolysaccharide in influencing the host immune response. B. longum 35624 induced relatively low levels of cytokine secretion from human dendritic cells, whereas an isogenic exopolysaccharide-negative mutant derivative (termed sEPS(neg)) induced vastly more cytokines, including interleukin-17 (IL-17), and this response was reversed when exopolysaccharide production was restored in sEPS(neg) by genetic complementation. Administration of B. longum 35624 to mice of the T cell transfer colitis model prevented disease symptoms, whereas sEPS(neg) did not protect against the development of colitis, with associated enhanced recruitment of IL-17(+) lymphocytes to the gut. Moreover, intranasal administration of sEPS(neg) also resulted in enhanced recruitment of IL-17(+) lymphocytes to the murine lung. These data demonstrate that the particular exopolysaccharide produced by B. longum 35624 plays an essential role in dampening proinflammatory host responses to the strain and that loss of exopolysaccharide production results in the induction of local TH17 responses.

  4. Prognostic Role of Host Cyclooxygenase and Cytokine Genotypes in a Caucasian Cohort of Patients with Gastric Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    García-González, María Asunción; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Lanas, Angel; Bujanda, Luis; Carrera, Patricia; Benito, Rafael; Strunk, Mark; Sopeña, Federico; Santolaria, Santos; Piazuelo, Elena; Jiménez, Pilar; Campo, Rafael; Espinel, Jesús; Manzano, Marisa; Geijo, Fernando; Pellisé, María; González-Huix, Ferrán; Espinós, Jorge; Zaballa, Manuel; Titó, Llúcia; Barranco, Luis; Pazo, Roberto; Quintero, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic factors influencing the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma (GAC) are not well known. Given the relevance of cytokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators in cancer progression and invasiveness, we aimed to assess the prognostic role of several functional cytokine and cyclooxygenase gene polymorphisms in patients with GAC. Methodology Genomic DNA from 380 Spanish Caucasian patients with primary GAC was genotyped for 23 polymorphisms in pro-inflammatory (IL1B, TNFA, LTA, IL6, IL12p40), anti-inflammatory (IL4, IL1RN, IL10, TGFB1) cytokine, and cyclooxygenase (PTGS1 and PTGS2) genes by PCR, RFLP and TaqMan assays. Clinical and histological information was collected prospectively. Survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log rank test. Outcome was determined by analysis of Cox proportional hazards, adjusting for confounding factors. Results The median follow-up period and median overall survival (OS) time were 9.9 months (range 0.4–120.3) and 10.9 months (95% CI: 8.9–14.1), respectively. Multivariate analysis identified tumor stages III (HR, 3.23; 95% CI:2–5.22) and IV (HR, 5.5; 95% CI: 3.51–8.63) as independent factors associated with a significantly reduced OS, whereas surgical treatment (HR: 0.44; 95%CI: 0.3–0.6) was related to a better prognosis of the disease. Concerning genetic factors, none of the 23 polymorphisms evaluated in the current study did influence survival. Moreover, no gene-environment interactions on GAC prognosis were observed. Conclusions Our results show that, in our population, the panel of selected pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine, and cyclooxygenase gene polymorphisms are not relevant in determining the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma. PMID:23029430

  5. Exposure to nicotine adversely affects the dendritic cell system and compromises host response to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Nouri-Shirazi, Mahyar; Guinet, Elisabeth

    2012-03-01

    The magnitude of Th1 cells response to vaccination is a critical factor in determining protection from clinical disease. Our previous in vitro studies suggested that exposure to the nicotine component of cigarette smoke skews the differentiation of both human and mouse dendritic cell (DC) precursors into atypical DCs (DCs differentiated ex vivo in the presence of nicotine) lacking parameters essential for the development of Th1-mediated immunity. In this study, we determined the causal relationship between nicotine-induced DC alterations and host response to vaccines. We show that animals exposed to nicotine failed to develop and maintain Ag-specific effector memory Th1 cells and Ab production to protein-based vaccine formulated with Th1 adjuvants. Accordingly, both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines failed to protect and cure the nicotine-exposed mice from disease. More importantly, we demonstrate the nicotine-induced defects in the biological activities of in vivo DCs as an underlying mechanism. Indeed, i.v. administration of DCs differentiated in the presence of nicotine preferentially promoted the development of Ag-specific IL-4-producing effector cells in the challenged mice. In addition, DC subsets isolated from mice exposed to nicotine produced significantly less cytokines in response to Th1 adjuvants and inadequately supported the development of Ag-specific Th1 cells. Collectively, our studies suggest that nicotine-induced defects in the DC system compromises vaccine efficacy in smokers.

  6. Cellular cytokine and chemokine responses to parasite antigens and fungus and mite allergens in children co-infected with helminthes and protozoa parasites.

    PubMed

    Hegewald, Jana; Gantin, Richard G; Lechner, Christian J; Huang, Xiangsheng; Agosssou, Abram; Agbeko, Yvon F; Soboslay, Peter T; Köhler, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa poly-parasite infections are frequently observed in children, and with poly-parasitism modulating immune mechanisms, mediated by cytokines and chemokines, are required to prevent overwhelming inflammation and host tissue damage. We analyzed in children co-infected with helminthes and protozoan parasites their cellular production of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in response to parasite antigens and allergens. Intestinal and intravascular parasite infections were detected in stool and urines samples. The in vitro cellular cytokine and chemokine responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to parasite antigens and allergens were analysed in children (n = 87) with single and poly-parasite infection, and skin prick test reactivity to fungus and mite allergens was determined in singly and poly-parasitized children (n = 509). In children Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (62%), Necator americanus (31%), Schistosoma haematobium (28%), S. mansoni (21%), Hymenolepis nana (2%) and Strongyloides stercoralis (1%) were diagnosed. Singly infected were 37%, 47% were positive for 2 or more parasite species and 16% were infection-free. When PBMC were stimulated in vitro with parasite antigens and allergens, regulatory-type cytokine IL-27 and alarmin-type IL-33 enhanced with poly-parasite infections whilst IL-10 and pro-inflammatory MIP3-α/CCL20 and MIG/CXCL9 were produced in similar amounts in singly or poly-parasitized children. The co-stimulation in vitro of PBMC with mite allergens and Ascaris lumbricoides antigens depressed the allergen-induced pro-inflammatory IL-27, IL-33 and MIP3-α/CCL20 responses while regulatory IL-10 remained unaffected. Post albendazole and/or praziquantel treatment, the cellular release of IL-10, IL-33, MIP3-α/CCL20 and MIG/CXCL9 lessened significantly in all children infection groups. Skin prick test (SPT) reactivity to fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

  7. Aeromonas caviae strain induces Th1 cytokine response in mouse intestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, S L; Lye, D J; McKinstry, Craig A.; Vesper, Sephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Aeromonas caviae has been associated with human gastrointestinal disease. Strains of this species typically lack virulence factors (VFs) such as enterotoxins and hemolysins that are produced by other human pathogens of the Aeromonas genus. Microarray profiling of murine small intestinal extracts, 24 hours after oral infection with an A. caviae strain, provides evidence of a Th1 type immune response. A large number of gamma-interferon (γ-IFN) induced genes are up-regulated as well as several tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) transcripts. A. caviae has always been considered as opportunistic pathogen because it lacks obvious virulence factors. This current effort suggests that an A. caviae strain can colonize the murine intestinal tract and cause what has been described by others as a dysregulatory cytokine response. This response could explain why a number of diarrheal waterborne disease cases have been attributed to A. caviae even though it lacks obvious enteropathogenic properties.

  8. Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody and cytokine responses in Bangladeshi children with rotavirus diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Azim, Tasnim; Zaki, M Hasan; Podder, Goutam; Sultana, Novera; Salam, M Abdus; Rahman, S Moshfiqur; Sefat-e-Khuda; Sack, David A

    2003-02-01

    Rotavirus-specific subclass antibody responses and cytokines, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-10, were measured in children 7-24 months of age with rotavirus diarrhoea (n = 29); the responses were compared with children with watery diarrhoea from whom no enteric pathogens were isolated (controls; n = 11). All children had diarrhoea for < 5 days and were enrolled from the Dhaka Hospital of the Centre for Health and Population Research. Samples of blood and stools were collected on the day of enrollment and 18-21 days after the onset of diarrhoea. Children showing a > or = 4-fold rise in antibody titre between the acute and convalescent stages were considered to have a response. The numbers of children with rotavirus-specific IgA and IgA1 responses in stool were similar in the two groups of children. In the plasma, more children with rotavirus diarrhoea had rotavirus-specific IgA, IgA1, IgG, IgG1, and IgG3 responses than did control children (P = 0.049, 0.007, 0.001, 0.002, and 0.012, respectively). IgA2 was not detectable. Among cytokines measured in supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) cultured for 6 and 24 hr, IFN-gamma was the only cytokine that was higher in children with rotavirus diarrhoea compared with controls (P = 0.013). Severity of illness did not correlate with nutritional status or antibody titres, but severity did correlate with TNF-alpha during the acute stage of illness. IFN-gamma correlated positively with IgG1 titres. These findings suggest a role for IFN-gamma in the pathogenesis of rotavirus infection, but this needs confirmation by other studies. The immune responses described are relevant to future vaccine trials, as immune responses in vaccinees should mimic those in natural infection.

  9. Nasal Lipopolysaccharide Challenge and Cytokine Measurement Reflects Innate Mucosal Immune Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dhariwal, Jaideep; Kitson, Jeremy; Jones, Reema E.; Nicholson, Grant; Tunstall, Tanushree; Walton, Ross P.; Francombe, Grace; Gilbert, Jane; Tan, Andrew J.; Murdoch, Robert; Kon, Onn Min; Openshaw, Peter J.; Hansel, Trevor T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Practical methods of monitoring innate immune mucosal responsiveness are lacking. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a component of the cell wall of Gram negative bacteria and a potent activator of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4. To measure LPS responsiveness of the nasal mucosa, we administered LPS as a nasal spray and quantified chemokine and cytokine levels in mucosal lining fluid (MLF). Methods We performed a 5-way cross-over, single blind, placebo-controlled study in 15 healthy non-atopic subjects (n = 14 per protocol). Doses of ultrapure LPS (1, 10, 30 or 100μg/100μl) or placebo were administered by a single nasal spray to each nostril. Using the recently developed method of nasosorption with synthetic adsorptive matrices (SAM), a series of samples were taken. A panel of seven cytokines/chemokines were measured by multiplex immunoassay in MLF. mRNA for intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was quantified from nasal epithelial curettage samples taken before and after challenge. Results Topical nasal LPS was well tolerated, causing no symptoms and no visible changes to the nasal mucosa. LPS induced dose-related increases in MLF levels of IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL8 (IL-8) and CCL3 (MIP-1α) (AUC at 0.5 to 10h, compared to placebo, p<0.05 at 30 and 100μg LPS). At 100μg LPS, IL-10, IFN-α and TNF-α were also increased (p<0.05). Dose-related changes in mucosal ICAM-1 mRNA were also seen after challenge, and neutrophils appeared to peak in MLF at 8h. However, 2 subjects with high baseline cytokine levels showed prominent cytokine and chemokine responses to relatively low LPS doses (10μg and 30μg LPS). Conclusions Topical nasal LPS causes dose-dependent increases in cytokines, chemokines, mRNA and cells. However, responsiveness can show unpredictable variations, possibly because baseline innate tone is affected by environmental factors. We believe that this new technique will have wide application in the study of the innate immune responses of the

  10. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  11. Host Response of Ornamental Palms to Rotylenchulus reniformis.

    PubMed

    Inserra, R N; Dunn, R A; Vovlas, N

    1994-12-01

    The responses of 20 species of ornamental palms and one cycad (Cycas revoluta) to two populations of the reniform nematode, Rotylenchulus reniformis, from southern Florida were studied in two greenhouse experiments conducted in 1989-1991 and 1991-92. Ornamental palms in pots were exposed to initial population densities of 400 and 1,500 R. reniformis/l00 cm(3) soil for 16 and 15 months, respectively. Nematode reproduction occurred on Acoelorrhaphe wrightii and Washingtonia robusta, but not on the other palms or the cycad. In both experiments, nematode numbers on A. wrightii and W. robusta were significantly smaller than those on cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), a susceptible host of the nematode used as a control in these experiments. Nematodes surviving in pots containing nonhost palms for 16 months retained infectivity and were able to reproduce on susceptible cowpea in a bioassay. Sections from Washingtonia robusta roots infected by R. reniformis females showed the nematode feeding on syncytia formed by endodermal, pericyclic, and vascular parenchyma cells in a manner similar to that reported for other monocot hosts of the reniform nematode.

