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Sample records for host disease prophylaxis

  1. Pharmacokinetic comparison of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus in graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Moiseev, Ivan Sergeevich; Burmina, Ekaterina Andreevna; Muslimov, Albert Radikovich; Pirogova, Olga Vladislavovna; Bondarenko, Sergey Nikolaevich; Darskaya, Elena Igorevna; Tarakanova, Yuliya Alexandrovna; Senina, Nadegda Georgievna; Afanasyev, Boris Vladimirovich

    2017-06-01

    A number of studies were published with contradictory results comparing tacrolimus (Tac) and cyclosporine A (CsA) for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, but there are only few that accounted for pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. In this study, we created a model based on median concentrations, variability of concentrations, and failures to maintain target levels that distinguished patients with low, intermediate, and high risks of acute GVHD (hazard ratios (HR) 1.77, 95%CI 1.36-2.32, p < 0.0001). This model was used to compare 95 patients with CsA and 239 with Tac GVHD prophylaxis. In the multivariate analysis, incorporating PK risk, no differences were observed for grade II-IV acute GVHD (HR 0.73, 95%CI 0.48-1.10, p = 0.13), but grade III-IV acute GVHD was lower in the Tac group (HR 0.47, 95%CI 0.28-0.78, p = 0.004). The observed difference was due to patients with high PK risk (HR 0.377, 95%CI 0.19-0.75, p = 0.005), but not with low and intermediate PK risk (p > 0.05). Patients in the Tac group had better GVHD relapse-free survival (HR = 0.659, p = 0.01) and comparable overall survival (p > 0.05). In conclusion, PK risk should be accounted for in comparisons of GVHD prophylaxis regimens with calcineurin inhibitors, and Tac was superior to CsA in patients with high, but not intermediate and low PK risk.

  2. Post-transplant cyclophosphamide versus anti-thymocyte globulin as graft- versus-host disease prophylaxis in haploidentical transplant

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Annalisa; Sun, Yuqian; Labopin, Myriam; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lorentino, Francesca; Arcese, William; Santarone, Stella; Gülbas, Zafer; Blaise, Didier; Messina, Giuseppe; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshi; Malard, Florent; Bruno, Benedetto; Diez-Martin, Jose Luis; Koc, Yener; Ciceri, Fabio; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon

    2017-01-01

    Severe graft-versus-host disease is a major barrier for non-T-cell-depleted haploidentical stem cell transplantation. There is no consensus on the optimal graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. This study compared the two most commonly used graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimens (post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based vs. the anti-thymocyte globulin-based) in adults with acute myeloid leukemia reported to the European Society for Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation. A total of 308 patients were analyzed; 193 received post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen and 115 anti-thymocyte globulin-based regimen as anti-graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. The post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen was more likely to be associated to bone marrow as graft source (60% vs. 40%; P=0.01). Patients in the post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen group had significantly less grade 3–4 acute graft-versus-host disease than those in the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group (5% vs. 12%, respectively; P=0.01), comparable to chronic graft-versus-host disease. Multivariate analysis showed that non-relapse mortality was lower in the post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen group [22% vs. 30%, Hazard ratio (HR) 1.77(95%CI: 1.09–2.86); P=0.02] with no difference in relapse incidence. Patients receiving post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen had better graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival [HR 1.45 (95%CI: 1.04–2.02); P=0.03] and leukemia-free survival [HR 1.48 (95%CI: 1.03–2.12); P=0.03] than those in the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group. In the multivariate analysis, there was also a trend for a higher overall survival [HR 1.43 (95%CI: 0.98–2.09); P=0.06] for post-transplant cyclophosphamide-based regimen versus the anti-thymocyte globulin-based group. Notably, center experience was also associated with non-relapse mortality and graft-versus-host disease-free, relapse-free survival. Haplo-SCT using a post

  3. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide versus conventional graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in mismatched unrelated donor haematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Rohtesh S.; Saliba, Rima M.; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Hammerstrom, Aimee E.; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Bashir, Qaiser; Ahmed, Sairah; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Khouri, Issa; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Ciurea, Stefan O.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is an effective strategy to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after haploidentical haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We determined the efficacy of PTCy-based GVHD prophylaxis in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) HCT. We analysed 113 adult patients with high-risk haematological malignancies who underwent one-antigen MMUD transplantation between 2009 and 2013. Of these, 41 patients received PTCy, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for GVHD prophylaxis; 72 patients received conventional prophylaxis with anti-thymocyte globulin, tacrolimus and methotrexate. Graft source was primarily bone marrow (83% PTCy vs. 63% conventional group). Incidence of grade II–IV (37% vs. 36%, P = 0.8) and grade III–IV (17% vs. 12%, P = 0.5) acute GVHD was similar at day 100. However, the incidence of grade II–IV acute GVHD by day 30 was significantly lower in the PTCy group (0% vs. 15%, P = 0.01). Median time to neutrophil (18 days vs. 12 days, P < 0.001) and platelet (25.5 days vs. 18 days, P = 0.05) engraftment was prolonged in PTCy group. Rates of graft failure, chronic GVHD, 2-year non-relapse mortality, relapse, progression-free survival or overall survival were similar. Our results demonstrate that PTCy, tacrolimus and MMF for GVHD prophylaxis is safe and produced similar results as conventional prophylaxis in patients with one antigen HLA-MMUD HCT. PMID:26947769

  4. Bortezomib-Based Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in HLA-Mismatched Unrelated Donor Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Koreth, John; Stevenson, Kristen E.; Kim, Haesook T.; McDonough, Sean M.; Bindra, Bhavjot; Armand, Philippe; Ho, Vincent T.; Cutler, Corey; Blazar, Bruce R.; Antin, Joseph H.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Ritz, Jerome; Alyea, Edwin P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose HLA-mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with increased graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and impaired survival. In reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), neither ex vivo nor in vivo T-cell depletion (eg, antithymocyte globulin) convincingly improved outcomes. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has immunomodulatory properties potentially beneficial for control of GVHD in T-cell-replete HLA-mismatched transplantation. Patients and Methods We conducted a prospective phase I/II trial of a GVHD prophylaxis regimen of short-course bortezomib, administered once per day on days +1, +4, and +7 after peripheral blood stem-cell infusion plus standard tacrolimus and methotrexate in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing MMUD RIC HSCT. We report outcomes for 45 study patients: 40 (89%) 1-locus and five (11%) 2-loci mismatches (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, or -DQB1), with a median of 36.5 months (range, 17.4 to 59.6 months) follow-up. Results The 180-day cumulative incidence of grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD was 22% (95% CI, 11% to 35%). One-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 29% (95% CI, 16% to 43%). Two-year cumulative incidences of nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and relapse were 11% (95% CI, 4% to 22%) and 38% (95% CI, 24% to 52%), respectively. Two-year progression-free survival and overall survival were 51% (95% CI, 36% to 64%) and 64% (95% CI, 49% to 76%), respectively. Bortezomib-treated HLA-mismatched patients experienced rates of NRM, acute and chronic GVHD, and survival similar to those of contemporaneous HLA-matched RIC HSCT at our institution. Immune recovery, including CD8+ T-cell and natural killer cell reconstitution, was enhanced with bortezomib. Conclusion A novel short-course, bortezomib-based GVHD regimen can abrogate the survival impairment of MMUD RIC HSCT, can enhance early immune reconstitution, and appears to be suitable for prospective randomized evaluation. PMID:22869883

  5. Outcomes of matched sibling donor bone marrow transplantation in children using single-agent calcineurin inhibitors as prophylaxis for graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Elgarten, Caitlin W; Arnold, Danielle E; Bunin, Nancy J; Seif, Alix E

    2017-07-27

    Optimal graft versus host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis prevents severe manifestations without excess immunosuppression. Standard prophylaxis includes a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) with low-dose methotrexate. However, single-agent CNI may be sufficient prophylaxis for a defined group of patients. Single-agent CNI has been used for GVHD prophylaxis for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling donor (MSD) bone marrow transplants (BMTs) in young patients at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for over 20 years. Here, we describe outcomes using this prophylactic strategy in a recent cohort. We performed a single-institution chart review and retrospective analysis of consecutive children undergoing MSD BMT who received single-agent CNI for GVHD prophylaxis between January 2002 and December 2014. Fifty-two children with a median age of 6.1 years (interquartile range [IQR] 2.5-8.3) and donor age of 6 years (IQR 3-10), with malignant and nonmalignant diseases (n = 35 and 17, respectively) were evaluated. Forty-three (82.6%) received oral prophylaxis with single-agent tacrolimus after initial intravenous therapy. Rates of GVHD were consistent with reported rates on dual prophylaxis: the overall incidence of grades 2-4 acute GVHD was 25.5%, grades 3-4 GVHD 9.8%, and chronic GVHD 10.4%. The cumulative incidence of relapse among children with malignancy was 20% at a median of 237 days (IQR 194-318) post-transplant. Two-year overall survival was 82.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 69.4-90.6%) and event-free survival was 78.9% (95% CI: 65.1-87.7%). No patient experienced graft failure. Single-agent CNI is a safe, effective approach to GVHD prophylaxis in young patients undergoing HLA-identical sibling BMT. Additionally, single-agent oral tacrolimus is a reasonable alternative to cyclosporine in this population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Antithymocyte globulin for acute-graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, A; Mhaskar, A R; Reljic, T; Mhaskar, R S; Kharfan-Dabaja, M A; Anasetti, C; Mohty, M; Djulbegovic, B

    2012-04-01

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major complication associated with allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is recommended for GVHD prophylaxis following allo-HCT, however, evidence on efficacy of ATG is conflicting. Accordingly, we undertook a systematic review. All phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing ATG versus control for prevention of GVHD in patients undergoing allo-HCT were eligible. Medline and Cochrane databases were searched. Data on methodological quality, benefits and harms were extracted for each trial and pooled under a random effects model. Seven RCTs enrolling 733 patients met inclusion criteria. Pooled results showed no difference for overall survival with use of ATG (hazard ratio was 0.91; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.75-1.10; P = 0.32). There was a significant benefit for prevention of grade III/IV acute GVHD (risk ratio (RR) = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27-0.94; P = 0.03). There was no benefit associated with ATG use for prevention of either grade II (RR = 0.79; 95% CI, 0.48-1.30; P = 0.35) or grade I acute GVHD (RR = 1.42; 95% CI, 0.75-2.69; P = 0.28). Use of ATG was not associated with significant reduction in non-relapse mortality (RR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.53-1.03; P = 0.08). Future trials with adequate sample size are required to provide more definitive answers.

  7. Mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine for graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis following reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohty, M; de Lavallade, H; Faucher, C; Bilger, K; Vey, N; Stoppa, A-M; Gravis, G; Coso, D; Viens, P; Gastaut, J-A; Blaise, D

    2004-09-01

    The use of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) can result in a significant decrease in early procedure-related toxicity in patients not eligible for standard myeloablative regimens. However, acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) remains a matter of concern after RIC allo-SCT, and its incidence might be expected to be higher in elderly and high-risk patients. This report investigated mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and cyclosporin A (CsA) combination (n=14) in comparison to CsA alone (n=20) for GVHD prophylaxis in cancer patients aged over 50 years (27 haematological malignancies and seven solid tumours) receiving an HLA-identical sibling antithymocyte-globulin (ATG)-based RIC allo-SCT. Baseline demographic characteristics and risk factors for aGVHD were comparable between both groups. Although MMF administration was not associated with any significant toxicity, the cumulative incidence of any form of GVHD was comparable between both groups (cumulative incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD, 50% (95% CI, 28-72%) for CsA alone, as compared to 64% (95% CI, 39-89%) to CsA and MMF, P=NS), suggesting that adjunction of MMF to CsA is feasible, but does not translate towards a significant reduction of aGVHD, at least in the context ATG-based RIC allo-SCT.

  8. A Pilot Study of Continuous Infusion of Mycophenolate Mofetil for Prophylaxis of Graft-versus-Host-Disease in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Windreich, Randy M; Goyal, Rakesh K; Joshi, Rujuta; Kenkre, Tanya S; Howrie, Denise; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-04-01

    Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), an ester prodrug of mycophenolic acid (MPA), is used increasingly for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. Empiric fixed-dose-escalation strategies in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients have failed to achieve target MPA exposure. We evaluated the safety and feasibility of a pharmacokinetics-based dosing approach using a novel continuous infusion (CI) method of administration of MMF in pediatric HCT recipients. All patients received a myeloablative conditioning with cyclosporine A and MMF for GVHD prophylaxis. MMF was initiated on day 0 at a dose of 15 mg/kg every 8 hours. Based on steady-state pharmacokinetics, MMF was converted to CI to target a total MPA AUC(0-24) of 40 to 80 μg·hour/mL. The MMF dose was adjusted to maintain a total MPA steady-state concentration (Css) of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. During the CI schedule, MPA AUC(0-24) was maintained at a mean of 40.1 μg·hour/mL (range, 20.6 to 63.8), and 17 of 19 patients (89%) achieved MPA Css within target of 1.7 to 3.3 μg/mL. Eighteen of 19 patients (95%) achieved neutrophil engraftment at a median of 13 days (range, 8 to 41) post-transplant and platelet engraftment at 39 days (range, 17 to 298) days post-transplant. Six of 18 assessable patients (33%) developed stages II to IV acute GVHD and 2 of 15 (13%) developed chronic GVHD. The MMF dose was reduced in 9 patients due to gastrointestinal symptoms (n = 6), low blood counts (n = 4), and viral infection (n = 3). Five patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsed, of whom 4 have died. Fifteen of 19 patients are alive with a median follow-up of 2.4 years (range, .4 to 4.9), with 3-year event-free and overall survival rates of 68% and 79%, respectively. In this pilot study of pharmacokinetically directed MMF dosing, we observed no toxic deaths, excellent engraftment, and low rates of grades III to IV acute and chronic GVHD. We found significantly lower half-life and higher drug clearance in

  9. Allogeneic Blood or Marrow Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide as Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Nilanjan; Ye, Xiaobu; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Bolaños-Meade, Javier; Fuchs, Ephraim J; Luznik, Leo; Swinnen, Lode J; Gladstone, Douglas E; Ambinder, Richard F; Varadhan, Ravi; Shanbhag, Satish; Brodsky, Robert A; Borrello, Ivan M; Jones, Richard J; Matsui, William; Huff, Carol Ann

    2017-07-12

    Allogeneic blood or marrow transplantation (alloBMT) may lead to long-term disease control in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). However, historically, the use of alloBMT in MM has been limited by its high nonrelapse mortality (NRM) rates, primarily from graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We previously demonstrated that post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) decreases the toxicities of both acute and chronic GVHD after alloBMT. Here, we examine the impact of PTCy in patients with MM undergoing alloBMT at Johns Hopkins Hospital. From 2003 to 2011, 39 patients with MM underwent bone marrow or peripheral blood alloBMT from HLA-matched related/unrelated or haploidentical related donors after either myeloablative or nonmyeloablative conditioning. Post-transplantation GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg) on days +3 and +4 with or without mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Engraftment was detected in 95% of patients, with neutrophil and platelet recovery at a median of 15 and 16 days, respectively. The cumulative incidences of acute grades 2 to 4 and grades 3 and 4 GVHD were .41 and .08, respectively, and no cases of grade 4 acute GVHD were observed. The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was .13. One patient succumbed to NRM. All cases of chronic GVHD involved extensive disease and 60% of these patients received systemic therapy with complete resolution. After alloBMT, the overall response rate was 62% with complete, very good partial, and partial response rates of 26%, 21%, and 15%, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 12 months and was associated with the depth of response but not cytogenetic risk. The estimated cumulative incidence of relapse was .46 (95% confidence interval [CI], .3 to .62) at 1 year and .56 (95% CI, .41 to .72) at 2 years. At last follow-up, 23% of patients remain without evidence of disease at a median follow-up of 10.3 years after alloBMT. The median overall survival was 4.4 years and the

  10. Sirolimus-based graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis promotes the in vivo expansion of regulatory T cells and permits peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from haploidentical donors.

    PubMed

    Peccatori, J; Forcina, A; Clerici, D; Crocchiolo, R; Vago, L; Stanghellini, M T L; Noviello, M; Messina, C; Crotta, A; Assanelli, A; Marktel, S; Olek, S; Mastaglio, S; Giglio, F; Crucitti, L; Lorusso, A; Guggiari, E; Lunghi, F; Carrabba, M; Tassara, M; Battaglia, M; Ferraro, A; Carbone, M R; Oliveira, G; Roncarolo, M G; Rossini, S; Bernardi, M; Corti, C; Marcatti, M; Patriarca, F; Zecca, M; Locatelli, F; Bordignon, C; Fleischhauer, K; Bondanza, A; Bonini, C; Ciceri, F

    2015-02-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haploidentical family donors is a promising therapeutic option for high-risk hematologic malignancies. Here we explored in 121 patients, mostly with advanced stage diseases, a sirolimus-based, calcineurin-inhibitor-free prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) to allow the infusion of unmanipulated peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) grafts from partially HLA-matched family donors (TrRaMM study, Eudract 2007-5477-54). Conditioning regimen was based on treosulfan and fludarabine, and GvHD prophylaxis on antithymocyte globulin Fresenius (ATG-F), rituximab and oral administration of sirolimus and mycophenolate. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred in median at 17 and 19 days after HSCT, respectively, and full donor chimerism was documented in patients' bone marrow since the first post-transplant evaluation. T-cell immune reconstitution was rapid, and high frequencies of circulating functional T-regulatory cells (Treg) were documented during sirolimus prophylaxis. Incidence of acute GvHD grade II-IV was 35%, and occurrence and severity correlated negatively with Treg frequency. Chronic GvHD incidence was 47%. At 3 years after HSCT, transpant-related mortality was 31%, relapse incidence 48% and overall survival 25%. In conclusion, GvHD prophylaxis with sirolimus-mycophenolate-ATG-F-rituximab promotes a rapid immune reconstitution skewed toward Tregs, allowing the infusion of unmanipulated haploidentical PBSC grafts.

  11. Comparison of cyclosporine and tacrolimus combined with mycophenolate mofetil in prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease after reduced-intensity umbilical cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Toshihiro; Takashima, Shuichiro; Kato, Koji; Takase, Ken; Yoshimoto, Goichi; Yoshida, Shuro; Henzan, Hideho; Osaki, Koichi; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Iwasaki, Hiromi; Eto, Tetsuya; Teshima, Takanori; Nagafuji, Koji; Akashi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood transplantation with a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC-UCBT) is used increasingly in patients who have comorbid organ functions and lack human leukocyte antigen-identical donors. We compared the outcomes in 35 patients who received mycophenolate mofetil plus cyclosporine (MMF/CSP, n = 17) or MMF plus tacrolimus (MMF/TAC, n = 18) for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis after RIC-UCBT. Cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 94 and 89 % in MMF/CSP and MMF/TAC groups, respectively (p = 0.34). The incidence of pre-engraftment immune reaction did not differ between the MMF/CSP (41 %) and MMF/TAC (39 %, p = 1.00) groups; however, patients in the MMF/TAC group tended to have a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD than those in MMF/CSP group (28 vs 53 %, p = 0.11). Overall survival (OS) at 1 year was 43 and 60 % in MMF/CSP and MMF/TAC groups, respectively (p = 0.39). Progression-free survival, non-relapse mortality, and relapse rate were comparable between the two groups (p = 0.76, 0.59, and 0.88, respectively). In multivariate analyses, MMF/TAC GVHD prophylaxis was closely associated with improved OS, but not with incidence of engraftment and acute GVHD. These results suggest that more intensive GVHD prophylaxis with MMF/TAC decreased acute GVHD without affecting other clinical outcomes, resulting in improved OS after RIC-UCBT.

  12. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor-associated stomatitis in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients receiving sirolimus prophylaxis for graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Villa, Alessandro; Aboalela, Ali; Luskin, Katharine A; Cutler, Corey S; Sonis, Stephen T; Woo, Sook Bin; Peterson, Douglas E; Treister, Nathaniel S

    2015-03-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor sirolimus is effective in reducing incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Agents that inhibit the mTOR pathway are known to be associated with significant and potentially dose-limiting toxicities, including stomatitis. The objective of this study was to report the clinical features and management outcomes of sirolimus-associated oral ulcers in the context of post-HSCT prophylaxis of GVHD. Seventeen patients, from a study cohort of 967, who were treated with sirolimus as prophylaxis for GVHD after allogeneic HSCT at the Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center developed oral ulcers and were referred to the oral medicine clinic for evaluation and treatment over a period of 6 years. Clinical characteristics (appearance, anatomic site, size) and therapeutic outcomes (time to complete resolution) were documented. Median time to onset of oral ulceration was 55 days after allogeneic HSCT (range, 6 to 387 days); 92.9% of ulcers were located on nonkeratinized mucosa, with the ventrolateral tongue the most common site of involvement. Thirteen patients were treated with topical corticosteroid therapy; 12 of these patients also required intralesional corticosteroid injections. Clinical improvement (resolution of the lesions and improvement of symptoms) was noted in all cases, with no reported adverse events. Median time to complete resolution after onset of therapy was 14 days (range, 2 to 70 days). Patients receiving sirolimus for GVHD prophylaxis may develop painful oral ulcerations, which can be effectively managed with topical steroid treatment. Further prospective studies are needed to better elucidate the incidence of this complication, identify risk factors, and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions.

  13. The addition of sirolimus to the graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimen in reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation for lymphoma: a multicentre randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T; Sainvil, Marie-Michele; Lange, Paulina B; Giardino, Angela A; Bachanova, Veronika; Devine, Steven M; Waller, Edmund K; Jagirdar, Neera; Herrera, Alex F; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P; McAfee, Steven L; Soiffer, Robert J; Chen, Yi-Bin; Antin, Joseph H

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has clinical activity in lymphoma. The mTOR inhibitor sirolimus has been used in the prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). A retrospective study suggested that patients with lymphoma undergoing reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) HSCT who received sirolimus as part of their GVHD prophylaxis regimen had a lower rate of relapse. We therefore performed a multicentre randomized trial comparing tacrolimus, sirolimus and methotrexate to standard regimens in adult patients undergoing RIC HSCT for lymphoma in order to assess the possible benefit of sirolimus on HSCT outcome. 139 patients were randomized. There was no difference overall in 2-year overall survival, progression-free survival, relapse, non-relapse mortality or chronic GVHD. However, the sirolimus-containing arm had a significantly lower incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD (9% vs. 25%, P = 0·015), which was more marked for unrelated donor grafts. In conclusion, the addition of sirolimus for GVHD prophylaxis in RIC HSCT is associated with no increased overall toxicity and a lower risk of acute GVHD, although it does not improve survival; this regimen is an acceptable option for GVHD prevention in RIC HSCT. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00928018).

  14. Comparison of continuous and twice-daily infusions of cyclosporine A for graft-versus-host-disease prophylaxis in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Katsutsugu; Adachi, Souichi; Tanaka, Shiro; Ogawa, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Naoki; Kudo, Kazuko; Sakata, Naoki; Igarashi, Shunji; Ohshima, Kumi; Hyakuna, Nobuyuki; Chin, Motoaki; Goto, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Azuma, Eiichi; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Sawada, Akihisa; Kato, Koji; Inoue, Masami; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi; Murata, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is used widely for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT); however, the optimal schedule of its administration has not been established. Although comparative studies of adult patients undergoing HSCT have demonstrated enhanced efficacy and safety of twice-daily infusion (TD) compared with continuous infusion (CIF) of CsA, to our knowledge, similar studies have not yet been performed in pediatric groups. A self-administered questionnaire was used to retrospectively compare the clinical outcome and incidence of CsA-associated adverse events of 70 pediatric acute myelogenous leukemia patients who were receiving CsA by TD (n = 36) or CIF (n = 34) as GVHD prophylaxis for their first allogeneic HSCT. The cumulative incidences of grade II-IV acute GVHD and chronic GVHD, as well as the overall survival and event-free survival rates, did not differ significantly between the TD and CIF groups; however, the incidence of severe hypertension was significantly higher in the CIF group than the TD group. The analysis presented here indicates that TD and CIF administration of CsA have similar prophylactic effect on pediatric GVHD and suggest that TD is associated with a lower rate of toxicity than CIF in pediatric patients undergoing HSCT. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:291-298. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Application of MultiStem(®) Allogeneic Cells for Immunomodulatory Therapy: Clinical Progress and Pre-Clinical Challenges in Prophylaxis for Graft Versus Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Vaes, Bart; Van't Hof, Wouter; Deans, Robert; Pinxteren, Jef

    2012-01-01

    The last decade has seen much progress in adjunctive cell therapy for immune disorders. Both corporate and institutional Phase III studies have been run using mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) for treatment of Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD), and product approval has been achieved for treatment of pediatric GvHD in Canada and New Zealand (Prochymal(®); Osiris Therapeutics). This effectiveness has prompted the prophylactic use of adherent stem cells at the time of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) to prevent occurrence of GvHD and possibly provide stromal support for hematopoietic recovery. The MultiStem(®) product is an adult adherent stem cell product derived from bone marrow which has significant clinical exposure. MultiStem cells are currently in phase II clinical studies for treatment of ischemic stroke and ulcerative colitis, with Phase I studies completed in acute myocardial infarction and for GvHD prophylaxis in allogeneic HSCT, demonstrating that MultiStem administration was well tolerated while the incidence and severity of GvHD was reduced. In advancing this clinical approach, it is important to recognize that alternate models exist based on clinical manufacturing strategies. Corporate sponsors exploit the universal donor properties of adherent stem cells and manufacture at large scale, with many products obtained from one or limited donors and used across many patients. In Europe, institutional sponsors often produce allogeneic product in a patient designated context. For this approach, disposable bioreactors producing <10 products/donor in a closed system manner are very well suited. In this review, the use of adherent stem cells for GvHD prophylaxis is summarized and the suitability of disposable bioreactors for MultiStem production is presented, with an emphasis on quality control parameters, which are critical with a multiple donor approach for manufacturing.

  16. Comparison of Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Alemtuzumab for Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis with Fludarabine/Melphalan-Based Conditioning in Matched Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Khilna; Parmar, Sapna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; van Besien, Koen

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare infusion-related reactions and outcomes of using subcutaneous (subQ) alemtuzumab versus intravenous (i.v.) alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations. Outcomes include incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV)/Epstein-Barr (EBV) viremia, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, time to engraftment, relapse rate, and survival. We conducted a retrospective study of all adult matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations patients who received fludarabine/melphalan with subQ or i.v. alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus as part of their conditioning for unrelated donor transplantation at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 21, 2014. Alemtuzumab was administered at a total cumulative dose of 100 mg (divided over days -7 to -3). Forty-six patients received an unrelated donor stem cell transplantation with fludarabine/melphalan and either subQ (n = 26) or i.v. (n = 20) alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus. Within the evaluable population, 130 subQ and 100 i.v. alemtuzumab doses were administered. For the primary outcome, ≥grade 2 infusion-related reactions occurred in 11 (8%) versus 25 (25%) infusions in the subQ and i.v. cohorts, respectively (P = .001). Overall, 12 injections (9%) in the subQ arm versus 26 infusions (26%) in the i.v. arm experienced an infusion-related reaction of any grade (P = .001). There were no significant differences between the subQ and i.v. arms in rates of reactivation of CMV/EBV, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, or survival. Subcutaneous administration of alemtuzumab for GVHD prophylaxis was associated with fewer infusion-related reactions compared with i.v. administration in the SCT setting

  17. Inhibitory effects of merocyanine 540-mediated photodynamic therapy on cellular immune functions: A role in the prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease?

    PubMed

    Traul, Donald L; Sieber, Fritz

    2015-12-01

    Merocyanine 540-mediated photodynamic therapy (MC540-PDT) has been used in clinical trials for the purging of autologous hematopoietic stem cell grafts. When the same combinations of dye and light were applied to human peripheral blood lymphocytes, a broad range of T- and B-cell functions were impaired, prompting speculations about a potential role of MC540-PDT in the prophylaxis of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We here report on the effects of MC540-PDT on in vitro functions of murine lymphocytes as well as a preliminary evaluation of MC540-PDT for the prevention of GVHD in murine models of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Mixed lymphocyte reactions, proliferative responses to lectins, interleukin-2 and lipopolysaccharide, T-cell-mediated lysis, and NK activity were all inhibited by moderate doses of MC540-PDT. Whether MC540-PDT reduced the incidence and/or the severity of GVHD in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation depended on the composition of the mismatched grafts and the intensity of the preparative regimen. MC540-PDT was only beneficial (i.e. reduced the incidence and/or severity of GVHD) when the spleen cell content of grafts was low and/or the radiation dose of the preparative regimen was not myeloablative, and, therefore, may have encouraged mixed chimerism.

  18. Single-Agent Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide as Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis after Human Leukocyte Antigen-Matched Related Bone Marrow Transplantation for Pediatric and Young Adult Patients with Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Elad; Chen, Allen; Loeb, David M; Gamper, Christopher J; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas J; Huo, Jeffrey; Cooke, Kenneth R; Jones, Rick; Fuchs, Ephraim; Luznik, Leo; Symons, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide given after HLA-matched related and unrelated allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for patients with hematologic malignancies is effective single-agent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis in adults. Data describing outcomes for pediatric and young adult patients have not been reported. Between the years 2007 and 2013, 29 pediatric and young adult patients ages ≤21 years of age treated at our institution for high-risk hematologic malignancies underwent myeloablative HLA-matched related T cell-replete BMT. Eleven patients received post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) as single-agent GVHD prophylaxis and were followed prospectively. Eighteen patients received calcineurin inhibitor (CNI)-based standard GVHD prophylaxis and were studied retrospectively as a control group. No acute GVHD (aGVHD) developed in patients receiving PTCy, whereas patients receiving CNI-based GVHD prophylaxis had cumulative incidences of grades II to IV and grades III and IV aGVHD of 27% and 5%, respectively. No patients receiving PTCy developed chronic GHVD, compared to 1 in the control group. Two-year overall survival was similar between the 2 groups (54% PTCy versus 58% CNI-based prophylaxis), as was event-free survival (42% PTCy versus 47% CNI-based). The 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 58% for PTCy and 42% for CNI-based GVHD prophylaxis (P = .45). These results suggest that PTCy is a safe and efficacious method of GVHD prophylaxis after an HLA-matched related BMT in the pediatric and young adult population that affords patients to be off all post-transplantation immunosuppression on day +5. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. All rights reserved.

  19. Methotrexate dose delivery is more important than ciclosporin level in graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis following T-replete reduced-intensity sibling allogeneic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Medd, Patrick; Monk, Ian; Danby, Robert; Malladi, Ram; Clifford, Ruth; Ellis, Amanda; Roberts, David; Hatton, Chris; Vyas, Paresh; Littlewood, Tim; Peniket, Andy

    2011-09-01

    We investigated the contributions of methotrexate (MTX) and ciclosporin (CsA) prophylaxis to acute/chronic graft-versus-host disease (a/cGvHD) prevention following reduced-intensity conditioned allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Ninety-two fludarabine-melphalan sibling allo-SCT received CsA. Nine, 30 and 47 patients received no MTX, 2-3 doses and 4 doses, respectively. Cumulative CsA blood level to day 21 (CsA(21)) was calculated. Grades II-IV aGvHD incidence was 37.2%. In multivariate analysis, MTX omission and increasing donor age significantly associated with aGvHD incidence whilst MTX reduction and CsA(21) did not. Median duration of first immunosuppressive therapy (IST) for aGvHD was 68 days; duration of first IST was significantly longer in older patients but was not associated with MTX or CsA(21). Extensive cGvHD incidence was 60.6% at 1 year. Reduction of MTX to 2-3 doses, but not MTX omission or CsA(21), was associated with greater incidence of cGvHD affecting ≥3 organs. Median IST duration was 22 months; neither MTX nor CsA(21) influenced this. IST duration was significantly greater in patients receiving a CD34 dose below median. Neither MTX nor CsA(21) altered survival or relapse outcomes. MTX influences GvHD following T-replete RIC sibling HSCT.

  20. Mycophenolate-based graft versus host disease prophylaxis is not inferior to methotrexate in myeloablative-related donor stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Nada; Shanavas, Mohamed; Michelis, Fotios V; Uhm, Jieun; Gupta, Vikas; Seftel, Matthew; Kuruvilla, John; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Messner, Hans A; Kim, Dennis Dong Hwan

    2015-05-01

    We retrospectively reviewed 242 patients who received related donor myeloablative peripheral blood hematopoietic cell transplantation. We compared patients who received mycophenolate (MMF)/cyclosporine (CSA) (n = 71), to historical controls who received methotrexate (MTX)/CSA (n = 172). There were no differences in overall survival, nonrelapse mortality, and relapse. The MMF/CSA group had significantly faster neutrophil and platelet engraftment: medians of 13 versus 18 days and 10 versus 14 days, respectively (P = 0.001). The cumulative incidence of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) (Grades, 2-4) was significantly lower in the MMF/CSA group (45.1 vs. 74.4%, P < 0.001). The MMF/CSA group showed a lower incidence of skin (51.5 vs. 72.1%, P < 0.001) and liver acute GVHD (11.3 vs. 54.2%, P < 0.001) and a higher incidence of lung (42.2 vs. 19.0%, P = 0.045), eye (59.7 vs. 30.1%, P < 0.001), and mouth (72.8 vs. 56.4%, P = 0.001) chronic GVHD but only eye chronic GVHD was confirmed in propensity score matching (PSM) analysis. The incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) viremia was higher in the MMF/CSA group (55.8 vs. 39.6%, P < 0.001) but this was not confirmed in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA was identified as an independent favorable factor for acute GVHD (P < 0.001, hazard ratio, 0.41) but as a possible adverse risk factor for CMV viremia as this was not found to be statistically significant in PSM analysis. MMF/CSA in myeloablative matched related donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant is not inferior as GVHD prophylaxis in comparison with MTX/CSA and is associated with faster engraftment but a potentially higher risk of CMV viremia.

  1. Host-based Prophylaxis Successfully Targets Liver Stage Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Douglass, Alyse N; Kain, Heather S; Abdullahi, Marian; Arang, Nadia; Austin, Laura S; Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Billman, Zachary P; Hume, Jen C C; Murphy, Sean C; Kappe, Stefan H I; Kaushansky, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Eliminating malaria parasites during the asymptomatic but obligate liver stages (LSs) of infection would stop disease and subsequent transmission. Unfortunately, only a single licensed drug that targets all LSs, Primaquine, is available. Targeting host proteins might significantly expand the repertoire of prophylactic drugs against malaria. Here, we demonstrate that both Bcl-2 inhibitors and P53 agonists dramatically reduce LS burden in a mouse malaria model in vitro and in vivo by altering the activity of key hepatocyte factors on which the parasite relies. Bcl-2 inhibitors act primarily by inducing apoptosis in infected hepatocytes, whereas P53 agonists eliminate parasites in an apoptosis-independent fashion. In combination, Bcl-2 inhibitors and P53 agonists act synergistically to delay, and in some cases completely prevent, the onset of blood stage disease. Both families of drugs are highly effective at doses that do not cause substantial hepatocyte cell death in vitro or liver damage in vivo. P53 agonists and Bcl-2 inhibitors were also effective when administered to humanized mice infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Our data demonstrate that host-based prophylaxis could be developed into an effective intervention strategy that eliminates LS parasites before the onset of clinical disease and thus opens a new avenue to prevent malaria. PMID:25648263

  2. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-09

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  3. Graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, G B; Wagner, J E

    1990-06-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is caused by immunologic recognition of the patient by the donor marrow graft after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Despite advances in understanding and new agents and methods to treat GVHD, the disease and complications related to it and its treatment are the principal causes of death after transplantation. This article reviews the pathogenesis, prediction, prophylaxis, and treatment of both acute and chronic GVHD.

  4. [Lyme disease: prophylaxis after tick bite].

    PubMed

    Patey, O

    2007-01-01

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, which is transmitted by infected ticks. The transmission depends on several factors, especially on the duration of the tick's presence in the host body (the nymph which is smaller than the adults and thus less visible, is in this case the most frequently involved) and on whether the tick is infected or not. The interpretation of results in the few available studies is made difficult by the lack of information obtained (due to difficulty to collect information and examination costs). The comparison is made even more difficult by the difference between Borrelia ticks species in various regions. Today, the best methods are preventive: protective clothing, tick repellents, checking and removal of ticks after a journey in an endemic zone, and in case of tick bite, regular examination of the bite site during the following weeks in order to initiate an early curative treatment if ECM is diagnosed. The currently available data seems to be insufficient to suggest systematic antimicrobial prophylaxis in case of tick bite.

  5. Comparison of Tacrolimus and Sirolimus (Tac/Sir) versus Tacrolimus, Sirolimus, and mini-methotrexate (Tac/Sir/MTX) as acute graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Vincent T; Aldridge, Julie; Kim, Haesook T; Cutler, Corey; Koreth, John; Armand, Philippe; Antin, Joseph H; Soiffer, Robert J; Alyea, Edwin P

    2009-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that adding sirolimus to a tacrolimus/mini-methotrexate regimen (Tac/Sir/MTX) as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis produces low rates of acute GVHD (aGVHD) after reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). To assess whether posttransplantation methotrexate MTX can be safely eliminated altogether, we conducted a prospective clinical trial testing the combination of T and Sir alone (tac/sir) as GVHD prophylaxis after RIC SCT from matched related donors. We compared the results with patients who received (Tac/Sir/MTX) as GVHD prophylaxis after RIC SCT from matched related donors in a previous prospective study. Patients in both groups received i.v. fludarabine (Flu) 30 mg/m(2)/day and i.v. busulfan (Bu) 0.8 mg/kg/day on days -5 to -2 as conditioning, followed by transplantation of unmanipulated filgrastim-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (PBSCS). After transplantation, patients in both groups received Tac and Sir orally starting on day -3, with doses adjusted to achieve trough serum levels of 5 to 10 ng/mL and 3 to 12 ng/mL, respectively. The patients in the Tac/Sir/MTX group also received mini-MTX therapy (5 mg/m(2) i.v.) on days +1, +3, and +6. Filgrastim 5 microg/kg/day s.c. was started on day +1 and continued until neutrophil engraftment. Twenty-nine patients received the Tac/Sir regimen, and 46 patients received the Tac/Sir/MTX regimen. The 2 groups were balanced in terms of age, sex, and disease characteristics. Engraftment was brisk and donor chimerism after transplantation robust in both groups. The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV aGVHD was similar in the 2 groups (17% for Tac/Sir versus 11% for Tac/Sir/MTX; P = .46). There also were no differences between the 2 groups in cumulative incidence of extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD), treatment-related mortality (TRM), disease relapse, or survival. The Tac/Sir combination for GVHD prophylaxis is well tolerated and associated with a

  6. Alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis strategy in a developing country: lower rate of acute GVHD, increased risk of cytomegalovirus reactivation.

    PubMed

    Resende, C B; Rezende, B M; Bernardes, P T T; Teixeira, G M; Teixeira, M M; Pinho, V; Bittencourt, H

    2017-02-09

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and cytomegalovirus reactivation are important complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). Here, we evaluated the impact of treatment with alemtuzumab on the occurrence of aGVHD, cytomegalovirus reactivation and survival after alloHSCT. This was a prospective cohort study conducted at the allo-HSCT unit of Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, from January 2009 to December 2011. Fifty-seven patients who underwent alloHSCT were included. Forty-five (79%) patients had a malignant disease. Alemtuzumab was administered before the conditioning regimen at a dose of 1 mg/kg in children and 30 mg/day for 2 days in adults or children weighing more than 40 kg (a total dose of 60 mg) with a non-malignant disease or patients with a malignant disease and high-risk for GVHD mortality. Alemtuzumab was used in 23 (40%) patients, of whom 17 received a reduced-intensity conditioning. Eleven patients presented aGVHD (grade 2-4) and only 1 of them received alemtuzumab. Cumulative incidence of aGVHD (grade 2-4) at day 100 after transplantation (D+100) was 4 for patients receiving alemtuzumab and 29% for patients not receiving alemtuzumab. Cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation for patients receiving or not alemtuzumab was 62 and 38%, respectively. Sixteen patients died in the first 100 days after alloHSCT, most of them due to bacterial sepsis. Only 2 patients died of aGVHD until D+100. Overall survival was 50% without any impact of alemtuzumab. Alemtuzumab effectively controlled aGVHD but increased the risk of cytomegalovirus reactivation without improving survival.

  7. Alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis strategy in a developing country: lower rate of acute GVHD, increased risk of cytomegalovirus reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Resende, C.B.; Rezende, B.M.; Bernardes, P.T.T.; Teixeira, G.M.; Teixeira, M.M.; Pinho, V.; Bittencourt, H.

    2017-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and cytomegalovirus reactivation are important complications after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT). Here, we evaluated the impact of treatment with alemtuzumab on the occurrence of aGVHD, cytomegalovirus reactivation and survival after alloHSCT. This was a prospective cohort study conducted at the allo-HSCT unit of Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil, from January 2009 to December 2011. Fifty-seven patients who underwent alloHSCT were included. Forty-five (79%) patients had a malignant disease. Alemtuzumab was administered before the conditioning regimen at a dose of 1 mg/kg in children and 30 mg/day for 2 days in adults or children weighing more than 40 kg (a total dose of 60 mg) with a non-malignant disease or patients with a malignant disease and high-risk for GVHD mortality. Alemtuzumab was used in 23 (40%) patients, of whom 17 received a reduced-intensity conditioning. Eleven patients presented aGVHD (grade 2–4) and only 1 of them received alemtuzumab. Cumulative incidence of aGVHD (grade 2–4) at day 100 after transplantation (D+100) was 4 for patients receiving alemtuzumab and 29% for patients not receiving alemtuzumab. Cumulative incidence of cytomegalovirus reactivation for patients receiving or not alemtuzumab was 62 and 38%, respectively. Sixteen patients died in the first 100 days after alloHSCT, most of them due to bacterial sepsis. Only 2 patients died of aGVHD until D+100. Overall survival was 50% without any impact of alemtuzumab. Alemtuzumab effectively controlled aGVHD but increased the risk of cytomegalovirus reactivation without improving survival. PMID:28198910

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells provide prophylaxis against acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A meta-analysis of animal models

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lixun; Zhao, Shasha; Gu, Zhenyang; Wei, Huaping; Gao, Zhe; Wang, Feiyan; Yang, Nan; Luo, Lan; Li, Yonghui; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Gao, Chunji

    2016-01-01

    A meta-analysis of animal models was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 50 studies involving 1848 animals were included. The pooled results showed that MSCs significantly reduced aGVHD-associated mortality (risk ratio = 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.62 to 0.79, P = 2.73×10−9) and clinical scores (standardized mean difference = −3.60, 95% confidence interval −4.43 to −2.76, P = 3.61×10−17). In addition, MSCs conferred robust favorable prophylactic effects on aGVHD across recipient species, MSC doses, and administration times, but not MSC sources. Our meta-analysis showed that MSCs significantly prevented mortality and alleviated the clinical manifestations of aGVHD in animal models. These data support further clinical trials aimed at evaluating the efficacy of using MSCs to prevent aGVHD. PMID:27528221

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells provide prophylaxis against acute graft-versus-host disease following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: A meta-analysis of animal models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Haiyan; Guan, Lixun; Zhao, Shasha; Gu, Zhenyang; Wei, Huaping; Gao, Zhe; Wang, Feiyan; Yang, Nan; Luo, Lan; Li, Yonghui; Wang, Lili; Liu, Daihong; Gao, Chunji

    2016-09-20

    A meta-analysis of animal models was conducted to evaluate the prophylactic effects of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) on acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A total of 50 studies involving 1848 animals were included. The pooled results showed that MSCs significantly reduced aGVHD-associated mortality (risk ratio = 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.62 to 0.79, P = 2.73×10-9) and clinical scores (standardized mean difference = -3.60, 95% confidence interval -4.43 to -2.76, P = 3.61×10-17). In addition, MSCs conferred robust favorable prophylactic effects on aGVHD across recipient species, MSC doses, and administration times, but not MSC sources. Our meta-analysis showed that MSCs significantly prevented mortality and alleviated the clinical manifestations of aGVHD in animal models. These data support further clinical trials aimed at evaluating the efficacy of using MSCs to prevent aGVHD.

  10. A Time-to-Event Model for Acute Kidney Injury after Reduced Intensity Conditioning Stem Cell Transplantation Using a Tacrolimus and Sirolimus-Based Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Piñana, Jose Luis; Perez-Pitarch, Alejandro; Garcia-Cadenas, Irene; Barba, Pere; Hernandez-Boluda, Juan Carlos; Esquirol, Albert; Fox, María Laura; Terol, María José; Queraltó, Josep M; Vima, Jaume; Valcarcel, David; Ferriols-Lisart, Rafael; Sierra, Jorge; Solano, Carlos; Martino, Rodrigo

    2017-04-07

    There is a paucity of data evaluating acute kidney injury (AKI) incidence and its relationship with the tacrolimus-sirolimus (Tac-Sir) concentrations in the setting of reduced intensity conditioning after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (RIC-allo-HSCT). This multicenter retrospective study evaluated risk factors of AKI defined by two classification systems (KDIGO score and "Grade 0-3 staging") in 186 consecutive RIC-allo-HSCT recipients with Tac-Sir as graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Conditioning regimens consisted of fludarabine and busulfan (n=53), or melphalan (n=83), or a combination of thiotepa, fludarabine and busulfan (n=50). A parametric model, with detailed Tac-Sir consecutive blood levels, describing time to AKI was developed using the NONMEM software version 7.4. Overall, 81 (44%) out of 186 RIC-allo-HSCT recipients developed AKI with a cumulative incidence of 42% at a median follow-up of 25 months. Time to AKI was best described using a piecewise-function. AKI-predicting factors were: melphalan-based conditioning regimen (HR=1.96, p<0.01), unrelated donor (HR 1.79, p=0.04) and tacrolimus concentration: the risk of AKI increased 2.3% per each 1 ng/ml increase in tacrolimus whole blood concentration (p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, AKI grade 2 and 3 according to KDIGO staging were independent risk factors for 2-year non-relapse mortality (HR 2.8, p=0.05 and HR 6.6, p<0.0001, respectively). According to the KDIGO score, overall survival decreased with the increase in severity of AKI; 78% for patients without AKI versus 68%, 50% and 30% for grade 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p< 0.0001). In conclusion, AKI is frequent after Tac-Sir based RIC-allo-HSCT and has a negative impact on outcome. This study presents the first predictive model describing time to AKI as a function of tacrolimus drug concentration.

  11. Graft-versus-host disease

    MedlinePlus

    GVHD; Bone marrow transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Stem cell transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Allogeneic transplant - ... GVHD may occur after a bone marrow, or stem cell, transplant in which someone receives bone marrow ...

  12. Prophylaxis in von Willebrand Disease: Coming of Age?

    PubMed

    Saccullo, Giorgia; Makris, Mike

    2016-07-01

    Although in most cases von Willebrand disease (VWD) is a mild disorder, a subgroup of patients experience frequent bleeding. In contrast to severe hemophilia in which prophylaxis is the accepted standard of care, this is less frequently used in VWD. Most type 1 VWD patients can be adequately managed with episodic desmopressin and tranexamic acid. In patients with more severe disease, especially those with type 3 VWD, joint bleeds, epistaxis, menorrhagia, and gastrointestinal bleeding are problematic and usually require treatment with von Willebrand factor/factor VIII (VWF/FVIII) concentrate. While in the past these patients were managed with on-demand VWF/FVIII concentrate, several recent reports have demonstrated the value of prophylactic treatment. Despite some uncertainties about the economic impact of treatment of severe VWD, prophylaxis with VWF concentrate should now be considered as the standard of care for the more severe end of the spectrum of affected individuals. The recent introduction of recombinant VWF concentrate is likely to improve the acceptability of prophylaxis in VWD.

  13. Hepatitis B and inflammatory bowel disease: role of antiviral prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    López-Serrano, Pilar; Pérez-Calle, Jose Lázaro; Sánchez-Tembleque, Maria Dolores

    2013-03-07

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a very common infection worldwide. Its reactivation in patients receiving immunosuppression has been widely described as being associated with significant morbidity and mortality unless anti-viral prophylaxis is administered. Treatment in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients has changed in recent years and immunosuppression and biological therapies are now used more frequently than before. Although current studies have reported an incidence of hepatitis B in inflammatory bowel disease patients similar to that in the general population, associated liver damage remains an important concern in this setting. Liver dysfunction may manifest in several ways, from a subtle change in serum aminotransferase levels to fulminant liver failure and death. Patients undergoing double immunosuppression are at a higher risk, and reactivation usually occurs after more than one year of treatment. As preventive measures, all IBD patients should be screened for HBV markers at diagnosis and those who are positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen should receive antiviral prophylaxis before undergoing immunosuppression in order to avoid HBV reactivation. Tenofovir/entecavir are preferred to lamivudine as nucleos(t)ide analogues due to their better resistance profile. In patients with occult or resolved HBV, viral reactivation does not appear to be a relevant issue and regular DNA determination is recommended during immunosuppression therapy. Consensus guidelines on this topic have been published in recent years. The prevention and management of HBV infection in IBD patients is addressed in this review in order to address practical recommendations.

  14. Chagas disease in the immunosuppressed host.

    PubMed

    Bern, Caryn

    2012-08-01

    This review examines recent literature on Chagas disease in the immunosuppressed host. Chagas disease in immunosuppressed patients may represent acute transmission in an organ recipient, or reactivation of chronic infection in an HIV-infected individual or patient receiving cardiac transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy. Transplantation of the kidney or liver from an infected donor resulted in transmission in 18-19 and 29%, respectively. Prospective monitoring usually detects acute infection before symptom onset; early treatment is highly effective. In heart transplant patients, reactivation symptoms include fever, myocarditis and skin lesions, and may mimic rejection. Approximately 20% of HIV- Trypanosoma cruzi infected patients experience reactivation; manifestations include meningoencephalitis and/or myocarditis. Transplantation of the heart from a T. cruzi-infected donor is contraindicated; use of other organs can be considered. Guidelines recommend prospective monitoring rather than prophylactic treatment in recipients. Posttransplant monitoring for acute infection or reactivation relies on PCR, culture and microscopy of blood specimens regularly for at least 6 months. Treatment employs standard courses of benznidazole or nifurtimox, and immune reconstitution for the HIV-coinfected patient. Case reports suggest some HIV-T. cruzi-infected patients may benefit from secondary prophylaxis, but more data are needed to determine efficacy and specific regimens.

  15. Posaconazole prophylaxis--impact on incidence of invasive fungal disease and antifungal treatment in haematological patients.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Lisa; Ostermann, Julia; Rieger, Heidi; Ostermann, Helmut; Rieger, Christina Theresa

    2013-11-01

    Since two large-scale, randomised studies on posaconazole prophylaxis have demonstrated a clear benefit for patients at high risk for contracting invasive fungal disease (IFD), posaconazole prophylaxis has been adopted as standard of care for this patient collective. Several years on from implementation at our institution, we wanted to evaluate its impact on the incidence and use of empirical antifungal therapy in a real-life setting. We analysed retrospectively incidence and severity of IFD in high-risk patients with prophylaxis, using a historical cohort as comparator. A total of 200 patients had either received the extended spectrum triazole posaconazole in prophylactic dosage of 200 mg tid or empirical antifungal therapy. Disease events were analysed by application of the revised EORTC/MSG definitions for IFD. Before posaconazole prophylaxis, we recorded 57/100 cases of IFD which was reduced to 28/100 with prophylaxis. The empirical use of antifungal drugs was reduced to 41% from 91% in the non-prophylaxis cohort. Furthermore, we observed a shift in the categorisation of IFD according to EORTC/MSG criteria. Our data suggest that posaconazole was effective in reducing the rate and probability of invasive fungal disease in high-risk patients.

  16. Unexpected hosts: imaging parasitic diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Carnero, Pablo; Hernández Mateo, Paula; Martín-Garre, Susana; García Pérez, Ángela; Del Campo, Lourdes

    2017-02-01

    Radiologists seldom encounter parasitic diseases in their daily practice in most of Europe, although the incidence of these diseases is increasing due to migration and tourism from/to endemic areas. Moreover, some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain European regions, and immunocompromised individuals also pose a higher risk of developing these conditions. This article reviews and summarises the imaging findings of some of the most important and frequent human parasitic diseases, including information about the parasite's life cycle, pathophysiology, clinical findings, diagnosis, and treatment. We include malaria, amoebiasis, toxoplasmosis, trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis, clonorchiasis, schistosomiasis, fascioliasis, ascariasis, anisakiasis, dracunculiasis, and strongyloidiasis. The aim of this review is to help radiologists when dealing with these diseases or in cases where they are suspected. Teaching Points • Incidence of parasitic diseases is increasing due to migratory movements and travelling. • Some parasitic diseases are still endemic in certain regions in Europe. • Parasitic diseases can have complex life cycles often involving different hosts. • Prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential for patient management in parasitic diseases. • Radiologists should be able to recognise and suspect the most relevant parasitic diseases.

  17. Prophylaxis of bleeding episodes in patients with von Willebrand’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Federici, Augusto B.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with severe forms of von Willebrand’s disease (VWD) may have frequent haemarthroses, especially when factor VIII (FVIII) levels are below 10 U/dL, so that some of them develop target joints like patients with severe haemophilia A. Some patients have recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding, often without lesions in the gastrointestinal tract, and need treatment every day or every other day. Finally, there are children who have epistaxis frequently and severely enough to cause anaemia. In these frequent and severe bleeders, the optimal therapy may be secondary long-term prophylaxis with von Willebrand factor (VWF)/FVIII concentrates rather than on-demand treatment on the occasion of bleeding episodes. The largest experience on such prophylaxis in VWD has been in Sweden in 35 patients with severe forms of VWD. Long-term prophylaxis was also implemented in a cohort of Italian patients with VWD: prophylaxis was used in seven patients with types 3 (n=1), 2A (n=4), 2M (n=1) and type 1 (n=1) VWD because of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeds and in four patients with type 3 VWD because of joint bleeds. Prophylaxis prevented bleeding completely in eight patients and largely reduced hospitalisation for blood transfusions in the remaining three. The cost-effectiveness of these prophylaxis regimens versus on-demand therapy will now be investigated in one large international study. PMID:19105507

  18. Hepatic veno-occlusive disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Prophylaxis and treatment controversies.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Daniel Kl

    2012-04-24

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, is a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and it carries a high mortality. Prophylaxis for hepatic VOD is commonly given to transplant recipients from the start of conditioning through the early weeks of transplant. However, high quality evidence from randomized controlled trials is scarce with small sample sizes and the trials yielded conflicting results. Although various treatment options for hepatic VOD are available, most have not undergone stringent evaluation with randomized controlled trial and therefore it remains uncertain which treatment offers real benefit. It remains controversial whether VOD prophylaxis should be given, which prophylactic therapy should be given, who should receive prophylaxis, and what treatment should be offered once VOD is established.

  19. Stress-related mucosal disease: incidence of bleeding and the role of omeprazole in its prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Marta C; Favas, Catarina; Alves, J Delgado; Riso, Nuno; Riscado, M Vaz

    2010-10-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is the severe complication of stress-related mucosal disease in hospitalized patients. In intensive care units (ICU), risk factors are well defined and only mechanical ventilation and coagulopathy proved to be relevant for significant bleeding. On the contrary, in non-ICU settings there is no consensus about this issue. Nevertheless, omeprazole is still widely used in prophylaxis of bleeding. The objective of our study was to evaluate the relevance of stress-related mucosal disease bleeding in patients admitted to an internal medicine ward, and the role of omeprazole in its prophylaxis. We conducted a retrospective study in which we analysed consecutive patients who were admitted to our ward over a year. We recorded demographic characteristics of the patients, potential risk factors for stress-related mucosal disease (clinical data, laboratory, and medication), administration of prophylactic omeprazole, and total cost of this prophylaxis. Patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding on the admission were excluded. We recorded every upper gastrointestinal bleeding event with clinical relevance. Five hundred and thirty-five patients, mean age 70 years, mean length of stay 9.6+/-7.7 days; 140 (26.2%) patients were treated with 40 mg of omeprazole intravenously, 193 (36.1%) with 20mg of omeprazole orally, and 202 (37.8%) patients had no prophylaxis. There was only one episode (0.2%) of clinically relevant bleeding. In patients admitted to an internal medicine ward, incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding as a complication of stress-related mucosal disease is low. We found that there is no advantage in prophylaxis with omeprazole. Copyright (c) 2010 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adherence to secondary prophylaxis and disease recurrence in 536 Brazilian children with rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background More than 15 million people worldwide have rheumatic fever (RF) and rheumatic heart disease due to RF. Secondary prophylaxis is a critical cost-effective intervention for preventing morbidity and mortality related to RF. Ensuring adequate adherence to secondary prophylaxis for RF is a challenging task. This study aimed to describe the rates of recurrent episodes of RF, quantify adherence to secondary prophylaxis, and examine the effects of medication adherence to the rates of RF in a cohort of Brazilian children and adolescents with RF. Methods This retrospective study took place in the Pediatric Rheumatology outpatient clinic at a tertiary care hospital (Instituto de Puericultura e Pediatria Martagão Gesteira) in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and included patients with a diagnosis of RF from 1985 to 2005. Results 536 patients with RF comprised the study sample. Recurrent episodes of RF occurred in 88 of 536 patients (16.5%). Patients with a recurrent episode of RF were younger (p < 0.0001), more frequently males (p = 0.003), and less adherent (p < 0.0001) to secondary prophylaxis than patients without RF recurrence. Non-adherence to medication at any time during follow-up was detected in 35% of patients. Rates of non-adherence were higher in the group of patients that were lost to follow-up (42%) than in the group of patients still in follow-up (32%) (p = 0.027). Appointment frequency was inadequate in 10% of patients. Higher rates of inadequate appointment frequency were observed among patients who were eventually lost to follow-up (14.5%) than in patients who were successfully followed-up (8%) (p = 0.022). 180 patients (33.5%) were lost to follow up at some point in time. Conclusions We recommend implementation of a registry, and a system of active search of missing patients in every service responsible for the follow-up of RF patients. Measures to increase adherence to secondary prophylaxis need to be implemented formally, once non-adherence to secondary

  1. Prenatal prophylaxis of hyaline membrane disease with prednisolone: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Wauer, R R; Hengst, P; Grauel, E L

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the prophylaxis of hyaline membrane disease (HMD) with prenatal steroids from the viewpoint of neonatology. In 397 preterm infants of 27-35 week gestation the prenatal prophylaxis of HMD with prednisolone (200-300 mg over 48-72 h) significantly reduced the HMD morbidity and mortality rate (0-7th day of life), especially in newborns under 33-week gestation. HMD was not detected if a 48-h interval lay between the end of prednisolone application and birth. There was no influence on the severity and the lethality of HMD. The 29-day mortality rate in the prednisolone group (14.6%) corresponded more or less to that of the control group (16%). In the prednisolone group the increase in late mortality rate was due to a significantly higher number of late serious infections. The time interval between the rupture of the membranes and birth did not influence the infection rate and HMD frequency. At this time we cannot recommend a general prenatal glucocorticoid prophylaxis of HMD in cases of threatened preterm labor.

  2. Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in pregnancy and the early postnatal period

    PubMed Central

    Tooher, Rebecca; Gates, Simon; Dowswell, Therese; Davis, Lucy-Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background Venous thromboembolic disease (TED), although rare, is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity, hence methods of prophylaxis are often used for women at risk. This may include women delivered by caesarean section, those with a personal or family history of TED and women with inherited or acquired thrombophilias (conditions that predispose people to thrombosis). Many methods of prophylaxis carry a risk of side effects, and as the risk of TED is low, it is possible that the benefits of thromboprophylaxis may be outweighed by harm. Current guidelines for clinical practice are based on expert opinion only, rather than high quality evidence from randomised trials. Objectives To determine the effects of thromboprophylaxis in women who are pregnant or have recently delivered and are at increased risk of TED on the incidence of venous TED and side effects of treatment. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (May 2009). Selection criteria Randomised trials comparing one method of thromboprophylaxis with placebo or no treatment, and randomised trials comparing two (or more) methods of thromboprophylaxis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently and resolved any discrepancies by discussion. Main results Sixteen trials met the inclusion criteria but only 13 trials, involving 1774 women, examining a range of methods of thromboprophylaxis, contributed data for the outcomes of interest. Four of them compared methods of antenatal prophylaxis: low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) versus unfractionated heparin (UFH) (two studies), and heparin versus no treatment (two studies). Eight studies assessed postnatal prophylaxis after caesarean section; one compared hydroxyethyl starch with unfractionated heparin; four compared heparin with placebo; and the other three compared UFH with LMWH. One study examined prophylaxis in the postnatal period. The small number of statistically

  3. The virome in host health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cadwell, Ken

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian virome includes diverse commensal and pathogenic viruses that evoke a broad range of immune responses from the host. Sustained viral immunomodulation is implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases, but also confers unexpected benefits to the host. These outcomes of viral infections are often dependent on host genotype. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the virome is part of a dynamic network of microorganisms that inhabit the body. Therefore, viruses can be viewed as a component of the microbiome, and interactions with commensal bacteria and other microbial agents influence their behavior. In this article, our current understanding of how the virome, together with other components of the microbiome, affects the function of the host immune system to regulate health and disease is reviewed. PMID:25992857

  4. The virome in host health and disease.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Ken

    2015-05-19

    The mammalian virome includes diverse commensal and pathogenic viruses that evoke a broad range of immune responses from the host. Sustained viral immunomodulation is implicated in a variety of inflammatory diseases, but also confers unexpected benefits to the host. These outcomes of viral infections are often dependent on host genotype. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the virome is part of a dynamic network of microorganisms that inhabit the body. Therefore, viruses can be viewed as a component of the microbiome, and interactions with commensal bacteria and other microbial agents influence their behavior. This piece is a review of our current understanding of how the virome, together with other components of the microbiome, affects the function of the host immune system to regulate health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [ANALYSIS OF THE INTRAOPERATIVE PROPHYLAXIS EFFICACY OF THE ABDOMINAL CAVITY ADHESIVE DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Yevtushenko, D A

    2015-09-01

    Results of treatment of 152 patients, operated on for various diseases of the abdominal cavity, were analyzed. In 72 of them (the main group) intraoperatively a Defensal was used as an antiadhesive barrier preparation for the abdominal adhesions prophylaxis, and in 80 (a comparison group)--antiadhesive measures were not conducted. Application of antiadhesive sterile solution have promoted a reduction of period, which is necessary for the gut motor-evacuation function restoration--by 1.5 days, stationary treatment--by 2.5 days, postoperative morbidity rate--in 2.7 times.

  6. Health education policy 1916-1926: venereal disease and the prophylaxis dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Towers, Bridget A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper seeks to account for the development of a public health education policy with respect to venereal disease during the period 1916-1926. Two competing pressure groups, the National Council for Combatting Venereal Disease and the Society for the Prevention of Venereal Disease, defended opposing programmes; the one based on moral education (NCCVD) and the other (SPVD) on medical prophylaxis. Many of the interests represented by the groups and the political dimensions that they took, were influenced by factors only very tangentially connected to health education. Any account of the development of policy in this field needs placing in the context of the early history of nineteenth-century anti-vice crusades; the role of the Army Medical Corps during the 1914-18 war; and the bureaucratic protectionism of the Ministry of Health personnel. PMID:6990122

  7. Health education policy 1916-1926: venereal disease and the prophylaxis dilemma.

    PubMed

    Towers, B A

    1980-01-01

    This paper seeks to account for the development of a public health education policy with respect to venereal disease during the period 1916-1926. Two competing pressure groups, the National Council for Combatting Venereal Disease and the Society for the Prevention of Venereal Disease, defended opposing programmes; the one based on moral education (NCCVD) and the other (SPVD) on medical prophylaxis. Many of the interests represented by the groups and the political dimensions that they took, were influenced by factors only very tangentially connected to health education. Any account of the development of policy in this field needs placing in the context of the early history of nineteenth-century anti-vice crusades; the role of the Army Medical Corps during the 1914-18 war; and the bureaucratic protectionism of the Ministry of Health personnel.

  8. Retrospective Multicenter Study of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Prophylaxis in Korean Children with Congenital Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ah Young; Jung, Se Yong; Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Gi Beom; Kim, Young-Hwue; Shim, Woo Sup; Kang, I-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We conducted a review of current data on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis with palivizumab, in Korean children with congenital heart diseases (CHD). In 2009, the Korean guideline for RSV prophylaxis had established up to five shots monthly per RSV season, only for children <1 year of age with hemodynamic significance CHD (HS-CHD). Subjects and Methods During the RSV seasons in 2009-2015, we performed a retrospective review of data for 466 infants with CHD, examined at six centers in Korea. Results Infants received an average of 3.7±1.9 (range, 1-10) injections during the RSV season. Fifty-seven HS-CHD patients (12.2%) were hospitalized with breakthrough RSV bronchiolitis, with a recurrence in three patients, one year after the initial check-up. Among patients with simple CHD, only five (1.1%) patients received one additional dose postoperatively, as per the limitations set by the Korean guideline. Among the 30 deaths (6.4%), five (1.1%) were attributed to RSV infection; three to simple CHD, one to Tetralogy of Fallot, and one to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Of the three HCM patients that exceeded guidelines for RSV prophylaxis, two (66.6%) were hospitalized, and one died of RSV infection (33.3%). Conclusion In accordance to the Korean guideline, minimal injections of palivizumab were administered to patients having HS-CHD

  9. Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal infections in patients with hematologic malignancies. Recommendations of the Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology.

