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Sample records for host stars ogle-tr-10

  1. Asteroseismology of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayhan, Cenk; Çelik Orhan, Zeynep; Yildiz, Mutlu

    2016-07-01

    Exoplanet studies are one of the most interesting and attractive topics in astrophysics. Besides of ground-based observations, Kepler and CoRoT space missions improved our knowledge by providing unprecedented data of exoplanets and host stars. Precise determination of basic properties of planets depends on how we accurately determine fundamental properties of host stars. Asteroseismology is a powerful tool to study stellar structure and evolution and provides us radius, mass and age of the host stars. In this study, we construct stellar interior models of these stars with the MESA evolution code and compare model frequencies with the oscillation frequencies derived from Kepler data. Then, we obtain fundamental parameters of the host stars. Finally, fundamental parameters of exoplanets are reevaluated.

  2. Exoplanets and their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, J.

    2016-06-01

    Among the most fundamental astrophysical discoveries are clearly the detections of many thousands of ``extrasolar'' planets orbiting their hosts. The majority of these new planetary systems have properties dramatically different from those in our solar system. The large distances to extrasolar planets imply that they can only be observed together with their hosts. Modern observations have shown that stars and planets are not merely accidental celestial neighbors bound by the force of gravity, rather they influence each other in a variety of ways. This also and specifically applies to the X-ray properties of exoplanet systems which I will review in my talk and give some ideas for future work in this area.

  3. Hidden Milky Way star clusters hosting Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtev, R.; Borissova, J.; Ivanov, V. D.; Georgiev, L.

    2009-05-01

    A noticeable fraction of the hidden young star clusters contain WR and O stars providing us with unique laboratories to study the evolution of these rare objects and their maternity places. We are reporting the reddening, the distance and age of two new members of the family of massive young Galactic clusters, hosting WR stars - Glimpse 23 and Glimpse 30.

  4. On the age of stars harboring transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, C.; Santos, N. C.; Pont, F.; Guillot, T.; Israelian, G.; Mayor, M.; Queloz, D.; Udry, S.

    2006-12-01

    Results of photometric surveys have brought to light the existence of a population of giant planets orbiting their host stars even closer than the hot Jupiters (HJ), with orbital periods below 3 days. The reason why radial velocity surveys were not able to detect these very-hot Jupiters (VHJ) is under discussion. A possible explanation is that these close-in planets are short-lived, being evaporated on short time-scales due to UV flux of their host stars. In this case, stars hosting transiting VHJ planets would be systematically younger than those in the radial velocity sample. We have used the UVES spectrograph (VLT-UT2 telescope) to obtain high resolution spectra of 5 faint stars hosting transiting planets, namely, OGLE-TR-10, 56, 111, 113 and TrES-1. Previously obtained CORALIE spectra of HD189733, and published data on the other transiting planet-hosts were also used. The immediate objective is to estimate ages via Li abundances, using the Ca II activity-age relation, and from the analysis of the stellar rotational velocity. For the stars for which we have spectra, Li abundances were computed as in Israelian et al. (2004, A&A, 414, 601) using the stellar parameters derived in Santos et al. (2006, A&A, 450, 825). The chromospheric activity index S_US was built as the ratio of the flux within the core of the Ca II H & K lines and the flux in two nearby continuum regions. The index S_US was calibrated to Mount Wilson index S_MW allowing the computation of the Ca II H & K corrected for the photospheric contribution. These values were then used to derive the ages by means of the Henry et al. (1996) activity-age relation. Bearing in mind the limitations of the ages derived by Li abundances, chromospheric activity, and stellar rotational velocities, none of the stars studied in this paper seem to be younger than 0.5 Gyr.

  5. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Miranda; Waaler, Mason; Patience, Jennifer; Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Rajan, Abhijith; McCarthy, Don; Kulesa, Craig; Wilson, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    With the Arizona Infrared imager and Echelle Spectrograph (ARIES) instrument on the 6.5m MMT telescope, we obtained high angular resolution adaptive optics images of 12 exoplanet host stars. The targets are all systems with exoplanets in extremely close orbits such that the planets transit the host stars and cause regular brightness changes in the stars. The transit depth of the light curve is used to infer the radius and, in combination with radial velocity measurements, the density of the planet, but the results can be biased if the light from the host star is the combined light of a pair of stars in a binary system or a chance alignment of two stars. Given the high frequency of binary star systems and the increasing number of transit exoplanet discoveries from Kepler, K2, and anticipated discoveries with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), this is a crucial point to consider when interpreting exoplanet properties. Companions were identified around five of the twelve targets at separations close enough that the brightness measurements of these host stars are in fact the combined brightness of two stars. Images of the resolved stellar systems and reanalysis of the exoplanet properties accounting for the presence of two stars are presented.

  6. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  7. Spectroscopy of Kepler Candidate Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, Mark E.; Howell, Steve B.; Silva, David R.; Szkody, Paula

    2014-02-01

    Currently the NASA Kepler Mission has identified 3449 exoplanet candidates, one third with estimated radii R_p<2.5R_oplus and orbiting faint (m_Kep>14.5) host stars. The NASA sponsored Kepler Follow-up Program is focusing on small exoplanet candidates (R_p<2.5R_oplus) and those in habitable zone orbits. Planet radii estimates depend on estimates of host star radii. Based on spectra previously obtained at the KPNO Mayall 4-m for 220 stars with candidate exoplanets, Everett et al. (2013) have shown that many host stars are larger than originally assumed (up to factor of 2). Therefore, the exoplanet candidates they host must be larger than originally assumed, which conversely reduces the number of known Earth- sized exoplanet candidates. Determination of the frequency of such Earth-sized planets is a cornerstone Kepler mission objective and of keen general interest. These Mayall spectra were also used to confirm the Buchhave et al. (2012) result that exoplanet candidates larger than 4R_oplus in short-period orbits are preferentially associated with host stars with solar or higher metallicity, using a fainter and larger sample of stars than Buchhave et al. In short, followup Mayall optical spectroscopy is critical to confirming the detection of Earth-sized exoplanets, a Kepler cornerstone goal, as well as characterizing the relationship between host star properties and planetary system properties. Here, we propose to continue our reconnaissance survey with a focus on the smallest (most rare) exoplanet candidates orbiting the faintest Kepler host stars.

  8. Characterization of Kepler Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, M.; Ciardi, D. R.; Silva, D.; Szkody, P.

    2014-01-01

    Using a sample of 220 Exoplanet host stars in the Kepler field for which spectroscopic properties have been determined, we examine their spatial, physical, and time variable properties. Covering effective temperatures from 4670K to 6400K (K4 to F4) and masses from 0.7 to 1.4 M-sun, this sample represents host stars covering the entire Kepler field of view. The majority of the host stars contain one or more Earth-sized exoplanet and range in log g from 4.0 to 4.7 and [Fe/H] from -02.4 to +0.3. Using Yale-Yonsei isochrone fits and photometric information form the Howell-Everett UBV survey of the Kepler field, we examine a complete set of parameters for these stars including their likely residence in the thin or thick disk of the Galaxy. the variability of this sample, in terms of time sale and amplitude, is examined as well.

  9. Accurate Stellar Parameters for Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John Michael; Fischer, Debra; Basu, Sarbani; Valenti, Jeff A.

    2015-01-01

    A large impedement to our understanding of planet formation is obtaining a clear picture of planet radii and densities. Although determining precise ratios between planet and stellar host are relatively easy, determining accurate stellar parameters is still a difficult and costly undertaking. High resolution spectral analysis has traditionally yielded precise values for some stellar parameters but stars in common between catalogs from different authors or analyzed using different techniques often show offsets far in excess of their uncertainties. Most analyses now use some external constraint, when available, to break observed degeneracies between surface gravity, effective temperature, and metallicity which can otherwise lead to correlated errors in results. However, these external constraints are impossible to obtain for all stars and can require more costly observations than the initial high resolution spectra. We demonstrate that these discrepencies can be mitigated by use of a larger line list that has carefully tuned atomic line data. We use an iterative modeling technique that does not require external constraints. We compare the surface gravity obtained with our spectral synthesis modeling to asteroseismically determined values for 42 Kepler stars. Our analysis agrees well with only a 0.048 dex offset and an rms scatter of 0.05 dex. Such accurate stellar gravities can reduce the primary source of uncertainty in radii by almost an order of magnitude over unconstrained spectral analysis.

  10. The Circumstellar Environments of Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Christine

    The WFIRST-AFTA mission currently includes the provision for a high contrast imaging instrument with a primary goal of discovering new, low mass exoplanets and characterizing their atmospheres. To date, eight exoplanetary systems have been discovered via direct imaging using the current generation of ground-based high-contrast facilities. Five of those systems, including the iconic beta Pictoris and HR 8799 systems, possess infrared excesses, indicative of the presence of circumstellar dust. Detailed studies of dust and gas morphology in the beta Pictoris disk provided the impetus for searching for, and eventually imaging the planet. These studies further suggest that additional planets orbit the star, but are below current detection thresholds. Such systems will be prime targets for WFIRST-AFTA, which will obtain visual spectroscopy of several spectral features from molecules in the exoplanet atmospheres including CH4, H2O, and CO2. We propose to: (1) model the dust in exoplanetary systems with well characterized planets and infrared excesses to better constrain the dust geometry and particle properties; (2) generate synthetic WFIRST-AFTA images of these disks with embedded known and putative planets using point-spread-functions generated by JPL, and run our simulations though a WFIRST-AFTA pipeline; and (3) evaluate the sensitivity of WFIRST-AFTA to known and putative planets that have a range of masses and distances from their host stars. The proposed simulations will also assist the community in understanding how WFIRST-AFTA will contribute to our knowledge of debris disks and the role that minor bodies play in the delivery of water into the terrestrial planet zone. The proposed project is complementary to the efforts currently being carried out by the Science Definition Team (SDT), which focus on simulating planets embedded in tenuous disks, analogous to the Zodiacal dust system in our Solar System, the Earth s resonant dust ring, and the HR 4796 dust ring

  11. The Asteroseismic Potential of TESS: Exoplanet-host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campante, T. L.; Schofield, M.; Kuszlewicz, J. S.; Bouma, L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Huber, D.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Kjeldsen, H.; Bossini, D.; North, T. S. H.; Appourchaux, T.; Latham, D. W.; Pepper, J.; Ricker, G. R.; Stassun, K. G.; Vanderspek, R.; Winn, J. N.

    2016-10-01

    New insights on stellar evolution and stellar interior physics are being made possible by asteroseismology. Throughout the course of the Kepler mission, asteroseismology has also played an important role in the characterization of exoplanet-host stars and their planetary systems. The upcoming NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will be performing a near all-sky survey for planets that transit bright nearby stars. In addition, its excellent photometric precision, combined with its fine time sampling and long intervals of uninterrupted observations, will enable asteroseismology of solar-type and red-giant stars. Here we develop a simple test to estimate the detectability of solar-like oscillations in TESS photometry of any given star. Based on an all-sky stellar and planetary synthetic population, we go on to predict the asteroseismic yield of the TESS mission, placing emphasis on the yield of exoplanet-host stars for which we expect to detect solar-like oscillations. This is done for both the target stars (observed at a 2-minute cadence) and the full-frame-image stars (observed at a 30-minute cadence). A similar exercise is also conducted based on a compilation of known host stars. We predict that TESS will detect solar-like oscillations in a few dozen target hosts (mainly subgiant stars but also in a smaller number of F dwarfs), in up to 200 low-luminosity red-giant hosts, and in over 100 solar-type and red-giant known hosts, thereby leading to a threefold improvement in the asteroseismic yield of exoplanet-host stars when compared to Kepler's.

  12. Locating star-forming regions in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. E.; Eracleous, M.; Shemmer, O.; Netzer, H.; Gronwall, C.; Lutz, Dieter; Ciardullo, R.; Sturm, Eckhard

    2014-02-01

    We present a study of the morphology and intensity of star formation in the host galaxies of eight Palomar-Green quasars using observations with the Hubble Space Telescope. Our observations are motivated by recent evidence for a close relationship between black hole growth and the stellar mass evolution in its host galaxy. We use narrow-band [O II]λ3727, Hβ, [O III]λ5007 and Paα images, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 and NICMOS instruments, to map the morphology of line-emitting regions, and, after extinction corrections, diagnose the excitation mechanism and infer star-formation rates. Significant challenges in this type of work are the separation of the quasar light from the stellar continuum and the quasar-excited gas from the star-forming regions. To this end, we present a novel technique for image decomposition and subtraction of quasar light. Our primary result is the detection of extended line-emitting regions with sizes ranging from 0.5 to 5 kpc and distributed symmetrically around the nucleus, powered primarily by star formation. We determine star-formation rates of the order of a few tens of M⊙ yr-1. The host galaxies of our target quasars have stellar masses of the order of 1011 M⊙ and specific star-formation rates on a par with those of M82 and luminous infrared galaxies. As such they fall at the upper envelope or just above the star-formation mass sequence in the specific star formation versus stellar mass diagram. We see a clear trend of increasing star-formation rate with quasar luminosity, reinforcing the link between the growth of the stellar mass of the host and the black hole mass found by other authors.

  13. Host Star Evolution for Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Florian; Charbonnel, Corinne; Amard, Louis

    2016-04-01

    With about 2000 exoplanets discovered within a large range of different configurations of distance from the star, size, mass, and atmospheric conditions, the concept of habitability cannot rely only on the stellar effective temperature anymore. In addition to the natural evolution of habitability with the intrinsic stellar parameters, tidal, magnetic, and atmospheric interactions are believed to have strong impact on the relative position of the planets inside the so-called habitable zone. Moreover, the notion of habitability itself strongly depends on the definition we give to the term "habitable". The aim of this contribution is to provide a global and up-to-date overview of the work done during the last few years about the description and the modelling of the habitability, and to present the physical processes currently includes in this description.

  14. Host Star Evolution for Planet Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Florian; Charbonnel, Corinne; Amard, Louis

    2016-11-01

    With about 2000 exoplanets discovered within a large range of different configurations of distance from the star, size, mass, and atmospheric conditions, the concept of habitability cannot rely only on the stellar effective temperature anymore. In addition to the natural evolution of habitability with the intrinsic stellar parameters, tidal, magnetic, and atmospheric interactions are believed to have strong impact on the relative position of the planets inside the so-called habitable zone. Moreover, the notion of habitability itself strongly depends on the definition we give to the term "habitable". The aim of this contribution is to provide a global and up-to-date overview of the work done during the last few years about the description and the modelling of the habitability, and to present the physical processes currently includes in this description.

  15. SILICON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Brugamyer, Erik; Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Cochran, William D.; Sneden, Christopher

    2011-09-01

    The positive correlation between planet detection rate and host star iron abundance lends strong support to the core accretion theory of planet formation. However, iron is not the most significant mass contributor to the cores of giant planets. Since giant planet cores are thought to grow from silicate grains with icy mantles, the likelihood of gas giant formation should depend heavily on the oxygen and silicon abundance of the planet formation environment. Here we compare the silicon and oxygen abundances of a set of 76 planet hosts and a control sample of 80 metal-rich stars without any known giant planets. Our new, independent analysis was conducted using high resolution, high signal-to-noise data obtained at McDonald Observatory. Because we do not wish to simply reproduce the known planet-metallicity correlation, we have devised a statistical method for matching the underlying [Fe/H] distributions of our two sets of stars. We find a 99% probability that planet detection rate depends on the silicon abundance of the host star, over and above the observed planet-metallicity correlation. We do not detect any such correlation for oxygen. Our results would thus seem to suggest that grain nucleation, rather than subsequent icy mantle growth, is the important limiting factor in forming giant planets via core accretion. Based on our results and interpretation, we predict that planet detection should correlate with host star abundance for refractory elements responsible for grain nucleation and that no such trends should exist for the most abundant volatile elements responsible for icy mantle growth.