  12. Air pollution and cytokine responsiveness in asthmatic and non-asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Klümper, Claudia; Krämer, Ursula; Lehmann, Irina; von Berg, Andrea; Berdel, Dietrich; Herberth, Gunda; Beckmann, Christina; Link, Elke; Heinrich, Joachim; Hoffmann, Barbara; Schins, Roel P F

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that asthmatic children are more susceptible to traffic-related air pollution exposure than non-asthmatic children. Local and systemic inflammation in combination with oxidative stress have been suggested as a possible susceptibility factor. We investigated effect modification by asthma status for the association between air pollution exposure and systemic effects using whole blood cytokine responsiveness as an inflammatory marker. The study was nested within the two German birth cohort studies GINIplus and LISAplus and initially designed as a random sub-sample enriched with asthmatic children. Using data from 27 asthmatic and 59 non-asthmatic six-year-old children we measured the production of Interleukin-6 (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in whole blood after ex-vivo stimulation with urban particulate matter (EHC-93). Air pollution exposure (nitrogen dioxide (NO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <10μm (PM10), particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5μm (PM2.5mass), coarse particulate matter (PMcoarse) and PM2.5absorbance (PM2.5abs)) was modelled for children´s home addresses applying land-use regression. To assess effect modification by asthma status linear regression models with multiplicative interaction terms were used. In asthmatics exposure to NO2 was associated with higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines: adjusted means ratio (MR) 2.22 (95% confidence interval 1.22-4.04) for IL-6 per 2.68µg/m³ NO2. The interaction term between asthma status and NO2 exposure was significant. Results for NOx, PM10, PM2.5mass and PM2.5abs were in the same direction. No association between air pollution and cytokine responsiveness was found in the group of non-asthmatic children and in the overall group. Traffic-related air pollution exposure is associated with higher pro

  13. Colostrum proinflammatory cytokines as biomarkers of bovine immune response to bovine tuberculosis (bTB).

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Soto, Eduardo; Ponce-Ramos, Rosa; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Gutiérrez-Ortega, Abel; Álvarez, Angel H; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Absalón, Angel E; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo; Limón-Flores, Alberto; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Herrera-Rodríguez, Sara E

    2017-02-01

    Bovine colostrum contains compounds, which provide passive immune protection from mother to newborn calves. Little is known about cytokine levels and their role in bovine colostrum. Moreover, the capacity of bovine colostrum cells to mount specific immune responses after natural exposure to bovine tuberculosis (bTB) antigens in dairy herds has not been studied, thus far. The purpose of this study was to identify biomarkers for bTB infection measurable in bovine colostrum. The present study reveals that isolated-immune colostrum cells can mount a specific immune response against bTB antigens, by measuring the novo IFN-γ release in cell culture. We found that IFN-γ levels in the responders (Bov(+)) to bTB antigen were higher than in non-responders (Bov(-)). On the other hand, proinflammatory cytokines contained in colostrum's whey were tested in Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) reactor (TST(+)) and non-reactor (TST(-)) animals to assess their potential role as biomarker. We observed that IFN-γ levels were lower or undetectable, as opposed to IL4 levels were measurable, the TNF-α level was higher in TST(-) than TST(+), while IL-6 levels showed the opposite reaction and with no statistical significance. Moreover, IL-1α mRNA expression levels were higher in colostrum mononuclear cells (CMC) in Bov(+) cattle. Collectively, these data suggest that the differential expression of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines could have relevant value to diagnose bTB in cattle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cytokines in tears during the secondary keratoconjunctival responses induced by allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Pelikan, Zdenek

    2014-01-01

    Allergic keratoconjunctivitis (KC) can occur in a primary form due to an allergic reaction taking place in the conjunctivae or in a secondary form induced by nasal allergy. To search for the cytokine changes in tears accompanying the secondary keratoconjunctival response types (SKCR), caused by the nasal allergy. In 43 KC patients developing 15 immediate (SIKCR), 16 late (SLKCR) and 12 delayed (SDYKCR) responses to nasal provocation tests with allergens (NPT), the NPTs were repeated with subsequent recording of cytokine concentrations in tears up to 72 h. The SIKCRs (p<0.001), occurring 10-120 min after the NPT, were accompanied by significant changes (p<0.05) of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p70 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). The SLKCRs (p<0.01), appearing 5-12 h after the NPT, were associated with significant changes (p<0.05) of IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, GM-CSF and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. The SDYKCRs (p<0.01), occurring 24-48 h after the NPT, were accompanied by significant changes (p<0.05) of IL-2, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-γ, transforming growth factor-β and TNF-α. The particular SKCR types, induced by an allergic reaction in the nasal mucosa, were accompanied by different cytokine profiles in the tears, suggesting involvement of different hypersensitivity mechanisms. These results also stress the diagnostic usefulness of NPTs combined with monitoring of ocular features in KC patients who did not respond satisfactorily to the topical ophthalmological treatment. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Host Habitat Volatiles Enhance the Olfactory Response of the Larval Parasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis to Specifically Host-Associated Cues.

    PubMed

    Fürstenau, Benjamin; Adler, Cornel; Schulz, Hartwig; Hilker, Monika

    2016-09-01

    Host foraging of parasitic wasps attacking insects living in stored food may be guided by volatile cues emanating from these postharvest products. However, little knowledge is available as to how habitat odor released from noninfested stored food affects the parasitoid's response to host-specific chemicals. In this study, we investigated the impact of wheat grist odor on the olfactory host search by the ectoparasitoid Holepyris sylvanidis This parasitoid attacks larvae of the confused flour beetle Tribolium confusum, a common pest of grain products. Olfactometer bioassays showed that female H. sylvanidis were attracted by volatiles released from host larval feces, whereas odor of noninfested wheat grist was neither attractive nor did it mask the host-indicating cues. We analyzed the odor of host larval feces and wheat grist by coupled gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and recorded the parasitoid's electroantennographic (EAG) responses to the detected volatiles. Two specifically host-associated components of the fecal odor, (E)-2-nonenal and 1-pentadecene, elicited strong EAG responses. Both components were attractive when tested individually, but less than larval feces. Attraction of parasitoids to these host-specific key compounds was enhanced by addition of (i) noninfested habitat substrate odor or (ii) a blend of 3 EAG-active (but not behaviorally active) volatiles that had been identified in odor of noninfested grist (benzaldehyde, 1-tetradecene, 1-hexadecene), but were also detected in the host fecal odor. The impact of these volatiles ubiquitously released in a food store by noninfested habitat substrate on the parasitoid's orientation to host-specific volatile cues is discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors mediate host cell proinflammatory responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducer.

    PubMed

    Jahoor, Aruna; Patel, Rashila; Bryan, Amanda; Do, Catherine; Krier, Jay; Watters, Chase; Wahli, Walter; Li, Guigen; Williams, Simon C; Rumbaugh, Kendra P

    2008-07-01

    The pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes the 3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC(12)-HSL) autoinducer as a signaling molecule to coordinate the expression of virulence genes through quorum sensing. 3OC(12)-HSL also affects responses in host cells, including the upregulation of genes encoding inflammatory cytokines. This proinflammatory response may exacerbate underlying disease during P. aeruginosa infections. The specific mechanism(s) through which 3OC(12)-HSL influences host responses is unclear, and no mammalian receptors for 3OC(12)-HSL have been identified to date. Here, we report that 3OC(12)-HSL increases mRNA levels for a common panel of proinflammatory genes in murine fibroblasts and human lung epithelial cells. To identify putative 3OC(12)-HSL receptors, we examined the expression patterns of a panel of nuclear hormone receptors in these two cell lines and determined that both peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta (PPARbeta/delta) and PPARgamma were expressed. 3OC(12)-HSL functioned as an agonist of PPARbeta/delta transcriptional activity and an antagonist of PPARgamma transcriptional activity and inhibited the DNA binding ability of PPARgamma. The proinflammatory effect of 3OC(12)-HSL in lung epithelial cells was blocked by the PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone, suggesting that 3OC(12)-HSL and rosiglitazone are mutually antagonistic negative and positive regulators of PPARgamma activity, respectively. These data identify PPARbeta/delta and PPARgamma as putative mammalian 3OC(12)-HSL receptors and suggest that PPARgamma agonists may be employed as anti-inflammatory therapeutics for P. aeruginosa infections.

  17. The angiogenic response of the aorta to injury and inflammatory cytokines requires macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gelati, Maurizio; Aplin, Alfred C; Fogel, Eric; Smith, Kelly D; Nicosia, Roberto Francesco

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to define early events during the angiogenic response of the aortic wall to injury. Rat aortic rings produced neovessels in collagen culture but lost this capacity over time. These quiescent rings responded to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) but not to a cocktail of macrophage-stimulatory cytokines and chemokines that was angiogenically active on fresh rings. Analysis of cytokine receptor expression revealed selective loss in quiescent rings of the proangiogenic chemokine receptor CXCR2, which was expressed predominantly in aortic macrophages. Pharmacologic inhibition of CXCR2 impaired angiogenesis from fresh rings but had no effect on VEGF-induced angiogenesis from quiescent explants. Angiogenesis was also impaired in cultures of aortic rings from CXCR2-deficient mice. Reduced CXCR2 expression in quiescent rat aortic rings correlated with marked macrophage depletion. Pharmacologic ablation of macrophages from aortic explants blocked formation of neovessels in vitro and reduced aortic ring-induced angiogenesis in vivo. The angiogenic response of macrophage-depleted rings was completely restored by adding exogenous macrophages. Moreover, angiogenesis from fresh rings was promoted by macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) and inhibited with anti-CSF-1 antibody. Thus aortic angiogenic sprouting following injury is strongly influenced by conditions that modulate resident macrophage numbers and function. PMID:18832730

  18. Carbohydrate and the cytokine response to 2.5 h of running.

    PubMed

    Nehlsen-Cannarella, S L; Fagoaga, O R; Nieman, D C; Henson, D A; Butterworth, D E; Schmitt, R L; Bailey, E M; Warren, B J; Utter, A; Davis, J M

    1997-05-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to determine the influence of 6% carbohydrate (C) vs. placebo (P) beverage ingestion on cytokine responses (5 total samples over 9 h) to 2.5 h of high-intensity running (76.7 +/- 0.4% maximal O2 uptake) by 30 experienced marathon runners. For interleukin-6 (IL-6), a difference in the pattern of change between groups was found, highlighted by a greater increase in P vs. C immediately postrun (753 vs. 421%) and 1.5 h postrun (193 vs. 86%) [F(4,112) = 3.77, P = 0.006]. For interleukin-1-receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), a difference in the pattern of change between groups was found, highlighted by a greater increase in P vs. C 1.5 h postrun (231 vs. 72%) [F(2,50) = 6.38, P = 0.003]. No significant interaction effects were seen for bioactive IL-6 or IL-1 beta. The immediate postrun plasma glucose concentrations correlated negatively with those of plasma cortisol (r = -0.67, P < 0.001); postrun plasma cortisol (r = 0.70, P < 0.001) and IL-6 levels (r = 0.54, P = 0.003) correlated positively with levels of IL-1ra. Taken together, the data indicate that carbohydrate ingestion attenuates cytokine levels in the inflammatory cascade in response to heavy exertion.