    PubMed

    Cornely, Oliver A; Böhme, Angelika; Buchheidt, Dieter; Einsele, Hermann; Heinz, Werner J; Karthaus, Meinolf; Krause, Stefan W; Krüger, William; Maschmeyer, Georg; Penack, Olaf; Ritter, Jörg; Ruhnke, Markus; Sandherr, Michael; Sieniawski, Michal; Vehreschild, Jörg-Janne; Wolf, Hans-Heinrich; Ullmann, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    There is no widely accepted standard for antifungal prophylaxis in patients with hematologic malignancies. The Infectious Diseases Working Party of the German Society for Haematology and Oncology assigned a committee of hematologists and infectious disease specialists to develop recommendations. Literature data bases were systematically searched for clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis. The studies identified were shared within the committee. Data were extracted by two of the authors (OAC and MSi). The consensus process was conducted by email communication. Finally, a review committee discussed the proposed recommendations. After consensus was established the recommendations were finalized. A total of 86 trials were identified including 16,922 patients. Only a few trials yielded significant differences in efficacy. Fluconazole 400 mg/d improved the incidence rates of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients. Posaconazole 600 mg/d reduced the incidence of IFI and attributable mortality in allogeneic stem cell recipients with severe graft versus host disease, and in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome additionally reduced overall mortality. Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B reduced the incidence rate of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. Posaconazole 600 mg/d is recommended in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome or undergoing allogeneic stem cell recipients with graft versus host disease for the prevention of invasive fungal infections and attributable mortality (Level A I). Fluconazole 400 mg/d is recommended in allogeneic stem cell recipients until development of graft versus host disease only (Level A I). Aerosolized liposomal amphotericin B is recommended during prolonged neutropenia (Level B II).

  10. Host-microorganism interactions in lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Benjamin J; Gollwitzer, Eva S

    2014-12-01

    Until recently, the airways were thought to be sterile unless infected; however, a shift towards molecular methods for the quantification and sequencing of bacterial DNA has revealed that the airways harbour a unique steady-state microbiota. This paradigm shift is changing the way that respiratory research is approached, with a clear need now to consider the effects of host-microorganism interactions in both healthy and diseased lungs. We propose that akin to recent discoveries in intestinal research, dysbiosis of the airway microbiota could underlie susceptibility to, and progression and chronicity of lung disease. In this Opinion article, we summarize current knowledge of the airway microbiota and outline how host-microorganism interactions in the lungs and other tissues might influence respiratory health and disease.

  11. Nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase is required for graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Valdepeñas, Carmen; Casanova, Lucía; Colmenero, Isabel; Arriero, Mar; González, África; Lozano, Nieves; González-Vicent, Marta; Díaz, Miguel A.; Madero, Luís; Fresno, Manuel; Ramírez, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Background Donor T lymphocytes are directly responsible for graft-versus-host disease. Molecules important in T-cell function may, therefore, be appropriate targets for graft-versus-host disease therapy and/or prophylaxis. Here we analyzed whether nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase might have a role in graft-versus-host disease. Design and Methods We studied the expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in human samples from patients with graft-versus-host disease. We also explored the effect of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in a murine model of graft-versus-host disease using donor cells from aly/aly mice (deficient in nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase) and C57BL/6 mice (control). Results We detected expression of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase in T-lymphocytes in the pathological lesions of patients with acute graft-versus-host disease. Mice transplanted with aly/aly T lymphocytes did not develop graft-versus-host disease at all, while mice receiving C57BL/6 cells died of a lethal form of the disease. Deficiency of nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase did not affect the engrafting ability of donor T cells, but severely impaired their expansion capacity early after transplantation, and aly/aly T cells showed a higher proportion of apoptosis than did C57BL/6 T cells. Effector T lymphocytes were the T-cell subset most affected by nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase deficiency. We also detected lower amounts of inflammatory cytokines in the serum of mice receiving aly/aly T cells than in the serum of mice receiving C57BL/6 T cells. Conclusions Our results show that nuclear factor-κ B inducing kinase has a role in graft-versus-host disease by maintaining the viability of activated alloreactive T lymphocytes. PMID:20823135

  12. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Roddy, Julianna V. F.; Haverkos, Bradley M.; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M.; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C.; Benson, Don M.; Andritsos, Leslie A.; Devine, Steven M.; Efebera, Yvonne A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3–4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13–1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation. PMID:26140610

  13. Tocilizumab for steroid refractory acute graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Julianna V F; Haverkos, Bradley M; McBride, Ali; Leininger, Kathryn M; Jaglowski, Samantha; Penza, Sam; Klisovic, Rebecca; Blum, William; Vasu, Sumithira; Hofmeister, Craig C; Benson, Don M; Andritsos, Leslie A; Devine, Steven M; Efebera, Yvonne A

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) is a frequent and often lethal complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant despite prophylaxis. Tocilizumab is a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody that has evidence of activity in patients with steroid refractory (SR) GVHD. We retrospectively report on nine patients with grade 3 or 4 SR aGVHD who received tocilizumab. Eight mg/kg of tocilizumab was administered intravenously every 3-4 weeks. aGVHD grading and responses were based on consensus criteria. Median age at transplant was 48 years. Five patients had alternate donor sources. Median time from aGVHD onset to tocilizumab administration was 44 days. Two patients had complete responses and two had partial responses. Median survival from start of tocilizumab was 26 days (range 13-1054). Our limited experience demonstrated an overall response rate of 44% (CR + PR); however, this response was not durable. Further studies are needed to determine the optimal time for tocilizumab initiation.

  14. First versus second year respiratory syncytial virus prophylaxis in chronic lung disease (2005-2015).

    PubMed

    Wang, Daniel Y; Li, Abby; Paes, Bosco; Mitchell, Ian; Lanctôt, Krista L

    2017-03-01

    Children aged <2 years with chronic lung disease (CLD) have a 10-fold higher risk for respiratory syncytial virus-positive hospitalization (RSVH) compared to healthy term infants. Based on the updated position statements, we compared respiratory-related illness hospitalization (RIH) and RSVH risks in CLD children who received palivizumab during the first year (FY) versus second year (SY) of life in the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS). Demographic data were collected at enrolment and RIH events recorded monthly from 2005 to 2015. Eight hundred forty-seven FY and 450 SY children with CLD were identified. SY children had a lower gestational age (27 versus 29 weeks) and required more days of respiratory support (64 versus 43), oxygen therapy (108 versus 55), and length of stay (118 versus 73) during the neonatal course compared to FY children; all p < 0.0005. RIH rates were 12.2 (FY) and 18.2 (SY), and RSVH rates were 2.3 (FY) and 3.9 (SY). Cox regression showed similar hazards for both RIH (hazard ratio 0.9, 95% CI 0.6-1.6, p = 0.812) and RSVH (hazard ratio 1.1, 95% CI 0.4-2.9, p = 0.920). SY and FY children had similar risks for RIH and RSVH. The findings imply that SY children with CLD are correctly selected for palivizumab based on neonatal illness severity and merit prophylaxis. What is Known: • Children with chronic lung disease have a 10-fold higher risk for RSV-positive hospitalization in comparison to healthy term infants and commonly receive palivizumab prophylaxis as a preventative measure against serious RSV-related lower respiratory tract infections. • The American Academy of Pediatrics [ 2 ] and the Canadian Paediatric Society [ 30 ] have recently modified their recommendations for RSV prophylaxis in children with chronic lung disease, limiting palivizumab to either those <32 weeks gestation or those in the first year of life who are oxygen dependent or require medical therapy for the treatment of their condition. What is New:

  15. [Spanish Society for Pediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines on tuberculosis in pregnant women and neonates (ii): Prophylaxis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Baquero-Artigao, F; Mellado Peña, M J; del Rosal Rabes, T; Noguera Julián, A; Goncé Mellgren, A; de la Calle Fernández-Miranda, M; Navarro Gómez, M L

    2015-10-01

    In pregnant women who have been exposed to tuberculosis (TB), primary isoniazid prophylaxis is only recommended in cases of immunosuppression, chronic medical conditions or obstetric risk factors, and close and sustained contact with a patient with infectious TB. Isoniazid prophylaxis for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is recommended in women who have close contact with an infectious TB patient or have risk factors for progression to active disease. Otherwise, it should be delayed until at least three weeks after delivery. Treatment of TB disease during pregnancy is the same as for the general adult population. Infants born to mothers with disseminated or extrapulmonary TB in pregnancy, with active TB at delivery, or with postnatal exposure to TB, should undergo a complete diagnostic evaluation. Primary isoniazid prophylaxis for at least 12 weeks is recommended for those with negative diagnostic tests and no evidence of disease. Repeated negative diagnostic tests are mandatory before interrupting prophylaxis. Isoniazid for 9 months is recommended in LTBI. Treatment of neonatal TB disease is similar to that of older children, but should be maintained for at least 9 months. Respiratory isolation is recommended in congenital TB, and in postnatal TB with positive gastric or bronchial aspirate acid-fast smears. Separation of mother and infant is only necessary when the mother has received treatment for less than 2 weeks, is sputum smear-positive, or has drug-resistant TB. Breastfeeding is not contraindicated, and in case of mother-infant separation expressed breast milk feeding is recommended.

  16. A validated measure of adherence to antibiotic prophylaxis in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Natalie A; Kronenberger, William G; Hampton, Kisha C; Bloom, Ellen M; Rampersad, Angeli G; Roberson, Christopher P; Shapiro, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic prophylaxis is a mainstay in sickle cell disease management. However, adherence is estimated at only 66%. This study aimed to develop and validate a Sickle Cell Antibiotic Adherence Level Evaluation (SCAALE) to promote systematic and detailed adherence evaluation. Methods A 28-item questionnaire was created, covering seven adherence areas. General Adherence Ratings from the parent and one health care provider and medication possession ratios were obtained as validation measures. Results Internal consistency was very good to excellent for the total SCAALE (α=0.89) and four of the seven subscales. Correlations between SCAALE scores and validation measures were strong for the total SCAALE and five of the seven subscales. Conclusion The SCAALE provides a detailed, quantitative, multidimensional, and global measurement of adherence and can promote clinical care and research. PMID:27354768

  17. Microbiota and autoimmune disease: the hosted self.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2011-10-20

    The trillions of microbial symbionts normally hosted by mammals have important influences on the development and function of the immune system. We highlight recently discovered cellular and molecular mechanisms by which they impact autoimmune diseases--in particular, gut-distal disorders. Besides provoking a reconsideration of the definition of immunological "self" and "nonself," these new findings evoke exciting possibilities for the discovery of a whole new class of immunomodulatory molecules.

  18. History of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Vriesendorp, Huib M; Heidt, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Nuclear warfare at the end of World War II inspired Dick W. van Bekkum to study total-body irradiation (TBI) in animal models. After high-dose TBI, mice died from "primary disease" or bone marrow (BM) aplasia. Intravenous administration of allogeneic BM cells delayed mortality but did not prevent it. Initially the delayed deaths were said to be caused by "secondary disease," which was later renamed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). GvHD is caused by donor T lymphocytes that destroy recipient cells in skin, intestinal mucosa, bile ducts, and lymph nodes. GvHD is opposed by host-versus-graft disease (HvGD), in which host T lymphocytes destroy the administered allogeneic BM cells, including the administered T lymphocytes of the BM donor. In 1960, van Bekkum became the director of the Radiobiological Institute of the Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands, where he built a multidisciplinary team that defined the variables controlling the outcome of a BM transplant. The team published their early results in the Journal of Experimental Hematology [1981;9:904-916 and 1956;4:482-488]. Later, protocols were established for BM transplantation (BMT) in patients with severe combined immunodeficiency disease, leukemia, lymphoma, and other diseases of the hematopoietic system. This review honors the scientific contributions made by Dick van Bekkum and his team in defining the four dominant variables for improving the therapeutic ratio of allogeneic BMT and in fostering the international collaboration necessary to translate this knowledge into current clinical practice. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Recommendations for the use of palivizumab as prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus in infants with congenital cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Tulloh, Robert; Marsh, Michael; Blackburn, Michael; Casey, Frank; Lenney, Warren; Weller, Peter; Keeton, Barry R

    2003-10-01

    New data are emerging on the use of palivizumab as prophylaxis against infection with the respiratory syncytial virus in infants with congenital cardiac disease. Following a 4-year multicentre randomised trial, it was shown that prophylactic injections with palivizumab were effective and safe for such children. Prophylaxis consists of 5, monthly, intramuscular injections of palivizumab, at a dose of 15 mg/kg, given during the season for infection with the respiratory syncytial virus. Timing is at the discretion of the physician, depending on the onset of the season locally. It is suggested that, in the United Kingdom, this should be commenced in mid-September. To help clinicians to identify appropriate candidates for palivizumab, a working group of the British Paediatric Cardiac Association has developed recommendations. Infants, namely those under 1 year old, with congenital cardiac disease likely to benefit from prophylaxis include those with haemodynamically significant lesions, particularly increased pulmonary blood flow with or without cyanosis; pulmonary venous congestion, pulmonary hypertension or long-term pulmonary complications, residual haemodynamic abnormalities following medical or surgical intervention (patients who have undergone cardiopulmonary bypass should receive an injection as soon as they are medically stable), cardiomyopathy requiring treatment, and congenital cardiac disease likely to need hospital admission for medical or surgical intervention during the season of infection with the virus. Prophylaxis with palivizumab may also be indicated, at the discretion of the physician, in some children with complex cardiac disease over the age of 1 year. Children less likely to benefit from prophylaxis are those with haemodynamically insignificant disease, or those with lesions adequately corrected by medical or surgical intervention.

  20. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in adults.

    PubMed

    Enzler, Mark J; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement, and bite wounds. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is recommended for various surgical procedures to prevent surgical site infections. Optimal antimicrobial agents for prophylaxis should be bactericidal, nontoxic, inexpensive, and active against the typical pathogens that can cause surgical site infection postoperatively. To maximize its effectiveness, intravenous perioperative prophylaxis should be administered within 30 to 60 minutes before the surgical incision. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be of short duration to decrease toxicity and antimicrobial resistance and to reduce cost.

  1. [Allicor efficacy in lowering the risk of ischemic heart disease in primary prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Sobenin, I A; Prianishnikov, V V; Kunnova, L M; Rabinovich, E A; Orekhov, A N

    2005-01-01

    To assess effects of allicor (a long-acting garlic drug) on the risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases. A double blind placebo-controlled study investigated for a year changes in multifactorial risks of cardiovascular events or their complications in 167 patients with hyperlipidemia free of IHD. In men, intake of allicor for 12 months resulted in a 10.7% reduction of a 10-year absolute risk to develop IHD (p < 0.05) and decreased a 10-year absolute risk of acute myocardial infarction and sudden death by 22.7% (p < 0.05). In women, allicor prevented age-related cardiovascular risk (p < 0.05). Among lipid parameters, the greatest fall was observed for total cholesterol and LDLP cholesterol (p < 0.05) in men by 27.9 and 22.5 mg/dl, in women--by 11.4 and 10.8 mg/dl, respectively. Allicor is effective in reducing multifactorial risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. [Prophylaxis and medical rehabilitation of patients presenting with soft tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, D V; Shavianidze, G O

    2010-01-01

    Soft tissue diseases are pathologic conditions underlain by degenerative, dystrophic, and inflammatory processes developing in muscles, ligaments, synovial bursae and sheaths, fascias, and aponeuroses. Their prevention and medical rehabilitation are achieved with the help of various methods targeted toward different pathogenetic mechanisms and factors facilitating recovery of the affected structures. These methods include instrumental physiotherapy, balneotherapy, peloidotherapy, therapeutic exercises, massage, and pharmacotherapy as appropriate. The rehabilitative strategy implies systematic step-by-step application of these tools in various combinations. Balneotherapy needs to be scheduled to the most favourable climatic seasons. Massage and remedial gymnastics are indispensable procedures in all rehabilitative strategies for the patients with soft tissue diseases. Mechanotherapy, traction, elements of manual therapy, and reflexotherapy should be provided if indicated. They are of special importance whenever the motor function of muscles and circumarticular soft tissues needs to be improved. Regular remedial gymnastics and swimming in a pool are highly efficacious methods of secondary prophylaxys preventing exacerbation of soft tissue diseases. It should be emphasized that early and systematic application of rehabilitative treatment by the above methods helps to restore functional capacity of the affected soft tissues and substantially improve the patients' quality of life.

  3. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    PubMed

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  4. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  5. Changes in bleeding patterns in von Willebrand disease after institution of long-term replacement therapy: results from the von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network.

    PubMed

    Holm, Elena; Abshire, Thomas C; Bowen, Joel; Álvarez, M Teresa; Bolton-Maggs, Paula; Carcao, Manuel; Federici, Augusto B; Gill, Joan Cox; Halimeh, Susan; Kempton, Christine; Key, Nigel S; Kouides, Peter; Lail, Alice; Landorph, Andrea; Leebeek, Frank; Makris, Michael; Mannucci, Pier; Mauser-Bunschoten, Eveline P; Nugent, Diane; Valentino, Leonard A; Winikoff, Rochelle; Berntorp, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Clinically, the leading symptom in von Willebrand disease (VWD) is bleeding, chiefly of mucosal type, for example, epistaxis, gingival, or gastrointestinal bleeding, and menorrhagia. In severe forms of VWD with secondary deficiency of factor VIII, spontaneous joint bleeding, resembling that observed in severe haemophilia A, may also be observed. The bleeding patterns of VWD can affect quality of life, and may be life-threatening. The von Willebrand Disease Prophylaxis Network is an international study group formed with the goal of investigating the role of prophylaxis in clinically severe VWD. The objective of the present study is to investigate the response to prophylaxis focusing primarily on epistaxis, joint bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, and heavy bleeding associated with menses. Data from 105 subjects, 10 enrolled in a prospective study and 95 in a retrospective study between 2008 and 2013, were available for analysis. The median annualized rate reductions in bleeding were significant for epistaxis (P < 0.0001), gastrointestinal bleeding (P = 0.0003), joint bleeding (P < 0.0001), and menorrhagia (P = 0.008). Doses on a group level were approximately the same prior to and during prophylaxis, but more patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had prophylaxis three or more times per week as well as higher dosages. Our study, which primarily used retrospective data, indicates that prospective studies are needed to better delineate the doses and dose intervals that should be used for prophylactic treatment of VWD.

  6. An Electronic Alert System Is Associated With a Significant Increase in Pharmacologic Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Rates Among Hospitalized Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Mathers, Bradley; Williams, Emmanuelle; Bedi, Gurneet; Messaris, Evangelos; Tinsley, Andrew

    Utilization of pharmacologic venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients seems to be suboptimal with reported rates as low as 50% in some studies. Implementation of an electronic alert system seems to be an effective tool for increasing VTE prophylaxis rates in medical inpatients. To date, no studies have assessed whether this approach is associated with improved rates of pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis specifically in IBD patients. To determine the efficacy of an electronic alert in improving VTE prophylaxis rates in hospitalized IBD patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 576 hospitalized IBD patients. The medical record of each patient was then examined to determine whether pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis was both ordered and administered, the timing of pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis, and reasons for any missed doses. The VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis rate was improved from 60% to 81.2% following the implementation of the electronic alert system (p < .001). An increase in prophylaxis rates was seen in both medical (26.3% vs. 62.8%, p < .001) and surgical services (83.7% vs. 95.5%, p < .001). In patients who received pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis, 16% of all ordered doses were not administered and 57.3% of missed doses were the result of patient refusal. Hospitalization after implementation of the electronic alert system (odds ratio [OR] 4.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.94-7.57) and admission to a surgical service (OR 14.3, 95% CI 8.62-24.39) were predictive of VTE pharmacologic prophylaxis orders. The introduction of an electronic alert system was associated with a significant increase in rates of pharmacologic VTE prophylaxis. However, orders were often delayed and doses not always administered. The most common reason that ordered doses were not given was patient refusal.

  7. Host-response therapeutics for periodontal diseases.

    PubMed

    Giannobile, William V

    2008-08-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by Gram-negative tooth-associated microbial biofilms that elicit a host response, with resultant osseous and soft tissue destruction. In response to endotoxins derived from periodontal pathogens, several osteoclast-related mediators target the destruction of alveolar bone and supporting connective tissues. Major drivers of this aggressive tissue destruction are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and other osteoclast-derived enzymes. This article focuses on the downstream factors of the osteoclast responsible for the degradation of bone and soft tissues around teeth and oral implants. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches that target MMP-2, -8, and -9 inhibition, such as MMP inhibitors, chemically modified tetracyclines, and subantimicrobial formulations of tetracycline analogues, are discussed. The use of rapid, chair-side tests of MMP activity, in particular for MMP-8 and bone collagen fragments, show strong potential as non-invasive measures of tissue health or disease. In addition, studies using other agents for the preservation of bone mass, such as bisphosphonates that inhibit osteoclast recruitment, are highlighted. The application of these bone-preservation strategies to periodontal management and treatment are discussed in the context of high-risk patients susceptible to disease reactivation or disease complications.

  8. Host-Response Therapeutics for Periodontal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Giannobile, William V.

    2008-01-01

    Periodontal diseases are initiated by Gram-negative tooth-associated microbial biofilms that elicit a host response, with resultant osseous and soft tissue destruction. In response to endotoxins derived from periodontal pathogens, several osteoclast-related mediators target the destruction of alveolar bone and supporting connective tissues. Major drivers of this aggressive tissue destruction are matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), cathepsins, and other osteoclast-derived enzymes. This article focuses on the downstream factors of the osteoclast responsible for the degradation of bone and soft tissues around teeth and oral implants. Furthermore, therapeutic approaches that target MMP-2, -8, and -9 inhibition, such as MMP inhibitors, chemically modified tetracyclines, and subantimicrobial formulations of tetracycline analogues, are discussed. The use of rapid, chair-side tests of MMP activity, in particular for MMP-8 and bone collagen fragments, show strong potential as non-invasive measures of tissue health or disease. In addition, studies using other agents for the preservation of bone mass, such as bisphosphonates that inhibit osteoclast recruitment, are highlighted. The application of these bone-preservation strategies to periodontal management and treatment are discussed in the context of high-risk patients susceptible to disease reactivation or disease complications. PMID:18673015

  9. Oral graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Imanguli, MM; Alevizos, I; Brown, R; Pavletic, SZ; Atkinson, JC

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients receiving hematopoietic cell transplant. It is estimated that 40–70% of engrafted patients surviving the initial transplant eventually develop chronic GVHD (cGVHD), which can persist for months to years and require long-term management from multiple disciplines. This review describes the oral component of this transplant complication. DESIGN: The search related to GVHD patho-biology, salivary gland disease after hematopoietic cell transplant and treatments for oral GVHD encompassed literature from 1966 through 2008. Searches were limited to the MEDLINE/PubMed database and English language literature in peer-reviewed journals. RESULTS: Our understanding of the patho-biology of oral cGVHD is based on studies of other affected tissues. It is difficult to determine the prevalence and incidence of salivary gland disease after transplant because there is no universally accepted case definition. In general, clinical trials for treatment of oral cGVHD have been too small to make strong recommendations for use in clinical practice. CONCLUSIONS: Larger well-designed clinical studies are needed to understand the patho-biology of oral cGVHD and determine best treatments for this disease. PMID:18593456

  10. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide nanomedicines for the prophylaxis or treatment of cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotide-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), which are synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), activate humoral and cellular immunity and are being developed as vaccine adjuvants to prevent or treat cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies. Free CpG ODNs have been used in many clinical trials implemented to verify their effects. However, recent research has reported that self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes demonstrate higher adjuvant effects than free CpG ODNs, owing to their improved uptake efficiency into cells expressing TLR9. Moreover, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes are able to deliver CpG ODNs and antigens (or allergens) to the same types of cells, which enables a higher degree of prophylaxis or therapeutic effect. In this review, the author describes recent trends in the research and development of CpG ODN nanomedicines containing self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide-CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial-CpG ODN complexes, focusing mainly on the results of preclinical and clinical studies.

  11. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide nanomedicines for the prophylaxis or treatment of cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies

    PubMed Central

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2017-01-01

    Unmethylated cytosine-guanine dinucleotide-containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs), which are synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), activate humoral and cellular immunity and are being developed as vaccine adjuvants to prevent or treat cancers, infectious diseases, and allergies. Free CpG ODNs have been used in many clinical trials implemented to verify their effects. However, recent research has reported that self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide–CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial–CpG ODN complexes demonstrate higher adjuvant effects than free CpG ODNs, owing to their improved uptake efficiency into cells expressing TLR9. Moreover, protein/peptide–CpG ODN conjugates and nanomaterial–CpG ODN complexes are able to deliver CpG ODNs and antigens (or allergens) to the same types of cells, which enables a higher degree of prophylaxis or therapeutic effect. In this review, the author describes recent trends in the research and development of CpG ODN nanomedicines containing self-assembled CpG ODNs, protein/peptide–CpG ODN conjugates, and nanomaterial–CpG ODN complexes, focusing mainly on the results of preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:28144136

  12. Adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for patients with rheumatic heart disease diagnosed through screening in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Engelman, Daniel; Mataika, Reapi L; Kado, Joseph H; Ah Kee, Maureen; Donath, Susan; Parks, Tom; Steer, Andrew C

    2016-12-01

    Echocardiographic screening for rheumatic heart disease (RHD) can detect subclinical cases; however, adequate adherence to secondary antibiotic prophylaxis (SAP) is required to alter disease outcomes. We aimed to investigate the adherence to SAP among young people with RHD diagnosed through echocardiographic screening in Fiji and to investigate factors associated with adherence. Patients diagnosed with RHD through echocardiographic screening in Fiji from 2006 to 2014 were included. Dates of benzathine penicillin G injections were collected from 76 health clinics nationally from December 2011 to December 2014. Adherence was measured using the proportion of days covered (PDC). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify characteristics associated with any adherence (≥1 injection received) and adequate adherence (PDC ≥0.80). Of 494 patients, 268 (54%) were female and the median age was 14 years. Overall, 203 (41%) had no injections recorded and just 33 (7%) had adequate adherence. Multivariate logistic regression showed increasing age (OR 0.93 per year, 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.37-0.79) to be inversely associated with any adherence. Non-iTaukei ethnicity (OR 2.58, 95%CI 1.04-6.33) and urban residence (OR 3.36, 95% CI 1.54-7.36) were associated with adequate adherence, whereas time since diagnosis ≥1.5 years (OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.17-0.83) was inversely associated with adequate adherence. Adherence to SAP after screening in Fiji is currently inadequate for individual patient protection or population disease control. Secondary prevention should be strengthened before further screening can be justified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Allorecognition and graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Theobald, M

    1995-04-01

    The development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is mediated by alloreactive donor T lymphocytes infused with the bone marrow (BM) inoculum. Over the past few years, knowledge about the molecular basis of antigen (Ag) recognition, tolerance induction and activation of alloreactive T lymphocytes has increased remarkably. Recent observations also challenged the traditional view of the role and significance of various alloreactive T cell subsets and their particular effector cell functions involved in the generation of GVHD. New information which emerged from these studies has a major impact in understanding the immunobiology of GVHD. It also has important practical consequences, such as the successful prediction of GVHD before allogeneic BMT by the measurement of recipient-specific alloreactivity. The current concepts of the molecular basis of allorecognition, tolerance induction and T cell activation could be important in developing strategies to avoid GVHD while preserving a graft-versus-leukemia response.

  14. Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Risk Factors and Stratification, Prophylaxis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Giralt, Sergio A

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD), also known as sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS), can develop in a subset of patients, primarily after myeloablative hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but it also may occur after reduced-intensity conditioning. Severe VOD/SOS, typically characterized by multiorgan failure, has been associated with a mortality rate greater than 80%. Therefore, an accurate and prompt diagnosis of VOD/SOS is essential for early initiation of appropriate therapy to improve clinical outcomes. Moreover, some studies have support the use of prophylaxis for patients who are at high risk of developing VOD/SOS. This review summarizes risk factors associated with development of VOD/SOS, including pretransplantation patient characteristics and factors related to stem cell transplantation, that can facilitate patient stratification according to risk. The incidence of VOD/SOS, clinical features, and diagnostic criteria are reviewed. Data on emerging treatment strategies for patients with VOD/SOS are discussed in the context of recent treatment guidelines. Additionally, options for prophylaxis in individuals who are at increased risk are presented. Although historically only those patients with moderate to severe VOD/SOS have been treated, early therapy and prophylaxis may be appropriate for many patients and may have the potential to improve patients' outcomes and survival, including for those with nonsevere disease.

  15. Pharmaceutical thrombosis prophylaxis, bleeding complications and thromboembolism in a national cohort of hysterectomy for benign disease.

    PubMed

    Brummer, T H I; Heikkinen, A; Jalkanen, J; Fraser, J; Mäkinen, J; Tomás, E; Seppälä, T; Sjöberg, J; Härkki, P

    2012-06-01

    Pharmaceutical thrombosis prophylaxis (PTP) with low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) is highly effective in preventing venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) and fatal pulmonary embolism. Important risk factors for VTEs are surgery and immobilization, along with malignancy. Many studies involving gynaecological malignancies show no increased risk for bleeding complications with PTP. Little is known about the PTP-associated risk for bleeding complications with hysterectomy for benign disease, or about current VTE incidence in the less-invasive hysterectomy methods. Our observational prospective national 1-year cohort from 1 January to 31 December 2006 in 53 hospitals represented 79.4% (5297 of 6645) of hysterectomies performed for benign cause in Finland in 2006. We evaluated PTP use and VTE incidence. Operative and post-operative bleeding complications were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for confounders: age, BMI, experience of the gynaecological surgeon, hospital type, indication for hysterectomy, uterine weight, operative haemorrhage, concomitant surgery, adhesiolysis and antibiotic prophylaxis. Hysterectomies were performed by three main approaches: 2345 vaginal hysterectomies (VHs, 44%), of which 1433 were for uterine prolapse and 912 for other indications, 1679 laparoscopic hysterectomies (LHs, 32%) and 1255 abdominal hysterectomies (AHs, 24%). PTP was given to 64.8% of patients (3420 of 5279) and was identified as LMWH in 3313 patients (97%); 107 left unidentified. By type of hysterectomy, PTP was given in VH for uterine prolapse to 73.2% of patients, VH for other indication to 51.6%, in LH to 59.4% and in AH to 71.9%. For all hysterectomies analysed together, PTP doubled the odds for post-operative haemorrhage or haematoma. By type of hysterectomy, PTP associated with post-operative haemorrhage or haematoma in VH for prolapse [2.7% of PTP given, versus 0.8% of no PTP; odds ratio (OR): 4.82, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38-16.83]; and in AH (3

  16. Ocular graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hessen, Michelle; Akpek, Esen K

    2012-10-01

    This review was carried out to study the frequency, and severity of ocular surface involvement at the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and subsequent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and evaluate the clinical outcomes of newer treatments. Ocular involvement has been reported in 60-90% of patients with chronic GVHD. Although dry eye is the most frequent finding occurring in the great majority of patients (up to 90%), posterior segment complications are also not infrequent, seen in 12.8% of patients after bone marrow transplantation. Anti-inflammatory treatments particularly T-cell suppressants seem to have a beneficial effect in managing GVHD. Corticoteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, as well as antifibrotic agents such as tranilast are available options for topical application. Cyclosporine ophthalmic drop seems to be a well tolerated and effective treatment modality; favorable results have been demonstrated with increased dosage. GVHD is an increasingly frequent cause of ocular surface morbidity with the potential of visual loss from corneal involvement. Early diagnosis and aggressive local as well as systemic treatment can be vision saving.

  17. Graft-versus-host disease management.

    PubMed

    Mistrik, M; Bojtarova, E; Sopko, L; Masakova, L; Roziakova, L; Martinka, J; Batorova, A

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major problem of allogeneic hematopoietic-stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and an obstacle for successful outcome. Clinically significant acute GVHD (grade II or higher) developed in 20 to 65 percent of the patients. Death due to this complication accounts for approximately 50 percent of the deaths that are not due to a relapse of the neoplasm. Up to 70 % of patients who survive beyond day 100 develop chronic GVHD and it is the leading cause of nonrelapse mortality more than 2 years after allogeneic HSCT. In addition, chronic GVHD is associated with decreased quality of life, impaired functional status, and ongoing need for immunosuppressive medications. The incidence of chronic GVHD is increasing because of expansion of the donor population beyond HLA-identical siblings, older recipient age, use of peripheral blood cells as the graft source, and infusion of donor lymphocytes for treatment of recurrent malignancy after HSCT. With the current rush in new findings related to GVHD, we see a significant advancement in its management. Given these various new options and challenges, it is important to identify the minimal requirements for diagnosis and treatment of GVHD, as access to the most sophisticated advances may vary depending on local circumstances (Tab. 4, Fig. 1, Ref. 51).

  18. Cytokines in Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Henden, Andrea S; Hill, Geoffrey R

    2015-05-15

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation whereby transplanted naive and marrow-derived T cells damage recipient tissue through similar mechanisms to those that allow destruction of malignant cells, the therapeutic intent of bone marrow transplantation. The manifestations and severity of GVHD are highly variable and are influenced by the proportions of naive cells maturing along regulatory T cell, Th1, Th2, or Th17 phenotypes. This maturation is largely influenced by local cytokines, which, in turn, activate transcription factors and drive development toward a dominant phenotype. In addition, proinflammatory cytokines exert direct effects on GVHD target tissues. Our knowledge of the role that cytokines play in orchestrating GVHD is expanding rapidly and parallels other infective and inflammatory conditions in which a predominant T cell signature is causative of pathology. Because a broad spectrum of cytokine therapies is now routinely used in clinical practice, they are increasingly relevant to transplant medicine. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Host response mechanisms in periodontal diseases

    PubMed Central

    SILVA, Nora; ABUSLEME, Loreto; BRAVO, Denisse; DUTZAN, Nicolás; GARCIA-SESNICH, Jocelyn; VERNAL, Rolando; HERNÁNDEZ, Marcela; GAMONAL, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal diseases usually refer to common inflammatory disorders known as gingivitis and periodontitis, which are caused by a pathogenic microbiota in the subgingival biofilm, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola that trigger innate, inflammatory, and adaptive immune responses. These processes result in the destruction of the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth, and eventually in tissue, bone and finally, tooth loss. The innate immune response constitutes a homeostatic system, which is the first line of defense, and is able to recognize invading microorganisms as non-self, triggering immune responses to eliminate them. In addition to the innate immunity, adaptive immunity cells and characteristic cytokines have been described as important players in the periodontal disease pathogenesis scenario, with a special attention to CD4+ T-cells (T-helper cells). Interestingly, the T cell-mediated adaptive immunity development is highly dependent on innate immunity-associated antigen presenting cells, which after antigen capture undergo into a maturation process and migrate towards the lymph nodes, where they produce distinct patterns of cytokines that will contribute to the subsequent polarization and activation of specific T CD4+ lymphocytes. Skeletal homeostasis depends on a dynamic balance between the activities of the bone-forming osteoblasts (OBLs) and bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCLs). This balance is tightly controlled by various regulatory systems, such as the endocrine system, and is influenced by the immune system, an osteoimmunological regulation depending on lymphocyte- and macrophage-derived cytokines. All these cytokines and inflammatory mediators are capable of acting alone or in concert, to stimulate periodontal breakdown and collagen destruction via tissue-derived matrix metalloproteinases, a characterization of the progression of periodontitis as a stage that

  20. OCTET-CY: a phase II study to investigate the efficacy of post-transplant cyclophosphamide as sole graft-versus-host prophylaxis after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Holtick, Udo; Chemnitz, Jens-Markus; Shimabukuro-Vornhagen, Alexander; Theurich, Sebastian; Chakupurakal, Geothy; Krause, Anke; Fiedler, Anne; Luznik, Leo; Hellmich, Martin; Wolf, Dominik; Hallek, Michael; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Scheid, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant cyclophosphamide is increasingly used as graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) prophylaxis in the setting of bone marrow transplantation. No data have been published on the use of single-agent GvHD prophylaxis with post-transplant cyclophosphamide in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). In a phase II trial, 11 patients with myeloma or lymphoma underwent conditioning with fludarabine and busulfan followed by T-replete PBSCT and application of 50 mg/kg/d of cyclophosphamide on day+3 and +4 without other concurrent immunosuppression (IS). Median time to leukocyte, neutrophil, and platelet engraftment was 18, 21, and 18 d. The incidence of grade II-IV and grade III-IV GvHD was 45% and 27%, with a non-relapse mortality (NRM) of 36% at one and 2 yr. After median follow-up of 927 d, overall and relapse-free survival was 64% and 34%. Three patients did not require any further systemic IS until day+100 and thereafter. Analysis of immune reconstitution demonstrated rapid T- and NK-cell recovery. B- and CD3+/CD161+NK/T-cell recovery was superior in patients not receiving additional IS. Post-transplant cyclophosphamide as sole IS in PBSCT is feasible and allows rapid immune recovery. Increased rates of severe acute GvHD explain the observed NRM and may advise a temporary combination partner such as mTor-inhibitors in the PBSCT setting. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Veno-occlusive disease prophylaxis with fresh frozen plasma and heparin in bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Batsis, Ioannis; Yannaki, Evangelia; Kaloyannidis, Panayotis; Sakellari, Ioanna; Smias, Christos; Georgoulis, Ioannis; Fassas, Athanasios; Anagnostopoulos, Achilles

    2006-01-01

    Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) contains natural anticoagulants, such as antithrombin (AT) and Protein C (Prot-C). We hypothesized that FFP given in addition to heparin, could potentially replace the consumption of endogenous anticoagulants occurring during conditioning and moreover, corrected AT levels could augment heparin's anticoagulant function. This could therefore result in an effective anti-VOD prophylaxis. In this study, we retrospectively analyzed the incidence of hepatic VOD in 403 consecutive bone marrow transplants (BMTs) comparing 2 prophylactic regimens and no prophylaxis. Patients received no prophylaxis (70/403), heparin-only (27/403) or heparin+2FFP daily during conditioning (306/403). VOD was significantly lower in the heparin+FFP group (5.9%) compared to heparin (20%) and no prophylaxis group (15.7%) [p<0.01]. Day 8 AT and Prot-C levels, were lower in the VOD- compared to the non-VOD group (AT: 69+/-26% vs. 89+/-19%, Prot-C:68+/-26% vs. 91+/-29%, respectively, p=0.001). In a multivariate logistic regression, risk factors for developing VOD were: the administration of >2 hepato-nephrotoxic drugs, previous history of hepatitis B or C and number of BMT. Multivariate analysis in a subset of 198 patients (all having recorded AT, Prot-C), demonstrated as VOD-related factors, the low day 8 Prot-C, number of BMT>1 and prior abdominal radiotherapy. Our study implies that FFP during conditioning, in addition to heparin, potentially has an anti-VOD prophylactic effect, presumably by minimizing the drop of natural anticoagulants around day 8. In order to evaluate if there truely is a beneficial effect of heparin+FFP in VOD prophylaxis, we have initiated a prospective randomized trial.

  2. Graft-versus-host disease: part I. Pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hymes, Sharon R; Alousi, Amin M; Cowen, Edward W

    2012-04-01

    Approximately 25,000 allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants are performed worldwide each year for a variety of malignant and non-malignant conditions. Graft-versus-host disease represents one of the most frequent complications and is a major source of long-term morbidity and mortality. Whereas acute graft-versus-host disease is induced by recognition of host tissues as foreign by immunocompetent donor cells, the pathogenesis of chronic graft-versus-host disease is not as well understood, and continues to be a major treatment challenge. Part I of this two-part series reviews the epidemiologic factors, classification, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. Part II discusses the topical, physical, and systemic treatment options available to patients with graft-versus-host disease. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Using host response modifiers in the treatment of periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Novak, M John; Donley, Timothy G

    2002-01-01

    Periodontal disease is the result of a complex interaction between microbial plaque, the host's inflammatory response to the plaque, and host modifying factors (e.g., smoking, diabetes, genetics) that may have an impact on the disease process. It is known that plaque initiates periodontal disease but that the host response is responsible for the destruction of periodontal tissues. This article describes why host response modifiers may be used to help control inflammation and tissue destruction as part of the initial phase of periodontal therapy in selected patient groups.

  4. [Open clinical trial with oral acyclovir for the prophylaxis of disease by Cytomegalovirus in low risk liver transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Moreno, J; Montero, J L; Gavilán, F; Costán, G; Herrero, C; Cárdenas, M; Sánchez-Guijo, P; Torre-Cisneros, J

    1999-10-01

    Checking the first 70 low risk liver transplantation performed in our hospital, who did not receive prophylaxis for Cytomegalovirus, we found that the incidence of Cytomegalovirus-infection and Cytomegalovirus-disease were 47% and 16% respectively. For this reason we started a prospective, open clinical study, to address the safety of acyclovir prophylaxis in low-risk liver transplant patients. Seventy patients did not receive acyclovir. Fifty patients received oral acyclovir during 3 months (800-3,200 mg/day). The occurrence of Cytomegalovirus infection was not modified (40%) but Cytomegalovirus disease decreased dramatically (4%, p < 0.01) during the first year after transplantation. Acyclovir was well tolerated. The incidence of leukopenia and renal failure were similar in both groups. Acyclovir did not improved the global survival of patients. Thus, oral acyclovir does not reduce Cytomegalovirus infection although it is efficient and safe in the prevention of Cytomegalovirus disease in low-risk liver transplantation, and prevents Herpes-simplex and Varicela-zoster symptomatic disease in this group of patients.

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R T

    1981-11-01

    This review examines the principles and practice of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery. Such prophylaxis is required to decrease the frequency of postoperative infection in most patients with clean-contaminated and contaminated wounds, to prevent infrequent but devastating infection of prostheses in cardiovascular and orthopedic surgery and to prevent endocarditis in noncardiac surgery in patients who have valvular heart disease. Prophylaxis should begin before operation; it is usually unnecessary afterwards. The antibiotic may be given topically or parenterally. The latter is more certain, but oral prophylaxis in bowel surgery may offer additional protection by reducing colonic flora, and topical wound and peritoneal antibiotics may be augment protective antibiotic levels at those sites. Antibiotics, such as the cephalosporin cefazolin (but not cephalothin), which penetrate blood and tissues rapidly and for prolonged periods, afford excellent prophylaxis at most sites. But for prophylaxis in colonic surgery, antibiotics directed against Bacteroides fragilis may be superior, and to prevent endocarditis in noncardiac surgery, vancomycin or a combination of penicillin and an aminoglycoside is best.

  6. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Nephropathy Associated with Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease without Extrarenal Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Ryo; Shimizu, Akira; Kitani, Takashi; Nakata, Mayumi; Ota, Noriyoshi; Kado, Hiroshi; Shiotsu, Yayoi; Ishida, Mami; Tamagaki, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    A 30-year-old woman with myelodysplastic syndrome underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) derived from her HLA-matched sister six years previously. She received preconditioning total body irradiation with renal shielding and was subsequently administered cyclosporin A (CyA) as prophylaxis against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Four months after HSCT, asymptomatic proteinuria and glomerular hematuria developed during CyA tapering without obvious extrarenal involvements of GVHD, and persisted for six years. A renal biopsy revealed endothelial injury in the glomeruli, and the deposition of C4d was detected diffusely on glomerular capillaries and focally on peritubular capillaries, suggesting that nephropathy involved antibody- or complement-associated immune reactions. PMID:27725545

  7. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of hepatic graft versus host disease (GVHD)

    PubMed Central

    Matsukuma, Karen E.; Wei, Dongguang; Sun, Kai; Ramsamooj, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a common complication following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) that typically manifests as injury to the skin, gastrointestinal mucosa, and liver. In some cases, hepatic GVHD may be histologically indistinguishable from other disorders such as infection and drug-induced liver injury (DILI). Additionally, clinical signs and symptoms are frequently confounded by the superimposed effects of pretransplant chemoradiotherapy, immunotherapy (IT) (targeted to the underlying malignancy), GVHD prophylaxis, and infection. Thus, careful attention to and correlation with clinical findings, laboratory values, and histologic features is essential for diagnosis. This review, aimed at the practicing pathologist, will discuss current clinical and histologic criteria for GVHD, the approach to diagnosis of hepatic GVHD, and features helpful for distinguishing it from other entities in the differential diagnosis. PMID:27034810

  8. Graft-versus-host disease: part II. Management of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hymes, Sharon R; Alousi, Amin M; Cowen, Edward W

    2012-04-01

    Dermatologists are ideally suited to manage the various cutaneous sequelae of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) outlined in part I of this review. However, the complexity of the patient with GVHD, including comorbidities, potential drug interactions related to polypharmacy, and the lack of evidence-based treatment guidelines, are significant challenges to optimizing patient care. In this section, we will provide an outline for the role of the dermatologist in a multispecialty approach to caring for patients with GVHD. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [The PROMET study: Prophylaxis for venous thromboembolic disease in at-risk patients hospitalized in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Guermaz, R; Belhamidi, S; Amarni, A

    2015-07-01

    PROMET is an observational study aimed to assess the management of patients at venous thromboembolism risk in the Algerian hospitals and to evaluate the proportion of at-risk patients treated with an adequate prophylaxis. Following the ENDORSE study achieved five years before with a similar protocol, PROMET included 435hospitalized patients (229 in medical units and 206 in surgical units). Compared to the ENDORSE results, the PROMET data reflect progress in the management of venous thromboembolism: 73.3% of at-risk patients received prophylaxis (57.6% of medical patients and 90.8% of surgical patients). In 93.1% of cases, this prophylaxis was provided by a low molecular weight heparin, mainly at the dose of one injection per day. In medical population, the prescription was triggered by long-term immobilization (P=0.01; OR=5.8 95%CI [1.5-23.0]), associated risk factors (P=0.025; OR=4.13 [1.2-14.2]) and the cause of hospitalization (P=0.056). In surgical departments, the therapeutic decision depended on the nature of the surgical intervention and was influenced by the presence of a contraindication for prophylaxis (P<0.001; OR=0.02 [0.00-0.14]) or a high hemorrhagic risk (P<0.001; OR=0.02). The assessment and management of thromboembolic risk were in accordance with ACCP recommendations for surgical patients. However efforts are needed for medical patients for whom the risk is underestimated and insufficiently supported. Unlike surgery where procedures are well established, there are real difficulties in medicine to define the at-risk patients who will benefit from thromboprophylaxis. The process of preventive treatment (particularly the optimal duration) needs to be clarified.

  10. Prophylaxis of chronic kidney disease after liver transplantation - experience from west China

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhen-Yong; Yan, Lu-Nan; Wang, Wen-Tao; Li, Bo; Wen, Tian-Fu; Yang, Jia-Yin; Xu, Ming-Qing; Zhao, Ji-Chun; Wei, Yong-Gang

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the prophylaxis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) after liver transplantation (LT) with low-dose calcineurin inhibitor (CNI) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF). METHODS: From March 1999 to December 2009, a total of 572 patients (478 males and 94 females) underwent LT enrolled in the study. Initial immunosuppression was by triple-drug regimens that included a CNI, MMF, and prednisone. The initial dose of CNI was 0.05-0.10 mg/kg per day for tacrolimus (TAC) and 5-10 mg/kg per d for cyclosporine A (CSA) respectively, and was gradually reduced based on a stable graft function. The serum trough level of CNI was 6-8 ng/mL for TAC and 120-150 ng/mL for CSA 3-mo post-operation, 4-6 ng/mL for TAC and 80-120 ng/mL for CSA 1-year after transplantation was expected with stable liver function. MMF was personalized between 1.0-1.5 g/d. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was estimated by an abbreviated Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Risk factors of CKD were examined by univariate and multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: With a definition of GFR < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m2, the incidence of CKD was 17.3% 5-year after LT. There were 68.3% (293 of 429 cases) patients managed to control their TAC trough concentrations within 8 ng/mL and 58.0% (83 of 143 cases) patients’ CSA trough concentrations within 150 ng/mL. Of the 450 recipients followed-up over 1 year, 55.5% (183 of 330 cases) of which were treated with TAC had a trough concentration ≤ 6 ng/mL while 65.8% (79 of 120 cases) of which were treated with CSA had a concentration ≤ 120 ng/mL. The incidence of CKD in the groups of lower CNI trough concentrations was significantly lower than the groups with CNI concentrations above the ideal range. Patients with CKD had much higher CNI trough concentrations than that of patients without CKD. MMF was adopted in 359 patients (62.8%). Patients administrated with MMF had a relatively low CNI trough concentrations but with no significant difference. The

  11. Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of invasive fungal infections in adult patients. Prophylaxis, empirical, preemptive or targeted therapy, which is the best in the different hosts?

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel; Viudes, Ángel; Solé, Amparo; Jarque, Isidro; Monte, Emilio; Romá, Eva; Cantón, Emilia

    2008-01-01

    The high morbidity, mortality, and health care costs associated with invasive fungal infections, especially in the critical care setting and immunocompromised host, have made it an excellent target for prophylactic, empiric, and preemptive therapy interventions principally based on early identification of risk factors. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In the last years there have been important developments in antifungal pharmacotherapy. An approach to the new diagnosis tools in the clinical mycology laboratory and an analysis of the use new antifungal agents and its application in different clinical situations has been made. Furthermore, an attempt of developing a state of the art in each clinical scenario (critically ill, hematological, and solid organ transplant patients) has been performed, trying to choose the best strategy for each clinical situation (prophylaxis, pre-emptive, empirical, or targeted therapy). The high mortality rates in these settings make mandatory the application of early de-escalation therapy in critically ill patients with fungal infection. In addition, the possibility of antifungal combination therapy might be considered in solid organ transplant and hematological patients. PMID:19337433

  12. Host Microbiota Contributes to Health and Response to Disease.

    PubMed

    Aurora, Rajeev; Sanford, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that normal microbiota interacts with the host through four mechanisms: the normal microbiome acts as a barrier against pathogens; second, as modulators of the permeability of host mucosa; third, as modulators of energy extraction from, and metabolic utilization of ingested food; and lastly, as modulators of the immune system. An alteration of the normal microbiota increases predisposition of the host to diseases through these four mechanisms.

  13. Biodiversity decreases disease through predictable changes in host community competence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pieter T J; Preston, Daniel L; Hoverman, Jason T; Richgels, Katherine L D

    2013-02-14

    Accelerating rates of species extinctions and disease emergence underscore the importance of understanding how changes in biodiversity affect disease outcomes. Over the past decade, a growing number of studies have reported negative correlations between host biodiversity and disease risk, prompting suggestions that biodiversity conservation could promote human and wildlife health. Yet the generality of the diversity-disease linkage remains conjectural, in part because empirical evidence of a relationship between host competence (the ability to maintain and transmit infections) and the order in which communities assemble has proven elusive. Here we integrate high-resolution field data with multi-scale experiments to show that host diversity inhibits transmission of the virulent pathogen Ribeiroia ondatrae and reduces amphibian disease as a result of consistent linkages among species richness, host composition and community competence. Surveys of 345 wetlands indicated that community composition changed nonrandomly with species richness, such that highly competent hosts dominated in species-poor assemblages whereas more resistant species became progressively more common in diverse assemblages. As a result, amphibian species richness strongly moderated pathogen transmission and disease pathology among 24,215 examined hosts, with a 78.4% decline in realized transmission in richer assemblages. Laboratory and mesocosm manipulations revealed an approximately 50% decrease in pathogen transmission and host pathology across a realistic diversity gradient while controlling for host density, helping to establish mechanisms underlying the diversity-disease relationship and their consequences for host fitness. By revealing a consistent link between species richness and community competence, these findings highlight the influence of biodiversity on infection risk and emphasize the benefit of a community-based approach to understanding infectious diseases.

  14. Appropriateness of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Neonatal Group B Streptococcus Disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Aida; Larosa, Elisabetta; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the adherence to CDC guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) and to identify possible factors influencing noncompliance with guidelines. We conducted a retrospective study in Italy. Our cohort included women in whom antenatal Group B Streptococcus (GBS) screening was not performed, was performed, but results were not available at the time of labor or delivery and women who were positive for GBS colonization. The indications for complete execution of IAP according to revised CDC guidelines was evaluated. It was considered adequate when performed with a recommended antibiotic at least four hours prior to delivery. The cohort included 902 women. Among those who had performed rectal and vaginal swabs (or recto-vaginal swabs), results were available in 86.9% of vaginal swabs and in 87.1% of rectal swabs and GBS was detected in 59.8% of vaginal swabs and in 71% of rectal swabs. 49.2% women had indication for GBS prophylaxis. Among these, 91.1% received an antibiotic during labor. Totally appropriate IAP was performed in 36.3% deliveries, an inappropriate antibiotic was administered in 10.4% women, the remaining 45.3% women received partially appropriate IAP; of these, 15.5% had received antibiotics through an inappropriate route of administration, 18.2% an inappropriate dosage regimen. Overall, 27.5% women received intrapartum ampicillin with inappropriate timing. Multivariate analysis showed that totally appropriate prophylaxis was significantly more likely in women who had no previous live birth, who had vaginal delivery, and a positive result at antenatal GBS screening. Despite satisfactory GBS screening implementation, there is still a substantial gap between optimal and actual IAP. We hypothesize that the complexity of the CDC guidelines may partially explain this shortcoming. Future efforts will include initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to evidence-based prevention practices.

  15. Early Gut Microbiota Perturbations Following Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Group B Streptococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ross, R. Paul; Biavati, Bruno; Corvaglia, Luigi T.; Faldella, Giacomo; Stanton, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The faecal microbiota composition of infants born to mothers receiving intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis with ampicillin against group B Streptococcus was compared with that of control infants, at day 7 and 30 of life. Recruited newborns were both exclusive breastfed and mixed fed, in order to also study the effect of dietary factors on the microbiota composition. Massive parallel sequencing of the V3-V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene and qPCR analysis were performed. Antibiotic prophylaxis caused the most marked changes on the microbiota in breastfed infants, mainly resulting in a higher relative abundance of Enterobacteriaceae, compared with control infants (52% vs. 14%, p = 0.044) and mixed-fed infants (52% vs. 16%, p = 0.13 NS) at day 7 and in a lower bacterial diversity compared to mixed-fed infants and controls. Bifidobacteria were also particularly vulnerable and abundances were reduced in breastfed (p = 0.001) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated groups compared to non-treated groups. Reductions in bifidobacteria in antibiotic treated infants were also confirmed by qPCR. By day 30, the bifidobacterial population recovered and abundances significantly increased in both breastfed (p = 0.025) and mixed-fed (p = 0.013) antibiotic treated groups, whereas Enterobacteriaceae abundances remained highest in the breastfed antibiotic treated group (44%), compared with control infants (16%) and mixed-fed antibiotic treated group (28%). This study has therefore demonstrated the short term consequences of maternal intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis on the infant faecal microbial population, particularly in that of breastfed infants. PMID:27332552

  16. Appropriateness of Intrapartum Antibiotic Prophylaxis to Prevent Neonatal Group B Streptococcus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Aida; Larosa, Elisabetta; Pileggi, Claudia; Pavia, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the adherence to CDC guidelines for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) and to identify possible factors influencing noncompliance with guidelines. We conducted a retrospective study in Italy. Our cohort included women in whom antenatal Group B Streptococcus (GBS) screening was not performed, was performed, but results were not available at the time of labor or delivery and women who were positive for GBS colonization. The indications for complete execution of IAP according to revised CDC guidelines was evaluated. It was considered adequate when performed with a recommended antibiotic at least four hours prior to delivery. The cohort included 902 women. Among those who had performed rectal and vaginal swabs (or recto-vaginal swabs), results were available in 86.9% of vaginal swabs and in 87.1% of rectal swabs and GBS was detected in 59.8% of vaginal swabs and in 71% of rectal swabs. 49.2% women had indication for GBS prophylaxis. Among these, 91.1% received an antibiotic during labor. Totally appropriate IAP was performed in 36.3% deliveries, an inappropriate antibiotic was administered in 10.4% women, the remaining 45.3% women received partially appropriate IAP; of these, 15.5% had received antibiotics through an inappropriate route of administration, 18.2% an inappropriate dosage regimen. Overall, 27.5% women received intrapartum ampicillin with inappropriate timing. Multivariate analysis showed that totally appropriate prophylaxis was significantly more likely in women who had no previous live birth, who had vaginal delivery, and a positive result at antenatal GBS screening. Despite satisfactory GBS screening implementation, there is still a substantial gap between optimal and actual IAP. We hypothesize that the complexity of the CDC guidelines may partially explain this shortcoming. Future efforts will include initiatives focused at enabling and reinforcing adherence to evidence-based prevention practices. PMID

  17. Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Bacterial Homeostasis and Pathogenesis of Disease.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, Derek R; Harrison, Alistair; Mason, Kevin M

    2014-12-01

    Innate immune responses function as a first line of host defense against the development of bacterial infection, and in some cases to preserve the sterility of privileged sites in the human host. Bacteria that enter these sites must counter host responses for colonization. From the host's perspective, the innate immune system works expeditiously to minimize the bacterial threat before colonization and subsequent dysbiosis. The multifactorial nature of disease further challenges predictions of how each independent variable influences bacterial pathogenesis. From bacterial colonization to infection and through disease, the microenvironments of the host are in constant flux as bacterial and host factors contribute to changes at the host-pathogen interface, with the host attempting to eradicate bacteria and the bacteria fighting to maintain residency. A key component of this innate host response towards bacterial infection is the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). As an early component of the host response, AMPs modulate bacterial load and prevent establishment of infection. Under quiescent conditions, some AMPs are constitutively expressed by the epithelium. Bacterial infection can subsequently induce production of other AMPs in an effort to maintain sterility, or to restrict colonization. As demonstrated in various studies, the absence of a single AMP can influence pathogenesis, highlighting the importance of AMP concentration in maintaining homeostasis. Yet, AMPs can increase bacterial virulence through the co-opting of the peptides or alteration of bacterial virulence gene expression. Further, bacterial factors used to subvert AMPs can modify host microenvironments and alter colonization of the residential flora that principally maintain homeostasis. Thus, the dynamic interplay between host defense peptides and bacterial factors produced to quell peptide activity play a critical role in the progression and outcome of disease.

  18. Bacterial endocarditis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Carrión, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial endocarditis (BE) is a disease resulting from the association of morphological alterations of the heart and bacteraemia originating from different sources that at times can be indiscernible (infectious endocarditis). It is classified on the basis of the morphological alteration involved, depending on the clinical manifestations and course of illness, which varies according to the causative microorganism and host conditions (for example, it is characteristic in I.V. drug users). The most common microorganisms involved are: Streptococcus viridans (55%), Staphylococcus aureus (30%), Enterococcus (6%) and HACEK bacteria (corresponding to the initials: Haemophilus, Actinobacillus, Cardiobacterium, Eikenella and Kingella), although on occasions it can also be caused by fungi. The oral microbiological flora plays a very important role in the aetiopathogenesis of BE, given that the condition may be of oral or dental origin. This paper will deal with the prevention of said bacteraemia. Prophylaxis will be undertaken using amoxicillin or clindamycin according to action protocols, with special emphasis placed on oral hygiene in patients with structural defects of the heart.

  19. Ibrutinib Effective against Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    Cancer.gov

    A Cancer Currents blog post on results from a small clinical trial showing that ibrutinib can effectively treat graft-versus-host-disease, a common and serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplants.

  20. Palivizumab prophylaxis of respiratory syncytial virus disease in 2000-2001: results from The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry.

    PubMed

    Parnes, Curt; Guillermin, Judith; Habersang, Rolf; Nicholes, Peggy; Chawla, Vijay; Kelly, Tammy; Fishbein, Judith; McRae, Patty; Goessler, Mary; Gatti, Antoinette; Calcagno, John A; Eki, Cheryl; Harris, Kristen A; Joyave, Joseph; McFarland, Kathy; Protter, Paul; Sullivan, Mary; Stanford, Allan; Lovett, Nancy; Ortiz, Marisol; Rojas, Sharon; Cyrus, Scott; Cyrus, Janell; Cohen, Stuart; Buchin, Debbie; Riordan, Linda; Zuniga, Monica; Shah, Rupa; Minard, Carmen; Quintin, Arden; Douglas, Glenda; van Houten, John; Freutner, Sharyn; Chartrand, Stephen; Nowatzke, Patsy; Romero, Jose; Rhodes, Torunn; Benoit, Michelle; Walter, Emmanuel; Walker, Leslie; DeBonnett, Laurie; Cross, Mia; Free, Teresa; Martin, Sharman; Shank, Karen; Guedes, Ben; Atkinson, Lee Ann; Halpin, George J; Rouse, Kathy; Hand, Ivan; Geiss, Donna; Marshall, James R; Burleson, Lois; Boland, Jim; Seybold, Kelsey; Hunter, Vicki; Unfer, Susan; Schmucker, Jackie; Gley, Margaret; Marcus, Michael; Thompson, Patricia; Milla, Paulino; Young, Connie; Zanni, Robert; Zinno, Virginia; Fetter-Zarzeka, Alexandra; Busey, Amanda; Sokunbi, Modupe A; Airington, Sherrie; Richard, Nancy; Muraligopal, Vellore; Lewis, Stephanie; Weber, F Thomas; Giordano, Beverly P; Linehan, Denise; Roach, Jane; Davis, Randle; Rzepka, Andrew A; Booth, Teri; Smeltzer, David; Walsh, Jeanne; Arispe, Emilio; Rowley, Rhonda; Bolling, Christopher; Botts, Tanya; Haskett, Kateri; Raby, Deana; Batiz, Evelyn; Gelfand, Andrew; Farrell, Lynn; Butler, Stephen; Colby, Linda; Schochet, Peter; Bentler, Julie; Hirsch, David; Wilkinson, Lisa; Aaronson, Allen; Bennett, Eleanora; Wingate, Julie; Quinn, Dawn; Komendowski, Katherine; Deckard, Marcia; Frogel, Michael; Nerwen, Cliff; Copenhaver, Steven; Prater, Michele; Wolsztein, Jacob; Mackey, Kristine; Benbow, Marshall; Naranjo, Marisela; Hensley, Sandra; Hayes, Cindy; Sadeghi, Hossein; Lawson, Sally May; McCall, Mark; Combs, Karla; Ledbetter, Joel; Sarnosky, Karen; Swafford, Cathy; Speer, Michael; Barton, Wendy J; Mink, J W; Lemm, Dianne; Hudak, Mark; Case, Elizabeth; Rowen, Judith; Fuentes, Sandra; Pane, Carly; Richardson, Leslie; Chavarria, Cesar; Cassino, Deanne; Ghaffari, Kourosh; Carroll, Carol; Lee, Haesoon; Guclu, Lydia; Johnson, Christopher; Blum, Valerie; Boron, Marnie L; Sorrentino, Mark; Hirsch, Robert L; Van Veldhuisen, Paul C; Smith, Carol

    2003-06-01

    The objective of the Registry was to characterize the population of infants receiving prophylaxis for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease by describing the patterns and scope of usage of palivizumab in a cross section of US infants. RSV hospitalization outcomes were also described. The Palivizumab (Synagis, MedImmune, Inc., 25 West Watkins Mill Road, Gaithersburg, MD 20878) Outcomes Registry was a prospective multicenter survey conducted at 63 sites. Demographics, injection history, and RSV hospitalization outcomes were collected on 2,116 infants receiving palivizumab. Infants were enrolled in the Registry between September 1, 2000-March 1, 2001, at the time of their first injection. Infants born at less than 32 weeks of gestation accounted for 47% of infants enrolled, and those between 32-35 weeks accounted for 45%; approximately 8% were greater than 35 weeks of gestation. Lower RSV hospitalization rates were observed in infants who had greater adherence to regularly scheduled injections. Nearly one-half of all hospitalizations occurred within the first and second injection intervals, suggesting the importance of early RSV protection. The confirmed RSV hospitalization rate of all infants in the Registry was 2.9%; the rate was 5.8% in infants with chronic lung disease of infancy, and 2.1% in premature infants without chronic lung disease. In conclusion, these data support the continued effectiveness of palivizumab prophylaxis for severe RSV lower respiratory tract disease in a large cohort of high-risk infants from geographically diverse pediatric offices and clinics. The Palivizumab Outcomes Registry provides an opportunity to assess palivizumab utilization and clinical effectiveness in the US.

  1. Cutaneous manifestations of chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hymes, Sharon R; Turner, Maria L; Champlin, Richard E; Couriel, Daniel R

    2006-11-01

    Cutaneous chronic graft versus host disease has traditionally been classified into lichenoid and scleroderma-like forms. However, the initial presentation is sometimes subtle and a variety of less common cutaneous manifestation may be prevalent. This clinical review focuses on the lesional morphology of chronic graft versus host disease, and presents a classification system that may prove useful in early diagnosis. In addition, this approach may help to facilitate the correlation of different morphologic entities with outcome and response to therapy.