  16. Age consistency between exoplanet hosts and field stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, A.; Ortolani, S.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transiting planets around stars are discovered mostly through photometric surveys. Unlike radial velocity surveys, photometric surveys do not tend to target slow rotators, inactive or metal-rich stars. Nevertheless, we suspect that observational biases could also impact transiting-planet hosts. Aims: This paper aims to evaluate how selection effects reflect on the evolutionary stage of both a limited sample of transiting-planet host stars (TPH) and a wider sample of planet-hosting stars detected through radial velocity analysis. Then, thanks to uniform derivation of stellar ages, a homogeneous comparison between exoplanet hosts and field star age distributions is developed. Methods: Stellar parameters have been computed through our custom-developed isochrone placement algorithm, according to Padova evolutionary models. The notable aspects of our algorithm include the treatment of element diffusion, activity checks in terms of log{R'HK} and vsini, and the evaluation of the stellar evolutionary speed in the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram in order to better constrain age. Working with TPH, the observational stellar mean density ρ⋆ allows us to compute stellar luminosity even if the distance is not available, by combining ρ⋆ with the spectroscopic log g. Results: The median value of the TPH ages is 5 Gyr. Even if this sample is not very large, however the result is very similar to what we found for the sample of spectroscopic hosts, whose modal and median values are [3, 3.5) Gyr and 4.8 Gyr, respectively. Thus, these stellar samples suffer almost the same selection effects. An analysis of MS stars of the solar neighbourhood belonging to the same spectral types bring to an age distribution similar to the previous ones and centered around solar age value. Therefore, the age of our Sun is consistent with the age distribution of solar neighbourhood stars with spectral types from late F to early K, regardless of whether they harbour planets or not. We considered

  17. SPECTROSCOPY OF FAINT KEPLER MISSION EXOPLANET CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, Mark E.; Silva, David R.; Howell, Steve B.; Szkody, Paula

    2013-07-10

    Stellar properties are measured for a large set of Kepler mission exoplanet candidate host stars. Most of these stars are fainter than 14th magnitude, in contrast to other spectroscopic follow-up studies. This sample includes many high-priority Earth-sized candidate planets. A set of model spectra are fitted to R {approx} 3000 optical spectra of 268 stars to improve estimates of T{sub eff}, log (g), and [Fe/H] for the dwarfs in the range 4750 {<=} T{sub eff} {<=} 7200 K. These stellar properties are used to find new stellar radii and, in turn, new radius estimates for the candidate planets. The result of improved stellar characteristics is a more accurate representation of this Kepler exoplanet sample and identification of promising candidates for more detailed study. This stellar sample, particularly among stars with T{sub eff} {approx}> 5200 K, includes a greater number of relatively evolved stars with larger radii than assumed by the mission on the basis of multi-color broadband photometry. About 26% of the modeled stars require radii to be revised upward by a factor of 1.35 or greater, and modeling of 87% of the stars suggest some increase in radius. The sample presented here also exhibits a change in the incidence of planets larger than 3-4 R{sub Circled-Plus} as a function of metallicity. Once [Fe/H] increases to {>=} - 0.05, large planets suddenly appear in the sample while smaller planets are found orbiting stars with a wider range of metallicity. The modeled stellar spectra, as well as an additional 84 stars of mostly lower effective temperatures, are made available to the community.

  18. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. II. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY OF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Raghavan, Deepak; Subasavage, John P.; Roberts, Lewis C.; Turner, Nils H.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil E-mail: jsubasavage@ctio.noao.edu E-mail: nils@chara-array.org

    2011-11-15

    A study of the host stars to exoplanets is important for understanding their environment. To that end, we report new speckle observations of a sample of exoplanet host primaries. The bright exoplanet host HD 8673 (= HIP 6702) is revealed to have a companion, although at this time we cannot definitively establish the companion as physical or optical. The observing lists for planet searches and for these observations have for the most part been pre-screened for known duplicity, so the detected binary fraction is lower than what would otherwise be expected. Therefore, a large number of double stars were observed contemporaneously for verification and quality control purposes, to ensure that the lack of detection of companions for exoplanet hosts was valid. In these additional observations, 10 pairs are resolved for the first time and 60 pairs are confirmed. These observations were obtained with the USNO speckle camera on the NOAO 4 m telescopes at both KPNO and CTIO from 2001 to 2010.

  19. STELLAR VARIABILITY OF THE EXOPLANET HOSTING STAR HD 63454

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Dragomir, Diana; Ciardi, David R.; Lee, Jae-Woo; Lo Curto, Gaspare; Lovis, Christophe; Naef, Dominique; Udry, Stephane; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Pilyavsky, Genady; Wang Xuesong; Wright, Jason

    2011-08-20

    Of the hundreds of exoplanets discovered using the radial velocity (RV) technique, many are orbiting close to their host stars with periods less than 10 days. One of these, HD 63454, is a young active K dwarf which hosts a Jovian planet in a 2.82 day period orbit. The planet has a 14% transit probability and a predicted transit depth of 1.2%. Here we provide a re-analysis of the RV data to produce an accurate transit ephemeris. We further analyze 8 nights of time series data to search for stellar activity both intrinsic to the star and induced by possible interactions of the exoplanet with the stellar magnetospheres. We establish the photometric stability of the star at the 3 mmag level despite strong Ca II emission in the spectrum. Finally, we rule out photometric signatures of both star-planet magnetosphere interactions and planetary transit signatures. From this we are able to place constraints on both the orbital and physical properties of the planet.

  20. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  1. Revising the ages of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfanti, A.; Ortolani, S.; Piotto, G.; Nascimbeni, V.

    2015-03-01

    Aims: This article aims to measure the age of stars with planets (SWP) through stellar tracks and isochrones computed with the PAdova and TRieste Stellar Evolutionary Code (PARSEC). Methods: We developed algorithms based on two different techniques for determining the ages of field stars: isochrone placement and Bayesian estimation. Their application to a synthetic sample of coeval stars shows the intrinsic limits of each method. For instance, the Bayesian computation of the modal age tends to select the extreme age values in the isochrones grid. Therefore, we used the isochrone placement technique to measure the ages of 317 SWP. Results: We found that ~6% of SWP have ages lower than 0.5 Gyr. The age distribution peaks in the interval [1.5, 2) Gyr, then it decreases. However, ~7% of the stars are older than 11 Gyr. The Sun turns out to be a common star that hosts planets, when considering its evolutionary stage. Our SWP age distribution is less peaked and slightly shifted towards lower ages if compared with ages in the literature and based on the isochrone fit. In particular, there are no ages below 0.5 Gyr in the literature. Table 4 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  2. Fast outflows and star formation quenching in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniani, S.; Marconi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Cano-Díaz, M.; Cicone, C.; Comastri, A.; Cresci, G.; Fiore, F.; Feruglio, C.; La Franca, F.; Mainieri, V.; Mannucci, F.; Nagao, T.; Netzer, H.; Piconcelli, E.; Risaliti, G.; Schneider, R.; Shemmer, O.

    2016-06-01

    Negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is considered a key mechanism in shaping galaxy evolution. Fast, extended outflows are frequently detected in the AGN host galaxies at all redshifts and luminosities, both in ionised and molecular gas. However, these outflows are only potentially able to quench star formation, and we are still lacking decisive evidence of negative feedback in action. Here we present observations obtained with the Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observations in the Near Infrared (SINFONI) H- and K-band integral-field of two quasars at z ~ 2.4 that are characterised by fast, extended outflows detected through the [Oiii]λ5007 line. The high signal-to-noise ratio of our observations allows us to identify faint narrow (FWHM< 500 km s-1) and spatially extended components in [Oiii]λ5007 and Hα emission associated with star formation in the host galaxy. This star formation powered emission is spatially anti-correlated with the fast outflows. The ionised outflows therefore appear to be able to suppress star formation in the region where the outflow is expanding. However, the detection of narrow spatially extended Hα emission indicates star formation rates of at least ~50-90 M⊙ yr-1, suggesting either that AGN feedback does not affect the whole galaxy or that many feedback episodes are required before star formation is completely quenched. On the other hand, the narrow Hα emission extending along the edges of the outflow cone may also lead also to a positive feedback interpretation. Our results highlight the possible double role of galaxy-wide outflows in host galaxy evolution. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, P.ID: 086.B-0579(A) and 091.A-0261(A).The reduced data cubes are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A28

  3. Host Star C/O: Effects on Habitability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Torrence; Mousis, Olivier; Lunine, Jonathan; Sevin Peckmezci, Gul; Madhusudhan, Nikku

    2016-04-01

    We explore the effects of differences in C/O values for exoplanet host stars on the composition of planetesimals formed beyond the snow line in these systems. Since the value of C/O in a planet forming nebula has a strong effect on amount of oxygen available for water ice in an oxidizing nebula, exoplanet systems for host stars with C/O greater than the solar value may have planetesimals with very little or no water ice. The volatile ice content of planetesimals in these systems varies significantly with C/O, controlled primarily by the availability of O for H2O ice condensation (Gaidos, Icarus 145, 637, 2000.). Systems with C/O less than the solar value (C/O = 0.55) should have very water ice rich planetesimals, while water ice mass fraction decreases very rapidly with increasing C/O until only ices of CO and CO2 are left in significant proportions (Johnson et al., Astrophys. J. 757(2), 192, 2012). A number of surveys of stellar abundances, including C and O, are now available for planet host stars, solar type stars and stars supplying mass to the interstellar medium (e.g. AGB stars)(Bond et al., Astrophys. J. 715(2), 1050, 2010; Petigura and Marcy, Journal of Astrophysics 735, 2011; Wylie de-Boer and Cotrell, Astrophys. J. 692, 522, 2009). These studies report a range of C/O from about 0.3 to 1.4 with a peak in the distribution for values at or somewhat higher than the solar value. The reduction and analysis of the spectral data is complex and difficult due to low signal to noise and line blending and the accuracy of the highest reported C/O values in particular have been called into question (e.g. Fortney, Astrophys. J. 747, L27, 2012). However, as noted, water ice fractions decrease very rapidly for C/O values above solar. A study of expected planetesimal compositions for 457 stars in the Petigura and Marcy survey shows a large number of systems with only modestly super-solar C/O values from 0.6-0.7 which would be very water ice poor (<10% by mass) as well as

  4. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  5. The evolution of star formation in quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, Stephen; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia

    2009-07-01

    We have used far-infrared data from IRAS, Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), Spitzer Wide-Area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE), Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) and Max-Planck Millimetre Bolometer (MAMBO) to constrain statistically the mean far-infrared luminosities of quasars. Our quasar compilation at redshifts 0 < z < 6.5 and I-band luminosities -20 < IAB < -32 is the first to distinguish evolution from quasar luminosity dependence in such a study. We carefully cross-calibrate IRAS against Spitzer and ISO, finding evidence that IRAS 100-μm fluxes at <1Jy are overestimated by ~30 per cent. We find evidence for a correlation between star formation in quasar hosts and the quasar optical luminosities, varying as star formation rate (SFR) ~ L0.44+/-0.07opt at any fixed redshift below z = 2. We also find evidence for evolution of the mean SFR in quasar host galaxies, scaling as (1 + z)1.6+/-0.3 at z < 2 for any fixed quasar I-band absolute magnitude fainter than -28. We find no evidence for any correlation between SFR and black hole mass at 0.5 < z < 4. Our data are consistent with feedback from black hole accretion regulating stellar mass assembly at all redshifts.

  6. The Ultraviolet Radiation Environment around M Dwarf Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Stocke, John T.; Tian, Feng; Bushinsky, Rachel; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Mauas, Pablo; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No "UV-quiet" M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Lyman-alpha emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Lyman-alpha line fluxes comprise approximately 37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; approximately greater than 10(exp3) times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Lyman-alpha and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Lyman-alpha. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Lyman-alpha)/F(Mg II) = 10(exp3). The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, is shown to be approximately 0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, greather than 10(exp3) times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%.500% on 10(exp2)-10(exp3) s timescales. This effect should be taken

  7. THE ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION ENVIRONMENT AROUND M DWARF EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    France, Kevin; Froning, Cynthia S.; Stocke, John T.; Bushinsky, Rachel; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Tian, Feng; Desert, Jean-Michel; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2013-02-15

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. Ultraviolet photons influence the atmospheric temperature profiles and production of potential biomarkers on Earth-like planets around these stars. At present, little observational or theoretical basis exists for understanding the ultraviolet spectra of M dwarfs, despite their critical importance to predicting and interpreting the spectra of potentially habitable planets as they are obtained in the coming decades. Using observations from the Hubble Space Telescope, we present a study of the UV radiation fields around nearby M dwarf planet hosts that covers both far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) wavelengths. The combined FUV+NUV spectra are publicly available in machine-readable format. We find that all six exoplanet host stars in our sample (GJ 581, GJ 876, GJ 436, GJ 832, GJ 667C, and GJ 1214) exhibit some level of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. No 'UV-quiet' M dwarfs are observed. The bright stellar Ly{alpha} emission lines are reconstructed, and we find that the Ly{alpha} line fluxes comprise {approx}37%-75% of the total 1150-3100 A flux from most M dwarfs; {approx}>10{sup 3} times the solar value. We develop an empirical scaling relation between Ly{alpha} and Mg II emission, to be used when interstellar H I attenuation precludes the direct observation of Ly{alpha}. The intrinsic unreddened flux ratio is F(Ly{alpha})/F(Mg II) = 10 {+-} 3. The F(FUV)/F(NUV) flux ratio, a driver for abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O{sub 2} and O{sub 3}, is shown to be {approx}0.5-3 for all M dwarfs in our sample, >10{sup 3} times the solar ratio. For the four stars with moderate signal-to-noise Cosmic Origins Spectrograph time-resolved spectra, we find UV emission line variability with amplitudes of 50%-500% on 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} s timescales. This effect should be taken into account in future UV transiting

  8. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  9. A lucky imaging multiplicity study of exoplanet host stars - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.; Buder, S.; Errmann, R.; Avenhaus, H.; Mouillet, D.; Maire, A.-L.; Raetz, S.

    2016-04-01

    The vast majority of extrasolar planets are detected by indirect detection methods such as transit monitoring and radial velocity measurements. While these methods are very successful in detecting short-periodic planets, they are mostly blind to wide sub-stellar or even stellar companions on long orbits. In our study, we present high-resolution imaging observations of 60 exoplanet hosts carried out with the lucky imaging instrument AstraLux at the Calar Alto 2.2 m telescope as well as with the new Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) high-resolution adaptive optics imager at the ESO/VLT in the case of a known companion of specific interest. Our goal is to study the influence of stellar multiplicity on the planet formation process. We detected and confirmed four previously unknown stellar companions to the exoplanet hosts HD 197037, HD 217786, Kepler-21 and Kepler-68. In addition, we detected 11 new low-mass stellar companion candidates which must still be confirmed as bound companions. We also provide new astrometric and photometric data points for the recently discovered very close binary systems WASP-76 and HD 2638. Furthermore, we show for the first time that the previously detected stellar companion to the HD 185269 system is a very low mass binary. Finally, we provide precise constraints on additional companions for all observed stars in our sample.

  10. 100-year DASCH Light Curves of Kepler Planet-Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sumin; Sasselov, Dimitar; Grindlay, Jonathan; Los, Edward; Servillat, Mathieu

    2013-07-01

    We present 100 year light curves of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from the Digital Access to a Sky Century at Harvard (DASCH) project. 261 out of 997 host stars have at least 10 good measurements on DASCH scans of the Harvard plates. 109 of them have at least 100 good measurements, including 70% (73 out of 104) of all host stars with g <= 13 mag, and 44% (100 out of 228) of all host stars with g <= 14 mag. Our typical photometric uncertainty is ~0.1-0.15 mag. No variation is found at 3σ level for these host stars, including 21 confirmed or candidate hot Jupiter systems which might be expected to show enhanced flares from magnetic interactions between dwarf primaries and their close and relatively massive planet companions.

  11. Limits on stellar companions to exoplanet host stars with eccentric planets

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, Stephen R.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Howell, Steve B.; Horch, Elliott P.; Feng, Ying; Wright, Jason T.; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.; Howard, Andrew W.

    2014-04-20

    Though there are now many hundreds of confirmed exoplanets known, the binarity of exoplanet host stars is not well understood. This is particularly true of host stars that harbor a giant planet in a highly eccentric orbit since these are more likely to have had a dramatic dynamical history that transferred angular momentum to the planet. Here we present observations of four exoplanet host stars that utilize the excellent resolving power of the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument on the Gemini North telescope. Two of the stars are giants and two are dwarfs. Each star is host to a giant planet with an orbital eccentricity >0.5 and whose radial velocity (RV) data contain a trend in the residuals to the Keplerian orbit fit. These observations rule out stellar companions 4-8 mag fainter than the host star at passbands of 692 nm and 880 nm. The resolution and field of view of the instrument result in exclusion radii of 0.''05-1.''4, which excludes stellar companions within several AU of the host star in most cases. We further provide new RVs for the HD 4203 system that confirm that the linear trend previously observed in the residuals is due to an additional planet. These results place dynamical constraints on the source of the planet's eccentricities, place constraints on additional planetary companions, and inform the known distribution of multiplicity amongst exoplanet host stars.

  12. Kuiper belt structure around nearby super-Earth host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Matrà, Luca; Marmier, Maxime; Greaves, Jane S.; Wyatt, Mark C.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Holland, Wayne; Lovis, Christophe; Matthews, Brenda C.; Pepe, Francesco; Sibthorpe, Bruce; Udry, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    We present new observations of the Kuiper belt analogues around HD 38858 and HD 20794, hosts of super-Earth mass planets within 1 au. As two of the four nearby G-type stars (with HD 69830 and 61 Vir) that form the basis of a possible correlation between low-mass planets and debris disc brightness, these systems are of particular interest. The disc around HD 38858 is well resolved with Herschel and we constrain the disc geometry and radial structure. We also present a probable James Clerk Maxwell Telescope sub-mm continuum detection of the disc and a CO J = 2-1 upper limit. The disc around HD 20794 is much fainter and appears marginally resolved with Herschel, and is constrained to be less extended than the discs around 61 Vir and HD 38858. We also set limits on the radial location of hot dust recently detected around HD 20794 with near-IR interferometry. We present High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher upper limits on unseen planets in these four systems, ruling out additional super-Earths within a few au, and Saturn-mass planets within 10 au. We consider the disc structure in the three systems with Kuiper belt analogues (HD 69830 has only a warm dust detection), concluding that 61 Vir and HD 38858 have greater radial disc extent than HD 20794. We speculate that the greater width is related to the greater minimum planet masses (10-20 M⊕ versus 3-5 M⊕), arising from an eccentric planetesimal population analogous to the Solar system's scattered disc. We discuss alternative scenarios and possible means to distinguish among them.