  19. Parental Characteristics, Somatic Fetal Growth, and Season of Birth Influence Innate and Adaptive Cord Blood Cytokine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Diane R; Bloomberg, Gordon R; Cruikshank, William W; Visness, Cynthia M; Schwarz, John; Kattan, Meyer; O’Connor, George T; Wood, Robert A; Burger, Melissa S.; Wright, Rosalind J; Witter, Frank; Lee-Parritz, Aviva; Sperling, Rhoda; Sadovsky, Yoel; Togias, Alkis; Gern, James E

    2009-01-01

    Background Immunologic responses at birth likely relate to subsequent risks for allergic diseases and wheezing in infancy; however, the influences of parental characteristics and prenatal factors on neonatal immune responses are incompletely understood. Objective This study investigates potential correlations between urban parental, prenatal and perinatal factors on innate and adaptive stimuli-induced cytokine responses. Methods 560 and 49 children of parents with and without allergic disease or asthma, respectively, were enrolled into a prospective birth cohort study (Urban Environment and Childhood Asthma [URECA]). Cord blood mononuclear cells were incubated with innate and adaptive immune stimuli, and cytokine responses (ELISA) were compared to season of birth, parental characteristics, in-utero stressors, and fetal growth. Results Many cytokine responses varied by season of birth, including 2–3 fold fluctuations with specific IFN-α and IFN-γ responses. Birthweight was inversely associated with IFN-γ responses to RSV (R=−0.16), but positively associated with IL-8 responses to a variety of innate stimuli (R=0.08–0.12). Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induced cytokine responses were 21–54% lower in children of mothers with asthma. Cytokine responses were generally lower in babies born to parents with allergy/asthma. Conclusions Innate cytokine responses are associated with parental allergic or airway disease, somatic fetal growth, ethnicity, and season of birth. Collectively, these findings suggest that urban prenatal exposures and familial factors affect the development of the fetal immune system. Clinical Implications Prenatal influences that disturb normal immune development might establish the patterns that are associated with recurrent wheezing in infants and preschoolers, and later as allergy and asthma in school-age children. PMID:19895995

  20. Phosphorus source alters host plant response to ectomycorrhizal diversity.

    PubMed

    Baxter, James W; Dighton, John

    2005-11-01

    We examined the influence of phosphorus source and availability on host plant (Pinus rigida) response to ectomycorrhizal diversity under contrasting P conditions. An ectomycorrhizal richness gradient was established with equimolar P supplied as either inorganic phosphate or organic inositol hexaphosphate. We measured growth and N and P uptake of individual P. rigida seedlings inoculated with one, two, or four species of ectomycorrhizal fungi simultaneously and without mycorrhizas in axenic culture. Whereas colonization of P. rigida by individual species of ectomycorrhizal fungi decreased with increasing fungal richness, colonization of all species combined increased. Plant biomass and N content increased across the ectomycorrhizal richness gradient in the organic but not the inorganic P treatment. Plants grown under organic P conditions had higher N concentration than those grown under inorganic P conditions, but there was no effect of richness. Phosphorus content of plants grown in the organic P treatment increased with increasing ectomycorrhizal richness, but there was no response in the inorganic P treatment. Phosphorus concentration was higher in plants grown at the four-species richness level in the organic P treatment, but there was no effect of diversity under inorganic P conditions. Overall, few ectomycorrhizal composition effects were found on plant growth or nutrient status. Phosphatase activities of individual ectomycorrhizal fungi differed under organic P conditions, but there was no difference in total root system phosphatase expression between the inorganic or organic P treatments or across richness levels. Our results provide evidence that plant response to ectomycorrhizal diversity is dependent on the source and availability of P.

  1. Host neuro- immuno-endocrine responses in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rettori, Elisa; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Dees, W Les; Endruhn, Axel; Rettori, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory complex disease caused by microorganisms. It may be influenced by diverse systemic disorders, environmental, genetic and socio-psychological factors with the ability to alter the balance of the host neuro-immunoendocrine responses. It is characterized by the progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss, with possible impact on general health. Starting with a brief description of the periodontium, etiopathogenesis, repair processes and several physiological mechanisms and their disarray on periodontium response to bacterial challenge. Following, the negative effects of stress on the disease and some remarks on the recently discovered effects of oxytocin that modulate stress response and its role in individual coping mechanisms to stress. We also focus on the participation of components and functions of endocannabinoid system with anti-inflammatory actions on gingiva. Finally, a discussion that may link between diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, stroke and metabolic syndrome associated with periodontal disease; all of them sharing a common denominator that is inflammation and oxidative stress.

  2. Dynamically analyte-responsive macrocyclic host-fluorophore systems.

    PubMed

    Ghale, Garima; Nau, Werner M

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry commenced to a large degree with the work of Pedersen, who in 1967 first reported the synthesis of crown ethers. The past 45 years have witnessed a substantial progress in the field, from the design of highly selective host molecules as receptors to their application in drug delivery and, particularly, analyte sensing. Much effort has been expended on designing receptors and signaling mechanism for detecting compounds of biological and environmental relevance. Traditionally, the design of a chemosensor comprises one component for molecular recognition, frequently macrocycles of the cyclodextrin, cucurbituril, cyclophane, or calixarene type. The second component, used for signaling, is typically an indicator dye which changes its photophysical properties, preferably its fluorescence, upon analyte binding. A variety of signal transduction mechanisms are available, of which displacement of the dye from the macrocyclic binding site is one of the simplest and most popular ones. This constitutes the working principle of indicator displacement assays. However, indicator displacement assays have been predominantly exploited in a static fashion, namely, to determine absolute analyte concentrations, or, by using combinations of several reporter pairs, to achieve a differential sensing and, thus, identification of specific food products or brands. In contrast, their use in biological systems, for example, with membranes, cells, or with enzymes has been comparably less explored, which led us to the design of the so-called tandem assays, that is, dynamically analyte-responsive host-dye systems, in which the change in analyte concentrations is induced by a biological reaction or process. This methodological variation has practical application potential, because the ability to monitor these biochemical pathways or to follow specific molecules in real time is of paramount interest for both biochemical laboratories and the pharmaceutical industry

  3. Cytokine and lipid mediator networks in tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D.; Sher, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Summary A major approach for immunologic intervention in tuberculosis involves redirecting the outcome of the host immune response from the induction of disease to pathogen control. Cytokines and lipid mediators known as eicosanoids play key roles in regulating this balance and as such represent important targets for immunologic intervention. While the evidence for cytokine/eicosanoid function derives largely from the investigation of murine and zebra fish experimental infection models, clinical studies have confirmed the existence of many of the same pathways in tuberculosis patients. Here we summarize new data that reveal important intersections between the cytokine and eicosanoid networks in the host response to mycobacteria and discuss how targeting this crosstalk can promote resistance to lethal Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This approach could lead to new host-directed therapies to be used either as an adjunct for improving the efficacy of standard antibiotic treatment or for the management of drug-resistant infections. PMID:25703565

  4. Effect of Chemotherapy on Whole-Blood Cytokine Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens in a Small Cohort of Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis▿†

    PubMed Central

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Horne, David J.; Laughlin, Elsa M.; Savlov, Margery; Tucakovic, Ines; Coler, Rhea N.; Narita, Masahiro; Reed, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    The development of genomic and proteomic tools has enabled studies that begin to characterize the molecular targets of an effective host immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including understanding the specific immune responses associated with tuberculosis (TB) disease progression, disease resolution, and the development of latency. One application of such tools is the development of diagnostic reagents and assays useful as a test of cure. Such a test could be of considerable importance for the evaluation of new therapeutics. We and others have previously described immunodominant proteins of M. tuberculosis, including both vaccine and diagnostic candidates. In the present study, we describe the changes in immune responses to a panel of 71 M. tuberculosis antigens in six patients during the course of therapy. The levels of six cytokines were measured in 24-h whole-blood assays with these antigens, revealing that gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were differentially regulated in response to a subset of antigens. Therefore, measuring the production of these three cytokines in response to a panel of carefully selected M. tuberculosis proteins during the course of TB therapy might be a promising path toward the development of a test of cure and warrants further validation in larger cohorts of pulmonary TB patients. PMID:21715581

  5. Effect of chemotherapy on whole-blood cytokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in a small cohort of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bertholet, Sylvie; Horne, David J; Laughlin, Elsa M; Savlov, Margery; Tucakovic, Ines; Coler, Rhea N; Narita, Masahiro; Reed, Steven G

    2011-08-01

    The development of genomic and proteomic tools has enabled studies that begin to characterize the molecular targets of an effective host immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, including understanding the specific immune responses associated with tuberculosis (TB) disease progression, disease resolution, and the development of latency. One application of such tools is the development of diagnostic reagents and assays useful as a test of cure. Such a test could be of considerable importance for the evaluation of new therapeutics. We and others have previously described immunodominant proteins of M. tuberculosis, including both vaccine and diagnostic candidates. In the present study, we describe the changes in immune responses to a panel of 71 M. tuberculosis antigens in six patients during the course of therapy. The levels of six cytokines were measured in 24-h whole-blood assays with these antigens, revealing that gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-10 (IL-10) were differentially regulated in response to a subset of antigens. Therefore, measuring the production of these three cytokines in response to a panel of carefully selected M. tuberculosis proteins during the course of TB therapy might be a promising path toward the development of a test of cure and warrants further validation in larger cohorts of pulmonary TB patients.

  6. Quantification of T cell Antigen-specific Memory Responses in Rhesus Macaques, Using Cytokine Flow Cytometry (CFC, also Known as ICS and ICCS): Analysis of Flow Data.

    PubMed

    Sylwester, Andrew W; Hansen, Scott G; Picker, Louis J

    2014-04-20

    -characterize the phenotypes of antigen-responding cells, or else simultaneously quantify the responses according to many cytokines or activation markers. Powerful software like FlowJo (TreeStar) and SPICE (NIAID) can be used to analyse the data, and to do sophisticated multivariate analysis of cytokine responses. The method described here is customized for cells from Rhesus macaque monkeys, and the extensive annotating notes represent a decade of accumulated technical experience. The same scheme is readily applicable to other mammalian cells (e.g. human or mouse), though the exact antibody clones will differ according to host system. The basic method described here incubates 1 × 10(6) Lymphocytes in 1 ml tube culture with antigen and co-stimulatory antibodies in the presence of Brefeldin A, prior to staining and fixation. Note: This is the second part of a two-part procedure. Part one has the same initial title, but the subtitle "From Assay Set-up to Data Acquisition (Sylwester et al., 2014)". The Abstract and Historical Background is the same for both documents.

  7. Quantification of T cell Antigen-specific Memory Responses in Rhesus Macaques, Using Cytokine Flow Cytometry (CFC, also Known as ICS and ICCS): Analysis of Flow Data

    PubMed Central

    Sylwester, Andrew W.; Hansen, Scott G.; Picker, Louis J.

    2016-01-01

    highly-characterize the phenotypes of antigen-responding cells, or else simultaneously quantify the responses according to many cytokines or activation markers. Powerful software like FlowJo (TreeStar) and SPICE (NIAID) can be used to analyse the data, and to do sophisticated multivariate analysis of cytokine responses. The method described here is customized for cells from Rhesus macaque monkeys, and the extensive annotating notes represent a decade of accumulated technical experience. The same scheme is readily applicable to other mammalian cells (e.g. human or mouse), though the exact antibody clones will differ according to host system. The basic method described here incubates 1 × 106 Lymphocytes in 1 ml tube culture with antigen and co-stimulatory antibodies in the presence of Brefeldin A, prior to staining and fixation. Note: This is the second part of a two-part procedure. Part one has the same initial title, but the subtitle “From Assay Set-up to Data Acquisition (Sylwester et al., 2014)”. The Abstract and Historical Background is the same for both documents.

  8. Extracellular vesicles modulate host-microbe responses by altering TLR2 activity and phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    van Bergenhenegouwen, Jeroen; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Rutten, Lieke; Kettelarij, Nienke; Garssen, Johan; Vos, Arjan P

    2014-01-01

    Oral delivery of Gram positive bacteria, often derived from the genera Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium, can modulate immune function. Although the exact mechanisms remain unclear, immunomodulatory effects may be elicited through the direct interaction of these bacteria with the intestinal epithelium or resident dendritic cell (DC) populations. We analyzed the immune activation properties of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacterium species and made the surprising observation that cellular responses in vitro were differentially influenced by the presence of serum, specifically the extracellular vesicle (EV) fraction. In contrast to the tested Lactobacilli species, tested Bifidobacterium species induce TLR2/6 activity which is inhibited by the presence of EVs. Using specific TLR ligands, EVs were found to enhance cellular TLR2/1 and TLR4 responses while TLR2/6 responses were suppressed. No effect could be observed on cellular TLR5 responses. We determined that EVs play a role in bacterial aggregation, suggesting that EVs interact with bacterial surfaces. EVs were found to slightly enhance DC phagocytosis of Bifidobacterium breve whereas phagocytosis of Lactobacillus rhamnosus was virtually absent upon serum EV depletion. DC uptake of a non-microbial substance (dextran) was not affected by the different serum fractions suggesting that EVs do not interfere with DC phagocytic capacity but rather modify the DC-microbe interaction. Depending on the microbe, combined effects of EVs on TLR activity and phagocytosis result in a differential proinflammatory DC cytokine release. Overall, these data suggest that EVs play a yet unrecognized role in host-microbe responses, not by interfering in recipient cellular responses but via attachment to, or scavenging of, microbe-associated molecular patterns. EVs can be found in any tissue or bodily fluid, therefore insights into EV-microbe interactions are important in understanding the mechanism of action of potential probiotics and gut immune

  9. Delayed Asthmatic Response to Allergen Challenge and Cytokines Released by Nonspecifically Stimulated Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pelikan, Zdenek