  2. The intestinal microbiota in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant and graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Staffas, Anna; Burgos da Silva, Marina; van den Brink, Marcel R M

    2017-02-23

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a critical treatment of patients with high-risk hematopoietic malignancies, hematological deficiencies, and other immune diseases. In allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT), donor-derived T cells recognize host tissues as foreign, causing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) which is a main contributor to morbidity and mortality. The intestine is one of the organs most severely affected by GVHD and research has recently highlighted the importance of bacteria, particularly the gut microbiota, in HCT outcome and in GVHD development. Loss of intestinal bacterial diversity is common during the course of HCT and is associated with GVHD development and treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Loss of intestinal diversity and outgrowth of opportunistic pathogens belonging to the phylum Proteobacteria and Enterococcus genus have also been linked to increased treatment-related mortality including GVHD, infections, and organ failure after allo-HCT. Experimental studies in allo-HCT animal models have shown some promising results for prebiotic and probiotic strategies as prophylaxis or treatment of GVHD. Continuous research will be important to define the relation of cause and effect for these associations between microbiota features and HCT outcomes. Importantly, studies focused on geographic and cultural differences in intestinal microbiota are necessary to define applicability of new strategies targeting the intestinal microbiota.

  3. Oral disease profiles in chronic graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Fassil, H; Mays, J W; Edwards, D; Baird, K; Steinberg, S M; Cowen, E W; Naik, H; Datiles, M; Stratton, P; Gress, R E; Pavletic, S Z

    2015-04-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ≤ 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ≤ 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer's tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral c

  4. Oral Disease Profiles in Chronic Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fassil, H.; Mays, J.W.; Edwards, D.; Baird, K.; Steinberg, S.M.; Cowen, E.W.; Naik, H.; Datiles, M.; Stratton, P.; Gress, R.E.; Pavletic, S.Z.

    2015-01-01

    At least half of patients with chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD), the leading cause of morbidity and non-relapse mortality after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, have oral manifestations: mucosal lesions, salivary dysfunction, and limited mouth-opening. cGVHD may manifest in a single organ or affect multiple organ systems, including the mouth, eyes, and the skin. The interrelationship of the 3 oral manifestations of cGVHD with each other and with the specific manifestations of extraoral cGVHD has not been studied. In this analysis, we explored, in a large group of patients with cGVHD, the potential associations between: (1) oral mucosal disease and erythematous skin disease, (2) salivary gland dysfunction and lacrimal gland dysfunction, and (3) limited mouth-opening and sclerotic skin cGVHD. Study participants, enrolled in a cGVHD Natural History Protocol (NCT00331968, n = 212), underwent an oral examination evaluating: (1) mucosal cGVHD [NIH Oral Mucosal Score (OMS)], (2) salivary dysfunction (saliva flow and xerostomia), and (3) maximum mouth-opening measurement. Parameters for dysfunction (OMS > 2, saliva flow ≤ 1 mL/5 min, mouth-opening ≤ 35 mm) were analyzed for association with skin cGVHD involvement (erythema and sclerosis, skin symptoms), lacrimal dysfunction (Schirmer’s tear test, xerophthalmia), Lee cGVHD Symptom Scores, and NIH organ scores. Oral mucosal disease (31% prevalence) was associated with skin erythema (P < 0.001); salivary dysfunction (11% prevalence) was associated with lacrimal dysfunction (P = 0.010) and xerostomia with xerophthalmia (r = 0.32, P = 0.001); and limited mouth-opening (17% prevalence) was associated with skin sclerosis (P = 0.008) and skin symptoms (P = 0.001). There was no association found among these 3 oral cGVHD manifestations. This analysis supports the understanding of oral cGVHD as 3 distinct diseases: mucosal lesions, salivary gland dysfunction, and mouth sclerosis. Clear classification of oral c

  5. Host genetics and population structure effects on parasitic disease.

    PubMed

    Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Criscione, Charles D; VandeBerg, John L; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Williams, Kimberly D; Subedi, Janardan; Kent, Jack W; Williams, Jeff; Kumar, Satish; Blangero, John

    2012-03-19

    Host genetic factors exert significant influences on differential susceptibility to many infectious diseases. In addition, population structure of both host and parasite may influence disease distribution patterns. In this study, we assess the effects of population structure on infectious disease in two populations in which host genetic factors influencing susceptibility to parasitic disease have been extensively studied. The first population is the Jirel population of eastern Nepal that has been the subject of research on the determinants of differential susceptibility to soil-transmitted helminth infections. The second group is a Brazilian population residing in an area endemic for Trypanosoma cruzi infection that has been assessed for genetic influences on differential disease progression in Chagas disease. For measures of Ascaris worm burden, within-population host genetic effects are generally more important than host population structure factors in determining patterns of infectious disease. No significant influences of population structure on measures associated with progression of cardiac disease in individuals who were seropositive for T. cruzi infection were found.

  6. Disease dynamics in a coupled cholera model linking within-host and between-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueying; Wang, Jin

    2016-09-19

    A new modelling framework is proposed to study the within-host and between-host dynamics of cholera, a severe intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. The within-host dynamics are characterized by the growth of highly infectious vibrios inside the human body. These vibrios shed from humans contribute to the environmental bacterial growth and the transmission of the disease among humans, providing a link from the within-host dynamics at the individual level to the between-host dynamics at the population and environmental level. A fast-slow analysis is conducted based on the two different time scales in our model. In particular, a bifurcation study is performed, and sufficient and necessary conditions are derived that lead to a backward bifurcation in cholera epidemics. Our result regarding the backward bifurcation highlights the challenges in the prevention and control of cholera.

  7. Host Antimicrobial Peptides in Bacterial Homeostasis and Pathogenesis of Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heimlich, Derek R.; Harrison, Alistair; Mason, Kevin M.

    2014-01-01

    Innate immune responses function as a first line of host defense against the development of bacterial infection, and in some cases to preserve the sterility of privileged sites in the human host. Bacteria that enter these sites must counter host responses for colonization. From the host’s perspective, the innate immune system works expeditiously to minimize the bacterial threat before colonization and subsequent dysbiosis. The multifactorial nature of disease further challenges predictions of how each independent variable influences bacterial pathogenesis. From bacterial colonization to infection and through disease, the microenvironments of the host are in constant flux as bacterial and host factors contribute to changes at the host-pathogen interface, with the host attempting to eradicate bacteria and the bacteria fighting to maintain residency. A key component of this innate host response towards bacterial infection is the production of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). As an early component of the host response, AMPs modulate bacterial load and prevent establishment of infection. Under quiescent conditions, some AMPs are constitutively expressed by the epithelium. Bacterial infection can subsequently induce production of other AMPs in an effort to maintain sterility, or to restrict colonization. As demonstrated in various studies, the absence of a single AMP can influence pathogenesis, highlighting the importance of AMP concentration in maintaining homeostasis. Yet, AMPs can increase bacterial virulence through the co-opting of the peptides or alteration of bacterial virulence gene expression. Further, bacterial factors used to subvert AMPs can modify host microenvironments and alter colonization of the residential flora that principally maintain homeostasis. Thus, the dynamic interplay between host defense peptides and bacterial factors produced to quell peptide activity play a critical role in the progression and outcome of disease. PMID:26029470

  8. Viral Perturbations of Host Networks Reflect Disease Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Dricot, Amélie; Padi, Megha; Byrdsong, Danielle; Franchi, Rachel; Lee, Deok-Sun; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Mar, Jessica C.; Calderwood, Michael A.; Baldwin, Amy; Zhao, Bo; Santhanam, Balaji; Braun, Pascal; Simonis, Nicolas; Huh, Kyung-Won; Hellner, Karin; Grace, Miranda; Chen, Alyce; Rubio, Renee; Marto, Jarrod A.; Christakis, Nicholas A.; Kieff, Elliott; Roth, Frederick P.; Roecklein-Canfield, Jennifer; DeCaprio, James A.; Cusick, Michael E.; Quackenbush, John; Hill, David E.; Münger, Karl; Vidal, Marc; Barabási, Albert-László

    2012-01-01

    Many human diseases, arising from mutations of disease susceptibility genes (genetic diseases), are also associated with viral infections (virally implicated diseases), either in a directly causal manner or by indirect associations. Here we examine whether viral perturbations of host interactome may underlie such virally implicated disease relationships. Using as models two different human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV), we find that host targets of viral proteins reside in network proximity to products of disease susceptibility genes. Expression changes in virally implicated disease tissues and comorbidity patterns cluster significantly in the network vicinity of viral targets. The topological proximity found between cellular targets of viral proteins and disease genes was exploited to uncover a novel pathway linking HPV to Fanconi anemia. PMID:22761553

  9. Low-dose acyclovir prophylaxis for the prevention of herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus diseases after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Koji; Hayakawa, Jin; Akahoshi, Yu; Harada, Naonori; Nakano, Hirofumi; Kameda, Kazuaki; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Sakamoto, Kana; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Nakasone, Hideki; Yamazaki, Rie; Kanda, Junya; Kako, Shinichi; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2015-08-01

    Limited data are available on prophylaxis for herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV) disease following autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (auto-HCT). We retrospectively reviewed the clinical charts of 105 consecutive patients who underwent their first auto-HCT at our institution between September 2007 and June 2014. Before August 2009, 30 patients received oral acyclovir at 1000 mg/day until engraftment, whereas after September 2009, 69 patients received oral acyclovir at 200 mg/day. After engraftment, acyclovir was continued at 200 mg/day at the discretion of the attending physicians in both groups. The cumulative incidence of HSV disease at 1 year after auto-HCT was 7.7 and 4.5 % in patients who received oral acyclovir at 1000 and 200 mg/day, respectively (P = 0.75). Patients were next divided into three groups according to the timing at which acyclovir prophylaxis was stopped after auto-HCT; at engraftment, between engraftment and 1 year after auto-HCT, and later than 1 year. The cumulative incidence of VZV disease was 25.8, 7.7, and 0.0 % at 1 year, respectively. This study suggests that low-dose acyclovir prophylaxis may be effective for preventing HSV and VZV disease after auto-HCT. Our findings support the recommendation of acyclovir prophylaxis within the first year after auto-HCT.

  10. Failure of oral penicillin as secondary prophylaxis for rheumatic heart disease: a lesson from a low-prevalence rheumatic fever region.

    PubMed

    McGlacken-Byrne, S M; Parry, H M; Currie, P F; Wilson, N J

    2015-11-03

    Our patient is an 18-year-old Caucasian woman from the UK who developed severe mitral stenosis on a history of childhood acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD). She had been reporting of her oral penicillin secondary prophylaxis regimen since diagnosis. At the age of 15 years, a new murmur was discovered during routine cardiac follow-up. An echocardiogram confirmed moderate-severe mitral stenosis. One year later, her exercise tolerance significantly deteriorated and she subsequently underwent balloon valvuloplasty of her mitral valve to good effect. Our case emphasises the evidence base supporting the use of monthly intramuscular penicillin injection to prevent ARF recurrence and RHD progression; it also emphasises the reduced efficacy of oral penicillin prophylaxis in this context. It particularly resonates with regions of low rheumatic fever endemicity. The long-term cardiac sequelae of ARF can be devastating; prescribing the most effective secondary prophylaxis regimen is essential.

  11. Low-dose warfarin coupled with lower leg compression is effective prophylaxis against thromboembolic disease after hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Bern, Murray; Deshmukh, Rahul V; Nelson, Russell; Bierbaum, Benjamin; Sevier, Nancy; Howie, Noreen; Losina, Elena; Katz, Jeffrey N

    2007-08-01

    Consecutive patients having elective total hip arthroplasty were prescribed 1 mg of warfarin for 7 days preceding surgery, variable doses while in hospital (target international normalized ratio, 1.5-2.0), and discharged to rehabilitation center or home taking 1 mg daily until 4-week to 6-week follow-up visit. Lower leg pneumatic compression was used postoperatively and elastic compression stockings after discharge. Hospital and clinic charts plus auxiliary sources were reviewed for evidence of thromboembolic diseases (TED). Of 1003 consecutive patients studied, 3 (0.3%, 95% CI 0.0-0.6%) had symptomatic TED, including 2 with deep venous thrombosis and 1 with nonfatal pulmonary embolus. Follow-up rate was 99.1%. Complications from warfarin were minimal. Very-low-dose warfarin coupled with lower leg compression is effective prophylaxis against TED after elective hip arthroplasty when prescribed as described.

  12. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4)

    PubMed Central

    Boğa, Can; Bolaman, Zahit; Çağırgan, Seçkin; Karadoğan, İhsan; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Özkalemkaş, Fahir; Saba, Rabin; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şenol, Esin; Akan, Hamdi; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease. PMID:26316478

  13. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4).

    PubMed

    Boğa, Can; Bolaman, Zahit; Çağırgan, Seçkin; Karadoğan, İhsan; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Özkalemkaş, Fahir; Saba, Rabin; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şenol, Esin; Akan, Hamdi; Akova, Murat

    2015-06-01

    This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease.

  14. Clinicopathologic Threshold of Acute Colorectal Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Adam J; Arai, Sally; Higgins, John P; Kambham, Neeraja

    2016-06-01

    -Colon biopsies are often used to determine the presence and severity of acute gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease following bone marrow transplant. -To establish a threshold consensus within our institution on the number of crypt apoptotic bodies (CAB) indicative of grade 1 acute colorectal graft-versus-host disease, we retrospectively reviewed colon biopsies from posttransplant patients and incorporated clinical and endoscopic findings to validate recently proposed minimum criteria for grade 1 graft-versus-host disease as 7 or more CAB per 10 contiguous crypts. -Eighty-one biopsies performed for suspected graft-versus-host disease from 74 individual patients were initially stratified based on their prior (prestudy) diagnoses: no significant abnormality, grade 1 graft-versus-host disease, and descriptive diagnoses mentioning increased apoptosis. A chart review was performed to assess the clinical and endoscopic impression at the time of biopsy and to determine the subsequent management and outcome. -Twenty-six biopsies with an average of 3 CAB were considered true-negative cases, and 32 biopsies with an average of 9.75 CAB were considered true-positive cases (t = 3.95999, P < .001). True-negative cases had an average density of 1.36 CAB per crypt, and true-positive cases had an average density of 2.97 CAB per crypt (t = 3.950178, P < .001). -A threshold of 7 or more CAB per 10 contiguous crypts promotes appropriate treatment of grade 1 acute graft-versus-host disease after other diagnostic entities are excluded. Although this threshold is 100% specific to grade 1 acute colorectal graft-versus-host disease after other histologic mimics are excluded, this threshold has a low sensitivity (59.4%) as patients with less than 7 CAB per 10 contiguous crypts constitute a heterogeneous group.

  15. Conspicuous impacts of inconspicuous hosts on the Lyme disease epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Dustin; Dykhuizen, Daniel E; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2007-01-01

    Emerging zoonotic pathogens are a constant threat to human health throughout the world. Control strategies to protect public health regularly fail, due in part to the tendency to focus on a single host species assumed to be the primary reservoir for a pathogen. Here, we present evidence that a diverse set of species can play an important role in determining disease risk to humans using Lyme disease as a model. Host-targeted public health strategies to control the Lyme disease epidemic in North America have focused on interrupting Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto (ss) transmission between blacklegged ticks and the putative dominant reservoir species, white-footed mice. However, B. burgdorferi ss infects more than a dozen vertebrate species, any of which could transmit the pathogen to feeding ticks and increase the density of infected ticks and Lyme disease risk. Using genetic and ecological data, we demonstrate that mice are neither the primary host for ticks nor the primary reservoir for B. burgdorferi ss, feeding 10% of all ticks and 25% of B. burgdorferi-infected ticks. Inconspicuous shrews feed 35% of all ticks and 55% of infected ticks. Because several important host species influence Lyme disease risk, interventions directed at a multiple host species will be required to control this epidemic. PMID:18029304

  16. Duelling timescales of host mixing and disease spread determine invasion of disease in structured populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, P.C.; Lloyd-Smith, J. O.; Johnson, P.L.F.; Getz, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The epidemic potential of a disease is traditionally assessed using the basic reproductive number, R0. However, in populations with social or spatial structure a chronic disease is more likely to invade than an acute disease with the same R0, because it persists longer within each group and allows for more host movement between groups. Acute diseases ‘perceive’ a more structured host population, and it is more important to consider host population structure in analyses of these diseases. The probability of a pandemic does not arise independently from characteristics of either the host or disease, but rather from the interaction of host movement and disease recovery timescales. The R* statistic, a group-level equivalent of R0, is a better indicator of disease invasion in structured populations than the individual-level R0.

  17. Possible Implication of Bacterial Infection in Acute Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fuji, Shigeo; Kapp, Markus; Einsele, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the pathogenesis of acute GVHD, it has been established that donor-derived T-cells activated in the recipient play a major role in GVHD in initiation and maintenance within an inflammatory cascade. To reduce the risk of GVHD, intensification of GVHD prophylaxis like T-cell depletion is effective, but it inevitably increases the risk of infectious diseases and abrogates beneficial graft-versus-leukemia effects. Although various cytokines are considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of GVHD, GVHD initiation is such a complex process that cannot be prevented by means of single inflammatory cytokine inhibition. Thus, efficient methods to control the whole inflammatory milieu both on cellular and humoral view are needed. In this context, infectious diseases can theoretically contribute to an elevation of inflammatory cytokines after allogeneic HSCT and activation of various subtypes of immune effector cells, which might in summary lead to an aggravation of acute GVHD. The appropriate treatments or prophylaxis of bacterial infection during the early phase after allogeneic HSCT might be beneficial to reduce not only infectious-related but also GVHD-related mortality. Here, we aim to review the literature addressing the interactions of bacterial infections and GVHD after allogeneic HSCT. PMID:24795865

  18. Complex Host Genetics Influence the Microbiome in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-09

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Human genetics and host- associated microbial communities have been associated independently with a wide range of chronic...diseases. One of the strongest associations in each case is inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but disease risk cannot be explained fully by either factor...when the dysbiosis was initially genetically derived. Although there have been several tests for association of 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4

  19. The role of adenotonsillectomy in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Brian; Raynor, Eileen

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better characterize the impact of pre-transplant adenotonsillectomy in the development of graft-versus-host disease in pediatric patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This retrospective study involved 211 children undergoing stem cell transplantation at Duke University. Patients who had undergone transplant were characterized by age at transplant, age at adenotonsillectomy (if applicable), age at graft-versus-host disease (if applicable), average length of follow up and other factors. Statistical analyses were performed to determine the relative risks associated with each variable. A total of 136 patients developed graft-versus-host disease and 75 did not. Average length of follow up was 2 years for GVHD and 1.7 years for non-GVHD patients. The relative risk (RR) of graft-versus-host disease was significantly increased under univariate analysis if the donor and recipient were unrelated (RR=2.1, p<0.0001) and if the HLA match was not identical (RR=1.6, p<0.001). A history of adenotonsillectomy prior to transplant did not affect the risk of developing graft-versus-host disease (RR=1.1, p=0.70). Adenotonsillectomy prior to bone marrow transplant has no significant impact either protectively or adversely on the risk of developing graft-versus-host disease after transplantation in pediatric patients. Future studies are needed to further examine the impact of otolaryngologic surgery on pediatric patients in terms of immune system modification. Research should specifically focus on the immunological effects of surgery on patients who will be undergoing bone marrow transplant. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Host susceptibility hypothesis for shell disease in American lobsters.

    PubMed

    Tlusty, Michael F; Smolowitz, Roxanna M; Halvorson, Harlyn O; DeVito, Simone E

    2007-12-01

    Epizootic shell disease (ESD) in American lobsters Homarus americanus is the bacterial degradation of the carapace resulting in extensive irregular, deep erosions. The disease is having a major impact on the health and mortality of some American lobster populations, and its effects are being transferred to the economics of the fishery. While the onset and progression of ESD in American lobsters is undoubtedly multifactorial, there is little understanding of the direct causality of this disease. The host susceptibility hypothesis developed here states that although numerous environmental and pathological factors may vary around a lobster, it is eventually the lobster's internal state that is permissive to or shields it from the final onset of the diseased state. To support the host susceptibility hypothesis, we conceptualized a model of shell disease onset and severity to allow further research on shell disease to progress from a structured model. The model states that shell disease onset will occur when the net cuticle degradation (bacterial degradation, decrease of host immune response to bacteria, natural wear, and resorption) is greater than the net deposition (growth, maintenance, and inflammatory response) of the shell. Furthermore, lesion severity depends on the extent to which cuticle degradation exceeds deposition. This model is consistent with natural observations of shell disease in American lobster.

  1. Defining dysbiosis and its influence on host immunity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Charisse; Round, June L

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian immune system development depends on instruction from resident commensal microorganisms. Diseases associated with abnormal immune responses towards environmental and self antigens have been rapidly increasing over the last 50 years. These diseases include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), multiple sclerosis (MS), type I diabetes (T1D), allergies and asthma. The observation that people with immune mediated diseases house a different microbial community when compared to healthy individuals suggests that pathogenesis arises from improper training of the immune system by the microbiota. However, with hundreds of different microorganisms on our bodies it is hard to know which of these contribute to health and more importantly how? Microbiologists studying pathogenic organisms have long adhered to Koch's postulates to directly relate a certain disease to a specific microbe, raising the question of whether this might be true of commensal–host relationships as well. Emerging evidence supports that rather than one or two dominant organisms inducing host health, the composition of the entire community of microbial residents influences a balanced immune response. Thus, perturbations to the structure of complex commensal communities (referred to as dysbiosis) can lead to deficient education of the host immune system and subsequent development of immune mediated diseases. Here we will overview the literature that describes the causes of dysbiosis and the mechanisms evolved by the host to prevent these changes to community structure. Building off these studies, we will categorize the different types of dysbiosis and define how collections of microorganisms can influence the host response. This research has broad implications for future therapies that go beyond the introduction of a single organism to induce health. We propose that identifying mechanisms to re-establish a healthy complex microbiota after dysbiosis has occurred, a process we will refer to as rebiosis

  2. Defining dysbiosis and its influence on host immunity and disease.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Charisse; Round, June L

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian immune system development depends on instruction from resident commensal microorganisms. Diseases associated with abnormal immune responses towards environmental and self antigens have been rapidly increasing over the last 50 years. These diseases include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), multiple sclerosis (MS), type I diabetes (T1D), allergies and asthma. The observation that people with immune mediated diseases house a different microbial community when compared to healthy individuals suggests that pathogenesis arises from improper training of the immune system by the microbiota. However, with hundreds of different microorganisms on our bodies it is hard to know which of these contribute to health and more importantly how? Microbiologists studying pathogenic organisms have long adhered to Koch's postulates to directly relate a certain disease to a specific microbe, raising the question of whether this might be true of commensal-host relationships as well. Emerging evidence supports that rather than one or two dominant organisms inducing host health, the composition of the entire community of microbial residents influences a balanced immune response. Thus, perturbations to the structure of complex commensal communities (referred to as dysbiosis) can lead to deficient education of the host immune system and subsequent development of immune mediated diseases. Here we will overview the literature that describes the causes of dysbiosis and the mechanisms evolved by the host to prevent these changes to community structure. Building off these studies, we will categorize the different types of dysbiosis and define how collections of microorganisms can influence the host response. This research has broad implications for future therapies that go beyond the introduction of a single organism to induce health. We propose that identifying mechanisms to re-establish a healthy complex microbiota after dysbiosis has occurred, a process we will refer to as rebiosis

  3. Tinzaparin sodium: a review of its pharmacology and clinical use in the prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic disease.

    PubMed

    Cheer, Susan M; Dunn, Christopher J; Foster, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Tinzaparin sodium (tinzaparin; innohep) is a low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) formed by the enzymatic degradation of porcine unfractionated heparin (UFH). In clinical trials, once-daily subcutaneous (SC) tinzaparin was effective and generally well tolerated in the prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic disease. SC tinzaparin 75 anti-Xa IU/kg/day showed similar thromboprophylactic efficacy to adjusted-dosage oral warfarin in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty; in patients undergoing knee replacement, the incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) was significantly lower with tinzaparin. The drug had similar efficacy to equivalent-dosage SC enoxaparin sodium in orthopaedic surgery. In patients undergoing general surgery, SC tinzaparin 3500 anti-Xa IU/day was of equivalent thromboprophylactic efficacy to SC UFH 5000IU twice daily. Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained with tinzaparin in the prevention of DVT in patients with complete motor paralysis. In the initial treatment of acute proximal DVT and pulmonary embolism, SC tinzaparin 175 anti-Xa IU/kg/day was at least as effective as adjusted-dosage intravenous (IV) UFH. In the outpatient treatment of venous thromboembolism, tinzaparin has demonstrated similar efficacy to dalteparin sodium (dalteparin) and warfarin. Tinzaparin was effective in preventing clotting in haemodialysis circuits; the anticoagulant efficacy of tinzaparin in patients undergoing haemodialysis was similar to that of SC dalteparin and similar to or less than (although in this case the tinzaparin dose was too low for sufficient anticoagulant efficacy) that of IV UFH. Advantages of tinzaparin over UFH and warfarin include ease of administration and lack of need for laboratory monitoring. Tinzaparin is more cost effective than UFH in the treatment of established thromboembolic disease, and home-based treatment with tinzaparin may offer greater cost benefits than hospital-based therapy. Tinzaparin is well tolerated

  4. Bandage soft contact lenses for ocular graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Yoshihiro; Sun, Yi-Chen; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Carpenter, Paul A.; Martin, Paul J.; Li, Peng; Wang, Ruikang; Chai, Xiaoyu; Storer, Barry E.; Shen, Tueng T.; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2015-01-01

    To examine safety and efficacy of bandage soft contact lenses (BSCLs) for ocular chronic graft-versus host disease (GVHD), we conducted a phase II clinical trial. Extended-wear BSCLs were applied under daily topical antibiotics prophylaxis. Patients completed standardized symptom questionnaires at enrollment and at 2 weeks, 4 weeks and 3 months afterwards. Ophthalmologic assessment was performed at enrollment, at 2 weeks and afterwards as medically needed. Assessments at follow-up were compared with baseline by paired t-test. Nineteen patients with ocular GVHD who remained symptomatic despite conventional treatments were studied. The mean Lee eye subscale score was 75.4 at enrollment, and improved significantly to 63.2 at 2 weeks (p=0.01), to 61.8 at 4 weeks (p=0.005) and to 56.3 at 3 months (p=0.02). The ocular surface disease index score and 11-point eye symptom ratings also improved significantly. According to the Lee eye subscale, clinically meaningful improvement was observed in 9 patients (47%) at 2 weeks, in 11 (58%) at 4 weeks and in 9 (47%) at 3 months. Visual acuity improved significantly at 2 weeks compared with enrollment values. Based on slit lamp exam at 2 weeks, punctate epithelial erosions improved in 58% of the patients, showed stability in 16% and worsened in 5%. No corneal ulceration or ocular infection occurred. BSCLs are a widely available, safe and effective treatment option that improves manifestations of ocular graft-versus host disease in approximately 50% of patients. This study was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01616056. PMID:26189353

  5. Solid-Organ Graft-Versus-Host Disease After Liver Transplant: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, Jonathan S; Schott, Christopher K

    2016-06-01

    Solid-organ transplant graft-versus-host disease (SOT-GVHD) is a rare complication of organ transplant that is associated with high mortality. The initial signs and symptoms are vague, so this disease is easily confused with other posttransplant complications. A case of SOT-GVHD occurred after orthotopic liver transplant for liver failure due to hepatitis C in a patient in a Veterans Affairs intensive care unit. The patient had dehydration, acute kidney injuries, rashes, diarrhea, and pancytopenia. Results of skin biopsy, bone marrow biopsy, and cytogenetic studies were consistent with SOT-GVHD. Despite supportive care including antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal therapy, high-dose steroids, antithymoglobulin and neupogen, the patient died of overwhelming sepsis. Owing to the rarity of SOT-GVHD, no evidence-based guidelines or recommendations for treatment exist. Treatment includes high-dose corticosteroids and antibiotic, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis. Treatment of liver transplant-related GVHD with anti-tumor necrosis factor a agents has been successful. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  6. How the devil facial tumor disease escapes host immune responses.

    PubMed

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2013-08-01

    The devil facial tumor disease (DFTD) is a contagious cancer that has recently emerged among Tasmanian devils, rapidly decimating the population. We have recently discovered that DFTD cells lose the expression MHC molecules on the cell surface, explaining how this tumor avoids recognition by host CD8(+) T cells.

  7. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases.

  8. Is antibiotic prophylaxis mandatory after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systemin order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed Central

    Munteanu, O; Radulescu, L; Bodean, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study was undertaken in order to determine if antibiotic prophylaxis is mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. Materials and methods: We prospectively evaluated 44 patients, admitted in the Bucharest Emergency Hospital between the 1ⁱ of February 2012 and the 1ⁱ of October 2012, in whom the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system was inserted. The patients enrolled were divided into two groups. In group A, a number of 22 patients, received, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, 875mg Amoxicillin Trihydrate + 125 mg Potassium Clavulanate, a dose every 12 hours for 5 days. Group B was represented by the other 22 patients who did not receive antibiotic prophylaxis. All patients were reevaluated at 4 and 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. Results: During the first 4 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system only two patients, one from group A and one from group B were diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. At a second follow up visit – 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, no other patient was diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis is not mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. PMID:24868262

  9. Is antibiotic prophylaxis mandatory after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systemin order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease?

    PubMed

    Munteanu, O; Radulescu, L; Bodean, O; Cirstoiu, C; Secara, D; Cirstoiu, M

    2013-01-01

    This study was undertaken in order to determine if antibiotic prophylaxis is mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. We prospectively evaluated 44 patients, admitted in the Bucharest Emergency Hospital between the 1ⁱ of February 2012 and the 1ⁱ of October 2012, in whom the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system was inserted. The patients enrolled were divided into two groups. In group A, a number of 22 patients, received, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, 875mg Amoxicillin Trihydrate + 125 mg Potassium Clavulanate, a dose every 12 hours for 5 days. Group B was represented by the other 22 patients who did not receive antibiotic prophylaxis. All patients were reevaluated at 4 and 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system. During the first 4 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system only two patients, one from group A and one from group B were diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. At a second follow up visit - 12 weeks after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, no other patient was diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease. Antibiotic prophylaxis is not mandatory, after the insertion of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system in order to decrease the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease.

  10. Advances in graft-versus-host disease biology and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blazar, Bruce R.; Murphy, William J.; Abedi, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Preface Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is used to treat a variety of disorders, but its efficacy is limited by the occurrence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The past decade has brought impressive advances in our understanding of the role of both donor and host adaptive and innate immune stimulatory and immune suppressive factors that influence GVHD pathogenesis. New insights in basic immunology, preclinical models and clinical studies have led to novel prevention or treatment approaches. This review highlights recent advances in GVHD pathophysiology and its treatment with a focus on immune system manipulations that are amenable to clinical application. PMID:22576252

  11. Low-dose acyclovir prophylaxis for the prevention of herpes simplex virus disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, K; Wada, H; Yamasaki, R; Ishihara, Y; Sakamoto, K; Ashizawa, M; Sato, M; Machishima, T; Terasako, K; Kimura, S I; Kikuchi, M; Nakasone, H; Yamazaki, R; Kanda, J; Kako, S; Tanihara, A; Nishida, J; Kanda, Y

    2013-10-01

    Currently, acyclovir (ACV) at 1000 mg/day is widely used as prophylaxis in the early phase of hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) in Japan. However, low-dose ACV (200 mg/day) has been shown to prevent varicella zoster virus reactivation in the middle and late phases of HSCT. Therefore, in this study, we decreased the dose of ACV to 200 mg/day in the early phase after HSCT. We analyzed 93 consecutive herpes simplex virus (HSV)-seropositive patients who underwent allogeneic HSCT for the first time in our center between June 2007 and December 2011. Before August 2009, 38 patients received oral ACV at 1000 mg/day (ACV1000) until day 35 after HSCT, whereas 55 patients received oral ACV at 200 mg/day (ACV200) after September 2009. We compared the cumulative incidence of HSV infection in the 2 groups. Oral ACV was changed to intravenous administration because of intolerance in 66% and 45% of the patients in the ACV1000 and ACV200 groups, respectively (P = 0.060). The probability of severe stomatitis (Bearman grade II-III) was 76% and 60% in the ACV1000 and ACV200 groups, respectively (P = 0.12). The number of patients who developed HSV disease before day 100 after HSCT was 0 in the ACV1000 group and 2 in the ACV200 group, with a cumulative incidence of 3.6% (P = 0.43). HSV disease in the latter 2 patients was limited to the lips and tongue and was successfully treated with ACV or valacyclovir at a treatment dose. ACV at 200 mg/day appeared to be effective for preventing HSV disease in the early phase after HSCT. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival.

  13. Host-microbial Cross-talk in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    A vast community of commensal microorganisms, commonly referred to as the gut microbiota, colonizes the gastrointestinal tract (GI). The involvement of the gut microbiota in the maintenance of the gut ecosystem is two-fold: it educates host immune cells and protects the host from pathogens. However, when healthy microbial composition and function are disrupted (dysbiosis), the dysbiotic gut microbiota can trigger the initiation and development of various GI diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD, primarily includes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is a major global public health problem affecting over 1 million patients in the United States alone. Accumulating evidence suggests that various environmental and genetic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of IBD. In particular, the gut microbiota is a key factor associated with the triggering and presentation of disease. Gut dysbiosis in patients with IBD is defined as a reduction of beneficial commensal bacteria and an enrichment of potentially harmful commensal bacteria (pathobionts). However, as of now it is largely unknown whether gut dysbiosis is a cause or a consequence of IBD. Recent technological advances have made it possible to address this question and investigate the functional impact of dysbiotic microbiota on IBD. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances in the field, focusing on host-microbial cross-talk in IBD. PMID:28261015

  14. Immunosuppressive Effects of Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells on Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Rats Following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nevruz, Oral; Avcu, Ferit; Ural, A. Uğur; Pekel, Aysel; Dirican, Bahar; Safalı, Mükerrem; Akdağ, Elvin; Beyzadeoğlu, Murat; İde, Tayfun; Sengül, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). While multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) demonstrate alloresponse in vitro and in vivo, they also have clinical applications toward prevention or treatment of GVHD. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of MSCs to prevent or treat GVHD in a rat BMT model. Materials and Methods: The GVHD model was established by transplantation of Sprague Dawley rats’ bone marrow and spleen cells into lethally irradiated (950 cGy) SDxWistar rat recipients. A total of 49 rats were randomly assigned to 4 study and 3 control groups administered different GVHD prophylactic regimens including MSCs. After transplantation, clinical GVHD scores and survival status were monitored. Results: All irradiated and untreated control mice with GVHD died. MSCs inhibited lethal GVHD as efficiently as the standard GVHD prophylactic regimen. The gross and histopathological findings of GVHD and the ratio of CD4/CD8 expression decreased. The subgroup given MSCs displayed higher in vivo proportions of CD25+ T cells and plasma interleukin-2 levels as compared to conventional GVHD treatment after allo-BMT. Conclusion: Our results suggest that clinical use of MSCs in both prophylaxis against and treatment of established GVHD is effective. This study supports the use of MSCs in the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD after allo-BMT; however, large scale studies are needed. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385804

  15. Helminth Infections Decrease Host Susceptibility to Immune-Mediated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weinstock, Joel V; Elliott, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Helminthic infection has become rare in highly industrialized nations. Concurrent with the decline in helminthic infection is an increase in prevalence of inflammatory disease. Removal of helminths from our environment and their powerful effects on host immunity may have contributed to this increase. Several different helminth species can abrogate disease in murine models of inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and other conditions. Helminths evoke immune regulatory pathways often involving dendritic cells, Tregs and macrophages that help control disease. Cytokines such as IL4, IL10 and TGFβ have a role. Notable is helminthic modulatory effect on innate immunity, which impedes development of aberrant adaptive immunity. Investigators are identifying key helminth-derived immune modulatory molecules that may have therapeutic utility in the control of inflammatory disease. PMID:25240019

  16. Helminth infections decrease host susceptibility to immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Joel V; Elliott, David E

    2014-10-01

    Helminthic infection has become rare in highly industrialized nations. Concurrent with the decline in helminthic infection has been an increase in the prevalence of inflammatory disease. Removal of helminths from our environment and their powerful effects on host immunity may have contributed to this increase. Several helminth species can abrogate disease in murine models of inflammatory bowel disease, type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and other conditions. Helminths evoke immune regulatory pathways often involving dendritic cells, regulatory T cells, and macrophages that help to control disease. Cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-β, have a role. Notable is the helminthic modulatory effect on innate immunity, which impedes development of aberrant adaptive immunity. Investigators are identifying key helminth-derived immune modulatory molecules that may have therapeutic usefulness in the control of inflammatory disease. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Coinfection Dynamics of Two Diseases in a Single Host Population.

    PubMed

    Gao, Daozhou; Porco, Travis C; Ruan, Shigui

    2016-10-01

    A susceptible-infectious-susceptible (SIS) epidemic model that describes the coinfection and cotransmission of two infectious diseases spreading through a single population is studied. The host population consists of two subclasses: susceptible and infectious, and the infectious individuals are further divided into three subgroups: those infected by the first agent/pathogen, the second agent/pathogen, and both. The basic reproduction numbers for all cases are derived which completely determine the global stability of the system if the presence of one agent/pathogen does not affect the transmission of the other. When the constraint on the transmissibility of the dually infected hosts is removed, we introduce the invasion reproduction number, compare it with two other types of reproduction number and show the uniform persistence of both diseases under certain conditions. Numerical simulations suggest that the system can display much richer dynamics such as backward bifurcation, bistability and Hopf bifurcation.

  18. Prophylaxis and treatment of Chagas disease in renal transplant donor and recipient: case report.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A M; Troncoso, P; Sainz, M; Vilches, S

    2010-01-01

    Chagas disease is a prevalent zoonosis in Latin America, caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by Triatoma infestans. Part of the infectious cycle consists of chronic subclinical parasitemia, causing in the long term end-organ damage. Amastigotes have been isolated from various organs including native and allograft renal parenchyma; thus, transplantation plus immunosuppression therapy is another mode of disease transmission and reactivation. Herein, we report 2 successful kidney transplantations cases in which either infection or reactivation was averted using prophylactic nitroderivates.

  19. Contrast media triggering cutaneous graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Vavricka, S R; Halter, J; Furrer, K; Wolfensberger, U; Schanz, U

    2002-06-01

    Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media are varied and known to develop in patients with asthma and a history of allergy. We describe three successful allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients, who all developed dermal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after receiving contrast media. Cutaneous GVHD triggered by contrast media has not been reported to date and has implications for the assessment, monitoring and treatment of patients during the post-transplant period.

  20. Spatial heterogeneity, host movement and mosquito-borne disease transmission.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Miguel A; Prosper, Olivia; Lopiano, Kenneth; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Caughlin, T Trevor; Martcheva, Maia; Osenberg, Craig W; Smith, David L

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are a global health priority disproportionately affecting low-income populations in tropical and sub-tropical countries. These pathogens live in mosquitoes and hosts that interact in spatially heterogeneous environments where hosts move between regions of varying transmission intensity. Although there is increasing interest in the implications of spatial processes for mosquito-borne disease dynamics, most of our understanding derives from models that assume spatially homogeneous transmission. Spatial variation in contact rates can influence transmission and the risk of epidemics, yet the interaction between spatial heterogeneity and movement of hosts remains relatively unexplored. Here we explore, analytically and through numerical simulations, how human mobility connects spatially heterogeneous mosquito populations, thereby influencing disease persistence (determined by the basic reproduction number R0), prevalence and their relationship. We show that, when local transmission rates are highly heterogeneous, R0 declines asymptotically as human mobility increases, but infection prevalence peaks at low to intermediate rates of movement and decreases asymptotically after this peak. Movement can reduce heterogeneity in exposure to mosquito biting. As a result, if biting intensity is high but uneven, infection prevalence increases with mobility despite reductions in R0. This increase in prevalence decreases with further increase in mobility because individuals do not spend enough time in high transmission patches, hence decreasing the number of new infections and overall prevalence. These results provide a better basis for understanding the interplay between spatial transmission heterogeneity and human mobility, and their combined influence on prevalence and R0.

  1. Spatial Heterogeneity, Host Movement and Mosquito-Borne Disease Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Miguel A.; Prosper, Olivia; Lopiano, Kenneth; Ruktanonchai, Nick; Caughlin, T. Trevor; Martcheva, Maia; Osenberg, Craig W.; Smith, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are a global health priority disproportionately affecting low-income populations in tropical and sub-tropical countries. These pathogens live in mosquitoes and hosts that interact in spatially heterogeneous environments where hosts move between regions of varying transmission intensity. Although there is increasing interest in the implications of spatial processes for mosquito-borne disease dynamics, most of our understanding derives from models that assume spatially homogeneous transmission. Spatial variation in contact rates can influence transmission and the risk of epidemics, yet the interaction between spatial heterogeneity and movement of hosts remains relatively unexplored. Here we explore, analytically and through numerical simulations, how human mobility connects spatially heterogeneous mosquito populations, thereby influencing disease persistence (determined by the basic reproduction number R0), prevalence and their relationship. We show that, when local transmission rates are highly heterogeneous, R0 declines asymptotically as human mobility increases, but infection prevalence peaks at low to intermediate rates of movement and decreases asymptotically after this peak. Movement can reduce heterogeneity in exposure to mosquito biting. As a result, if biting intensity is high but uneven, infection prevalence increases with mobility despite reductions in R0. This increase in prevalence decreases with further increase in mobility because individuals do not spend enough time in high transmission patches, hence decreasing the number of new infections and overall prevalence. These results provide a better basis for understanding the interplay between spatial transmission heterogeneity and human mobility, and their combined influence on prevalence and R0. PMID:26030769

  2. A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, M G; Williams, D R; Tilyard, P A; Pinkard, E A; Wardlaw, T J; Glen, M; Vaillancourt, R E; Potts, B M

    2013-01-01

    The possible drivers and implications of an observed latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree were examined. Mycosphaerella leaf disease (MLD) damage, caused by Teratosphaeria species, was assessed in five Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian blue gum) common garden trials containing open-pollinated progeny from 13 native-forest populations. Significant population and family within population variation in MLD resistance was detected, which was relatively stable across different combinations of trial sites, ages, seasons and epidemics. A distinct genetic-based latitudinal cline in MLD damage among host populations was evident. Two lines of evidence argue that the observed genetic-based latitudinal trend was the result of direct pathogen-imposed selection for MLD resistance. First, MLD damage was positively associated with temperature and negatively associated with a prediction of disease risk in the native environment of these populations; and, second, the quantitative inbreeding coefficient (QST) significantly exceeded neutral marker FST at the trial that exhibited the greatest MLD damage, suggesting that diversifying selection contributed to differentiation in MLD resistance among populations. This study highlights the potential for spatial variation in pathogen risk to drive adaptive differentiation across the geographic range of a foundation host tree species. PMID:23211794

  3. A latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M G; Williams, D R; Tilyard, P A; Pinkard, E A; Wardlaw, T J; Glen, M; Vaillancourt, R E; Potts, B M

    2013-04-01

    The possible drivers and implications of an observed latitudinal cline in disease resistance of a host tree were examined. Mycosphaerella leaf disease (MLD) damage, caused by Teratosphaeria species, was assessed in five Eucalyptus globulus (Tasmanian blue gum) common garden trials containing open-pollinated progeny from 13 native-forest populations. Significant population and family within population variation in MLD resistance was detected, which was relatively stable across different combinations of trial sites, ages, seasons and epidemics. A distinct genetic-based latitudinal cline in MLD damage among host populations was evident. Two lines of evidence argue that the observed genetic-based latitudinal trend was the result of direct pathogen-imposed selection for MLD resistance. First, MLD damage was positively associated with temperature and negatively associated with a prediction of disease risk in the native environment of these populations; and, second, the quantitative inbreeding coefficient (QST) significantly exceeded neutral marker FST at the trial that exhibited the greatest MLD damage, suggesting that diversifying selection contributed to differentiation in MLD resistance among populations. This study highlights the potential for spatial variation in pathogen risk to drive adaptive differentiation across the geographic range of a foundation host tree species.

  4. Cutaneous graft-versus-host disease after hematopoietic stem cell transplant - a review*

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Cesar Daniel Villarreal; Alanis, Julio Cesar Salas; Pérez, Jose Carlos Jaime; Candiani, Jorge Ocampo

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants (allo-HSCT) associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The earliest and most common manifestation is cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. This review focuses on the pathophysiology, clinical features, prevention and treatment of cutaneous graft-versus-host disease. We discuss various insights into the disease's mechanisms and the different treatments for acute and chronic skin graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27438202

  5. [Organization of prophylaxis and treatment of respiratory diseases in military personnel].

    PubMed

    Ovchinnikov, Iu V; Azarov, I I; Kuvshinov, K É; Ogarkov, P I; Zhdanov, K V; Zaĭtsev, A A; Afonaskov, O V

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory diseases for many years in the Armed Forces of the Russian occupy the leading position in the structure of the pathology of internal organs. Preventive measures to prevention of the emergence and spread of acute respiratory infections among soldiers can help to reduce the incidence of community-acquired pneumonia in the armed forces. Particular attention is drawn to the control of the conditions of accommodation, food and combat training of military personnel, as well as the implementation of the commanders of their duties. Shows typical action plans for the prevention of outbreaks of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract in military units and algorithms for the treatment of respiratory infections in military personnel in military units and hospitals.

  6. [Efficacy of the treatment and secondary antifungal prophylaxis in AIDS-related histoplasmosis. Experience at the Francisco J. Muñiz Infectious Diseases Hospital in Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Negroni, Ricardo; Messina, Fernando; Arechavala, Alicia; Santiso, Gabriela; Bianchi, Mario

    Classic histoplasmosis is a systemic endemic mycosis due to Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum. A significant reduction in the morbidity and mortality of AIDS-related histoplasmosis has been observed since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and secondary antifungal prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine the current state of prognosis and treatment response of HIV-positive patients with histoplasmosis in the Francisco J. Muñiz Infectious Diseases Hospital in Buenos Aires City. A retrospective study was conducted using the demographic, clinical, immunological and treatment data of 80 patients suffering from AIDS-related histoplasmosis. Of the 80 cases studied 65 were male, the median age was 36 years, with 73.7% of the patients being drug addicts, 82.5% of the patients was not receiving HAART at diagnosis, and 58.7% of the cases had less than 50 CD4+ cells/μl at the beginning of the treatment. The initial phase of treatment consisted of intravenous amphotericin B and/or oral itraconazole for 3 months, with 78.7% of the cases showing a good clinical response. Only 26/63 patients who were discharged from hospital continued with the follow-up of the HAART, secondary prophylaxis with itraconazole or amphotericin B. Secondary prophylaxis was stopped after more than one year of HAART if the patients were asymptomatic, had two CD4+ cell counts greater than 150cells/μl, and undetectable viral loads. No relapses were observed during a two-year follow up after prophylaxis was stopped. The treatment of histoplasmosis in HIV-positive patients was effective in 78.8% of the cases. The combination of HAART and secondary antifungal prophylaxis is safe, well tolerated, and effective. The low adherence of patients to HAART and the lack of laboratory kits for rapid histoplasmosis diagnosis should be addressed in the future. The usefulness of primary antifungal prophylaxis for cryptococcosis and histoplasmosis HIV-positive patients

  7. [Prophylaxis against Toxoplasma gondii disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation].

    PubMed

    Payá, Ernesto; Noemí, Isabel; Tassara, Renzo; Catalán, Paula; Avilés, Carmen L

    2012-09-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely distributed zoonosis produced by the parasite T. gondii. In Chile the seroprevalence has been estimated between 20-37% in general population. Defined risk groups acquire or reactivate the infection by T. gondii in patients undergoing SOT and HSCT are: heart transplant or heart-lung with D (+) and R (-), allogeneic HSCT with R (+), HSCT with cord cells, GVHD, history of previous clinical toxoplasmosis and use of corticosteroids for prolonged periods or in high doses. Hand washing, hygiene in food handling and weekly post-transplant surveillance since day 15 post transplant for six months, are universally recommended. All patients with SOT and HSCT, regardless of risk, should receive prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole and require no another specific prophylaxis against T. gondii (A2). It is particularly important in high-risk patients who cannot receive cotrimoxazole prophylaxis establish specific alternative against T. gondii (B3).

  8. Evaluation of the Usability of Selected Questionnaires Assessing Physical Activity in the Prophylaxis of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Czeczelewska, Ewa; Czeczelewski, Jan; Wasiluk, Agnieszka; Saczuk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    The main health problem of the Polish population is posed by cardiovascular diseases (CDVD), coronary artery disease (CAD) in particular. Respectively higher physical activity linked with energy expenditure of at least 1000 kcal/week may significantly reduce the risk of CAD development. The protective effect of exercise applies not only to persons from high-risk groups and with diagnosed chronic diseases that increase the risk of the incidence of atherosclerosis and its complications, but also to healthy individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of the Seven-Day Physical Activity Recall (SDPAR) and International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) in research on the correlation between physical activity and risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. A screening survey, conducted in 2012, included students (n = 340) of the Division of the Academy of Physical Education in Biała Podlaska, aged 18-29 years. Total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels were analyzed, and arterial blood pressure and heart rate were measured. The physical activity of the students was estimated using IPAQ and SDPAR questionnaires. The effect of physical activity on the biochemical blood markers, arterial blood pressure and heart rate was analyzed in groups differing in weekly energy expenditure (WEE). Along with increasing WEE values, calculated with IPAQ and SDPAR questionnaires, tangible descending tendencies were observed in cholesterol concentration in both genders. Significant differences were demonstrated in mean values of the resting heart rate between terciles of women ranked according to the increasing WEE values calculated using IPAQ (p < 0.05) and SDPAR (p < 0.01). Significant (p < 0.05) negative correlations were demonstrated only between the heart rate of women and WEE value calculated with IPAQ (r = -0.223) and SDPAR (r = -0.238). Beneficial changes were observed in the blood lipid profile and in mean resting heart rate values as affected by

  9. Chronic graft-versus-host disease of the kidney in patients with allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Pilar; Pilar, Fraile; Vazquez, Lourdes; Lourdes, Vazquez; Caballero, Dolores; Dolores, Caballero; Garcia-Cosmes, Pedro; Pedro, Garcia-Cosmes; López, Lucia; Lucia, López; San Miguel, Jesus; Jesus, San Miguel; Tabernero, Jose Matias; Jose Matias, Tabernero

    2013-08-01

    Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is the treatment of choice for several hematological diseases. Although rare, patients could present nephrotic syndrome as a clinical feature of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). The objective of our study is to screen patients with allo-HSCT to determine who developed a glomerular pathology in the context of cGVHD. We studied patients who underwent allo-HSCT treatment in our center between October 1995 and October 2012 and who developed glomerular pathology. cGVHD was defined as a pathology when it appeared after 100 d post-allo-HSCT. Five hundred eighty-three allo-HSCT were performed. The prevalence of cGVHD of the kidney was 1.03%. All patients with cGVHD of the kidney were hosts who received peripheral blood from an identical HLA match donor. GVHD prophylaxis with calcineurin inhibitors plus methotrexate was administered in five cases, and prophylaxis with sirolimus was used in another case. cGVHD of the kidney was seen to appear after the removal of the prophylaxis for GVHD, within 33 ± 11.54 months intervals after allo-HSCT in five patients and in another patient, it appeared despite immunosuppressive therapy being administered. All patients had proteinuria, within 11.82 ± 9.03 g/d ranges. The kidney biopsies revealed membranous glomerulonephritis (four patients), focal segmental glomerulonephritis (one patient) and lupus nephropathy class III (one patient). It seems, immunosuppressive therapy achieved complete remission, within the first year of treatment in four patients. Although in three of them, the proteinuria recurred when we tried to remove the therapy; two patients have recently started treatment, being in partial remission now. cGVHD of the kidney is a rare complication after allo-HSCT, related with the removal of the immunosuppression. Monitoring proteinuria in these patients may be useful. In our patients, a complete remission was achieved; although the removal of the

  10. Sex influences immune responses to viruses, and efficacy of prophylaxis and treatments for viral diseases.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabra L

    2012-12-01

    The intensity and prevalence of viral infections are typically higher in males, whereas disease outcome can be worse for females. Females mount higher innate and adaptive immune responses than males, which can result in faster clearance of viruses, but also contributes to increased development of immunopathology. In response to viral vaccines, females mount higher antibody responses and experience more adverse reactions than males. The efficacy of antiviral drugs at reducing viral load differs between the sexes, and the adverse reactions to antiviral drugs are typically greater in females than males. Several variables should be considered when evaluating male/female differences in responses to viral infection and treatment: these include hormones, genes, and gender-specific factors related to access to, and compliance with, treatment. Knowledge that the sexes differ in their responses to viruses and to treatments for viral diseases should influence the recommended course of action differently for males and females. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays X-chromosome-located microRNAs in immunity: Might they explain male/female differences Abstract.

  11. [Etiology, determinants, diagnostics and prophylaxis of occupational allergic respiratory diseases in hairdressers].

    PubMed

    Golińska-Zach, Aleksandra; Krawczyk-Szulc, Patrycja; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    Hairdressers are occupationally exposed to many substances both, allergizing and irritating. The continuous development of hairdressing services brings about new risks. The most important allergens are: persulfates (ammonium and potassium), paraphenylenediamine, and latex. A growing number of occupational allergens in the work environment of hairdresses, providing that most of them are low weight allergens, may cause some diagnostic problems. Health risks related with haidressing occupation, have prompted the researchers to pay more attention to risk factors of occupational allergy. Owing to the fact, that first morbid symptoms may occur very early, even during the apprenticeship in a hairdressing school, it is very important to indentify health risks, which can be useful in predicting the onset of occupational allergy and in developing effective prevention methods. The most common allergens at the hairdressers' workplace, risk factors, diagnostics of occupational asthma and rhinitis, as well as the prevention of these diseases are reviewed in this publication.

  12. Approaches to Improving Adherence to Secondary Prophylaxis for Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Literature Review with a Global Perspective.

    PubMed

    Rémond, Marc G W; Coyle, Meaghan E; Mills, Jane E; Maguire, Graeme P

    2016-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are autoimmune conditions resulting from infection with group A streptococcus. Current management of these conditions includes secondary antibiotic prevention. This comprises regular 3 to 4 weekly long-acting intramuscular benzathine penicillin injections. Secondary antibiotic prevention aims to protect individuals against reinfection with group A streptococcus, thereby preventing recurrent ARF and the risk of further damage to the heart valves. However, utilization of benzathine penicillin can be poor leaving patients at risk of avoidable and progressive heart damage. This review utilizes the Chronic Care Model as a framework to discuss initiatives to enhance the delivery of secondary antibiotic prophylaxis for ARF and RHD. Results from the search strategy utilized revealed that there is limited pertinent published evidence. The evidence that is available suggests that register/recall systems, dedicated health teams for delivery of secondary antibiotic prophylaxis, education about ARF and RHD, linkages with the community (particularly between health services and schools), and strong staff-patient relationships may be important. However, it is difficult to generalize findings from individual studies to other settings and high quality studies are lacking. Although secondary antibiotic prophylaxis is an effective treatment for those with ARF or RHD, the difficulties in implementing effective programs that reduce the burden of ARF and RHD demonstrates the importance of ongoing work in developing and evaluating research translation initiatives.

  13. Living related liver transplantation for hepatitis B-related liver disease without hepatitis B immune globulin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subash; Goyal, Neerav; Taneja, Sunil; Kumar, Ajay

    2013-09-01

    Hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) is routinely used in liver transplantation for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver disease. With potent oral antivirals, HBIG may not be required. We conducted a prospective trial to evaluate living related liver transplantation (LRLT) without HBIG. Eighty-nine patients with HBV-related liver disease underwent LRLT between January 2005 and January 2012. All donors were vaccinated with the HBV vaccine. All patients were given oral antivirals for HBV before transplantation. Patients with HBV DNA levels ≤ 2000 IU/mL were not given HBIG, and patients with HBV DNA levels > 2000 IU/mL were given HBIG. Recurrence was defined as HBV DNA positivity 6 months after transplantation. Seventy-five of the 89 patients who underwent LRLT for HBV-related liver disease were not given HBIG. Nineteen patients received a combination of lamivudine and adefovir, 42 received entecavir, 12 received tenofovir, and 2 received a combination of entecavir and tenofovir. At the last follow-up (median = 21 months, range = 1-83 months), all patients were HBV DNA-negative. Sixty-six patients cleared hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and 19 patients formed antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (anti-HBs). The cumulative probabilities of clearing HBsAg were 90% and 92% at 1 and 2 years after transplantation, respectively. Nine patients were HBsAg-positive with undetectable DNA at the last follow-up. The recurrence rate in our series was 8% (6/75). Five of these 6 patients had stopped taking oral antivirals, and 1 had entecavir resistance. All recurrences were salvaged with changes in the oral antivirals. The actuarial probability of survival in this cohort was 73.7% at 83 months. There was no mortality due to HBV recurrence. In conclusion, HBV prophylaxis with oral antivirals and without HBIG is safe and effective in LRLT. A majority of the patients will clear HBsAg, and some will develop anti-HBs antibodies.

  14. Does genetic diversity limit disease spread in natural host populations?

    PubMed Central

    King, K C; Lively, C M

    2012-01-01

    It is a commonly held view that genetically homogenous host populations are more vulnerable to infection than genetically diverse populations. The underlying idea, known as the ‘monoculture effect,' is well documented in agricultural studies. Low genetic diversity in the wild can result from bottlenecks (that is, founder effects), biparental inbreeding or self-fertilization, any of which might increase the risk of epidemics. Host genetic diversity could buffer populations against epidemics in nature, but it is not clear how much diversity is required to prevent disease spread. Recent theoretical and empirical studies, particularly in Daphnia populations, have helped to establish that genetic diversity can reduce parasite transmission. Here, we review the present theoretical work and empirical evidence, and we suggest a new focus on finding ‘diversity thresholds.' PMID:22713998

  15. Skin explant model of human graft-versus-host disease: prediction of clinical outcome and correlation with biological risk factors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Nong; Collin, Matthew; Sviland, Lisbet; Marshall, Scott; Jackson, Graham; Schulz, Ute; Holler, Ernst; Karrer, Sigrid; Greinix, Hildegard; Elahi, Fariborz; Hromadnikova, Ilona; Dickinson, A M

    2006-02-01

    A human skin explant model has been used to predict the clinical outcome and to study the immunopathology of human graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Whether the model gives the same predictive effect for GVHD in different hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) settings has not been assessed. It is also unknown whether the skin explant result reflects the known biological risk factors for clinical GVHD. In this study, the skin explant model was used to detect graft-versus-host reactions (GVHR) in vitro for 225 eligible patient/donor pairs. The predicted skin GVHR grade was correlated with the outcome of clinical GVHD, as well as HLA matching status, sex mismatches, and patient age. In sibling HSCT under either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning, a significant correlation was observed between the predicted skin GVHR and clinical GVHD (P < .001 and P = .033, respectively). In HSCT using unrelated donors, the involvement of T-cell depletion led to a sharp increase in false-positive GVHR results, and no correlation was observed between the predicted skin GVHR and clinical GVHD. The skin GVHR grade correlated significantly with the HLA matching status (HLA-matched sibling pairs, HLA-matched unrelated pairs, and HLA-unmatched unrelated pairs). Furthermore, HLA-matched sibling pairs with a female-to-male sex mismatch had a significantly higher overall skin GVHR grade and a higher ratio of high- versus low-grade skin GVHR than the sibling pairs with all other sex combinations. Patient age was not reflected in the skin explant result. In conclusion, the predictive value of the skin explant model for aGVHD varies depending on the clinical transplant protocols, such as the type of GVHD prophylaxis used. Nevertheless, the skin explant model remains a unique in vitro system that provides an in situ histopathologic readout for studying alloreactivity and human GVHD. The model has also the potential to aid the development of novel prophylaxis and treatment for

  16. [Reduction of cardiovascular risk in primary prophylaxy of coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Sobenin, I A; Prianishnikov, V V; Kunnova, L M; Radinovich, E A; Orekhov, A N

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of Allicor, an Allium sativum (garlic) preparation with prolonged activity, on 10-year prognostic risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), acute myocardial infarction (MI) and sudden death in patients with elevated and high risk of CHD. 79 patients with elevated and high risk of CHD were included in a double blind randomized placebo-controlled study. They underwent multifactor evaluation of cardiovascular risk by algorithms based on the results of Framingham and Munster studies. Prolonged (12 months) administration of Allicor significantly reduced the multifactor risk, which was demonstrated by a 13.2% (p = 0.005) reduction of prognostic 10-year risk of CHD in men, and a 7.1% (p = 0.040) reduction of the same parameter in women. Prognostic 10-year risk of MI and sudden death in men was reduced by 26.1% (p = 0.025) and did not change significantly in women. In men the main factor of cardiovascular risk reduction was the decrease of cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein concentration by 23.5 +/- 6.6 mg/dl (p = 0.004), and in women - the increase of high-density lipoprotein level by 2.8 +/- 1.5 mg/dl (p = 0.040). The results of the study demonstrate that prolonged Allicor therapy can be applied to the large category of patients who are in need of atherosclerosis prevention.

  17. [Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following cardiovascular surgery].

    PubMed

    Aybey, Bekir; Coşkun, Diler; Aytaç, Jale

    2006-01-01

    In this report, a case of transfusion-associated graft versus host disease that developed following coronary arter bypass grafting and mitral annuloplasty operations, has been presented. The diagnosis of 62 year-old male patient was based on the presence of typical findings as fever, liver function disorders, skin rash and hypoplastic bone marrow findings that began ten days after the operation; with the exclusion of other pathologies (e.g. drug eruptions, viral infections, septicemia, scalded skin syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis) and histopathological findings of skin biopsy. There was a history of five units of blood transfusion of which one was from a close relative. The blood from the relative was thought to be responsible for the disease. With this case, we wanted to emphasize once more that transfusion of the blood of a relative must be avoided in patients who have undergone major operations such as cardiovascular surgery. The irradiation of these bloods before transfusion may be effective to prevent graft versus host disease.

  18. Interventions for prophylaxis of hepatic veno-occlusive disease in people undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Daniel K L; Chiang, Alan K S; Ha, Shau Yin; Chan, Godfrey C F

    2015-05-27

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a severe complication after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Different drugs with different mechanisms of action have been tried in HSCT recipients to prevent hepatic VOD. However, it is uncertain whether high-quality evidence exists to support any prophylactic therapy. We aimed to determine the effects of various prophylactic therapies on the incidence of hepatic VOD, overall survival, mortality, quality of life (QOL), and the safety of these therapies in people undergoing HSCT. We searched the Cochrane Central Registe of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, conference proceedings of three international haematology-oncology societies and two trial registries in January 2015, together with reference checking, citation searching and contact with study authors to identify additional studies. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing prophylactic therapies with placebo or no treatment, or comparing different therapies for hepatic VOD in people undergoing HSCT. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 14 RCTs. Four trials (612 participants) compared ursodeoxycholic acid with or without additional treatment versus placebo or no treatment or same additional treatment. Two trials (259 participants) compared heparin with no treatment. Two trials (106 participants) compared low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) with placebo or no treatment. One trial (360 participants) compared defibrotide with no treatment. One trial (34 participants) compared glutamine with placebo. Two trials (383 participants) compared fresh frozen plasma (FFP) with or without additional treatment versus no treatment or same additional treatment. One trial (30 participants) compared antithrombin III with heparin versus heparin. One trial compared heparin (47 participants) with LMWH (46 participants) and prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) (47 participants). No trial investigated the effects of

  19. Emerging prion disease drives host selection in a wildlife population.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Stacie J; Samuel, Michael D; Johnson, Chad J; Adams, Marie; McKenzie, Debbie I

    2012-04-01

    Infectious diseases are increasingly recognized as an important force driving population dynamics, conservation biology, and natural selection in wildlife populations. Infectious agents have been implicated in the decline of small or endangered populations and may act to constrain population size, distribution, growth rates, or migration patterns. Further, diseases may provide selective pressures that shape the genetic diversity of populations or species. Thus, understanding disease dynamics and selective pressures from pathogens is crucial to understanding population processes, managing wildlife diseases, and conserving biological diversity. There is ample evidence that variation in the prion protein gene (PRNP) impacts host susceptibility to prion diseases. Still, little is known about how genetic differences might influence natural selection within wildlife populations. Here we link genetic variation with differential susceptibility of white-tailed deer to chronic wasting disease (CWD), with implications for fitness and disease-driven genetic selection. We developed a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay to efficiently genotype deer at the locus of interest (in the 96th codon of the PRNP gene). Then, using a Bayesian modeling approach, we found that the more susceptible genotype had over four times greater risk of CWD infection; and, once infected, deer with the resistant genotype survived 49% longer (8.25 more months). We used these epidemiological parameters in a multi-stage population matrix model to evaluate relative fitness based on genotype-specific population growth rates. The differences in disease infection and mortality rates allowed genetically resistant deer to achieve higher population growth and obtain a long-term fitness advantage, which translated into a selection coefficient of over 1% favoring the CWD-resistant genotype. This selective pressure suggests that the resistant allele could become dominant in the population within an

  20. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rappeport, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of foreign recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. 58 refs.