  13. Kinematics of exoplanet host stars: membership in young moving groups and the thin/thick disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, D.; Caballero, J. A.; Rojas-Peña, I.; Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Alloza, L. J.; Bertrán de Lis, S.; Fernández Rodríguez, C. J.; Garrido Rubio, A.; Greciano, R.; Herranz Luque, J. E.; Juárez-Martínez, I.; Manjavacas, E.; Ocaña, F.; Pila Díez, B.; Tapia Ayuga, C. E.

    2013-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the kinematics of known exoplanets host stars with known parallactic distance and precise proper motion and radial velocity measurements, from where the Galactic space motions (U, V, W) were computed. For the stars with U and V velocity components inside or near the boundaries that determine the young disc population, we have analyzed the possible membership in the classical moving groups and nearby loose associations with ages between 10 and 600 Ma. For the candidate members, we have compiled the information available in the literature in order to constrain their membership by applying age-dating methods for late-type stars. We identify several dozen young exoplanet host star candidates, many of which were considered to have solar-like ages. We also look for old exoplanet host stars in the Galactic thick disc and the thin-thick transition.

  14. Know the Star, Know the Planet. III. Discovery of Late-Type Companions to Two Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Mason, Brian D.; Riddle, Reed L.; Hartkopf, William I.; Law, Nicholas M.; Baranec, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    We discuss two multiple star systems that host known exoplanets: HD 2638 and 30 Ari B. Adaptive optics imagery revealed an additional stellar companion to both stars. We collected multi-epoch images of the systems with Robo-AO and the PALM-3000 adaptive optics systems at Palomar Observatory and provide relative photometry and astrometry. The astrometry indicates that the companions share common proper motion with their respective primaries. Both of the new companions have projected separations less than 30 AU from the exoplanet host star. Using the projected separations to compute orbital periods of the new stellar companions, HD 2638 has a period of 130 yr and 30 Ari B has a period of 80 yr. Previous studies have shown that the true period is most likely within a factor of three of these estimated values. The additional component to 30 Ari makes it the second confirmed quadruple system known to host an exoplanet. HD 2638 hosts a hot Jupiter and the discovery of a new companion strengthens the connection between hot Jupiters and binary stars. We place the systems on a color-magnitude diagram and derive masses for the companions which turn out to be roughly 0.5 solar mass stars.

  15. LARGER PLANET RADII INFERRED FROM STELLAR ''FLICKER'' BRIGHTNESS VARIATIONS OF BRIGHT PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bastien, Fabienne A.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Pepper, Joshua

    2014-06-10

    Most extrasolar planets have been detected by their influence on their parent star, typically either gravitationally (the Doppler method) or by the small dip in brightness as the planet blocks a portion of the star (the transit method). Therefore, the accuracy with which we know the masses and radii of extrasolar planets depends directly on how well we know those of the stars, the latter usually determined from the measured stellar surface gravity, log g. Recent work has demonstrated that the short-timescale brightness variations ({sup f}licker{sup )} of stars can be used to measure log g to a high accuracy of ∼0.1-0.2 dex. Here, we use flicker measurements of 289 bright (Kepmag < 13) candidate planet-hosting stars with T {sub eff} = 4500-6650 K to re-assess the stellar parameters and determine the resulting impact on derived planet properties. This re-assessment reveals that for the brightest planet-host stars, Malmquist bias contaminates the stellar sample with evolved stars: nearly 50% of the bright planet-host stars are subgiants. As a result, the stellar radii, and hence the radii of the planets orbiting these stars, are on average 20%-30% larger than previous measurements had suggested.

  16. Ultraviolet and X-ray Activity and Flaring on Low-Mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Brown, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to NUV) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential “biomarker” gases. We present results from the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, an ongoing study of time-resolved UV and X-ray spectroscopy of nearby M and K dwarf exoplanet host stars. This program uses contemporaneous Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra (or XMM) observations to characterize the time variability of the energetic radiation field incident on the habitable zones planetary systems at d < 15 pc. We find that all exoplanet host stars observed to date exhibit significant levels of chromospheric and transition region UV emission. M dwarf exoplanet host stars display 30 - 2000% UV emission line amplitude variations on timescales of minutes-to-hours. The relative flare/quiescent UV flux amplitudes on old (age > 1 Gyr) planet-hosting M dwarfs are comparable to active flare stars (e.g., AD Leo), despite their lack of flare activity at visible wavelengths. We also detect similar UV flare behavior on a subset of our K dwarf exoplanet host stars. We conclude that strong flares and stochastic variability are common, even on “optically inactive” M dwarfs hosting planetary systems. These results argue that the traditional assumption of weak UV fields and low flare rates on older low-mass stars needs to be revised.

  17. Binary frequency of planet-host stars at wide separations. A new brown dwarf companion to a planet-host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Pérez-Garrido, A.; Béjar, V. J. S.; Gauza, B.; Ruiz, M. T.; Rebolo, R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Martín, E. L.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: The aim of the project is to improve our knowledge on the multiplicity of planet-host stars at wide physical separations. Methods: We cross-matched approximately 6200 square degree area of the southern sky imaged by the Visible Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) Hemisphere Survey (VHS) with the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) to look for wide common proper motion companions to known planet-host stars. We complemented our astrometric search with photometric criteria. Results: We confirmed spectroscopically the co-moving nature of seven sources out of 16 companion candidates and discarded eight, while the remaining one stays as a candidate. Among these new wide companions to planet-host stars, we discovered a T4.5 dwarf companion at 6.3 arcmin (~9000 au) from HIP 70849, a K7V star which hosts a 9 Jupiter mass planet with an eccentric orbit. We also report two new stellar M dwarf companions to one G and one metal-rich K star. We infer stellar and substellar binary frequencies for our complete sample of 37 targets of 5.4±3.8% and 2.7±2.7% (1σ confidence level), respectively, for projected physical separations larger than ~60-160 au assuming the range of distances of planet-host stars (24-75 pc). These values are comparable to the frequencies of non planet-host stars. We find that the period-eccentricity trend holds with a lack of multiple systems with planets at large eccentricities (e> 0.2) for periods less than 40 days. However, the lack of planets more massive than 2.5 Jupiter masses and short periods (<40 days) orbiting single stars is not so obvious due to recent discoveries by ground-based transit surveys and space missions. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgSpectra are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/569/A120Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research

  18. The nature of FS CMa stars as revealed by host young clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Fuente, D.; Najarro, F.; Trombley, C.; Davies, B.; Figer, D. F.

    2015-05-01

    The nature and evolutionary state of the diverse objects displaying the B[e] phenomenon are reasonably known, except for a rare subtype named FS CMa stars. These are surrounded by compact disks of warm dust whose origin is unclear. Although the luminosity of these objects corresponds to main-sequence stars, mass loss rates derived from emission lines are 2 orders of magnitude larger than predicted by wind theory. Hitherto, FS CMa stars have been only found in isolation, which hinders the study of their nature. In this contribution, we present the discovery of FS CMa stars in two young Galactic clusters, which host Wolf-Rayet stars and OB supergiants. Membership to these coeval populations allows us to constrain the luminosity, circumstellar extinction and age of FS CMa stars in an unprecedented way. Due to their relatively low brightness when compared with coeval evolved massive stars, a high number of these objects may remain unnoticed in young clusters.

  19. Ages of Exoplanet Host-stars from Asteroseismology: HD 17156, a Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Y.

    2012-09-01

    The characterization of the growing number of newly discovered exoplanets —nature, internal structure, formation and evolution— strongly relies on the properties of their host-star, i.e., its mass, radius and age. These can be inferred from stellar evolution models constrained by the observed global parameters of the host-star — effective temperature, photospheric chemical composition, surface gravity and/or luminosity— and by its mean density inferred from a transit analysis. Additional constraints for the models can be provided by asteroseismic observations of the host-star. The precision and accuracy of the age, mass and radius not only depend on the quality and number of available observations of the host-star but also on our ability to model it properly. Stellar models are still based on a number of approximations, they rely on physical inputs and data that can be uncertain and do not correctly treat all the physical processes that can be at work inside a star. We focus here on the determination of the age of HD 17156, an oscillating star hosting an exoplanet. We examine the dispersion of the age values obtained by different methods —empirical or model-dependent— and the different sources of error —observational or theoretical— that intervene in the age determination based on stellar models.

  20. Probing dust-obscured star formation in the most massive gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Jochen; Michałowski, Michał J.; Klose, Sylvio; Hunt, Leslie K.; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kamphuis, Peter; Herrero-Illana, Rubén; Wieringa, Mark; Krühler, Thomas; Schady, Patricia; Elliott, Jonathan; Graham, John F.; Ibar, Eduardo; Knust, Fabian; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, Ana; Palazzi, Eliana; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra

    2016-08-01

    Context. As a result of their relation to massive stars, long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the pinpointing of star formation in galaxies independent of redshift, dust obscuration, or galaxy mass/size, thus providing a unique tool to investigate star formation history over cosmic time. Aims: About half of the optical afterglows of long-duration GRBs are missed owing to dust extinction and are primarily located in the most massive GRB hosts. It is important to investigate the amount of obscured star formation in these GRB host galaxies to understand this bias. Methods: Radio emission of galaxies correlates with star formation, but does not suffer extinction as do the optical star formation estimators. We selected 11 GRB host galaxies with either large stellar mass or large UV-based and optical-based star formation rates (SFRs) and obtained radio observations of these with the Australia Telescope Compact Array and the Karl Jansky Very Large Array. Results: Despite intentionally selecting GRB hosts with expected high SFRs, we do not find any radio emission related to star formation in any of our targets. Our upper limit for GRB 100621A implies that the earlier reported radio detection was due to afterglow emission. We detect radio emission from the position of GRB 020819B, but argue that it is in large part, if not completely, due to afterglow contamination. Conclusions: Half of our sample has radio-derived SFR limits, which are only a factor 2-3 above the optically measured SFRs. This supports other recent studies that the majority of star formation in GRB hosts is not obscured by dust. Based on observations collected with ATCA under ID C2718, and at VLA under ID 13B-017.

  1. Design stars: how small DNA viruses remodel the host nucleus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengxi; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Numerous host components are encountered by viruses during the infection process. While some of these host structures are left unchanged, others may go through dramatic remodeling processes. In this review, we summarize these host changes that occur during small DNA virus infections, with a focus on host nuclear components and pathways. Although these viruses differ significantly in their genome structures and infectious pathways, there are common nuclear targets that are altered by various viral factors. Accumulating evidence suggests that these nuclear remodeling processes are often essential for productive viral infections and/or viral-induced transformation. Understanding the complex interactions between viruses and these host structures and pathways will help to build a more integrated network of how the virus completes its life cycle and point toward the design of novel therapeutic regimens that either prevent harmful viral infections or employ viruses as nontraditional treatment options or molecular tools.

  2. Red Dwarf Stars: Ages, Rotation, Magnetic Dynamo Activity and the Habitability of Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, S. G.; Guinan, E. F.

    2011-12-01

    We report on our continued efforts to understand and delineate the magnetic dynamo-induced behavior/variability of red dwarf (K5 V - M6 V) stars over their long lifetimes. These properties include: rotation, light variations (from star spots), coronal-chromospheric XUV activity and flares. This study is being carried out as part of the NSF-sponsored Living with a Red Dwarf program. The Living with a Red Dwarf program's database of dM stars with photometrically determined rotation rates (from starspot modulations) continues to expand, as does the inventory of archival XUV observations. Recently, the photometric properties of several hundred dM stars from the Kepler database are being analyzed to determine the rotation rates, starspot areal coverage/distributions and stellar flare rates. When all data setsare combined with ages from cluster/population memberships and kinematics, the determination of Age-Rotation-Activity relationships is possible. Such relationships have broad impacts not only on the studies of magnetic dynamo theory and angular momentum loss of low-mass stars with deep convective zones, but also on the suitability of planets hosted by red dwarfs to support life. With intrinsically low luminosities (L< 0.02L⊙), the liquid water habitable zones (HZs) for hosted planets are very close to their host stars - typically at ˜0.1 AU < HZ < 0.4 AU. Planets located close to their host stars risk damage and atmospheric loss from coronal & chromospheric XUV radiation, flares and plasma blasts via strong winds and coronal mass ejections. In addition, our relationships permit the stellar ages to be determined through measures of either the stars' rotation periods (best way) or XUV activity levels. This also permits a determination of the ages of their hosted planets. We illustrate this with examples of age determinations of the exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large Earth-size planets within the host star's HZ), GJ 1214 (hot, close

  3. Decreased specific star formation rates in AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, T. Taro; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Meléndez, Marcio; Koss, Michael; Rosario, David J.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the location of an ultra-hard X-ray selected sample of active galactic nuclei (AGN) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalogue with respect to the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies using Herschel-based measurements of the star formation rate (SFR) and M*'s from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometry where the AGN contribution has been carefully removed. We construct the MS with galaxies from the Herschel Reference Survey and Herschel Stripe 82 Survey using the exact same methods to measure the SFR and M* as the Swift/BAT AGN. We find that a large fraction of the Swift/BAT AGN lie below the MS indicating decreased specific SFR (sSFR) compared to non-AGN galaxies. The Swift/BAT AGN are then compared to a high-mass galaxy sample (CO Legacy Database for GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey, COLD GASS), where we find a similarity between the AGN in COLD GASS and the Swift/BAT AGN. Both samples of AGN lie firmly between star-forming galaxies on the MS and quiescent galaxies far below the MS. However, we find no relationship between the X-ray luminosity and distance from the MS. While the morphological distribution of the BAT AGN is more similar to star-forming galaxies, the sSFR of each morphology is more similar to the COLD GASS AGN. The merger fraction in the BAT AGN is much higher than the COLD GASS AGN and star-forming galaxies and is related to distance from the MS. These results support a model in which bright AGN tend to be in high-mass star-forming galaxies in the process of quenching which eventually starves the supermassive black hole itself.

  4. CEMP stars: possible hosts to carbon planets in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashian, Natalie; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-08-01

    We explore the possibility of planet formation in the carbon-rich protoplanetary discs of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars, possible relics of the early Universe. The chemically anomalous abundance patterns ([C/Fe] ≥ 0.7) in this subset of low-mass stars suggest pollution by primordial core-collapsing supernovae ejecta that are particularly rich in carbon dust grains. By comparing the dust-settling time-scale in the protoplanetary discs of CEMP stars to the expected disc lifetime (assuming dissipation via photoevaporation), we determine the maximum distance rmax from the host CEMP star at which carbon-rich planetesimal formation is possible, as a function of the host star's [C/H] abundance. We then use our linear relation between rmax and [C/H], along with the theoretical mass-radius relation derived for a solid, pure carbon planet, to characterize potential planetary transits across host CEMP stars. Given that the related transits are detectable with current and upcoming space-based transit surveys, we suggest initiating an observational programme to search for carbon planets around CEMP stars in hopes of shedding light on the question of how early planetary systems may have formed after the big bang.

  5. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Perley, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  6. The exoplanet-host star ι Horologii: an evaporated member of the primordial Hyades cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vauclair, S.; Laymand, M.; Bouchy, F.; Vauclair, G.; Hui Bon Hoa, A.; Charpinet, S.; Bazot, M.

    2008-05-01

    Aims: We show that the exoplanet-host star iota Horologii, alias HD 17051, which belongs to the so-called Hyades stream, was formed within the primordial Hyades stellar cluster and has evaporated towards its present location, 40 pc away. Methods: This result has been obtained unambiguously by studying the acoustic oscillations of this star, using the HARPS spectrometer in La Silla Observatory (ESO, Chili). Results: Besides the fact that ι Hor belongs to the Hyades stream, we give evidence that it has the same metallicity, helium abundance, and age as the other stars of the Hyades cluster. They were formed together, at the same time, in the same primordial cloud. Conclusions: This result has strong implications for theories of stellar formation. It also indicates that the observed overmetallicity of this exoplanet-host star, about twice that of the Sun, is original and not caused by planet accretion during the formation of the planetary system. !

  7. Most sub-arcsecond companions of Kepler exoplanet candidate host stars are gravitationally bound

    SciTech Connect

    Horch, Elliott P.; Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Ciardi, David R. E-mail: steve.b.howell@nasa.gov E-mail: ciardi@ipac.caltech.edu

    2014-11-01

    Using the known detection limits for high-resolution imaging observations and the statistical properties of true binary and line-of-sight companions, we estimate the binary fraction of Kepler exoplanet host stars. Our speckle imaging programs at the WIYN 3.5 m and Gemini North 8.1 m telescopes have observed over 600 Kepler objects of interest and detected 49 stellar companions within ∼1 arcsec. Assuming binary stars follow a log-normal period distribution for an effective temperature range of 3000-10,000 K, then the model predicts that the vast majority of detected sub-arcsecond companions are long period (P > 50 yr), gravitationally bound companions. In comparing the model predictions to the number of real detections in both observational programs, we conclude that the overall binary fraction of host stars is similar to the 40%-50% rate observed for field stars.