    2013-01-01

    Background. Bronchial asthma patients can develop various asthmatic response types following bronchial allergen challenge, such as immediate (IAR), late (LAR), dual late (DLAR), or delayed (DYAR), due to different immunologic mechanisms. The DYAR, recorded in 24 patients, beginning between 26 and 32 hrs and lasting up to 56 hrs after the bronchial allergen challenge, differs from the IAR, LAR, and DLAR in clinical, diagnostic, and immunologic aspects. Objective. To investigate amounts of particular cytokines released by the blood cells after an additional nonspecific stimulation with Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) during the DYAR. Methods. In 24 patients, the repeated DYAR was supplemented with determination of cytokines both in the nonstimulated plasma and in the supernatants of the blood cells stimulated with PMA before and up to 72 hours after the bronchial challenge, by means of enzyme-linked immunoassay. Results. No significant changes of the prechallenge cytokine concentrations in the non-stimulated serum were recorded in the DYAR patients as compared with the healthy subjects. The DYAR was accompanied by significantly increased postchallenge concentrations (P < 0.05) of IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ, G-CSF, TNF-α, and TGF-β, while decreased concentration of IL-7 (P < 0.05) in the nonstimulated plasma. The significantly increased postchallenge concentrations of IL-2, IL-8, IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and TGF-β were released by peripheral blood cells after stimulation with PMA, as compared with both their prechallenge concentrations and with the PBS control values. Conclusions. These results would support evidence for an important role of the Th1 cells, neutrophils, monocytes, and probably also NK cells in the immunologic mechanism(s) leading to the development of the clinical DYAR. Nevertheless, an additional role of macrophages, endothelial and epithelial cells in these mechanisms cannot be even excluded. PMID:24049660

  10. The Effect of C. burnetii Infection on the Cytokine Response of PBMCs from Pregnant Goats

    PubMed Central

    Ammerdorffer, Anne; Roest, Hendrik-I J.; Dinkla, Annemieke; Post, Jacob; Schoffelen, Teske; van Deuren, Marcel; Sprong, Tom; Rebel, Johanna M.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, infection with Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever, leads to acute or chronic infection, both associated with specific clinical symptoms. In contrast, no symptoms are observed in goats during C. burnetii infection, although infection of the placenta eventually leads to premature delivery, stillbirth and abortion. It is unknown whether these differences in clinical outcome are due to the early immune responses of the goats. Therefore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from pregnant goats. In total, 17 goats were included in the study. Six goats remained naive, while eleven goats were infected with C. burnetii. Toll-like receptor (TLR) and cytokine mRNA expression were measured after in vitro stimulation with heat-killed C. burnetii at different time points (prior infection, day 7, 35 and 56 after infection). In naive goats an increased expression of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-10 and interferon (IFN)-γ mRNA upon C. burnetii stimulation was detected. In addition, TLR2 expression was strongly up-regulated. In goats infected with C. burnetii, PBMCs re-stimulated in vitro with C. burnetii, expressed significantly more TNF-α mRNA and IFN-γ mRNA compared to naive goats. In contrast, IL-10 mRNA production capacity was down-regulated during C. burnetii infection. Interestingly, at day 7 after inoculation a decreased IFN-γ protein level was observed in stimulated leukocytes in whole blood from infected goats, whereas at other time-points increased production of IFN-γ protein was seen. Our study shows that goats initiate a robust pro-inflammatory immune response against C. burnetii in vitro. Furthermore, PBMCs from C. burnetii infected goats show augmented pro-inflammatory cytokine responses compared to PBMCs from non-infected goats. However, despite this pro-inflammatory response, goats are not capable of clearing the C. burnetii infection. PMID:25279829

  11. Pre-exercise carbohydrate status influences carbohydrate-mediated attenuation of post-exercise cytokine responses.

    PubMed

    Cox, A J; Pyne, D B; Cox, G R; Callister, R; Gleeson, M

    2008-12-01

    Most studies investigating the effects of acute carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on post-exercise cytokine responses have involved fasted athletes. This study characterised the effects of acute CHO beverage ingestion preceded by consumption of a CHO-containing pre-exercise meal. Sixteen highly-trained male cyclists/triathletes (age: 30.6 +/- 5.6 y; V O (2max): 64.8 +/- 4.7 ml . kg . min (-1) [mean +/- SD]) undertook two cycle ergometry trials involving randomised consumption of a 10 % CHO beverage (15 mL . kg (-1) . hr (-1)) or water (H (2)O). Trials were undertaken 2 h after a breakfast providing 2.1 g CHO . kg (-1) body mass (BM) (48 kJ . kg (-1) BM) and consisted of 100 min steady state cycle ergometry at 70 % V O (2max) followed by a time trial of approximately 30 min duration. Blood samples were collected pre-, post- and 1 h post-exercise for measurement of Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-1ra. Time-trial performance was not substantially different between CHO and H (2)O trials (4.5 %, p = 0.42). Neither IL-6 nor IL-8 responses were substantially reduced in the CHO compared to the H (2)O trial. There was a substantial reduction in IL-10 (32 %, p = 0.05) and IL-1ra (43 %, p = 0.02) responses at 1 h post-exercise with CHO compared to H (2)O ingestion. In conclusion, the previously shown attenuating effects of CHO ingestion during exercise on cytokine responses appear reduced when athletes consume a CHO-containing pre-exercise meal.

  12. Innate immune memory: Implications for host responses to damage-associated molecular patterns.

    PubMed

    Crișan, Tania O; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the innate immune system build immunological memory via epigenetic reprogramming after stimulations with microbial ligands. This functional readjustment allows for enhanced nonspecific inflammatory responses upon secondary challenges, a process termed "trained immunity." The epigenomic blueprint of trained monocytes has been recently reported, which revealed several important immunologic and metabolic mechanisms that underlie these changes. Interestingly, similar long-term reprogramming of cytokine production has also been described to be induced by endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Here, we present an overview of the novel data showing that endogenous alarm signals associated with tissue damage and sterile inflammation can induce trained immunity through epigenetic regulation of transcriptional programs. We describe new and old evidence of persistent effects of DAMPs in driving inflammation and enforce the concept that the influence of tissue-derived signals is critical in adjusting the magnitude and type of immune response built by the host. The better characterization of trained immunity for the persistence of inflammation induced by DAMPs would provide new possibilities for intervention in aging and autoinflammatory disorders. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Changes in serum and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines in response to non-neurological surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgery launches an inflammatory reaction in the body, as seen through increased peripheral levels of cytokines and cortisol. However, less is known about perioperative inflammatory changes in the central nervous system (CNS). Our aim was to compare inflammatory markers in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) before and after surgery and evaluate their association with measures of blood–brain barrier (BBB) integrity. Methods Thirty-five patients undergoing knee arthroplastic surgery with spinal anesthesia had CSF and serum samples drawn before, after and on the morning following surgery. Cytokines and albumin in serum and CSF and cortisol in CSF were assessed at all three points. Results Cytokines and cortisol were significantly increased in serum and CSF after surgery (Ps <0.01) and CSF increases were greater than in serum. Ten individuals had an increased cytokine response and significantly higher CSF/serum albumin ratios (Ps <0.01), five of whom had albumin ratios in the pathological range (>11.8). Serum and CSF levels of cytokines were unrelated, but there were strong correlations between CSF IL-2, IL-10 and IL-13, and albumin ratios (Ps <0.05) following surgery. Conclusion Cytokine increases in the CNS were substantially greater than in serum, indicating that the CNS inflammatory system is activated during peripheral surgery and may be regulated separately from that in the peripheral body. CSF cytokine increase may indicate sensitivity to trauma and is linked to BBB macromolecular permeability. PMID:23095517

  14. Cytokine response patterns, exposure to viruses, and respiratory infections in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Christopher C; Gern, James E; Li, Zhanhai; Shult, Peter A; Rosenthal, Louis A; Mikus, Lance D; Kirk, Carol J; Roberg, Kathy A; Anderson, Elizabeth L; Tisler, Christopher J; DaSilva, Douglas F; Hiemke, Heidi J; Gentile, Kevin; Gangnon, Ronald E; Lemanske, Robert F

    2004-07-15

    Daycare attendance and siblings are associated with viral-induced wheezing in children. Preexisting immunologic factors may influence the expression of viral infections in infancy, and in turn, recurrent infections may influence the development of immune responses. A total of 285 children were enrolled in the Childhood Origins of Asthma Project at birth and followed for at least 1 year. Cord blood and 1-year mononuclear cells were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin, and cytokine-response profiles were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Nasal lavage was performed for moderate to severe respiratory illnesses. Daycare attendance and/or siblings significantly increased the likelihood of contracting respiratory syncytial virus (1.5-1.6-fold increase) and rhinovirus (1.8-2.1-fold increase), and increased the risk of rhinovirus-induced wheezing (14-18% vs. 2%, p = 0.011). Cord blood IFN-gamma responses were inversely related to the frequency of viral respiratory infections (r(s) = -0.11, p = 0.05), and more significant for subjects with high exposure to other children (r(s) = -0.27, p = 0.028). The interval change in infantile IFN-gamma responses correlated positively with the frequency of viral infections in infancy (r(s) = 0.12, p = 0.047). These data suggest that neonatal IFN-gamma responses may influence antiviral activity, or may represent a marker of antiviral immunity maturation. Conversely, the frequency of viral infections in infancy can influence IFN-gamma responses.

  15. Host response and bacterial virulence factor expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus pneumoniae corneal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Rajapandian SivaGanesa; Priya, Jeganathan Lakshmi; Leal, Sixto M; Toska, Jonida; Rietsch, Arne; Prajna, Venkatesh; Pearlman, Eric; Lalitha, Prajna

    2013-01-01

    P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae are major bacterial causes of corneal ulcers in industrialized and in developing countries. The current study examined host innate immune responses at the site of infection, and also expression of bacterial virulence factors in clinical isolates from patients in south India. Corneal ulcer material was obtained from 49 patients with confirmed P. aeruginosa and 27 patients with S. pneumoniae, and gene expression of Toll Like Receptors (TLR), cytokines and inflammasome proteins was measured by quantitative PCR. Expression of P. aeruginosa type III secretion exotoxins and S. pneumoniae pneumolysin was detected by western blot analysis. We found that neutrophils comprised >90% cells in corneal ulcers, and that there was elevated expression of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5 and TLR9, the NLRP3 and NLRC4 inflammasomes and the ASC adaptor molecule. IL-1α IL-1β and IFN-γ expression was also elevated; however, there was no significant difference in expression of any of these genes between corneal ulcers from P. aeruginosa and S. pneumoniae infected patients. We also show that 41/49 (84%) of P. aeruginosa clinical isolates expressed ExoS and ExoT, whereas 5/49 (10%) of isolates expressed ExoS, ExoT and ExoU with only 2/49 isolates expressing ExoT and ExoU. In contrast, all 27 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates produced pneumolysin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that ExoS/T expressing P. aeruginosa and pneumolysin expressing S. pneumoniae predominate in bacterial keratitis. While P. aeruginosa strains expressing both ExoU and ExoS are usually rare, these strains actually outnumbered strains expressing only ExoU in the current study. Further, as neutrophils are the predominant cell type in these corneal ulcers, they are the likely source of cytokines and of the increased TLR and inflammasome expression.