  1. Chronic graft versus host disease and nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barbouch, Samia; Gaied, Hanene; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Goucha, Rim; Lakhal, Amel; Torjemen, Lamia; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Adel, Khedher

    2014-09-01

    Disturbed kidney function is a common complication after bone marrow transplantation. Recently, attention has been given to immune-mediated glomerular damage related to graft versus host disease (GVHD). We describe a 19-year-old woman who developed membranous glomerulonephritis after bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Six months later, she developed soft palate, skin and liver lesions considered to be chronic GVHD. Fifteen months after undergoing BMT, this patient presented with nephrotic syndrome. A renal biopsy showed membranous glomerulonephritis associated with a focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. She was started on corticosteroid treatment with good outcome.

  2. A fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis: an unusual rare expression of chronic graft versus host disease. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Violeta, Labžentytė; Silvija, Zemnickienė; Edvardas, Danila; Virginija, Šileikienė; Rolandas, Zablockis; Vygantas, Gruslys

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. We report a case of a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia whose treatment with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was followed by chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) with lung involvement and bronchiectasis. This report illustrates an unusual course of a fast progression of the bronchiectasis due to BMT. Case description. A 33-year-old female was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia. An allogeneic BMT was performed. One month after the transplantation, acute GVHD with skin involvement occurred. Treatment with prednisolone and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) has been started. Nine months later, the patient was examined by a pulmonologist due to progressive dyspnoea. A pulmonary computed tomography (CT) scan showed normal parenchyma of the lungs and no changes to the bronchi. A CT scan performed 7 months later revealed bronchiectasis for the first time. No clinical response was associated with the treatment and the patient’s respiratory status progressively deteriorated. During the final hospitalization, a CT scan performed 1 year later revealed huge cystic bronchiectasis in both lungs. Despite the prophylaxis and treatment of GVHD and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, the patient died one year after the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. Conclusions. This case demonstrates that a fast and fatal course of bronchiectasis, that occurs after BMT, should always be considered as a possible manifestation of chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD) following allogeneic BMT.

  3. A Review of Ocular Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saleha Z; Aylward, James

    2017-05-01

    : Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major complication that occurs following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which is a potential curative therapy used in a variety of malignant or benign hematological diseases. Graft-versus-host disease primarily occurs in many organs, but most notably in the skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, liver, eyes, mucosa, and musculoskeletal system. Ocular manifestations of GVHD may precede other systemic GVHD findings, and it may be a poor prognosis for mortality. While all parts of the eye may be affected, ocular GVHD occurs primarily in the ocular surface. Dry eye disease or keratoconjunctivitis sicca is the most common presenting manifestation of chronic ocular GVHD. Dry eye disease in ocular GVHD is a multifactorial process, which involves destruction and fibrosis of lacrimal glands and conjunctiva, leading to tear film deficiency and instability. Depending on the severity of ocular involvement and response to treatment, ocular GVHD may cause decreased quality of life. Management of GVHD begins with prevention by understanding risk factors and by implementing prophylactic treatment after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. A multidisciplinary approach to the prevention and treatment of GVHD is important, and there are currently no preventive therapies available for ocular GVHD. Once diagnosed, ocular GVHD treatment strategies target ocular surface lubrication and support, tear film stabilization, inflammation reduction, and surgical intervention. The goal of this review is to define ocular GVHD and its categorical manifestations, as well as to describe the importance of comprehensive assessment, diagnosis, and ophthalmologic treatment and management of ocular GVHD with a multidisciplinary approach.

  4. Late-onset acute graft-versus-host disease mimicking hand, foot, and mouth disease

    PubMed Central

    Mahabal, Gauri; George, Leni; Bindra, Mandeep; George, Biju

    2016-01-01

    Acute skin graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) classically presents as a pruritic erythematous maculopapular rash. We describe a patient who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and presented with a hand foot and mouth disease like clinical presentation. Histopathology was suggestive of acute GVHD. This case is being reported to make dermatologists aware of this unusual presentation of GVHD. PMID:27990387

  5. [A method for modeling skin explants--an in vitro predictive test for graft vs host disease in allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Hromadníková, I; Sedlácek, P; Starý, J; Vavrinec, J; Cermáková-Frantlová, M; Stechová, K; Houbová, B; Vítek, A; Sajdová, J; Sviland, L; Dickinson, A M

    2001-02-15

    Acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) remains a severe complication of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Our study summaries results of skin explant assay (SEA) as a pretransplant GvHD predictive test in a cohort of paediatric (n = 33) and adult (a = 8) patients receiving grafts from their HLA identical siblings (n = 28), haploidentical relatives (n = 3) and unrelated donors (n = 10). Results GvHD prediction are correlated with the occurrence and severity of acute GvHD posttransplant and effect of GvHD prophylaxis on GvHD clinical outcome is evaluated. SEA utilises responding lymphocytes of the donor, which are sensitized firstly in vitro by mononuclears cells of patient in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and subsequently co-cultured with recipient's skin. Histopathological changes found in patients' skin explants are evaluated according to standard Lerner classification for acute GvHD. In general, GvHD predictive results in SEA correlated with GvHd clinical outcome in 28 out of 41 tested patients (68%, p = 0.015). In a cohort of HLA identical sibling transplants GvHD predictive results correlated with clinical manifestation of acute GvHD only in 15 out of 28 patients on individual GvHD prophylaxis. GvHD prophylaxis in the form of cyclosporine A (CsA) combined with short-term methotrexate (MTX) reduced the risk of acute GvHD in 10 out of 14 transplanted patients (71%) meanwhile CsA alone prophylaxis only in 1 out of 5 patients (20%). In a cohort of unrelated pairs on CsA/MTX prophylaxis combined with horse anti-lymphocyte globuline (ALG) correlated the GvHD prediction with GvHD clinical outcome (100%, p = 0.003). In all patients transplanted with the grafts from their haploidentical relatives the occurrence of severe GvHD was predicted. Skin explant assay helps identify pretransplant patients at higher risk of severe acute GvHD. GvHD predictive results enable the transplantation team to individualise GvHD prophylaxis and to

  6. Review of Cutaneous Graft-vs-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Sánchez, R; Navarro-Mira, M; Sanz-Caballer, J; Botella-Estrada, R

    2016-04-01

    Graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) is a multisystem disease that arises as a complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It is due to recognition of the recipient's tissues by immune cells from the donor. The skin and mucous membranes are the organs most commonly affected. GVHD is classified as acute or chronic depending on the pathophysiology and clinical presentation. Acute GVHD typically presents with the triad of rash, diarrhea, and hyperbilirubinemia, and treatment is based on systemic corticosteroid and immunosuppressant therapy. The cutaneous manifestations of chronic GVHD are divided into sclerodermiform and nonsclerodermiform, and the mucous membranes and skin appendages may also be affected. The diagnosis is mainly clinical, but skin biopsy can help in doubtful cases. Treatment can be topical, systemic, or physical, depending on the size, site, and depth of the lesions and the involvement of other organs.

  7. Prion disease tempo determined by host-dependent substrate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Charles E.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; van der Merwe, Jacques; Lau, Agnes; Yang, Jing; Grams, Jennifer; Di Bari, Michele A.; Nonno, Romolo; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Langeveld, Jan; McKenzie, Debbie; Westaway, David; Safar, Jiri G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of prion infection can take years or decades to manifest following the initial exposure. Molecular markers of prion disease include accumulation of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc), which is derived from its cellular precursor (PrPC), as well as downregulation of the PrP-like Shadoo (Sho) glycoprotein. Given the overlapping cellular environments for PrPC and Sho, we inferred that PrPC levels might also be altered as part of a host response during prion infection. Using rodent models, we found that, in addition to changes in PrPC glycosylation and proteolytic processing, net reductions in PrPC occur in a wide range of prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and cervid chronic wasting disease. The reduction in PrPC results in decreased prion replication, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for generating PrPSc in vitro. While PrPC downregulation is not discernible in animals with unusually short incubation periods and high PrPC expression, slowly evolving prion infections exhibit downregulation of the PrPC substrate required for new PrPSc synthesis and as a receptor for pathogenic signaling. Our data reveal PrPC downregulation as a previously unappreciated element of disease pathogenesis that defines the extensive, presymptomatic period for many prion strains. PMID:24430187

  8. Host-bacterial interactions in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mahida, Yashwant R; Rolfe, Vivien E

    2004-10-01

    Large numbers of different bacterial species are resident in the lumen of the distal gastrointestinal tract. The normal intestinal host-microbial interactions are not well understood, but the relationship is generally believed to be either mutually beneficial or beneficial to one without disadvantage to the other. Animal model and clinical studies suggest that IBD (inflammatory bowel disease) may develop in a susceptible individual when the normal host-bacterial relationship is dysregulated. In addition to rodent models, this article reviews studies that have investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms of interactions between intestinal mucosal cells and the resident luminal bacteria in healthy individuals and patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Mechanisms by which the intestinal mucosa is able to avoid pro-inflammatory responses to commensal bacteria (and their products) but able to respond appropriately to luminal pathogens is currently an area of active investigation. Such studies are beginning to provide important clues regarding possible alterations in the mucosa that lead to the development of pro-inflammatory responses to resident bacteria in patients with IBD. Approaches to alter the intestinal microflora for therapeutic purposes and their potential mechanisms of action are also discussed.

  9. ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE PATHOLOGY AS A HOST RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an age-related neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by dementia and neuropathologically by accumulation of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Identification of their constituents in the mid 1980s led to an exponential expansion of knowledge pertaining to metabolic pathways of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, in terms of normal human physiology and pathophysiology of neurodegeneration. Forgotten is the fact that our experience with AD pathology is based on end-stage lesions that have an imperfect correlation with clinical dementia in terms of lesion burden and affected brain region, and that the an AD is based on lesions that also occur in cognitively intact elderly. Attempts at addressing this fundamental defect now focus on toxic intermediates, namely Aβ oligomers, and their potential direct involvement of the synapse. Current thinking on AD pathology includes the concept that hallmark lesions may be non-toxic- something we have long been suggesting. We favor the interpretation that AD pathology represents a host response to an upstream pathophysiological process, and targeting lesions, including toxic intermediates, will not likely be beneficial so long as the host response is directly deleterious. Therefore, renewed efforts directed at basic age-related processes, such as oxidative stress and/or inflammatory mediators, are warranted. PMID:18520771

  10. Steroid-responsive chronic hepatic graft-versus-host disease without extrahepatic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Gholson, C F; Yau, J C; LeMaistre, C F; Cleary, K R

    1989-10-01

    A 29-yr-old woman developed severe, progressive cholestasis 5 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Extrahepatic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was absent. Skin biopsy was equivocal 2 months after transplant, rash was absent during the period of cholestasis, and cholangiographic abnormalities were absent. Liver biopsy 7.5 months posttransplant revealed chronic hepatic GVHD. Cholestasis dramatically resolved with high dose corticosteroid therapy. Chronic hepatic GVHD occurs in the absence of overt extraintestinal GVHD and respond promptly to therapy. This underscores the importance of aggressive diagnostic evaluation of posttransplant cholestasis.

  11. Host neuro- immuno-endocrine responses in periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Rettori, Elisa; De Laurentiis, Andrea; Dees, W Les; Endruhn, Axel; Rettori, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory complex disease caused by microorganisms. It may be influenced by diverse systemic disorders, environmental, genetic and socio-psychological factors with the ability to alter the balance of the host neuro-immunoendocrine responses. It is characterized by the progressive destruction of the tooth supporting apparatus leading to tooth loss, with possible impact on general health. Starting with a brief description of the periodontium, etiopathogenesis, repair processes and several physiological mechanisms and their disarray on periodontium response to bacterial challenge. Following, the negative effects of stress on the disease and some remarks on the recently discovered effects of oxytocin that modulate stress response and its role in individual coping mechanisms to stress. We also focus on the participation of components and functions of endocannabinoid system with anti-inflammatory actions on gingiva. Finally, a discussion that may link between diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, stroke and metabolic syndrome associated with periodontal disease; all of them sharing a common denominator that is inflammation and oxidative stress.

  12. Primary prophylaxis of bacterial infections and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with hematological malignancies and solid tumors : guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (DGHO).

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Krause, S W; Maschmeyer, G; Schiel, X; von Lilienfeld-Toal, M

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common cause for treatment-related mortality in patients with neutropenia after chemotherapy. Here, we discuss the use of antibacterial prophylaxis against bacteria and Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in neutropenic cancer patients and offer guidance towards the choice of drug. A literature search was performed to screen all articles published between September 2000 and January 2012 on antibiotic prophylaxis in neutropenic cancer patients. The authors assembled original reports and meta-analysis from the literature and drew conclusions, which were discussed and approved in a consensus conference of the Infectious Disease Working Party of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology (AGIHO). Antibacterial prophylaxis has led to a reduction of febrile events and infections. A significant reduction of overall mortality could only be shown in a meta-analysis. Fluoroquinolones are preferred for antibacterial and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for PCP prophylaxis. Due to serious concerns about an increase of resistant pathogens, only patients at high risk of severe infections should be considered for antibiotic prophylaxis. Risk factors of individual patients and local resistance patterns must be taken into account. Risk factors, choice of drug for antibacterial and PCP prophylaxis and concerns regarding the use of prophylactic antibiotics are discussed in the review.

  13. Prophylaxis for blood-borne diseases during the London 7/7 mass casualty terrorist bombing: a review and the role of bioethics.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Dafydd S; Barnett-Vanes, A; Narayan, N; Patel, H D L

    2016-10-01

    The suicide bombings in London on 7 July 2005 resulted in a mass casualty situation. Over 50% of casualties were treated at the Royal London Hospital where clinicians witnessed large numbers of severely injured patients. In some casualties human biological foreign material was found embedded in the soft tissue originating from the suicide bombers or other casualties. This had the potential of placing individuals at risk of transmission of blood-borne diseases. Advances in the fields of medicine and biology have led to increased survivorship in the context of trauma and mass casualty incidents. This has resulted in the emergence of ethical scenarios surrounding patient management. A systematic review of the literature of the 7/7 bombings, and suicide bombings reported globally, where biological implantation is noted, was performed to examine the medicolegal issues arising during such attack. Twelve casualties with human tissue implanted were recorded in the 7/7 bombings. While all patients at risk were given prophylaxis based on recommendations by the Health Protection Agency, several ethical considerations surfaced as a result. In this paper, we compare the sequence of events and the management process of the victims of the 7/7 bombings and the evidence-based research regarding blood-borne infection transmission. Furthermore, it explores the ethical dilemmas, experienced by the senior author on 7/7, surrounding prophylaxis for blood-borne diseases and protocols to avoid confusion over best practice in future bombing incidents.

  14. Primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases in allogeneic stem cell transplantation: revised recommendations from a consensus process by Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

    PubMed

    Girmenia, Corrado; Barosi, Giovanni; Piciocchi, Alfonso; Arcese, William; Aversa, Franco; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Bandini, Giuseppe; Bosi, Alberto; Busca, Alessandro; Castagnola, Elio; Caselli, Desiree; Cesaro, Simone; Ciceri, Fabio; Locasciulli, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Pagano, Livio; Prete, Arcangelo; Raiola, Anna Maria; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    This document updates and expands the recommendations on primary prophylaxis of invasive fungal diseases (IFD) in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients, published in 2009 by the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO). A consensus process was undertaken to describe and evaluate current information and practice regarding risk stratification and primary antifungal prophylaxis during the pre-engraftment and postengraftment phases after allo-HSCT. The revised recommendations were based on the evaluation of recent literature including a large, prospective, multicenter epidemiological study of allo-HSCT recipients conducted among the GITMO transplantation centers during the period of 2008 to 2010. It is intended as a guide for the identification of types and phases of transplantation at low, standard, and high risk for IFD, according to the underlying disease, transplantation, and post-transplantation factors. The risk stratification was the critical determinant of the primary antifungal approach for allo-HSCT recipients. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Host NKT cells can prevent graft-versus-host disease and permit graft antitumor activity after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Asha B; George, Tracy I; Dutt, Suparna; Teo, Pearline; Strober, Samuel

    2007-05-15

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is a curative treatment for leukemia and lymphoma, but graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) remains a major complication. Using a GVHD protective nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen of total lymphoid irradiation and antithymocyte serum (TLI/ATS) in mice that has been recently adapted to clinical studies, we show that regulatory host NKT cells prevent the expansion and tissue inflammation induced by donor T cells, but allow retention of the killing activity of donor T cells against the BCL1 B cell lymphoma. Whereas wild-type hosts given transplants from wild-type donors were protected against progressive tumor growth and lethal GVHD, NKT cell-deficient CD1d-/- and Jalpha-18-/- host mice given wild-type transplants cleared the tumor cells but died of GVHD. In contrast, wild-type hosts given transplants from CD8-/- or perforin-/- donors had progressive tumor growth without GVHD. Injection of host-type NKT cells into Jalpha-18-/- host mice conditioned with TLI/ATS markedly reduced the early expansion and colon injury induced by donor T cells. In conclusion, after TLI/ATS host conditioning and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, host NKT cells can separate the proinflammatory and tumor cytolytic functions of donor T cells.

  16. [Chemokine Receptor-5 and Graft-versus-Host Disease].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Liu, Wei; Ren, Han-Yun

    2015-06-01

    Chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) belongs to a G-protein coupled receptors superfamily. It is mainly expressed on a wide variety of immune cells. CCR5 can bind with its specific ligands, which plays very important roles in inflammatory cell growth, differentiation, activation, adhesion and migration. CCR5 was identified as a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) to infect CD4+ T cells. In addition, CCR5 not only participates in the pathogenic mechanisms of many inflammation disease such as AIDS, auto-immune disease, and atherosclerosis, but also plays important roles in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Recent studies using murine models have demonstrated the critical role of CCR5 and its ligands which direct T-cell infiltration and recruitment into target tissues during acute GVHD. CCR5 has become the focus of intense interest and discussion, and this review will attempt to describe what is understood about the structure and function, internalization, signal transduction of CCR5, in order to investigate the relationship between CCR5 and acute GVHD.

  17. Initiation of acute graft-versus-host disease by angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Riesner, Katarina; Shi, Yu; Jacobi, Angela; Kraeter, Martin; Kalupa, Martina; McGearey, Aleixandria; Mertlitz, Sarah; Cordes, Steffen; Schrezenmeier, Jens-Florian; Mengwasser, Jörg; Westphal, Sabine; Perez-Hernandez, Daniel; Schmitt, Clemens; Dittmar, Gunnar; Guck, Jochen; Penack, Olaf

    2017-01-17

    The inhibition of inflammation-associated angiogenesis ameliorates inflammatory diseases by reducing the recruitment of tissue infiltrating leukocytes. However, it is not known if angiogenesis has an active role during the initiation of inflammation or if it is merely a secondary effect occurring in response to stimuli by tissue infiltrating leukocytes. Here we show that angiogenesis precedes leukocyte infiltration in experimental models of inflammatory bowel disease and acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We found that angiogenesis occurred as early as day+2 after allogeneic transplantation mainly in GVHD typical target organs skin, liver and intestines whereas no angiogenic changes appeared due to conditioning or syngeneic transplantation. The initiation phase of angiogenesis was not associated to classical endothelial cell (EC) activation signs, such as Vegfa/VEGFR1+2 upregulation or increased adhesion molecule expression. During early GVHD at day+2, we found significant metabolic and cytoskeleton changes in target organ ECs in gene array- and proteomic analyses. These modifications have significant functional consequences as indicated by profoundly higher deformation in Real-time deformability cytometry. Our results demonstrate that metabolic changes trigger alterations in cell mechanics leading to enhanced migratory and proliferative potential of ECs during the initiation of inflammation. Our study adds evidence to the hypothesis that angiogenesis is involved in the initiation of tissue inflammation during GVHD.

  18. Gut Microbiota and Host Reaction in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Although alcohol feeding produces evident intestinal microbial changes in animals, only some alcoholics show evident intestinal dysbiosis, a decrease in Bacteroidetes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Gut dysbiosis is related to intestinal hyperpermeability and endotoxemia in alcoholic patients. Alcoholics further exhibit reduced numbers of the beneficial Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium. Large amounts of endotoxins translocated from the gut strongly activate Toll-like receptor 4 in the liver and play an important role in the progression of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), especially in severe alcoholic liver injury. Gut microbiota and bacterial endotoxins are further involved in some of the mechanisms of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its progression to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). There is experimental evidence that a high-fat diet causes characteristic dysbiosis of NAFLD, with a decrease in Bacteroidetes and increases in Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, and gut dysbiosis itself can induce hepatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome. Clinical data support the above dysbiosis, but the details are variable. Intestinal dysbiosis and endotoxemia greatly affect the cirrhotics in relation to major complications and prognosis. Metagenomic approaches to dysbiosis may be promising for the analysis of deranged host metabolism in NASH and cirrhosis. Management of dysbiosis may become a cornerstone for the future treatment of liver diseases. PMID:27682116

  19. The changing face of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Julie V

    2006-12-01

    Despite advances in the procedure and posttransplantation immunosuppressive therapy, more than half of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients develop graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Modern HSCT protocols have resulted in substantial alterations in the timing and relative incidences of acute and chronic GVHD, making traditional classification schemes obsolete. This article reviews major changes in HSCT during the past decade, evolving concepts of acute and chronic GVHD (including new diagnostic criteria) and the expanding spectrum of cutaneous GVHD. It focuses on observations that have led to a better delineation of the full constellation of skin findings in chronic cutaneous GVHD, including lichen sclerosus, morpheaform lesions, and eosinophilic fasciitis. Recent insights into pathogenesis of GVHD, lessons from GVHD arising in settings outside HSCT, and therapeutic advances also are highlighted.

  20. HISTOPATHOLOGIC DIAGNOSIS OF CHRONIC GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Howard M.; Cardona, Diana M.; Greenson, Joel K.; Hingorani, Sangeeta; Horn, Thomas; Huber, Elisabeth; Kreft, Andreas; Longerich, Thomas; Morton, Thomas; Myerson, David; Prieto, Victor G.; Rosenberg, Avi; Treister, Nathaniel; Washington, Kay; Ziemer, Mirjana; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Lee, Stephanie J.; Flowers, Mary E.D.; Schultz, Kirk R.; Jagasia, Madan; Martin, Paul J.; Vogelsang, Georgia B.; Kleiner, David E.

    2015-01-01

    The 2005 National Institute of Health (NIH) Consensus Conference outlined histopathological diagnostic criteria for the major organ systems affected by both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The 2014 Consensus Conference led to this updated document with new information from histopathological studies of GVHD in the gut, liver, skin and oral mucosa and expanded discussion of GVHD in the lungs and kidneys. The recommendations for final histological diagnostic categories have been simplified from 4 categories to 3: no GVHD, possible, and likely GVHD based on better reproducibility achieved by combining the previous categories of consistent with and definite GVHD into the single category of likely GVHD. Issues remain in the histopathological characterization of GVHD, particularly with respect to the threshold of histological changes required for diagnostic certainty. Guidance is provided for the incorporation of biopsy information into prospective clinical studies of GVHD, particularly with respect to biomarker validation. PMID:25639770

  1. Photo-induced graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Juliette M; Marguery, Marie-Claude; Huynh, Anne; Borel, Cécile; Apoil, Pol André; Lamant, Laurence; Tournier, Emilie; Alberto, Chloé; Pauwels, Céline; Thomas, Marianne; Mazereeuw Hautier, Juliette; Paul, Carle; Bulai Livideanu, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Overlap chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) associates both features of acute and chronic GVHD. Trigger factors for chronic GVHD are unclear. We describe two patients who received allogenic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and who later developed overlap chronic GVHD after sun exposure. Available data from in vivo investigations suggest ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) has a beneficial effect on acute and chronic GVHD. The role of sun irradiation as a trigger for isomorphic cutaneous GVHD has been rarely reported in the literature. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, using repetitive broadband phototesting, that UVB triggers chronic GVHD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Gastrointestinal chronic graft-versus-host disease: management options.

    PubMed

    Awan, Farrukh; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2007-03-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a common and debilitating condition afflicting a number of allogeneic stem cell recipients more than 100 days after their transplant. Limited options are available for the acute management of patients with severe gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms including gastric bleeding. Along with increased immunosuppression and aggressive supportive care, we report here the use of aminocaproic acid in the management of patients with GI bleeding resulting from severe GVHD. The use of aminocaproic acid enabled us to reduce the frequency and number of blood product transfusions required to manage our patient. Anti-fibrinolytic agents may therefore serve as useful adjunctive but underutilized therapy in the management of patients with severe GI chronic GVHD.

  3. Autoimmune disease and malignant lymphoma associated with host-versus-graft disease in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, M; Kondo, N; Itoh, T; Yoshiki, T

    1985-01-01

    BALB/c mice neonatally injected with (BALB/c X C57BL/6)F1 hybrid spleen cells develop host-versus-graft disease (HVGD) with immunopathological features characteristic of either systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or immunoblastic lymphadenopathy (IBL) in man. HVGD mice manifest polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia with various autoantibodies, generalized lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, immune complex glomerulonephritis and evolve in the end to malignant lymphoma. The necessary prerequisite for HVGD induction between donor and host can be summarized as follows: Histoincompatibilities in the H-2 region between donor and host are needed; predominant F1 donor cells needed for HVGD induction are, if not sole, steroid resistant, nylon wool nonadherent and Thy-1 positive T cells; the role of donor T cells is not only to present H-2 complex to the host, but also to interact with and proliferate in the host; strain differences are found for the susceptibility of HVGD induction in the host. It has been found that HVGD evolves to a malignant lymphoma of host T cell origin. The HVGD mouse model may, therefore, contribute to the understanding of the cell to cell interactions at work in the pathogenesis of IBL, as well as SLE, in man. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:4085149

  4. Effect of delaying prophylaxis against CMV in D+/R- solid organ transplant recipients in the development of CMV-specific cellular immunity and occurrence of late CMV disease.

    PubMed

    San-Juan, R; Navarro, D; García-Reyne, A; Montejo, M; Muñoz, P; Carratala, J; Len, O; Fortun, J; Muñoz-Cobo, B; Gimenez, E; Eworo, A; Sabe, N; Meije, Y; Martin-Davila, P; Andres, A; Delgado, J; Jimenez, C; Amat, P; Fernández-Ruiz, M; López-Medrano, F; Lumbreras, C; Aguado, J M

    2015-11-01

    Evaluate the protective effect against late CMV disease of delaying antiviral prophylaxis initiation in D+/R- patients receiving solid organ transplant (SOT). Prospective multicenter study in D+/R- SOT recipients in Spain (Sept/09-Sept/12). Whole blood specimens were prospectively collected after Tx for CMV-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) determination. Two prophylaxis strategies were compared: early prophylaxis (EP; starting within the first 3 days after Tx) and delayed prophylaxis (DP; starting 14 days after Tx). Risk factors for the occurrence of CMV disease were determined by survival analysis and proportional risk Cox regression models. We included 95 patients (50 EP V 45 DP). Twenty six patients (27.4%) developed CMV disease: 32.7% EP vs. 20% DP; (p = 0.2). No cases of CMV disease were reported previously to beginning delayed prophylaxis. The percentage of individuals with detectable CMI response was higher in patients with DP although differences did not reach statistic significance (42% vs 29.6% at day 200 after Tx; p = 0.4). There was a clear trend towards less end-organ CMV disease in patients receiving DP (18.2% EP vs 5% DP; p = 0.09) and DP was the only protective factor in the multivariate analysis (HR: 0.26; CI: 0.05-1.2; p = 0.09). A 14-day delay in CMV prophylaxis in D+/R- SOT recipients is safe and may reduce the incidence of late CMV end-organ disease although correlation of this effect with CMI responses was not complete. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Triazole antifungals used for prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal disease in adult haematology patients: Trough serum concentrations in relation to outcome.

    PubMed

    Ceesay, M Mansour; Couchman, Lewis; Smith, Melvyn; Wade, Jim; Flanagan, Robert J; Pagliuca, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Triazole antifungal drugs are widely used for the prophylaxis and treatment of invasive fungal disease (IFD). Efficacy may depend on attaining minimum effective plasma concentrations. The aim of this study was to ascertain the proportion of samples in which the recommended concentrations were achieved in patients given these drugs in relation to outcome. In-patients prescribed standard doses of fluconazole, itraconazole solution, posaconazole suspension, or oral voriconazole for at least one week were studied. Pre-dose serum triazole concentrations were measured using validated methods. There were 359 samples from 90 patients. The median (range) number of samples per patient was 3 (1-13), and the median (range) fluconazole, itraconazole, posaconazole (prophylaxis), posaconazole (treatment), and voriconazole serum concentrations were 5.64 (0.11-18), 0.57 (0-5.3), 0.31 (0.02-2.5), 0.65 (0.02-2.5), and 0.95 (0.10-5.4) mg/l, respectively. The number of samples in which the recommended pre-dose concentrations were achieved was 98 (54%), 9 (20%), 2 (18%), and 29 (49%) for itraconazole, posaconazole (>0.7 mg/l prophylaxis), posaconazole (treatment), and voriconazole, respectively. No significant differences were detected in the median triazole trough concentrations between patients with proven/probable IFD compared to those with no evidence of IFD. However, itraconazole was not detected in 10 samples (7 patients). The small number of patients who achieved the recommended trough posaconazole concentrations may explain the high rate of break-through IFD observed in patients prescribed this drug. Except for fluconazole, the number of patients prescribed standard doses of triazoles who achieved recommended trough triazole concentrations was low. The prospective use of serum triazole measurements assay may have improved outcomes with itraconazole, posaconazole, and with voriconazole.

  6. Eight challenges in modelling disease ecology in multi-host, multi-agent systems.

    PubMed

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G; Roberts, Mick G; Dobson, Andrew P; Heesterbeek, Hans; Hudson, Peter J; Lloyd-Smith, James O

    2015-03-01

    Many disease systems exhibit complexities not captured by current theoretical and empirical work. In particular, systems with multiple host species and multiple infectious agents (i.e., multi-host, multi-agent systems) require novel methods to extend the wealth of knowledge acquired studying primarily single-host, single-agent systems. We outline eight challenges in multi-host, multi-agent systems that could substantively increase our knowledge of the drivers and broader ecosystem effects of infectious disease dynamics.

  7. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mikio

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical molecular and genetic studies on Alzheimer's disease (AD) are summarized here. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Aβ42 and tau are the most sensitive biomarkers for the diagnosis of AD and prediction of its onset following mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Based on this progress, new diagnostic criteria for AD dementia, MCI due to AD, and preclinical AD were proposed by the National Institute of Aging (NIA) and Alzheimer's Association (AA) in April 2011. In these new criteria, progress in CSF biomarker and amyloid imaging studies over the past 10 years has added to critical information. The marked contributions of basic and clinical studies have established clinical evidence supporting these markers. Based on this progress, essential curative therapy for AD is urgently expected.

  8. Inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase alleviates graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Rezende, Barbara Maximino; Athayde, Rayssa Maciel; Gonçalves, William Antônio; Resende, Carolina Braga; Teles de Tolêdo Bernardes, Priscila; Perez, Denise Alves; Esper, Lísia; Reis, Alesandra Côrte; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Castor, Marina Gomes Miranda E; Cunha, Thiago Mattar; Machado, Fabiana Simão; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Pinho, Vanessa

    2017-09-25

    Leukotriene B4 (LTB4), a proinflammatory mediator produced by the enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO), is associated with the development of many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we evaluated the participation of the 5-LO/LTB4 axis in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) pathogenesis by transplanting 5-LO-deficient leukocytes and investigated the effect of pharmacologic 5-LO inhibition by zileuton and LTB4 inhibition by CP-105,696. Mice that received allogeneic transplant showed an increase in nuclear 5-LO expression in splenocytes, indicating enzyme activation after GVHD. Mice receiving 5-LO-deficient cell transplant or zileuton treatment had prolonged survival, reduced GVHD clinical scores, reduced intestinal and liver injury, and decreased levels of serum and hepatic LTB4 These results were associated with inhibition of leukocyte recruitment and decreased production of cytokines and chemokines. Treatment with CP-105,696 achieved similar effects. The chimerism or the beneficial graft-versus-leukemia response remained unaffected. Our data provide evidence that the 5-LO/LTB4 axis orchestrates GVHD development and suggest it could be a target for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for GVHD treatment. © 2017 Rezende et al.

  9. Biomarkers in chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozmus, Jacob; Schultz, Kirk R

    2011-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a leading cause of allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation-related mortality and morbidity. It is an immune-mediated disorder that can target almost any organ in the body, often with devastating consequences. The immune-suppressive medications currently used to treat it are equally toxic and are often not very effective. At this time, our understanding of its pathophysiology is limited. The discovery of potential biomarkers offers new possibilities in the clinical management of cGVHD. They could potentially be used for diagnosing cGVHD, for predicting or evaluating response to therapy and for unique insights into the pathophysiology underlying the clinical manifestations of cGVHD. Understanding the biological origins of these biomarkers can help us construct a more comprehensive and clinically relevant model for the pathogenesis of this disease. In this article, we review existing evidence for candidate biomarkers that have been identified in the framework of how they may contribute to the pathophysiology of cGVHD. Issues regarding the discovery and application of biomarkers are discussed. PMID:21668397

  10. How we treat chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a common and potentially life-threatening complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). The 2-year cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD requiring systemic treatment is ∼30% to 40% by National Institutes of Health criteria. The risk of chronic GVHD is higher and the duration of treatment is longer after HCT with mobilized blood cells than with marrow cells. Clinical manifestations can impair activities of daily living and often linger for years. Hematology and oncology specialists who refer patients to centers for HCT are often subsequently involved in the management of chronic GVHD when patients return to their care after HCT. Treatment of these patients can be optimized under shared care arrangements that enable referring physicians to manage long-term administration of immunosuppressive medications and supportive care with guidance from transplant center experts. Keys to successful collaborative management include early recognition in making the diagnosis of chronic GVHD, comprehensive evaluation at the onset and periodically during the course of the disease, prompt institution of systemic and topical treatment, appropriate monitoring of the response, calibration of treatment intensity over time in order to avoid overtreatment or undertreatment, and the use of supportive care to prevent complications and disability. PMID:25398933

  11. Tolerability and outcome of once weekly liposomal amphotericin B for the prevention of invasive fungal infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Tran, H. Luu; Mahmoudjafari, Zahra; Rockey, Michelle; Henry, Dave; Grauer, Dennis; Aljitawi, Omar; Abhyankar, Sunil; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Lin, Tara; McGuirk, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Invasive fungal infections remain problematic in immunosuppressed allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients and the use of corticosteroids for the treatment of graft-versus-host-disease can increase the risk three-fold. Although antifungal prophylaxis has been shown to decrease the incidence of infection, the optimal antifungal prophylactic regimen in this patient population has yet to be identified. Since early diagnosis of fungal infections might not be possible and the treatment of established fungal infections might be difficult and associated with high infection related mortality, prevention has become an important strategy in reducing overall morbidity and mortality. While triazoles are the preferred agents, some patients are unable to tolerate them and an alternative drug is warranted. Objectives To assess the tolerability of once weekly liposomal amphotericin B as a prophylactic strategy in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation by evaluating any adverse events leading to its discontinuation. In terms of efficacy, to also compare the outcome and incidence of invasive fungal infections in patients who received amphotericin B, triazoles, and echinocandins. Results A total of 101 allogeneic transplant recipients receiving corticosteroids for the treatment of graft-versus-host-disease and antifungal prophylaxis were evaluated from August 2009 to September 2012. Liposomal amphotericin B 3 mg/kg intravenous once weekly was found to be well-tolerated. The incidence of invasive fungal infections was 19%, 17%, and 7% in the liposomal amphotericin B, echinocandin, and triazole groups, respectively. Two deaths occurred in the liposomal amphotericin B group and one death occurred in the echinocandin group. None of the deaths were fungal infection-related. Conclusion Antifungal prophylaxis with liposomal amphotericin B was well-tolerated but the incidence of invasive fungal infections in patients receiving liposomal amphotericin B was higher than

  12. Hepatobiliary graft-versus-host disease manifested by common and hepatic biliary duct obstruction.

    PubMed

    Zelig, O; Goldin, E; Okon, E; Or, R; Alian, H; Caspi, O; Ben-Yehuda, D

    1997-01-01

    A 26-year-old patient presented with ascending cholangitis 8 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for immunoblastic lymphoma. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed common and hepatic biliary duct obstruction that was attibuted to chronic graft-versus-host disease. This case indicates that hepatobiliary disease related to chronic graft-versus-host disease may involve major bile ducts causing obstruction.

  13. Targeting Alpha Toxin and ClfA with a Multimechanistic Monoclonal-Antibody-Based Approach for Prophylaxis of Serious Staphylococcus aureus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tkaczyk, C.; Hamilton, M. M.; Sadowska, A.; Shi, Y.; Chang, C.S.; Chowdhury, P.; Buonapane, R.; Xiao, X.; Warrener, P.; Mediavilla, J.; Kreiswirth, B.; Suzich, J.; Stover, C. K.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus produces numerous virulence factors, each contributing different mechanisms to bacterial pathogenesis in a spectrum of diseases. Alpha toxin (AT), a cytolytic pore-forming toxin, plays a key role in skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia, and a human anti-AT monoclonal antibody (MAb), MEDI4893*, has been shown to reduce disease severity in dermonecrosis and pneumonia infection models. However, interstrain diversity and the complex pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections suggests that MEDI4893* alone may not provide adequate protection against S. aureus sepsis. Clumping factor A (ClfA), a fibrinogen binding protein, is an important virulence factor facilitating S. aureus bloodstream infections. Herein, we report on the identification of a high-affinity anti-ClfA MAb, 11H10, that inhibits ClfA binding to fibrinogen, prevents bacterial agglutination in human plasma, and promotes opsonophagocytic bacterial killing (OPK). 11H10 prophylaxis reduced disease severity in a mouse bacteremia model and was dependent on Fc effector function and OPK. Additionally, prophylaxis with 11H10 in combination with MEDI4893* provided enhanced strain coverage in this model and increased survival compared to that obtained with the individual MAbs. The MAb combination also reduced disease severity in murine dermonecrosis and pneumonia models, with activity similar to that of MEDI4893* alone. These results indicate that an MAb combination targeting multiple virulence factors provides benefit over a single MAb neutralizing one virulence mechanism by providing improved efficacy, broader strain coverage, and protection against multiple infection pathologies. PMID:27353753

  14. The influence of host genetics on Marek's disease virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Henry D; Dunn, John R

    2013-06-01

    Since the first report of a polyneuritis in chickens by Joseph Marek in 1907, the clinical nature of the disease has changed. Over the last five decades, the pathogenicity of the Marek's disease virus (MDV) has continued to evolve from the relatively mild strains observed in the 1960s to the more severe strains labeled very virulent plus currently observed in today's outbreaks. To understand the influence of host genetics, specifically the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), on virus evolution, a bacterial artificial chromosome-derived MDV (Md5B40BAC) was passed in vivo through resistant (MHC-B21) and susceptible (MHC-B13) Line 0 chickens. Criteria for selecting virus isolates for in vivo passage were based on virus replication in white blood cells 21 days after challenge and evaluation of MD pathology at necropsy. In the MHC-B13-susceptible line the Md5B40BAC virulence consistently increased from 18% Marek's disease (MD) after in vivo passage 1 (B13-IVP1 Md5B40BAC) to 94% MD after B13-IVP5 Md5B40BAC challenge. In the MHC-B21-resistant line MD virulence fluctuated from 28% at B21-IVP1 Md5B40BAC to a high of 65% in B21-IVP2 Md5B40BAC back to a low of 23% in B21-IVP5 Md5B40BAC-challenged chicks. Although the B21-IVP5 Md5B40BAC isolates were relatively mild in the MHC-B21 chicken line (56% MDV), they were highly virulent in the MHC-B13 line (100% MDV). From this series of experiments it would appear that MDV evolution toward greater virulence occurs in both susceptible and resistant MHC haplotypes, but the resulting increase in pathogenicity is constrained by the resistant MHC haplotype.

  15. Absence of P-selectin in Recipients of Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation Ameliorates Experimental Graft-versus-Host-Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Sydney X.; Holland, Amanda M.; Na, Il-Kang; Terwey, Theis H.; Alpdogan, Onder; Bautista, Jhoanne L.; Smith, Odette M.; Suh, David; King, Christopher; Kochman, Adam; Hubbard, Vanessa M.; Rao, Uttam K.; Yim, Nury; Liu, Chen; Laga, Alvaro C.; Murphy, George; Jenq, Robert; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Penack, Olaf; Dykstra, Lindsay; Bampoe, Kevin; Perez, Lia; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Alloreactive T cells are crucial for graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) pathophysiology, and modulating their trafficking patterns has been efficacious in ameliorating experimental disease. We report here that P-selectin, a glycoprotein found on resting and inflamed endothelium, is important for donor alloreactive T cells trafficking into GVHD target organs such as the intestines and skin. Compared with wildtype recipients of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT), P-selectin−/− recipients exhibit decreased GVHD mortality and decreased GVHD of the skin, liver and small bowels. This was associated with diminished infiltration of alloactivated T cells into the Peyer's Patches and small bowels, coupled with increased numbers of donor T cells in the spleen and secondary lymphoid organs (SLO). Surprisingly however, donor T cells deficient for PSGL1, the most well-described P-selectin ligand, mediated similar GVHD as WT T cells, and accumulated in SLO and target organs in similar numbers as WT T cells. This suggests that P-selectin may be required for trafficking into inflamed tissues but not SLO, and that donor T cells may utilize multiple P-selectin ligands apart from PSGL1 to interact with P-selectin and traffic into inflamed tissues during GVHD. We conclude that targeting P-selectin may be a viable target for GVHD prophylaxis or treatment. PMID:20622117

  16. Fulminant transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease in a premature infant

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.S.; Dixon, S.L.

    1989-05-01

    A fatal case of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease developed in a premature infant after receiving several blood products, including nonirradiated white blood cells. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease can be prevented. Irradiation of blood products is the least controversial and most effective method. Treatment was unsuccessful in most reported cases of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Therefore irradiation of blood products before transfusing to patients susceptible to transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease is strongly recommended.

  17. Chronic graft-versus-host disease: clinical presentation of multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern*

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Luiza; Vieira, Érica Cristina; Minicucci, Eliana Maria; Salvio, Ana Gabriela; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar; Marques, Silvio Alencar

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease is observed mainly in recipients of hematopoietic cell transplantation and is expressed by cutaneous or systemic signals and symptoms. Graft-versus-host disease is clinically classified as acute or chronic. Chronic Graft-versus-host disease occurs in up to 70% of hematopoietic cell transplanted patients and its clinical manifestations have important impact on morbidity and quality of life. The authors report an expressive cutaneous, oral and adnexal involvement in a patient with chronic Graft-versus-host disease with multiple lesions of lichenoid and atrophic pattern. PMID:24173188

  18. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile.

  19. Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Laryea, Jonathan; Champagne, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) can occur after major general surgery. Pulmonary embolism is recognized as the most common identifiable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States. The risk of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is higher in colorectal surgical procedures compared with general surgical procedures. The incidence of venous thromboembolism in this population is estimated to be 0.2 to 0.3%. Prevention of VTE is considered a patient-safety measure in most mandated quality initiatives. The measures for prevention of VTE include mechanical methods (graduated compression stockings and intermittent pneumatic compression devices) and pharmacologic agents. A combination of mechanical and pharmacologic methods produces the best results. Patients undergoing surgery should be stratified according to their risk of VTE based on patient risk factors, disease-related risk factors, and procedure-related risk factors. The type of prophylaxis should be commensurate with the risk of VTE based on the composite risk profile. PMID:24436666

  20. Prophylaxis of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Eli

    2012-01-01

    Malaria prevention in travelers to endemic areas remains dependent principally on chemoprophylaxis. Although malaria chemoprophylaxis refers to all malaria species, a distinction should be drawn between falciparum malaria prophylaxis and the prophylaxis of the relapsing malaria species (vivax & ovale). While the emergence of drug resistant strains, as well as the costs and adverse reactions to medications, complicate falciparum prophylaxis use, there are virtually no drugs available for vivax prophylaxis, beside of primaquine. Based on traveler’s malaria data, a revised recommendation for using chemoprophylaxis in low risk areas should be considered. PMID:22811794

  1. Host and parasite diversity jointly control disease risk in complex communities

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Pieter T. J.; Preston, Daniel L.; Hoverman, Jason T.; LaFonte, Bryan E.

    2013-01-01

    Host–parasite interactions are embedded within complex communities composed of multiple host species and a cryptic assemblage of other parasites. To date, however, surprisingly few studies have explored the joint effects of host and parasite richness on disease risk, despite growing interest in the diversity–disease relationship. Here, we combined field surveys and mechanistic experiments to test how transmission of the virulent trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae was affected by the diversity of both amphibian hosts and coinfecting parasites. Within natural wetlands, host and parasite species richness correlated positively, consistent with theoretical predictions. Among sites that supported Ribeiroia, however, host and parasite richness interacted to negatively affect Ribeiroia transmission between its snail and amphibian hosts, particularly in species-poor assemblages. In laboratory and outdoor experiments designed to decouple the relative contributions of host and parasite diversity, increases in host richness decreased Ribeiroia infection by 11–65%. Host richness also tended to decrease total infections by other parasite species (four of six instances), such that more diverse host assemblages exhibited ∼40% fewer infections overall. Importantly, parasite richness further reduced both per capita and total Ribeiroia infection by 15–20%, possibly owing to intrahost competition among coinfecting species. These findings provide evidence that parasitic and free-living diversity jointly regulate disease risk, help to resolve apparent contradictions in the diversity–disease relationship, and emphasize the challenges of integrating research on coinfection and host heterogeneity to develop a community ecology-based approach to infectious diseases. PMID:24082092

  2. Biologic markers of chronic graft vs. host disease

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Sarwal, Minnie; Roedder, Silke; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Biologic markers of chronic graft vs. host disease (GVHD) may provide insight into the pathogenesis of the syndrome, identify molecular targets for novel interventions, and facilitate advances in clinical management. Despite extensive work performed to date largely focused on prediction and diagnosis of the syndrome, little synthesis of findings and validation of promising candidate markers in independent populations has been performed. Studies suggest that risk for subsequent chronic GVHD development may be associated with donor-recipient genetic polymorphism, deficiency in regulatory immune cell populations (NK, Treg, DC2), and variation in inflammatory and immunoregulatory mediators post-HCT (increased TNFα, IL-10 and BAFF, and decreased TGFβ and IL-15). Established chronic GVHD is associated with alteration in immune cell populations (increased CD3+ T cells, Th17, CD4+ and CD8+ effector memory cells, monocytes, CD86 expression, BAFF/B cell ratio, and deficiency of Treg, NK cells, and naïve CD8+ T cells). Inflammatory and immunomodulatory factors (TNFα, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, sIL-2R, and IL-1Ra, BAFF, anti-dsDNA, sIL-2Rα, and sCD13) are also perturbed. Little is known about biologic markers of chronic GVHD phenotype and severity, response to therapy, and prognosis. PMID:23872737

  3. Graft-versus-Host Disease Biomarkers: Omics and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Paczesny, Sophie; Raiker, Nisha; Brooks, Sam; Mumaw, Christy

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the most effective form of tumor immunotherapy available to date and the frequency of transplants continues to increase worldwide. However, while allo-HSCT usually induces a beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect, a major source of morbidity and mortality following allo-HSCT is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Currently available diagnostic and staging tools frequently fail to identify those at higher risk for GVHD morbidity, treatment unresponsiveness, and death. Furthermore, there are shortcomings in the risk stratification of patients before GVHD clinical signs develop. In parallel, recent years have been characterized by an explosive evolution of omics technologies, largely due to technological advancements in chemistry, engineering, and bioinformatics. Building on these opportunities, plasma biomarkers have been identified and validated as promising diagnostic and prognostic tools for acute GVHD. This review summarizes current information on the types of GVHD biomarkers, the omics tools used to identify them, the biomarkers currently validated as acute GVHD markers, and future recommendations for incorporating biomarkers into new grading algorithms for risk-stratifying patients and creating more personalized treatment courses. Future directions will include randomized evaluations of these biomarkers in multicenter prospective studies while extending on the need for biomarkers of chronic GVHD. PMID:23959582

  4. Ocular manifestations of graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Nassar, Amr; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Aljurf, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has evolved over the past two decades to become the standard of care for hematologic and lymphoid malignancies. Major ocular complications after allogeneic HSCT have been increasing in number and severity. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of ocular morbidity after allogeneic HSCT. The main objective of this review is to elucidate the ocular complications in patients developing GVHD following HSCT. Ocular complications secondary to GVHD are common and include dry eye syndrome, acquisition of ocular allergy from donors with allergic disorders. Eyelid changes may occur in GVHD leading to scleroderma-like changes. Patients may develop poliosis, madarosis, vitiligo, lagophthalmos, and entropion. The cornea may show filamentary keratitis, superficial punctate keratitis, corneal ulcers, and peripheral corneal melting which may lead to perforation in severe cases. Scleritis may also occur which can be anterior or posterior. Keratoconjunctivis sicca appears to be the most common presentation of GVHD. The lacrimal glands may be involved with mononuclear cell infiltration of both the major and accessory lacrimal glands and decrease in tear production. Severe dry eye syndrome in patients with GVHD may develop conjunctival scarring, keratinization, and cicatrization of the conjunctiva. Therapy of GVHD includes systemic immunosuppression and local therapy. Surgical treatment in refractory cases includes surgical intervention to improve the manifestation of GVHD of the eye. This may include tarsorrhapy, prose lenses, punctal occlusions and corneal transplantation. PMID:24227989

  5. Lymphocyte dysfunction in chronic graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Saxon, A.; McIntyre, R.E.; Stevens, R.H.; Gale, R.P.

    1981-10-01

    Three recipients of HLA-identical bone marrow transplants developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and hypergammaglobulinemia. All three had evidence of abnormal B-lymphocyte function, including a polyclonal increase in immunoglobulins (Ig), antinuclear antibodies, rheumatoid factor, lymphocytotoxins, and increased immune complexes. T-lymphocyte function was also abnormal, including decreased mitogen reactivity and delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity. The cellular basis of these immune abnormalities was studied in an in vitro system in which we analyzed spontaneous pokeweed mitogen (PWM) driven Ig synthesis. Multiple defects in both T- and B-lymphocyte function were detected. In contrast to normal B cells, circulating B cells from all three patients with cGVHD spontaneously synthesized in vitro greater than 200 ng of IgG and in two of the three greater than 175 ng of IgM. This increase in spontaneous Ig synthesis was not due to a deficiency of regulatory cells, since T cells from the three patients suppressed spontaneous Ig synthesis in a normal fashion. In contrast to this increased spontaneous Ig synthesis, the response of the patients' B cells to PWM-driven Ig synthesis was normal. Using the PWM system we demonstrated several defects in these patients' T cells, including increased suppressor activity and decreased helper cell activity. These data indicate that some patients with cGVHD have multiple defects in both T- and B-cell function that may contribute to their profound immune deficiency.

  6. Treatment of chronic graft-versus-host disease with bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Chien-Chun Steven; Chen, Mingyi; Mirsoian, Annie; Grossenbacher, Steven K.; Tellez, Joseph; Ames, Erik; Sun, Kai; Jagdeo, Jared; Blazar, Bruce R.; Abedi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has emerged as a predominant complication following HSCT and has a distinct etiology. We and others have previously demonstrated that bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, can prevent but not treat acute GVHD in mice. To assess the effects of bortezomib on cGVHD, a mouse minor histocompatibility antigen-mismatched strain combination was used to mimic clinical cGVHD sclerodermatous pathogenesis and phenotype. Treatment of ongoing cGVHD with bortezomib ameliorated cutaneous lesions, which were also associated with a reduction in total numbers of germinal center B cells and lower B-cell activating factor gene expression levels in cutaneous tissues. Importantly, lymphoma-bearing mice receiving allogeneic HSCT with bortezomib preserved graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. Based on these animal studies, we initiated an intrapatient dose escalation clinical trial in patients with extensive steroid–intolerant, dependent, or resistant cGVHD. Marked clinical improvement was observed in patients, which was also associated with reductions of peripheral B cells and minimal toxicity. These results indicate that bortezomib can be of significant use in the treatment of cGVHD and may also allow for maintenance of GVT. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01672229. PMID:25009225

  7. Bilateral corneal ulceration in ocular graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, William; Shikari, Hasanain; Saboo, Ujwala S; Amparo, Francisco; Dana, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report on corneal ulceration in ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Methods This was a retrospective, observational case series investigating corneal ulceration and perforation in a cohort of ocular GVHD patients seen between June 2007 and October 2012. Results Four of 243 ocular GVHD patients developed corneal ulcerations attributable to ocular GVHD, and all four cases involved bilateral corneal ulceration. The median length of time from the diagnosis of ocular GVHD to the diagnosis of the first corneal ulceration was 317 days (range 168–434). The median length of time between the diagnosis of corneal ulceration in each patient’s first and second eye was 248 days (range 9–645). Outcomes varied from complete resolution with medical treatment to corneal perforation necessitating penetrating keratoplasty. In cases of corneal perforation, the median length of time from the diagnosis of corneal ulceration to perforation was 10 days (range 0–20). Common clinical features included: centrally or paracentrally located ulcerations and perforations, concomitant dry eye, and the use of topical or systemic corticosteroids. Conclusion Frequent follow-up and bilateral monitoring are highly recommended in cases of ocular GVHD-associated stromal thinning, as bilateral involvement or rapid progression to corneal perforation can occur. PMID:24204119

  8. Bilateral corneal ulceration in ocular graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, William; Shikari, Hasanain; Saboo, Ujwala S; Amparo, Francisco; Dana, Reza

    2013-01-01

    To report on corneal ulceration in ocular graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). This was a retrospective, observational case series investigating corneal ulceration and perforation in a cohort of ocular GVHD patients seen between June 2007 and October 2012. Four of 243 ocular GVHD patients developed corneal ulcerations attributable to ocular GVHD, and all four cases involved bilateral corneal ulceration. The median length of time from the diagnosis of ocular GVHD to the diagnosis of the first corneal ulceration was 317 days (range 168-434). The median length of time between the diagnosis of corneal ulceration in each patient's first and second eye was 248 days (range 9-645). Outcomes varied from complete resolution with medical treatment to corneal perforation necessitating penetrating keratoplasty. In cases of corneal perforation, the median length of time from the diagnosis of corneal ulceration to perforation was 10 days (range 0-20). Common clinical features included: centrally or paracentrally located ulcerations and perforations, concomitant dry eye, and the use of topical or systemic corticosteroids. Frequent follow-up and bilateral monitoring are highly recommended in cases of ocular GVHD-associated stromal thinning, as bilateral involvement or rapid progression to corneal perforation can occur.

  9. Chronic cutaneous graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, H. M.; Sale, G. E.; Lerner, K. G.; Barker, E. A.; Weiden, P. L.; Sullivan, K.; Gallucci, B.; Thomas, E. D.; Storb, R.

    1978-01-01

    This clinicopathologic study of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic marrow transplantation emphasizes the most prominent feature of the syndrome, the cutaneous aspects, and describes the ophthalmic-oral sicca syndrome with sialoadenitis and the neurologic findings. Chronic cutaneous GVHD affected 19 of 92 recipients surviving 150 days or more. In 6 patients chronic GVHD presented as a continuation of acute GVHD; in 8 it occurred after the resolution of acute GVHD; and in 5 it arose without preceding acute GVHD, ie, de novo late onset. Two cutaneous types were distinguished. The generalized type affected 16 patients and ran a progressive course resulting in late complications of poikiloderma, diffuse dermal and subcutaneous fibrosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled generalized morphea and lupus erythermatosus hypertrophicus et profundus. The local type affected 3 patients with a more variable picture of poikiloderma, dermal sclerosis, and contractures. Microscopically, it resembled lupus of erythematosus profundus and scleroderma. Guidelines for defining and subclassifying chronic cutaneous GVHD are proposed. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 Figure 18 Figure 19 Figure 20 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:26221

  10. Innate lymphoid cells in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Konya, V; Mjösberg, J

    2015-11-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILC) are lymphocytes lacking rearranged antigen receptors such as those expressed by T and B cells. ILC are important effector and regulatory cells of the innate immune system, controlling lymphoid organogenesis, tissue inflammation, and homeostasis. The family of ILC consists of cytotoxic NK cells and the more recently described noncytotoxic group 1, 2, and 3 ILC. The classification of noncytotoxic ILC-in many aspects-mirrors that of T helper cells, which is based on the expression of master transcription factors and signature cytokines specific for each subset. The IL-22 producing RORγt(+) ILC3 subset was recently found to be critical in the prevention of intestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) via strengthening the intestinal mucosal barrier. In this review, we summarize the current view of the immunological functions of human noncytotoxic ILC subsets and discuss the potentially beneficial features of IL-22 producing ILC3 in improving allo-HCT efficacy by attenuating susceptibility to GVHD. In addition, we explore the possibility of other ILC subsets playing a role in GVHD. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Transplantation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Role of eosinophil peroxidase in host defense and disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianguo; Slungaard, Arne

    2006-01-15

    Three unusual substrates-bromide (Br(-)), nitrite (NO(2)(-)), and thiocyanate (SCN(-))-compete for oxidation by eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) in physiologic fluids in the presence of H(2)O(2) to yield, respectively, hypobromous acid (HOBr), nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)()), or hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). These oxidant products have strikingly different reactivities: HOBr and NO(2)() are potent, widely reactive, membrane-lytic oxidants whereas HOSCN is a weak, SH-specific oxidant that penetrates into cells and imposes an intracellular oxidant stress that can activate kinase pathways and transcription factors that profoundly influence gene expression in host cells. All three oxidants are lethal for pathogens. SCN(-) is the strongly preferred substrate for the EPO/H(2)O(2). Specific biomarkers document that EPO-dependent oxidants are generated at sites of inflammation, but direct evidence that these oxidants cause disease is confined to the observation that an EPO knockout mouse line has dramatically less pathologic damage than do wild type animals in a murine model of ulcerative colitis.

  12. Chronic graft-versus-host disease complicated by nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsin-Hui; Yang, An-Hang; Yang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Giun-Yi; Chang, Jei-Wen; Wang, Chun-Kai; Lee, Tzong-Yann; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2011-09-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Nephrotic syndrome (NS) is an uncommon and underrecognized manifestation of cGVHD. We report a patient who developed NS 18 months after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The onset of NS was accompanied by active manifestations of cGVHD, and immunosuppressants had not been tapered recently. Renal biopsy revealed membranous nephropathy. The patient failed to improve with three combined immunosuppressants (prednisolone, cyclosporine, and mycophenolate mofetil), but achieved partial remission after intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusion. Twenty-four months after the diagnosis of NS, the patient was still in hematological remission, with normal serum creatinine level, urinary protein loss of 0.7-1.9 g/day and mild oral mucositis. Our report suggests that NS can be a cGVHD-related immune disorder in HSCT patients. Monitoring of renal parameters, especially proteinuria, is important in cGVHD patients. Our case indicated that post-transplant NS, occurring without history of tapering or following immunosuppressant withdrawal, presents a more severe activity of cGVHD and a relatively severe clinical course. IVIG may modify and control the refractory GVHD-related NS, and can be one of the choices of treatment. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Can You Judge a Disease Host by the Company It Keeps? Predicting Disease Hosts and Their Relative Importance: A Case Study for Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Christopher R; González-Salazar, Constantino; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Becker, Ingeborg; Rebollar-Tellez, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Domingo Balcells, Cristina; Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N; Ibarra López, Martha Pilar; Iñiguez Dávalos, Luis Ignacio; Ramírez Martínez, María Magdalena

    2016-10-01

    Zoonoses are an important class of infectious diseases. An important element determining the impact of a zoonosis on domestic animal and human health is host range. Although for particular zoonoses some host species have been identified, until recently there have been no methods to predict those species most likely to be hosts or their relative importance. Complex inference networks infer potential biotic interactions between species using their degree of geographic co-occurrence, and have been posited as a potential tool for predicting disease hosts. Here we present the results of an interdisciplinary, empirical study to validate a model based on such networks for predicting hosts of Leishmania (L.) mexicana in Mexico. Using systematic sampling to validate the model predictions we identified 22 new species of host (34% of all species collected) with the probability to be a host strongly dependent on the probability of co-occurrence of vector and host. The results confirm that Leishmania (L.) mexicana is a generalist parasite but with a much wider host range than was previously thought. These results substantially change the geographic risk profile for Leishmaniasis and provide insights for the design of more efficient surveillance measures and a better understanding of potential dispersal scenarios.

  14. Can You Judge a Disease Host by the Company It Keeps? Predicting Disease Hosts and Their Relative Importance: A Case Study for Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Christopher R.; Sánchez-Cordero, Víctor; Becker, Ingeborg; Rebollar-Tellez, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Moreno, Ángel; Berzunza-Cruz, Miriam; Domingo Balcells, Cristina; Gutiérrez-Granados, Gabriel; Hidalgo-Mihart, Mircea; Ibarra-Cerdeña, Carlos N.; Ibarra López, Martha Pilar; Iñiguez Dávalos, Luis Ignacio; Ramírez Martínez, María Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Zoonoses are an important class of infectious diseases. An important element determining the impact of a zoonosis on domestic animal and human health is host range. Although for particular zoonoses some host species have been identified, until recently there have been no methods to predict those species most likely to be hosts or their relative importance. Complex inference networks infer potential biotic interactions between species using their degree of geographic co-occurrence, and have been posited as a potential tool for predicting disease hosts. Here we present the results of an interdisciplinary, empirical study to validate a model based on such networks for predicting hosts of Leishmania (L.) mexicana in Mexico. Using systematic sampling to validate the model predictions we identified 22 new species of host (34% of all species collected) with the probability to be a host strongly dependent on the probability of co-occurrence of vector and host. The results confirm that Leishmania (L.) mexicana is a generalist parasite but with a much wider host range than was previously thought. These results substantially change the geographic risk profile for Leishmaniasis and provide insights for the design of more efficient surveillance measures and a better understanding of potential dispersal scenarios. PMID:27716833

  15. Marek's disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed

    McPherson, Marla C; Cheng, Hans H; Delany, Mary E

    2016-11-04

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotropic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unvaccinated host birds. The causative pathogen, MD virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres. MD occurrence is controlled across the globe by biosecurity, selective breeding for enhanced MD genetic resistance, and widespread vaccination of flocks using attenuated serotype 1 MDV or other serotypes. Despite over 40 years of usage, the specific mechanism(s) of MD vaccine-related immunity and anti-tumor effects are not known. Here we investigated the cytogenetic interactions of commonly used MD vaccine strains of all three serotypes (HVT, SB-1, and Rispens) with the host to determine if all were equally capable of host genome integration. We also studied the dynamic profiles of chromosomal association and integration of the three vaccine strains, a first for MD vaccine research. Our cytogenetic data provide evidence that all three MD vaccine strains tested integrate in the chicken host genome as early as 1 day after vaccination similar to oncogenic strains. However, a specific, transformation-associated virus-host phenotype observed for oncogenic viruses is not established. Our results collectively provide an updated model of MD vaccine-host genome interaction and an improved understanding of the possible mechanisms of vaccinal immunity. Physical integration of the oncogenic MDV genome into host chromosomes along with cessation of viral replication appears to have joint signification in MDV's ability to induce oncogenic transformation. Whereas for MD vaccine serotypes, a sustained viral replication stage and lack of the chromosome-integrated only stage were shared traits during early infection.

  16. Appropriate VTE prophylaxis is associated with lower direct medical costs.

    PubMed

    Amin, Alpesh; Hussein, Mohamed; Battleman, David; Lin, Jay; Stemkowski, Stephen; Merli, Geno J

    2010-11-01

    To calculate and compare the direct medical costs of guideline-recommended prophylaxis with prophylaxis that does not fully adhere with guideline recommendations in a large, real-world population. Discharge records were retrieved from the US Premier Perspective™ database (January 2003-December 2003) for patients aged≥40 years with a primary diagnosis of cancer, chronic heart failure, lung disease, or severe infectious disease who received some form of thromboprophylaxis. Univariate analysis and multivariate regression modeling were performed to compare direct medical costs between discharges who received appropriate prophylaxis (correct type, dose, and duration based on sixth edition American College of Chest Physicians [ACCP] recommendations) and partial prophylaxis (not in full accordance with ACCP recommendations). Market segmentation analysis was used to compare costs stratified by hospital and patient characteristics. Of the 683 005 discharges included, 148,171 (21.7%) received appropriate prophylaxis and 534,834 (78.3%) received partial prophylaxis. The total direct unadjusted costs were $15,439 in the appropriate prophylaxis group and $17,763 in the partial prophylaxis group. After adjustment, mean adjusted total costs per discharge were lower for those receiving appropriate prophylaxis ($11,713; 95% confidence interval [CI], $11,675-$11,753) compared with partial prophylaxis ($13,369; 95% CI, $13,332-$13 406; P<0.01). Appropriate prophylaxis appeared to be associated with numerically lower unadjusted costs than partial prophylaxis, regardless of hospital size, rural/urban location, teaching status, and patient age and gender. This large, real-world analysis suggests that appropriate prophylaxis, in adherence with ACCP guidelines, is potentially cost-saving compared with partial prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients.