  8. LOW Mg/Si PLANETARY HOST STARS AND THEIR Mg-DEPLETED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P.; Delgado Mena, Elisa; Israelian, Garik; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2012-03-15

    Simulations have shown that a diverse range of extrasolar terrestrial planet bulk compositions are likely to exist based on the observed variations in host star elemental abundances. Based on recent studies, it is expected that a significant proportion of host stars may have Mg/Si ratios below 1. Here we examine this previously neglected group of systems. Planets simulated as forming within these systems are found to be Mg-depleted (compared to Earth), consisting of silicate species such as pyroxene and various feldspars. Planetary carbon abundances also vary in accordance with the host star C/O ratio. The predicted abundances are in keeping with observations of polluted white dwarfs, lending validity to this approach. Further studies are required to determine the full planetary impacts of the bulk compositions predicted here.

  9. Tides and angular momentum redistribution inside low-mass stars hosting planets: a first dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Mathis, S.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a general mathematical framework to model the internal transport of angular momentum in a star hosting a close-in planetary/stellar companion. By assuming that the tidal and rotational distortions are small and that the deposit/extraction of angular momentum induced by stellar winds and tidal torques are redistributed solely by an effective eddy-viscosity that depends on the radial coordinate, we can formulate the model in a completely analytic way. It allows us to compute simultaneously the evolution of the orbit of the companion and of the spin and the radial differential rotation of the star. An illustrative application to the case of an F-type main-sequence star hosting a hot Jupiter is presented. The general relevance of our model to test more sophisticated numerical dynamical models and to study the internal rotation profile of exoplanet hosts, submitted to the combined effects of tides and stellar winds, by means of asteroseismology are discussed.

  10. The host stars of Kepler's habitable exoplanets: superflares, rotation and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. J.; Pugh, C. E.; Broomhall, A.-M.; Brown, D. J. A.; Lund, M. N.; Osborn, H. P.; Pollacco, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We embark on a detailed study of the light curves of Kepler's most Earth-like exoplanet host stars using the full length of Kepler data. We derive rotation periods, photometric activity indices, flaring energies, mass-loss rates, gyrochronological ages, X-ray luminosities and consider implications for the planetary magnetospheres and habitability. Furthermore, we present the detection of superflares in the light curve of Kepler-438, the exoplanet with the highest Earth Similarity Index to date. Kepler-438b orbits at a distance of 0.166 au to its host star, and hence may be susceptible to atmospheric stripping. Our sample is taken from the Habitable Exoplanet Catalogue, and consists of the stars Kepler-22, Kepler-61, Kepler-62, Kepler-174, Kepler-186, Kepler-283, Kepler-296, Kepler-298, Kepler-438, Kepler-440, Kepler-442, Kepler-443 and KOI-4427, between them hosting 15 of the most habitable transiting planets known to date from Kepler.

  11. Host Star Properties and Transit Exclusion for the HD 38529 Planetary System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Kane, Stephen R.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wright, Jason T.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Dragomir, Diana; Farrington, Chris; Fischer, Debra A.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Howard, Andrew W.; Jensen, Eric; Laughlin, Gregory; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Pilyavsky, Genady

    2013-05-01

    The transit signature of exoplanets provides an avenue through which characterization of exoplanetary properties may be undertaken, such as studies of mean density, structure, and atmospheric composition. The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey is a program to expand the catalog of transiting planets around bright host stars by refining the orbits of known planets discovered with the radial velocity technique. Here we present results for the HD 38529 system. We determine fundamental properties of the host star through direct interferometric measurements of the radius and through spectroscopic analysis. We provide new radial velocity measurements that are used to improve the Keplerian solution for the two known planets, and we find no evidence for a previously postulated third planet. We also present 12 years of precision robotic photometry of HD 38529 that demonstrate the inner planet does not transit and the host star exhibits cyclic variations in seasonal mean brightness with a timescale of approximately six years.

  12. Tides and angular momentum redistribution inside low-mass stars hosting planets: a first dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, A. F.; Mathis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a general mathematical framework to model the internal transport of angular momentum in a star hosting a close-in planetary/stellar companion. By assuming that the tidal and rotational distortions are small and that the deposit/extraction of angular momentum induced by stellar winds and tidal torques are redistributed solely by an effective eddy-viscosity that depends on the radial coordinate, we can formulate the model in a completely analytic way. It allows us to compute simultaneously the evolution of the orbit of the companion and of the spin and the radial differential rotation of the star. An illustrative application to the case of an F-type main-sequence star hosting a hot Jupiter is presented. The general relevance of our model to test more sophisticated numerical dynamical models and to study the internal rotation profile of exoplanet hosts, submitted to the combined effects of tides and stellar winds, by means of asteroseismology are discussed.

  13. HOST STAR PROPERTIES AND TRANSIT EXCLUSION FOR THE HD 38529 PLANETARY SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Gregory W.; Kane, Stephen R.; Von Braun, Kaspar; Ciardi, David R.; Hinkel, Natalie R.; Wang, Sharon X.; Wright, Jason T.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Pilyavsky, Genady; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; Fischer, Debra A.; Dragomir, Diana; Farrington, Chris; Howard, Andrew W.; Jensen, Eric; Laughlin, Gregory

    2013-05-10

    The transit signature of exoplanets provides an avenue through which characterization of exoplanetary properties may be undertaken, such as studies of mean density, structure, and atmospheric composition. The Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey is a program to expand the catalog of transiting planets around bright host stars by refining the orbits of known planets discovered with the radial velocity technique. Here we present results for the HD 38529 system. We determine fundamental properties of the host star through direct interferometric measurements of the radius and through spectroscopic analysis. We provide new radial velocity measurements that are used to improve the Keplerian solution for the two known planets, and we find no evidence for a previously postulated third planet. We also present 12 years of precision robotic photometry of HD 38529 that demonstrate the inner planet does not transit and the host star exhibits cyclic variations in seasonal mean brightness with a timescale of approximately six years.

  14. FUNDAMENTAL PARAMETERS OF THE EXOPLANET HOST K GIANT STAR {iota} DRACONIS FROM THE CHARA ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; McAlister, Harold A.; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Turner, Nils H.; Sturmann, Judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Goldfinger, P. J.; Farrington, Christopher D.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2011-12-20

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {iota} Dra with Georgia State University's Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy Array interferometer and, using the star's parallax and photometry from the literature, calculated its physical radius and effective temperature. We then combined our results with stellar oscillation frequencies from Zechmeister et al. and orbital elements from Kane et al. to determine the masses for the star and exoplanet. Our value for the central star's mass is 1.82 {+-} 0.23 M{sub Sun }, which means the exoplanet's minimum mass is 12.6 {+-} 1.1 M{sub Jupiter}. Using our new effective temperature, we recalculated the habitable zone for the system, though it is well outside the star-planet separation.

  15. Mapping small-scale starspots on Kepler transiting planet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, Leslie; Davenport, J. R.; Hawley, S. L.; Jardine, M. M.; Llama, J.

    2014-01-01

    High precision, near-continuous time series photometry of large numbers of transiting planet host stars is now available from the Kepler satellite archive. Using short cadence light curves of transiting planet host stars with sub-millimag photometric precision we are now, for the first time, able to map relative brightness variations due to small-scale starspots on the surfaces of stars other than the Sun. Here, we present a new project whose goal is to derive the detailed time evolution of the starspot distribution on the surface of tens of stars with a range of masses and rotation rates. We have developed an eclipse mapping code which we are using to determine the lifetime of individual starspots and starspot groups by identifying and modeling brightness variations during planetary transits caused by the planet crossing in front of a starspot on the stellar surface. In order to reduce the degeneracy of the light curve inversion problem, we are using precise knowledge of the planet's position and comprehensively modeling the in- and out- of transit data to strengthen the constraints on the positions of the surface spots. Here, we describe our overall project, explain our eclipse mapping technique in detail, and present preliminary results on the transiting planet host star, Kepler-17. Preliminary results on the spot evolution of additional systems (Kepler-17, Kepler-63, HAT-P-11, and GJ1243) are presented in a corresponding presentation by J.R.A. Davenport.

  16. Sating a Voracious Appetite: The Tidal Interaction of Close-in Planets with their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsakos, Titos; Königl, Arieh

    2015-12-01

    Transit observations of the apparent angle between the stellar spin and the vector normal to the planetary orbital plane suggest that cool stars are preferably aligned systems even as hot stars exhibit a large range of obliquities. In addition, as was demonstrated recently by Mazeh et al., the distribution of planet periods as a function of mass exhibits a dearth of sub-Jupiter--mass planets at < 4 days periods, with the boundary of the sparsely populated region in phase space having a roughly conical shape. We suggest that both of these seemingly disparate features are manifestations of the tidal interaction between close-in planets and their host stars. We attribute the dichotomy in the obliquity properties to the effect of an early population of hot Jupiters that got stranded near the inner edge of a primordially misaligned protoplanetary disk and subsequently (on a timescale < 1 Gyr) ingested by the host star. The relative magnitudes of the stellar spin and planetary orbital angular momenta at the time of ingestion determined whether the hot Jupiter could realign the host; this did not happen in the case of hot stars because of inefficient magnetic braking and a comparatively high moment of inertia. We interpret the dearth of intermediate-mass planets at short periods by considering the tidal evolution of planets that arrive on highly eccentric orbits at later (> 1 Gyr) times and become circularized at radii of a few times the Roche limit.

  17. The Coevolution of Nuclear Star Clusters, Massive Black Holes, and Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Barausse, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2015-10-01

    Studying how nuclear star clusters (NSCs) form and how they are related to the growth of the central massive black holes (MBHs) and their host galaxies is fundamental for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and the processes that have shaped their central structures. We present the results of a semi-analytical galaxy formation model that follows the evolution of dark matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components. This model allows us to study the evolution of NSCs in a cosmological context, by taking into account the growth of NSCs due to both dynamical-friction-driven migration of stellar clusters and star formation triggered by infalling gas, while also accounting for dynamical heating from (binary) MBHs. We find that in situ star formation contributes a significant fraction (up to ∼80%) of the total mass of NSCs in our model. Both NSC growth through in situ star formation and that through star cluster migration are found to generate NSC—host galaxy scaling correlations that are shallower than the same correlations for MBHs. We explore the role of galaxy mergers on the evolution of NSCs and show that observational data on NSC—host galaxy scaling relations provide evidence of partial erosion of NSCs by MBH binaries in luminous galaxies. We show that this observational feature is reproduced by our models, and we make predictions about the NSC and MBH occupation fraction in galaxies. We conclude by discussing several implications for theories of NSC formation.

  18. SPI or Spin-up? An UV Investigation of Activity on Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2010-01-01

    Using the near-UV and far-UV photometry of the GALEX All-sky Imaging Survey, we study the effects of tidal and magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) on the stellar activity of the host stars. We compare samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.15 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 1.5 AU) and show that the former group has on average several times the FUV and NUV luminosity of the latter sample. This is consistent with the X-ray results of Kashyap et al. (2008), who speculate that this may be due to the magnetic influence on the star by its innermost planet, as previously observed in several individual hot Jupiter systems. Our study suggests that increased stellar rotation rate due to the tidal interaction with the planet plays the dominant role in increasing the global stellar activity level. For the stars with close-in planets, the FUV and NUV fluxes are anti-correlated with the stellar synchronization time scales but are not correlated for stars with planets at larger orbital distances. Even though the stars with close-in planets are not fully synchronized (full synchronization in most cases will take longer than the age of the Universe), they have already undergone some increase in rotation rate. This result also suggests that the competing force of magnetic drag slowing down the stars is losing out to tidal spin-up in these systems.

  19. High-contrast imaging search for stellar and substellar companions of exoplanet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Ginski, C.

    2015-07-01

    We present the results of our high-contrast imaging survey of close stellar and substellar companions of exoplanet host stars, carried out with the adaptive optics imager NACO at the ESO Paranal observatory, in Chile. In total, 33 exoplanet host stars were observed with NACO in the Ks-band. New comoving companions could be identified close to the stars HD 9578, HD 96167, and HD 142245. The newly detected companions exhibit masses between 0.21 and 0.56 M⊙ and are located at projected separations from their primaries between about 190 and 510 au. In the case of HD 142245, we found evidence that the detected companion is actually a close binary itself with a projected separation of only about 4 au, i.e. HD 142245 might be a hierarchical triple stellar system, which hosts an exoplanet, a new member in the short list of such systems, presently known. In our imaging campaign, a limiting magnitude of Ks = 18.5 mag is reached in average in the background noise limited region around our targets at projected separations beyond about 100 au, which allows the detection of substellar companions with masses down to about 60 MJup. With our NACO observations we can rule out additional stellar companions at projected separations between about 30 and 370 au around the observed exoplanet host stars.

  20. Revisiting the First Galaxies: The Effects of Population III Stars on their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Zemp, Marcel

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H2 formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 108 years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 × 106 M ⊙ re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  1. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EFFECTS OF POPULATION III STARS ON THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-01

    We revisit the formation and evolution of the first galaxies using new hydrodynamic cosmological simulations with the adaptive refinement tree code. Our simulations feature a recently developed model for H{sub 2} formation and dissociation, and a star formation recipe that is based on molecular rather than atomic gas. Here, we develop and implement a recipe for the formation of metal-free Population III (Pop III) stars in galaxy-scale simulations that resolve primordial clouds with sufficiently high density. We base our recipe on the results of prior zoom-in simulations that resolved the protostellar collapse in pre-galactic objects. We find the epoch during which Pop III stars dominated the energy and metal budget of the first galaxies to be short-lived. Galaxies that host Pop III stars do not retain dynamical signatures of their thermal and radiative feedback for more than 10{sup 8} years after the lives of the stars end in pair-instability supernovae, even when we consider the maximum reasonable efficiency of the feedback. Though metals ejected by the supernovae can travel well beyond the virial radius of the host galaxy, they typically begin to fall back quickly, and do not enrich a large fraction of the intergalactic medium. Galaxies with a total mass in excess of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} re-accrete most of their baryons and transition to metal-enriched Pop II star formation.

  2. The Relation between Luminous AGNs and Star Formation in Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Rieke, G. H.; Egami, E.; Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Smith, G. P.

    2015-08-01

    We study the relation of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to star formation in their host galaxies. Our sample includes 205 Type-1 and 85 Type-2 AGNs, 162 detected with Herschel, from fields surrounding 30 galaxy clusters in the Local Cluster Substructure Survey. The sample is identified by optical line widths and ratios after selection to be brighter than 1 mJy at 24 μm. We show that Type-2 AGN [O iii]λ5007 line fluxes at high z can be contaminated by their host galaxies with typical spectrograph entrance apertures (but our sample is not compromised in this way). We use spectral energy distribution (SED) templates to decompose the galaxy SEDs and estimate star formation rates (SFRs), AGN luminosities, and host galaxy stellar masses (described in an accompanying paper). The AGNs arise from massive black holes (˜ 3× {10}8{M}⊙ ) accreting at ˜10% of the Eddington rate and residing in galaxies with stellar mass \\gt 3× {10}10{M}⊙ ; those detected with Herschel have IR luminosity from star formation in the range of {L}{SF,{IR}}˜ {10}10-{10}12{L}⊙ . We find that (1) the specific SFRs in the host galaxies are generally consistent with those of normal star-forming (main sequence) galaxies; (2) there is a strong correlation between the luminosities from star formation and the AGN; and (3) the correlation may not result from a causal connection, but could arise because the black hole mass (and hence AGN Eddington luminosity) and star formation are both correlated with the galaxy mass.

  3. FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS USING ASTEROSEISMOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Daniel; Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Chaplin, William J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jorgen; Kjeldsen, Hans; Handberg, Rasmus; Karoff, Christoffer; Lund, Mikkel N.; Lundkvist, Mia; Gilliland, Ronald L.; Buchhave, Lars A.; Fischer, Debra A.; Basu, Sarbani; Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto; Hekker, Saskia; Howard, Andrew W.; Isaacson, Howard; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Latham, David W.; and others

    2013-04-20

    We have used asteroseismology to determine fundamental properties for 66 Kepler planet-candidate host stars, with typical uncertainties of 3% and 7% in radius and mass, respectively. The results include new asteroseismic solutions for four host stars with confirmed planets (Kepler-4, Kepler-14, Kepler-23 and Kepler-25) and increase the total number of Kepler host stars with asteroseismic solutions to 77. A comparison with stellar properties in the planet-candidate catalog by Batalha et al. shows that radii for subgiants and giants obtained from spectroscopic follow-up are systematically too low by up to a factor of 1.5, while the properties for unevolved stars are in good agreement. We furthermore apply asteroseismology to confirm that a large majority of cool main-sequence hosts are indeed dwarfs and not misclassified giants. Using the revised stellar properties, we recalculate the radii for 107 planet candidates in our sample, and comment on candidates for which the radii change from a previously giant-planet/brown-dwarf/stellar regime to a sub-Jupiter size or vice versa. A comparison of stellar densities from asteroseismology with densities derived from transit models in Batalha et al. assuming circular orbits shows significant disagreement for more than half of the sample due to systematics in the modeled impact parameters or due to planet candidates that may be in eccentric orbits. Finally, we investigate tentative correlations between host-star masses and planet-candidate radii, orbital periods, and multiplicity, but caution that these results may be influenced by the small sample size and detection biases.