  16. Host immune responses after hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Jerchel, Stefan; Kaufhold, Inga; Schuchardt, Larissa; Shima, Kensuke; Rupp, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Genital tract infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (C. trachomatis) are the most frequent sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Severe clinical sequelae such as pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), tubal occlusion, and tubal infertility are linked to inflammatory processes of chronically infected tissues. The oxygen concentrations in the female urogenital tract are physiologically low and further diminished (0.5–5% O2, hypoxia) during an ongoing inflammation. However, little is known about the effect of a low oxygen environment on genital C. trachomatis infections. In this study, we investigated the host immune responses during reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection under hypoxia. For this purpose, the activation of the MAP-kinases p44/42 and p38 as well as the induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 were analyzed. Upon hypoxic reactivation of IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infection, the phosphorylation of the p44/42 but not of the p38 MAP-kinase was significantly diminished compared to IFN-γ induced chlamydial persistence under normoxic condition. In addition, significantly reduced IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression levels were observed for reactivated Chlamydiae under hypoxia compared to a persistent chlamydial infection under normoxia. Our findings indicate that hypoxia not only reactivates IFN-γ induced persistent C. trachomatis infections resulting in increased bacterial growth and progeny but also dampens inflammatory host immune signaling responses that are normally observed in a normoxic environment. PMID:24783060

  17. Aggressive Periodontitis: microbes and host response, who to blame?

    PubMed Central

    Nibali, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    A paradigm shift several decades ago elucidated that aggressive periodontitis (AgP) was not a degenerative disorder but a rapid progressive form of plaque-induced inflammatory periodontal disease. Ensuing years of research have led to linkage analysis identification of specific genetic defects responsible for AgP in some families and to the finding that subgingival detection of A. actinomycet-emcomitans JP2 clone is a predictive factor for disease onset and progression. However, rather disappointingly, these ‘proven’ risk factors are only detected in a small subset of AgP cases. Recent advances are leading to a new paradigm shift, with the realization that genetically-driven dysbiotic changes in the subgingival microbiota may predispose to a cascade of events leading to the rapid periodontal tissue destruction seen in AgP. This review tries to dissect the existing literature on the host response-microbial axis of AgP and to propose possible pathogenic pathways in line with current theories. PMID:25654663

  18. Similarly Lethal Strains of Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli Trigger Markedly Diverse Host Responses in a Zebrafish Model of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Amelia E.; Fleming, Brittany A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In individuals with sepsis, the infecting microbes are commonly viewed as generic inducers of inflammation while the host background is considered the primary variable affecting disease progression and outcome. To study the effects of bacterial strain differences on the maladaptive immune responses that are induced during sepsis, we employed a novel zebrafish embryo infection model using extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) isolates. These genetically diverse pathogens are a leading cause of sepsis and are becoming increasingly dangerous because of the rise of multidrug-resistant strains. Zebrafish infected with ExPEC isolates exhibit many of the pathophysiological features seen in septic human patients, including dysregulated inflammatory responses (cytokine storms), tachycardia, endothelial leakage, and progressive edema. However, only a limited subset of ExPEC isolates can trigger a sepsis-like state and death of the host when introduced into the bloodstream. Mirroring the situation in human patients, antibiotic therapy reduced ExPEC titers and improved host survival rates but was only effective within limited time frames that varied, depending on the infecting pathogen. Intriguingly, we find that phylogenetically distant but similarly lethal ExPEC isolates can stimulate markedly different host transcriptional responses, including disparate levels of inflammatory mediators. These differences correlate with the amounts of bacterial flagellin expression during infection, as well as differential activation of Toll-like receptor 5 by discrete flagellar serotypes. Altogether, this work establishes zebrafish as a relevant model of key aspects of human sepsis and highlights the ability of genetically distinct ExPEC isolates to induce divergent host responses independently of baseline host attributes. IMPORTANCE Sepsis is a life-threatening systemic inflammatory condition that is initiated by the presence of microorganisms in the bloodstream. In

  19. A Toxoplasma Patatin-Like Protein Changes Localization and Alters the Cytokine Response during Toxoplasmic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tobin Magle, Crystal; Pittman, Kelly J.; Moser, Lindsey A.; Boldon, Kyle M.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that forms a lifelong infection within the central nervous system of its host. The T. gondii genome encodes six members of the patatin-like phospholipase family; related proteins are associated with host-microbe interactions in bacteria. T. gondii patatin-like protein 1 (TgPL1) was previously determined to be necessary for parasites to suppress nitric oxide and prevent degradation in activated macrophages. Here, we show that in the rapidly replicating tachyzoite stage, TgPL1 is localized within vesicles inside the parasite that are distinct from the dense granules; however, in the encysted bradyzoite stage, TgPL1 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and cyst wall. While we had not previously seen a defect of the TgPL1 deletion mutant (ΔTgPL1) during acute and early chronic infection, the localization change of TgPL1 in bradyzoites caused us to reevaluate the ΔTgPL1 mutant during late chronic infection and in a toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) mouse model. Mice infected with ΔTgPL1 are more resistant to TE and have fewer inflammatory lesions than mice infected with the wild type and ΔTgPL1 genetically complemented with TgPL1. This increased resistance to TE could result from several contributing factors. First, we found that ΔTgPL1 bradyzoites did not convert back to tachyzoites readily in tissue culture. Second, a subset of cytokine levels were higher in ΔTgPL1-infected mice, including gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). These studies suggest that TgPL1 plays a role in the maintenance of chronic T. gondii infection. PMID:24478077

  20. Salidroside attenuates LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine responses and improves survival in murine endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuang; Feng, Haihua; Song, Bocui; Guo, Weixiao; Xiong, Ying; Huang, Guoren; Zhong, Weiting; Huo, Meixia; Chen, Na; Lu, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2011-12-01

    Salidroside is a major component isolated from the Rhodiola rosea. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of salidroside on cytokine production by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in vitro, and the results showed that salidroside reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretions. This inspired us to further study the effects of salidroside in vivo. Salidroside significantly attenuated TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 productions in serum from mice challenged with LPS, and consistent with the results in vitro. In the murine model of endotoxemia, mice were treated with salidroside prior to or after LPS challenge. The results showed that salidroside significantly increased mouse survival. Further studies revealed that salidroside could downregulate LPS-induced nuclear transcription factor-қB (NF-қB) DNA-binding activation and ERK/MAPKs signal transduction pathways production in RAW 264.7 macrophages. These observations indicated that salidroside modulated early cytokine responses by blocking NF-қB and ERK/MAPKs activation, and thus, increased mouse survival. These effects of salidroside may be of potential usefulness in the treatment of inflammation-mediated endotoxemia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cardiopulmonary reflex, cardiac cytokines, and nandrolone decanoate: response to resistance training in rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, Ewelyne Miranda; Nascimento, Andrews Marques; Brasil, Girlandia Alexandre; Kalil, Ieda Carneiro; Lenz, Dominik; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; Andrade, Tadeu Uggere; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza

    2015-11-01

    This study evaluated the effects of nandrolone associated with resistance training (RT) on cardiac cytokines, angiotensin-converting enzyme activity (ACEA), and the sensitivity of the Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR). Male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: CONT (received vehicle, no training); EXERC (RT: after one week of water adaptation, rats were exercised by jumping into water twice a week for 4 weeks), and ND+EXERC (received nandrolone decanoate 10 mg/kg, twice/week, i.m, associated with RT). The BJR was analysed by measuring bradycardic and hypotensive responses elicited by serotonin administration. Myocyte hypertrophy and matrix collagen deposition were determined by morphometric analysis of H&E and picrosirius red-stained samples, respectively. TNF-α and ACEA were also studied. RT promoted physiological myocyte hyrpertrophy but did not cause changes in the other parameters. The association of ND with RT increased myocyte hypertrophy, deposition of matrix type I collagen, TNF-α and ACEA; decreased IL-10, and impairment in the BJR were observed in ND+EXERC compared with CONT and EXERC. ND is associated with alterations in cardiac structure and function as a result of the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy (cardiac cytokine imbalance, elevation of ACEA) and cardiac injury, even when combined with resistance training.

  2. Migrational changes of mesenchymal stem cells in response to cytokines, growth factors, hypoxia, and aging.

    PubMed

    Naaldijk, Yahaira; Johnson, Adiv A; Ishak, Stefan; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Hohaus, Christian; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2015-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-immunogenic, multipotent cells with at least trilineage differentiation potential. They promote wound healing, improve regeneration of injured tissue, and mediate numerous other health effects. MSCs migrate to sites of injury and stimulate repair either through direct differentiation or indirectly through the stimulation of endogenous repair mechanisms. Using the in vitro scratch assay, we show that the inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors TNF-α, SDF-1, PDGF, and bFGF enhance migration of rat MSCs under normoxic conditions, while TNF-α, IFN-γ, PDGF, and bFGF promote MSC migration under hypoxic conditions. This indicates that the oxygen concentration affects how MSCs will migrate in response to specific factors and, consistent with this, differential expression of cytokines was observed under hypoxic versus normoxic conditions. Using the transwell migration assay, we find that TNF-α, IFN-γ, bFGF, IGF-1, PDGF, and SDF-1 significantly increase transmigration of rat MSCs compared to unstimulated medium. MSCs derived from aged rats exhibited comparable migration to MSCs derived from young rats under hypoxic and normoxic conditions, even after application with specific factors. Similarly, migration in MSCs from aged, human donors did not statistically differ compared to migration in MSCs derived from human umbilical cord tissue or younger donors.

  3. Thimerosal induces TH2 responses via influencing cytokine secretion by human dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anshu; Kaushal, Poonam; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gollapudi, Sastry; Gupta, Sudhir

    2007-02-01

    Thimerosal is an organic mercury compound that is used as a preservative in vaccines and pharmaceutical products. Recent studies have shown a TH2-skewing effect of mercury, although the underlying mechanisms have not been identified. In this study, we investigated whether thimerosal can exercise a TH2-promoting effect through modulation of functions of dendritic cells (DC). Thimerosal, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited the secretion of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p70 from human monocyte-derived DC. However, the secretion of IL-10 from DC was not affected. These thimerosal-exposed DC induced increased TH2 (IL-5 and IL-13) and decreased TH1 (IFN-gamma) cytokine secretion from the T cells in the absence of additional thimerosal added to the coculture. Thimerosal exposure of DC led to the depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH), and addition of exogenous GSH to DC abolished the TH2-promoting effect of thimerosal-treated DC, restoring secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-6, and IL-12p70 by DC and IFN-gamma secretion by T cells. These data suggest that modulation of TH2 responses by mercury and thimerosal, in particular, is through depletion of GSH in DC.

  4. Kainic Acid-Induced Neurotoxicity: Targeting Glial Responses and Glia-Derived Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xing-Mei; Zhu, Jie

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity contributes to a variety of disorders in the central nervous system, which is triggered primarily by excessive Ca2+ influx arising from overstimulation of glutamate receptors, followed by disintegration of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and ER stress, the generation and detoxification of reactive oxygen species as well as mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. Kainic acid (KA), a potent agonist to the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate class of glutamate receptors, is 30-fold more potent in neuro-toxicity than glutamate. In rodents, KA injection resulted in recurrent seizures, behavioral changes and subsequent degeneration of selective populations of neurons in the brain, which has been widely used as a model to study the mechanisms of neurodegenerative pathways induced by excitatory neurotransmitter. Microglial activation and astrocytes proliferation are the other characteristics of KA-induced neurodegeneration. The cytokines and other inflammatory molecules secreted by activated glia cells can modify the outcome of disease progression. Thus, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory treatment could attenuate or prevent KA-induced neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarized updated experimental data with regard to the KA-induced neurotoxicity in the brain and emphasized glial responses and glia-oriented cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-12 and IL-18. PMID:22131947

  5. Francisella Infection in Cultured Tilapia in Thailand and the Inflammatory Cytokine Response.

    PubMed

    Jantrakajorn, Sasibha; Wongtavatchai, Janenuj

    2016-06-01

    Francisella infections developed in freshwater Nile Tilapia Oreochromis niloticus and red tilapia Oreochromis spp. farms in Thailand during 2012-2014. The diseased fish were lethargic and pale in color and showed numerous white nodules in their enlarged spleens. Histopathological examination and electron microscopy suggested that the white nodules were multifocal granulomas consisting of coccobacilli within vacuolated cells. Isolation of Francisella-like bacteria was achieved from 42 of 100 samples, while polymerase chain reaction confirmed Francisella infections in all samples. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene from samples obtained from three different geographical culture areas revealed more than 99% similarity with F. noatunensis subsp. orientalis. The influence of Francisella infection on inflammatory cytokines was determined on splenic cells of fish intraperitoneally injected with the bacteria (0.8 × 10(5) colony-forming units per fish). Infected tilapia showed significantly greater expression of the pro-inflammatory genes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrotic factor-α (TNF-α) within 24 h postinjection (hpi) and for up to 96 hpi. However, down-regulation of an anti-inflammatory gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was observed as early as 24 hpi. This investigation demonstrates that an imbalance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in response to the infection may account for the substantial number of granulomas in fish hematopoietic tissues that was found in the later stage of the disease. Received September 9, 2015; accepted December 13, 2015.

  6. Integration of the thiol redox status with cytokine response to physical training in professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Zembron-Lacny, A; Slowinska-Lisowska, M; Ziemba, A

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the plasma markers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and cytokines, and their relationship with thiol redox status of basketball players during training. Sixteen professional players of the Polish Basketball Extraleague participated in the study. The study was performed during the preparatory period and the play-off round. Markers of ROS activity (lipid peroxidation TBARS, protein carbonylation PC) and reduced glutathione (GSH) demonstrated regularity over time, i.e. TBARS, PC and GSH were elevated at the beginning and decreased at the end of training periods. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) was not affected by exercise training. Thiol redox status (GSH(total)-2GSSG/GSSG) correlated with TBARS and PC in both training periods. The level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) was increased and positively correlated with thiol redox (r=0.423) in the preparatory period, whereas tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) was increased and inversely correlated with thiol redox (r= 0.509) in the play-off round. The present study showed significant shifts in markers of ROS activity, thiol redox status and inflammatory mediators (IL-6, TNFalpha) following professional sport training as well as correlation between changes in thiol redox and cytokine response.