  17. Presentation and Outcome of Castleman's Disease in Immunocompetent Hosts.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Gaurav; Bal, Amanjeet; Malhotra, Pankaj; Aggarwal, Vaishali; Khadwal, Alka; Suri, Vikas; Jain, Sanjay; Kumari, Savita; Srinivasan, Radhika; Das, Ashim; Varma, Neelam; Varma, Subhash

    2016-12-01

    Castleman's disease (CD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder of unknown aetiology. Mostly, this disorder is seen in immunocompromised hosts. It is known to be associated with systemic disorders like HIV, HHV-8, lymphoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. As of today, the clinical behaviour and outcome of CD in immunocompetent host remains suboptimally studied. We analyzed consecutively treated cases of CD presented to our centre in last 12 years. Case record files were studied for patient's characteristics, clinical presentation, baseline laboratory and pathologic parameters, therapy and outcome. This study describes presentation and treatment outcome of CD in immunocompetent patients. Total 16 patients of CD were treated during the study period. The median age of patients at the time of presentation was 40.5 years (range 13-72 years). An equal number of patients (8 each) had unicentric and multicentric CD. Sixty-three percent patients had hyaline vascular subtype while 37 % patients had plasma cell or mixed variant. Majority of the patients had good performance status (ECOG PS 0, 1 in 10 (62.5 %) patients; PS2-4 in 6 (37.5 %) patients). The median duration of symptoms was 6 months (range 2-36 months). None of the patients in our study had associated HIV infection. Six patients presented with fever, out of which four had plasma cell variant of CD and three of them had multicentric involvement. In comparison to unicentric CD, patients with multicentric CD had lower albumin levels (4.15 vs. 3.38 g/dl, p = 0.006), haemoglobin levels (11.3 vs. 9.8, p = 0.06), and lower complete remission rates (62.5 % vs. none). Patients were treated according to the stage and clinical status with surgery, chemotherapy or combination of both modalities. Surgery was the predominant treatment for unicentric CD while multicentric CD was treated with various chemotherapy regimens. Eight patients were treated with chemotherapy (CHOP-based regimen-5, melphalan

  18. A randomized study of the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, N.K.C.; Kersey, J.H.; Robison, L.L.; McGlave, P.B.; Woods, W.G.; Krivit, W.; Kim, T.H.; Goldman, A.I.; Nesbit, M.E., Jr.

    1982-02-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease is a major problem in allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. We performed a randomized study to compare the effectiveness of two regimens in the prevention of acute graft-versus-host disease. Thirty-five patients received methotrexate alone, and 32 received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone. Of the patients who received methotrexate alone, 48 percent had acute graft-versus-host disease, as compared with 21 per cent of those who received methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone (P = 0.01). The age of the recipient was a significant factor in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease: Older patients had a higher incidence of the disease (P = 0.001). We conclude that the combination of methotrexate, antithymocyte globulin, and prednisone significantly decreased the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease and should be used to prevent this disorder in patients receiving allogeneic marrow transplants.

  19. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Chronic graft-versus-host disease following umbilical cord blood transplantation: retrospective survey involving 1072 patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Hiroto; Miyakoshi, Shigesaburo; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Kami, Masahiro; Matsumura, Tomoko; Yuji, Koichiro; Murashige, Naoko; Kusumi, Eiji; Kodama, Yuko; Komatsu, Tsunehiko; Sakamaki, Hisashi; Kouzai, Yasushi; Okada, Masaya; Osugi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Inoue, Masami; Takahashi, Satoshi; Kai, Shunro; Kato, Koji; Inoue-Nagamura, Tokiko; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Kato, Shunichi

    2008-09-15

    We have little information on chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after cord blood transplantation (CBT). We investigated its clinical features in 1072 Japanese patients with hematologic malignancies who received a transplant through the Japan Cord Blood Bank Network. The primary end point was to investigate the incidence of any chronic GVHD. Median age of the patients was 33 years (range, 0-79 years). The cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD 2 years after transplantation was 28%. Chronic GVHD was fatal in 29 patients. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that development of chronic GVHD was favorably associated with both overall survival and event-free survival. Multivariate analysis identified risk factors of chronic GVHD: higher patient body weight, higher number of mismatched antigens for GVHD direction, myeloablative preparative regimen, use of mycophenolate mofetil in GVHD prophylaxis, and development of grades II to IV acute GVHD. Although chronic GVHD is a significant problem after CBT, it is associated with improved survival, perhaps due to graft-versus-malignancy effects.

  1. Cryptic disease-induced mortality may cause host extinction in an apparently stable host-parasite system.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela-Sánchez, Andrés; Schmidt, Benedikt R; Uribe-Rivera, David E; Costas, Francisco; Cunningham, Andrew A; Soto-Azat, Claudio

    2017-09-27

    The decline of wildlife populations due to emerging infectious disease often shows a common pattern: the parasite invades a naive host population, producing epidemic disease and a population decline, sometimes with extirpation. Some susceptible host populations can survive the epidemic phase and persist with endemic parasitic infection. Understanding host-parasite dynamics leading to persistence of the system is imperative to adequately inform conservation practice. Here we combine field data, statistical and mathematical modelling to explore the dynamics of the apparently stable Rhinoderma darwinii-Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) system. Our results indicate that Bd-induced population extirpation may occur even in the absence of epidemics and where parasite prevalence is relatively low. These empirical findings are consistent with previous theoretical predictions showing that highly pathogenic parasites are able to regulate host populations even at extremely low prevalence, highlighting that disease threats should be investigated as a cause of population declines even in the absence of an overt increase in mortality. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Immune stimulation during chemotherapy increases incidence of acute graft versus host disease in acute myeloid leukemia: A study on behalf of SFGM-TC and ALFA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lining; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Thomas, Xavier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Bouhris, Jean-Henri; de Botton, Stéphane; Michallet, Mauricette; Quoc, Stéphanie Nguyen; Chantepie, Sylvain; Deconinck, Eric; Caillot, Denis; Turlure, Pascal; Vigouroux, Stéphane; Pigneux, Arnaud; Huynh, Anne; Malfuson, Jean-Valère; Loschi, Michael; Socie, Gerard; Dombret, Hervé; de la Tour, Régis Peffault; Cluzeau, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    60-70% of AML patients have an indication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) during their treatment. Graft versus host disease (GvHD), the major cause of mortality and comorbidities post-transplantation, develops by immunological mechanism and decides greatly prognosis and quality of life (QoL) of graft recipient. Current GvHD prophylaxis is not personalized. Infections, toxicities and leukemic infiltration complicate the first chemotherapy phases prior to allo-HSCT. They, to certain extent, induce local immune stimulation. Impact of immune stimulation of this period on incidence of GvHD has not been evaluated. We retrospectively studied 238 AML patients transplanted at first remission from 21 French centers in the ALFA-0702 protocol and found that cutaneous and digestive immune stimulation during induction increases the incidence of skin and gut aGVHD, respectively. Furthermore, prolonged febrile duration correlates with elevated incidence of grade II-IV aGvHD. Thus, we identified a group of patients with higher risk of aGvHD. The benefit of personalized GvHD prophylaxis should be explored in a prospective cohort to decrease incidence of aGvHD in these patients and improve their QoLs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Sepsis and antibiotic prophylaxis in stereotaxic neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Padrón-Sánchez, A; Ochoa-Zaldivar, L; López-Flores, G; García-Maeso, I; Barnés-Domínguez, J A; Reconde-Suárez, D

    Stereotaxic surgery is becoming increasingly important because of the possibility of approaching the deep zones of the brain with less risk. It is in daily use in cerebral tumours and in the functional surgery of Parkinson's disease. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery is controversial, although in many centres, including ours, all patients receive it. To study the pre-operative clinical characteristics analysing the antibiotic prophylaxis used, septic complications seen and their management. In this study we included 93 patients with neurosurgical disorders operated on using a stereotaxic approach in the Neurosurgical Department of the Centro Internacional de Restauración Neurologica (Cuba) during 1997 and 1998, in which antibiotic prophylaxis was used and septic patients detected. The variables studied included age, sex, neurological disorders, surgical operations done and the antibiotic used for prophylaxis. We analysed the test of clinical criteria for sepsis in all patients. We found that a greater number of patients operated on had had functional surgery, which showed its importance as an alternative surgical method in Parkinson's disease. There was satisfactory use of antibiotic prophylaxis with a reduction in the rate of nosocomial infection; most infections were seen in the lower respiratory tract. These results support the hypothesis of use of antibiotic prophylaxis in stereotaxic surgery to achieve a reduction in intra-hospital infections in surgical patients.

  4. New mechanisms of disease and parasite-host interactions.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Tiago Alves Jorge; de Carli, Gabriel Jose; Pereira, Tiago Campos

    2016-09-01

    An unconventional interaction between a patient and parasites was recently reported, in which parasitic cells invaded host's tissues, establishing several tumors. This finding raises various intriguing hypotheses on unpredicted forms of interplay between a patient and infecting parasites. Here we present four unusual hypothetical host-parasite scenarios with intriguing medical consequences. Relatively simple experimental designs are described in order to evaluate such hypotheses. The first one refers to the possibility of metabolic disorders in parasites intoxicating the host. The second one is on possibility of patients with inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) being more resistant to parasites (due to accumulation of toxic compounds in the bloodstream). The third one refers to a mirrored scenario: development of tumors in parasites due to ingestion of host's circulating cancer cells. The last one describes a complex relationship between parasites accumulating a metabolite and supplying it to a patient with an IEM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparing First- and Second-Year Palivizumab Prophylaxis in Patients with Hemodynamically Significant Congenital Heart Disease in the CARESS Database (2005-2015).

    PubMed

    Li, Abby; Wang, Daniel Y; Lanctôt, Krista L; Mitchell, Ian; Paes, Bosco A

    2016-10-06

    Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization (RSVH) rates in children less than <2 years of age with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (HSCHD) are 2-4 fold higher compared with healthy term infants. Pediatric recommendations differ as to whether palivizumab is beneficial beyond 1 year of age. The objective was to determine whether differences exist in respiratory-related illness hospitalization (RIH) and RSVH in HSCHD infants receiving palivizumab during the first year versus second year of life in the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS). CARESS is a prospective database of infants who received ≥1 dose of palivizumab in 32 hospitals from 2005-2015. Demographic data were collected at enrollment and RIH events recorded monthly. Infants <24 months with HSCHD were recruited. Of 1909 HSCHD infants, 1380 (72.3%) in the first year (mean age 4.2 months) and 529 (27.7%) in the second year of life (mean age 17.8 months) received prophylaxis. Baseline demographics for daycare attendance, multiple births, enrollment age and weight differed between the groups (all p<0.05). Additionally, second year infants had a more complicated neonatal course, with significantly longer length of stay (51.2 versus 24.9 days) compared with those in the first year. The RIH and RSVH rates in the first year and second year were 11.2%; 10.6% and 2.3%; 1.7% respectively. Cox regression analysis showed similar hazard for RIH (Hazard ratio: 1.9, 95%CI 0.7-4.6, p=0.18) and RSVH (Hazard ratio: 2.0, 95%CI 0.2-16.5, p=0.52). Infants in the first and second year of life had a similar RSVH hazard. These findings suggest that infants in the second year with HSCHD, who remain unstable, are equally at risk for RSVH and merit prophylaxis.

  6. Comparing First- and Second-year Palivizumab Prophylaxis in Patients With Hemodynamically Significant Congenital Heart Disease in the CARESS Database (2005-2015).

    PubMed

    Li, Abby; Wang, Daniel Y; Lanctôt, Krista L; Mitchell, Ian; Paes, Bosco A

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization (RSVH) rates in children <2 years of age with hemodynamically significant congenital heart disease (HSCHD) are 2- to 4-fold higher compared with healthy term infants. Pediatric recommendations differ as to whether palivizumab is beneficial beyond 1 year of age. The objective of this study was to determine whether differences exist in respiratory-related illness hospitalization (RIH) and RSVH in HSCHD infants receiving palivizumab during the first year versus second year of life in the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab. The Canadian Registry of Palivizumab is a prospective database of infants who received ≥1 dose of palivizumab in 32 hospitals from 2005 to 2015. Demographic data were collected at enrollment and RIH events recorded monthly. Infants <24 months of age with HSCHD were recruited. Of 1909 HSCHD infants, 1380 (72.3%) in the first year (mean age, 4.2 months) and 529 (27.7%) in the second year of life (mean age, 17.8 months) received prophylaxis. Baseline demographics for day-care attendance, multiple births, enrollment age and weight differed between the groups (all P < 0.05). Additionally, second year infants had a more complicated neonatal course, with significantly longer length of stay (51.2 vs. 24.9 days) compared with those in the first year. The RIH and RSVH rates in the first year were 11.2% and 2.3% and in the second year were 10.6% and 1.7%. Cox regression analysis showed similar hazard for RIH [hazard ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval: 0.7-4.6; P = 0.18] and RSVH [hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% confidence interval: 0.2-16.5; P = 0.52]. Infants in the first and second year of life had a similar RSVH hazard. These findings suggest that infants in the second year with HSCHD, who remain unstable, are equally at risk for RSVH and merit prophylaxis.

  7. Prophylaxis for the International Traveller

    PubMed Central

    MacPherson, D. W.

    1985-01-01

    Travellers should know as much as possible about the quality of food and drink in the areas of travel, and be prepared with safety measures if necessary. Routine immunization should be up to date; cholera and yellow fever vaccinations are required for travel to certain areas. Such prophylaxis should be sought, ideally, several months before departure. Resurgences of malaria are occurring in areas where the disease had previously been controlled, making prophylaxis essential for travel to endemic areas. Other mild disorders may be treated with medication appropriate to the type of travel and area. Patients may appreciate cautionary advice about behavior, to lessen the likelihood of physical or social harm. ImagesFig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:21274123

  8. Eight challenges in modelling disease ecology in multi-host, multi-agent systems

    PubMed Central

    Buhnerkempe, Michael G.; Roberts, Mick G.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Heesterbeek, Hans; Hudson, Peter J.; Lloyd-Smith, James O.

    2015-01-01

    Many disease systems exhibit complexities not captured by current theoretical and empirical work. In particular, systems with multiple host species and multiple infectious agents (i.e., multi-host, multi-agent systems) require novel methods to extend the wealth of knowledge acquired studying primarily single-host, single-agent systems. We outline eight challenges in multi-host, multi-agent systems that could substantively increase our knowledge of the drivers and broader ecosystem effects of infectious disease dynamics. PMID:25843378

  9. Biomarker Panel for Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeffrey; Storer, Barry E.; Kushekhar, Kushi; Abu Zaid, Mohammad; Zhang, Qing; Gafken, Philip R.; Ogata, Yuko; Martin, Paul J.; Flowers, Mary E.; Hansen, John A.; Arora, Mukta; Cutler, Corey; Jagasia, Madan; Pidala, Joseph; Hamilton, Betty K.; Chen, George L.; Pusic, Iskra; Lee, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify diagnostic and prognostic markers of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), the major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients and Methods Using a quantitative proteomics approach, we compared pooled plasma samples obtained at matched time points after HCT (median, 103 days) from 35 patients with cGVHD and 18 without cGVHD (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002762). Of 105 proteins showing at least a 1.25-fold difference in expression, 22 were selected on the basis of involvement in relevant pathways and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay availability. Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 (CXCL9) and suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) also were measured on the basis of previously determined associations with GVHD. Concentrations of the four lead biomarkers were measured at or after diagnosis in plasma from two independent verification cohorts (n = 391) to determine their association with cGVHD. Their prognostic ability when measured at approximately day +100 after HCT was evaluated in plasma of a second verification cohort (n = 172). Results Of 24 proteins measured in the first verification cohort, nine proteins were associated with cGVHD, and only four (ST2, CXCL9, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and osteopontin) were necessary to compose a four-biomarker panel with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.89 and significant correlation with cGVHD diagnosis, cGVHD severity, and nonrelapse mortality. In a second verification cohort, this panel distinguished patients with cGVHD (AUC, 0.75), and finally, the panel measured at day +100 could predict cGVHD occurring within the next 3 months with an AUC of 0.67 and 0.79 without and with known clinical risk factors, respectively. Conclusion We conclude that the biomarker panel measured at diagnosis or day +100 after HCT may allow patient stratification according to risk of cGVHD. PMID:27217465

  10. A Canine Model of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Graves, Scott S; Rezvani, Andrew; Sale, George; Stone, Diane; Parker, Maura; Rosinski, Steven; Spector, Michele; Swearingen, Bruce; Kean, Leslie; Storb, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    In long-term survivors of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is the major cause of morbidity and mortality and a major determinant of quality of life. Chronic GVHD responds poorly to current immunosuppressive drugs, and while T cell depletion may be preventive, this gain is offset by increased relapse rates. A significant impediment to progress in treating chronic GVHD has been the limitations of existing animal models. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible comprehensive model of chronic GVHD in the dog. Ten recipient dogs received 920 cGy total body irradiation, infusion of marrow, and an infusion of buffy coat cells from a dog leukocyte antigen (DLA)-mismatched unrelated donor. Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of methotrexate (days 1, 3, 6, 11) and cyclosporine. The duration of cyclosporine administration was limited to 80 days instead of the clinically used 180 days. This was done to contain costs, as chronic GVHD was expected to develop at earlier time points. All recipients were given ursodiol for liver protection. One dog had graft failure and 9 dogs showed stable engraftment. Eight of the 9 developed de novo chronic GVHD. Dogs progressed with clinical signs of chronic GVHD over a period of 43 to 164 (median, 88) days after discontinuation of cyclosporine. Target organs showed the spectrum of chronic GVHD manifestations that are typically seen clinically. These included lichenoid changes of the skin, fasciitis, ocular involvement (xerophthalmia), conjunctivitis, bronchiolitis obliterans, salivary gland involvement, gingivitis, esophageal involvement, and hepatic involvement. Peripheral blood lymphocyte surface antigen expression of CD28 and inducible costimulator was elevated in dogs with GHVD compared with those in normal dogs, but not significantly so. Serum levels of IL-8 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in GVHD-affected dogs at time of euthanasia were elevated, whereas

  11. Biomarker Panel for Chronic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jeffrey; Storer, Barry E; Kushekhar, Kushi; Abu Zaid, Mohammad; Zhang, Qing; Gafken, Philip R; Ogata, Yuko; Martin, Paul J; Flowers, Mary E; Hansen, John A; Arora, Mukta; Cutler, Corey; Jagasia, Madan; Pidala, Joseph; Hamilton, Betty K; Chen, George L; Pusic, Iskra; Lee, Stephanie J; Paczesny, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    To identify diagnostic and prognostic markers of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), the major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Using a quantitative proteomics approach, we compared pooled plasma samples obtained at matched time points after HCT (median, 103 days) from 35 patients with cGVHD and 18 without cGVHD (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002762). Of 105 proteins showing at least a 1.25-fold difference in expression, 22 were selected on the basis of involvement in relevant pathways and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay availability. Chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 9 (CXCL9) and suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) also were measured on the basis of previously determined associations with GVHD. Concentrations of the four lead biomarkers were measured at or after diagnosis in plasma from two independent verification cohorts (n = 391) to determine their association with cGVHD. Their prognostic ability when measured at approximately day +100 after HCT was evaluated in plasma of a second verification cohort (n = 172). Of 24 proteins measured in the first verification cohort, nine proteins were associated with cGVHD, and only four (ST2, CXCL9, matrix metalloproteinase 3, and osteopontin) were necessary to compose a four-biomarker panel with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.89 and significant correlation with cGVHD diagnosis, cGVHD severity, and nonrelapse mortality. In a second verification cohort, this panel distinguished patients with cGVHD (AUC, 0.75), and finally, the panel measured at day +100 could predict cGVHD occurring within the next 3 months with an AUC of 0.67 and 0.79 without and with known clinical risk factors, respectively. We conclude that the biomarker panel measured at diagnosis or day +100 after HCT may allow patient stratification according to risk of cGVHD. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Marek’s disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotrophic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unimmunized host birds. The causative pathogen, Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres during viral latency an...

  13. Development and Infectious Disease in Hosts with Complex Life Cycles

    PubMed Central

    Searle, Catherine L.; Xie, Gisselle Yang; Blaustein, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Metamorphosis is often characterized by profound changes in morphology and physiology that can affect the dynamics of species interactions. For example, the interaction between a pathogen and its host may differ depending on the life stage of the host or pathogen. One pathogen that infects hosts with complex life cycles is the emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We sought to determine how conditions at the larval stage can affect variation in development and patterns of Bd infection across amphibian life stages. We used outdoor experimental mesocosms to simulate natural pond habitats and manipulated the presence of Bd, the larval density, and the number of host species in larvae of two co-occurring amphibian species (Rana cascadae and Pseudacris regilla). We found that infection differed between species throughout development; P. regilla consistently had higher infection severity compared to R. cascadae. Additionally, while up to 100% of larvae were infected, only 18.2% of R. cascadae and 81.5% of P. regilla were infected after metamorphosis. This indicates that amphibians have the ability to recover from Bd infection as they undergo metamorphosis. Higher larval densities in P. regilla led to a shorter larval period, and individuals with a shorter larval period had lower infection severity. This led to a trend where P. regilla larvae reared at high densities tended to have lower infection prevalence after metamorphosis. We also found that exposure to Bd increased larval mortality and prolonged the larval period in P. regilla, indicating that P. regilla are susceptible to the negative effects of Bd as larvae. This study demonstrates that host density, species composition, and pathogen exposure may all interact to influence development and infection in hosts with complex life cycles. PMID:23565288

  14. Development and infectious disease in hosts with complex life cycles.

    PubMed

    Searle, Catherine L; Xie, Gisselle Yang; Blaustein, Andrew R

    2013-01-01

    Metamorphosis is often characterized by profound changes in morphology and physiology that can affect the dynamics of species interactions. For example, the interaction between a pathogen and its host may differ depending on the life stage of the host or pathogen. One pathogen that infects hosts with complex life cycles is the emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We sought to determine how conditions at the larval stage can affect variation in development and patterns of Bd infection across amphibian life stages. We used outdoor experimental mesocosms to simulate natural pond habitats and manipulated the presence of Bd, the larval density, and the number of host species in larvae of two co-occurring amphibian species (Rana cascadae and Pseudacris regilla). We found that infection differed between species throughout development; P. regilla consistently had higher infection severity compared to R. cascadae. Additionally, while up to 100% of larvae were infected, only 18.2% of R. cascadae and 81.5% of P. regilla were infected after metamorphosis. This indicates that amphibians have the ability to recover from Bd infection as they undergo metamorphosis. Higher larval densities in P. regilla led to a shorter larval period, and individuals with a shorter larval period had lower infection severity. This led to a trend where P. regilla larvae reared at high densities tended to have lower infection prevalence after metamorphosis. We also found that exposure to Bd increased larval mortality and prolonged the larval period in P. regilla, indicating that P. regilla are susceptible to the negative effects of Bd as larvae. This study demonstrates that host density, species composition, and pathogen exposure may all interact to influence development and infection in hosts with complex life cycles.

  15. Cannabidiol for the Prevention of Graft-versus-Host-Disease after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Results of a Phase II Study.

    PubMed

    Yeshurun, Moshe; Shpilberg, Ofer; Herscovici, Corina; Shargian, Liat; Dreyer, Juliet; Peck, Anat; Israeli, Moshe; Levy-Assaraf, Maly; Gruenewald, Tsipora; Mechoulam, Raphael; Raanani, Pia; Ram, Ron

    2015-10-01

    Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) is a major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Cannabidiol (CBD), a nonpsychotropic ingredient of Cannabis sativa, possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We hypothesized that CBD may decrease GVHD incidence and severity after alloHCT. We conducted a phase II study. GVHD prophylaxis consisted of cyclosporine and a short course of methotrexate. Patients transplanted from an unrelated donor were given low-dose anti-T cell globulin. CBD 300 mg/day was given orally starting 7 days before transplantation until day 30. Forty-eight consecutive adult patients undergoing alloHCT were enrolled. Thirty-eight patients (79%) had acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome and 35 patients (73%) were given myeloablative conditioning. The donor was either an HLA-identical sibling (n = 28), a 10/10 matched unrelated donor (n = 16), or a 1-antigen-mismatched unrelated donor (n = 4). The median follow-up was 16 months (range, 7 to 23). No grades 3 to 4 toxicities were attributed to CBD. None of the patients developed acute GVHD while consuming CBD. In an intention-to-treat analysis, we found that the cumulative incidence rates of grades II to IV and grades III to IV acute GVHD by day 100 were 12.1% and 5%, respectively. Compared with 101 historical control subjects given standard GVHD prophylaxis, the hazard ratio of developing grades II to IV acute GVHD among subjects treated with CBD plus standard GVHD prophylaxis was .3 (P = .0002). Rates of nonrelapse mortality at 100 days and at 1 year after transplantation were 8.6% and 13.4%, respectively. Among patients surviving more than 100 days, the cumulative incidences of moderate-to-severe chronic GVHD at 12 and 18 months were 20% and 33%, respectively. The combination of CBD with standard GVHD prophylaxis is a safe and promising strategy to reduce the incidence of acute GVHD. A randomized double-blind controlled study is warranted

  16. The Gut Microbiota and Immune System Relationship in Human Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Laterza, Lucrezia; Rizzatti, Gianenrico; Gaetani, Eleonora; Chiusolo, Patrizia; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota has gained increasing interest in the pathogenesis of immune-related diseases. In this context, graft-versus-host disease is a condition characterized by an immune response which frequently complicates and limits the outcomes of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations. Past studies, carried mostly in animals, already supported a relationship between gut microbiota and graft-versus-host disease. However, the possible mechanisms underlying this connection remain elusory. Moreover, strategies to prevent graft-versus-host disease are of great interest as well as the potential role of gut microbiota modulation. We reviewed the role of gut microbiota in the development of immune system and its involvement in the graft-versus-host disease, focusing on data available on humans. PMID:27158438

  17. HIV postexposure prophylaxis after sexual assault.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L; Brown, M A

    2001-12-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease have prompted health care providers to reexamine recommendations for prophylaxis of HIV infection. Parallels with occupational exposure through mucous membrane tissues spur consideration of HIV prophylaxis after sexual assault for several reasons. In both instances, exposure occurs at a single point in time and is unlikely to recur. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention does not make definitive recommendations regarding postexposure prophylaxis after sexual assault, the reality is that as clinicians, we face situations in which we must consider treatment for prevention of HIV disease after sexual assault. Guidelines for treatment and how to create and implement a policy to ensure the best outcomes, and provide a high quality of patient care with the New York State guidelines as a model, are discussed.

  18. From superspreaders to disease hotspots: linking transmission across hosts and space

    PubMed Central

    Paull, Sara H.; Song, Sejin; McClure, Katherine M.; Sackett, Loren C.; Kilpatrick, A. Marm; Johnson, Pieter T. J.

    2012-01-01

    Since the identification and imprisonment of “Typhoid Mary,” a woman who infected at least 47 people with typhoid in the early 1900s, epidemiologists have recognized that ‘superspreading’ hosts play a key role in disease epidemics. Such variability in transmission also exists among species within a community (amplification hosts) and among habitat patches across a landscape (disease ‘hotspots’), underscoring the need for an integrative framework for studying transmission heterogeneity. Here, we synthesize literature on human, plant, and animal diseases to evaluate the relative contributions of host, pathogen, and environmental factors in driving transmission heterogeneity across hosts and space. We show that host and spatial heterogeneity are closely linked and that quantitatively assessing the contribution of infectious individuals, species, or environmental patches to overall transmission can aid management strategies. We conclude by posing hypotheses regarding how pathogen natural history influences transmission heterogeneity and highlight emerging frontiers in the study of transmission heterogeneity. PMID:23482675

  19. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  20. [Effectiveness of iodine prophylaxis and frequency of thyroid enlargement (thyroid goiter) and clinical diagnosis of thyroid diseases in inhabitants of the Szczecin region after the Czernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Syrenicz, A; Goździk, J; Pynka, S; Pilarska, K; Gruszczyńska, M; Gołebiowska, I; Syrenicz, M; Miazgowski, T; Listewnik, M; Krzyzanowska, B

    1991-01-01

    The study, supported by program MZ-XVII, was carried on 4567 inhabitants of the area of Szczecin (2350 females and 2217 males). The population was chosen randomly, according to a simple drawing scheme. All subjects were clinically examined using standardised questionnaires. In 3468 persons (including 1807 girls and women, 1661 boys and men) apart form clinical examination, the assessment of thyrotropin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine in serum and frequency of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antithyroid membrane antibodies were evaluated. The data indicate that 94% of children in Szczecin's region received the prophylactic dose of iodine, mostly between the 1st and the 5th of May 1986. Only 17% of the adults received iodine. The most common preparation was Lugol solution given in a single dose. Among all persons who received iodine, only in 5% of subjects the side effects were noted (mostly in children), including symptoms of gastrointestinal tract (vomiting, abdomen pain) and occasionally intrathyroid side effects (thyroid pains). In examined population the high frequency of thyroid enlargement, mainly in women (up to 43-44% at the age group 30-50 years) was found. The frequency of clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease was higher in women than in man (most often the diffuse goiter, rarely the nodular goiter). The frequency of thyroid enlargement and clinical diagnosis of thyroid disease was not dependent on prophylactic iodine intake. The iodine prophylaxis did not influence on thyroid hormones and TSH serum levels and on frequency of antithyroid antibodies.

  1. Molecular biology of viroid-host interactions and disease control strategies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Viroids are single-stranded, covalently closed, circular, highly structured noncoding RNAs that cause disease in several economically important crop plants. They replicate autonomously and move systemically in host plants with the aid of the host machinery. In addition to symptomatic infections, vir...

  2. Transmission dynamics of an emerging infectious disease in wildlife through host reproductive cycles

    PubMed Central

    Uchii, Kimiko; Telschow, Arndt; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Honjo, Mie N; Matsui, Kazuaki; Kawabata, Zen'ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Emerging infectious diseases are major threats to wildlife populations. To enhance our understanding of the dynamics of these diseases, we investigated how host reproductive behavior and seasonal temperature variation drive transmission of infections among wild hosts, using the model system of cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) disease in common carp. Our main findings were as follows: (1) a seroprevalence survey showed that CyHV-3 infection occurred mostly in adult hosts, (2) a quantitative assay for CyHV-3 in a host population demonstrated that CyHV-3 was most abundant in the spring when host reproduction occurred and water temperature increased simultaneously and (3) an analysis of the dynamics of CyHV-3 in water revealed that CyHV-3 concentration increased markedly in breeding habitats during host group mating. These results indicate that breeding habitats can become hot spots for transmission of infectious diseases if hosts aggregate for mating and the activation of pathogens occurs during the host breeding season. PMID:20740025

  3. [Deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Chagoya, Gloria Alejandra; Laniado-Laborín, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background: despite the proven effectiveness of preventive therapy for deep vein thrombosis, a significant proportion of patients at risk for thromboembolism do not receive prophylaxis during hospitalization. Our objective was to determine the adherence to thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines in a general hospital as a quality control strategy. Methods: a random audit of clinical charts was conducted at the Tijuana General Hospital, Baja California, Mexico, to determine the degree of adherence to deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis guidelines. The instrument used was the Caprini's checklist for thrombosis risk assessment in adult patients. Results: the sample included 300 patient charts; 182 (60.7 %) were surgical patients and 118 were medical patients. Forty six patients (15.3 %) received deep vein thrombosis pharmacologic prophylaxis; 27.1 % of medical patients received deep vein thrombosis prophylaxis versus 8.3 % of surgical patients (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: our results show that adherence to DVT prophylaxis at our hospital is extremely low. Only 15.3 % of our patients at risk received treatment, and even patients with very high risk received treatment in less than 25 % of the cases. We have implemented strategies to increase compliance with clinical guidelines.

  4. Resources, mortality, and disease ecology: Importance of positive feedbacks between host growth rate and pathogen dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Val H.; Holt, Robert D.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Niu, Yafen; Barfield, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Resource theory and metabolic scaling theory suggest that the dynamics of a pathogen within a host should strongly depend upon the rate of host cell metabolism. Once an infection occurs, key ecological interactions occur on or within the host organism that determine whether the pathogen dies out, persists as a chronic infection, or grows to densities that lead to host death. We hypothesize that, in general, conditions favoring rapid host growth rates should amplify the replication and proliferation of both fungal and viral pathogens. If a host population experiences an increase in mortality, to persist it must have a higher growth rate, per host, often reflecting greater resource availability per capita. We hypothesize that this could indirectly foster the pathogen, which also benefits from increased within-host resource turnover. We first bring together in a short review a number of key prior studies which illustrate resource effects on viral and fungal pathogen dynamics. We then report new results from a semi-continuous cell culture experiment with SHIV, demonstrating that higher mortality rates indeed can promote viral proliferation. We develop a simple model that illustrates dynamical consequences of these resource effects, including interesting effects such as alternative stable states and oscillatory dynamics. Our paper contributes to a growing body of literature at the interface of ecology and infectious disease epidemiology, emphasizing that host abundances alone do not drive community dynamics: the physiological state and resource content of infected hosts also strongly influence host-pathogen interactions. PMID:27642269

  5. Less graft-versus-host disease after rabbit antithymocyte globulin conditioning in unrelated bone marrow transplantation for leukemia and myelodysplasia: comparison with matched related bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Atta, Elias Hallack; de Oliveira, Danielli Cristina Muniz; Bouzas, Luis Fernando; Nucci, Márcio; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks for unrelated donor (UD) bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Despite results from randomized trials, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is not routinely included for GVHD prophylaxis in UD BMT by many centers. One of ways to demonstrate the usefulness of rabbit ATG in UD BMT is to evaluate how its results approximate to those observed in matched related (MRD) BMT. Therefore, we compared the outcomes between UD BMT with rabbit ATG (Thymoglobulin) for GVHD prophylaxis (n = 25) and MRD BMT (n = 91) for leukemia and myelodysplasia. All but one patient received a myeloablative conditioning regimen. Grades II-IV acute GVHD were similar (39.5% vs. 36%, p = 0.83); however, MRD BMT recipients developed more moderate-severe chronic GVHD (36.5% vs. 8.6%, p = 0.01) and GVHD-related deaths (32.5% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.04). UD BMT independently protected against chronic GVHD (hazard ratio 0.23, p = 0.04). The 6-month transplant-related mortality, 1-year relapse incidence, and 5-year survival rates were similar between patients with non-advanced disease in the MRD and UD BMT groups, 13.8% vs. 16.6% (p = 0.50), 20.8% vs. 16.6% (p = 0.37), and 57% vs. 50% (p = 0.67), respectively. Stable full donor chimerism was equally achieved (71.3% vs. 71.4%, p = 1). Incorporation of rabbit ATG in UD BMT promotes less GVHD, without jeopardizing chimerism evolution, and may attain similar survival outcomes as MRD BMT for leukemia and myelodysplasia especially in patients without advanced disease.

  6. Prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole, posaconazole and caspofungin - review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Major progress for the management of invasive aspergillosis has come from the introduction of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Although mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains as high as 30-50%. Backbone of management are prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungals for reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Randomized trials have been undertaken for the prophylaxis as well as treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the last two decades. Posaconazole is recommended for prophylaxis against aspergillosis in patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or patients with graft versus host disease after allogeneic transplantation. Efficacy has been shown for first-line therapy of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B. Gastrointestinal resorption for the azoles posaconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole differ considerably. While oral voriconazole resportion is reduced when taken with food, posaconazole has to be taken with fatty food for optimal intestinal resorption. Beside all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state of prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs. PMID:21486728

  7. Prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole, posaconazole and caspofungin: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Karthaus, M

    2011-04-28

    Major progress for the management of invasive aspergillosis has come from the introduction of new antifungals since the late 1990s. Although mortality of invasive aspergillosis remains as high as 30-50%. Backbone of management are prophylaxis, early diagnosis and early initiation of antifungals for reduction of invasive aspergillosis related mortality. Randomized trials have been undertaken for the prophylaxis as well as treatment of invasive aspergillosis in the last two decades. Posaconazole is recommended for prophylaxis against aspergillosis in patients treated for acute myelogenous leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or patients with graft versus host disease after allogeneic transplantation. Efficacy has been shown for first-line therapy of invasive aspergillosis with voriconazole and liposomal amphotericin B. Gastrointestinal resorption for the azoles posaconazole, voriconazole and itraconazole differ considerably. While oral voriconazole resportion is reduced when taken with food, posaconazole has to be taken with fatty food for optimal intestinal resorption. Beside all advances in the management of invasive aspergillosis important questions remain unresolved. This article reviews the current state of prophylaxis and treatment of invasive aspergillosis and points out clinicians unmet needs.

  8. Homeostatic expansion and repertoire regeneration of donor T cells during graft versus host disease is constrained by the host environment

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Jack; Chen, Xiao; Gendelman, Mariya; Yassai, Maryam; Krueger, Ashley; Tivol, Elizabeth; Logan, Brent; Komorowski, Richard; Vodanovic-Jankovic, Sanja

    2007-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) typically results in impaired T-cell reconstitution characterized by lymphopenia and repertoire skewing. One of the major causes of inadequate T-cell reconstitution is that T-cell survival and expansion in the periphery are impaired. In this report, we have performed adoptive transfer studies to determine whether the quantitative reduction in T-cell numbers is due to an intrinsic T-cell defect or whether the environmental milieu deleteriously affects T-cell expansion. These studies demonstrate that T cells obtained from animals with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) are capable of significant expansion and renormalization of an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio when they are removed from this environment. Moreover, these cells can generate complex T-cell repertoires early after transplantation and are functionally competent to respond to third-party alloantigens. Our data indicate that T cells from mice undergoing GVHD can respond to homeostatic signals in the periphery and are not intrinsically compromised once they are removed from the GVHD environment. We thereby conclude that the host environment and not an intrinsic T-cell defect is primarily responsible for the lack of effective T-cell expansion and diversification of complex T-cell repertoires that occurs during GVHD. PMID:17347406

  9. Pre-exposure Prophylaxis With OspA-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice Against Tick Transmission of Lyme Disease Spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Kern, Aurélie; Boatright, Naomi K; Schiller, Zachary A; Sadowski, Andrew; Ejemel, Monir; Souders, Colby A; Reimann, Keith A; Hu, Linden; Thomas, William D; Klempner, Mark S

    2016-07-15

    Tick transmission of Borrelia spirochetes to humans results in significant morbidity from Lyme disease worldwide. Serum concentrations of antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA) were shown to correlate with protection from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the primary cause of Lyme disease in the United States. Mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin genes were immunized with OspA from B. burgdorferi to generate human monoclonal antibodies (HuMabs) against OspA. HuMabs were generated and tested in in vitro borreliacidal assays and animal protection assays. Nearly 100 unique OspA-specific HuMabs were generated, and 4 HuMabs (221-7, 857-2, 319-44, and 212-55) were selected as lead candidates on the basis of borreliacidal activity. HuMabs 319-44, 857-2, and 212-55 were borreliacidal against 1 or 2 Borrelia genospecies, whereas 221-7 was borreliacidal (half maximal inhibitory concentration, < 1 nM) against B. burgdorferi, Borrelia afzelii, and Borrelia garinii, the 3 main genospecies endemic in the United States, Europe, and Asia. All 4 HuMabs completely protected mice from infection at 10 mg/kg in a murine model of tick-mediated transmission of B. burgdorferi  Our study indicates that OspA-specific HuMabs can prevent the transmission of Borrelia and that administration of these antibodies could be employed as preexposure prophylaxis for Lyme disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Dysbiosis May Trigger Autoimmune Diseases via Inappropriate Post-Translational Modification of Host Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Aaron; Aminov, Rustam; Matthias, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in post-translational modification of proteins (PTMP) may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26903965

  11. Circadian entrainment by light and host in the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Valentinuzzi, Verónica Sandra; Amelotti, Ivana; Gorla, David Eladio; Catalá, Silvia Susana; Ralph, Martin Roland

    2014-03-01

    Triatoma infestans (Reduviidae: Triatominae, "kissing bug") is the main insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, a chronic trypanosomiasis infecting 10 million people world-wide. This hematophagous bug feeds on diurnal and nocturnal species during each host's quiescent time. As the hosts are also its major predators, kissing bugs are subjected to dual selective pressures from a single source. Therefore, synchronization of feeding with the host's behavior is critical to the insects' survival. We show that nonphotic signals linked to the host eclipse the role of light and dark as the primary circadian zeitgeber for these bugs, although light still strongly inhibits locomotor behavior directly. In nature, this combination provides the insect with great flexibility in organizing physiology and behavior: anticipating a quiescent host or avoiding its potential predation while remaining directly responsive to immediate environmental conditions. Manipulation of nonphotic entrainment could be a useful chronobiotic tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  12. Evaluation of oseltamivir prophylaxis regimens for reducing influenza virus infection, transmission and disease severity in a ferret model of household contact.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ding Yuan; Lowther, Sue; McCaw, James M; Sullivan, Sheena G; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Haining, Jessica; Arkinstall, Rachel; Kelso, Anne; Mcvernon, Jodie; Barr, Ian G; Middleton, Deborah; Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-09-01

    The emergence of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009 saw a significant increase in the therapeutic and prophylactic use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) to mitigate the impact of this highly transmissible virus. Prior to the pandemic, many countries stockpiled NAIs and developed pandemic plans for the use of antiviral drugs, based on either treatment of high-risk individuals and/or prophylaxis of contacts. However, to date there has been a lack of in vivo models to test the efficacy of treatment or prophylaxis with NAIs, for influenza-infected individuals or exposed contacts, in a household setting. A ferret model of household contact was developed to study the efficacy of different prophylaxis regimens in preventing infection in contact ferrets exposed to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09-infected index ferrets. Among the different prophylactic regimens, contact ferrets receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis twice daily showed better outcomes than those receiving oseltamivir once daily. Benefits included a significant delay in the time to secondary infection, lower weight loss and higher activity levels. The treatment of index ferrets at 36 h post-infection did not influence either secondary infection rates or clinical symptoms in exposed contact ferrets. Neither prophylaxis nor treatment prevented infection or reduced the duration of viral shedding, although clinical symptoms did improve in infected animals receiving prophylaxis. Different oseltamivir prophylaxis regimens did not prevent infections, but consistently resulted in a reduction in symptoms in infected ferrets. However, oseltamivir prophylaxis failed to reduce viral titres, which warrants further investigation in humans. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  13. Evaluation of oseltamivir prophylaxis regimens for reducing influenza virus infection, transmission and disease severity in a ferret model of household contact

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ding Yuan; Lowther, Sue; McCaw, James M.; Sullivan, Sheena G.; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Haining, Jessica; Arkinstall, Rachel; Kelso, Anne; Mcvernon, Jodie; Barr, Ian G.; Middleton, Deborah; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The emergence of the pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in 2009 saw a significant increase in the therapeutic and prophylactic use of neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) to mitigate the impact of this highly transmissible virus. Prior to the pandemic, many countries stockpiled NAIs and developed pandemic plans for the use of antiviral drugs, based on either treatment of high-risk individuals and/or prophylaxis of contacts. However, to date there has been a lack of in vivo models to test the efficacy of treatment or prophylaxis with NAIs, for influenza-infected individuals or exposed contacts, in a household setting. Methods A ferret model of household contact was developed to study the efficacy of different prophylaxis regimens in preventing infection in contact ferrets exposed to influenza A(H1N1)pdm09-infected index ferrets. Results Among the different prophylactic regimens, contact ferrets receiving oseltamivir prophylaxis twice daily showed better outcomes than those receiving oseltamivir once daily. Benefits included a significant delay in the time to secondary infection, lower weight loss and higher activity levels. The treatment of index ferrets at 36 h post-infection did not influence either secondary infection rates or clinical symptoms in exposed contact ferrets. Neither prophylaxis nor treatment prevented infection or reduced the duration of viral shedding, although clinical symptoms did improve in infected animals receiving prophylaxis. Conclusions Different oseltamivir prophylaxis regimens did not prevent infections, but consistently resulted in a reduction in symptoms in infected ferrets. However, oseltamivir prophylaxis failed to reduce viral titres, which warrants further investigation in humans. PMID:24840623

  14. Seedling diseases of sugar beet – diversity and host interactions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seedling diseases cause loss of plant stand due to pre- and post-emergence damping-off and weakened plants due to root or hypocotyl infection. Several pathogens cause seedling disease of sugar beet, including Rhizoctonia solani, Aphanomyces cochlioides, Pythium species, and Fusarium species. Differe...

  15. An area-based study on intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing group B streptococcus early-onset disease: advances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Alberto; Rossi, Cecilia; Bacchi Reggiani, Maria Letizia; Bastelli, Annalisa; Capretti, Maria Grazia; Chiossi, Claudio; Fiorini, Valentina; Gambini, Lucia; Gavioli, Sara; Lanari, Marcello; Memo, Luigi; Papa, Irene; Pini, Luana; Rizzo, Maria Vittoria; Zucchini, Andrea; Facchinetti, Fabio; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2017-07-01

    The prevalence of maternal group-B-streptococcus (GBS) colonization and risk factors (RFs) for neonatal early-onset disease (EOD) in Europe are poorly defined. Large-scale information concerning adherence to recommendations for preventing GBS-EOD are lacking. This was a 3-month retrospective area-based study including all regional deliveries  ≥35 weeks' gestation (in 2012). The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, odds ratio and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis (IAP) among full-term and preterm deliveries and prolonged membrane rupture (PROM) were calculated. Among 7133 women, 259 (3.6%) were preterm (35-36 weeks' gestation). Full-term women were 6874, and 876 (12.7%) had at least 1 RF. Most women (6495) had prenatal screening and 21.4% (1390) were GBS positive. IAP was given to 2369 (33.2%) women (preterm, n = 166; full term, n = 2203). Compared to full-term, preterm women were less likely to receive IAP when indicated (73.2% versus 90.3%, p < 0.01). Full-term women represented the largest area under the curve (AUC, 0.87). PROM showed the highest sensitivity (98.6%), but the lowest specificity (6.9%) and AUC (0.53). Large-scale prenatal screening and IAP are feasible. Women delivering preterm are less likely to receive IAP when indicated. Most unnecessary antibiotics are given in cases of PROM.

  16. [Artificial silicious-carbon dioxide baths for the rehabilitation and secondary prophylaxis in the patients presenting with arterial hypertension associated with coronary heart disease].

    PubMed

    Nikiforova, T I; Kniazeva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The present paper is designed to report the results of a clinical study undertaken to estimate the efficacy of artificial silicious-carbon dioxide baths for the rehabilitation and secondary prophylaxis in the patients presenting with arterial hypertension associated with coronary heart disease. The study included 130 patients whose treatment outcome was compared with that in a group of patients treated with the use of ordinary silicious baths alone. It was shown that artificial silicious-carbon dioxide baths have an advantage over the ordinary silicious baths in that they produce a more pronounced therapeutic effect especially in the patients with the most severe forms of hypertension associated with cardiovascular disorders. This effect is due to the combined action of their constituent components, in the first place water soluble silicates and carbon dioxide. The simultaneous action of the water soluble silicon on the structure and permeability of cellular membranes coupled with the reduction of sensitivity of vascular beta-adrenorecepors to pressor agents and inhibition of aldosterone secretion from the adrenal glands under effect of carbon dioxide accounts for the more pronounced hypotensive, anti-ischemic, and antiarrhythmic effect of artificial silicious-carbon dioxide baths that is associated with the beneficial effect on the quality of life in the majority of the treated patients.

  17. Rabies postexposure prophylaxis in routine practice in view of the new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and World Health Organization recommendations.

    PubMed

    Uwanyiligira, Mediatrice; Landry, Pierre; Genton, Blaise; de Valliere, Serge

    2012-07-01

    New recommendations for rabies postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) were published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization in 2010. In view of these new recommendations, we investigated the adequacy of rabies PEP among patients consulting our travel clinic. A retrospective analysis of the files of all patients who consulted for rabies PEP at the Travel Clinic of the University Hospital in Lausanne, Switzerland, between January 2005 and August 2011 was conducted. A total of 110 patients who received rabies PEP were identified. The median age of the patients was 34 years (range, 2-79 years), and 53% were women. Ninety subjects were potentially exposed to rabies while travelling abroad. Shortcomings in the management of these patients were (1) late initiation of rabies PEP in travelers who waited to seek medical care until returning to Switzerland, (2) administration of human rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG) to only 7 of 50 travelers (14%) who sought care abroad and for whom HRIG was indicated, and (3) antibody levels <0.5 IU/mL in 6 of 90 patients (6.7%) after 4 doses of vaccine. Patients do not always receive optimal rabies PEP under real-life conditions. A significant proportion of patients did not develop adequate antibody levels after 4 doses of vaccine. These data indicate that the measurement of antibody levels on day 21 of the Essen PEP regimen is useful in order to verify an adequate immune response.

  18. Bleeding prophylaxis for major surgery in patients with type 2 von Willebrand disease with an intermediate purity factor VIII-von Willebrand factor concentrate (Haemate-P).

    PubMed

    Michiels, Jan Jacques; Berneman, Zwi N; van der Planken, Marc; Schroyens, Wilfried; Budde, Ulrich; van Vliet, Huub H D M

    2004-06-01

    The parameters to diagnose von Willebrand disease (vWD) include factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C), von Willebrand factor antigen (vWF:Ag), von Willebrand factor ristocetin cofactor activity (vWF:RCo), and von Willebrand factor collagen binding activity (vWF:CB). Type 2 vWD is associated with a moderate bleeding diathesis due to low levels of vWF:RCo and vWF:CB as compared with near normal or normal values for FVIII:C and vWF:Ag. As the factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (vWF) concentrate, Haemate-P, is featured by a vWF:RCo/FVIII:C ratio of about 2.2, the recommended loading dose of 50 U/kg FVIII:C followed by 25 U/kg FVIII:C every 12 h for several days for bleeding prophylaxis in type 2 vWD patients undergoing major surgery demonstrated a predicted significant over-treatment reaching vWF:RCo levels above 2 U/ml. Therefore, we restricted Haemate-P substitution for major surgery to one loading dose of 40-50 U/kg FVIII:C (88-110 U/kg vWF:RCo) followed by 15-20 U/kg FVIII:C (33-44 U/kg vWF:RCo) every 12 h for several days and evaluated this strategy in a prospective pharmacokinetic and efficacy study for bleeding prophylaxis in five type 2 vWD patients. Pre-treatment and peak levels (1 h after Haemate-P loading dose) rose from 0.43-0.66 to 1.5-2.5 U/ml for FVIII:C, from 0.23-0.45 to 1.5-2.5 U/ml for vWF:Ag, from 0.10-< 0.20 to 1.5-2.5 U/ml for vWF:RCo, and from < 0.05-0.10 to 1.0-2.0 U/ml for vWF:CB. Mean in vivo recoveries per transfused IU FVIII:C/kg body weight were 3.2% for FVIII:C, 3.9% for vWF:RCo, and 2.8% for vWF:CB. Mean in vivo recoveries per transfused IU vWF:RCo/kg were 1.45% for FVIII:C, 1.7% for vWF:RCo and 1.25% for vWF:CB. The biological half-life times after transfused Haemate-P were about 12 h for both vWF:RCo and vWF:CB. Based on these pharmacokinetic data, we propose to adapt the loading dose factor VIII/vWF concentrate (Haemate-P) to 60-80 U/kg vWF:RCo followed by 30-40 U/kg vWF:RCo every 12 h for no longer than several days (less than 1

  19. Interferon prophylaxis of hepatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Voiosu, R; Dimitriu, L; Dragomir, P; Eremia, L

    1999-01-01

    The present article reveals the importance of hepatic carcinoma among the other diseases in digestive oncology, and also the importance of a correct designation of these cases. Epidemiology and actual hypothesis on the mechanisms of oncogenesis are discussed. There are reviewed some studies in the literature concerning infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, coinfection (B and C viruses, B and D viruses), the role of interferon prophylaxis in such cases. Also there is present a statistics on chronic viral hepatits, cirrhosis of viral etiology and hepatic carcinoma, diagnosed in patients in "N.Gh.Lupu" Hospital, over two decades.

  20. Modulation of host cell signaling pathways as a therapeutic approach in periodontal disease

    PubMed Central

    de SOUZA, João Antonio Chaves; ROSSA JUNIOR, Carlos; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; NOGUEIRA, Andressa Vilas Boas; CIRELLI, Joni Augusto

    2012-01-01

    Recently, new treatment approaches have been developed to target the host component of periodontal disease. This review aims at providing updated information on host-modulating therapies, focusing on treatment strategies for inhibiting signal transduction pathways involved in inflammation. Pharmacological inhibitors of MAPK, NFκB and JAK/STAT pathways are being developed to manage rheumatoid arthritis, periodontal disease and other inflammatory diseases. Through these agents, inflammatory mediators can be inhibited at cell signaling level, interfering on transcription factors activation and inflammatory gene expression. Although these drugs offer great potential to modulate host response, their main limitations are lack of specificity and developments of side effects. After overcoming these limitations, adjunctive host modulating drugs will provide new therapeutic strategies for periodontal treatment. PMID:22666826

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Technical report: prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Overturf, G D

    2000-08-01

    Pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections peaks in children younger than 2 years, reaching rates of 228/100,000 in children 6 to 12 months old. Children with functional or anatomic asplenia (including sickle cell disease [SCD]) and children with human immunodeficiency virus infection have pneumococcal infection rates 20- to 100-fold higher than those of healthy children during the first 5 years of life. Others at high risk of pneumococcal infections include children with congenital immunodeficiency; chronic cardiopulmonary disease; children receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy; children with immunosuppressive neoplastic diseases; children with chronic renal insufficiency, including nephrotic syndrome; children with diabetes; and children with cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Children of Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) or African American descent also have higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. Outbreaks of pneumococcal infection have occurred with increased frequency in children attending out-of-home care. Among these children, nasopharyngeal colonization rates of 60% have been observed, along with pneumococci resistant to multiple antibiotics. The administration of antibiotics to children involved in outbreaks of pneumococcal disease has had an inconsistent effect on nasopharyngeal carriage. In contrast, continuous penicillin prophylaxis in children younger than 5 years with SCD has been successful in reducing rates of pneumococcal disease by 84%. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have been recommended since 1985 for children older than 2 years who are at high risk of invasive disease, but these vaccines were not recommended for younger children and infants because of poor antibody response before 2 years of age. In contrast, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevnar) induce proposed protective antibody responses (>.15

  2. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in caesarean section delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ronghua; Lin, Lin; Wang, Dujuan

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is used routinely for pre-, intra- and post-operative caesarean section. One of the most important risk factors for postpartum infection is caesarean delivery. Caesarean section shows a higher incidence of infection than vaginal delivery. It is complicated by surgical site infections, endometritis or urinary tract infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the usage of antimicrobials in women undergoing caesarean section at a Tertiary Care Hospital. A prospective study was conducted in 100 women during the period of February 2013 to August 2013 in the inpatient Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. Data collected included the age of the patient, gravidity, and type of caesarean section, which was analyzed for the nature and number of antimicrobials prescribed, duration of treatment, polypharmacy, fixed-dose combinations, generic/brand names used and failure of prophylaxis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis was administered to the patients. The most commonly prescribed antimicrobial was a combination of ceftriaxone and sulbactam. Of 100 patients, 87% were aged 20–35 years. The highest proportion of patients were primigravida 72%. Elective procedure was carried out in 38%, the remaining were emergency C-section in whom intra- and post-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis was given for a duration of 7 days. In total, 27% of patients were reported with infection even after the antimicrobial prophylaxis. In conclusion, pre-operative prophylaxis was given in the early rupture of membranes. Fixed-dose combinations were preferred. Incidence of infection even after antimicrobial prophylaxis was reported due to pre-existing infection, debilitating disease or prolonged rupture of membranes. Patients with recurrent infection were shifted to amoxicillin and clavulinic acid combination. Drugs were prescribed only by brand names which is of concern. PMID:27446303

  3. Antimicrobial prophylaxis for children with vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Hoberman, Alejandro; Greenfield, Saul P; Mattoo, Tej K; Keren, Ron; Mathews, Ranjiv; Pohl, Hans G; Kropp, Bradley P; Skoog, Steven J; Nelson, Caleb P; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Chesney, Russell W; Carpenter, Myra A

    2014-06-19

    Children with febrile urinary tract infection commonly have vesicoureteral reflux. Because trial results have been limited and inconsistent, the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis to prevent recurrences in children with reflux remains controversial. In this 2-year, multisite, randomized, placebo-controlled trial involving 607 children with vesicoureteral reflux that was diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection, we evaluated the efficacy of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis in preventing recurrences (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes were renal scarring, treatment failure (a composite of recurrences and scarring), and antimicrobial resistance. Recurrent urinary tract infection developed in 39 of 302 children who received prophylaxis as compared with 72 of 305 children who received placebo (relative risk, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 0.78). Prophylaxis reduced the risk of recurrences by 50% (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.34 to 0.74) and was particularly effective in children whose index infection was febrile (hazard ratio, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.64) and in those with baseline bladder and bowel dysfunction (hazard ratio, 0.21; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.58). The occurrence of renal scarring did not differ significantly between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (11.9% and 10.2%, respectively). Among 87 children with a first recurrence caused by Escherichia coli, the proportion of isolates that were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 63% in the prophylaxis group and 19% in the placebo group. Among children with vesicoureteral reflux after urinary tract infection, antimicrobial prophylaxis was associated with a substantially reduced risk of recurrence but not of renal scarring. (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; RIVUR ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00405704.).

  4. Host behaviour–parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology

    PubMed Central

    Archie, Elizabeth A.; Craft, Meggan E.; Hawley, Dana M.; Martin, Lynn B.; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour–disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour–parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour–parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained. PMID:27053751

  5. Host behaviour-parasite feedback: an essential link between animal behaviour and disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O; Archie, Elizabeth A; Craft, Meggan E; Hawley, Dana M; Martin, Lynn B; Moore, Janice; White, Lauren

    2016-04-13

    Animal behaviour and the ecology and evolution of parasites are inextricably linked. For this reason, animal behaviourists and disease ecologists have been interested in the intersection of their respective fields for decades. Despite this interest, most research at the behaviour-disease interface focuses either on how host behaviour affects parasites or how parasites affect behaviour, with little overlap between the two. Yet, the majority of interactions between hosts and parasites are probably reciprocal, such that host behaviour feeds back on parasites and vice versa. Explicitly considering these feedbacks is essential for understanding the complex connections between animal behaviour and parasite ecology and evolution. To illustrate this point, we discuss how host behaviour-parasite feedbacks might operate and explore the consequences of feedback for studies of animal behaviour and parasites. For example, ignoring the feedback of host social structure on parasite dynamics can limit the accuracy of predictions about parasite spread. Likewise, considering feedback in studies of parasites and animal personalities may provide unique insight about the maintenance of variation in personality types. Finally, applying the feedback concept to links between host behaviour and beneficial, rather than pathogenic, microbes may shed new light on transitions between mutualism and parasitism. More generally, accounting for host behaviour-parasite feedbacks can help identify critical gaps in our understanding of how key host behaviours and parasite traits evolve and are maintained.

  6. T-cell frequency analysis does not predict the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, X N; Taylor, P R; Skinner, R; Jackson, G H; Proctor, S J; Hedley, D; Dickinson, A M

    2000-08-15

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a major and sometimes fatal complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The prediction of GVHD remains an important issue in preventing morbidity and mortality after allogeneic BMT. In the past 10 years, there has been great interest in using the frequency analysis of alloreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocyte precursors (HTLp and CTLp) to detect recipient-specific alloreactivity and thus predict GVHD in HLA-matched related and unrelated BMT. However, the results remain controversial. The intention of the present study was to investigate whether alloreactive HTLp and CTLp frequencies measured in donor peripheral blood before BMT would be a useful predictor for the occurrence of acute GVHD after HLA-matched sibling BMT. A combined limiting dilution assay was used to determine alloreactive HTLp and CTLp frequencies for 42 HLA-matched sibling patient/donor pairs. The pretransplantation host-reactive HTLp and CTLp frequencies were then correlated with post-transplantation clinical outcomes of acute GVHD. The association between HTLp/CTLp frequencies and the incidence of acute GVHD was determined using the Fisher's exact test. The mean values of HTLp and CTLp frequencies for this cohort of HLA-matched sibling patient/donor pairs were 1:321,322 (range 1:71,000 to 1:1000,000) and 1:195,260 (range 1:3,717 to 1:1000,000), respectively. Acute GVHD (> or =II) was observed in one of four patients with high (>1:100,000) HTLp frequencies and 20 of 36 patients with low (<1:100,000) HTLp frequencies. Similarly, 6 of 10 patients with high (>1: 100,000) CTLp frequencies and 14 of 29 patients with low (<1:100,000) CTLp frequencies developed acute GVHD (> or =II). The overall correlation between hostreactive HTLp/CTLp frequencies and the incidence of acute GVHD in this cohort of patients was 42.5% and 53.9%, respectively. There was no significant difference in the incidence of acute GVHD between the patients with either high or

  7. Host behavior alters spiny lobster-viral disease dynamics: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Thomas W; Butler, Mark J; Shields, Jeffrey D

    2014-08-01

    Social behavior confers numerous benefits to animals but also risks, among them an increase in the spread of pathogenic diseases. We examined the trade-off between risk of predation and disease transmission under different scenarios of host spatial structure and disease avoidance behavior using a spatially explicit, individual-based model of the host pathogen interaction between juvenile Caribbean spiny lobster (Panulirus argus) and Panulirus argus Virus 1 (PaV1). Spiny lobsters are normally social but modify their behavior to avoid diseased conspecifics, a potentially effective means of reducing transmission but one rarely observed in the wild. We found that without lobster avoidance of diseased conspecifics, viral outbreaks grew in intensity and duration in simulations until the virus was maintained continuously at unrealistically high levels. However, when we invoked disease avoidance at empirically observed levels, the intensity and duration of outbreaks was reduced and the disease extirpated within five years. Increased lobster (host) spatial aggregation mimicking that which occurs when sponge shelters for lobsters are diminished by harmful algal blooms, did not significantly increase PaV1 transmission or persistence in lobster populations. On the contrary, behavioral aversion of diseased conspecifics effectively reduced viral prevalence, even when shelters were limited, which reduced shelter availability for all lobsters but increased predation, especially of infected lobsters. Therefore, avoidance of diseased conspecifics selects against transmission by contact, promotes alternative modes of transmission, and results in a more resilient host-pathogen system.

  8. Prediction of systemic fungal infection in allogeneic marrow recipients: impact of amphotericin prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, M R; Schmidt, G M; Tegtmeier, B R; Faucett, C; Fahey, J L; Ito, J; Nademanee, A; Niland, J; Parker, P; Smith, E P

    1994-04-01

    To identify risk factors that might predict for systemic fungal infections in marrow transplant recipients within the first 100 days and to assess the efficacy of low-dose amphotericin B used as prophylaxis for candidemia and infection with invasive Aspergillus species in patients at risk. A retrospective analysis of transplant outcomes for 331 allogeneic marrow recipients transplanted between 1983 and 1989 was performed to identify patients who might be at increased risk of fungal infection. Factors analyzed included disease, remission status, transplant regimen, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, duration of neutropenia, and development of GVHD. A trial of low-dose amphotericin (5 to 10 mg/d) begun on day +1 and continuing for 2 to 3 months posttransplant was begun in 1987 to evaluate its utility in reducing systemic mycoses. There were 18 episodes of candidemia and 18 systemic mycoses documented by blood or tissue culture or by biopsy. The initiation of high-dose (0.5 to 1 mg/kg/d) corticosteroids early as a component of GVHD prophylaxis in 1986 was identified as the most important risk factor for fungal infections, with a sixfold increase in infections as compared with the previous GVHD regimen (P < .0001); this was despite a significant decrease in the incidence of grade II to IV GVHD (7% v 43%; P = .0001). Low-dose amphotericin B initiated before the start of high-dose corticosteroid GVHD prophylaxis reduced the incidence of fungal infections from 30% to 9% (P = .01) without renal toxicity. Cyclosporine levels were lower in the patients who received amphotericin, leading to an increase in the rate of GVHD to 19% (P = .02). Controlling for GVHD prophylaxis, prolonged neutropenia (P = .00), and grade II to IV GVHD (P = .01) were also identified as risk factors for fungal infection. Amphotericin B can be used in low doses as prophylaxis for fungal infections early in the posttransplant course. However, cyclosporine doses need to be monitored to

  9. Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatric OI Prevention and Treatment Guidelines Care for Disaster Displaced HIV-Infected Patients Guidelines on Care for HIV-Infected Residents Displaced from Disaster Areas Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) ...