  4. Living with a Red Dwarf Star: Radiation and Plasma Environments of Hosted Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, S. G.; Ribas, I.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; McCook, G. P.

    2007-05-01

    Red Dwarf (dM) stars are the most numerous stars in our Galaxy. These cool, faint and low mass stars make up > 75% of all stars. Also dM stars have extremely long life times >50-100 Gyr. Determining the number of red dwarfs with planets and assessing planetary habitability (a planet’s potential to develop and sustain life) is critically important because such studies would indicate how common life is in the universe. Our program - Living with a Red Dwarf - addresses these questions by investigating the long-term nuclear evolution and magnetic-dynamo coronal and chromospheric X-ray to Ultraviolet properties of red dwarf stars with widely different ages. The major focus of the program is to study the magnetic-dynamo generated coronal and chromospheric X-ray-Ultraviolet emissions and flare properties. Also studied is how the stellar emissions and winds affect hosted planets and impact on their habitability. For this program we have selected 15 nearby dM0-5 star as proxies for dM-stars of different ages to characterize their radiation and high energy plasma properties. We are constructing irradiance tables (X-UV fluxes) that are used to model the effects of XUV radiation on planetary atmospheres and on possible life on planetary surfaces. Despite the earlier pessimistic view that red dwarfs stars are not suitable environments for habitable planets mainly because their low luminosities require a host planet to orbit quite close (r <0.3 AU) to be warm enough to support life. Our initial study shows that red dwarf stars (at least stars hotter than dM5) can be suitable as hosts for habitable planets. This research is supported by grants from NASA/FUSE (NNX06AD38G) and NSF (AST-0507542 & AST-0507536) which we gratefully acknowledge. The “Living with a Red Dwarf Star” Program is on the web at: http://astronomy.villanova.edu/livingwithareddwarf/Opener.htm

  5. Massive star-forming host galaxies of quasars on Sloan digital sky survey stripe 82

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Strauss, Michael A.; Price, Ted N. III; DiDonato, Matthew S.

    2014-01-10

    The stellar properties of about 800 galaxies hosting optically luminous, unobscured quasars at z < 0.6 are analyzed. Deep co-added Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images of the quasars on Stripe 82 are decomposed into nucleus and host galaxy using point spread function and Sérsic models. The systematic errors in the measured galaxy absolute magnitudes and colors are estimated to be less than 0.5 mag and 0.1 mag, respectively, with simulated quasar images. The effect of quasar light scattered by the interstellar medium is also carefully addressed. The measured quasar-to-galaxy ratio in total flux decreases toward longer wavelengths, from ∼8 in the u band to ∼1 in the i and z bands. We find that the SDSS quasars are hosted exclusively by massive galaxies (stellar mass M {sub star} > 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉}), which is consistent with previous results for less luminous narrow-line (obscured) active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The quasar hosts are very blue and almost absent on the red sequence, showing stark contrast to the color-magnitude distribution of normal galaxies. The fact that more powerful AGNs reside in galaxies with higher star-formation efficiency may indicate that negative AGN feedback, if it exists, is not concurrent with the most luminous phase of AGNs. We also find positive correlation between the mass of supermassive black holes (SMBHs; M {sub BH}) and host stellar mass, but the M {sub BH}-M {sub star} relation is offset toward large M {sub BH} or small M {sub star} compared to the local relation. While this could indicate that SMBHs grow earlier than do their host galaxies, such an argument is not conclusive, as the effect may be dominated by observational biases.

  6. A CORRELATION BETWEEN HOST STAR ACTIVITY AND PLANET MASS FOR CLOSE-IN EXTRASOLAR PLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Poppenhaeger, K.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2011-07-01

    The activity levels of stars are influenced by several stellar properties, such as stellar rotation, spectral type, and the presence of stellar companions. Analogous to binaries, planetary companions are also thought to be able to cause higher activity levels in their host stars, although at lower levels. Especially in X-rays, such influences are hard to detect because coronae of cool stars exhibit a considerable amount of intrinsic variability. Recently, a correlation between the mass of close-in exoplanets and their host star's X-ray luminosity has been detected, based on archival X-ray data from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. This finding has been interpreted as evidence for star-planet interactions. We show in our analysis that this correlation is caused by selection effects due to the flux limit of the X-ray data used and due to the intrinsic planet detectability of the radial velocity method, and thus does not trace possible planet-induced effects. We also show that the correlation is not present in a corresponding complete sample derived from combined XMM-Newton and ROSAT data.

  7. CONFIRMING FUNDAMENTAL PROPERTIES OF THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI USING THE NAVY OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas E-mail: tarmstr@crater.nrl.navy.mil

    2012-01-10

    We measured the angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {epsilon} Eridani using the Navy Optical Interferometer. We determined its physical radius, effective temperature, and mass by combining our measurement with the star's parallax, photometry from the literature, and the Yonsei-Yale isochrones, respectively. We used the resulting stellar mass of 0.82 {+-} 0.05 M{sub Sun} plus the mass function from Benedict et al. to calculate the planet's mass, which is 1.53 {+-} 0.22 M{sub Jupiter}. Using our new effective temperature, we also estimated the extent of the habitable zone for the system.

  8. Evolved stars and the origin of abundance trends in planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, J.; Villaver, E.

    2016-04-01

    Context. Detailed chemical abundance studies have revealed different trends between samples of planet and non-planet hosts. Whether these trends are related to the presence of planets or not is strongly debated. At the same time, tentative evidence that the properties of evolved stars with planets may be different from what we know for main-sequence hosts has recently been reported. Aims: We aim to test whether evolved stars with planets show any chemical peculiarity that could be related to the planet formation process. Methods: In a consistent way, we determine the metallicity and individual abundances of a large sample of evolved (subgiants and red giants) and main-sequence stars that are with and without known planetary companions, and discuss their metallicity distribution and trends. Our methodology is based on the analysis of high-resolution échelle spectra (R ≳ 57 000) from 2-3 m class telescopes. It includes the calculation of the fundamental stellar parameters, as well as individual abundances of C, O , Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, and Zn. Results: No differences in the ⟨[X/Fe]⟩ vs. condensation temperature (TC) slopes are found between the samples of planet and non-planet hosts when all elements are considered. However, if the analysis is restricted to only refractory elements, differences in the TC-slopes between stars with and without known planets are found. This result is found to be dependent on the stellar evolutionary stage, as it holds for main-sequence and subgiant stars, while there seems to be no difference between planet and non-planet hosts among the sample of giants. A search for correlations between the TC-slope and the stellar properties reveals significant correlations with the stellar mass and the stellar age. The data also suggest that differences in terms of mass and age between main-sequence planet and non-planet hosts may be present. Conclusions: Our results are well explained by radial mixing in the

  9. Four new planets around giant stars and the mass-metallicity correlation of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Brahm, R.; Wittenmyer, R. A.; Olivares E., F.; Melo, C. H. F.; Rojo, P.; Jordán, A.; Drass, H.; Butler, R. P.; Wang, L.

    2016-05-01

    -type and post-MS hosting stars, and provide further support to the core-accretion formation model. Based on observations collected at La Silla - Paranal Observatory under programs IDs 085.C-0557, 087.C.0476, 089.C-0524, 090.C-0345 and through the Chilean Telescope Time under programs IDs CN 12A-073, CN 12B-047, CN 13A-111, CN 13B-51, CN 14A-52, CN-15A-48, and CN-15B-25.

  10. THE COEVOLUTION OF NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTERS, MASSIVE BLACK HOLES, AND THEIR HOST GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Antonini, Fabio; Barausse, Enrico; Silk, Joseph

    2015-10-10

    Studying how nuclear star clusters (NSCs) form and how they are related to the growth of the central massive black holes (MBHs) and their host galaxies is fundamental for our understanding of the evolution of galaxies and the processes that have shaped their central structures. We present the results of a semi-analytical galaxy formation model that follows the evolution of dark matter halos along merger trees, as well as that of the baryonic components. This model allows us to study the evolution of NSCs in a cosmological context, by taking into account the growth of NSCs due to both dynamical-friction-driven migration of stellar clusters and star formation triggered by infalling gas, while also accounting for dynamical heating from (binary) MBHs. We find that in situ star formation contributes a significant fraction (up to ∼80%) of the total mass of NSCs in our model. Both NSC growth through in situ star formation and that through star cluster migration are found to generate NSC—host galaxy scaling correlations that are shallower than the same correlations for MBHs. We explore the role of galaxy mergers on the evolution of NSCs and show that observational data on NSC—host galaxy scaling relations provide evidence of partial erosion of NSCs by MBH binaries in luminous galaxies. We show that this observational feature is reproduced by our models, and we make predictions about the NSC and MBH occupation fraction in galaxies. We conclude by discussing several implications for theories of NSC formation.

  11. A simple evolutional model of Habitable Zone around host stars with various mass and low metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Midori; Kamaya, Hideyuki

    2016-02-01

    Habitable Zone (HZ) is defined as a life existence area, where water at the surface of the terrestrial planet is in liquid phase. This is caused by the balance of flux from the host star and effective radiative cooling with greenhouse effect of the planet. However, the flux varies according to evolutional phase of the host star. So, a simple but newest HZ model considering stellar mass range from 0.08 to 4.00 M⊙ has been proposed. It studies both at zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) and terminal-age main sequence (TMS) phases to examine persistence of HZ. By the way, it discusses the case of the metallicity like the Sun. Actually, it is interesting to study a HZ model considering host stars with low metallicity. So, we examine the effect of metallicity, following the precedent simple model. In our analysis, metallicity affects little for HZ orbital range at ZAMS, while it affects clearly in case of TMS. Since the inner and outer HZ boundaries at TMS are shifted outward especially in the mass range from 1.5 to 2.0 M⊙, we find persistent HZ is allowed above about 1.8 M⊙. The age of the universe is 13.8 Gyr, which is comparable to main sequence life time of about 0.8 M⊙ for the low metallicity case. Then, the effect of metallicity to estimate HZ of low metallicity host stars is important for the mass range from 0.8 to 1.8 M⊙.

  12. Stellar Companions to the Exoplanet Host Stars HD 2638 and HD 164509

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittrock, Justin M.; Kane, Stephen R.; Horch, Elliott P.; Hirsch, Lea; Howell, Steve B.; Ciardi, David R.; Everett, Mark E.; Teske, Johanna K.

    2016-11-01

    An important aspect of searching for exoplanets is understanding the binarity of the host stars. It is particularly important, because nearly half of the solar-like stars within our own Milky Way are part of binary or multiple systems. Moreover, the presence of two or more stars within a system can place further constraints on planetary formation, evolution, and orbital dynamics. As part of our survey of almost a hundred host stars, we obtained images at 692 and 880 nm bands using the Differential Speckle Survey Instrument (DSSI) at the Gemini-North Observatory. From our survey, we detect stellar companions to HD 2638 and HD 164509. The stellar companion to HD 2638 has been previously detected, but the companion to HD 164509 is a newly discovered companion. The angular separation for HD 2638 is 0.512 ± 0.″002 and for HD 164509 is 0.697+/- 0\\buildrel{\\prime\\prime}\\over{.} 002. This corresponds to a projected separation of 25.6 ± 1.9 au and 36.5 ± 1.9 au, respectively. By employing stellar isochrone models, we estimate the mass of the stellar companions of HD 2638 and HD 164509 to be 0.483 ± 0.007 M ⊙ and 0.416+/- 0.007 {M}ȯ , respectively, and their effective temperatures to be 3570 ± 8 K and 3450 ± 7 K, respectively. These results are consistent with the detected companions being late-type M dwarfs.

  13. A tale of two feedbacks: Star formation in the host galaxies of radio AGNs

    SciTech Connect

    Karouzos, Marios; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Ji Hoon; Trichas, Markos; Goto, Tomo; Malkan, Matt; Ruiz, Angel; Lee, Hyung Mok; Kim, Seong Jin; Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Murata, K.; Wada, Takehiko; Wada, Kensuke; Shim, Hyunjin; Hanami, Hitoshi; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J.; and others

    2014-04-01

    Several lines of argument support the existence of a link between activity at the nuclei of galaxies, in the form of an accreting supermassive black hole, and star formation activity in these galaxies. Radio jets have long been argued to be an ideal mechanism that allows active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to interact with their host galaxies and affect star formation. We use a sample of radio sources in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) field to study the nature of this putative link, by means of spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting. We employ the excellent spectral coverage of the AKARI infrared space telescope and the rich ancillary data available in the NEP to build SEDs extending from UV to far-IR wavelengths. We find a significant AGN component in our sample of relatively faint radio sources (star formation in the host galaxy, independent of the radio luminosity. In contrast, for narrow redshift and AGN luminosity ranges, we find that increasing radio luminosity leads to a decrease in the specific star formation rate. The most radio-loud AGNs are found to lie on the main sequence of star formation for their respective redshifts. For the first time, we potentially see such a two-sided feedback process in the same sample. We discuss the possible suppression of star formation, but not total quenching, in systems with strong radio jets, that supports the maintenance nature of feedback from radio AGN jets.

  14. The Age of the Directly Imaged Planet Host Star κ Andromedae Determined from Interferometric Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; White, R. J.; Quinn, S.; Ireland, M.; Boyajian, T.; Schaefer, G.; Baines, E. K.

    2016-05-01

    κ Andromedae, an early-type star that hosts a directly imaged low-mass companion, is expected to be oblate due to its rapid rotational velocity (v sin i = ˜162 km s‑1). We observed the star with the CHARA Array’s optical beam combiner, PAVO, measuring its size at multiple orientations and determining its oblateness. The interferometric measurements, combined with photometry and this v sin i value are used to constrain an oblate star model that yields the fundamental properties of the star and finds a rotation speed that is ˜85% of the critical rate and a low inclination of ˜30°. Three modeled properties (the average radius, bolometric luminosity, and equatorial velocity) are compared to MESA evolution models to determine an age and mass for the star. In doing so, we determine an age for the system of {47}-40+27 Myr. Based on this age and previous measurements of the companion’s temperature, the BHAC15 evolution models imply a mass for the companion of {22}-9+8 M J.

  15. Herschel Observed Stripe 82 Quasars and Their Host Galaxies: Connections between AGN Activity and host Galaxy Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X. Y.; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present a study of 207 quasars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasar catalogs and the Herschel Stripe 82 survey. Quasars within this sample are high-luminosity quasars with a mean bolometric luminosity of 1046.4 erg s-1. The redshift range of this sample is within z < 4, with a mean value of 1.5 ± 0.78. Because we only selected quasars that have been detected in all three Herschel-SPIRE bands, the quasar sample is complete yet highly biased. Based on the multi-wavelength photometric observation data, we conducted a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting through UV to FIR. Parameters such as active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity, far-IR (FIR) luminosity, stellar mass, as well as many other AGN and galaxy properties are deduced from the SED fitting results. The mean star formation rate (SFR) of the sample is 419 M ⊙ yr-1 and the mean gas mass is ˜1011.3 M ⊙. All of these results point to an IR luminous quasar system. Compared with star formation main sequence (MS) galaxies, at least 80 out of 207 quasars are hosted by starburst galaxies. This supports the statement that luminous AGNs are more likely to be associated with major mergers. The SFR increases with the redshift up to z = 2. It is correlated with the AGN bolometric luminosity, where {L}{{FIR}}\\propto {L}{{Bol}}0.46+/- 0.03. The AGN bolometric luminosity is also correlated with the host galaxy mass and gas mass. Yet the correlation between L FIR and L Bol has higher significant level, implies that the link between AGN accretion and the SFR is more primal. The M BH/M * ratio of our sample is 0.02, higher than the value 0.005 in the local universe. It might indicate an evolutionary trend of the M BH-M * scaling relation.

  16. STAR FORMATION IN LINER HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.3

    SciTech Connect

    Tommasin, Silvia; Netzer, Hagai; Sternberg, Amiel; Nordon, Raanan; Lutz, Dieter; Berta, Stefano; Magnelli, Benjamin; Bongiorno, Angela; Le Floc'h, Emeric; Riguccini, Laurie

    2012-07-10

    We present the results of a Herschel-PACS study of a sample of 97 low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) at redshift z {approx} 0.3 selected from the zCOSMOS survey. Of these sources, 34 are detected in at least one PACS band, enabling reliable estimates of the far-infrared L{sub FIR} luminosities, and a comparison to the FIR luminosities of local LINERs. Many of our PACS-detected LINERs are also UV sources detected by GALEX. Assuming that the FIR is produced in young dusty star-forming regions, the typical star formation rates (SFRs) for the host galaxies in our sample are {approx}10 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than in many local LINERs. Given stellar masses inferred from optical/NIR photometry of the (unobscured) evolved stellar populations, we find that the entire sample lies close to the star-forming 'main sequence' for galaxies at redshift 0.3. For young star-forming regions, the H{alpha}- and UV-based estimates of the SFRs are much smaller than the FIR-based estimates, by factors {approx}30, even assuming that all of the H{alpha} emission is produced by O-star ionization rather than by the active galactic nuclei (AGNs). These discrepancies may be due to large (and uncertain) extinctions toward the young stellar systems. Alternatively, the H{alpha} and UV emissions could be tracing residual star formation in an older, less obscured population with decaying star formation. We also compare L{sub SF} and L(AGN) in local LINERs and in our sample. Finally, we comment on the problematic use of several line diagnostic diagrams in cases with an estimated obscuration similar to that in the sample under study.