  7. PLEIOTROPHIN, A MULTIFUNCTIONAL CYTOKINE AND GROWTH FACTOR, INDUCES LEUKOCYTE RESPONSES THROUGH THE INTEGRIN MAC-1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Di; Podolnikova, Nataly P; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Ardell, Christopher L; Balabiyev, Arnat; Ugarova, Tatiana P; Wang, Xu

    2017-09-22

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a multifunctional, cationic, glycosaminoglycan-binding cytokine and growth factor involved in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including tissue repair and inflammation-related diseases. PTN has been shown to promote leukocyte responses by inducing their migration and expression of inflammatory cytokines. However, the mechanisms through which PTN mediates these responses remain unclear. Here, we identified the integrin Mac-1 (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) as the receptor mediating macrophage adhesion and migration to PTN. We also found that expression of Mac-1 on the surface of human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells induced their adhesion and migration to PTN. Accordingly, PTN promoted Mac-1-dependent cell spreading and initiated intracellular signaling manifested in phosphorylation of Erk1/2. While binding to PTN, Mac-1 on Mac-1-expressing HEK293 cells appear to cooperate with cell-surface proteoglycans, since both anti-Mac-1 function-blocking mAb and heparin were required to block adhesion. Moreover, biolayer interferometry and NMR indicated a direct interaction between the αMI domain, the major ligand-binding region of Mac-1, and PTN. Using peptide libraries, we found that in PTN, the αMI domain bound sequences enriched in basic and hydrophobic residues, indicating that PTN conforms to the general principle of ligand-recognition specificity of the αMI domain toward cationic proteins/peptides. Finally, using recombinant PTN-derived fragments, we show that PTN contains two distinct Mac-1-binding sites in each of its constitutive domains. Collectively, these results identify PTN as a ligand for the integrin Mac-1 on the surface of leukocytes and suggest that this interaction may play a role in inflammatory responses. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Well-controlled proinflammatory cytokine responses of Peyer’s patch cells to probiotic Lactobacillus casei

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Yukihide; Shida, Kan; Nagata, Satoru; Wada, Mariko; Bian, Lei; Wang, Chongxin; Shimizu, Toshiaki; Yamashiro, Yuichiro; Kiyoshima-Shibata, Junko; Nanno, Msanobu; Nomoto, Koji

    2010-01-01

    In order to clarify the probiotic features of immunomodulation, cytokine production by murine spleen and Peyer’s patch (PP) cells was examined in response to probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. In spleen cells, probiotic Lactobacillus casei induced interleukin (IL)-12 production by CD11b+ cells more strongly than pathogenic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and effectively promoted the development of T helper (Th) type 1 cells followed by high levels of secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ. Although the levels of IL-12 secreted by PP cells in response to L. casei were lower in comparison with spleen cells, Th1 cells developed as a result of this low-level induction of IL-12. However, IFN-γ secretion by the L. casei-induced Th1 cells stimulated with a specific antigen was down-regulated in PP cells. Development of IL-17-producing Th17 cells was efficiently induced in PP cells by antigen stimulation. Lactobacillus casei slightly, but significantly, inhibited the antigen-induced secretion of IL-17 without a decrease in the proportion of Th17 cells. No bacteria tested induced the development of IL-10-producing, transforming growth factor-β-producing or Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells, thus suggesting that certain probiotics might regulate proinflammatory responses through as yet unidentified mechanisms in PP cells. These data show probiotic L. casei to have considerable potential to induce IL-12 production and promote Th1 cell development, but the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-12 and IL-17 may be well controlled in PP cells. PMID:20636824

  9. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 modulates the immune response profile and development of experimental cerebral malaria.

    PubMed

    Brant, Fatima; Miranda, Aline S; Esper, Lisia; Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Cisalpino, Daniel; de Souza, Danielle da Gloria; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Tanowitz, Herbert B; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lucio; Machado, Fabiana Simão

    2016-05-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infection results in severe malaria in humans, affecting various organs, including the liver, spleen and brain, and resulting in high morbidity and mortality. The Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection in mice closely recapitulates many aspects of human cerebral malaria (CM); thus, this model has been used to investigate the pathogenesis of CM. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2), an intracellular protein induced by cytokines and hormones, modulates the immune response, neural development, neurogenesis and neurotrophic pathways. However, the role of SOCS2 during CM remains unknown. SOCS2 knockout (SOCS2(-/-)) mice infected with PbA show an initial resistance to infection with reduced parasitemia and production of TNF, TGF-β, IL-12 and IL-17 in the brain. Interestingly, in the late phase of infection, SOCS2(-/-) mice display increased parasitemia and reduced Treg cell infiltration, associated with enhanced levels of Th1 and Th17 cells and related cytokines IL-17, IL-6, and TGF-β in the brain. A significant reduction in protective neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), was also observed. Moreover, the molecular alterations in the brain of infected SOCS2(-/-) mice were associated with anxiety-related behaviors and cognition impairment. Mechanistically, these results revealed enhanced nitric oxide (NO) production in PbA-infected SOCS2(-/-) mice, and the inhibition of NO synthesis through l-NAME led to a marked decrease in survival, the disruption of parasitemia control and more pronounced anxiety-like behavior. Treatment with l-NAME also shifted the levels of Th1, Th7 and Treg cells in the brains of infected SOCS2(-/-) mice to the background levels observed in infected WT, with remarkable exception of increased CD8(+)IFN(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes. These results indicate that SOCS2 plays a dual role during PbA infection, being detrimental

  10. microRNA function is limited to cytokine control in the acute response to virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Lauren C.; Schmid, Sonja; Sachs, David; Shim, Jaehee V.; Lim, Jean K.; tenOever, Benjamin R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY With the capacity to fine-tune protein expression via sequence-specific interactions, microRNAs (miRNAs) help regulate cell maintenance and differentiation. While some studies have also implicated miRNAs as regulators of the antiviral response, others have found that the RISC complex that facilitates miRNA-mediated silencing is rendered non-functional during cellular stress, including virus infection. To determine the global role of miRNAs in the cellular response to virus infection, we generated a vector that rapidly eliminates total cellular miRNA populations in terminally differentiated primary cultures. Loss of miRNAs has a negligible impact on both innate sensing of and immediate response to acute viral infection. In contrast, miRNA depletion specifically enhances cytokine expression, providing a post-translational mechanism for immune cell activation during cellular stress. This work highlights the physiological role of miRNAs during the antiviral response and suggests their contribution is limited to chronic infections and the acute activation of the adaptive immune response. PMID:26651947

  11. Broad heparin-binding haemagglutinin-specific cytokine and chemokine response in infants following Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven G; Lecher, Sophie; Blitz, Rose; Locht, Camille; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2012-09-01

    Heparin-binding haemagglutinin (HBHA)-specific immune responses have been linked to protection against tuberculosis (TB). We investigated the hypothesis that BCG vaccination of human infants primes an HBHA-specific response, using multiplex to measure secreted cytokines and chemokines following HBHA and Mycobacterium tuberculosis purified protein derivative (PPD) stimulation of diluted whole blood samples from BCG-vaccinated or -unvaccinated infants. Of 42 analytes measured, 24 and 32 significant, BCG-associated increases were detected in response to HBHA and PPD, respectively. Both response profiles included Th-1, Th-2, Th-17 and inflammatory cytokines and chemokines (e.g. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, MIP-1α and MIP-1β). We also found that six of the seven responses most closely correlated with IFN-γ were common to both HBHA and PPD. Notably, all HBHA-specific secretion of cytokines and chemokines from infant samples was dependent on previous BCG vaccination. Also, long-term persistence of HBHA-specific responses was found in adolescents with evidence of infant BCG vaccination. This study demonstrates for the first time BCG priming of an HBHA-specific immune response in infants that is characterised by a broad cytokine and chemokine signature. It also suggests a number of BCG vaccination associated, HBHA-induced responses that should be useful for future studies of biomarkers of protection against TB. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Host Microbiota Contributes to Health and Response to Disease.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Rajeev; Sanford, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that normal microbiota interacts with the host through four mechanisms: the normal microbiome acts as a barrier against pathogens; second, as modulators of the permeability of host mucosa; third, as modulators of energy extraction from, and metabolic utilization of ingested food; and lastly, as modulators of the immune system. An alteration of the normal microbiota increases predisposition of the host to diseases through these four mechanisms.

  13. Cytokine responses of human intestinal epithelial-like Caco-2 cells to the nonpathogenic bacterium Bacillus subtilis (natto).

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Tomohiro; Hirose, Rieko; Saegusa, Shizue; Ametani, Akio; Kiuchi, Kan; Kaminogawa, Shuichi

    2003-05-15

    Intestinal epithelial cells produce cytokines in response to pathogenic bacteria. However, cellular responses of these cells to nonpathogenic strains, such as Bacillus subtilis, are yet to be determined. In this study, we investigate whether epithelial-like human colon carcinoma Caco-2 cells produce cytokines in response to B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The latter strain is utilized for manufacturing the fermented soy food "natto". Live cells of nonpathogenic B. subtilis JCM 1465(T), B. subtilis (natto) and E. coli JCM 1649(T), as well as pathogenic S. enteritidis JCM 1652 and P. aeruginosa JCM 5516 strains, induced secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and/or IL-8, but not IL-7, IL-15 or tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) of Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured with E. coli, S. enteritidis or P. aeruginosa decreased more rapidly than that of cells cultured with B. subtilis or B. subtilis (natto). The amounts of cytokine induced by B. subtilis (natto) cells were strain-dependent. Moreover, B. subtilis (natto) cells subjected to hydrochloric acid treatment, but not autoclaving, induced a higher secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 than intact cells. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including AG126 and genistein, suppressed cytokine secretion. Our results suggest that the nonpathogenic B. subtilis (natto) bacterium induces cytokine responses in intestinal epithelial cells via activation of an intracellular signaling pathway, such as that of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB).

  14. Peripheral CD4+ T cell cytokine responses following human challenge and re-challenge with Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Fimlaid, Kelly A; Lindow, Janet C; Tribble, David R; Bunn, Janice Y; Maue, Alexander C; Kirkpatrick, Beth D

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide; however, our understanding of the human immune response to C. jejuni infection is limited. A previous human challenge model has shown that C. jejuni elicits IFNγ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a response associated with protection from clinical disease following re-infection. In this study, we investigate T lymphocyte profiles associated with campylobacteriosis using specimens from a new human challenge model in which C. jejuni-naïve subjects were challenged and re-challenged with C. jejuni CG8421. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to investigate T lymphocytes as a source of cytokines, including IFNγ, and to identify cytokine patterns associated with either campylobacteriosis or protection from disease. Unexpectedly, all but one subject evaluated re-experienced campylobacteriosis after re-challenge. We show that CD4+ T cells make IFNγ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection; however, multifunctional cytokine response patterns were not found. Cytokine production from peripheral CD4+ T cells was not enhanced following re-challenge, which may suggest deletion or tolerance. Evaluation of alternative paradigms or models is needed to better understand the immune components of protection from campylobacteriosis.