  10. Virus and host genomic, molecular, and cellular interactions during Marek's disease pathogenesis and oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, M. C.; Delany, M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Marek's Disease Virus (MDV) is a chicken alphaherpesvirus that causes paralysis, chronic wasting, blindness, and fatal lymphoma development in infected, susceptible host birds. This disease and its protective vaccines are highly relevant research targets, given their enormous impact within the poultry industry. Further, Marek's disease (MD) serves as a valuable model for the investigation of oncogenic viruses and herpesvirus patterns of viral latency and persistence—as pertinent to human health as to poultry health. The objectives of this article are to review MDV interactions with its host from a variety of genomic, molecular, and cellular perspectives. In particular, we focus on cytogenetic studies, which precisely assess the physical status of the MDV genome in the context of the chicken host genome. Combined, the cytogenetic and genomic research indicates that MDV-host genome interactions, specifically integration of the virus into the host telomeres, is a key feature of the virus life cycle, contributing to the viral achievement of latency, transformation, and reactivation of lytic replication. We present a model that outlines the variety of virus-host interactions, at the multiple levels, and with regard to the disease states. PMID:26755654

  11. Understanding transmissibility patterns of Chagas disease through complex vector-host networks.

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Correa, Laura; Stephens, Christopher R; Morrone, Juan J; Téllez-Rendón, Juan Luis; González-Salazar, Constantino

    2017-01-12

    Chagas disease is one of the most important vector-borne zoonotic diseases in Latin America. Control strategies could be improved if transmissibility patterns of its aetiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, were better understood. To understand transmissibility patterns of Chagas disease in Mexico, we inferred potential vectors and hosts of T. cruzi from geographic distributions of nine species of Triatominae and 396 wild mammal species, respectively. The most probable vectors and hosts of T. cruzi were represented in a Complex Inference Network, from which we formulated a predictive model and several associated hypotheses about the ecological epidemiology of Chagas disease. We compiled a list of confirmed mammal hosts to test our hypotheses. Our tests allowed us to predict the most important potential hosts of T. cruzi and to validate the model showing that the confirmed hosts were those predicted to be the most important hosts. We were also able to predict differences in the transmissibility of T. cruzi among triatomine species from spatial data. We hope our findings help drive efforts for future experimental studies.

  12. Host-directed therapies for infectious diseases: current status, recent progress, and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Zumla, Alimuddin; Rao, Martin; Wallis, Robert S; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Rustomjee, Roxana; Mwaba, Peter; Vilaplana, Cris; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Chakaya, Jeremiah; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Azhar, Esam; Hoelscher, Michael; Maeurer, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Despite extensive global efforts in the fight against killer infectious diseases, they still cause one in four deaths worldwide and are important causes of long-term functional disability arising from tissue damage. The continuing epidemics of tuberculosis, HIV, malaria, and influenza, and the emergence of novel zoonotic pathogens represent major clinical management challenges worldwide. Newer approaches to improving treatment outcomes are needed to reduce the high morbidity and mortality caused by infectious diseases. Recent insights into pathogen-host interactions, pathogenesis, inflammatory pathways, and the host's innate and acquired immune responses are leading to identification and development of a wide range of host-directed therapies with different mechanisms of action. Host-directed therapeutic strategies are now becoming viable adjuncts to standard antimicrobial treatment. Host-directed therapies include commonly used drugs for non-communicable diseases with good safety profiles, immunomodulatory agents, biologics (eg monoclonal antibodies), nutritional products, and cellular therapy using the patient's own immune or bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. We discuss clinically relevant examples of progress in identifying host-directed therapies as adjunct treatment options for bacterial, viral, and parasitic infectious diseases.

  13. Chronic Wasting Disease Prion Strain Emergence and Host Range Expansion.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Velásquez, Camilo Duque; Triscott, Elizabeth; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2017-09-01

    Human and mouse prion proteins share a structural motif that regulates resistance to common chronic wasting disease (CWD) prion strains. Successful transmission of an emergent strain of CWD prion, H95(+), into mice resulted in infection. Thus, emergent CWD prion strains may have higher zoonotic potential than common strains.

  14. Integrating host gene expression and the microbiome to explore disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Allyson L; Segre, Julia A

    2015-04-08

    In a recent study, rich clinical assessment and longitudinal study design are combined with host gene expression and microbial sequencing analyses to develop a framework for exploring disease etiology and outcomes in the context of human inflammatory disease.See related article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13059-015-0637-x.

  15. Malaria prophylaxis and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Calleri, Guido

    2014-10-01

    Malaria prophylaxis recommendations issued by different health authorities in Europe are inhomogeneous, and so is the opinion of experts, but a general trend towards reducing its use is evident, and prescribers apparently adhere more easily to more restrictive recommendations. A new Italian guideline has been produced, looking both at scientific evidence (data on malaria risk and drugs' side effects) and at the opinion of experts (surveys and previously issued recommendations). Collecting data on imported malaria, stating a clear methodology and introduce a discussion at international level should be the next goals in order to homogenise recommendations for malaria prophylaxis in Europe.

  16. Metagenomics: A New Way to Illustrate the Crosstalk between Infectious Diseases and Host Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Lun, Cheuk-Yin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2015-11-03

    Microbes have co-evolved with human beings for millions of years. They play a very important role in maintaining the health of the host. With the advancement in next generation sequencing technology, the microbiome profiling in the host can be obtained under different circumstances. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the alteration of complex microbial communities upon the infection of different pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, influenza virus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, at different body sites. It is believed that the increased understanding of the correlation between infectious disease and the alteration of the microbiome can contribute to better management of disease progression in the future. However, future studies may need to be more integrative so as to establish the exact causality of diseases by analyzing the correlation between microorganisms within the human host and the pathogenesis of infectious diseases.

  17. Metagenomics: A New Way to Illustrate the Crosstalk between Infectious Diseases and Host Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinfeng; Lun, Cheuk-Yin; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2015-01-01

    Microbes have co-evolved with human beings for millions of years. They play a very important role in maintaining the health of the host. With the advancement in next generation sequencing technology, the microbiome profiling in the host can be obtained under different circumstances. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the alteration of complex microbial communities upon the infection of different pathogens, such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, influenza virus, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, at different body sites. It is believed that the increased understanding of the correlation between infectious disease and the alteration of the microbiome can contribute to better management of disease progression in the future. However, future studies may need to be more integrative so as to establish the exact causality of diseases by analyzing the correlation between microorganisms within the human host and the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. PMID:26540050

  18. Applying Precision Medicine and Immunotherapy Advances from Oncology to Host-Directed Therapies for Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Robert N.; Hafner, Richard

    2017-01-01

    To meet the challenges of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the infectious disease community needs innovative therapeutics. Precision medicine and immunotherapies are transforming cancer therapeutics by targeting the regulatory signaling pathways that are involved not only in malignancies but also in the metabolic and immunologic function of the tumor microenvironment. Infectious diseases target many of the same regulatory pathways as they modulate host metabolic functions for their own nutritional requirements and to impede host immunity. These similarities and the advances made in precision medicine and immuno-oncology that are relevant for the current development of host-directed therapies (HDTs) to treat infectious diseases are discussed. To harness this potential, improvements in drug screening methods and development of assays that utilize the research tools including high throughput multiplexes already developed by oncology are essential. A multidisciplinary approach that brings together immunologists, infectious disease specialists, and oncologists will be necessary to fully develop the potential of HDTs. PMID:28706516

  19. Effects of host social hierarchy on disease persistence.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ross S; Marion, Glenn; Hutchings, Michael R

    2008-08-07

    The effects of social hierarchy on population dynamics and epidemiology are examined through a model which contains a number of fundamental features of hierarchical systems, but is simple enough to allow analytical insight. In order to allow for differences in birth rates, contact rates and movement rates among different sets of individuals the population is first divided into subgroups representing levels in the hierarchy. Movement, representing dominance challenges, is allowed between any two levels, giving a completely connected network. The model includes hierarchical effects by introducing a set of dominance parameters which affect birth rates in each social level and movement rates between social levels, dependent upon their rank. Although natural hierarchies vary greatly in form, the skewing of contact patterns, introduced here through non-uniform dominance parameters, has marked effects on the spread of disease. A simple homogeneous mixing differential equation model of a disease with SI dynamics in a population subject to simple birth and death process is presented and it is shown that the hierarchical model tends to this as certain parameter regions are approached. Outside of these parameter regions correlations within the system give rise to deviations from the simple theory. A Gaussian moment closure scheme is developed which extends the homogeneous model in order to take account of correlations arising from the hierarchical structure, and it is shown that the results are in reasonable agreement with simulations across a range of parameters. This approach helps to elucidate the origin of hierarchical effects and shows that it may be straightforward to relate the correlations in the model to measurable quantities which could be used to determine the importance of hierarchical corrections. Overall, hierarchical effects decrease the levels of disease present in a given population compared to a homogeneous unstructured model, but show higher levels of

  20. A Rare Consequence of Chronic Graft Versus Host Disease - Peyronie's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Natasha A; Venkatesan, Krishnan; Anandi, Prathima; Ito, Sawa; Kumar, Dhruv; Lu, Kit; Battiwalla, Minoo; Barrett, A. John

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GvHD) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) may involve any organ system, but male genital involvement is rare. Peyronie’s Disease (PD) is an acquired, localized fibrotic disorder of the tunica albuginea, which leads to penile deformity, pain, and eventually to erectile dysfunction. We report the case of a 52 year old African American male with Acute Myeloid Leukemia who underwent human leucocyte antigen (HLA) matched sibling allogeneic peripheral blood SCT. His post transplant course was complicated by development of acute and multi-organ chronic GvHD requiring prolonged immunosuppression. He developed progressive dorsal curvature of the penis with erections within 1 year of ultra low dose interleukin -2 (IL2) treatment for his chronic GvHD but concealed symptoms for several months. Color Doppler Duplex ultrasound evaluation of the erect penis revealed a 75-degree curvature and appropriate hemodynamic response to prostaglandin injection. He underwent successful incision and grafting of the penile plaque. There is no significant residual curvature and is now able to engage in intercourse. A strong temporal association between GVHD (or its treatment) and Peyronie's is documented here. Awareness of the possible link between PD and chronic GVHD is required in this era of rapid growth in numbers of SCT. PMID:26770907

  1. Disease transmission promotes evolution of host spatial patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bull, James C.; Keeling, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Ecological dynamics can produce a variety of striking patterns. On ecological time scales, pattern formation has been hypothesized to be due to the interaction between a species and its local environment. On longer time scales, evolutionary factors must be taken into account. To examine the evolutionary robustness of spatial pattern formation, we construct a spatially explicit model of vegetation in the presence of a pathogen. Initially, we compare the dynamics for vegetation parameters that lead to competition induced spatial patterns and those that do not. Over ecological time scales, banded spatial patterns dramatically reduced the ability of the pathogen to spread, lowered its endemic density and hence increased the persistence of the vegetation. To gain an evolutionary understanding, each plant was given a heritable trait defining its resilience to competition; greater competition leads to lower vegetation density but stronger spatial patterns. When a disease is introduced, the selective pressure on the plant's resilience to the competition parameter is determined by the transmission of the disease. For high transmission, vegetation that has low resilience to competition and hence strong spatial patterning is an evolutionarily stable strategy. This demonstrates a novel mechanism by which striking spatial patterns can be maintained by disease-driven selection. PMID:27628172

  2. Oral chronic graft-versus-host disease: analysis of dendritic cells subpopulations*

    PubMed Central

    Botari, Clara Marino Espricigo; Nunes, Adauto José Ferreira; de Souza, Mair Pedro; Orti-Raduan, Érica Sinara Lenharo; Salvio, Ana Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The graft-versus-host disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Aiming at contributing to the understanding of the role of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and natural killer cells in chronic graft-versus-host disease, we examined biopsies of jugal mucosa of 26 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who had undergone allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Half of these patients developed oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. Microscopic sections were immunohistochemically stained for anti-CD1a, anti-CD123 and anti-CD56. We calculated the number of immunostained cells in the corium per square millimeter and applied the Mann-Whitney test. Results showed a statistically significant increase of myeloid dendritic cells (CD1a+; p=0,02) and natural killer cells (CD56; p=0,04) in patients with oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. CD123 immunostaining showed no statistical difference between groups. It was concluded that myeloid dendritic cells and natural killer cells participate in the development of oral chronic graft-versus-host disease. PMID:25054751

  3. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ximing; Ford, Susan E

    2016-03-05

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance.

  4. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance. PMID:26880838

  5. Understanding the Effects of Host Evolution and Skin Bacteria Composition on Disease Vector Choices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-14

    Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 14-04-2016 1-Sep-2014 31-Dec-2015 Final Report: Understanding the effects of host evolution and skin bacteria...reviewed journals: Final Report: Understanding the effects of host evolution and skin bacteria composition on disease vector choices Report Title Here...Robert R. Dunn, Julie E. Horvath. Diversity and evolution of the primate skin microbiome, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

  6. MODELING HOST-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS: COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY AND BIOINFORMATICS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASE RESEARCH (Session introduction)

    SciTech Connect

    McDermott, Jason E.; Braun, Pascal; Bonneau, Richard A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.

    2011-12-01

    Pathogenic infections are a major cause of both human disease and loss of crop yields and animal stocks and thus cause immense damage to the worldwide economy. The significance of infectious diseases is expected to increase in an ever more connected warming world, in which new viral, bacterial and fungal pathogens can find novel hosts and ecologic niches. At the same time, the complex and sophisticated mechanisms by which diverse pathogenic agents evade defense mechanisms and subvert their hosts networks to suit their lifestyle needs is still very incompletely understood especially from a systems perspective [1]. Thus, understanding host-pathogen interactions is both an important and a scientifically fascinating topic. Recently, technology has offered the opportunity to investigate host-pathogen interactions on a level of detail and scope that offers immense computational and analytical possibilities. Genome sequencing was pioneered on some of these pathogens, and the number of strains and variants of pathogens sequenced to date vastly outnumbers the number of host genomes available. At the same time, for both plant and human hosts more and more data on population level genomic variation becomes available and offers a rich field for analysis into the genetic interactions between host and pathogen.

  7. Significance of Ethnicity in the Risk of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease and Leukemia Relapse after Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morishima, Yasuo; Kawase, Takakazu; Malkki, Mari; Morishima, Satoko; Spellman, Stephen; Kashiwase, Koichi; Kato, Shunichi; Cesbron, Anne; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Senitzer, David; Velardi, Andrea; Petersdorf, Effie W.

    2014-01-01

    The significance of patient and donor ethnicity on risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and disease relapse after unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is not known. A total of 4335 patient/donor pairs from the International Histocompatibility Working Group in HCT met the following three criteria: (1) HLA-A, B, C, DRB1 and DQB1 allele matched donor; (2) diagnosis of leukemia, and (3) non-T cell depleted GVHD prophylaxis. Post-transplant risks of acute GVHD and leukemia relapse were defined in Asian/Pacific Islander, Caucasian, African American, Hispanic, and Native American patients transplanted from donors with the same self-described background. Asian patients had a significantly lower incidence of acute GVHD (Japanese patients: 40.0% grades II-IV and 15.3% grades III-IV; non-Japanese Asian patients: 42.1% grades II-IV and 15.7% grades III-IV) compared to Caucasian patients (56.5% grades II-IV and 22.6% grades III-IV) (p< 0.001). The hazard ratio (HR) of acute GVHD for Caucasian patients was significantly higher than for Japanese patients. Unexpectedly, the HR of leukemia relapse in Caucasian patients with early disease status was also significantly higher than that in Japanese patients. These results provide a platform for future investigation into the genetic factors for unrelated donor HCT and clinical implications of diverse ethnic background. PMID:23747601

  8. Increased incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease with the continuous infusion of cyclosporine A compared to twice-daily infusion.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Kanda, Y; Matsubara, M; Asano, Y; Nakagawa, M; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Kandabashi, K; Izutsu, K; Imai, Y; Hangaishi, A; Kurokawa, M; Tsujino, S; Ogawa, S; Aoki, K; Chiba, S; Motokura, T; Hirai, H

    2004-03-01

    We retrospectively compared the incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) before and after September 1999, when we changed the mode of cyclosporine A (CsA) administration from twice-daily infusions (TD) (n=58) to continuous infusion (CIF) (n=71). The incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD in the CIF group (56%) was significantly higher than that in the TD group (27%, P=0.00022). Multivariate analysis identified only two independent significant risk factors for the development of grade II-IV acute GVHD; CIF of CsA (relative risk 2.59, 95% CI 1.46-4.60, P=0.0011) and the presence of HLA mismatch (2.01, 95% CI 1.15-3.53, P=0.014). The incidence of relapse was significantly lower in the CIF group when adjusted for disease status before transplantation (0.41, 95% CI 0.18-0.95, P=0.038), which resulted in better disease-free survival in high-risk patients (43 vs 16% at 2 years, P=0.039), but not in standard-risk patients (72 vs 80%, P=0.45). CIF of CsA with a target level of 250-400 ng/ml may not be appropriate for GVHD prophylaxis in standard-risk patients.

  9. Initial fluconazole prophylaxis may not be required in adults with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative disorders after reduced intensity conditioning peripheral blood stem cell allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brissot, Eolia; Cahu, Xavier; Guillaume, Thierry; Delaunay, Jacques; Ayari, Sameh; Peterlin, Pierre; Le Bourgeois, Amandine; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Milpied, Noel; Bene, Marie-Christine; Moreau, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Chevallier, Patrice

    2015-04-01

    In the myeloablative transplant setting, the early use of fluconazole prophylaxis provides a benefit in overall survival. Recent changes in transplantation practices, including the use of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and/or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen may have favorably impacted the epidemiology of invasive fungal infections (IFI) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Yet, the impact of removing fluconazole prophylaxis after RIC PBSC allotransplant is ill known. Here, a retrospective analysis was performed comparing patients who received fluconazole as antifungal prophylaxis (n = 53) or not (n = 56) after allo-SCT for acute leukemia or myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative syndrome. Sixteen IFI were documented (14 %) at a median time of 103 days after transplantation, including eight before day +100, at a similar rate, whether the patients received fluconazole prophylaxis (13 %) or not (16 %). IFI were due mainly to Aspergillus species (87 %), and only two Candida-related IFI (13 %) were documented in the non-fluconazole group before day +100. The incidences of IFI (overall, before or after day +100) as well as 3-year overall and disease-free survival, non-relapse mortality, or acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were similar between both groups. In conclusion, this study suggests that fluconazole may not be required at the initial phase of RIC allo-SCT using PBSC. This result has to be confirmed prospectively while Aspergillus prophylaxis should be discussed in this particular setting.

  10. Phylogenetic analysis of beak and feather disease virus across a host ring-species complex

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Justin R.; Berg, Mathew L.; Ribot, Raoul F. H.; Raidal, Shane R.; Buchanan, Katherine L.; Walder, Ken R.; Bennett, Andrew T. D.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens have been hypothesized to play a major role in host diversity and speciation. Susceptibility of hybrid hosts to pathogens is thought to be a common phenomenon that could promote host population divergence and subsequently speciation. However, few studies have tested for pathogen infection across animal hybrid zones while testing for codivergence of the pathogens in the hybridizing host complex. Over 8 y, we studied natural infection by a rapidly evolving single-strand DNA virus, beak and feather diseases virus (BFDV), which infects parrots, exploiting a host-ring species complex (Platycercus elegans) in Australia. We found that host subspecies and their hybrids varied strikingly in both BFDV prevalence and load: both hybrid and phenotypically intermediate subspecies had lower prevalence and load compared with parental subspecies, while controlling for host age, sex, longitude and latitude, as well as temporal effects. We sequenced viral isolates throughout the range, which revealed patterns of genomic variation analogous to Mayr’s ring-species hypothesis, to our knowledge for the first time in any host–pathogen system. Viral phylogeny, geographic location, intraspecific host density, and parrot community diversity and composition did not explain the differences in BFDV prevalence or load between subpopulations. Overall, our analyses suggest that functional host responses to infection, or force of infection, differ between subspecies and hybrids. Our findings highlight the role of host hybridization and clines in altering host–pathogen interactions, dynamics that can have important implications for models of speciation with gene flow, and offer insights into how pathogens may adapt to diverging host populations. PMID:25225394

  11. Transinfection: a method to investigate Wolbachia-host interactions and control arthropod-borne disease.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G L; Rasgon, J L

    2014-04-01

    The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia manipulates arthropod host biology in numerous ways, including sex ratio distortion and differential offspring survival. These bacteria infect a vast array of arthropods, some of which pose serious agricultural and human health threats. Wolbachia-mediated phenotypes such as cytoplasmic incompatibility and/or pathogen interference can be used for vector and disease control; however, many medically important vectors and important agricultural species are uninfected or are infected with strains of Wolbachia that do not elicit phenotypes desirable for disease or pest control. The ability to transfer strains of Wolbachia into new hosts (transinfection) can create novel Wolbachia-host associations. Transinfection has two primary benefits. First, Wolbachia-host interactions can be examined to tease apart the influence of the host and bacteria on phenotypes. Second, desirable phenotypes induced by Wolbachia in a particular insect can be transferred to another recipient host. This can allow the manipulation of insect populations that transmit pathogens or detrimentally affect agriculture. As such, transinfection is a valuable tool to explore Wolbachia biology and control arthropod-borne disease. The present review summarizes what is currently known about Wolbachia transinfection methods and applications. We also provide a comprehensive list of published successful and unsuccessful Wolbachia transinfection attempts.

  12. Transinfection: a method to investigate Wolbachia-host interactions and control arthropod-borne disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant L.; Rasgon, Jason L.

    2014-01-01

    The bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia manipulates arthropod host biology in numerous ways including sex ratio distortion and differential offspring survival. These bacteria infect a vast array of arthropods, some of which pose serious agricultural and human health threats. Wolbachia-mediated phenotypes such as cytoplasmic incompatibility and/or pathogen interference can be utilized for vector and disease control. However, many medically important vectors and important agricultural species are uninfected or are infected with strains of Wolbachia that do not elicit phenotypes desirable for disease or pest control. The ability to transfer strains of Wolbachia into new hosts (transinfection) can create novel Wolbachia-host associations. Transinfection has two primary benefits. First, Wolbachia-host interactions can be examined to tease apart the influence of the host and bacteria on phenotypes. Secondly, desirable phenotypes induced by Wolbachia in a particular insect can be transferred to another recipient host. This can allow for manipulation of insect populations that transmit pathogens or detrimentally affect agriculture. As such, transinfection is a valuable tool to explore Wolbachia biology and control arthropod-borne disease. This review summarizes what is currently known about Wolbachia transinfection methods and applications. We also provide a comprehensive list of published successful and unsuccessful Wolbachia transinfection attempts. PMID:24329998

  13. From Within Host Dynamics to the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease: Scientific Overview and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Juan B.; Galinski, Mary R.; Cantrell, Stephen; Voit, Eberhard O.

    2015-01-01

    Since their earliest days, humans have been struggling with infectious diseases. Caused by viruses, bacteria, protozoa, or even higher organisms like worms, these diseases depend critically on numerous intricate interactions between parasites and hosts, and while we have learned much about these interactions, many details are still obscure. It is evident that the combined host-parasite dynamics constitutes a complex system that involves components and processes at multiple scales of time, space, and biological organization. At one end of this hierarchy we know of individual molecules that play crucial roles for the survival of a parasite or for the response and survival of its host. At the other end, one realizes that the spread of infectious diseases by far exceeds specific locales and, due to today's easy travel of hosts carrying a multitude of organisms, can quickly reach global proportions. The community of mathematical modelers has been addressing specific aspects of infectious diseases for a long time. Most of these efforts have focused on one or two select scales of a multi-level disease and used quite different computational approaches. This restriction to a molecular, physiological, or epidemiological level was prudent, as it has produced solid pillars of a foundation from which it might eventually be possible to launch comprehensive, multi-scale modeling efforts that make full use of the recent advances in biology and, in particular, the various high-throughput methodologies accompanying the emerging –omics revolution. This special issue contains contributions from biologists and modelers, most of whom presented and discussed their work at the workshop From within Host Dynamics to the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, which was held at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute at Ohio State University in April 2014. These contributions highlight some of the forays into a deeper understanding of the dynamics between parasites and their hosts, and the

  14. From within host dynamics to the epidemiology of infectious disease: Scientific overview and challenges.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Juan B; Galinski, Mary R; Cantrell, Stephen; Voit, Eberhard O

    2015-12-01

    Since their earliest days, humans have been struggling with infectious diseases. Caused by viruses, bacteria, protozoa, or even higher organisms like worms, these diseases depend critically on numerous intricate interactions between parasites and hosts, and while we have learned much about these interactions, many details are still obscure. It is evident that the combined host-parasite dynamics constitutes a complex system that involves components and processes at multiple scales of time, space, and biological organization. At one end of this hierarchy we know of individual molecules that play crucial roles for the survival of a parasite or for the response and survival of its host. At the other end, one realizes that the spread of infectious diseases by far exceeds specific locales and, due to today's easy travel of hosts carrying a multitude of organisms, can quickly reach global proportions. The community of mathematical modelers has been addressing specific aspects of infectious diseases for a long time. Most of these efforts have focused on one or two select scales of a multi-level disease and used quite different computational approaches. This restriction to a molecular, physiological, or epidemiological level was prudent, as it has produced solid pillars of a foundation from which it might eventually be possible to launch comprehensive, multi-scale modeling efforts that make full use of the recent advances in biology and, in particular, the various high-throughput methodologies accompanying the emerging -omics revolution. This special issue contains contributions from biologists and modelers, most of whom presented and discussed their work at the workshop From within Host Dynamics to the Epidemiology of Infectious Disease, which was held at the Mathematical Biosciences Institute at Ohio State University in April 2014. These contributions highlight some of the forays into a deeper understanding of the dynamics between parasites and their hosts, and the

  15. Implementation of Preexposure Prophylaxis for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Among Men Who Have Sex With Men at a New England Sexually Transmitted Diseases Clinic.

    PubMed

    Chan, Philip A; Glynn, Tiffany R; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Montgomery, Madeline C; Robinette, Ashley E; Almonte, Alexi; Raifman, Julia; Mena, Leandro; Patel, Rupa; Mayer, Kenneth H; Beauchamps, Laura S; Nunn, Amy S

    2016-11-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is efficacious in preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among men who have sex with men (MSM). We assessed PrEP uptake among MSM presenting for services at a sexually transmitted diseases (STD) clinic. Men who have sex with men presenting to the Rhode Island STD Clinic between October 2013 and November 2014 were educated about, and offered, PrEP. We categorized PrEP engagement using an implementation cascade to describe gaps in uptake which described MSM who: (1) were educated about PrEP, (2) indicated interest, (3) successfully received follow-up contact, (4) scheduled an appointment, (5) attended an appointment, and (6) initiated PrEP (ie, received a prescription). Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of PrEP initiation. A total of 234 MSM were educated about PrEP; of these, 56% expressed interest. Common reasons for lack of interest were low HIV risk perception (37%), wanting more time to consider (10%), concern about side effects (7%), and financial barriers (3%). Among those interested, 53% followed up. Of those, 51% scheduled an appointment. The most common reason patients did not schedule an appointment was low HIV risk perception (38%). Seventy-seven percent of those with an appointment attended the appointment; of those, 93% initiated PrEP. Patients with higher HIV-risk perception (adjusted odds ratios, 2.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.64) and a history of sex with an HIV-positive partner (adjusted odds ratios, 7.08; 95% confidence interval, 2.35-21.34) had significantly higher odds of initiating PrEP. Low HIV-risk perception was the most significant barrier to PrEP uptake among MSM attending a public STD clinic.

  16. Tick-borne Diseases (Borreliosis, Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis) in German and Austrian Dogs: Status quo and Review of Distribution, Transmission, Clinical Findings, Diagnostics and Prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Pantchev, Nikola; Pluta, Silvia; Huisinga, Elke; Nather, Stephanie; Scheufelen, Miriam; Vrhovec, Majda Globokar; Schweinitz, Andrea; Hampel, Herwig; Straubinger, Reinhard K

    2015-08-01

    Tick-borne diseases (TBD) in dogs have gained in significance in German and Austrian veterinary practices. The widespread European tick species Ixodes ricinus represents an important vector for spirochaetes of the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato group and Rickettsiales such as Anaplasma phagocytophilum. The meadow or ornate dog tick (Dermacentor reticulatus) is an important vector for Babesia canis, as is the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus) for Babesia vogeli in the Mediterranean region. The present work covers pathogen transmission by tick vectors, including the mechanisms and the minimum intervals required, in conjunction with possible non-vector-borne transmission routes. It also addresses the incubation periods, pathogenicity and clinical findings associated with each pathogen and genospecies and presents case examples. Current data on prevalence, annual fluctuations and distribution in various pre-selected dog populations (symptomatic versus asymptomatic) in both countries are depicted in maps. Reasons for changes in prevalence (especially of Borrelia) are discussed. Criteria and algorithms for clinical diagnosis and monitoring in dogs, including case history, direct detection (blood smears, molecular detection by species-specific PCR and sequencing) and indirect methods (whole-cell and peptide-based antibody tests), are presented, together with laboratory abnormalities (haematology, clinical chemistry, urine). The role of anti-C6 antibody concentration (ACAC) and its correlation with proteinuria and Lyme nephritis are assessed on the basis of new data. Consideration is also given to the importance of blood smears, PCR and serology in the case of anaplasmosis and babesiosis, and the diagnostic value of combining these methods. The relevance of molecular differentiation of Anaplasma species (A. phagocytophilum versus A. platys) and Babesia spp. (large versus small forms) in cases of serological cross-reaction is emphasized. A summary is given of

  17. Oral cancer after prolonged immunosuppression for multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Renata Lins Fuentes; Lyko, Karine de Fátima; Funke, Vaneuza Araújo Moreira; Torres-Pereira, Cassius Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Long-term survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are recognized as a risk group for malignization. Malignant oral neoplasms are increasingly being reported in the literature as a consequence of lesions of chronic graft-versus-host disease, and prolonged multidrug treatment to control its manifestations. This report describes a 43-year-old patient who, after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, developed an oral squamous cell carcinoma secondary to the use of azathioprine, cyclosporine, prednisone, and tacrolimus, associated with multiorgan chronic graft-versus-host disease involving the oral mucosa, skin, eyes, and liver. This report aims to discuss the possible role of immunosuppressant therapy for chronic graft-versus-host disease on the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma, and the relevance of a close oral follow-up of patients to detect dysplastic or malignant alterations at an early stage.

  18. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis in the setting of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Kunishige, Joy H; Hymes, Sharon R; Madkan, Vandana; Wyatt, Angela J; Uptmore, David; Lazar, Alexander J F; Giralt, Sergio; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    We report a case of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV)-like lesions in a patient with graft-versus-host disease after peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from his HLA-matched brother. The patient presented with a diffuse papular eruption that was clinically consistent with graft-versus-host disease; however, histopathology demonstrated viral cytopathic changes and polymerase chain reaction confirmed EV human papillomavirus types 8 and 20. Repeated biopsy specimen showed both human papillomavirus cytopathic effect and graft-versus-host disease, and further workup revealed ocular and hepatic involvement. This progressed to a lupuslike syndrome with lichenoid, violaceous, flat-topped papules in a malar distribution and positive antinuclear autoantibodies. Although EV-like lesions have been reported in patients who are immunocompromised, the incidence is low, and may be linked to EV-related haplotypes.

  19. Passive immunization with hyperimmune egg-yolk IgY as prophylaxis and therapy for poultry diseases--A review.

    PubMed

    Gadde, U; Rathinam, T; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2015-12-01

    Passive immunization with pathogen-specific egg yolk antibodies (IgY) is emerging as a potential alternative to antibiotics for the treatment and prevention of various human and animal diseases. Laying hens are an excellent source of high-quality polyclonal antibodies, which can be collected noninvasively from egg yolks. The use of IgY offers several advantages in that it is environmentally friendly, nontoxic, and reduces the numbers of animals required for antibody production. This paper reviews the use of IgY antibodies in the treatment and prevention of enteric pathogen infections in poultry. Brief descriptions of the production, structure, and properties of IgY are also presented. Some limitations of the technology and future perspectives are discussed.

  20. The Price equation framework to study disease within-host evolution.

    PubMed

    Alizon, S

    2009-05-01

    The evolution of infectious diseases is known to affect epidemiological dynamics, but, for some viruses and bacteria, this evolution also takes place inside a host during the course of an infection. I develop an original approach to study intrahost evolutionary dynamics of quantitative disease traits. This approach can be expressed mathematically using the ‘Price equation’ framework recently developed in evolutionary epidemiology. This framework combines population genetics and within-host population dynamics models to identify trade-offs that affect disease intrahost evolution and to predict short-term evolutionary dynamics of life-history traits. I show that this can be applied to study the evolution of viruses competing for host cells or to study the coevolution between parasites and the immune system of the host. This framework can also easily incorporate experimental data. Studying intrahost evolutionary dynamics provides insight at the within-host level, because it allows us to better understand the course of chronic infections, and at the epidemiological level, because it helps to study multi-scale evolutionary processes. This framework can be used to address important biological issues, from immune escape to disease evolutionary response to treatments.

  1. Borrelia burgdorferi has minimal impact on the Lyme disease reservoir host Peromyscus leucopus.

    PubMed

    Schwanz, Lisa E; Voordouw, Maarten J; Brisson, Dustin; Ostfeld, Richard S

    2011-02-01

    The epidemiology of vector-borne zoonotic diseases is determined by encounter rates between vectors and hosts. Alterations to the behavior of reservoir hosts caused by the infectious agent have the potential to dramatically alter disease transmission and human risk. We examined the effect of Borrelia burgdorferi, the etiological agent of Lyme disease, on one of its most important reservoir hosts, the white-footed mouse, Peromyscus leucopus. We mimic natural infections in mice using the vector (Black-legged ticks, Ixodes scapularis) and examine the immunological and behavioral responses of mouse hosts. Despite producing antibodies against B. burgdorferi, infected mice did not have elevated white blood cells compared with uninfected mice. In addition, infected and uninfected mice did not differ in their wheel-running activity. Our results suggest that infection with the spirochete B. burgdorferi has little impact on the field activity of white-footed mice. Lyme disease transmission appears to be uncomplicated by pathogen-altered behavior of this reservoir host.

  2. Host response, malnutrition and oral diseases. Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Słotwiński, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Acute phase proteins enhance antioxidant defenses; they are involved in the activation of complement components, opsonization and increase in platelet aggregation as well as inhibition of the respiratory burst in the course of inflammation. Malnutrition plays an important role in the course of response of acute phase proteins. The role of nutrients as antioxidants or as key components of antioxidant enzymes is commonly known. In the course of various inflammatory states, including oral diseases, disorders are observed in caloric requirements of the organism and the requirements for specific amino acids. Numerous experimental studies in animals have also confirmed the relationship between protein- calorie malnutrition and hypofunction of the salivary glands. Studies in children with malnutrition syndrome showed a significantly lower volume of saliva compared to properly nourished children. Depleted nutritional reserves due to long-term chronic malnutrition cause a significant reduction in resistance, progressive damage to the oral mucosa, and reduce resistance to colonization and invasion of pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:26155173

  3. Ecosystem screening approach for pathogen-associated microorganisms affecting host disease.

    PubMed

    Galiana, Eric; Marais, Antoine; Mura, Catherine; Industri, Benoît; Arbiol, Gilles; Ponchet, Michel

    2011-09-01

    The microbial community in which a pathogen evolves is fundamental to disease outcome. Species interacting with a pathogen on the host surface shape the distribution, density, and genetic diversity of the inoculum, but the role of these species is rarely determined. The screening method developed here can be used to characterize pathogen-associated species affecting disease. This strategy involves three steps: (i) constitution of the microbial community, using the pathogen as a trap; (ii) community selection, using extracts from the pathogen as the sole nutrient source; and (iii) molecular identification and the screening of isolates focusing on their effects on the growth of the pathogen in vitro and host disease. This approach was applied to a soilborne plant pathogen, Phytophthora parasitica, structured in a biofilm, for screening the microbial community from the rhizosphere of Nicotiana tabacum (the host). Two of the characterized eukaryotes interfered with the oomycete cycle and may affect the host disease. A Vorticella species acted through a mutualistic interaction with P. parasitica, disseminating pathogenic material by leaving the biofilm. A Phoma species established an amensal interaction with P. parasitica, strongly suppressing disease by inhibiting P. parasitica germination. This screening method is appropriate for all nonobligate pathogens. It allows the definition of microbial species as promoters or suppressors of a disease for a given biotope. It should also help to identify important microbial relationships for ecology and evolution of pathogens.

  4. The endless race between Trypanosoma cruzi and host immunity: lessons for and beyond Chagas disease.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Caroline; Caetano, Braulia; Bartholomeu, Daniella C; Melo, Mariane B; Ropert, Catherine; Rodrigues, Maurício M; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T

    2010-09-15

    Infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, is characterised by a variable clinical course - from symptomless cases to severe chronic disease with cardiac and/or gastrointestinal involvement. The variability in disease outcome has been attributed to host responses as well as parasite heterogeneity. In this article, we review studies indicating the importance of immune responses as key determinants of host resistance to T. cruzi infection and the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. Particular attention is given to recent studies defining the role of cognate innate immune receptors and immunodominant CD8+ T cells that recognise parasite components - both crucial for host-parasite interaction and disease outcome. In light of these studies we speculate about parasite strategies that induce a strong and long-lasting T-cell-mediated immunity but at the same time allow persistence of the parasite in the vertebrate host. We also discuss what we have learned from these studies for increasing our understanding of Chagas pathogenesis and for the design of new strategies to prevent the development of Chagas disease. Finally, we highlight recent studies employing a genetically engineered attenuated T. cruzi strain as a vaccine shuttle that elicits potent T cell responses specific to a tumour antigen and protective immunity against a syngeneic melanoma cell line.

  5. Is antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis cost-effective?

    PubMed

    Agha, Zia; Lofgren, Richard P; VanRuiswyk, Jerome V

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis is recommended by the American Heart Association (AHA) before undergoing certain dental procedures. Whether such antibiotic prophylaxis is cost-effective is not clear. The authors' objective is to estimate the cost-effectiveness of predental antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with underlying heart disease. The authors conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis using a Markov model to compare cost-effectiveness of 7 antibiotic regimens per AHA guidelines and a no prophylaxis strategy. The study population consisted of a hypothetical cohort of 10 million patients with either a high or moderate risk for developing endocarditis. Prophylaxis for patients with moderate or high risk for endocarditis cost $88,007/quality-adjusted life years saved if clarithromycin was used. Prophylaxis with amoxicillin and ampicillin resulted in a net loss of lives. All other regimens were less cost-effective than clarithromycin. For 10 million persons, clarithromycin prophylaxis prevented 119 endocarditis cases and saved 19 lives. Predental antibiotic prophylaxis is cost-effective only for persons with moderate or high risk of developing endocarditis. Contrary to current recommendations, our data demonstrate that amoxicillin and ampicillin are not cost-effective and should not be considered the agents of choice. Clarithromycin should be considered the drug of choice and cephalexin as an alternative drug of choice. The current published guidelines and recommendations should be revised.

  6. The consequences of reservoir host eradication on disease epidemiology in animal communities

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shorbaji, Farah; Roche, Benjamin; Gozlan, Rodolphe; Britton, Robert; Andreou, Demetra

    2016-01-01

    Non-native species have often been linked with introduction of novel pathogens that spill over into native communities, and the amplification of the prevalence of native parasites. In the case of introduced generalist pathogens, their disease epidemiology in the extant communities remains poorly understood. Here, Sphaerothecum destruens, a generalist fungal-like fish pathogen with bi-modal transmission (direct and environmental) was used to characterise the biological drivers responsible for disease emergence in temperate fish communities. A range of biotic factors relating to both the pathogen and the surrounding host communities were used in a novel susceptible-exposed-infectious-recovered (SEIR) model to test how these factors affected disease epidemiology. These included: (i) pathogen prevalence in an introduced reservoir host (Pseudorasbora parva); (ii) the impact of reservoir host eradication and its timing and (iii) the density of potential hosts in surrounding communities and their connectedness. These were modelled across 23 combinations and indicated that the spill-over of pathogen propagules via environmental transmission resulted in rapid establishment in adjacent fish communities (<1 year). Although disease dynamics were initially driven by environmental transmission in these communities, once sufficient numbers of native hosts were infected, the disease dynamics were driven by intra-species transmission. Subsequent eradication of the introduced host, irrespective of its timing (after one, two or three years), had limited impact on the long-term disease dynamics among local fish communities. These outputs reinforced the importance of rapid detection and eradication of non-native species, in particular when such species are identified as healthy reservoirs of a generalist pathogen. PMID:27165562

  7. Indium-111-labeled autologous leukocyte scanning in gastrointestinal graft versus host disease (GVHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Peters, A.M.; O'Brien, C.; Chadwick, V.S.; Lavender, J.P.; Goldman, J.M.; Gordon-Smith, E.C.; Hodgson, H.J.

    1986-08-01

    The technique of scanning with indium-111 autologous leukocytes has been used to assess gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogenic marrow transplantation. In patients with active disease, abdominal scans showed extensive abnormal localization in the bowel, while in those whose disease was quiescent after responding to treatment, scans showed localized ileocecal involvement. Rectal histology showed excellent agreement with scanning in the diagnosis of GVHD, but in three of six cases with active disease underestimated disease severity. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning is a useful noninvasive technique for the diagnosis and assessment of gut GVHD.

  8. Multiple and Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity After Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xiuhong; Xing, Yuzhen; Cheng, Bo

    2017-02-22

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is one of the most common secondary solid tumors in patients who have undergone hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, according to previous reports, multiple and recurrent OSCC is very rare. The presented case shows the susceptibility to the development of secondary malignancies, particularly oral cancer, of patients who present with chronic graft-versus-host disease after HSCT. OSCC after HSCT appears to be more invasive and has a tendency to recur, with a poor prognosis. Therefore, regular and thorough evaluations of the oral mucosa are recommended for all patients who undergo bone marrow transplantation and have chronic graft-versus-host disease.

  9. Annular plaques: An unusual manifestation of graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Laura J; Paravar, Taraneh; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor; Hymes, Sharon R

    2012-06-15

    Chronic cutaneous graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) classically presents with lichenoid papules or sclerotic plaques. This case highlights an unusual clinical manifestation of chronic GVHD and demonstrates that the skin morphology of chronic GVHD and cutaneous lymphoma may be similar. We report for the first time a case of annular scleroderma-like graft-versus-host disease in a patient following allogeneic stem cell transplant for CD30+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Treatment of these skin lesions with ultraviolet A1 (UVA1) phototherapy resulted in significant improvement.

  10. The pathogen causing Dutch elm disease makes host trees attract insect vectors

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Geoff; Gries, Regine; von Reuß, Stephan H; Rahe, James E; McIntosh, Rory; König, Wilfried A; Gries, Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    Dutch elm disease is caused by the fungal pathogen Ophiostoma novo-ulmi which is transmitted by the native elm bark beetle, Hylurgopinus rufipes. We have found that four semiochemicals (the monoterpene (−)-β-pinene and the sesquiterpenes (−)-α-cubebene, (+)-spiroaxa-5,7-diene and (+)-δ-cadinene) from diseased American elms, Ulmus americana, synergistically attract H. rufipes, and that sesquiterpene emission is upregulated in elm trees inoculated with O. novo-ulmi. The fungus thus manipulates host trees to enhance their apparency to foraging beetles, a strategy that increases the probability of transportation of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID:16271975

  11. Postpartum von Willebrand factor levels in women with and without von Willebrand disease and implications for prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    James, A H; Konkle, B A; Kouides, P; Ragni, M V; Thames, B; Gupta, S; Sood, S; Fletcher, S K; Philipp, C S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the fall in von Willebrand factor (VWF) and factor VIII activity (FVIII) after childbirth in women with and without von Willebrand disease (VWD). VWF:RCo, VWF:Ag, and FVIII were obtained in the third trimester of pregnancy, on admission for childbirth, and 10 times postpartum. Specimens were processed within 4 h and analysed centrally. Means were calculated at each time point. Forty women (40 pregnancies) without VWD and 32 women (35 pregnancies) with VWD were enrolled. 15/32 with VWD were treated (30% of those with type 1 and all of those with type 2) in 17 pregnancies. Treatments prior to delivery consisted of desmopressin (2/17), VWF concentrate (15/17) and after delivery VWF concentrate (16/17). Duration of treatment was 0-21 days (median 6). VWF levels peaked at 250% of baseline--4 h postpartum in women with VWD and 12 h postpartum in women without VWD. Thereafter, VWF levels fell rapidly, approached baseline at 1 week and reached baseline at 3 weeks. Except immediately postpartum, when the levels among treated cases were higher, levels among women with VWD appeared to parallel, but were lower than those among women without VWD. Levels were lowest among those who received treatment. VWF levels fall rapidly after childbirth. Except immediately postpartum, current treatment strategies do not raise VWF levels to the levels of women without VWD or even to the levels of women with milder, untreated VWD. Consequently, women with VWD may be at risk of postpartum haemorrhage despite treatment.

  12. Microbiome-Linked Crosstalk in the Gastrointestinal Exposome towards Host Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal exposome represents the integration of all xenobiotic components and host-derived endogenous components affecting the host health, disease progression and ultimately clinical outcomes during the lifespan. The human gut microbiome as a dynamic exposome of commensalism continuously interacts with other exogenous exposome as well as host sentineling components including the immune and neuroendocrine circuit. The composition and diversity of the microbiome are established on the basis of the luminal environment (physical, chemical and biological exposome) and host surveillance at each part of the gastrointestinal lining. Whereas the chemical exposome derived from nutrients and other xenobiotics can influence the dynamics of microbiome community (the stability, diversity, or resilience), the microbiomes reciprocally alter the bioavailability and activities of the chemical exposome in the mucosa. In particular, xenobiotic metabolites by the gut microbial enzymes can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host health although xenobiotics can alter the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome. The integration of the mucosal crosstalk in the exposome determines the fate of microbiome community and host response to the etiologic factors of disease. Therefore, the network between microbiome and other mucosal exposome would provide new insights into the clinical intervention against the mucosal or systemic disorders via regulation of the gut-associated immunological, metabolic, or neuroendocrine system. PMID:28090466

  13. Proteomics and integrative omic approaches for understanding host-pathogen interactions and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jean Beltran, Pierre M; Federspiel, Joel D; Sheng, Xinlei; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-03-27

    Organisms are constantly exposed to microbial pathogens in their environments. When a pathogen meets its host, a series of intricate intracellular interactions shape the outcome of the infection. The understanding of these host-pathogen interactions is crucial for the development of treatments and preventive measures against infectious diseases. Over the past decade, proteomic approaches have become prime contributors to the discovery and understanding of host-pathogen interactions that represent anti- and pro-pathogenic cellular responses. Here, we review these proteomic methods and their application to studying viral and bacterial intracellular pathogens. We examine approaches for defining spatial and temporal host-pathogen protein interactions upon infection of a host cell. Further expanding the understanding of proteome organization during an infection, we discuss methods that characterize the regulation of host and pathogen proteomes through alterations in protein abundance, localization, and post-translational modifications. Finally, we highlight bioinformatic tools available for analyzing such proteomic datasets, as well as novel strategies for integrating proteomics with other omic tools, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics, to obtain a systems-level understanding of infectious diseases.

  14. Microbiome-Linked Crosstalk in the Gastrointestinal Exposome towards Host Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yuseok

    2016-12-01

    The gastrointestinal exposome represents the integration of all xenobiotic components and host-derived endogenous components affecting the host health, disease progression and ultimately clinical outcomes during the lifespan. The human gut microbiome as a dynamic exposome of commensalism continuously interacts with other exogenous exposome as well as host sentineling components including the immune and neuroendocrine circuit. The composition and diversity of the microbiome are established on the basis of the luminal environment (physical, chemical and biological exposome) and host surveillance at each part of the gastrointestinal lining. Whereas the chemical exposome derived from nutrients and other xenobiotics can influence the dynamics of microbiome community (the stability, diversity, or resilience), the microbiomes reciprocally alter the bioavailability and activities of the chemical exposome in the mucosa. In particular, xenobiotic metabolites by the gut microbial enzymes can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host health although xenobiotics can alter the composition and diversity of the gut microbiome. The integration of the mucosal crosstalk in the exposome determines the fate of microbiome community and host response to the etiologic factors of disease. Therefore, the network between microbiome and other mucosal exposome would provide new insights into the clinical intervention against the mucosal or systemic disorders via regulation of the gut-associated immunological, metabolic, or neuroendocrine system.

  15. The thermal mismatch hypothesis explains host susceptibility to an emerging infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jeremy M; Venesky, Matthew D; Sauer, Erin L; Civitello, David J; McMahon, Taegan A; Roznik, Elizabeth A; Rohr, Jason R

    2017-02-01

    Parasites typically have broader thermal limits than hosts, so large performance gaps between pathogens and their cold- and warm-adapted hosts should occur at relatively warm and cold temperatures, respectively. We tested this thermal mismatch hypothesis by quantifying the temperature-dependent susceptibility of cold- and warm-adapted amphibian species to the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) using laboratory experiments and field prevalence estimates from 15 410 individuals in 598 populations. In both the laboratory and field, we found that the greatest susceptibility of cold- and warm-adapted hosts occurred at relatively warm and cool temperatures, respectively, providing support for the thermal mismatch hypothesis. Our results suggest that as climate change shifts hosts away from their optimal temperatures, the probability of increased host susceptibility to infectious disease might increase, but the effect will depend on the host species and the direction of the climate shift. Our findings help explain the tremendous variation in species responses to Bd across climates and spatial, temporal and species-level variation in disease outbreaks associated with extreme weather events that are becoming more common with climate change.

  16. Modified inoculation and disease assessment methods reveal host specificity in Erwinia tracheiphila-Cucurbitaceae interactions.

    PubMed

    Nazareno, Eric S; Dumenyo, C Korsi

    2015-12-01

    We conducted a greenhouse trial to determine specific compatible interactions between Erwinia tracheiphila strains and cucurbit host species. Using a modified inoculation system, E. tracheiphila strains HCa1-5N, UnisCu1-1N, and MISpSq-N were inoculated to cucumber (Cucumis sativus) cv. 'Sweet Burpless', melon (Cucumis melo) cv. 'Athena Hybrid', and squash (Cucubita pepo) cv. 'Early Summer Crookneck'. We observed symptoms and disease progression for 30 days; recorded the number of days to wilting of the inoculated leaf (DWIL), days to wilting of the whole plant (DWWP), and days to death of the plant (DDP). We found significant interactions between host cultivar and pathogen strains, which imply host specificity. Pathogen strains HCa1-5N and UnisCu1-1N isolated from Cucumis species exhibited more virulence in cucumber and melon than in squash, while the reverse was true for strain MISpSq-N, an isolate from Cucurbita spp. Our observations confirm a previous finding that E. tracheiphila strains isolated from Cucumis species were more virulent on Cucumis hosts and those from Cucubita were more virulent on Cucubita hosts. This confirmation helps in better understanding the pathosystem and provides baseline information for the subsequent development of new disease management strategies for bacterial wilt. We also demonstrated the efficiency of our modified inoculation and disease scoring methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interactions between the host innate immune system and microbes in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Clara; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2011-05-01

    The intestinal immune system defends against pathogens and entry of excessive intestinal microbes; simultaneously, a state of immune tolerance to resident intestinal microbes must be maintained. Perturbation of this balance is associated with intestinal inflammation in various mouse models and is thought to predispose humans to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The innate immune system senses microbes; dendritic cells, macrophages, and epithelial cells produce an initial, rapid response. The immune system continuously monitors resident microbiota and utilizes constitutive antimicrobial mechanisms to maintain immune homeostasis. associations between IBD and genes that regulate microbial recognition and innate immune pathways, such as nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (Nod2), genes that control autophagy (eg, ATG16L1, IRGM), and genes in the interleukin-23-T helper cell 17 pathway indicate the important roles of host-microbe interactions in regulating intestinal immune homeostasis. There is increasing evidence that intestinal microbes influence host immune development, immune responses, and susceptibility to human diseases such as IBD, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Conversely, host factors can affect microbes, which in turn modulate disease susceptibility. We review the cell populations and mechanisms that mediate interactions between host defense and tolerance and how the dysregulation of host-microbe interactions leads to intestinal inflammation and IBD.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Targeting the Host Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Pulido, Miguel; Sáiz, Margarita

    2017-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is the causative agent of an acute vesicular disease affecting pigs, cattle and other domestic, and wild animals worldwide. The aim of the host interferon (IFN) response is to limit viral replication and spread. Detection of the viral genome and products by specialized cellular sensors initiates a signaling cascade that leads to a rapid antiviral response involving the secretion of type I- and type III-IFNs and other antiviral cytokines with antiproliferative and immunomodulatory functions. During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have acquired strategies to actively counteract host antiviral responses and the balance between innate response and viral antagonism may determine the outcome of disease and pathogenesis. FMDV proteases Lpro and 3C have been found to antagonize the host IFN response by a repertoire of mechanisms. Moreover, the putative role of other viral proteins in IFN antagonism is being recently unveiled, uncovering sophisticated immune evasion strategies different to those reported to date for other members of the Picornaviridae family. Here, we review the interplay between antiviral responses induced by FMDV infection and viral countermeasures to block them. Research on strategies used by viruses to modulate immunity will provide insights into the function of host pathways involved in defense against pathogens and will also lead to development of new therapeutic strategies to fight virus infections. PMID:28660175

  19. Estimating the Delay between Host Infection and Disease (Incubation Period) and Assessing Its Significance to the Epidemiology of Plant Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leclerc, Melen; Doré, Thierry; Gilligan, Christopher A.; Lucas, Philippe; Filipe, João A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the incubation period of infectious diseases (time between host infection and expression of disease symptoms) is crucial to our epidemiological understanding and the design of appropriate prevention and control policies. Plant diseases cause substantial damage to agricultural and arboricultural systems, but there is still very little information about how the incubation period varies within host populations. In this paper, we focus on the incubation period of soilborne plant pathogens, which are difficult to detect as they spread and infect the hosts underground and above-ground symptoms occur considerably later. We conducted experiments on Rhizoctonia solani in sugar beet, as an example patho-system, and used modelling approaches to estimate the incubation period distribution and demonstrate the impact of differing estimations on our epidemiological understanding of plant diseases. We present measurements of the incubation period obtained in field conditions, fit alternative probability models to the data, and show that the incubation period distribution changes with host age. By simulating spatially-explicit epidemiological models with different incubation-period distributions, we study the conditions for a significant time lag between epidemics of cryptic infection and the associated epidemics of symptomatic disease. We examine the sensitivity of this lag to differing distributional assumptions about the incubation period (i.e. exponential versus Gamma). We demonstrate that accurate information about the incubation period distribution of a pathosystem can be critical in assessing the true scale of pathogen invasion behind early disease symptoms in the field; likewise, it can be central to model-based prediction of epidemic risk and evaluation of disease management strategies. Our results highlight that reliance on observation of disease symptoms can cause significant delay in detection of soil-borne pathogen epidemics and mislead practitioners and

  20. Estimating the delay between host infection and disease (incubation period) and assessing its significance to the epidemiology of plant diseases.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Melen; Doré, Thierry; Gilligan, Christopher A; Lucas, Philippe; Filipe, João A N

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the incubation period of infectious diseases (time between host infection and expression of disease symptoms) is crucial to our epidemiological understanding and the design of appropriate prevention and control policies. Plant diseases cause substantial damage to agricultural and arboricultural systems, but there is still very little information about how the incubation period varies within host populations. In this paper, we focus on the incubation period of soilborne plant pathogens, which are difficult to detect as they spread and infect the hosts underground and above-ground symptoms occur considerably later. We conducted experiments on Rhizoctonia solani in sugar beet, as an example patho-system, and used modelling approaches to estimate the incubation period distribution and demonstrate the impact of differing estimations on our epidemiological understanding of plant diseases. We present measurements of the incubation period obtained in field conditions, fit alternative probability models to the data, and show that the incubation period distribution changes with host age. By simulating spatially-explicit epidemiological models with different incubation-period distributions, we study the conditions for a significant time lag between epidemics of cryptic infection and the associated epidemics of symptomatic disease. We examine the sensitivity of this lag to differing distributional assumptions about the incubation period (i.e. exponential versus Gamma). We demonstrate that accurate information about the incubation period distribution of a pathosystem can be critical in assessing the true scale of pathogen invasion behind early disease symptoms in the field; likewise, it can be central to model-based prediction of epidemic risk and evaluation of disease management strategies. Our results highlight that reliance on observation of disease symptoms can cause significant delay in detection of soil-borne pathogen epidemics and mislead practitioners and

  1. Reservoir-host amplification of disease impact in an endangered amphibian.

    PubMed

    Scheele, Ben C; Hunter, David A; Brannelly, Laura A; Skerratt, Lee F; Driscoll, Don A

    2017-06-01

    Emerging wildlife pathogens are an increasing threat to biodiversity. One of the most serious wildlife diseases is chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has been documented in over 500 amphibian species. Amphibians vary greatly in their susceptibility to Bd; some species tolerate infection, whereas others experience rapid mortality. Reservoir hosts-species that carry infection while maintaining high abundance but are rarely killed by disease-can increase extinction risk in highly susceptible, sympatric species. However, whether reservoir hosts amplify Bd in declining amphibian species has not been examined. We investigated the role of reservoir hosts in the decline of the threatened northern corroboree frog (Pseudophryne pengilleyi) in an amphibian community in southeastern Australia. In the laboratory, we characterized the response of a potential reservoir host, the (nondeclining) common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera), to Bd infection. In the field, we conducted frog abundance surveys and Bd sampling for both P. pengilleyi and C. signifera. We built multinomial logistic regression models to test whether Crinia signifera and environmental factors were associated with P. pengilleyi decline. C. signifera was a reservoir host for Bd. In the laboratory, many individuals maintained intense infections (>1000 zoospore equivalents) over 12 weeks without mortality, and 79% of individuals sampled in the wild also carried infections. The presence of C. signifera at a site was strongly associated with increased Bd prevalence in sympatric P. pengilleyi. Consistent with disease amplification by a reservoir host, P. pengilleyi declined at sites with high C. signifera abundance. Our results suggest that when reservoir hosts are present, population declines of susceptible species may continue long after the initial emergence of Bd, highlighting an urgent need to assess extinction risk in remnant populations of other declined

  2. Host mating system and the spread of a disease-resistant allele in a population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeAngelis, D.L.; Koslow, Jennifer M.; Jiang, J.; Ruan, S.

    2008-01-01

    The model presented here modifies a susceptible-infected (SI) host-pathogen model to determine the influence of mating system on the outcome of a host-pathogen interaction. Both deterministic and stochastic (individual-based) versions of the model were used. This model considers the potential consequences of varying mating systems on the rate of spread of both the pathogen and resistance alleles within the population. We assumed that a single allele for disease resistance was sufficient to confer complete resistance in an individual, and that both homozygote and heterozygote resistant individuals had the same mean birth and death rates. When disease invaded a population with only an initial small fraction of resistant genes, inbreeding (selfing) tended to increase the probability that the disease would soon be eliminated from a small population rather than become endemic, while outcrossing greatly increased the probability that the population would become extinct due to the disease.

  3. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh; Halfvarson, Jonas; Tysk, Curt; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers. PMID:23209564

  4. Integrated metagenomics/metaproteomics reveals human host-microbiota signatures of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Alison R; Cantarel, Brandi L; Lamendella, Regina; Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh; Halfvarson, Jonas; Tysk, Curt; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Fraser, Claire M; Hettich, Robert L; Jansson, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  5. Integrated Metagenomics/Metaproteomics Reveals Human Host-Microbiota Signatures of Crohn's Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, Alison L; Cantarel, Brandi; Lamendella, Regina; Darzi, Youssef; Mongodin, Emmanuel; Pan, Chongle; Shah, Manesh B; Halfvarsson, J; Tysk, C; Henrissat, Bernard; Raes, Jeroen; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Fraser-Liggett, C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Jansson, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an inflammatory bowel disease of complex etiology, although dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in chronic immune-mediated inflammation associated with CD. Here we combined shotgun metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches to identify potential functional signatures of CD in stool samples from six twin pairs that were either healthy, or that had CD in the ileum (ICD) or colon (CCD). Integration of these omics approaches revealed several genes, proteins, and pathways that primarily differentiated ICD from healthy subjects, including depletion of many proteins in ICD. In addition, the ICD phenotype was associated with alterations in bacterial carbohydrate metabolism, bacterial-host interactions, as well as human host-secreted enzymes. This eco-systems biology approach underscores the link between the gut microbiota and functional alterations in the pathophysiology of Crohn's disease and aids in identification of novel diagnostic targets and disease specific biomarkers.

  6. THE INDUCTION OF GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE IN MICE TREATED WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Albert H.; Santos, George W.

    1968-01-01

    In these studies adult mice treated with cyclophosphamide and foreign immunologically competent cells developed a graft versus host disease which outwardly resembled that encountered in other experimental systems. Progressively larger doses of cyclophosphamide produced an increasingly severe disease whereas comparable doses of mechlorethamine were ineffective. Increasingly larger cell inocula from parental, allogeneic, and xenogeneic donors resulted in a correspondingly more severe disease. Nucleated cells obtained from the peripheral blood were found to be the most potent inducers of this syndrome, while cells from the spleen, bone marrow, and thymus displayed lesser degrees of reactivity in that order. No such graft versus host disease occurred in mice given saline, lysed, or heat-killed cells in place of viable foreign cells. Neither did the disorder develop when comparable inocula of isogeneic cells were used. PMID:4873022

  7. Butyrate enhances disease resistance of chickens by inducing antimicrobial host defense peptide gene expression

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. I...

  8. Apoptosis of ileal crypt epithelia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Andreas; Russo, Alexandra; Lux, Steffi; Waiz, Lioudmila; Seidmann, Larissa; Faber, Jörg; Kirkpatrick, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Intestinal crypt cell apoptosis may occur after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation without clinically overt graft-versus-host disease. We describe this phenomenon in a case of a 12-year-old girl who had segments of the ileum resected because of a relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The diagnostic difficulties are discussed. PMID:25984309

  9. Host responses in the bursa of Fabricius of chickens infected with virulent Marek's disease virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host responses associated with very virulent Marek’s disease virus (MDV) infection in the bursa of Fabricius of chicken was investigated. The expression of MDV pp38 antigen and MDV gB transcripts were higher at 4 days post-infection (dpi) and then showed a declining trend. On the contrary, the expre...

  10. Cyclosporine and methotrexate-related pharmacogenomic predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Laverdière, Isabelle; Guillemette, Chantal; Tamouza, Ryad; Loiseau, Pascale; de Latour, Regis Peffault; Robin, Marie; Couture, Félix; Filion, Alain; Lalancette, Marc; Tourancheau, Alan; Charron, Dominique; Socié, Gérard; Lévesque, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Effective immunosuppression is mandatory to prevent graft-versus-host disease and to achieve a successful clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we tested whether germline single nucleotide polymorphisms in 20 candidate genes related to methotrexate and cyclosporine metabolism and activity influence the incidence of graft-versus-host disease in patients who undergo stem cell transplantation for hematologic disorders. Recipient genetic status of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 transporters, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/ inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase within the methotrexate pathway, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) loci exhibit a remarkable influence on severe acute graft-versus-host disease prevalence. Indeed, an increased risk of acute graft-versus-host disease was observed in association with single nucleotide polymorphisms located in 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide formyltransferase/inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (hazard ratio=3.04; P=0.002), nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 1) (hazard ratio=2.69; P=0.004), adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C2 (hazard ratio=3.53; P=0.0018) and adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette sub-family C1 (hazard ratio=3.67; P=0.0005). While donor single nucleotide polymorphisms of dihydrofolate reductase and solute carrier family 19 (member 1) genes are associated with a reduced risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (hazard ratio=0.32–0.41; P=0.0009–0.008), those of nuclear factor of activated T cells (cytoplasmic 2) are found to increase such risk (hazard ratio=3.85; P=0.0004). None of the tested single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with the occurrence of chronic graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, by targeting drug-related biologically relevant genes, this work emphasizes the potential

  11. Recent advances in host defense mechanisms/therapies against oral infectious diseases and consequences for systemic disease.

    PubMed

    Gaffen, S L; Herzberg, M C; Taubman, M A; Van Dyke, T E

    2014-05-01

    The innate and adaptive immune systems are both crucial to oral disease mechanisms and their impact on systemic health status. Greater understanding of these interrelationships will yield opportunities to identify new therapeutic targets to modulate disease processes and/or increase host resistance to infectious or inflammatory insult. The topics addressed reflect the latest advances in our knowledge of the role of innate and adaptive immune systems and inflammatory mechanisms in infectious diseases affecting the oral cavity, including periodontitis and candidiasis. In addition, several potential links with systemic inflammatory conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, are explored. The findings elucidate some of the defense mechanisms utilized by host tissues, including the role of IL-17 in providing immunity to oral candidiasis, the antimicrobial defense of mucosal epithelial cells, and the pro-resolution effects of the natural inflammatory regulators, proresolvins and lipoxins. They also describe the role of immune cells in mediating pathologic bone resorption in periodontal disease. These insights highlight the potential for therapeutic benefit of immunomodulatory interventions that bolster or modulate host defense mechanisms in both oral and systemic disease. Among the promising new therapeutic approaches discussed here are epithelial cell gene therapy, passive immunization against immune cell targets, and the use of proresolvin agents.