  17. Another short-burst host galaxy with an optically obscured high star formation rate: The case of GRB 071227

    SciTech Connect

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Klose, S.; Kann, D. A.; Rossi, A.; Schmidl, S.; Michałowski, M. J.; McKenzie, M. R. G.; Savaglio, S.; Greiner, J.; Hunt, L. K.; Gorosabel, J.

    2014-07-01

    We report on radio continuum observations of the host galaxy of the short gamma-ray burst 071227 (z = 0.381) with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We detect the galaxy in the 5.5 GHz band with an integrated flux density of F {sub ν} = 43 ± 11 μJy, corresponding to an unobscured star-formation rate of about 24 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, 40 times higher than what was found from optical emission lines. Among the ∼30 well-identified and studied host galaxies of short bursts this is the third case where the host is found to undergo an episode of intense star formation. This suggests that a fraction of all short-burst progenitors hosted in star-forming galaxies could be physically related to recent star formation activity, implying a relatively short merger timescale.

  18. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?

    SciTech Connect

    Kocevski, Daniel; West, Andrew A.; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2009-08-03

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

  19. A DEBRIS disk around the planet hosting M-star GJ 581 spatially resolved with Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestrade, J.-F.; Matthews, B. C.; Sibthorpe, B.; Kennedy, G. M.; Wyatt, M. C.; Bryden, G.; Greaves, J. S.; Thilliez, E.; Moro-Martín, A.; Booth, M.; Dent, W. R. F.; Duchêne, G.; Harvey, P. M.; Horner, J.; Kalas, P.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Phillips, N. M.; Rodriguez, D. R.; Su, K. Y. L.; Wilner, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    Debris disks have been found primarily around intermediate and solar mass stars (spectral types A-K) but rarely around low mass M-type stars. We have spatially resolved a debris disk around the remarkable M3-type star GJ 581 hosting multiple planets using deep PACS images at 70, 100 and 160 μm as part of the DEBRIS Program on the Herschel Space Observatory. This is the second spatially resolved debris disk found around an M-type star, after the one surrounding the young star AU Mic (12 Myr). However, GJ 581 is much older (2-8 Gyr), and is X-ray quiet in the ROSAT data. We fit an axisymmetric model of the disk to the three PACS images and found that the best fit model is for a disk extending radially from 25 ± 12 AU to more than 60 AU. Such a cold disk is reminiscent of the Kuiper belt but it surrounds a low mass star (0.3 M⊙) and its fractional dust luminosity Ldust/L∗ of ~ 10-4 is much higher. The inclination limits of the disk found in our analysis make the masses of the planets small enough to ensure the long-term stability of the system according to some dynamical simulations. The disk is collisionally dominated down to submicron-sized grains and the dust cannot be expelled from the system by radiation or wind pressures because of the low luminosity and low X-ray luminosity of GJ 581. We suggest that the correlation between low-mass planets and debris disks recently found for G-type stars also applies to M-type stars. Finally, the known planets, of low masses and orbiting within 0.3 AU from the star, cannot dynamically perturb the disk over the age of the star, suggesting that an additional planet exists at larger distance that is stirring the disk to replenish the dust. Herschel in an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation by NASA.

  20. Herschel ATLAS: The cosmic star formation history of quasar host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.; Bertoldi, F.; Blain, A. W.; Clements, D. L.; Cooray, A.; Danese, L.; Dunlop, J.; Dunne, L.; Eales, S.; Falder, J.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hughes, D. H.; Ibar, E.; Jarvis, M. J.; Lawrence, A.; Lee, M. G.; Michałowski, M.; Negrello, M.; Omont, A.; Page, M.; Pearson, C.; van der Werf, P. P.; White, G.; Amblard, A.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Bonfield, D. G.; Burgarella, D.; Buttiglione, S.; Cava, A.; Dariush, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dye, S.; Frayer, D.; Fritz, J.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Herranz, D.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Leeuw, L.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Maddox, S.; Pascale, E.; Pohlen, M.; Rigby, E.; Rodighiero, G.; Samui, S.; Sibthorpe, B.; Smith, D. J. B.; Temi, P.; Thompson, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Verma, A.

    2010-07-01

    We present a derivation of the star formation rate per comoving volume of quasar host galaxies, derived from stacking analyses of far-infrared to mm-wave photometry of quasars with redshifts 0 < z < 6 and absolute I-band magnitudes -22 > IAB > -32 We use the science demonstration observations of the first ~16 deg2 from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in which there are 240 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and a further 171 from the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO (2SLAQ) survey. We supplement this data with a compilation of data from IRAS, ISO, Spitzer, SCUBA and MAMBO. H-ATLAS alone statistically detects the quasars in its survey area at >5σ at 250,350 and 500 μm. From the compilation as a whole we find striking evidence of downsizing in quasar host galaxy formation: low-luminosity quasars with absolute magnitudes in the range -22 > IAB > -24 have a comoving star formation rate (derived from 100 μm rest-frame luminosities) peaking between redshifts of 1 and 2, while high-luminosity quasars with IAB < -26 have a maximum contribution to the star formation density at z ~ 3. The volume-averaged star formation rate of -22 > IAB > -24 quasars evolves as (1 + z)2.3±0.7 at z < 2, but the evolution at higher luminosities is much faster reaching (1 + z)10±1 at -26 > IAB > -28. We tentatively interpret this as a combination of a declining major merger rate with time and gas consumption reducing fuel for both black hole accretion and star formation. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia with important participation from NASA.

  1. Elemental Abundances for Nearby Exosolar Planet Host Stars: A Look at Planetary Composition Assumptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Michael D.; Young, P. A.; Shim, S.; Challa, P.; Gonzales, J.

    2013-01-01

    We look at 29 nearby F, G, and K stars that are known to host planets and find their chemical abundances for up to 30 different elements while using an extensive line list for as many elements as possible. We look for; C, N, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, K, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, St, Y, Zr, Mo, Ba, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, and Hf, where some elements are not measured in all stars, and a few (K, N, and Sr) are rarely if ever measurable, though always attempted. These stars were obtained from Paul Butler at the Carnegie Institute of Washington’s Department of Terrestrial Magnetism. The spectra were observed for a high-resolution doppler planet search done at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The abundances of these elements can be used to help us understand how stellar abundances affect planetary formation, habitability, and composition. We examine the C/O ratio for these stars to hypothesize if rocky planets around them would be dominated by carbide or silicate chemistry. Mg/Si ratios would allow us to consider whether these would be olivine rich or pyroxene rich systems, which would drastically affect mantle convection and structure. Also, by looking at the Si/Fe ratio we try to understand the core to mantle ratios. The stars we look at are the planetary hosts; HD205739, HD204941, HD204313, HD202206, HD20003, HD154672, HD152079, HD148156, HD147018, HD143361, HD142022, HD13808, HD137388, HD131664, HD129445, HD126525, HD121504, HD113538, HD111232, HD101930, HD190647, HD181433, HD175167, HD1690, HD164604, HD126525, HD114386, HD111232, HD100777.

  2. The GRB 030329 host: a blue low metallicity subluminous galaxy with intense star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorosabel, J.; Pérez-Ramírez, D.; Sollerman, J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Jakobsson, P.; Christensen, L.; Hjorth, J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Guziy, S.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Björnsson, G.; Sokolov, V. V.; Fatkhullin, T. A.; Nilsson, K.

    2005-12-01

    We present broad band photometry and spectroscopic observations of the host galaxy of GRB 030329. Analysis of the spectral emission lines shows that the host is likely a low metallicity galaxy (Z˜0.004). The spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed with the photometric points has been fitted using synthetic and observational templates. The best SED fit is obtained with a starburst template with an age of 150 Myr and an extinction Av ˜ 0.6. We find that the GRB 030329 host galaxy is a subluminous galaxy (L ˜ 0.016 Lstar) with a stellar mass of ≳ 108 M⊙. Three independent diagnostics, based on the restframe UV continuum, the [O II], and the Balmer emission lines, provide a consistent unextinguished star formation rate of ˜ 0.6 M⊙ yr-1, implying a high unextinguished specific star formation rate ( 34 M⊙ yr-1 (L/Lstar)-1). We estimate that the unextinguished specific star formation rate of the GRB 030329 host is higher than 93.5% of the galaxies at a similar redshift. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias. Based on data taken at the 2.2-m and 3.5-m telescopes of the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán de Calar Alto, operated by the Max Planck institute of Heidelberg and Centro Superior de Investigaciones Científicas. The spectral observations were obtained at the European Southern Observatory, Cerro Paranal (Chile), under the Director's Discretionary Time programme 271.D-5006(A).

  3. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T.; Adams, Elisabeth R.; Ciardi, David R.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  4. Activity and magnetic field structure of the Sun-like planet-hosting star HD 1237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Grunhut, J.; Fares, R.; Donati, J.-F.; Alecian, E.; Kochukhov, O.; Oksala, M.; Morin, J.; Redfield, S.; Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Jardine, M.; Matt, S.; Petit, P.; Walter, F. M.

    2015-10-01

    We analyse the magnetic activity characteristics of the planet-hosting Sun-like star, HD 1237, using HARPS spectro-polarimetric time-series data. We find evidence of rotational modulation of the magnetic longitudinal field measurements that is consistent with our ZDI analysis with a period of 7 days. We investigate the effect of customising the LSD mask to the line depths of the observed spectrum and find that it has a minimal effect on the shape of the extracted Stokes V profile but does result in a small increase in the S/N (~7%). We find that using a Milne-Eddington solution to describe the local line profile provides a better fit to the LSD profiles in this slowly rotating star, which also affects the recovered ZDI field distribution. We also introduce a fit-stopping criterion based on the information content (entropy) of the ZDI map solution set. The recovered magnetic field maps show a strong (+90 G) ring-like azimuthal field distribution and a complex radial field dominating at mid latitudes (~45 degrees). Similar magnetic field maps are recovered from data acquired five months apart. Future work will investigate how this surface magnetic field distribution affeccts the coronal magnetic field and extended environment around this planet-hosting star.

  5. GRB hosts and the search for missing star formation at high redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanvir, Nial

    2014-10-01

    Measuring the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshift is crucial for understanding cosmic reionization and the formation of galaxies at early times. Two common, complementary approaches are Lyman-Break-Galaxy (LBG) surveys, providing large samples, and Gamma-Ray-Bursts (GRBs) which can sign-post star formation even in the smallest galaxies. Recent results of both methods have found evidence for a dominant population of very faint star-forming galaxies at z>5, representing a continuation of the steepening of the galaxy luminosity function with redshift. However, LBG surveys are affected by possible incompleteness and contamination, while the magnitude limit means very large correction factors must be applied to account for these unseen galaxies. On the other hand GRBs suffer small number statistics and have their own selection biases. We propose to construct a new sample of six 6hosts with deep imaging in order to assess the proportion of star formation in very faint galaxies during at this key epoch. This is a critical issue, since only if faint galaxies dominate global star formation can UV light from stars sustain reionization. We will carry out WFC3/IR (F140W) imaging to a limit approaching that of the current HUDF observations (M(AB)~-18) in all cases. Prior knowledge of the exact locations and redshifts of the targets means that this can be achieved relatively economically, since we can accept a lower level of significance and single filter. This method depends only on GRBs and SF tracing UV light (both likely at high-z), and in turn will constrain the completeness correction to be applied to LBG surveys in order to derive the ionizing photon budget.

  6. Interpreting the extended emission around three nearby debris disc host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. P.; Kirchschlager, F.; Ertel, S.; Augereau, J.-C.; Kennedy, G. M.; Booth, M.; Wolf, S.; Montesinos, B.; Eiroa, C.; Matthews, B.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Cool debris discs are a relic of the planetesimal formation process around their host star, analogous to the solar system's Edgeworth-Kuiper belt. As such, they can be used as a proxy to probe the origin and formation of planetary systems like our own. Aims: The Herschel open time key programmes "DUst around NEarby Stars" (DUNES) and "Disc Emission via a Bias-free Reconnaissance in the Infrared/Submillimetre" (DEBRIS) observed many nearby, sun-like stars at far-infrared wavelengths seeking to detect and characterize the emission from their circumstellar dust. Excess emission attributable to the presence of dust was identified from around ~20% of stars. Herschel's high angular resolution (~7'' FWHM at 100 μm) provided the capacity for resolving debris belts around nearby stars with radial extents comparable to the solar system (50-100 au). Methods: As part of the DUNES and DEBRIS surveys, we obtained observations of three debris disc stars, HIP 22263 (HD 30495), HIP 62207 (HD 110897), and HIP 72848 (HD 131511), at far-infrared wavelengths with the Herschel PACS instrument. Combining these new images and photometry with ancilliary data from the literature, we undertook simultaneous multi-wavelength modelling of the discs' radial profiles and spectral energy distributions using three different methodologies: single annulus, modified black body, and a radiative transfer code. Results: We present the first far-infrared spatially resolved images of these discs and new single-component debris disc models. We characterize the capacity of the models to reproduce the disc parameters based on marginally resolved emission through analysis of two sets of simulated systems (based on the HIP 22263 and HIP 62207 data) with the noise levels typical of the Herschel images. We find that the input parameter values are recovered well at noise levels attained in the observations presented here.

  7. Measurements of the Stellar Wind Strengths of Planet-Hosting G- and K-Type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelman, Eric; Redfield, S.; Wood, B.; Linsky, J.; Mueller, H. R.

    2014-01-01

    Voyager 1 has recently crossed the heliosphere, where the solar wind meets the material of the interstellar medium. With line of sight spectral information provided by the STIS on Hubble, the analogous boundary around other stars, which is known as an astrosphere, can be detected. We are conducting a thorough analysis of MgII, FeII, DI, and HI Lyman-alpha absorption along the lines of sight to a sample of nearby K and G stars in order to obtain and use astrospheric detections to estimate stellar wind strengths, and to study their effects upon exoplanetary atmospheres. Each astrospheric measurement is obtained by careful examination and reconstruction of the Lyman-alpha emission feature, which ultimately provides an estimate of the neutral hydrogen column density associated with a star’s astrosphere. The amount of neutral hydrogen in that region is highly dependent on the stellar wind strength of the host star, and is one of the scant few methods available today for measuring that quantity. If stellar winds are strong enough, they can be responsible for stripping a nearby planet of its atmosphere, as was potentially the case with Mars and our Sun approximately 4 billion years ago. Increasing the sample size of measurements of stellar wind strengths for K and G type stars will allow for us to more accurately determine the influence of solar-type host stars on their respective exoplanetary systems. Included in our sample are the stars HD9826 and HD192310, which both have confirmed exoplanets in orbit. This project includes the reconstructions of the Lyman-alpha emission feature along the lines of sight to a sample of nearby stars, with a determination of whether or not astrospheric or heliospheric absorption is detected in each instance, with hydrogen column densities for positive detections. We would like to acknowledge NASA HST Grant GO-12475 awarded by the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in

  8. CONSTRAINTS ON OBSCURED STAR FORMATION IN HOST GALAXIES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukade, Bunyo; Ohta, Kouji; Hashimoto, Tetsuya; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of the 16 cm wave band continuum observations of four host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 990705, 021211, 041006, and 051022 using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Radio emission was not detected in any of the host galaxies. The 2{sigma} upper limits on star formation rates derived from the radio observations of the host galaxies are 23, 45, 27, and 26 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, respectively, which are less than about 10 times those derived from UV/optical observations, suggesting that they have no significant dust-obscured star formation. GRBs 021211 and 051022 are known as the so-called dark GRBs and our results imply that dark GRBs do not always occur in galaxies enshrouded by dust. Because large dust extinction was not observed in the afterglow of GRB 021211, our result suggests the possibility that the cause of the dark GRB is the intrinsic faintness of the optical afterglow. On the other hand, by considering the high column density observed in the afterglow of GRB 051022, the likely cause of the dark GRB is the dust extinction in the line of sight of the GRB.

  9. A SPITZER INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH STUDY OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND PLANET-HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson-Robinson, Sarah E.; Beichman, C. A.; Carpenter, John M.; Bryden, Geoffrey

    2011-01-15

    Since giant planets scatter planetesimals within a few tidal radii of their orbits, the locations of existing planetesimal belts indicate regions where giant planet formation failed in bygone protostellar disks. Infrared observations of circumstellar dust produced by colliding planetesimals are therefore powerful probes of the formation histories of known planets. Here we present new Spitzer infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectrophotometry of 111 solar-type stars, including 105 planet hosts. Our observations reveal 11 debris disks, including two previously undetected debris disks orbiting HD 108874 and HD 130322. Combining the 32 {mu}m spectrophotometry with previously published MIPS photometry, we find that the majority of debris disks around solar-type stars have temperatures in the range 60 {approx}< T{sub dust} {approx}< 100 K. Assuming a dust temperature T{sub dust} = 70 K, which is representative of the nine debris disks detected by both IRS and MIPS, debris rings surrounding Sun-like stars orbit between 15 and 240 AU depending on the mean particle size. Our observations imply that the planets detected by radial-velocity searches formed within 240 AU of their parent stars. If any of the debris disks studied here have mostly large, blackbody emitting grains, their companion giant planets must have formed in a narrow region between the ice line and 15 AU.