  15. African swine fever virus multigene family 360 and 530 genes affect host interferon response.

    PubMed

    Afonso, C L; Piccone, M E; Zaffuto, K M; Neilan, J; Kutish, G F; Lu, Z; Balinsky, C A; Gibb, T R; Bean, T J; Zsak, L; Rock, D L

    2004-02-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) multigene family 360 and 530 (MGF360/530) genes affect viral growth in macrophage cell cultures and virulence in pigs (L. Zsak, Z. Lu, T. G. Burrage, J. G. Neilan, G. F. Kutish, D. M. Moore, and D. L. Rock, J. Virol. 75:3066-3076, 2001). The mechanism by which these novel genes affect virus-host interactions is unknown. To define MGF360/530 gene function, we compared macrophage transcriptional responses following infection with parental ASFV (Pr4) and an MGF360/530 deletion mutant (Pr4 Delta 35). A swine cDNA microarray containing 7,712 macrophage cDNA clones was used to compare the transcriptional profiles of swine macrophages infected with Pr4 and Pr4 Delta 35 at 3 and 6 h postinfection (hpi). While at 3 hpi most (7,564) of the genes had similar expression levels in cells infected with either virus, 38 genes had significantly increased (>2.0-fold, P < 0.05) mRNA levels in Pr4 Delta 35-infected macrophages. Similar up-regulation of these genes was observed at 6 hpi. Viral infection was required for this induced transcriptional response. Most Pr Delta 35 up-regulated genes were part of a type I interferon (IFN) response or were genes that are normally induced by double-stranded RNA and/or viral infection. These included monocyte chemoattractant protein, transmembrane protein 3, tetratricopeptide repeat protein 1, a ubiquitin-like 17-kDa protein, ubiquitin-specific protease ISG43, an RNA helicase DEAD box protein, GTP-binding MX protein, the cytokine IP-10, and the PKR activator PACT. Differential expression of IFN early-response genes in Pr4 Delta 35 relative to Pr4 was confirmed by Northern blot analysis and real-time PCR. Analysis of IFN-alpha mRNA and secreted IFN-alpha levels at 3, 8, and 24 hpi revealed undetectable IFN-alpha in mock- and Pr4-infected macrophages but significant IFN-alpha levels at 24 hpi in Pr4 Delta 35-infected macrophages. The absence of IFN-alpha in Pr4-infected macrophages suggests that MGF360/530 genes

  16. Immune and biochemical responses in skin differ between bovine hosts genetically susceptible and resistant to the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Alessandra Mara; Maruyama, Sandra Regina; Garcia, Gustavo Rocha; Oliveira, Rosane Pereira; Ribeiro, José Marcos Chaves; Bishop, Richard; Maia, Antônio Augusto Mendes; Moré, Daniela Dantas; Ferreira, Beatriz Rossetti; Santos, Isabel Kinney Ferreira de Miranda

    2017-01-31

    Ticks attach to and penetrate their hosts' skin and inactivate multiple components of host responses in order to acquire a blood meal. Infestation loads with the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, are heritable: some breeds carry high loads of reproductively successful ticks, whereas in others, few ticks feed and reproduce efficiently. In order to elucidate the mechanisms that result in the different outcomes of infestations with cattle ticks, we examined global gene expression and inflammation induced by tick bites in skins from one resistant and one susceptible breed of cattle that underwent primary infestations with larvae and nymphs of R. microplus. We also examined the expression profiles of genes encoding secreted tick proteins that mediate parasitism in larvae and nymphs feeding on these breeds. Functional analyses of differentially expressed genes in the skin suggest that allergic contact-like dermatitis develops with ensuing production of IL-6, CXCL-8 and CCL-2 and is sustained by HMGB1, ISG15 and PKR, leading to expression of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines that recruit granulocytes and T lymphocytes. Importantly, this response is delayed in susceptible hosts. Histopathological analyses of infested skins showed inflammatory reactions surrounding tick cement cones that enable attachment in both breeds, but in genetically tick-resistant bovines they destabilized the cone. The transcription data provided insights into tick-mediated activation of basophils, which have previously been shown to be a key to host resistance in model systems. Skin from tick-susceptible bovines expressed more transcripts encoding enzymes that detoxify tissues. Interestingly, these enzymes also produce volatile odoriferous compounds and, accordingly, skin rubbings from tick-susceptible bovines attracted significantly more tick larvae than rubbings from resistant hosts. Moreover, transcripts encoding secreted modulatory molecules by the tick were significantly more

  17. Cytokine profile in PFAPA syndrome suggests continuous inflammation and reduced anti-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Silvia; Hoffmann, Florian; Kéry, Anja; Renner, Ellen D; Hartl, Dominik; Lohse, Peter; Huss, Kristina; Fraunberger, Peter; Malley, James D; Zellerer, Stephanie; Albert, Michael H; Belohradsky, Bernd H

    2006-06-01

    PFAPA syndrome is characterized by periodic episodes of high fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and/or cervical adenitis. It is of unknown etiology and manifests usually before 5 years of age. We determined serum and intracellular cytokine levels in six PFAPA patients (4 males, 2 females, mean age 8 years (+/- 1.2 SEM), range 4-13) during the symptom-free period as well as 6-12 hours and 18-24 hours after fever onset. Values were compared to age-matched, healthy controls. Febrile PFAPA attacks led to a significant increase in IL-6 and IFN-gamma serum concentrations compared to symptom-free periods and to controls, with IL-1beta, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 levels being significantly higher than in controls. Lymphocytic IFN-gamma and CD8+ IL-2 production was consistently significantly elevated compared to healthy children. During the asymptomatic period, serum concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha and IL-12p70 were significantly increased compared to controls. Intracellular TNF-alpha synthesis was not elevated at any time point. Soluble TNFRp55 levels were even lower in between febrile episodes, reaching values comparable to controls during attacks, whereas soluble TNFRp75 levels increased during attacks compared to healthy children. Anti-inflammatory IL-4 in serum was at all times lower in PFAPA patients compared to controls with no difference in levels of intracellular IL-4 and IL-10 or serum IL-10. The observed increase of pro-inflammatory mediators, even between febrile attacks, suggests a dysregulation of the immune response in PFAPA syndrome, with continuous pro-inflammatory cytokine activation and a reduced anti-inflammatory response.

  18. Physiological and cytokine response to acute exercise under hypoxic conditions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lira, Fábio S; Lemos, Valdir A; Bittar, Irene G; Caris, Aline V; Dos Santos, Ronaldo V; Tufik, Sergio; Zagatto, Alessandro M; de Souza, Claudio T; Pimentel, Gustavo D; De Mello, Marco T

    2017-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that exercise in hypoxia situations induces a cytotoxicity effects. However, the cytokines participation in this condition is remaining unknown. Thus, the aim the present study was to evaluate physiological parameters and inflammatory profiles in response to acute exercise after five hours of hypoxic conditions. Fourteen healthy men were distributed randomly into two groups: normoxic exercise (N.=7) and hypoxic exercise (N.=7). All volunteers were blinded to the protocol. Initially, all subjects were submitted to chamber normobaric in a room fitted for altitude simulations of up to 4500 m, equivalent to a barometric pressure of 433 mmHg. All analyses began at 7:00 a.m. and was maintained for 5 hours; the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was 13.5%. The groups began a 60-minute session of physical exercise starting at 11:00 a.m., at 50% of peak VO2 (50% VO2peak). Blood was collected for cytokine analysis in the morning upon waking, before the 60-minute exercise session and immediately thereafter. The heart rate during 60 minutes' exercise training was significantly increased in both exercise groups (P<0.05), and the oxygen saturation was reduced under hypoxic conditions during exercise (P<0.05). After exercise, significant increases were found for IL-1ra and IL-10 under hypoxic conditions (P<0.05) and for IL-6 for both groups (P<0.05). TNF-α was not altered under either environmental condition. Our data demonstrate that acute exercise performance in hypoxic conditions can promotes early inflammatory response, leads for immunosuppression state.

  19. Vitamin A Modifies the Intestinal Chemokine and Cytokine Responses to Norovirus Infection in Mexican Children12

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kurt Z.; Garcıa, Coralith; Ko, GwangPyo; Santos, Jose I.; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Rosado, Jorge L.; DuPont, Herbert L.; Nathakumar, Nanda

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A supplementation is associated with divergent clinical norovirus (NoV) outcomes in Mexican children. Fecal cytokine concentrations following NoV genogroup infections among 127 Mexican children 5–15 mo old enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, vitamin A supplementation trial were determined to clarify the role the gut immune response plays in these associations. Stools collected from supplemented children [20,000 IU retinol (3.3 IU = 1 μg retinol) for children < 12 mo of age; 45,000 iu for children ≥ 12 mo] or children in the placebo group were screened for NoV genogroups I (GI) and II (GII). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), TNFα, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFNγ, and IL-10 fecal concentrations were also determined. Differences in cytokine levels between the 2 groups following GI and GII infections were determined using ordered logistic regression models. MCP-1 and IL-8 levels were greater among GI- and GII-infected children, respectively, compared with uninfected children, whereas IL-5 levels were greater following both genogroup infections. MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-6 fecal levels were reduced among supplemented children with GII-associated diarrhea compared with the placebo group. Vitamin A–supplemented, GII-infected children had reduced MCP-1 and TNFα levels compared with GII-infected children in the placebo group (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). Supplemented children with GI-associated diarrhea had higher TNFα and IL-4 levels compared with children in the placebo group with diarrhea (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.02, respectively). The divergent effects of supplementation on NoV outcomes may result from the different effects vitamin A has on the genogroup-specific immune responses. PMID:21411606

  20. Cytokine Gene Expression in Response to SnSAG1 in Horses with Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jennifer A.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Moyana, Edith M.; Guarino, Anthony J.; Ellison, Siobhan E.; Bird, R. Curtis; Blagburn, Byron L.

    2005-01-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a neurologic syndrome seen in horses from the Americas and is mainly caused by Sarcocystis neurona. Recently, a 29-kDa surface antigen from S. neurona merozoites was identified as being highly immunodominant on a Western blot. This antigen has been sequenced and cloned, and the expressed protein has been named SnSAG1. In a previous study, cell-mediated immune responses to SnSAG1 were shown to be statistically significantly reduced in horses with EPM in comparison to EPM-negative control horses. It therefore appears as though the parasite is able to induce immunosuppression towards parasite-derived antigens as parasite-specific responses are decreased. Isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes from 21 EPM (cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] Western blot)-negative horses with no clinical signs and 21 horses with clinical signs of EPM (CSF Western blot positive) were cocultured with SnSAG1 for 48 and 72 h, and the effect on cytokine production was investigated by means of reverse transcriptase PCR. Cytokines assayed include gamma interferon (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-6. β-Actin was used as the housekeeping gene. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test of the findings indicated that there was a statistically significant decrease in IFN-γ production after 48 h in culture for samples from horses with clinical disease. There was also a statistically significant increase in IL-4 production after 72 h in culture for samples from horses with EPM. These results further support the notion that this parasite is able to subvert the immune system in horses with clinical disease. PMID:15879026

  1. Cytokine gene expression in response to SnSAG1 in horses with equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Jennifer A; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Moyana, Edith M; Guarino, Anthony J; Ellison, Siobhan E; Bird, R Curtis; Blagburn, Byron L

    2005-05-01

    Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) is a neurologic syndrome seen in horses from the Americas and is mainly caused by Sarcocystis neurona. Recently, a 29-kDa surface antigen from S. neurona merozoites was identified as being highly immunodominant on a Western blot. This antigen has been sequenced and cloned, and the expressed protein has been named SnSAG1. In a previous study, cell-mediated immune responses to SnSAG1 were shown to be statistically significantly reduced in horses with EPM in comparison to EPM-negative control horses. It therefore appears as though the parasite is able to induce immunosuppression towards parasite-derived antigens as parasite-specific responses are decreased. Isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes from 21 EPM (cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] Western blot)-negative horses with no clinical signs and 21 horses with clinical signs of EPM (CSF Western blot positive) were cocultured with SnSAG1 for 48 and 72 h, and the effect on cytokine production was investigated by means of reverse transcriptase PCR. Cytokines assayed include gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, and IL-6. beta-Actin was used as the housekeeping gene. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test of the findings indicated that there was a statistically significant decrease in IFN-gamma production after 48 h in culture for samples from horses with clinical disease. There was also a statistically significant increase in IL-4 production after 72 h in culture for samples from horses with EPM. These results further support the notion that this parasite is able to subvert the immune system in horses with clinical disease.

  2. Vitamin A modifies the intestinal chemokine and cytokine responses to norovirus infection in Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Long, Kurt Z; Garcia, Coralith; Ko, GwangPyo; Santos, Jose I; Al Mamun, Abdullah; Rosado, Jorge L; DuPont, Herbert L; Nathakumar, Nanda

    2011-05-01

    Vitamin A supplementation is associated with divergent clinical norovirus (NoV) outcomes in Mexican children. Fecal cytokine concentrations following NoV genogroup infections among 127 Mexican children 5-15 mo old enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, vitamin A supplementation trial were determined to clarify the role the gut immune response plays in these associations. Stools collected from supplemented children [20,000 IU retinol (3.3 IU = 1 μg retinol) for children < 12 mo of age; 45,000 iu for children ≥ 12 mo] or children in the placebo group were screened for NoV genogroups I (GI) and II (GII). Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), TNFα, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-4, IFNγ, and IL-10 fecal concentrations were also determined. Differences in cytokine levels between the 2 groups following GI and GII infections were determined using ordered logistic regression models. MCP-1 and IL-8 levels were greater among GI- and GII-infected children, respectively, compared with uninfected children, whereas IL-5 levels were greater following both genogroup infections. MCP-1, IL-8, and IL-6 fecal levels were reduced among supplemented children with GII-associated diarrhea compared with the placebo group. Vitamin A-supplemented, GII-infected children had reduced MCP-1 and TNFα levels compared with GII-infected children in the placebo group (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively). Supplemented children with GI-associated diarrhea had higher TNFα and IL-4 levels compared with children in the placebo group with diarrhea (P-interaction = 0.02 and 0.02, respectively). The divergent effects of supplementation on NoV outcomes may result from the different effects vitamin A has on the genogroup-specific immune responses.