  12. Acquired immunity and stochasticity in epidemic intervals impede the evolution of host disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Harding, Karin C; Hansen, B Johan L; Goodman, Simon J

    2005-12-01

    Disease can generate intense selection pressure on host populations, but here we show that acquired immunity in a population subject to repeated disease outbreaks can impede the evolution of genetic disease resistance by maintaining susceptible genotypes in the population. Interference between the life-history schedule of a species and periodicity of the disease has unintuitive effects on selection intensity, and stochasticity in outbreak period further reduces the rate of spread of disease-resistance alleles. A general age-structured population genetic model was developed and parameterized using empirical data for phocine distemper virus (PDV) epizootics in harbor seals. Scenarios with acquired immunity had lower levels of epizootic mortality compared with scenarios without acquired immunity for the first PDV outbreaks, but this pattern was reversed after about five disease cycles. Without acquired immunity, evolution of disease resistance was more rapid, and long-term population size variation is efficiently dampened. Acquired immunity has the potential to significantly influence rapid evolutionary dynamics of a host population in response to age-structured disease selection and to alter predicted selection intensities compared with epidemiological models that do not consider such feedback. This may have important implications for evolutionary population dynamics in a range of human, agricultural, and wildlife disease settings.

  13. The distribution of parasite strains among hosts affects disease spread in a social insect.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Yuko; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Social insects present highly interesting and experimentally amenable systems for the study of disease transmission because they naturally live in dense groups of frequently interacting individuals. Using experimental inoculations of five trypanosomatid strains into groups of its natural host, the bumblebee Bombus terrestris, we investigate the effects of the initial parasite strain distribution across group members on the establishment and transmission success of the different strains to new hosts. For a given number of parasite strains circulating within a host group, transmission to new hosts was increased when the strains were initially inoculated as mixed infections (as opposed to separate single infections), presumably because mixed infections generally favored fast replicating strains. In contrast, separate single infections reduced transmission at least in part through a precedence effect, whereby weak strains appeared to persist by making their host unavailable to superinfection. These results suggest that host groups could benefit from 'compartmentalizing' infections by different parasite strains across different group members, which might be achieved in social insects, for example, by division of labor.

  14. Stability of Microbiota Facilitated by Host Immune Regulation: Informing Probiotic Strategies to Manage Amphibian Disease

    PubMed Central

    Küng, Denise; Bigler, Laurent; Davis, Leyla R.; Gratwicke, Brian; Griffith, Edgardo; Woodhams, Douglas C.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities can augment host immune responses and probiotic therapies are under development to prevent or treat diseases of humans, crops, livestock, and wildlife including an emerging fungal disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis. However, little is known about the stability of host-associated microbiota, or how the microbiota is structured by innate immune factors including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) abundant in the skin secretions of many amphibians. Thus, conservation medicine including therapies targeting the skin will benefit from investigations of amphibian microbial ecology that provide a model for vertebrate host-symbiont interactions on mucosal surfaces. Here, we tested whether the cutaneous microbiota of Panamanian rocket frogs, Colostethus panamansis, was resistant to colonization or altered by treatment. Under semi-natural outdoor mesocosm conditions in Panama, we exposed frogs to one of three treatments including: (1) probiotic - the potentially beneficial bacterium Lysinibacillus fusiformis, (2) transplant – skin washes from the chytridiomycosis-resistant glass frog Espadarana prosoblepon, and (3) control – sterile water. Microbial assemblages were analyzed by a culture-independent T-RFLP analysis. We found that skin microbiota of C. panamansis was resistant to colonization and did not differ among treatments, but shifted through time in the mesocosms. We describe regulation of host AMPs that may function to maintain microbial community stability. Colonization resistance was metabolically costly and microbe-treated frogs lost 7–12% of body mass. The discovery of strong colonization resistance of skin microbiota suggests a well-regulated, rather than dynamic, host-symbiont relationship, and suggests that probiotic therapies aiming to enhance host immunity may require an approach that circumvents host mechanisms maintaining equilibrium in microbial communities. PMID:24489847

  15. Stability of microbiota facilitated by host immune regulation: informing probiotic strategies to manage amphibian disease.

    PubMed

    Küng, Denise; Bigler, Laurent; Davis, Leyla R; Gratwicke, Brian; Griffith, Edgardo; Woodhams, Douglas C

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities can augment host immune responses and probiotic therapies are under development to prevent or treat diseases of humans, crops, livestock, and wildlife including an emerging fungal disease of amphibians, chytridiomycosis. However, little is known about the stability of host-associated microbiota, or how the microbiota is structured by innate immune factors including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) abundant in the skin secretions of many amphibians. Thus, conservation medicine including therapies targeting the skin will benefit from investigations of amphibian microbial ecology that provide a model for vertebrate host-symbiont interactions on mucosal surfaces. Here, we tested whether the cutaneous microbiota of Panamanian rocket frogs, Colostethus panamansis, was resistant to colonization or altered by treatment. Under semi-natural outdoor mesocosm conditions in Panama, we exposed frogs to one of three treatments including: (1) probiotic - the potentially beneficial bacterium Lysinibacillus fusiformis, (2) transplant - skin washes from the chytridiomycosis-resistant glass frog Espadarana prosoblepon, and (3) control - sterile water. Microbial assemblages were analyzed by a culture-independent T-RFLP analysis. We found that skin microbiota of C. panamansis was resistant to colonization and did not differ among treatments, but shifted through time in the mesocosms. We describe regulation of host AMPs that may function to maintain microbial community stability. Colonization resistance was metabolically costly and microbe-treated frogs lost 7-12% of body mass. The discovery of strong colonization resistance of skin microbiota suggests a well-regulated, rather than dynamic, host-symbiont relationship, and suggests that probiotic therapies aiming to enhance host immunity may require an approach that circumvents host mechanisms maintaining equilibrium in microbial communities.

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for prevention of graft-versus-host disease in people receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed; Mhaskar, Rahul; Reljic, Tea; Pidala, Joseph; Perkins, Janelle B; Djulbegovic, Benjamin; Kumar, Ambuj

    2014-07-25

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) is associated with improved outcomes for people with various hematologic diseases; however, the morbidity and mortality resulting from acute and subsequently chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) pose a serious challenge to wider applicability of allo-HCT. Intravenous methotrexate in combination with a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporine or tacrolimus, is a widely used regimen for the prophylaxis of acute GVHD, but the administration of methotrexate is associated with a number of adverse events. Mycophenolate mofetil, in combination with a calcineurin inhibitor, has been used extensively in people undergoing allo-HCT. Conflicting results regarding various clinical outcomes following allo-HCT have been observed when comparing mycophenolate mofetil-based regimens against methotrexate-based regimens for acute GVHD prophylaxis. to assess the effect of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for prevention of acute GVHD in people undergoing allo-HCT. to evaluate the effect of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for overall survival, prevention of chronic GVHD, incidence of relapse, treatment-related harms, nonrelapse mortality, and quality of life. We searched Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and MEDLINE from inception to March 2014. We handsearched conference abstracts from the last two meetings (2011 and 2012) of relevant societies in the field. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov, Novartis clinical trials database (www.novctrd.com), Roche clinical trial protocol registry (www.roche-trials.com), Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR), and the metaRegister of Controlled Trials for ongoing trials. Two review authors independently reviewed all titles/abstracts and selected full-text articles for inclusion. We included all references that reported results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of mycophenolate mofetil versus methotrexate for the prophylaxis of

  17. The genetic predisposition and the interplay of host genetics and gut microbiome in Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Jianzhong, Hu

    2014-12-01

    Extensive genetic studies have identified more than 140 loci predisposing to Crohn disease (CD). Several major CD susceptibility genes have been shown to impair biological function with regard to immune response to recognizing and clearance of bacterial infection. Recent human microbiome studies suggest that the gut microbiome composition is differentiated in carriers of many risk variants of major CD susceptibility genes. This interplay between host genetics and its associated gut microbiome may play an essential role in the pathogenesis of CD. The ongoing microbiome research is aimed to investigate the detailed host genetics-microbiome interacting mechanism.

  18. Fibreoptic bronchoscopy in the diagnosis of pulmonary disease in the immunocompromised host in northern Alberta

    PubMed Central

    Crocket, Jennifer A; Chaput, Michelle R; Lien, Dale C

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the diagnostic utility of bronchoscopy in a population of immunocompromised hosts in northern Alberta. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Results from bronchoscopy in 86 immunocompromised patients who underwent a total of 101 procedures were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: The overall diagnostic yield was 57% with the highest yield in patients on immunosuppressive drug therapy (80%) and the lowest yield in the group of bone marrow transplant patients (27%). CONCLUSIONS: Bronchoscopy is a valuable tool for the evaluation of pulmonary disease in the immunocompromised host. Overall diagnostic yield of 57% is comparable with that reported in the literature. PMID:22550406

  19. The lyme disease pathogen has no effect on the survival of its rodent reservoir host.

    PubMed

    Voordouw, Maarten J; Lachish, Shelly; Dolan, Marc C

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause devastating morbidity and mortality in humans may be relatively harmless in their natural reservoir hosts. The tick-borne bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease in humans but few studies have investigated whether this pathogen reduces the fitness of its reservoir hosts under natural conditions. We analyzed four years of capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data on a population of white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, to test whether B. burgdorferi and its tick vector affect the survival of this important reservoir host. We used a multi-state CMR approach to model mouse survival and mouse infection rates as a function of a variety of ecologically relevant explanatory factors. We found no effect of B. burgdorferi infection or tick burden on the survival of P. leucopus. Our estimates of the probability of infection varied by an order of magnitude (0.051 to 0.535) and were consistent with our understanding of Lyme disease in the Northeastern United States. B. burgdorferi establishes a chronic avirulent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts because this pathogen depends on rodent mobility to achieve transmission to its sedentary tick vector. The estimates of B. burgdorferi infection risk will facilitate future theoretical studies on the epidemiology of Lyme disease.

  20. The Lyme Disease Pathogen Has No Effect on the Survival of Its Rodent Reservoir Host

    PubMed Central

    Voordouw, Maarten J.; Lachish, Shelly; Dolan, Marc C.

    2015-01-01

    Zoonotic pathogens that cause devastating morbidity and mortality in humans may be relatively harmless in their natural reservoir hosts. The tick-borne bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi causes Lyme disease in humans but few studies have investigated whether this pathogen reduces the fitness of its reservoir hosts under natural conditions. We analyzed four years of capture-mark-recapture (CMR) data on a population of white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, to test whether B. burgdorferi and its tick vector affect the survival of this important reservoir host. We used a multi-state CMR approach to model mouse survival and mouse infection rates as a function of a variety of ecologically relevant explanatory factors. We found no effect of B. burgdorferi infection or tick burden on the survival of P. leucopus. Our estimates of the probability of infection varied by an order of magnitude (0.051 to 0.535) and were consistent with our understanding of Lyme disease in the Northeastern United States. B. burgdorferi establishes a chronic avirulent infection in their rodent reservoir hosts because this pathogen depends on rodent mobility to achieve transmission to its sedentary tick vector. The estimates of B. burgdorferi infection risk will facilitate future theoretical studies on the epidemiology of Lyme disease. PMID:25688863

  1. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus-Host Interactions: Multifunctional Viral Proteins that Perform Multiple and Differing Jobs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yao; Zheng, Shijun J

    2017-01-14

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease caused by IBD virus (IBDV). The consequent immunosuppression increases susceptibility to other infectious diseases and the risk of subsequent vaccination failure as well. Since the genome of IBDV is relatively small, it has a limited number of proteins inhibiting the cellular antiviral responses and acting as destroyers to the host defense system. Thus, these virulence factors must be multifunctional in order to complete the viral replication cycle in a host cell. Insights into the roles of these viral proteins along with their multiple cellular targets in different pathways will give rise to a rational design for safer and effective vaccines. Here we summarize the recent findings that focus on the virus-cell interactions during IBDV infection at the protein level.

  2. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. L.; McDermott, Jason E.; Proll, Sean; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-02-01

    The 20th century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and water borne illnesses are frequent, multi-drug resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the 21st century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm.

  3. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus-Host Interactions: Multifunctional Viral Proteins that Perform Multiple and Differing Jobs

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yao; Zheng, Shijun J.

    2017-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease (IBD) is an acute, highly contagious and immunosuppressive poultry disease caused by IBD virus (IBDV). The consequent immunosuppression increases susceptibility to other infectious diseases and the risk of subsequent vaccination failure as well. Since the genome of IBDV is relatively small, it has a limited number of proteins inhibiting the cellular antiviral responses and acting as destroyers to the host defense system. Thus, these virulence factors must be multifunctional in order to complete the viral replication cycle in a host cell. Insights into the roles of these viral proteins along with their multiple cellular targets in different pathways will give rise to a rational design for safer and effective vaccines. Here we summarize the recent findings that focus on the virus–cell interactions during IBDV infection at the protein level. PMID:28098808

  4. A Systems Biology Approach to Infectious Disease Research: Innovating the Pathogen-Host Research Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Aderem, Alan; Adkins, Joshua N.; Ansong, Charles; Galagan, James; Kaiser, Shari; Korth, Marcus J.; Law, G. Lynn; McDermott, Jason G.; Proll, Sean C.; Rosenberger, Carrie; Schoolnik, Gary; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    The twentieth century was marked by extraordinary advances in our understanding of microbes and infectious disease, but pandemics remain, food and waterborne illnesses are frequent, multidrug-resistant microbes are on the rise, and the needed drugs and vaccines have not been developed. The scientific approaches of the past—including the intense focus on individual genes and proteins typical of molecular biology—have not been sufficient to address these challenges. The first decade of the twenty-first century has seen remarkable innovations in technology and computational methods. These new tools provide nearly comprehensive views of complex biological systems and can provide a correspondingly deeper understanding of pathogen-host interactions. To take full advantage of these innovations, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases recently initiated the Systems Biology Program for Infectious Disease Research. As participants of the Systems Biology Program, we think that the time is at hand to redefine the pathogen-host research paradigm. PMID:21285433

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ottoline, Ana Carolina Xavier; Tomita, Shiro; Marques, Marise da Penha Costa; Felix, Felippe; Ferraiolo, Priscila Novaes; Laurindo, Roberta Silveira Santos

    2013-01-01

    Summary Aim: Antibiotic prophylaxis aims to prevent infection of surgical sites before contamination or infection occurs. Prolonged antibiotic prophylaxis does not enhance the prevention of surgical infection and is associated with higher rates of antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. This review of the literature concerning antibiotic prophylaxis, with an emphasis on otolaryngologic surgery, aims to develop a guide for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery in order to reduce the numbers of complications stemming from the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. PMID:25991999

  6. Lichenoid exanthema mimicking graft-versus-host disease associated with obstructive lung disease in a non-transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Eberle, Franziska Carola; Holland, Angelique; Hörster, Stefan; Vogelmeier, Claus; Hertl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Lichenoid graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is commonly observed in patients who have received donor lymphocyte infusions or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Here we report a striking case of lichenoid GVH-like exanthema in a young woman without any history of blood transfusions or BMT. A polymorphous, multiforme-like exanthema was observed after systemic antibiotic therapy of bronchitis and was initially diagnosed as drug eruption. Later on, disseminated lichenoid papules were noticed on the trunk and extremities with all histologic and clinical characteristics of lichenoid GVHD. Cutaneous GVH-like disease developed, as did obstructive lung disease. Pulmonary as well as skin disease were both refractory to various immunosuppressive therapies. The immune pathogenesis that caused the skin and lung disease in this patient remains unclear. Multiple pregnancies with two abortions with the potential induction of microchimerism may play a role in the disease pathogenesis.

  7. Peritransplant Serum Albumin Decline Predicts Subsequent Severe Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease after Mucotoxic Myeloablative Conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Armin; DiPersio, John F; Westervelt, Peter; Abboud, Camille N; Schroeder, Mark A; Cashen, Amanda F; Pusic, Iskra; Romee, Rizwan

    2016-06-01

    Conditioning-related gut toxicity can result in a protein-losing enteropathy manifesting as a decline in serum albumin in the peritransplant period. Inspired by the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), we hypothesized that the magnitude of decline in serum albumin from the day of conditioning initiation until its nadir in the first 2 weeks after hematopoietic cell transplantation HCT (DeltaAlb) predicts the risk for subsequent severe aGVHD. We reviewed the medical records of all 88 patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who underwent highly mucotoxic myeloablative (busulfan/cyclophosphamide or cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation) allogeneic HCT from a matched related donor (MRD) or matched unrelated donor (MUD) at our institution between January 1, 2012 and January 1, 2015. Severe aGVHD was associated with MUD (47% versus 14% with MRD; P = .001) and DeltaAlb, which was significantly greater among patients who developed versus did not develop severe aGVHD (1.2 ± .5 versus .8 ± .4 g/dL, respectively; P < .001). In multivariate analysis DeltaAlb remained a significant predictor of severe aGVHD (odds ratio, 5.68; 95% CI, 1.65 to 19.64; P = .006; area under the ROC curve, .74; 95% CI, .63 to .86; P < .001). The best cutoff for DeltaAlb to predict severe aGVHD was .9, with a sensitivity, specificity, and overall classification accuracy of 77%, 66%, and 69%, respectively. The model was validated using the bootstrap technique, with no significant change in its performance. These results were not generalizable to a cohort of 30 patients who received less mucotoxic myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning. In conclusion, with mucotoxic myeloablative HCT, each .1-g/dL increase in DeltaAlb was associated with an approximately 23% increase in the odds of developing severe aGVHD. As an early biomarker of gut damage, DeltaAlb can be incorporated in composite risk models for aGVHD prediction, with hopes for

  8. Targeting of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway to inhibit T cell activation and prevent graft-versus-host disease development.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Sánchez, Mª Carmen; Rodríguez-Serrano, Concepción; Almeida, Julia; San Segundo, Laura; Inogés, Susana; Santos-Briz, Ángel; García-Briñón, Jesús; Corchete, Luis Antonio; San Miguel, Jesús F; Del Cañizo, Consuelo; Blanco, Belén

    2016-10-20

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) remains the major obstacle to successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, despite of the immunosuppressive regimens administered to control T cell alloreactivity. PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is crucial in T cell activation and function and, therefore, represents an attractive therapeutic target to prevent GvHD development. Recently, numerous PI3K inhibitors have been developed for cancer therapy. However, few studies have explored their immunosuppressive effect. The effects of a selective PI3K inhibitor (BKM120) and a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor (BEZ235) on human T cell proliferation, expression of activation-related molecules, and phosphorylation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway proteins were analyzed. Besides, the ability of BEZ235 to prevent GvHD development in mice was evaluated. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was efficient at lower concentrations than PI3K specific targeting. Importantly, BEZ235 prevented naïve T cell activation and induced tolerance of alloreactive T cells, while maintaining an adequate response against cytomegalovirus, more efficiently than BKM120. Finally, BEZ235 treatment significantly improved the survival and decreased the GvHD development in mice. These results support the use of PI3K inhibitors to control T cell responses and show the potential utility of the dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor BEZ235 in GvHD prophylaxis.

  9. Host-microbe interactions in distal airways: relevance to chronic airway diseases.

    PubMed

    Martin, Clémence; Burgel, Pierre-Régis; Lepage, Patricia; Andréjak, Claire; de Blic, Jacques; Bourdin, Arnaud; Brouard, Jacques; Chanez, Pascal; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Deslée, Gaetan; Deschildre, Antoine; Gosset, Philippe; Touqui, Lhousseine; Dusser, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    This article is the summary of a workshop, which took place in November 2013, on the roles of microorganisms in chronic respiratory diseases. Until recently, it was assumed that lower airways were sterile in healthy individuals. However, it has long been acknowledged that microorganisms could be identified in distal airway secretions from patients with various respiratory diseases, including cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma and other chronic airway diseases (e.g. post-transplantation bronchiolitis obliterans). These microorganisms were sometimes considered as infectious agents that triggered host immune responses and contributed to disease onset and/or progression; alternatively, microorganisms were often considered as colonisers, which were considered unlikely to play roles in disease pathophysiology. These concepts were developed at a time when the identification of microorganisms relied on culture-based methods. Importantly, the majority of microorganisms cannot be cultured using conventional methods, and the use of novel culture-independent methods that rely on the identification of microorganism genomes has revealed that healthy distal airways display a complex flora called the airway microbiota. The present article reviews some aspects of current literature on host-microbe (mostly bacteria and viruses) interactions in healthy and diseased airways, with a special focus on distal airways.

  10. Symbiosis with systemic fungal endophytes promotes host escape from vector-borne disease.

    PubMed

    Perez, L I; Gundel, P E; Marrero, H J; Arzac, A González; Omacini, M

    2017-03-18

    Plants interact with a myriad of microorganisms that modulate their interactions within the community. A well-described example is the symbiosis between grasses and Epichloë fungal endophytes that protects host plants from herbivores. It is suggested that these symbionts could play a protective role for plants against pathogens through the regulation of their growth and development and/or the induction of host defences. However, other endophyte-mediated ecological mechanisms involved in disease avoidance have been scarcely explored. Here we studied the endophyte impact on plant disease caused by the biotrophic fungus, Claviceps purpurea, under field conditions through (1) changes in the survival of the pathogen´s resistance structure (sclerotia) during overwintering on the soil surface, and (2) effects on insects responsible for the transportation of pathogen spores. This latter mechanism is tested through a visitor exclusion treatment and the measurement of plant volatile cues. We found no significant effects of the endophyte on the survival of sclerotia and thus on disease inocula. However, both pathogen incidence and severity were twofold lower in endophyte-symbiotic plants than in non-symbiotic ones, though when insect visits were prevented this difference disappeared. Endophyte-symbiotic and non-symbiotic plots presented different emission patterns of volatiles suggesting that they can play a role in this protection. We show a novel indirect ecological mechanism by which endophytes can defend host grasses against diseases through negatively interacting with intermediary vectors of the epidemic process.

  11. Contentious host-microbiota relationship in inflammatory bowel disease--can foes become friends again?

    PubMed

    Satokari, Reetta

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic debilitating disorders of unknown etiology, consisting of two main conditions, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Major advances have recently taken place in human genetic studies of IBD and over 160 risk loci for these two diseases have been uncovered. These genetic data highlight a key role for genes that code for immunological and epithelial barrier functions. Environmental factors also make substantial contributions to the pathogenesis of IBD and account for the growing incidence of the diseases around the world. Intestinal microbiota creates resistance to infection, provides nutrients, and educates the immune system and in many ways has a significant impact on human health. Aberrant microbiota composition and decreased diversity (dysbiotic microbiota) are key etiopathological events in IBD. Dysbiotic microbiota can lead to loss of normal, regulatory immune effects in the gut mucosa. This may play a central role in the development and perpetuation of chronic inflammation. Further, the expression of specific innate immune receptors that recognize microbes is altered in the IBD epithelium. Therefore, the combination of host side epithelial barrier functions and the presence of dysbiotic microbiota in the gut together promote inflammation. New therapeutic options targeting microbiota are currently considered for IBD and they may, in the future, provide means to reverse the pathogenic host-microbiota relationship into a symbiotic one. In this review, the focus is on the intestinal microbiota and host-microbe interactions in IBD.

  12. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome.

    PubMed

    Haley, Kathryn P; Gaddy, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization.

  13. Disease in a dynamic landscape: host behavior and wildfire reduce amphibian chytrid infection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, Blake R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Ware, Joy L.; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Disturbances are often expected to magnify effects of disease, but these effects may depend on the ecology, behavior, and life history of both hosts and pathogens. In many ecosystems, wildfire is the dominant natural disturbance and thus could directly or indirectly affect dynamics of many diseases. To determine how probability of infection by the aquatic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) varies relative to habitat use by individuals, wildfire, and host characteristics, we sampled 404 boreal toads (Anaxyrus boreas boreas) across Glacier National Park, Montana (USA). Bd causes chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease linked with widespread amphibian declines, including the boreal toad. Probability of infection was similar for females and the combined group of males and juveniles. However, only 9% of terrestrial toads were infected compared to >30% of aquatic toads, and toads captured in recently burned areas were half as likely to be infected as toads in unburned areas. We suspect these large differences in infection reflect habitat choices by individuals that affect pathogen exposure and persistence, especially in burned forests where warm, arid conditions could limit Bd growth. Our results show that natural disturbances such as wildfire and the resulting diverse habitats can influence infection across large landscapes, potentially maintaining local refuges and host behaviors that facilitate evolution of disease resistance.

  14. Nutrition and Helicobacter pylori: Host Diet and Nutritional Immunity Influence Bacterial Virulence and Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H. pylori which increase the risk for developing gastric cancer. Furthermore, host diet and nutrition status have been shown to influence H. pylori-associated disease outcomes. In this review we will discuss how H. pylori is able to create a replicative niche within the hostile host environment by subverting and modifying the host-generated immune response as well as successfully competing for limited nutrients such as transition metals by deploying an arsenal of metal acquisition proteins and virulence factors. Lastly, we will discuss how micronutrient availability or alterations in the gastric microbiome may exacerbate negative disease outcomes associated with H. pylori colonization. PMID:27688750

  15. Host genetics of Epstein–Barr virus infection, latency and disease

    PubMed Central

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J; Kellam, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infects 95% of the adult population and is the cause of infectious mononucleosis. It is also associated with 1% of cancers worldwide, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and Burkitt's lymphoma. Human and cancer genetic studies are now major forces determining gene variants associated with many cancers, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Host genetics is also important in infectious disease; however, there have been no large-scale efforts towards understanding the contribution that human genetic variation plays in primary EBV infection and latency. This review covers 25 years of studies into host genetic susceptibility to EBV infection and disease, from candidate gene studies, to the first genome-wide association study of EBV antibody response, and an EBV-status stratified genome-wide association study of Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although many genes are implicated in EBV-related disease, studies are often small, not replicated or followed up in a different disease. Larger, appropriately powered genomic studies to understand the host response to EBV will be needed to move our understanding of the biology of EBV infection beyond the handful of genes currently identified. Fifty years since the discovery of EBV and its identification as a human oncogenic virus, a glimpse of the future is shown by the first whole-genome and whole-exome studies, revealing new human genes at the heart of the host–EBV interaction. © 2014 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25430668

  16. Dual Transcriptomic Profiling of Host and Microbiota during Health and Disease in Pediatric Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Bendall, Matthew L.; Freishtat, Robert J.; Crandall, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-throughput sequencing (HTS) analysis of microbial communities from the respiratory airways has heavily relied on the 16S rRNA gene. Given the intrinsic limitations of this approach, airway microbiome research has focused on assessing bacterial composition during health and disease, and its variation in relation to clinical and environmental factors, or other microbiomes. Consequently, very little effort has been dedicated to describing the functional characteristics of the airway microbiota and even less to explore the microbe-host interactions. Here we present a simultaneous assessment of microbiome and host functional diversity and host-microbe interactions from the same RNA-seq experiment, while accounting for variation in clinical metadata. Methods Transcriptomic (host) and metatranscriptomic (microbiota) sequences from the nasal epithelium of 8 asthmatics and 6 healthy controls were separated in silico and mapped to available human and NCBI-NR protein reference databases. Human genes differentially expressed in asthmatics and controls were then used to infer upstream regulators involved in immune and inflammatory responses. Concomitantly, microbial genes were mapped to metabolic databases (COG, SEED, and KEGG) to infer microbial functions differentially expressed in asthmatics and controls. Finally, multivariate analysis was applied to find associations between microbiome characteristics and host upstream regulators while accounting for clinical variation. Results and Discussion Our study showed significant differences in the metabolism of microbiomes from asthmatic and non-asthmatic children for up to 25% of the functional properties tested. Enrichment analysis of 499 differentially expressed host genes for inflammatory and immune responses revealed 43 upstream regulators differentially activated in asthma. Microbial adhesion (virulence) and Proteobacteria abundance were significantly associated with variation in the expression of the upstream

  17. Nasopharyngeal Microbiota, Host Transcriptome, and Disease Severity in Children with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Heinonen, Santtu; Hasrat, Raiza; Bunsow, Eleonora; Smith, Bennett; Suarez-Arrabal, Maria-Carmen; Chaussabel, Damien; Cohen, Daniel M; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Ramilo, Octavio; Bogaert, Debby; Mejias, Asuncion

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections and hospitalizations in infants worldwide. Known risk factors, however, incompletely explain the variability of RSV disease severity, especially among healthy children. We postulate that the severity of RSV infection is influenced by modulation of the host immune response by the local bacterial ecosystem. To assess whether specific nasopharyngeal microbiota (clusters) are associated with distinct host transcriptome profiles and disease severity in children less than 2 years of age with RSV infection. We characterized the nasopharyngeal microbiota profiles of young children with mild and severe RSV disease and healthy children by 16S-rRNA sequencing. In parallel, using multivariable models, we analyzed whole-blood transcriptome profiles to study the relationship between microbial community composition, the RSV-induced host transcriptional response, and clinical disease severity. We identified five nasopharyngeal microbiota clusters characterized by enrichment of either Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus, Corynebacterium, Moraxella, or Staphylococcus aureus. RSV infection and RSV hospitalization were positively associated with H. influenzae and Streptococcus and negatively associated with S. aureus abundance, independent of age. Children with RSV showed overexpression of IFN-related genes, independent of the microbiota cluster. In addition, transcriptome profiles of children with RSV infection and H. influenzae- and Streptococcus-dominated microbiota were characterized by greater overexpression of genes linked to Toll-like receptor and by neutrophil and macrophage activation and signaling. Our data suggest that interactions between RSV and nasopharyngeal microbiota might modulate the host immune response, potentially affecting clinical disease severity.

  18. Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide and Tacrolimus-Mycophenolate Mofetil Combination Prevents Graft-versus-Host Disease in Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation from HLA-Matched Donors.

    PubMed

    Carnevale-Schianca, Fabrizio; Caravelli, Daniela; Gallo, Susanna; Coha, Valentina; D'Ambrosio, Lorenzo; Vassallo, Elena; Fizzotti, Marco; Nesi, Francesca; Gioeni, Luisa; Berger, Massimo; Polo, Alessandra; Gammaitoni, Loretta; Becco, Paolo; Giraudo, Lidia; Mangioni, Monica; Sangiolo, Dario; Grignani, Giovanni; Rota-Scalabrini, Delia; Sottile, Antonino; Fagioli, Franca; Aglietta, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) remains the only curative therapy for many hematologic malignancies but it is limited by high nonrelapse mortality (NRM), primarily from unpredictable control of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recently, post-transplant cyclophosphamide demonstrated improved GVHD control in allogeneic bone marrow HCT. Here we explore cyclophosphamide in allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (alloPBSCT). Patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies received alloPBSCT from HLA-matched unrelated/related donors. GVHD prophylaxis included combination post-HCT cyclophosphamide 50 mg/kg (days +3 and +4) and tacrolimus/mofetil mycophenolate (T/MMF) (day +5 forward). The primary objective was the cumulative incidence of acute and chronic GVHD. Between March 2011 and May 2015, 35 consecutive patients received the proposed regimen. MMF was stopped in all patients at day +28; the median discontinuation of tacrolimus was day +113. Acute and chronic GVHD cumulative incidences were 17% and 7%, respectively, with no grade IV GVHD events, only 2 patients requiring chronic GVHD immunosuppression control, and no deaths from GVHD. Two-year NRM, overall survival, event-free survival, and chronic GVHD event-free survival rates were 3%, 77%, 54%, and 49%, respectively. The graft-versus-tumor effect was maintained as 5 of 15 patients (33%) who received HCT with evidence of disease experienced further disease response. A post-transplant cyclophosphamide + T/MMF combination strategy effectively prevented acute and chronic GVHD after alloPBSCT from HLA-matched donors and achieved an unprecedented low NRM without losing efficacy in disease control or impaired development of the graft-versus-tumor effect. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02300571.

  19. Host-Microbiota Interactions in the Pathogenesis of Antibiotic-Associated Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, Joshua S; Ferreyra, Jessica A; Ng, Katharine M; Smits, Samuel A; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Elias, Joshua E

    2016-02-09

    Improved understanding of the interplay between host and microbes stands to illuminate new avenues for disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Here, we provide a high-resolution view of the dynamics between host and gut microbiota during antibiotic-induced intestinal microbiota depletion, opportunistic Salmonella typhimurium and Clostridium difficile pathogenesis, and recovery from these perturbed states in a mouse model. Host-centric proteome and microbial community profiles provide a nuanced longitudinal view, revealing the interdependence between host and microbiota in evolving dysbioses. Time- and condition-specific molecular and microbial signatures are evident and clearly distinguished from pathogen-independent inflammatory fingerprints. Our data reveal that mice recovering from antibiotic treatment or C. difficile infection retain lingering signatures of inflammation, despite compositional normalization of the microbiota, and host responses could be rapidly and durably relieved through fecal transplant. These experiments demonstrate insights that emerge from the combination of these orthogonal, untargeted approaches to the gastrointestinal ecosystem. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Potential ‘Curative’ Modality for Crohn’s Disease---Modeled after Prophylaxis of Bovine Johne’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Click, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    A naturally occurring, gastrointestinal disorder of ruminants (Johne’s disease) is a chronic, debilitating, lethal disease. The causative agent is Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Exposure that leads to disease occurs primarily in utero and/or during the neonatal period. Outside a dietzia probiotic treatment, there are no preventive/curative therapies. Interestingly, MAP is at the center of a controversy as to its role (cause of, perpetuate of, innocent bystander) in Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, sarcoidosis, Blau syndrome, and multiple sclerosis—diseases in which the incidence of systemic MAP is higher than that in the general population. Conventional therapeutic modalities, including biologic agents, for the majority of these diseases are, in general, directed at curtailing processes that are an intricate part of inflammation, with goals to induce and maintain remission. Most possess side effects of varying severity, lose therapeutic value, and more importantly, few are directed at prevention, attainment of long lasting remissions or cures, and essential none at reduction/elimination of MAP. This report presents a rationale for how/why Dietzia subsp. C79793-74 should be clinically evaluated for efficacy in patients with IBD. Arguments are based on previous studies that demonstrated (a) clinical similarities of Johne’s disease and Crohn’s disease, (b) inhibition of growth of MAP by Dietzia under specific culture conditions, (c) safe usage for extended daily treatments of adult cattle (up to 24 months), and (d) when used as a probiotic, curtailed diarrhea and cured 40% of adult cattle with early stage paratuberculosis. PMID:24494172

  1. Tolerability of up to 200 days of prophylaxis with valganciclovir oral solution and/or film-coated tablets in pediatric kidney transplant recipients at risk of cytomegalovirus disease.

    PubMed

    Varela-Fascinetto, G; Benchimol, C; Reyes-Acevedo, R; Genevray, M; Bradley, D; Ives, J; Silva, H T

    2017-02-01

    This multicenter, open-label study evaluated the tolerability of extended prophylaxis with valganciclovir in pediatric kidney transplant recipients at risk of CMV disease. Fifty-six patients aged 4 months to 16 years received once-daily valganciclovir oral solution and/or tablets, dosed by BSA and renal function, for up to 200 days. The most common AEs on treatment were upper respiratory tract infection (33.9%), urinary tract infection (33.9%), diarrhea (32.1%), leukopenia (25.0%), neutropenia (23.2%), and headache (21.4%). There were fewer AEs during days 101-228 vs days 1-100. Twenty-seven patients (48.2%) had treatment-related AEs during valganciclovir treatment, most commonly leukopenia (21.4%), neutropenia (19.6%), anemia (7.1%), and tremor (5.4%). Treatment-related serious AEs were reported for nine patients (16.1%) and six withdrew due to AEs. Viremia was centrally confirmed in 10 patients; there was no confirmed CMV disease. One patient tested positive for a resistance mutation (UL97 L595F). Biopsy-proven acute rejection occurred in six patients (10.7%), but no graft loss or deaths occurred. In conclusion, up to 200 days of valganciclovir prophylaxis in pediatric kidney allograft recipients showed a safety profile consistent with that established in adult transplant patients.

  2. Sea fan immunity and disease is influenced by metal pollution, host demography, and multiple stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, A. M.; Weil, E.; Harvell, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    Organisms in natural populations experience an onslaught of stressful conditions that may compromise their ability to fight pathogens, particularly if multiple stressors impact a host at the same time. Environmental stressors can also influence the pathogens. Despite the clear importance of environmental factors for coral host-pathogen interactions and the potential for population-level consequences, there is relatively little research to date on multiple stressors. The population of Caribbean sea fans, Gorgonia ventalina, in Parguera, Puerto Rico is a tractable system in which to study the effects of multiple stressors on two pathogens. Sea fans are dominant members of reefs that provide food and habitat for diverse reef inhabitants. In addition, there is already a foundation of research on sea fan disease and immunity. We first conducted field surveys of 15 sites to assess the effects of demographic and environmental factors on the prevalence and severity of multifocal purple spots (MFPS) and a Labyrinthulid stramenopile pathogen, as well as the host's cellular immune response to each pathogen. We complemented the field survey with a fully factorial, clonally replicated experiment on the separate and combined effects of thermal stress and copper pollution on both the host and the pathogen. Although water quality has been linked to coral disease, there are no studies investigating the role of metal or chemical pollutants, which are high at some of our study sites. Preliminary results show that the sea fan immune response to the Labyrinthulid depends on interactive effects of copper and thermal stress. The field survey identifies colony size as the main driver of MFPS. This in-depth perspective on sea fan disease speaks to the immune capabilities of cnidarians, highlights factors that modify those capabilities, and reflects the complex interaction of host, pathogens, and environment in this ecologically important coral.

  3. Comparative Genome Sequencing Reveals Within-Host Genetic Changes in Neisseria meningitidis during Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Klughammer, Johanna; Dittrich, Marcus; Blom, Jochen; Mitesser, Vera; Vogel, Ulrich; Frosch, Matthias; Goesmann, Alexander; Müller, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Some members of the physiological human microbiome occasionally cause life-threatening disease even in immunocompetent individuals. A prime example of such a commensal pathogen is Neisseria meningitidis, which normally resides in the human nasopharynx but is also a leading cause of sepsis and epidemic meningitis. Using N. meningitidis as model organism, we tested the hypothesis that virulence of commensal pathogens is a consequence of within host evolution and selection of invasive variants due to mutations at contingency genes, a mechanism called phase variation. In line with the hypothesis that phase variation evolved as an adaptation to colonize diverse hosts, computational comparisons of all 27 to date completely sequenced and annotated meningococcal genomes retrieved from public databases showed that contingency genes are indeed enriched for genes involved in host interactions. To assess within-host genetic changes in meningococci, we further used ultra-deep whole-genome sequencing of throat-blood strain pairs isolated from four patients suffering from invasive meningococcal disease. We detected up to three mutations per strain pair, affecting predominantly contingency genes involved in type IV pilus biogenesis. However, there was not a single (set) of mutation(s) that could invariably be found in all four pairs of strains. Phenotypic assays further showed that these genetic changes were generally not associated with increased serum resistance, higher fitness in human blood ex vivo or differences in the interaction with human epithelial and endothelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, we hypothesize that virulence of meningococci results from accidental emergence of invasive variants during carriage and without within host evolution of invasive phenotypes during disease progression in vivo. PMID:28081260

  4. The interplay between intestinal bacteria and host metabolism in health and disease: lessons from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Adam C. N.; Vanhove, Audrey S.; Watnick, Paula I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT All higher organisms negotiate a truce with their commensal microbes and battle pathogenic microbes on a daily basis. Much attention has been given to the role of the innate immune system in controlling intestinal microbes and to the strategies used by intestinal microbes to overcome the host immune response. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the metabolisms of intestinal microbes and their hosts are linked and that this interaction is equally important for host health and well-being. For instance, an individual's array of commensal microbes can influence their predisposition to chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. A better understanding of host–microbe metabolic interactions is important in defining the molecular bases of these disorders and could potentially lead to new therapeutic avenues. Key advances in this area have been made using Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we review studies that have explored the impact of both commensal and pathogenic intestinal microbes on Drosophila carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. These studies have helped to elucidate the metabolites produced by intestinal microbes, the intestinal receptors that sense these metabolites, and the signaling pathways through which these metabolites manipulate host metabolism. Furthermore, they suggest that targeting microbial metabolism could represent an effective therapeutic strategy for human metabolic diseases and intestinal infection. PMID:26935105

  5. Columnaris disease in fish: a review with emphasis on bacterium-host interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Flavobacterium columnare (F. columnare) is the causative agent of columnaris disease. This bacterium affects both cultured and wild freshwater fish including many susceptible commercially important fish species. F. columnare infections may result in skin lesions, fin erosion and gill necrosis, with a high degree of mortality, leading to severe economic losses. Especially in the last decade, various research groups have performed studies aimed at elucidating the pathogenesis of columnaris disease, leading to significant progress in defining the complex interactions between the organism and its host. Despite these efforts, the pathogenesis of columnaris disease hitherto largely remains unclear, compromising the further development of efficient curative and preventive measures to combat this disease. Besides elaborating on the agent and the disease it causes, this review aims to summarize these pathogenesis data emphasizing the areas meriting further investigation. PMID:23617544

  6. Global Stability of Vector-Host Disease with Variable Population Size

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Altaf; Islam, Saeed; Zaman, Gul

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the vector-host disease with a variability in population. We assume, the disease is fatal and for some cases the infected individuals become susceptible. We first show the local and global stability of the disease-free equilibrium, for the case when R 0 < 1. We also show that for R 0 < 1, the disease free-equilibrium of the model is both locally as well as globally stable. For R 0 > 1, there exists a unique positive endemic equilibrium. For R 0 > 1, the disease persistence occurs. The endemic equilibrium is locally as well as globally asymptotically stable for R 0 > 1. Numerical results are presented for the justifications of theoratical results. PMID:23841089

  7. In vivo kinetics and nonradioactive imaging of rapidly proliferating cells in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Buxbaum, Nataliya P; Farthing, Donald E; Maglakelidze, Natella; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Carpenter, Andrea C; Oliver, Brittany U; Kapoor, Veena; Castro, Ehydel; Swan, Gregory A; Dos Santos, Liliane M; Bouladoux, Nicolas J; Bare, Catherine V; Flomerfelt, Francis A; Eckhaus, Michael A; Telford, William G; Belkaid, Yasmine; Bosselut, Remy J; Gress, Ronald E

    2017-06-15

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a cure for cancers that are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation. Most HSCT recipients develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), a systemic alloimmune attack on host organs. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs and symptoms, as biopsies are risky. T cells are central to the biology of cGVHD. We found that a low Treg/CD4+ T effector memory (Tem) ratio in circulation, lymphoid, and target organs identified early and established mouse cGVHD. Using deuterated water labeling to measure multicompartment in vivo kinetics of these subsets, we show robust Tem and Treg proliferation in lymphoid and target organs, while Tregs undergo apoptosis in target organs. Since deuterium enrichment into DNA serves as a proxy for cell proliferation, we developed a whole-body clinically relevant deuterium MRI approach to nonradioactively detect cGVHD and potentially allow imaging of other diseases characterized by rapidly proliferating cells.

  8. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy associated with chronic graft-versus-host disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, JINBEI; SUN, LICHAO; LIN, WEIHONG

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the clinical manifestations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and treatments of a 22-year-old male patient diagnosed with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) associated with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) 7 months after a haploid hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The patient was admitted to hospital after falling unconscious. Head MRI demonstrated abnormal signals in the bilateral, frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes, consistent with reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS). Based on a detailed diagnosis, the response to treatment and follow-up, it was concluded that RPLS was closely associated with chronic graft-versus-host disease in the patient. The present case report is described in order to increase the awareness of RPLS. PMID:27284340

  9. The interleukin-17 cytokine family: critical players in host defence and inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rajita; Ramirez-Carrozzi, Vladimir; Sambandam, Arivazhagan

    2011-01-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) cytokines, IL-17A to IL-17F, are emerging as critical players in host defence responses and inflammatory diseases. Substantial data support the role of these proteins in innate and adaptive immunity. Of these family members, IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-17E have been the best studied. Both IL-17A and IL-17F contribute to the host response to extracellular bacteria and fungi, and IL-17E has been shown to play a role in parasitic infections. In addition, numerous pre-clinical and clinical studies link these proteins to the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, and a number of therapeutic programmes targeting these family members are in clinical development. This review will highlight the cellular sources, receptors/target cells, and role in inflammation of these and the less-characterized family members, IL-17B, IL-17C and IL-17D. PMID:21726218

  10. In vivo kinetics and nonradioactive imaging of rapidly proliferating cells in graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Buxbaum, Nataliya P.; Farthing, Donald E.; Maglakelidze, Natella; Lizak, Martin; Merkle, Hellmut; Carpenter, Andrea C.; Oliver, Brittany U.; Kapoor, Veena; Castro, Ehydel; Swan, Gregory A.; dos Santos, Liliane M.; Bouladoux, Nicolas J.; Bare, Catherine V.; Flomerfelt, Francis A.; Eckhaus, Michael A.; Telford, William G.; Belkaid, Yasmine; Bosselut, Remy J.; Gress, Ronald E.

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) offers a cure for cancers that are refractory to chemotherapy and radiation. Most HSCT recipients develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), a systemic alloimmune attack on host organs. Diagnosis is based on clinical signs and symptoms, as biopsies are risky. T cells are central to the biology of cGVHD. We found that a low Treg/CD4+ T effector memory (Tem) ratio in circulation, lymphoid, and target organs identified early and established mouse cGVHD. Using deuterated water labeling to measure multicompartment in vivo kinetics of these subsets, we show robust Tem and Treg proliferation in lymphoid and target organs, while Tregs undergo apoptosis in target organs. Since deuterium enrichment into DNA serves as a proxy for cell proliferation, we developed a whole-body clinically relevant deuterium MRI approach to nonradioactively detect cGVHD and potentially allow imaging of other diseases characterized by rapidly proliferating cells. PMID:28614804

  11. Subacute radiation dermatitis: a histologic imitator of acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    LeBoit, P.E.

    1989-02-01

    The histopathologic changes of radiation dermatitis have been classified either as early effects (necrotic keratinocytes, fibrin thrombi, and hemorrhage) or as late effects (vacuolar changes at the dermal-epidermal junction, atypical radiation fibroblasts, and fibrosis). Two patients, one exposed to radiation therapeutically and one accidentally, are described. Skin biopsy specimens showed an interface dermatitis characterized by numerous dyskeratotic epidermal cells with lymphocytes in close apposition (satellite cell necrosis); that is, the epidermal changes were similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease. Because recipients of bone marrow transplants frequently receive total body irradiation as part of their preparatory regimen, the ability of radiation to cause persistent epidermal changes similar to those in acute graft-versus-host disease could complicate the interpretation of posttransplant skin biopsy specimens.

  12. Network transmission inference: host behavior and parasite life cycle make social networks meaningful in disease ecology.

    PubMed

    Grear, Daniel A; Luong, Lien T; Hudson, Peter J

    2013-12-01

    The process of disease transmission is determined by the interaction of host susceptibility and exposure to parasite infectious stages. Host behavior is an important determinant of the likelihood of exposure to infectious stages but is difficult to measure and often assumed to be homogenous in models of disease spread. We evaluated the importance of precisely defining host contact when using networks that estimate exposure and predict infection prevalence in a replicated, empirical system. In particular, we hypothesized that infection patterns would be predicted only by a contact network that is defined according to host behavior and parasite life cycle. Two competing host contact criteria were used to construct networks defined by parasite life cycle and social contacts. First, parasite-defined contacts were based on shared space with a time delay corresponding to the environmental development time of nematode parasites with a direct fecal-oral life cycle. Second, social contacts were defined by shared space in the same time period. To quantify the competing networks of exposure and infection, we sampled natural populations of the eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus) and infection of their gastrointestinal helminth community using replicated longitudinal capture-mark-recapture techniques. We predicted that (1) infection with parasites with direct fecal-oral life cycles would be explained by the time delay contact network, but not the social contact network; (2) infection with parasites with trophic life cycles (via a mobile intermediate host; thus, spatially decoupling transmission from host contact) would not be explained by either contact network. The prevalence of fecal-oral life cycle nematode parasites was strongly correlated to the number and strength of network connections from the parasite-defined network (including the time delay), while the prevalence of trophic life cycle parasites was not correlated with any network metrics. We concluded that

  13. First Case of Pseudoclavibacter bifida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Host with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    De Baere, Thierry; Breyne, Joke; De Laere, Emmanuel; Mariën, Stan; Waets, Peter; Laffut, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Pseudoclavibacter spp. are Gram-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, coryneform bacteria belonging to the family of Microbacteriaceae. Identification of these species with conventional biochemical assays is difficult. This case report of a Pseudoclavibacter bifida bacteremia occurring in an immunocompromised host diagnosed with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, with a lethal outcome, confirms that this organism may be a human pathogen. PMID:23536403

  14. [Gran versus host disease with oral involvement: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Rojas A, Gonzalo; González G, Néstor; Venables G, Cristián; Araos H, Daniel

    2008-12-01

    Gran versus Host Disease (GVHD) is a common complication in allogenic bone marrow transplants and in some cases, it involves the oral mucosa. Therefore, the appropriate diagnosis and timely treatment is essential to prevent local complications which interfere with normal oral functions and facilitate infection spread. We report a 17 years old woman with GVHD associated to lichenoid and ulcerative lesion in the oral mucosa, which responded to the topical administration of a 0.1% tacrolimus ointment.

  15. Antimicrobial proteins and peptides in human lung diseases: A friend and foe partnership with host proteases.

    PubMed

    Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Andrault, Pierre-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Lung antimicrobial proteins and peptides (AMPs) are major sentinels of innate immunity by preventing microbial colonization and infection. Nevertheless bactericidal activity of AMPs against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is compromised in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF) and asthma. Evidence is accumulating that expression of harmful human serine proteases, matrix metalloproteases and cysteine cathepsins is markedely increased in these chronic lung diseases. The local imbalance between proteases and protease inhibitors compromises lung tissue integrity and function, by not only degrading extracellular matrix components, but also non-matrix proteins. Despite the fact that AMPs are somewhat resistant to proteolytic degradation, some human proteases cleave them efficiently and impair their antimicrobial potency. By contrast, certain AMPs may be effective as antiproteases. Host proteases participate in concert with bacterial proteases in the degradation of key innate immunity peptides/proteins and thus may play immunomodulatory activities during chronic lung diseases. In this context, the present review highlights the current knowledge and recent discoveries on the ability of host enzymes to interact with AMPs, providing a better understanding of the role of human proteases in innate host defense.

  16. The Impact of Fusarium Mycotoxins on Human and Animal Host Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Li, Shaoji; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of food and feed with mycotoxins is a worldwide problem. At present, acute mycotoxicosis caused by high doses is rare in humans and animals. Ingestion of low to moderate amounts of Fusarium mycotoxins is common and generally does not result in obvious intoxication. However, these low amounts may impair intestinal health, immune function and/or pathogen fitness, resulting in altered host pathogen interactions and thus a different outcome of infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the impact of Fusarium mycotoxin exposure on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the one hand, exposure to deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium mycotoxins generally exacerbates infections with parasites, bacteria and viruses across a wide range of animal host species. Well-known examples include coccidiosis in poultry, salmonellosis in pigs and mice, colibacillosis in pigs, necrotic enteritis in poultry, enteric septicemia of catfish, swine respiratory disease, aspergillosis in poultry and rabbits, reovirus infection in mice and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus infection in pigs. However, on the other hand, T-2 toxin has been shown to markedly decrease the colonization capacity of Salmonella in the pig intestine. Although the impact of the exposure of humans to Fusarium toxins on infectious diseases is less well known, extrapolation from animal models suggests possible exacerbation of, for instance, colibacillosis and salmonellosis in humans, as well. PMID:24476707

  17. TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host immune responses in major infectious diseases: a review.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Suprabhat; Karmakar, Subhajit; Babu, Santi Prasad Sinha

    2016-01-01

    During the course of evolution, multicellular organisms have been orchestrated with an efficient and versatile immune system to counteract diverse group of pathogenic organisms. Pathogen recognition is considered as the most critical step behind eliciting adequate immune response during an infection. Hitherto Toll-like receptors (TLRs), especially the surface ones viz. TLR2 and TLR4 have gained immense importance due to their extreme ability of identifying distinct molecular patterns from invading pathogens. These pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) not only act as innate sensor but also shape and bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, they also play a pivotal role in regulating the balance between Th1 and Th2 type of response essential for the survivability of the host. In this work, major achievements rather findings made on the typical signalling and immunopathological attributes of TLR2 and TLR4 mediated host response against the major infectious diseases have been reviewed. Infectious diseases like tuberculosis, trypanosomiasis, malaria, and filariasis are still posing myriad threat to mankind. Furthermore, increasing resistance of the causative organisms against available therapeutics is also an emerging problem. Thus, stimulation of host immune response with TLR2 and TLR4 agonist can be the option of choice to treat such diseases in future.

  18. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-09-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic.

  19. Hydrogen, a potential safeguard for graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury?

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lijuan; Shen, Jianliang

    2016-01-01

    Post-transplant complications such as graft-versus-host disease and graft ischemia-reperfusion injury are crucial challenges in transplantation. Hydrogen can act as a potential antioxidant, playing a preventive role against post-transplant complications in animal models of multiple organ transplantation. Herein, the authors review the current literature regarding the effects of hydrogen on graft ischemia-reperfusion injury and graft-versus-host disease. Existing data on the effects of hydrogen on ischemia-reperfusion injury related to organ transplantation are specifically reviewed and coupled with further suggestions for future work. The reviewed studies showed that hydrogen (inhaled or dissolved in saline) improved the outcomes of organ transplantation by decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation at both the transplanted organ and the systemic levels. In conclusion, a substantial body of experimental evidence suggests that hydrogen can significantly alleviate transplantation-related ischemia-reperfusion injury and have a therapeutic effect on graft-versus-host disease, mainly via inhibition of inflammatory cytokine secretion and reduction of oxidative stress through several underlying mechanisms. Further animal experiments and preliminary human clinical trials will lay the foundation for hydrogen use as a drug in the clinic. PMID:27652837

  20. Butyrate Enhances Disease Resistance of Chickens by Inducing Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptide Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T.; Achanta, Mallika; Schreiber, Nicole B.; Bommineni, Yugendar R.; Dai, Gan; Jiang, Weiyu; Lamont, Susan; Lillehoj, Hyun S.; Beker, Ali; Teeter, Robert G.; Zhang, Guolong

    2011-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute a large group of natural broad-spectrum antimicrobials and an important first line of immunity in virtually all forms of life. Specific augmentation of synthesis of endogenous HDPs may represent a promising antibiotic-alternative approach to disease control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that exogenous administration of butyrate, a major type of short-chain fatty acids derived from bacterial fermentation of undigested dietary fiber, is capable of inducing HDPs and enhancing disease resistance in chickens. We have found that butyrate is a potent inducer of several, but not all, chicken HDPs in HD11 macrophages as well as in primary monocytes, bone marrow cells, and jejuna and cecal explants. In addition, butyrate treatment enhanced the antibacterial activity of chicken monocytes against Salmonella enteritidis, with a minimum impact on inflammatory cytokine production, phagocytosis, and oxidative burst capacities of the cells. Furthermore, feed supplementation with 0.1% butyrate led to a significant increase in HDP gene expression in the intestinal tract of chickens. More importantly, such a feeding strategy resulted in a nearly 10-fold reduction in the bacterial titer in the cecum following experimental infections with S. enteritidis. Collectively, the results indicated that butyrate-induced synthesis of endogenous HDPs is a phylogenetically conserved mechanism of innate host defense shared by mammals and aves, and that dietary supplementation of butyrate has potential for further development as a convenient antibiotic-alternative strategy to enhance host innate immunity and disease resistance. PMID:22073293

  1. Warmer temperatures increase disease transmission and outbreak intensity in a host-pathogen system.

    PubMed

    Elderd, Bret D; Reilly, James R

    2014-07-01

    While rising global temperatures are increasingly affecting both species and their biotic interactions, the debate about whether global warming will increase or decrease disease transmission between individuals remains far from resolved. This may stem from the lack of empirical data. Using a tractable and easily manipulated insect host-pathogen system, we conducted a series of field and laboratory experiments to examine how increased temperatures affect disease transmission using the crop-defoliating pest, the fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and its species-specific baculovirus, which causes a fatal infection. To examine the effects of temperature on disease transmission in the field, we manipulated baculovirus density and temperature. As infection occurs when a host consumes leaf tissue on which the pathogen resides, baculovirus density was controlled by placing varying numbers of infected neonate larvae on experimental plants. Temperature was manipulated by using open-top chambers (OTCs). The laboratory experiments examined how increased temperatures affect fall armyworm feeding and development rates, which provide insight into how host feeding behaviour and physiology may affect transmission. Disease transmission and outbreak intensity, measured as the cumulative fraction infected during an epizootic, increased at higher temperatures. However, there was no appreciable change in the mean transmission rate of the disease, which is often the focus of empirical and theoretical research. Instead, the coefficient of variation (CV) associated with the transmission rate shrunk. As the CV decreased, heterogeneity in disease risk across individuals declined, which resulted in an increase in outbreak intensity. In the laboratory, increased temperatures increased feeding rates and decreased developmental times. As the host consumes the virus along with the leaf tissue on which it resides, increased feeding rate is likely to increase the probability of an individual

  2. MicroRNAs: The Missing Link in the Biology of Graft-Versus-Host Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Atarod, Sadaf; Dickinson, Anne Mary

    2013-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is still the major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Despite extensive studies in understanding the pathophysiology of GVHD, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Recently, important functions of microRNAs have been demonstrated in various autoimmune diseases and cancers such as psoriasis and lymphoma. This review highlights the need to investigate the role of microRNAs in GVHD and hypothesizes that microRNAs may be one of the missing links in our understanding of GVHD, with the potential for novel therapeutics. PMID:24348483

  3. Clinical Applications for Biomarkers of Acute and Chronic Graft vs. Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levine, John E.; Paczesny, Sophie; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Acute and chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) are serious complications of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The complex pathophysiology of these disease processes is associated with immune system activation, the release of cytokines and chemokines, and alterations in cell populations. The blood levels of specific protein and cellular levels in patients with GVHD have correlated with the development, diagnosis, and prognosis of GVHD. Here we review the most promising biomarkers for acute and chronic GVHD with clinical relevance. The utility of GVHD biomarkers in clinical care of allogeneic HCT recipients needs to be proven through clinical trials, and potential approaches to trial design are discussed. PMID:22226094

  4. Esophageal stenosis with sloughing esophagitis: A curious manifestation of graft-vs-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Trabulo, Daniel; Ferreira, Sara; Lage, Pedro; Rego, Rafaela Lima; Teixeira, Gilda; Pereira, A Dias

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 56-year-old woman with a history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation for two years, complaining with dysphagia and weight loss. Upper endoscopy revealed esophageal stenosis and extensive mucosa sloughing. Biopsies confirmed the diagnosis of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Balloon dilation, corticosteroids and cyclosporin resulted in marked clinical improvement. Gastrointestinal tract is involved in the majority of patients with chronic GVHD. Esophageal manifestations are rare and include vesiculobullous disease, ulceration, esophageal webs, casts or strictures. Sloughing esophagitis along with severe stenosis requiring endoscopic dilation has never been reported in this context. PMID:26290649

  5. Radiographic features of esophageal involvement in chronic graft-vs. -host disease

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, G.B.; Sullivan, K.M.; Plumley, T.F.

    1984-03-01

    Chronic graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) is an important late complication of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation. It resembles several naturally occurring autoimmune diseases and involves the skin, mouth, eyes, liver, and esophagus. The radiographic findings of 14 symptomatic patients with chronic GVHD involving the esophagus were reviewed and found to include webs, ringlike narrowings, and tapering strictures in the mid and upper esophagus. Esophagoscopy revealed characteristic desquamation in the 13 patients studied, but barium studies detected this lesion in only one patient. Knowledge of the site and characteristics of esophageal involvement with chronic GVHD assists the radiologic evaluation of this disorder.

  6. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    PubMed

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD agent infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE, and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25 nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic, and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration.

  7. Interferon-gamma and interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms associate with graft-versus-host disease in HLA-matched sibling bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cavet, J; Dickinson, A M; Norden, J; Taylor, P R; Jackson, G H; Middleton, P G

    2001-09-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines including interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) are implicated in the pathogenesis of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). Cytokine gene polymorphism is associated with functional differences in cytokine regulation and altered clinical performance in a variety of diseases. Polymorphism in the IFNgammaIntron1 microsatellite (CA)n repeat has been linked with in vitro IFNgamma production and renal transplant rejection. The IL-6(-174)(G/C) single nucleotide polymorphism has been linked to in vitro and in vivo IL-6 production, juvenile chronic arthritis, and renal transplant rejection. This study examined the potential association of GVHD with IFNgamma and IL-6 polymorphisms in 80 sibling bone marrow transplant (BMT) donor/recipient pairs. Patients homozygous for the IFNgammaIntron1 allele 3 had more severe (grade III-IV) aGVHD. Patients possessing the IL-6(-174)G allele had a trend toward higher grades of aGVHD, and those homozygous for the IL-6(-174)G allele were more likely to develop chronic GVHD (cGVHD). The associations of previously identified aGVHD severity-associated cytokine gene polymorphisms (TNFd and IL-10(-1064)) with severe aGVHD were reconfirmed. Logistic regression analysis confirmed the association of severe aGVHD with recipient genotype at IFNgammaIntron1 (odds ratio [OR] 3.92; P =.02), IL-10(-1064) (OR 4.61; P =.026) and TNFd (OR 3.29; P =.039), and that of cGVHD with recipient IL-6(-174) genotype (OR 4.25; P =.007), in addition to age, gender mismatch, and underlying disease. Assessment of cytokine genotype may potentially allow more accurate prediction of GVHD and appropriate adjustment of GVHD prophylaxis, as well as indicating novel areas for future studies of GVHD pathogenesis.

  8. Prevalence, host range, and spatial distribution of black band disease in the Maldivian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Montano, Simone; Strona, Giovanni; Seveso, Davide; Galli, Paolo

    2013-07-09

    Little research has been conducted on diseases affecting reef-building corals in the central Indian Ocean. During 2010 and 2011, we performed a quantitative assessment of black band disease (BBD) in the central Republic of Maldives. Distribution, host range, and prevalence of BBD were investigated at 6 coral islands (Magoodhoo, Adanga, Ihuru, Vabbinfaru, Thudufushi, and Athuruga) belonging to 3 different atolls. BBD was found to be widespread among the atolls. All the islands showed a prevalence lower than 0.5%. Magoodhoo Island showed the highest mean disease prevalence. In the whole surveyed area, shallow sites showed higher overall mean BBD prevalence than deep ones. BBD was recorded from 6 scleractinian families (Acroporidae, Faviidae, Poritidae, Siderastreidae, Agariciidae, Fungiidae) and 13 scleractinian genera. Two of them, Gardineroseris and Sandalolitha, constitute new records for the disease. The siderastreid Psammocora (BBD prevalence: 5.33 ± 1.41%, mean ± SE) was the most affected genus, followed by Goniopora (2.7 ± 1.3%). BBD prevalence was positively correlated to the respective host density in both genera. Favites and Acropora were the less affected genera (both <0.1%). Although we observed an extremely low overall disease prevalence in the surveyed area (<1%), the large number of different scleractinian genera affected and the widespread distribution of BBD indicate a need for further investigation.

  9. Dry Eye Disease Incidence Associated with Chronic Graft-Host Disease: Nonconcurrent Cohort Study (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis).

    PubMed

    Mian, Shahzad I; De la Parra-Colín, Paola; De Melo-Franco, Rafael; Johnson, Christopher; Barrientos-Gutierrez, Tonatiuh

    2015-09-01

    To determine if chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with stable or progressive dry eye disease and to determine the true incidence in patients with no prior history of dry eye disease. A nonconcurrent cohort study at a single institution with 136 patients who had no previous history of dry eye disease before HSCT. Survival analysis was used to estimate dry eye disease incidence. The incidence rate was calculated using life tables as the number of observed dry eye disease cases divided by the person-time at risk accumulated by the cohort. Transition probabilities were calculated from time of transplant to time of diagnosis, and then to last recorded visit. Incidence rate was 0.8 cases of dry eye disease per person-year, and half of the population at risk developed dry eye disease during the first 10 months post transplant. Time to develop dry eye disease was 2.5 months for mild dry eye disease, 9.6 months for moderate dry eye disease, and 13.2 months for severe dry eye disease. In terms of cumulative incidence, 73% of subjects developed dry eye disease (50% mild, 16% moderate, and 7% severe) at the time of diagnosis. Our findings suggest that dry eye disease associated with cGVHD is an extremely frequent event and shows a wide spectrum of severity, with a mild form presenting early and a moderate to severe form presenting later after HSCT. These findings need to be studied further to elucidate if these are two different pathophysiological entities or just different expressions of the same pathology.