  10. Spectroscopic Properties of Star-Forming Host Galaxies and Type Ia Supernova Hubble Residuals in a Nearly Unbiased Sample

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; et al.

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova host galaxy properties and their residuals on the Hubble diagram. We use supernovae discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M_r < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star-formation rates from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of ~ 40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve corrected Type Ia supernovae are ~ 0.1 magnitudes brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (> 3{\\sigma}) correlation between the Hubble residuals of Type Ia supernovae and the specific star-formation rate of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of supernova/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep supernova surveys.

  11. ON THE LINK BETWEEN ASSOCIATED Mg II ABSORBERS AND STAR FORMATION IN QUASAR HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yue; Menard, Brice E-mail: menard@pha.jhu.edu

    2012-04-01

    A few percent of quasars show strong associated Mg II absorption, with velocities (v{sub off}) lying within a few thousand km s{sup -1} from the quasar systemic redshift. These associated absorption line (AAL) systems are usually interpreted as absorbers that are either intrinsic to the quasar and its host, or arising from external galaxies clustering around the quasar. Using composite spectra of {approx}1800 Mg II AAL quasars selected from SDSS DR7 at 0.4 {approx}< z {approx}< 2, we show that quasars with AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} have a prominent excess in [O II] {lambda}3727 emission (detected at >7{sigma}) at rest relative to the quasar host, compared to unabsorbed quasars. We interpret this [O II] excess as due to enhanced star formation in the quasar host. Our results suggest that a significant fraction of AALs with v{sub off} < 1500 km s{sup -1} are physically associated with the quasar and its host. AAL quasars also have dust reddening lying between normal quasars and the so-called dust-reddened quasars. We suggest that the unique properties of AAL quasars can be explained if they are the transitional population from heavily dust-reddened quasars to normal quasars in the formation process of quasars and their hosts. This scenario predicts a larger fraction of young bulges, disturbed morphologies, and interactions of AAL quasar hosts compared to normal quasars. The intrinsic link between associated absorbers and quasar hosts opens a new window to probe massive galaxy formation and galactic-scale feedback processes, and provides a crucial test of the evolutionary picture of quasars.

  12. Asteroseismology of the planet-hosting star μ Arae. I. The acoustic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchy, F.; Bazot, M.; Santos, N. C.; Vauclair, S.; Sosnowska, D.

    2005-09-01

    We present HARPS spectroscopy of μ Arae (HD 160691) performed for studying the origin of the metallicity excess in this planet-hosting stars. The asteroseismologic campaign led to the previously reported discovery of a 14 earth mass planetary companion (Santos et al. 2004b, A&A, 426, L19). The present analysis reinforces this interpretation by excluding other possible processes for explaining the observed Doppler variation and leads to the identification of up to 43 p-mode oscillations with l = 0-3, frequencies in the range 1.3-2.5 mHz and amplitudes in the range 10-40 cm s-1.

  13. 3D climate modeling of Earth-like extrasolar planets orbiting different types of host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Hamann-Reinus, A.; Kitzmann, D.; Kunze, M.; Langematz, U.; von Paris, P.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.; Stracke, B.

    2015-06-01

    The potential habitability of a terrestrial planet is usually defined by the possible existence of liquid water on its surface, since life as we know it needs liquid water at least during a part of its life cycle. The potential presence of liquid water on a planetary surface depends on many factors such as, most importantly, surface temperatures. The properties of the planetary atmosphere and its interaction with the radiative energy provided by the planet's host star are thereby of decisive importance. In this study we investigate the influence of different main-sequence stars (F, G, and K-type stars) upon the climate of Earth-like extrasolar planets and their potential habitability by applying a state-of-the-art three-dimensional (3D) Earth climate model accounting for local and dynamical processes. The calculations have been performed for planets with Earth-like atmospheres at orbital distances (and corresponding orbital periods) where the total amount of energy received from the various host stars equals the solar constant. In contrast to previous 3D modeling studies, we include the effect of ozone radiative heating upon the vertical temperature structure of the atmospheres. The global orbital mean results obtained have been compared to those of a one-dimensional (1D) radiative convective climate model to investigate the approximation of global mean 3D results by those of 1D models. The different stellar spectral energy distributions lead to different surface temperatures and due to ozone heating to very different vertical temperature structures. As previous 1D studies we find higher surface temperatures for the Earth-like planet around the K-type star, and lower temperatures for the planet around the F-type star compared to an Earth-like planet around the Sun. However, this effect is more pronounced in the 3D model results than in the 1D model because the 3D model accounts for feedback processes such as the ice-albedo and the water vapor feedback. Whether the

  14. Multiplicity in transiting planet-host stars. A lucky imaging study of Kepler candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Bouy, H.

    2012-10-01

    Context. In the exoplanetary era, the Kepler spacecraft is causing a revolution by discovering thousands of new planet candidates. However, a follow-up program is needed to reject false candidates and fully characterize the bona-fide exoplanets. Aims: Our main aims are to 1./ detect and analyze close companions inside the typical Kepler point spread function (PSF) to study whether they are the responsible for the dimming found in Kepler light curves, 2./ study the change in the stellar and planetary parameters caused by an unresolved object, 3./ help validate the Kepler objects of interest (KOI) that do not have any object inside the Kepler PSF, and 4./ study the multiplicity rate of planet-host candidates. Such a large sample of observed planet-host candidates allows us to derive statistics for close (visual or bounded) companions to the harboring star. Methods: We present lucky imaging observations for a total of 98 KOIs. This technique is based on the acquisition of thousands of very-short-exposure-time images. A selection and combination of a small amount of the highest quality frames provides a high resolution image with objects having a 0.1 arcsec PSF. We apply this technique to carry out observations in the Sloan i and z filters of our Kepler candidates. Results: We find blended objects inside the Kepler PSF for a significant percentage of KOIs. On the one hand, only 58.2% of the hosts do not have any object within 6 arcsec. On the other hand, we find 19 companions closer than 3 arcsec in 17 KOIs. According to their magnitudes and i - z colors, 8 of them could be physically bound to the host star.

  15. Do Nuclear Star Clusters and Supermassive Black Holes Follow the Same Host-Galaxy Correlations?

    DOE PAGES

    Erwin, Peter; Gadotti, Dimitri Alexei

    2012-01-01

    Smore » tudies have suggested that there is a strong correlation between the masses of nuclear star clusters (NSCs) and their host galaxies, a correlation which is said to be an extension of the well-known correlations between supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies. But careful analysis of disk galaxies—including 2D bulge/disk/bar decompositions—shows that whileMBHs correlate with the stellar mass of the bulge component of galaxies, the masses of NSCs correlate much better with the total galaxy stellar mass. In addition, the mass ratio M NSC / M ⋆ ,  tot for NSCs in spirals (at least those with Hubble typesc and later) is typically an order of magnitude smaller than the mass ratio M BH / M ⋆ ,  bul ofMBHs. The absence of a universal “central massive object” correlation argues against common formation and growth mechanisms for bothMBHs and NSCs. We also discuss evidence for a break in the NSC-host galaxy correlation, galaxies with Hubble types earlier thanbc appear to host systematically more massive NSCs than do typesc and later.« less

  16. Progenitor mass constraints for core-collapse supernovae from correlations with host galaxy star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. P.; Habergham, S. M.; James, P. A.; Hamuy, M.

    2012-08-01

    Using Hα emission as a tracer of ongoing (<16 Myr old) and near-ultraviolet (UV) emission as a tracer of recent (16-100 Myr old) star formation, we present constraints on the properties of core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) progenitors through the association of their explosion sites with star-forming regions. Amalgamating previous results with those gained from new data, we present statistics of a large sample of SNe; 163.5 Type II (58 IIP, 13 IIL, 13.5 IIb, 19 IIn and 12 'impostors', plus 48 with no sub-type classification) and 96.5 Type Ib/c (39.5 Ib and 52 Ic, plus five with no sub-type classification). Using pixel statistics we build distributions of associations of different SN types with host galaxy star formation. Our main findings and conclusions are as follows. An increasing progenitor mass sequence is observed, implied from an increasing association of SNe to host galaxy Hα emission. This commences with the Type Ia showing the weakest association, followed by the Type II, then the Ib, with the Type Ic showing the strongest correlation to star-forming regions. Thus, our progenitor mass sequence runs Ia-II-Ib-Ic. Overall, the Type Ibc SNe are found to occur nearer to bright H II regions than SNe of Type II. This implies that the former have shorter stellar lifetimes, thus arising from more massive progenitor stars. While Type IIP SNe do not closely follow the ongoing star formation, they accurately trace the recent formation. This implies that their progenitors arise from stars at the low end of the CC SN mass sequence, consistent with direct detections of progenitors in pre-explosion imaging. Similarly, the Type IIn SNe trace recent but not the ongoing star formation. This implies that, contrary to the general consensus, the majority of these SN do not arise from the most massive stars. Results and suggestive constraints are also presented for the

  17. Three regimes of extrasolar planet radius inferred from host star metallicities.

    PubMed

    Buchhave, Lars A; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2014-05-29

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Here we report the metallicities (that is, the abundances of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (∼4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1.7 Earth radii), gas dwarf planets with rocky cores and hydrogen-helium envelopes (radii between 1.7 and 3.9 Earth radii) and ice or gas giant planets (radii greater than 3.9 Earth radii). These transitions correspond well with those inferred from dynamical mass estimates, implying that host star metallicity, which is a proxy for the initial solids inventory of the protoplanetary disk, is a key ingredient regulating the structure of planetary systems.

  18. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, Sub-Neptune Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The gravitational microlensing exoplanet detection method is uniquely sensitive to cold, low-mass planets which orbit beyond the snow-line, where the most massive planets are thought to form. The early statistical results from microlensing indicate that Neptune-Saturn mass planets located beyond the snow-line are substantially more common than their counterparts in closer orbits that have found by the Doppler radial velocity method. We present the discovery of the planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, which demonstrates that the gravitational microlensing method also has the capability to measure the masses of cold, low-mass planets. The mass measurements of the host star and the planet are made possible by the detection of the microlensing parallax signal due to the orbital motion or the Earth as well as observations from the EPOXI spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The microlensing light curve indicates a planetary host star mass of M(sun) = 0.54 + / - 0.05M(sun) located at a distance of DL= 2.94 _ 0.21 kpc, orbited by a planet of mass mp= 9.8 +/-1.1M(Earth) with a semi-major axis of a = 3.1(+1.9-0.4)MAU.

  19. Three regimes of extrasolar planet radius inferred from host star metallicities

    PubMed Central

    Buchhave, Lars A.; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W.; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods1. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Here we report the metallicities (that is, the abundances of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (~4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1.7 Earth radii), gas dwarf planets with rocky cores and hydrogen-helium envelopes (radii between 1.7 and 3.9 Earth radii) and ice or gas giant planets (radii greater than 3.9 Earth radii). These transitions correspond well with those inferred from dynamical mass estimates2,3, implying that host star metallicity, which is a proxy for the initial solids inventory of the protoplanetary disk, is a key ingredient regulating the structure of planetary systems. PMID:24870544

  20. Three regimes of extrasolar planet radius inferred from host star metallicities.

    PubMed

    Buchhave, Lars A; Bizzarro, Martin; Latham, David W; Sasselov, Dimitar; Cochran, William D; Endl, Michael; Isaacson, Howard; Juncher, Diana; Marcy, Geoffrey W

    2014-05-29

    Approximately half of the extrasolar planets (exoplanets) with radii less than four Earth radii are in orbits with short periods. Despite their sheer abundance, the compositions of such planets are largely unknown. The available evidence suggests that they range in composition from small, high-density rocky planets to low-density planets consisting of rocky cores surrounded by thick hydrogen and helium gas envelopes. Here we report the metallicities (that is, the abundances of elements heavier than hydrogen and helium) of more than 400 stars hosting 600 exoplanet candidates, and find that the exoplanets can be categorized into three populations defined by statistically distinct (∼4.5σ) metallicity regions. We interpret these regions as reflecting the formation regimes of terrestrial-like planets (radii less than 1.7 Earth radii), gas dwarf planets with rocky cores and hydrogen-helium envelopes (radii between 1.7 and 3.9 Earth radii) and ice or gas giant planets (radii greater than 3.9 Earth radii). These transitions correspond well with those inferred from dynamical mass estimates, implying that host star metallicity, which is a proxy for the initial solids inventory of the protoplanetary disk, is a key ingredient regulating the structure of planetary systems. PMID:24870544

  1. ON THE SURVIVAL OF BROWN DWARFS AND PLANETS ENGULFED BY THEIR GIANT HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Passy, Jean-Claude; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; De Marco, Orsola

    2012-11-10

    The recent discovery of two Earth-mass planets in close orbits around an evolved star has raised questions as to whether substellar companions can survive encounters with their host stars. We consider whether these companions could have been stripped of significant amounts of mass during the phase when they orbited through the dense inner envelopes of the giant. We apply the criterion derived by Murray et al. for disruption of gravitationally bound objects by ram pressure to determine whether mass loss may have played a role in the histories of these and other recently discovered low-mass companions to evolved stars. We find that the brown dwarf and Jovian-mass objects circling WD 0137-349, SDSS J08205+0008, and HIP 13044 are most unlikely to have lost significant mass during the common envelope phase. However, the Earth-mass planets found around KIC 05807616 could well be the remnants of one or two Jovian-mass planets that lost extensive mass during the common envelope phase.

  2. A mid-infrared search for substellar companions of nearby planet-host stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hulsebus, A.; Marengo, M.; Carson, J.; Stapelfeldt, K.

    2014-03-20

    Determining the presence of widely separated substellar-mass companion is crucial to understand the dynamics of inner planets in extrasolar planetary systems (e.g., to explain their high mean eccentricity as inner planets are perturbed by the Kozai mechanism). We report the results of our Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) imaging search for widely separated (10''-25'') substellar-mass companions for 14 planet-host stars within 15 pc of the Sun. Using deep 3.6 and 4.5 μm observations in subarray mode, we found one object in the field of 47 UMa with [3.6]–[4.5] color similar to a T5 dwarf, which is, however, unlikely to share common proper motion with 47 UMa. We also found three objects with brown-dwarf-like [3.6]–[4.5] color limits in the fields of GJ 86, HD 160691, and GJ 581, as well as another in the field of HD 69830 for which we have excluded common proper motion. We provide model-based upper mass limits for unseen objects around all stars in our sample, with typical sensitivity to 10 M {sub J} objects from a projected separation of 50-300 AU from the parent star. We also discuss our data analysis methods for point-spread-function subtraction, image co-alignment, and artifact subtraction of IRAC subarray images.

  3. Extreme star formation events in quasar hosts over 0.5 < z < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, L. K.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Feltre, A.; Farrah, D.; Clarke, C.; Harris, K. A.; Hurley, P.; Oliver, S.; Page, M.; Wang, L.

    2016-11-01

    We explore the relationship between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation in a sample of 513 optically luminous type 1 quasars up to redshifts of ˜4 hosting extremely high star formation rates (SFRs). The quasars are selected to be individually detected by the Herschel SPIRE instrument at >3σ at 250 μm, leading to typical SFRs of order of 1000 M⊙ yr-1. We find the average SFRs to increase by almost a factor 10 from z ˜ 0.5 to z ˜ 3, mirroring the rise in the comoving SFR density over the same epoch. However, we find that the SFRs remain approximately constant with increasing accretion luminosity for accretion luminosities above 1012 L⊙. We also find that the SFRs do not correlate with black hole mass. Both of these results are most plausibly explained by the existence of a self-regulation process by the starburst at high SFRs, which controls SFRs on time-scales comparable to or shorter than the AGN or starburst duty cycles. We additionally find that SFRs do not depend on Eddington ratio at any redshift, consistent with no relation between SFR and black hole growth rate per unit black hole mass. Finally, we find that high-ionization broad absorption line (HiBAL) quasars have indistinguishable far-infrared properties to those of classical quasars, consistent with HiBAL quasars being normal quasars observed along a particular line of sight, with the outflows in HiBAL quasars not having any measurable effect on the star formation in their hosts.

  4. Rates and Properties of Type Ia Supernovae as a Function of Mass and Star Formation in Their Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Le Borgne, D.; Pritchet, C. J.; Hodsman, A.; Neill, J. D.; Howell, D. A.; Carlberg, R. G.; Astier, P.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Hook, I.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Ellis, R. S.; Filiol, M.; Lusset, V.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.