  3. Grapevine Pathogenic Microorganisms: Understanding Infection Strategies and Host Response Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Armijo, Grace; Schlechter, Rudolf; Agurto, Mario; Muñoz, Daniela; Nuñez, Constanza; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) is one of the most important fruit crop worldwide. Commercial cultivars are greatly affected by a large number of pathogenic microorganisms that cause diseases during pre- and/or post-harvest periods, affecting production, processing and export, along with fruit quality. Among the potential threats, we can find bacteria, fungi, oomycete, or viruses with different life cycles, infection mechanisms and evasion strategies. While plant–pathogen interactions are cycles of resistance and susceptibility, resistance traits from natural resources are selected and may be used for breeding purposes and for a sustainable agriculture. In this context, here we summarize some of the most important diseases affecting V. vinifera together with their causal agents. The aim of this work is to bring a comprehensive review of the infection strategies deployed by significant types of pathogens while understanding the host response in both resistance and susceptibility scenarios. New approaches being used to uncover grapevine status during biotic stresses and scientific-based procedures needed to control plant diseases and crop protection are also addressed. PMID:27066032

  4. Host responses associated with chronic staphylococcal mastitis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Irene; Ferrian, Selena; Penadés, Mariola; García-Quirós, Ana; Pascual, Juan J; Selva, Laura; Viana, David; Corpa, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcal infection causes substantial economic losses in commercial rabbit production systems, and is associated with a wide variety of lesions, including chronic suppurative mastitis, which mainly affects breeding females. Most chronic staphylococcal infections in rabbits are caused by the ST121 lineage of Staphylococcus aureus, although other less common lineages, such as ST96 can also be involved. The aims of the present study were to characterise the host immune response in natural cases of mastitis in rabbits caused by S. aureus, to evaluate any relationship between peripheral and local immunity and to investigate the effect of different S. aureus genotypes on these immune responses. Adult multiparous female rabbits that were affected with chronic staphylococcal mastitis (n = 204) were enrolled into the study. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations of mammary glands were undertaken, as well as flow cytometric analyses of blood. S. aureus isolates from the mammary glands were identified by multilocus sequence typing. Differences in the number of infiltrating cells were detected, depending on the type of pathology, with more immature lesions demonstrating greater cellularity, characterised by greater numbers of T lymphocytes, macrophages and plasma cells. A relationship was seen between the cells in blood and mammary tissues, the most notable being the positive correlation between monocytes and tissue macrophages. When glands were infected with ST96 strains, fewer granulocytes (P < 0.01) and greater numbers of B cells (P < 0.01), T cells (P < 0.001), CD4(+) T cells (P < 0.001) and CD8(+) T cells (P < 0.01) were detected, compared with mammary glands that were infected by ST121 strains of S. aureus.

  5. Pillars article: downregulation of Th1 cytokine production accompanies induction of Th2 responses by a parasitic helminth, Schistosoma mansoni. J. Exp. Med. 1991. 173: 159-166.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Edward J; Caspar, Patricia; Grzych, Jean-Marie; Lewis, Fred A; Sher, Alan

    2012-08-01

    In the mouse, infection with Schistosoma mansoni results in an egg-producing infection and associated disease, whereas vaccination with attenuated larval stages produces a substantial and specific immunity in the absence of egg-induced pathology. Preliminary data showing enhanced interleukin-5 (IL-5) production by T cells from infected mice and interferon γ (IFN-γ) synthesis by cells from vaccinated animals (7), suggested differential CD4(+) subset stimulation by the different parasite stimuli. To confirem this hyposthesis, lymphocytes from vaccinated or infected animals were compared for their ability to produce IFN-γ and IL-2 (secreted by Th1 cells) as compared with IL-4 and IL-5 (characteristic Th2 cytokines). After stimulation with specific antigen or mitogen, T cells from vaccinated mice or prepatently infected animals responded primarily with Th1 lymphokines, whereas lymphocytes from patenly infected mice instead produced Th2 cytokines. The Th2 response in infected animals was shown to be induced by schistosome eggs and directed largely against egg antigens, whereas the Th1 reactivity in vaccinated mice was triggered primarily by larval anigens. Interestingly, Th1 responses in mice carrying egg-producing infections were found to be profoundly downregulated. Moreover, the injection of eggs into vaccinated mice resulted in a reduction of antigen and mitogen-stimulated Th1 function accompanied by a coincident expression of Th2 responses. Together, the data suggest that coincident with the induction of Th2 responses, murine schistosome infection results in an inhibition of potentially protective Th1 function. This previously unrecognized downregulation of Th1 cytokine production may be an important immunological consequence of helminth infection related to host adaptation.

  6. Flexible cytokine production by macrophages and T cells in response to probiotic bacteria: a possible mechanism by which probiotics exert multifunctional immune regulatory activities.

    PubMed

    Shida, Kan; Nanno, Masanobu; Nagata, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Probiotics have been reported to be efficacious against cancers, infections, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases and autoimmune diseases, and it is important to explain how such multifunctional activities are realized. Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) is one of these multifunctional probiotics, and its ability to augment the host immune system has been extensively examined. We have shown that the cell wall structure of this probiotic strain is responsible for potently inducing IL-12 production. In addition, we have recently found that LcS differentially controls the inflammatory cytokine responses of macrophages and T cells in either Peyer's patches or the spleen. Other studies revealed that LcS-induced IL-12 production by macrophages is modified when other bacteria or their cell components are simultaneously present. These findings can provide a theoretical basis for understanding the multifunctional activities of specific probiotics.

  7. Cytokines and cytokine-specific therapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Desai, Dhananjay; Brightling, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is increasing in prevalence worldwide. It is characterized by typical symptoms and variable airway obstruction punctuated with episodes of worsening symptoms known as exacerbations. Underlying this clinical expression of disease is airway inflammation and remodeling. Cytokines and their networks are implicated in the innate and adaptive immune responses driving airway inflammation in asthma and are modulated by host-environment interactions. Asthma is a complex heterogeneous disease, and the paradigm of Th2 cytokine-mediated eosinophilic inflammation as a consequence of allergic sensitization has been challenged and probably represents a subgroup of asthma. Indeed, as attention has switched to the importance of severe asthma, which represents the highest burden both to the patient and health care provider, there is an increasing recognition of inflammatory subphenotypes that are likely to be driven by different cytokine networks. Interestingly, these networks may be specific to aspects of clinical expression as well as inflammatory cell profiles and therefore present novel phenotype-specific therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the breadth of cytokines implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and focus upon the outcomes of early clinical trials conducted using cytokines or cytokine-blocking therapies.

  8. Host responses to historical climate change shape parasite communities in North America’s intermountain west

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host-parasite co-speciation, in which parasite divergence occurs in response to host divergence, is commonly proposed as a driver of parasite diversification, yet few empirical examples of strict co-speciation exist. Host-parasite co-evolutionary histories commonly reflect complex mosaics of co-spe...

  9. Effects of azithromycin on shiga toxin production by Escherichia coli and subsequent host inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Tatsuki; Kojio, Seiichi; Taneike, Ikue; Nakagawa, Saori; Gondaira, Fumio; Tamura, Yukiko; Gejyo, Fumitake; Zhang, Hui-Min; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2002-11-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) colonizes the human intestinal mucosa, produces Stx from phage, and causes the development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome via Stx-induced inflammatory cytokine production. Azithromycin exhibited strong in vitro activity against STEC without inducing Stx-converting phage, in marked contrast to norfloxacin. Azithromycin decreased the tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), and IL-6 production from Stx-treated human peripheral mononuclear cells or monocytes to a greater extent than did clarithromycin. In Stx-injected mice, azithromycin significantly suppressed Stx-induced TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6 levels in serum and improved the outcome as assessed by survival rate. In the STEC oral infection experiment using immature mice immediately after weaning (weaned immature-mouse model), all mice died within 7 days postinfection. Azithromycin administration gave the mice 100% protection from killing, while ciprofloxacin administration gave them 67% protection. The data suggest that azithromycin (at least at higher concentrations) has a strong effect on Stx production by STEC and on the Stx-induced inflammatory host response and prevents death in mice. Azithromycin may have a beneficial effect on STEC-associated disease.

  10. Clash of the Cytokine Titans: counter-regulation of interleukin-1 and type I interferon-mediated inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Barber, Katrin D; Yan, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decades the notion of 'inflammation' has been extended beyond the original hallmarks of rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling) and dolor (pain) described by Celsus. We have gained a more detailed understanding of the cellular players and molecular mediators of inflammation which is now being applied and extended to areas of biomedical research such as cancer, obesity, heart disease, metabolism, auto-inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and infectious diseases. Innate cytokines are often central components of inflammatory responses. Here, we discuss how the type I interferon and interleukin-1 cytokine pathways represent distinct and specialized categories of inflammatory responses and how these key mediators of inflammation counter-regulate each other.

  11. The Host Response to a Clinical MDR Mycobacterial Strain Cultured in a Detergent-Free Environment: A Global Transcriptomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Leisching, Gina; Pietersen, Ray-Dean; Mpongoshe, Vuyiseka; van Heerden, Carel; van Helden, Paul; Wiid, Ian; Baker, Bienyameen

    2016-01-01

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) infection, the initial interactions between the pathogen and the host cell determines internalization and innate immune response events. It is established that detergents such as Tween alter the mycobacterial cell wall and solubilize various lipids and proteins. The implication of this is significant since induced changes on the cell wall affect macrophage uptake and the immune response to M.tb. Importantly, during transmission between hosts, aerosolized M.tb enters the host in its native form, i.e. in a detergent-free environment, thus in vitro and in vivo studies should mimic this as closely as possible. To this end, we have optimized a procedure for growing and processing detergent-free M.tb and assessed the response of murine macrophages (BMDM) infected with multi drug-resistant M.tb (R179 Beijing 220 clinical isolate) using RNAseq. We compared the effects of the host response to M.tb cultured under standard laboratory conditions (Tween 80 containing medium -R179T), or in detergent-free medium (R179NT). RNAseq comparisons reveal 2651 differentially expressed genes in BMDMs infected with R179T M.tb vs. BMDMs infected with R179NT M.tb. A range of differentially expressed genes involved in BMDM receptor interaction with M.tb (Mrc1, Ifngr1, Tlr9, Fpr1 and Itgax) and pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines (Il6, Il1b, Tnf, Ccl5 and Cxcl14) were selected for analysis through qPCR. BMDMs infected with R179NT stimulate a robust inflammatory response. Interestingly, R179NT M.tb induce transcription of Fpr1, a receptor which detects bacterial formyl peptides and initiates a myriad of immune responses. Additionally we show that the host components Cxcl14, with an unknown role in M.tb infection, and Tlr9, an emerging role player, are only stimulated by infection with R179NT M.tb. Taken together, our results suggest that the host response differs significantly in response to Tween 80 cultured M.tb and should therefore not be used in

  12. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-12-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the design of vaccines against fasciolosis.

  13. Glycans from Fasciola hepatica Modulate the Host Immune Response and TLR-Induced Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Ernesto; Noya, Verónica; Cervi, Laura; Chiribao, María Laura; Brossard, Natalie; Chiale, Carolina; Carmona, Carlos; Giacomini, Cecilia; Freire, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Helminths express various carbohydrate-containing glycoconjugates on their surface, and they release glycan-rich excretion/secretion products that can be very important in their life cycles, infection and pathology. Recent evidence suggests that parasite glycoconjugates could play a role in the evasion of the immune response, leading to a modified Th2-polarized immune response that favors parasite survival in the host. Nevertheless, there is limited information about the nature or function of glycans produced by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, the causative agent of fasciolosis. In this paper, we investigate whether glycosylated molecules from F. hepatica participate in the modulation of host immunity. We also focus on dendritic cells, since they are an important target of immune-modulation by helminths, affecting their activity or function. Our results indicate that glycans from F. hepatica promote the production of IL-4 and IL-10, suppressing IFNγ production. During infection, this parasite is able to induce a semi-mature phenotype of DCs expressing low levels of MHCII and secrete IL-10. Furthermore, we show that parasite glycoconjugates mediate the modulation of LPS-induced maturation of DCs since their oxidation restores the capacity of LPS-treated DCs to secrete high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-12/23p40 and low levels of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition assays using carbohydrates suggest that the immune-modulation is mediated, at least in part, by the recognition of a mannose specific-CLR that signals by recruiting the phosphatase Php2. The results presented here contribute to the understanding of the role of parasite glycosylated molecules in the modulation of the host immunity and might be useful in the des