  10. Antifungal prophylaxis during neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Lortholary, O; Dupont, B

    1997-01-01

    Fungal infections represent a major source of morbidity and mortality in patients with almost all types of immunodeficiencies. These infections may be nosocomial (aspergillosis) or community acquired (cryptococcosis), or both (candidiasis). Endemic mycoses such as histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and penicilliosis may infect many immunocompromised hosts in some geographic areas and thereby create major public health problems. With the wide availability of oral azoles, antifungal prophylactic strategies have been extensively developed. However, only a few well-designed studies involving strict criteria have been performed, mostly in patients with hematological malignancies or AIDS. In these situations, the best dose and duration of administration of the antifungal drug often remain to be determined. In high-risk neutropenic or bone marrow transplant patients, fluconazole is effective for the prevention of superficial and/or systemic candidal infections but is not always able to prolong overall survival and potentially selects less susceptible or resistant Candida spp. Primary prophylaxis against aspergillosis remains investigative. At present, no standard general recommendation for primary antifungal prophylaxis can be proposed for AIDS patients or transplant recipients. However, for persistently immunocompromised patients who previously experienced a noncandidal systemic fungal infection, prolonged suppressive antifungal therapy is often indicated to prevent a relapse. Better strategies for controlling immune deficiencies should also help to avoid some potentially life-threatening deep mycoses. When prescribing antifungal prophylaxis, physicians should be aware of the potential emergence of resistant strains, drug-drug interactions, and the cost. Well-designed, randomized, multicenter clinical trials in high-risk immunocompromised hosts are urgently needed to better define how to prevent severe invasive mycoses. PMID:9227863

  11. Pathogenic landscapes: Interactions between land, people, disease vectors, and their animal hosts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Landscape attributes influence spatial variations in disease risk or incidence. We present a review of the key findings from eight case studies that we conducted in Europe and West Africa on the impact of land changes on emerging or re-emerging vector-borne diseases and/or zoonoses. The case studies concern West Nile virus transmission in Senegal, tick-borne encephalitis incidence in Latvia, sandfly abundance in the French Pyrenees, Rift Valley Fever in the Ferlo (Senegal), West Nile Fever and the risk of malaria re-emergence in the Camargue, and rodent-borne Puumala hantavirus and Lyme borreliosis in Belgium. Results We identified general principles governing landscape epidemiology in these diverse disease systems and geographic regions. We formulated ten propositions that are related to landscape attributes, spatial patterns and habitat connectivity, pathways of pathogen transmission between vectors and hosts, scale issues, land use and ownership, and human behaviour associated with transmission cycles. Conclusions A static view of the "pathogenecity" of landscapes overlays maps of the spatial distribution of vectors and their habitats, animal hosts carrying specific pathogens and their habitat, and susceptible human hosts and their land use. A more dynamic view emphasizing the spatial and temporal interactions between these agents at multiple scales is more appropriate. We also highlight the complementarity of the modelling approaches used in our case studies. Integrated analyses at the landscape scale allows a better understanding of interactions between changes in ecosystems and climate, land use and human behaviour, and the ecology of vectors and animal hosts of infectious agents. PMID:20979609

  12. Danger Signals and Graft-versus-host Disease: Current Understanding and Future Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Toubai, Tomomi; Mathewson, Nathan D.; Magenau, John; Reddy, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host response after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) represents one of the most intense inflammatory responses observed in humans. Host conditioning facilitates engraftment of donor cells, but the tissue injury caused from it primes the critical first steps in the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Tissue injuries release pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) through widespread stimulation of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) by the release of danger stimuli, such as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). DAMPs and PAMPs function as potent stimulators for host and donor-derived antigen presenting cells (APCs) that in turn activate and amplify the responses of alloreactive donor T cells. Emerging data also point towards a role for suppression of DAMP induced inflammation by the APCs and donor T cells in mitigating GVHD severity. In this review, we summarize the current understanding on the role of danger stimuli, such as the DAMPs and PAMPs, in GVHD. PMID:27965667

  13. Juxtaposition between host population structures: implications for disease transmission in a sympatric cervid community

    PubMed Central

    Vander Wal, Eric; Edye, Iain; Paquet, Paul C; Coltman, David W; Bayne, Erin; Brook, Ryan K; Andrés, José A

    2013-01-01

    Sympatric populations of phylogenetically related species are often vulnerable to similar communicable diseases. Although some host populations may exhibit spatial structure, other hosts within the community may have unstructured populations. Thus, individuals from unstructured host populations may act as interspecific vectors among discrete subpopulations of sympatric alternate hosts. We used a cervid-bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) system to investigate the landscape-scale potential for bovine tuberculosis transmission within a nonmigratory white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and elk (Cervus canadensis) community. Using landscape population genetics, we tested for genetic and spatial structure in white-tailed deer. We then compared these findings with the sympatric elk population that is structured and which has structure that correlates spatially and genetically to physiognomic landscape features. Despite genetic structure that indicates the white-tailed deer population forms three sympatric clusters, the absence of spatial structure suggested that intraspecific pathogen transmission is not likely to be limited by physiognomic landscape features. The potential for intraspecific transmission among subpopulations of elk is low due to spatial population structure. Given that white-tailed deer are abundant, widely distributed, and exhibit a distinct lack of spatial population structure, white-tailed deer likely pose a greater threat as bovine tuberculosis vectors among elk subpopulations than elk. PMID:24187583

  14. Probiotics, gut microbiota, and their influence on host health and disease.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Borja; Delgado, Susana; Blanco-Míguez, Aitor; Lourenço, Anália; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of mammals hosts a high and diverse number of different microorganisms, known as intestinal microbiota. Many probiotics were originally isolated from the gastrointestinal tract, and they were defined by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)/WHO as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host." Probiotics exert their beneficial effects on the host through four main mechanisms: interference with potential pathogens, improvement of barrier function, immunomodulation and production of neurotransmitters, and their host targets vary from the resident microbiota to cellular components of the gut-brain axis. However, in spite of the wide array of beneficial mechanisms deployed by probiotic bacteria, relatively few effects have been supported by clinical data. In this regard, different probiotic strains have been effective in antibiotic-associated diarrhea or inflammatory bowel disease for instance. The aim of this review was to compile the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of probiotics, mainly through their interaction with the intestinal microbiota and with the intestinal mucosa. The specific benefits discussed in this paper include among others those elicited directly through dietary modulation of the human gut microbiota.

  15. Origin of a major infectious disease in vertebrates: The timing of Cryptosporidium evolution and its hosts.

    PubMed

    Garcia-R, Juan C; Hayman, David T S

    2016-11-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect all vertebrate groups and display some host specificity in their infections. It is therefore possible to assume that Cryptosporidium parasites evolved intimately aside with vertebrate lineages. Here we propose a scenario of Cryptosporidium-Vertebrata coevolution testing the hypothesis that the origin of Cryptosporidium parasites follows that of the origin of modern vertebrates. We use calibrated molecular clocks and cophylogeny analyses to provide and compare age estimates and patterns of association between these clades. Our study provides strong support for the evolution of parasitism of Cryptosporidium with the rise of the vertebrates about 600 million years ago (Mya). Interestingly, periods of increased diversification in Cryptosporidium coincides with diversification of crown mammalian and avian orders after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary, suggesting that adaptive radiation to new mammalian and avian hosts triggered the diversification of this parasite lineage. Despite evidence for ongoing host shifts we also found significant correlation between protozoan parasites and vertebrate hosts trees in the cophylogenetic analysis. These results help us to understand the underlying macroevolutionary mechanisms driving evolution in Cryptosporidium and may have important implications for the ecology, dynamics and epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis disease in humans and other animals.

  16. Transcriptome of an Armillaria root disease pathogen reveals candidate genes involved in host substrate utilization at the host­-pathogen interface

    Treesearch

    A. L. Ross-Davis; J. E. Stewart; J. W. Hanna; M.-S. Kim; B. J. Knaus; R. Cronn; H. Rai; B. A. Richardson; G. I. McDonald; N. B. Klopfenstein

    2013-01-01

    Armillaria species display diverse ecological roles ranging from beneficial saprobe to virulent pathogen. Armillaria solidipes (formerly A. ostoyae), a causal agent of Armillaria root disease, is a virulent primary pathogen with a broad host range of woody plants across the Northern Hemisphere. This white-rot pathogen grows between trees as rhizomorphs and attacks...

  17. Increased serum IgE concentrations during infection and graft versus host disease after bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S A; Rogers, T R; Perry, D; Hobbs, J R; Riches, P G

    1984-01-01

    Serum IgE concentrations estimated in 25 bone marrow transplant recipients during episodes of infection or graft versus host disease, or both, were raised not only in some patients with acute graft versus host disease but also in many patients with infection. Raised values were not seen in chronic graft versus host disease. The routine estimation of serum IgE in bone marrow transplant recipients had minimal value because of the lack of specificity of the IgE response. PMID:6368605

  18. Modulation of the host inflammatory response in periodontal disease management: exciting new directions.

    PubMed

    Bhatavadekar, Neel B; Williams, Ray C

    2009-10-01

    New strategies for periodontal disease management have been emerging as more is learned about the role of the host response. Our increasing understanding of inflammation and its resolution has opened the door to the study of new periodontal treatment strategies. This review examines periodontal disease in the light of a new understanding of the role of inflammation in disease expression thus setting the stage for the development of new prevention and treatment strategies of a widespread disease. We examined current publications and focused on articles relating to anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution mechanisms in periodontal disease. Recent research has examined the inflammatory and resolution cascade in greater detail while looking at endogenous and exogenous mediators that can be utilised to achieve therapeutic end-points. The possible introduction of 'resolution indices' for drug testing warrants a new look at pharmacologic agents that might have been overlooked for their beneficial effects in periodontal disease treatment. The emerging awareness of inflammation and its control in periodontal disease management underscores the importance of exploring inflammatory pathways and mediators, thus exploring new ways to control inflammation. This direction of research promises a new era in drug discovery and therapeutics for periodontal disease treatment.

  19. Intra-host mathematical model of chronic wasting disease dynamics in deer (Odocoileus)

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Karen M.; Galloway, Nathan L.; Mathiason, Candace K.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bioassays of native cervid hosts have established the presence of infectious chronic wasting disease (CWD) prions in saliva, blood, urine, and feces of clinically diseased and pre-clinical infected deer. The intra-host trafficking of prions from the time of initial infection to shedding has been less well defined. We created a discrete-time compartmentalized model to simulate the misfolding catalysis, trafficking, and shedding of infectious prions throughout the organ systems of CWD-infected cervids. Using parameter values derived from experimental infections of North American deer (Odocoileus spp.), the exponential-based model predicts prion deposition over time with: 1) nervous tissues containing the highest deposition of prions at 20 months post-infection and 2) excreted fluids containing low levels of prions throughout infection with the highest numbers of prions predicted to be shed in saliva and feces (as high as 10 lethal doses (1.34 × 1029 prions) in 11–15 months). These findings are comparable to prion deposition described in literature as assayed by conventional and ultrasensitive amplification assays. The comparison of our model to published data suggests that highly sensitive assays (sPMCA, RT-QuIC, and bioassay) are appropriate for early prion detection in bodily fluids and secretions. The model provides a view of intra-host prion catalysis leading to pre-clinical shedding and provides a framework for continued development of antemortem diagnostic methods. PMID:27537196

  20. Interleukin-22 in Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lamarthée, Baptiste; Malard, Florent; Saas, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Gaugler, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potential curative treatment for hematologic malignancies and non-malignant diseases. Because of the lower toxicity of reduced intensity conditioning, the number of transplants is in constant increase. However, allo-HSCT is still limited by complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is associated with important morbidity and mortality. Acute GVHD is an exacerbated inflammatory response that leads to the destruction of healthy host tissues by donor immune cells. Recently, the contribution of innate immunity in GVHD triggering has been investigated by several groups and resulted in the identification of new cellular and molecular effectors involved in GVHD pathogenesis. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is produced by both immune and adaptive cells and has both protective and inflammatory properties. Its role in GVHD processes has been investigated, and the data suggest that its effect depends on the timing, the target tissue, and the origin of the producing cells (donor/host). In this review, we discuss the role of IL-22 in allo-HSCT and GVHD.

  1. Interleukin-22 in Graft-Versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lamarthée, Baptiste; Malard, Florent; Saas, Philippe; Mohty, Mohamad; Gaugler, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is a potential curative treatment for hematologic malignancies and non-malignant diseases. Because of the lower toxicity of reduced intensity conditioning, the number of transplants is in constant increase. However, allo-HSCT is still limited by complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is associated with important morbidity and mortality. Acute GVHD is an exacerbated inflammatory response that leads to the destruction of healthy host tissues by donor immune cells. Recently, the contribution of innate immunity in GVHD triggering has been investigated by several groups and resulted in the identification of new cellular and molecular effectors involved in GVHD pathogenesis. Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is produced by both immune and adaptive cells and has both protective and inflammatory properties. Its role in GVHD processes has been investigated, and the data suggest that its effect depends on the timing, the target tissue, and the origin of the producing cells (donor/host). In this review, we discuss the role of IL-22 in allo-HSCT and GVHD. PMID:27148267

  2. Can Differences in Host Behavior Drive Patterns of Disease Prevalence in Tadpoles?

    PubMed Central

    Venesky, Matthew D.; Kerby, Jacob L.; Storfer, Andrew; Parris, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Differences in host behavior and resistance to disease can influence the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. We capitalized on the variation in aggregation behavior of Fowler's toads (Anaxyrus [ = Bufo] fowleri) and grey treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles and tested for differences in transmission of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and host-specific fitness consequences (i.e., life history traits that imply fitness) of infection in single-species amphibian mesocosms. On average, A. fowleri mesocosms supported higher Bd prevalences and infection intensities relative to H. versicolor mesocosms. Higher Bd prevalence in A. fowleri mesocosms may result, in part, from higher intraspecific transmission due to the aggregation of tadpoles raised in Bd treatments. We also found that, independent of species, tadpoles raised in the presence of Bd were smaller and less developed than tadpoles raised in disease-free conditions. Our results indicate that aggregation behavior might increase Bd prevalence and that A. fowleri tadpoles carry heavier infections relative to H. versicolor tadpoles. However, our results demonstrate that Bd appears to negatively impact larval growth and developmental rates of A. fowleri and H. versicolor similarly, even in the absence of high Bd prevalence. PMID:21949824

  3. Can differences in host behavior drive patterns of disease prevalence in tadpoles?

    PubMed

    Venesky, Matthew D; Kerby, Jacob L; Storfer, Andrew; Parris, Matthew J

    2011-01-01

    Differences in host behavior and resistance to disease can influence the outcome of host-pathogen interactions. We capitalized on the variation in aggregation behavior of Fowler's toads (Anaxyrus [ = Bufo] fowleri) and grey treefrogs (Hyla versicolor) tadpoles and tested for differences in transmission of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and host-specific fitness consequences (i.e., life history traits that imply fitness) of infection in single-species amphibian mesocosms. On average, A. fowleri mesocosms supported higher Bd prevalences and infection intensities relative to H. versicolor mesocosms. Higher Bd prevalence in A. fowleri mesocosms may result, in part, from higher intraspecific transmission due to the aggregation of tadpoles raised in Bd treatments. We also found that, independent of species, tadpoles raised in the presence of Bd were smaller and less developed than tadpoles raised in disease-free conditions. Our results indicate that aggregation behavior might increase Bd prevalence and that A. fowleri tadpoles carry heavier infections relative to H. versicolor tadpoles. However, our results demonstrate that Bd appears to negatively impact larval growth and developmental rates of A. fowleri and H. versicolor similarly, even in the absence of high Bd prevalence.

  4. Newcastle disease. Environmental and host influences on immunity induced by non-parenteral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Hanson, R P

    1976-01-01

    Many millions of doses of Newcastle disease vaccine have been given to chickens by two non-parenteral routes; in aerosols and in drinking water. These vaccines, that reach either or both the respiratory and digestive tracts, have afforded protection against disabling disease for millions of chickens but not without irregularity in the adequacy and duration of the response induced. Among the factors that affect the response are the nature of the delivery system (i.e. aerosol particle size), the dose received, the time involved in delivery, the environmental circumstances (i.e. ambient temperature) and the precondition of the host from the withholding of feed and water and from handling and crowding. The site of initial replication is critical, presumably because by inducing nonspecific or specific blockage of other replication sites, it shapes the immune response. Most events in the development of a vaccine-induced infection are dependent upon both thresholds and inherent periodicities. Individual host responsiveness is an interplay between the virus, environmental factors and intrinsic systems of the host.

  5. Does the Arthropod Microbiota Impact the Establishment of Vector-Borne Diseases in Mammalian Hosts?

    PubMed Central

    Finney, Constance A. M.; Kamhawi, Shaden; Wasmuth, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the microbiota on the immune status of its host is a source of intense research and publicity. In comparison, the effect of arthropod microbiota on vector-borne infectious diseases has received little attention. A better understanding of the vector microbiota in relation to mammalian host immune responses is vital, as it can lead to strategies that affect transmission and improve vaccine design in a field of research where few vaccines exist and effective treatment is rare. Recent demonstrations of how microbiota decrease pathogen development in arthropods, and thus alter vector permissiveness to vector-borne diseases (VBDs), have led to renewed interest. However, hypotheses on the interactions between the arthropod-derived microbiota and the mammalian hosts have yet to be addressed. Advances in DNA sequencing technology, increased yield and falling costs, mean that these studies are now feasible for many microbiologists and entomologists. Here, we distill current knowledge and put forward key questions and experimental designs to shed light on this burgeoning research topic. PMID:25856431

  6. Kinetics of Disease Progression and Host Response in a Rat Model of Bubonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B.; Hinnebusch, B. Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease. PMID:15855643

  7. Kinetics of disease progression and host response in a rat model of bubonic plague.

    PubMed

    Sebbane, Florent; Gardner, Donald; Long, Daniel; Gowen, Brian B; Hinnebusch, B Joseph

    2005-05-01

    Plague, caused by the gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis, primarily affects rodents but is also an important zoonotic disease of humans. Bubonic plague in humans follows transmission by infected fleas and is characterized by an acute, necrotizing lymphadenitis in the regional lymph nodes that drain the intradermal flea bite site. Septicemia rapidly follows with spread to spleen, liver, and other organs. We developed a model of bubonic plague using the inbred Brown Norway strain of Rattus norvegicus to characterize the progression and kinetics of infection and the host immune response after intradermal inoculation of Y. pestis. The clinical signs and pathology in the rat closely resembled descriptions of human bubonic plague. The bacteriology; histopathology; host cellular response in infected lymph nodes, blood, and spleen; and serum cytokine levels were analyzed at various times after infection to determine the kinetics and route of disease progression and to evaluate hypothesized Y. pestis pathogenic mechanisms. Understanding disease progression in this rat infection model should facilitate further investigations into the molecular pathogenesis of bubonic plague and the immune response to Y. pestis at different stages of the disease.

  8. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao

    2004-02-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is widely performed in any surgical procedures to prevent postoperative infections. However, we have neither double-blind placebo-controlled studies nor sufficient surveillance of postoperative infections that are common in Europe and the United States, and therefore there is little convincing scientific basis accounting for the validity of this therapy. In addition, prophylactic agent is still uncovered by medical insurance despite the persistent arguments as to its necessity. To establish the guidelines in our own country, a greater deal of evidence needs to be accumulated. Strategies for antimicrobial prophylaxis should be determined based on the types of possible postoperative infections and the classifications of operations according to contamination levels in individual operative fields. This process may involve the precise selection of prophylactic agents for suspected contaminating bacterial species in each operative organ and their administration regimens suitable for the individual surgery. Upon selection of prophylactic agents for postoperative infections, various conditions should be considered: e.g., susceptibility, resistance, blood concentrations, urinary excretion, transition into body fluid and tissues, and adverse reactions. The first and second generations of cephem and cephamycin derivatives can be the first choice, but the use of various other antibacterial agents may be necessary for resistant bacterial strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). Cyclic therapy based on penicillins (including mixtures), cephems (including cephamycins) and phosphomycins also seems useful for such resistant strains. At present, there is only limited evidence supporting the importance of prophylactic agents. Controlled trials employing well-designed protocols that endure scientific criticism must be done with due consideration for medical economics.

  9. Interleukin-10 spot-forming cells as a novel biomarker of chronic graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, Masahiro; Azuma, Eiichi; Nakagawa-Nakazawa, Atsuko; Kumamoto, Tadashi; Iwamoto, Shotaro; Amano, Keishiro; Tamaki, Shigehisa; Usui, Eiji; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Although there are National Institutes of Health consensus criteria for the global assessment of chronic graft-versus-host disease, no validated biomarkers have been established for this disease. Furthermore, whereas the role of T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells in chronic graft-versus-host disease has been established, the contribution of monocytes has not been clearly addressed. Using an enzyme-linked immunospot assay, we measured the spot-forming cells for interferon-γ, interleukin-4, interleukin-10, and interleukin-17 in unstimulated peripheral blood of patients following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Other immunological examinations, including skin biopsy, were also done. Fifty-seven patients were enrolled. Interleukin-10 spot-forming cells were evaluable for therapeutic monitoring in 16 patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease. The number of interleukin-10 spot-forming cells in patients with active chronic graft-versus-host disease was significantly higher than the number in those with no or inactive chronic graft-versus-host disease. Interleukin-10 was predominantly produced by monocytes. CD29 expression on monocytes in patients with active chronic graft-versus-host disease was elevated. The level of plasma fibronectin, a ligand of CD29, correlated with the number of interleukin-10 spot-forming cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of the skin in active chronic graft-versus-host disease showed that infiltrating CD29+ monocytes might produce interleukin-10. A novel biomarker, interleukin-10 spot-forming cells, shows promise as both a diagnostic and prognostic indicator for chronic graft-versus-host disease, and may allow for early intervention prior to the onset of the disease. Measurement of interleukin-10 spot-forming cells would be helpful in clinical trials and in patients' management. PMID:22733028

  10. Host programmed death ligand 1 is dominant over programmed death ligand 2 expression in regulating graft-versus-host disease lethality

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Asim; Aoyama, Kazutoshi; Taylor, Patricia A.; Koehn, Brent H.; Veenstra, Rachelle G.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Munn, David H.; Murphy, William J.; Azuma, Miyuki; Yagita, Hideo; Fife, Brian T.; Sayegh, Mohammed H.; Najafian, Nader; Socie, Gerard; Ahmed, Rafi; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2013-01-01

    Programmed death 1 (PD-1) and its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, play an important role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. We explored the role of PD-1 ligands in regulating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Both PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression were upregulated in the spleen, liver, colon, and ileum of GVHD mice. Whereas PD-L2 expression was limited to hematopoietic cells, hematopoietic and endothelial cells expressed PD-L1. PD-1/PD-L1, but not PD-1/PD-L2, blockade markedly accelerated GVHD-induced lethality. Chimera studies suggest that PD-L1 expression on host parenchymal cells is more critical than hematopoietic cells in regulating acute GVHD. Rapid mortality onset in PD-L1-deficient hosts was associated with increased gut T-cell homing and loss of intestinal epithelial integrity, along with increased donor T-cell proliferation, activation, Th1 cytokine production, and reduced apoptosis. Bioenergetics profile analysis of proliferating alloreactive donor T-cells demonstrated increased aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in PD-L1-deficient hosts. Donor T-cells exhibited a hyperpolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, increased superoxide production, and increased expression of a glucose transporter in PD-L1-deficient hosts. Taken together, these data provide new insight into the differential roles of host PD-L1 and PD-L2 and their associated cellular and metabolic mechanisms controlling acute GVHD. PMID:24030385

  11. Microbiome Profiles in Periodontitis in Relation to Host and Disease Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Bo-Young; Furtado Araujo, Michel V.; Strausbaugh, Linda D.; Terzi, Evimaria; Ioannidou, Effie; Diaz, Patricia I.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory condition that affects the supporting tissues surrounding teeth. The occurrence of periodontitis is associated with shifts in the structure of the communities that inhabit the gingival sulcus. Although great inter-subject variability in the subgingival microbiome has been observed in subjects with periodontitis, it is unclear whether distinct community types exist and if differences in microbial signatures correlate with host characteristics or with the variable clinical presentations of periodontitis. Therefore, in this study we explored the existence of different community types in periodontitis and their relationship with host demographic, medical and disease-related clinical characteristics. Clustering analyses of microbial abundance profiles suggested two types of communities (A and B) existed in the 34 subjects with periodontitis evaluated. Type B communities harbored greater proportions of certain periodontitis-associated taxa, including species historically associated with the disease, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia and Treponema denticola, and taxa recently linked to periodontitis. In contrast, subjects with type A communities had increased proportions of different periodontitis-associated species, and were also enriched for health-associated species and core taxa (those equally prevalent in health and periodontitis). Periodontitis subgingival clusters were not associated with demographic, medical or disease-specific clinical parameters other than periodontitis extent (proportion of sites affected), which positively correlated with the total proportion of cluster B signature taxa. In conclusion, two types of microbial communities were detected in subjects with periodontitis. Host demographics and underlying medical conditions did not correlate with these profiles, which instead appeared to be related to periodontitis extent, with type B communities present in more widespread disease cases. The two

  12. Pathological and therapeutic interactions between bacteriophages, microbes and the host in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Babickova, Janka; Gardlik, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiome is a dynamic system of interactions between the host and its microbes. Under physiological conditions, a fine balance and mutually beneficial relationship is present. Disruption of this balance is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Whether an altered microbiome is the consequence or the cause of IBD is currently not fully understood. The pathogenesis of IBD is believed to be a complex interaction between genetic predisposition, the immune system and environmental factors. In the recent years, metagenomic studies of the human microbiome have provided useful data that are helping to assemble the IBD puzzle. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in IBD, host-microbe interactions and therapeutic possibilities using bacteria in IBD. Moreover, an outlook on the possible contribution of bacteriophages in the pathogenesis and therapy of IBD is provided. PMID:26525290

  13. Pathological and therapeutic interactions between bacteriophages, microbes and the host in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Babickova, Janka; Gardlik, Roman

    2015-10-28

    The intestinal microbiome is a dynamic system of interactions between the host and its microbes. Under physiological conditions, a fine balance and mutually beneficial relationship is present. Disruption of this balance is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Whether an altered microbiome is the consequence or the cause of IBD is currently not fully understood. The pathogenesis of IBD is believed to be a complex interaction between genetic predisposition, the immune system and environmental factors. In the recent years, metagenomic studies of the human microbiome have provided useful data that are helping to assemble the IBD puzzle. In this review, we summarize and discuss current knowledge on the composition of the intestinal microbiota in IBD, host-microbe interactions and therapeutic possibilities using bacteria in IBD. Moreover, an outlook on the possible contribution of bacteriophages in the pathogenesis and therapy of IBD is provided.

  14. The microbiome-immune-host defense barrier complex (microimmunosome) and developmental programming of noncommunicable diseases.

    PubMed

    Dietert, Rodney R

    2017-03-01

    Through its role as gatekeeper and filter to the external world, the microbiome affects developmental programming of physiological systems including the immune system. In turn, the immune system must tolerate, personalize, and prune the microbiome. Immune and host barrier status in early life significantly effects everything from embryo viability and pregnancy duration to the likelihood of misregulated inflammation, and risk of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Since the programming of and interactions among the microbiome, the host defense barrier, and the immune system can affect inflammation-driven health risks across the lifespan, a systems biology-type understanding of these three biological components may be useful. Here, I consider the potential utility of focusing on programming of a newly-defined systems biology unit termed the "microimmunosome." Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as CJD and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer (AD), Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration. PMID:25930988

  16. Role of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling in the Pathogenesis of Graft-versus-Host Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Sanfang; Zhong, Danli; Xie, Weixin; Huang, Wenfa; Jiang, Yangyang; Li, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and infection are major complications after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) and the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HSCT patients. Recent work has demonstrated that the two complications are interdependent. GVHD occurs when allo-reactive donor T lymphocytes are activated by major histocompatibility antigens or minor histocompatibility antigens on host antigen-presenting cells (APCs), with the eventual attack of recipient tissues or organs. Activation of APCs is important for the priming of GVHD and is mediated by innate immune signaling pathways. Current evidence indicates that intestinal microbes and innate pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) on host APCs, including both Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), are involved in the pathogenesis of GVHD. Patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation before allo-HSCT are susceptible to aggravated gastrointestinal epithelial cell damage and the subsequent translocation of bacterial components, followed by the release of endogenous dangerous molecules, termed pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), which then activate the PRRs on host APCs to trigger local or systemic inflammatory responses that modulate T cell allo-reactivity against host tissues, which is equivalent to GVHD. In other words, infection can, to some extent, accelerate the progression of GVHD. Therefore, the intestinal flora’s PAMPs can interact with TLRs to activate and mature APCs, subsequently activate donor T cells with the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and eventually, induce GVHD. In the present article, we summarize the current perspectives on the understanding of different TLR signaling pathways and their involvement in the occurrence of GVHD. PMID:27529218

  17. Research Strategies to Reduce Tick Densities and the Risk of Tick-borne Disease Transmission through Host-Targeted Control

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    While white-tailed deer are not reservoir hosts for the Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, they are the keystone host animal on which adult female blacklegged ticks engorge on blood that is essential to production of tick eggs and completion of the life cycle. This session explores current re...

  18. The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium: host plant resistance and disease management, current status and future outlook

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The 12th I. E. Melhus Graduate Student Symposium was held on 6 August 2012 during the Annual meeting of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) in Providence, RI. The theme for this symposium was “Host Plant Resistance and Disease Management: Current Status and Future Outlook”. The APS Host R...

  19. Cytomegalovirus Hyper Immunoglobulin for CMV Prophylaxis in Thoracic Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Federico; Potena, Luciano; Yonan, Nizar; Wagner, Florian; Calabrese, Fiorella

    2016-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection negatively influences both short- and long-term outcomes after cardiothoracic transplantation. In heart transplantation, registry analyses have shown that CMV immunoglobulin (CMVIG) with or without virostatic prophylaxis is associated with a significant reduction in mortality and graft loss versus no prophylaxis, particularly in high-risk donor (D)+/recipient (R)- transplants. Randomized comparative trials are lacking but retrospective data suggest that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis may reduce rates of CMV-related events after heart transplantation, including the incidence of acute rejection or chronic allograft vasculopathy. However, available data consistently indicate that when CMVIG is used, it should be administered with concomitant antiviral therapy, and that evidence concerning preemptive management with CMVIG is limited, but promising. In lung transplantation, CMVIG should again only be used with concomitant antiviral therapy. Retrospective studies have shown convincing evidence that addition of CMVIG to antiviral prophylaxis lowers CMV endpoints and mortality. The current balance of evidence suggests that CMVIG prophylaxis reduces the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, but a controlled trial is awaited. Overall, the relatively limited current data set suggests that prophylaxis with CMVIG in combination with antiviral therapy appears effective in D+/R- heart transplant patients, whereas in lung transplantation, addition of CMVIG in recipients of a CMV-positive graft may offer an advantage in terms of CMV infection and disease.

  20. Fluconazole prophylaxis in preterm infants: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rios, Juliana Ferreira da Silva; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Corrêa, Luísa Petri; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    This article aims to review the use of antifungal prophylaxis with intravenous fluconazole in premature newborns and the occurrence of Invasive Candidiasis. This is a systematic review with search at databases: PubMed, Capes Portal, Virtual Health Library (BVS - Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde)/Lilacs, Scopus and Cochrane. The keywords used were: "Antifungal", "Candida" "Fluconazole prophylaxis" and "Preterm infants". Invasive Candidiasis was evaluated in all the twelve items. In eleven of them, there was a statistically significant difference between the groups receiving prophylactic fluconazole, with lower frequency of Invasive Candidiasis, compared to placebo or no prophylaxis group. Colonization by Candida species was also evaluated in five studies; four of them presented statistically lower proportion of colonization in patients with Fluconazole prophylaxis, compared to placebo or no drugs. In one study, there was a significant difference, favoring the use of fluconazole, and reduction of death. Studies indicate the effectiveness of prophylaxis with fluconazole, with reduction in the incidence of colonization and invasive fungal disease. The benefits of prophylaxis should be evaluated considering the incidence of candidiasis in the unit, the mortality associated with candidiasis, the safety and toxicity of short and long-term medication, and the potential for development of resistant pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Differences in Early Donor Cell Proliferation in Graft-Versus-Host Disease Hosts with Different Pre-Conditioning Doses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Myung Geun; Kang, Bora; Jeon, Ji Yeong; Chang, Jun; Lee, Seungbok; Min, Chang-Ki; Youn, Hyewon; Choi, Eun Young

    2012-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) results from immune-mediated attacks on recipient tissues by donor-originated cells through the recognition of incompatible antigens expressed on host cells. The pre-conditioning irradiation dose is a risk factor influencing GVHD severity. In this study, using newly generated luciferase transgenic mice on a B6 background (B6.LucTg) as bone marrow and splenocyte donors, we explored the effects of irradiation doses on donor cell dynamics in major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allogeneic GVHD hosts via bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Results from BLI of GVHD hosts showed higher emission intensities of luminescence signals from hosts irradiated with 900 cGy as compared with those irradiated with 400 cGy. In particular, BLI signals from target organs, such as the spleen, liver, and lung, and several different lymph nodes fluctuated with similar time kinetics soon after transplantation, reflecting the synchronous proliferation of donor cells in the different organs in hosts irradiated with 900 cGy. The kinetic curves of the BLI signals were not synchronized between the target organs and the secondary organs in hosts irradiated with 400 cGy. These results demonstrate that pre-conditioning doses influence the kinetics and degree of proliferation in the target organs soon after transplantation. The results from this study are the first describing donor cell dynamics in MHC-matched allogeneic GVHD hosts and the influence of irradiation doses on proliferation dynamics, and will provide spatiotemporal information to help understand GVHD pathophysiology. PMID:22228184

  2. Antibiotic prophylaxis for dentoalveolar surgery: is it indicated?

    PubMed

    Lawler, B; Sambrook, P J; Goss, A N

    2005-12-01

    Usually dentists in Australia give patients oral antibiotics after dentoalveolar surgery as a prophylaxis against wound infection. When this practice is compared to the principle of antibiotic prophylaxis in major surgery it is found to be at variance in a number of ways. In major surgery, the risk of infection should be high, and the consequences of infection severe or catastrophic, before antibiotic prophylaxis is ordered. If it is provided then a high dose of an appropriate spectrum antibiotic must be present in the blood prior to the first incision. Other factors which need to be considered are the degree of tissue trauma, the extent of host compromise, other medical comorbidities and length of hospitalization. Standardized protocols of administration have been determined and evaluated for most major surgical procedures. Dentoalveolar surgery is undoubtedly a skilled and technically challenging procedure. However, in contrast to major surgical procedures, it has a less than five per cent infection rate and rarely has severe adverse consequences. Dentoalveolar surgery should be of short duration with minimal tissue damage and performed in the dental chair under local anaesthesia. Controlled studies for both mandibular third molar surgery and placement of dental implants show little or no evidence of benefit from antibiotic prophylaxis and there is an adverse risk from the antibiotic. This review concludes that there is no case for antibiotic prophylaxis for most dentoalveolar surgery in fit patients. In the few cases where it can be considered, a single high preoperative dose should be given.

  3. Host-microbiome interaction in Crohn's disease: A familiar or familial issue?

    PubMed

    Michielan, Andrea; D'Incà, Renata

    2015-11-15

    An impaired interaction between the gut and the intestinal microbiome is likely to be the key element in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). Family studies have provided invaluable information on CD pathogenesis and on its etiology. Relatives share the same genetic risk of developing the disease as affected subjects. Relatives also exhibit similar features relating to their host-microbiome interaction, namely genetic variants in loci involved in detecting bacteria, a greater sero-reactivity to microbial components, and an impaired intestinal permeability. The burden of environmental factors such as cigarette smoking and dysbiosis also seems to be particularly relevant in these genetically predisposed subjects. Diet is emerging as an important factor and could account for the changing epidemiology of CD in recent years. Despite the pivotal role of genetics in the disease's pathogenesis (especially in familial CD), screening tests in healthy relatives cannot be recommended.

  4. Path to Clinical Transplantation Tolerance and Prevention of Graft versus Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strober, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Although organ and bone marrow transplantation are life saving procedures for patients with terminal diseases, the requirement for the lifelong use of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent organ graft rejection and the development of graft versus host disease (GVHD) remain important problems. Experimental approaches to solve these problems, first in preclinical models and then in clinical studies, developed at Stanford during the past 40 years are summarized in this article. The approaches use fractionated radiation of the lymphoid tissues, a procedure initially developed to treat Hodgkin’s disease, to alter the immune system such that tolerance to organ transplants can be achieved and GVHD can be prevented after the establishment of chimerism. In both instances, the desired goal was achieved when the balance of immune cells was changed to favor regulatory innate and adaptive immune cells that suppress the conventional immune cells that ordinarily promote inflammation and tissue injury. PMID:24671802

  5. Molecular approaches to the treatment, prophylaxis, and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: possible involvement of HRD1, a novel molecule related to endoplasmic reticulum stress, in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Masayuki; Okuma, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is a protective mechanism against ER stress in which unfolded proteins accumulated in the ER are selectively transported to the cytosol for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We cloned the novel ubiquitin ligase HRD1, which is involved in ERAD, and showed that HRD1 promoted amyloid precursor protein (APP) ubiquitination and degradation, resulting in decreased generation of amyloid β (Aβ). In addition, suppression of HRD1 expression caused APP accumulation and promoted Aβ generation associated with ER stress and apoptosis. Interestingly, HRD1 levels were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and the brains of these patients experienced ER stress. Our recent study revealed that this decrease in HRD1 was due to its insolubilization; however, controversy persists about whether the decrease in HRD1 protein promotes Aβ generation or whether Aβ neurotoxicity causes the decrease in HRD1 protein levels. Here, we review current findings on the mechanism of HRD1 protein loss in the AD brain and the involvement of HRD1 in the pathogenesis of AD. Furthermore, we propose that HRD1 may be a target for novel AD therapeutics.

  6. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk

    PubMed Central

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-01-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  7. Targeting hunter distribution based on host resource selection and kill sites to manage disease risk.

    PubMed

    Dugal, Cherie J; van Beest, Floris M; Vander Wal, Eric; Brook, Ryan K

    2013-10-01

    Endemic and emerging diseases are rarely uniform in their spatial distribution or prevalence among cohorts of wildlife. Spatial models that quantify risk-driven differences in resource selection and hunter mortality of animals at fine spatial scales can assist disease management by identifying high-risk areas and individuals. We used resource selection functions (RSFs) and selection ratios (SRs) to quantify sex- and age-specific resource selection patterns of collared (n = 67) and hunter-killed (n = 796) nonmigratory elk (Cervus canadensis manitobensis) during the hunting season between 2002 and 2012, in southwestern Manitoba, Canada. Distance to protected area was the most important covariate influencing resource selection and hunter-kill sites of elk (AICw = 1.00). Collared adult males (which are most likely to be infected with bovine tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis) and chronic wasting disease) rarely selected for sites outside of parks during the hunting season in contrast to adult females and juvenile males. The RSFs showed selection by adult females and juvenile males to be negatively associated with landscape-level forest cover, high road density, and water cover, whereas hunter-kill sites of these cohorts were positively associated with landscape-level forest cover and increasing distance to streams and negatively associated with high road density. Local-level forest was positively associated with collared animal locations and hunter-kill sites; however, selection was stronger for collared juvenile males and hunter-killed adult females. In instances where disease infects a metapopulation and eradication is infeasible, a principle goal of management is to limit the spread of disease among infected animals. We map high-risk areas that are regularly used by potentially infectious hosts but currently underrepresented in the distribution of kill sites. We present a novel application of widely available data to target hunter distribution based on host resource

  8. Susceptibility to infection and pathogenicity of White Spot Disease (WSD) in non-model crustacean host taxa from temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K S; Tew, I; French, C; Hicks, R J; Martin, P; Munro, J; Stentiford, G D

    2012-07-01

    Despite almost two decades since its discovery, White Spot Disease (WSD) caused by White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is still considered the most significant known pathogen impacting the sustainability and growth of the global penaeid shrimp farming industry. Although most commonly associated with penaeid shrimp farmed in tropical regions, the virus is also able to infect, cause disease and kill a wide range of other decapod crustacean hosts from temperate regions, including lobsters, crabs, crayfish and shrimp. For this reason, WSSV has recently been listed in European Community Council Directive 2006/88. Using principles laid down by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) we applied an array of diagnostic approaches to provide a definitive statement on the susceptibility to White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection in seven ecologically or economically important crustacean species from Europe. We chose four marine species: Cancer pagurus, Homarus gammarus, Nephrops norvegicus and Carcinus maenas; one estuarine species, Eriocheir sinensis and two freshwater species, Austropotamobius pallipes and Pacifastacus leniusculus. Exposure trials based upon natural (feeding) and artificial (intra-muscular injection) routes of exposure to WSSV revealed universal susceptibility to WSSV infection in these hosts. However, the relative degree of susceptibility (measured by progression of infection to disease, and mortality) varied significantly between host species. In some instances (Type 1 hosts), pathogenesis mimicked that observed in penaeid shrimp hosts whereas in other examples (Types 2 and 3 hosts), infection did not readily progress to disease, even though hosts were considered as infected and susceptible according to accepted principles. Results arising from challenge studies are discussed in relation to the potential risk posed to non-target hosts by the inadvertent introduction of WSSV to European waters via trade. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for

  9. Venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Kayvon; Hyman, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Patients who undergo colorectal surgery are at a substantially higher risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) than their general surgery counterparts. The incidence of DVT in colorectal surgery patients who do not receive prophylaxis is approximately 30%; a four-fold increase exists in the incidence of pulmonary embolism. The precise reasons for the increased risk are uncertain; likely, contributing factors are the need for pelvic dissection, patient positioning (eg, use of stirrups), and indications for surgery (eg, inflammatory bowel disease, cancer). Despite the clear evidence that supports the safety and efficacy of DVT prophylaxis, appropriate preventive measures are frequently not used. Heparin preparations and mechanical compression in combination likely represents the most appropriate prophylactic regimen in these high-risk patients. Standard heparin appears to be as effective as low-molecular-weight heparin and considerably less costly. In the presence of relatively poor adherence to consensus guidelines for prophylaxis, critical pathways or electronic alerts may be useful to facilitate compliance with appropriate preventive measures.

  10. [Thromboembolic prophylaxis in hospitalized medical patients].

    PubMed

    Braekkan, Sigrid; Grimsgaard, Sameline; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2007-05-03

    The risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) ranges between 15 and 40% for patients hospitalized for certain medical conditions. Clinical studies have shown that prophylactic treatment with low molecular weight heparins (LMWH) reduces the risk of VTE from 15 to 6%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of thromboprophylaxis among hospitalized medical patients after the introduction of clinical guidelines. A retrospective chart review was conducted among patients hospitalized for pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and heart failure at Tromsø University Hospital during 2000-2001 and 2003-2004, i.e. before and after introduction of guidelines for thromboprophylaxis. Demographic data, risk factors for VTE and use of thromboprophylaxis were recorded. 434 hospitalizations were included. According to the guidelines, prophylaxis was indicated in 307 (71%) hospitalizations, and LMWH was prescribed in 62 (20%) hospitalizations. There was a non-significant increase in the use of prophylaxis from 18% to 23% after the introduction of clinical guidelines (p = 0.3). Acute myocardial infarction, acute infection and immobilization were significant predictors for prophylaxis. This study indicates insufficient adherence to clinical guidelines for thromboprophylaxis to patients at risk of VTE in internal medicine. There is potential for improvement of prophylactic treatment to avoid serious VTE among hospitalized medical patients.

  11. Venous thromboembolism risk and prophylaxis in hospitalised medically ill patients. The ENDORSE Global Survey.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Jean-Francois; Cohen, Alexander T; Tapson, Victor F; Goldhaber, Samuel Z; Kakkar, Ajay K; Deslandes, Bruno; Huang, Wei; Anderson, Frederick A

    2010-04-01

    Limited data are available regarding the risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE) and VTE prophylaxis use in hospitalised medically ill patients. We analysed data from the global ENDORSE survey to evaluate VTE risk and prophylaxis use in this population according to diagnosis, baseline characteristics, and country. Data on patient characteristics, VTE risk, and prophylaxis use were abstracted from hospital charts. VTE risk and prophylaxis use were evaluated according to the 2004 American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) guidelines. Multivariable analysis was performed to identify factors associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Data were evaluated for 37,356 hospitalised medical patients across 32 countries. VTE risk varied according to medical diagnosis, from 31.2% of patients with gastrointestinal/hepatobiliary diseases to 100% of patients with acute heart failure, active non-infectious respiratory disease, or pulmonary infection (global rate, 41.5%). Among those at risk for VTE, ACCP-recommended prophylaxis was used in 24.4% haemorrhagic stroke patients and 40-45% of cardiopulmonary disease patients (global rate, 39.5%). Large differences in prophylaxis use were observed among countries. Markers of disease severity, including central venous catheters, mechanical ventilation, and admission to intensive care units, were strongly associated with use of ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. In conclusion, VTE risk varies according to medical diagnosis. Less than 40% of at-risk hospitalised medical patients receive ACCP-recommended prophylaxis. Prophylaxis use appears to be associated with disease severity rather than medical diagnosis. These data support the necessity to improve implementation of available guidelines for evaluating VTE risk and providing prophylaxis to hospitalised medical patients.

  12. Beclomethasone in Treating Patients With Graft-Versus-Host Disease of the Esophagus, Stomach, Small Intestine, or Colon

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-03-31

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Graft Versus Host Disease; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  13. Coxsackievirus myocarditis: interplay between virus and host in the pathogenesis of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Tam, Patricia E

    2006-01-01

    Coxsackievirus (CVB) infection is a significant cause of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Heart disease may be caused by direct cytopathic effects of the virus, a pathologic immune response to persistent virus, or autoimmunity triggered by the viral infection. CVB interacts with its host at multiple stages during disease development. Signaling through viral receptors may alter the intracellular environment in addition to facilitating virus entry. Viral genetic determinants that encode cardiovirulence have been mapped and may change depending on the nutritional status of the host. Virus persistence is directly associated with pathology, and recent work demonstrates that CVB evolves into a slowly replicating form capable of establishing a low-grade infection in the heart. The innate immune response to CVB has taken on increasing importance because of its role in shaping the development of the adaptive immune response that is responsible for cardiac pathology. Studies of T cell responsiveness and the development of autoimmunity at the molecular level are beginning to clarify the mechanisms through which CVB infection causes inflammatory heart disease.

  14. Current data on IL-17 and Th17 cells and implications for graft versus host disease

    PubMed Central

    Normanton, Marília; Marti, Luciana Cavalheiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human interleukin 17 was first described in 1995 as a new cytokine produced primarily by activated T CD4+ cells that stimulate the secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by human fibroblasts, besides increasing the expression of ICAM-1. Various authors have reported that IL-17A has a role in the protection of organisms against extracellular bacteria and fungi due to the capacity of IL-17A to recruit neutrophils to the areas of infection, evidencing a pathological role in various models of autoimmune diseases, such as experimental autoimmune encephalitis and arthritis. The participation of IL-17A has also been described in the acute rejection of organ transplants and graft versus host disease. However, the greatest revolution in research with IL-17 happened in 2000, when it was proposed that IL-17 cannot be classified as Th1 or Th2, but rather, simply as a new lineage of IL-17-producing T-cells. These findings modified the previously established Th1/Th2 paradigm, leading to the definition of the CD3+ CD4+ Th17 cellular subtype and establishment of a new model to explain the origin of various immune events, as well as its implication in the graft versus host disease that is discussed in depth in this article. PMID:23843069

  15. Altered intestinal microbiota–host mitochondria crosstalk in new onset Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Mottawea, Walid; Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Mühlbauer, Marcus; Starr, Amanda E.; Butcher, James; Abujamel, Turki; Deeke, Shelley A.; Brandel, Annette; Zhou, Hu; Shokralla, Shadi; Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; Singleton, Ruth; Benchimol, Eric I.; Jobin, Christian; Mack, David R.; Figeys, Daniel; Stintzi, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbial dysbiosis is associated with Crohn's disease (CD). However, the mechanisms leading to the chronic mucosal inflammation that characterizes this disease remain unclear. In this report, we use systems-level approaches to study the interactions between the gut microbiota and host in new-onset paediatric patients to evaluate causality and mechanisms of disease. We report an altered host proteome in CD patients indicative of impaired mitochondrial functions. In particular, mitochondrial proteins implicated in H2S detoxification are downregulated, while the relative abundance of H2S microbial producers is increased. Network correlation analysis reveals that Atopobium parvulum controls the central hub of H2S producers. A. parvulum induces pancolitis in colitis-susceptible interleukin-10-deficient mice and this phenotype requires the presence of the intestinal microbiota. Administrating the H2S scavenger bismuth mitigates A. parvulum-induced colitis in vivo. This study reveals that host–microbiota interactions are disturbed in CD and thus provides mechanistic insights into CD pathogenesis. PMID:27876802

  16. Graft-versus-host disease-associated angiomatosis: a clinicopathologically distinct entity.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Benjamin H; Zuo, Rena C; Gru, Alejandro; Plotner, Alisha N; Sweeney, Sarah A; Devine, Steven M; Hymes, Sharon R; Cowen, Edward W

    2014-10-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) may present with various cutaneous manifestations. Isolated case reports describe eruptive angiomas in this setting. We sought to provide a clinical and pathologic description of vascular proliferations in patients with GVHD. Cases of documented GVHD associated with vascular proliferations were collected from the National Institutes of Health, Ohio State University, and MD Anderson Cancer Center. Eleven patients with a diagnosis of GVHD who developed vascular proliferations were identified. All patients manifested sclerotic type chronic GVHD of the skin. Vascular lesions were first documented a median of 44 months after transplantation and occurred primarily on the lower extremities or trunk. Histopathology revealed anastomosing networks of thin-walled vascular proliferations in a vague lobular growth pattern, with overlying epidermal acanthosis, peripheral collarette, ulceration, and disorganized fibroblast-rich and fibrotic stroma. Improvement was noted in 1 patient treated with propranolol and sirolimus and 1 patient with electrocautery. Given the retrospective nature of the study, the overall incidence of vascular lesions in patients with GVHD is unknown. Histopathology was present for review on only 3 of 11 patients. The phenomenon of vascular lesions appears to be relatively specific for sclerotic type chronic GVHD when compared with other fibrosing diseases. We propose the term "graft-versus-host disease-associated angiomatosis" to describe this entity. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Graft-versus-host disease-like erythroderma: a manifestation of thymoma-associated multiorgan autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Shay; Nehal, Kishwer; Querfeld, Christiane; Wong, Richard; Huang, James; Pulitzer, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Thymoma associated multiorgan autoimmunity is a rare paraneoplastic disorder, clinicopathologically similar to graft versus host disease, which is thought to be mediated by dysfunctional negative thymocyte selection and abnormally low levels of Tregs. We report a 50 year old Chinese women with a history of malignant thymoma and myasthenia gravis who developed graft versus host disease- like erythroderma after instituting chemotherapy and undergoing myasthenia crisis. Clinically her rash presented as erythematous scaly papules, which evolved to psoriasiform patches and plaques with foci of vitiligo. Histopathologically the biopsy showed a predominantly interface dermatitis with necrotic keratinocytes extending to the upper levels of the epidermis, and florid basket weave orthokeratosis. Clinical and laboratory work-up ruled out common inflammatory or infectious causes, eventually favoring the diagnosis of TAMA with GVHD-like erythroderma. Unfortunately, the patient underwent multi-organ compromise and death due to respiratory failure from myasthenia crisis. Patients with TAMA have a poor clinical outlook; rare successful treatments include high dose oral steroids and additional modalities including bone marrow transplant and chemotherapeutic or biologic agents. As the predominant findings are in the skin, dermatologists and dermatopathologists are in a unique position to enable the early diagnosis and treatment of this unusual disease. PMID:26509934

  18. Molecular Pathological Epidemiology of Epigenetics: Emerging Integrative Science to Analyze Environment, Host, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ogino, Shuji; Lochhead, Paul; Chan, Andrew T.; Nishihara, Reiko; Cho, Eunyoung; Wolpin, Brian M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Meissner, Alexander; Schernhammer, Eva S.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Giovannucci, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics acts as an interface between environmental / exogenous factors, cellular responses and pathological processes. Aberrant epigenetic signatures are a hallmark of complex multifactorial diseases, including non-neoplastic disorders (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, autoimmune diseases, and some infectious diseases) and neoplasms (e.g., leukemias, lymphomas, sarcomas, and breast, lung, prostate, liver and colorectal cancers). Epigenetic signatures (DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA expression, etc.) may serve as biomarkers for risk stratification, early detection, and disease classification, as well as targets for therapy and chemoprevention. DNA methylation assays are widely applied to formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue specimens as clinical pathology tests. To better understand the interplay between etiologic factors, cellular molecular characteristics, and disease evolution, the field of “Molecular Pathological Epidemiology (MPE)” has emerged as an interdisciplinary integration of “molecular pathology” and “epidemiology”, with a similar conceptual framework to systems biology and network medicine. In contrast to traditional epidemiologic research including genome-wide association studies (GWAS), MPE is founded on the unique disease principle; that is, each disease process results from unique profiles of exposomes, epigenomes, transcriptomes, proteomes, metabolomes, microbiomes, and interactomes in relation to the macro-environment and tissue microenvironment. The widespread application of epigenomics (e.g., methylome) analyses will enhance our understanding of disease heterogeneity, epigenotypes (CpG island methylator phenotype, LINE-1 hypomethylation, etc.), and host-disease interactions. MPE may represent a logical evolution of GWAS, termed “GWAS-MPE approach”. Though epigenome-wide association study attracts increasing attention, currently, it has a fundamental problem in that each cell

  19. How Stem Cells Speak with Host Immune Cells in Inflammatory Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pluchino, Stefano; Cossetti, Chiara

    2014-01-01

    Advances in stem cell biology have raised great expectations that diseases and injuries of the central nervous system (CNS) may be ameliorated by the development of non-hematopoietic stem cell medicines. Yet, the application of adult stem cells as CNS therapeutics is challenging and the interpretation of some of the outcomes ambiguous. In fact, the initial idea that stem cell transplants work only via structural cell replacement has been challenged by the observation of consistent cellular signaling between the graft and the host. Cellular signaling is the foundation of coordinated actions and flexible responses, and arises via networks of exchanging and interacting molecules that transmit patterns of information between cells. Sustained stem cell graft-to-host communication leads to remarkable trophic effects on endogenous brain cells and beneficial modulatory actions on innate and adaptive immune responses in vivo, ultimately promoting the healing of the injured CNS. Among a number of adult stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) are being extensively investigated for their ability to signal to the immune system upon transplantation in experimental CNS diseases. Here, we focus on the main cellular signaling pathways that grafted MSCs and NPCs use to establish a therapeutically relevant cross talk with host immune cells, while examining the role of inflammation in regulating some of the bidirectionality of these communications. We propose that the identification of the players involved in stem cell signaling might contribute to the development of innovative, high clinical impact therapeutics for inflammatory CNS diseases. PMID:23633288

  20. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. PMID:26729898

  1. Acute cutaneous graft-versus-host disease resembling type II (atypical adult) pityriasis rubra pilaris.

    PubMed

    Surjana, Devita; Robertson, Ivan; Kennedy, Glen; James, Daniel; Weedon, David

    2015-02-01

    We present a case of cutaneous acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) with confluent erythematous perifollicular hyperkeratosis and ichthyosiform scale in the clinical pattern of type II (atypical adult) pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP), which developed 26 days after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplant. Skin histology confirmed features of both aGVHD and PRP. The skin lesions were refractory to oral prednisolone and cyclosporine and only partially responsive to a combination of i.v. methylprednisolone, oral tacrolimus, oral mycophenolate mofetil, and infusions of anti-thymocyte globulin and the tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor, etanercept. © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  2. Novel Application of Extracorporeal Photopheresis as Treatment of Graft-versus-Host Disease Following Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Cathy; Hammer, Suntrea T. G.; Hwang, Christine S.; Vusirikala, Madhuri; Patel, Prapti A.; Matevosyan, Karén; Tujios, Shannan R.; Mufti, Arjmand R.; Collins, Robert H.

    2017-01-01

    A 48-year-old man with hepatitis C virus (HCV) cirrhosis complicated by hepatocellular carcinoma underwent liver transplantation. His course was complicated by fever, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and pancytopenia. He developed a diffuse erythematous rash, which progressed to erythroderma. Biopsies of the colon and skin were consistent with acute graft-versus-host disease. Donor-derived lymphocytes were present in the peripheral blood. The patient was treated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine; however, he had minimal response to intensive immunosuppressive therapy. Extracorporeal photopheresis was initiated as a salvage therapy. He had a dramatic response, and his rash, diarrhea, and pancytopenia resolved. He is maintained on minimal immunosuppression 24 months later. PMID:28377936

  3. A case report and literature review of chronic graft-versus-host disease manifesting as polymyositis.

    PubMed

    Michelis, Fotios V; Bril, Vera; Lipton, Jeffrey H

    2015-07-01

    Polymyositis (PM) is a rare but documented manifestation of chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGvHD) post allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We present the case of a 70-year-old male patient who developed severe cGvHD-related PM 3 years after undergoing allogeneic HCT for acute myeloid leukemia. The patient responded to steroids and was maintained long-term with hydroxychloroquine as a steroid-sparing agent. We review the literature concerning the diagnosis and treatment of PM as cGvHD as well as the differentiation of this manifestation from other forms of PM.

  4. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease: a serious residual risk of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Martha J; Blackall, Douglas P

    2005-11-01

    Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is well recognized as an uncommon, but frequently fatal, adverse effect of blood component therapy. In this disorder, viable donor lymphocytes transfused to a vulnerable patient orchestrate a devastating attack on the recipient's tissues. In contrast to the striking reduction in infectious risks of blood transfusion, a significant residual risk of TA-GVHD remains. This article reviews the pathogenesis and mechanism of TA-GVHD, which provide the foundation for a prevention strategy. A review of selected recent cases illustrates the challenges faced in the identification, prevention, and treatment of this frustrating disorder.

  5. Crosstalk between the nociceptive and immune systems in host defence and disease.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Stephen B; La Russa, Federica; Bennett, David L H

    2015-07-01

    Nociceptors and immune cells both protect the host from potential threats to homeostasis. There is growing evidence for bidirectional signalling between these two systems, and the underlying mechanisms are beginning to be elucidated. An understanding is emerging of how both the adaptive and innate immune systems can activate and sensitize nociceptors, and, reciprocally, how nociceptors modulate immune cells. In this Review, we discuss how these interactions can be adaptive and useful to the organism but also consider when such signalling might be maladaptive and pathophysiological, contributing to immune-mediated diseases and persistent pain states.

  6. Tc1 clonal T cell expansion during chronic graft-versus-host disease-associated hypereosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Clave, Emmanuel; Xhaard, Aliénor; Douay, Corrine; Adès, Lionel; Cayuela, Jean Michel; Peffault de Latour, Régis; Robin, Marie; Toubert, Antoine; Socié, Gérard

    2014-05-01

    Although hypereosinophilia (HE) associated with chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has long been recognized, biological data on this phenomenon are scarce. Here we compare patients with chronic GVHD with HE together with a clonal T cell expansion and control patients with acute or chronic GVHD but without HE. These clonal expansions share a CD8(+) TC1 phenotype rather than a CD4(+) Th2 profile. In contrast to the drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, these allogeneic CD8(+) clones do not recognize the epitopes of herpesviruses. Furthermore, these TC1 clones do not produce IL-17 as described in the DRESS syndrome.

  7. How I treat acute graft-versus-host disease of the gastrointestinal tract and the liver.

    PubMed

    McDonald, George B

    2016-03-24

    Treatment of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) has evolved from a one-size-fits-all approach to a more nuanced strategy based on predicted outcomes. Lower and time-limited doses of immune suppression for patients predicted to have low-risk GVHD are safe and effective. In more severe GVHD, prolonged exposure to immunosuppressive therapies, failure to achieve tolerance, and inadequate clinical responses are the proximate causes of GVHD-related deaths. This article presents acute GVHD-related scenarios representing, respectively, certainty of diagnosis, multiple causes of symptoms, jaundice, an initial therapy algorithm, secondary therapy, and defining futility of treatment. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Romiplostin may revert the thrombocytopenia in graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-03-01

    The thrombocytopenia ensuing during acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is multifactorial and may significantly compromise the prognosis of the patient; non-immune persistent thrombocytopenia has been considered as an adverse prognostic factor in GVHD. We describe here the case of a 10-year-old girl who developed steroid-refractory thrombocytopenia and who responded promptly to the subcutaneous delivery of romiplostin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of the usefulness of the peptibody in the setting of GVHD.

  9. Efficacy of acitretin for porokeratosis in a child with chronic cutaneous graft versus host disease.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Riccardo G; Poddighe, Dimitri; Zecca, Marco; Brazzelli, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Porokeratosis is a rare disorder of epidermal keratinization that is regarded as a precancerous. Recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a greater risk of skin cancer; chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is an additional risk factor. A 16-year-old boy who had received HSCT for acute myelogenous leukemia was referred to us for sclerodermoid chronic cutaneous GVHD. Two years later, he developed disseminated porokeratosis with a few atypical lesions. Despite cryotherapy, numerous lesions of porokeratosis recurred rapidly. Acitretin resulted in good clinical response and reduced the rate of onset of new lesions. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Bilateral Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy Related to Graft versus Host Disease Following Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation for Hodgkin Disease.

    PubMed

    Moesen, I; Kidd, D P

    2014-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD) is a common and often troublesome complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Neurological complications usually involve the peripheral nervous system and muscle, but the central nervous system may be affected. When an optic neuropathy develops, it is often difficult to determine the cause quickly; infective complications and drug toxicity may have arisen, but an inflammatory disorder due to GvHD should also be considered, particularly since treatment with steroids and immune suppression may improve the outcome significantly. This brief case report shows how this may be the case and reviews our current understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of the disorder within the nervous system.

  11. Emerging technologies for oral diagnostics: lessons from chronic graft-versus-host disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mays, Jacqueline W.; Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Bassim, Carol W.; Melvin, James E.

    2013-05-01

    Saliva is a protein-rich oral fluid that contains information about systemic and oral-specific disease pathogenesis and diagnosis. Technologies are emerging to improve detection of protein components of human saliva for use not only in biomarker discovery, but also for the illumination of pathways involved in oral disease. These include the optimization of liquid chromatography coupled tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of saliva in health and disease. Downstream of saliva component identification and validation comes the complex task of connecting salivary proteomic data to biological function, disease state, and other clinical patient information in a meaningful way. Augmentation of database information with biological expertise is crucial for effective analysis of potential biomarkers and disease pathways in order to improve diagnosis and identify putative therapeutic targets. This presentation will use LC-MS/MS analysis of saliva from chronic Graft-versus-Host disease (cGVHD) patients to illustrate these principles, and includes a discussion of the complex clinical and diagnostic issues related to proteomics and biomarker research in cGVHD.

  12. Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-00-1-0495 TITLE: Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mary Ann Kosir, M.D...NUMBER Lymphedema Prophylaxis Utilizing Perloperative Education 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAM D1 7-00-1-0495 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...perioperative training for lymphedema assessment and protection. The hypothesis is that structured perioperative training in lymphedema protection will

  13. [Levofloxacin prophylaxis in neutropenic patients].

    PubMed

    Carena, Alberto A; Jorge, Laura; Bonvehí, Pablo; Temporiti, Elena; Zárate, Mariela S; Herrera, Fabián

    2016-01-01

    Fluorquinolone-prophylaxis has proven useful in preventing infections in high risk neutropenic patients. The objective of this study was to describe the clinical, microbiological and therapeutic characteristics, and outcome of patients in the first episode of febrile neutropenia, comparing those who received levofloxacin prophylaxis with those who didn't. It was a prospective observational study that included all the episodes of inpatients with febrile neutropenia (February 1997- November 2014), also including the first episode in a same patient in different hospitalizations. Of 946 episodes here included, 821 presented high risk febrile neutropenia. A total of 264 cases (27.9%) received levofloxacin prophylaxis. This group consisted of a higher proportion of high risk febrile neutropenia (99.2% vs. 82.3%, p = 0.0001) and patients that had received an hematopoietic stem cell transplant (67.8% vs. 29.3%, p = 0.0001) compared to those who didn't receive prophylaxis. Those who received levofloxacin prophylaxis presented a similar frequency of clinically diagnosed but a lower proportion of microbiologically documented infections (28.8% vs. 37.5%, p = 0.012) than those who didn't receive prophylaxis. The episodes of bacteremia that occurred in the first group were more frequently caused by multidrug resistant bacteria (MDRB) (34.5% vs. 17.3%, p = 0.007) and by extended spectrum beta lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae (19% vs. 3.8%, p = 0.0001). The group that received prophylaxis had a lower proportion of adequate empirical antibiotic treatment (69.7% vs. 83.7%, p = 0.009), with similar outcomes in both groups. We suggest that levofloxacin prophylaxis should be stopped whenever there is a rise in the frequency of MDRB infections in this population.

  14. Graft irradiation abrogates graft-versus-host disease in combined pancreas-spleen transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Schulak, J.A.; Sharp, W.J.

    1986-04-01

    A model of combined pancreas-spleen transplantation (PST) was studied in LBN F1 recipients of Lewis grafts in order to evaluate the efficacy of pretransplant graft irradiation in preventing lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recipients of unmodi