    2006-09-01

    We show that Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are formed within both very young and old stellar populations, with observed rates that depend on the stellar mass and mean star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. Models in which the SN Ia rate depends solely on host galaxy stellar mass are ruled out with >99% confidence. Our analysis is based on 100 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, plus 24 photometrically classified events, all from the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) and distributed over 0.2host galaxies by fitting their broadband spectral energy distributions with the galaxy spectral synthesis code PÉGASE.2. We show that the SN Ia rate per unit mass is proportional to the specific SFR of the parent galaxies-more vigorously star-forming galaxies host more SNe Ia per unit stellar mass, broadly equivalent to the trend of increasing SN Ia rate in later type galaxies seen in the local universe. Following earlier suggestions for a simple ``two-component'' model approximating the SN Ia rate, we find bivariate linear dependencies of the SN Ia rate on both the stellar masses and the mean SFRs of the host systems. We find that the SN Ia rate can be well represented as the sum of 5.3+/-1.1×10-14 SNe yr-1 Msolar-1 and 3.9+/-0.7×10-4 SNe yr-1 (Msolar yr-1)-1 of star formation. We also demonstrate a dependence of distant SN Ia light-curve shapes on star formation in the host galaxy, similar to trends observed locally. Passive galaxies, with no star formation, preferentially host faster declining/dimmer SNe Ia, while brighter events are found in systems with ongoing star formation.

  5. SPECTROSCOPIC PROPERTIES OF STAR-FORMING HOST GALAXIES AND TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA HUBBLE RESIDUALS IN A NEARLY UNBIASED SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect

    D'Andrea, Chris B.; Gupta, Ravi R.; Sako, Masao; Morris, Matt; Nichol, Robert C.; Campbell, Heather; Lampeitl, Hubert; Brown, Peter J.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Kessler, Richard; Garnavich, Peter; Jha, Saurabh W.; Marriner, John; Schneider, Donald P.; Smith, Mathew

    2011-12-20

    We examine the correlation between supernova (SN) host-galaxy properties and their residuals in the Hubble diagram. We use SNe discovered during the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey, and focus on objects at a redshift of z < 0.15, where the selection effects of the survey are known to yield a complete Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) sample. To minimize the bias in our analysis with respect to measured host-galaxy properties, spectra were obtained for nearly all hosts, spanning a range in magnitude of -23 < M{sub r} < -17. In contrast to previous works that use photometric estimates of host mass as a proxy for global metallicity, we analyze host-galaxy spectra to obtain gas-phase metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) from host galaxies with active star formation. From a final sample of {approx}40 emission-line galaxies, we find that light-curve-corrected SNe Ia are {approx}0.1 mag brighter in high-metallicity hosts than in low-metallicity hosts. We also find a significant (>3{sigma}) correlation between the Hubble Residuals of SNe Ia and the specific SFR of the host galaxy. We comment on the importance of SN/host-galaxy correlations as a source of systematic bias in future deep SN surveys.

  6. CARBON AND OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN THE HOT JUPITER EXOPLANET HOST STAR XO-2B AND ITS BINARY COMPANION

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Schuler, Simon C.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2013-05-01

    With the aim of connecting the compositions of stars and planets, we present the abundances of carbon and oxygen, as well as iron and nickel, for the transiting exoplanet host star XO-2N and its wide-separation binary companion XO-2S. Stellar parameters are derived from high-resolution, high signal-to-noise spectra, and the two stars are found to be similar in their T{sub eff}, log g, iron ([Fe/H]), and nickel ([Ni/H]) abundances. Their carbon ([C/H]) and oxygen ([O/H]) abundances also overlap within errors, although XO-2N may be slightly more C-rich and O-rich than XO-2S. The C/O ratios of both stars ({approx}0.60 {+-} 0.20) may also be somewhat larger than solar (C/O {approx} 0.50). The XO-2 system has a transiting hot Jupiter orbiting one binary component but not the other, allowing us to probe the potential effects planet formation might have on the host star composition. Additionally, with multiple observations of its atmosphere the transiting exoplanet XO-2b lends itself to compositional analysis, which can be compared to the natal chemical environment established by our binary star elemental abundances. This work sets the stage for determining how similar or different exoplanet and host star compositions are, and the implications for planet formation, by discussing the C/O ratio measurements in the unique environment of a visual binary system with one star hosting a transiting hot Jupiter.

  7. STAR CLUSTER COMPLEXES AND THE HOST GALAXY IN THREE H II GALAXIES: Mrk 36, UM 408, AND UM 461

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, P.; Telles, E.; Nigoche-Netro, A.

    2011-11-15

    We present a stellar population study of three H II galaxies (Mrk 36, UM 408, and UM 461) based on the analysis of new ground-based high-resolution near-infrared J, H, and K{sub p} broadband and Br{gamma} narrowband images obtained with Gemini/NIRI. We identify and determine the relative ages and masses of the elementary star clusters and/or star cluster complexes of the starburst regions in each of these galaxies by comparing the colors with evolutionary synthesis models that include the contribution of stellar continuum, nebular continuum, and emission lines. We found that the current star cluster formation efficiency in our sample of low-luminosity H II galaxies is {approx}10%. Therefore, most of the recent star formation is not in massive clusters. Our findings seem to indicate that the star formation mode in our sample of galaxies is clumpy, and that these complexes are formed by a few massive star clusters with masses {approx}>10{sup 4} M{sub Sun }. The age distribution of these star cluster complexes shows that the current burst started recently and likely simultaneously over short timescales in their host galaxies, triggered by some internal mechanism. Finally, the fraction of the total cluster mass with respect to the low surface brightness (or host galaxy) mass, considering our complete range in ages, is less than 1%.

  8. Chromosomes Emission of Planet Candidate Host Stars: A Way to Identify False Positives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoff, Christoffer; Albrecht, Simon; Bonanno, Alfio; Faurschou Knudsen, Mads

    2016-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that the presence of closely orbiting giant planets is associated with enhanced chromospheric emission of their host stars. The main cause for such a relation would likely be enhanced dynamo action induced by the planet. We present measurements of chromospheric emission in 234 planet candidate systems from the Kepler mission. This ensemble includes 37 systems with giant-planet candidates, which show a clear emission enhancement. The enhancement, however, disappears when systems that are also identified as eclipsing binary candidates are removed from the ensemble. This suggests that a large fraction of the giant-planet candidate systems with chromospheric emission stronger than the Sun are not giant-planet systems, but false positives. Such false-positive systems could be tidally interacting binaries with strong chromospheric emission. This hypothesis is supported by an analysis of 188 eclipsing binary candidates that show increasing chromospheric emission as function of decreasing orbital period.

  9. Solar ALMA observations - A revolutionizing new view at our host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Brajsa, Roman; Bastian, Timothy S.; Barta, Miroslav; Hales, Antonio; Yagoubov, Pavel; Hudson, Hugh; Loukitcheva, Maria; Fleishman, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    Observations of the Sun with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have a large potential for revolutionizing our understanding of our host star with far reaching implications for stars in general. The radiation emitted at ALMA wavelengths originates mostly from the chromosphere - a complex and dynamic layer between the photosphere and the corona, which plays an important role in the transport of energy and matter and the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere.Despite decades of intensive research, the chromosphere is still elusive and challenging to observe owing to the complicated formation mechanisms of currently available diagnostics. ALMA will change the scene substantially as it serves as a nearly linear thermometer at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution, enabling us to study the complex interaction of magnetic fields and shock waves and yet-to-be-discovered dynamical processes. Furthermore, radio recombination and molecular lines may have great diagnostic potential but need to be investigated first. These unprecedented capabilities promise important new findings for a large range of topics in solar physics including the structure, dynamics and energy balance of quiet Sun regions, active regions and sunspots, flares and prominences. As a part of ongoing development studies, an international network has been initiated, which aims at defining and preparing key solar science with ALMA through simulation studies: SSALMON -- Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (http://ssalmon.uio.no). Here, we give an overview of potential science cases.

  10. Discovery and Mass Measurements of a Cold, 10-Earth Mass Planet and Its Host Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Richard K.; Muraki, Y.; Han, C.; Bennett, D. P.; Gaudi, B. S.

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and mass measurement of the cold, low-mass planet MOA-2009-BLG-266Lb, made with the gravitational microlensing method. This planet has a mass of mp = 10.4 +/- M(Earth) and orbits a star of Mstar = 0.56 +/- 0.09 M(Sun) at a semi-major axis of a = 3.2 + 1.9/-0.5 AU, and an orbital period of 7.6 +7.7/-1.5 yrs. The planet and host star mass measurements are due to the measurement of the microlensing parallax effect. This measurement was primarily due to the orbital motion of the Earth, but the analysis also demonstrates the capability measure micro lensing parallax with the Deep Impact (or EPOXI) spacecraft in a Heliocentric orbit. The planet mass and orbital distance are similar to predictions for the critical core mass needed to accrete a substantial gaseous envelope, and thus may indicate that this planet is a failed gas giant. This and future microlensing detections will test planet formation theory predictions regarding the prevalence and masses of such planets

  11. Future Interstellar Travel Destinations: Assessing the Suitability of Nearby Red Dwarf Stars as Hosts to Habitable Life-bearing Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, Edward F.; Engle, S. G.

    2013-01-01

    As part of our NSF/NASA sponsored “Living with a Red Dwarf Star” program, we are carrying out a comprehensive study of red dwarf stars across the electromagnetic spectrum to assess their suitability as hosts for habitable planets. These cool, dim, long-lived, low mass stars comprise >75% of the stars in our Galaxy. Moreover an increasing number of (potentially habitable) large Earth-size planets are being found hosted by red dwarfs. With intrinsically low luminosities (L < 0.02 Lsun), the habitable zones (HZs) of hosted planets are close to their host stars (typically 0.05 AU < HZ <0.4 AU). Our study indicates red dwarf HZ planets without strong (protective) magnetic fields are especially susceptible to atmospheric erosion & loss by the star’s X-UV and wind fluxes. Also, the frequent flaring of young red dwarf stars and tidal-locking of close-in planets could challenge the development of life. But tidal locking of these planets could have some advantages for the developmenet of life. The long lifetimes of the red dwarfs (> 50 BY) could be favorable for the development of complex (possibly even intelligent) life. We discuss our results in the context of nearby red dwarfs as possible destinations for future interstellar missions program. We illustrate this with examples of the red dwarf exoplanet systems: GJ 581 and HD 85512 (both with large HZ Earth-size planets). Also we discuss the nearest star (4.3 LY) - the red dwarf - Proxima Centauri as a potential destination for future interstellar missions such proposed by Icarus Interstellar and the 100-Year Starship and StarVoyager programs. We gratefully acknowledge the support from NSF-Grant AST-10-09903, Chandra Grants GO1-12124X & GO2-13020X and HST Grant GO-10920.

  12. Supermassive black holes and central star clusters: Connection with the host galaxy kinematics and color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasov, A. V.; Cherepashchuk, A. M.

    2013-11-01

    The relationship between the masses of the central, supermassive black holes ( M bh) and of the nuclear star clusters ( M nc) of disk galaxies with various parameters galaxies are considered: the rotational velocity at R = 2 kpc V (2), the maximum rotational velocity V max, the indicative dynamical mass M 25, the integrated mass of the stellar population M *, and the integrated color index B-V. The rotational velocities andmasses of the central objects were taken from the literature. Themass M nc correlatesmore closely with the kinematic parameters and the disk mass than M bh, including with the velocity V max, which is closely related to the virial mass of the dark halo. On average, lenticular galaxies are characterized by higher masses M bh compared to other types of galaxies with similar characteristics. The dependence of the blackhole mass on the color index is bimodal: galaxies of the red group (red-sequence) with B-V >0.6-0.7 which are mostly early-type galaxies with weak star formation, differ appreciably from blue galaxies, which have higher values of M nc and M bh. At the dependences we consider between the masses of the central objects and the parameters of the host galaxies (except for the dependence of M bh on the central velocity dispersion), the red-group galaxies have systematically higher M bh values, even when the host-galaxy parameters are similar. In contrast, in the case of nuclear star clusters, the blue and red galaxies form unified sequences. The results agree with scenarios in which most red-group galaxies form as a result of the partial or complete loss of interstellar gas in a stage of high nuclear activity in galaxies whose central black-hole masses exceed 106-107 M ⊙ (depending on the mass of the galaxy itself). The bulk of disk galaxies with M bh > 107 M ⊙ are lenticular galaxies (types S0, E/S0) whose disks are practically devoid of gas.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Spectra of wide companions to planet-host stars (Lodieu+ 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodieu, N.; Perez-Garrido, A.; Bejar, V. J. S.; Gauza, B.; Ruiz, M. T.; Rebolo, R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Martin, E. L.

    2014-08-01

    Optical spectra of 12 wide companions to planet-host stars. We provide ascii file with the wavelength and the flux in the first and second column, respectively. Wavelengths are in Angstroms and flux in ergs/cm2/s/Angstroem. (2 data files).

  14. The pattern of extreme star formation events in SDSS quasar hosts in Herschel fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchford, Lura Katherine; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Feltre, Anna; Clarke, Charlotte; Farrah, Duncan; Harris, Kathryn Amy; Hurley, Peter; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mat; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    Using a sample of ~500 quasars up to redshifts of ~4 detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) instrument of Herschel, we describe the behavior of intense starbursts in luminous quasars and how it correlates with the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN). We select our objects in the Herschel Stripe 82 Survey (HerS) and in the largest fields of the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES), including the HerMES Large Mode Survey (HeLMS).The far-infrared (FIR) emission of our objects is quantified using a spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting technique. As our sources are individually detected in the SPIRE bands, they are bright in the FIR, exhibiting typical star formation rates (SFRs) of order of 1000 M⊙yr-1. We find the SFR to increase by a factor of nearly ten from z~0.5 to z~3, in line with the increasing comoving SFR density over a similar redshift range. The SFR, however, is shown to remain constant with increasing quasar luminosity for quasars with IR luminosities above 1012L⊙, indicating a self-regulating star formation process rather than a suppression effect due to the presence of powerful AGN. We find no further proof of a causal relation between star formation and accretion onto the central black hole, as the SFR and the Eddington ratio, λEdd, are found to be uncorrelated.We then compare the broad absorption line (BAL) quasars to the rest of the quasar population, as they are candidates for outflows in action from which shorter-term feedback effects could be sought. We find the accretion luminosities and λEdd values of BAL quasars to be drawn from the same population as those of the non-BAL quasars; further, the host SFRs are statistically similar among the two populations, all of which argue against feedback effects. These similarities also oppose an evolutionary scenario, as a different evolutionary stage would imply differences in either the accretion state

  15. Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey. II. Adaptive Optics Imaging of 969 Kepler Exoplanet Candidate Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranec, Christoph; Ziegler, Carl; Law, Nicholas M.; Morton, Tim; Riddle, Reed; Atkinson, Dani; Schonhut, Jessica; Crepp, Justin

    2016-07-01

    We initiated the Robo-AO Kepler Planetary Candidate Survey in 2012 to observe each Kepler exoplanet candidate host star with high angular resolution, visible light, laser adaptive optics (AOs) imaging. Our goal is to find nearby stars lying in Kepler's photometric apertures that are responsible for the relatively high probability of false-positive exoplanet detections and that cause underestimates of the size of transit radii. Our comprehensive survey will also shed light on the effects of stellar multiplicity on exoplanet properties and will identify rare exoplanetary architectures. In this second part of our ongoing survey, we observed an additional 969 Kepler planet candidate hosts and we report blended stellar companions up to {{Δ }}m≈ 6 that contribute to Kepler's measured light curves. We found 203 companions within ˜4″ of 181 of the Kepler stars, of which 141 are new discoveries. We measure the nearby star probability for this sample of Kepler planet candidate host stars to be 10.6% ± 1.1% at angular separations up to 2.″5, significantly higher than the 7.4% ± 1.0% probability discovered in our initial sample of 715 stars; we find the probability increases to 17.6% ± 1.5% out to a separation of 4.″0. The median position of Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) observed in this survey are 1.°1 closer to the galactic plane, which may account for some of the nearby star probability enhancement. We additionally detail 50 Keck AO images of Robo-AO observed KOIs in order to confirm 37 companions detected at a <5σ significance level and to obtain additional infrared photometry on higher significance detected companions.

  16. Tidal dissipation in planet-hosting stars: damping of spin-orbit misalignment and survival of hot Jupiters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong

    2012-06-01

    Observations of hot Jupiters around solar-type stars with very short orbital periods (˜1 d) suggest that tidal dissipation in such stars is not too efficient so that these planets can survive against rapid orbital decay. This is consistent with recent theoretical works, which indicate that the tidal quality factor, Q★, of planet-hosting stars can indeed be much larger than the values inferred from the circularization of stellar binaries. On the other hand, recent measurements of Rossiter-McLaughlin effects in transiting hot Jupiter systems not only reveal that many such systems have misaligned stellar spin with respect to the orbital angular momentum axis, but also show that systems with cooler host stars tend to have aligned spin and orbital axes. Winn et al. suggested that this obliquity-temperature correlation may be explained by efficient damping of stellar obliquity due to tidal dissipation in the convection zone of the star. This explanation, however, is in apparent contradiction with the survival of these short-period hot Jupiters. We show that in the solar-type parent stars of close-in exoplanetary systems, the effective tidal Q★ governing the damping of stellar obliquity can be much smaller than that governing orbital decay. This is because, for misaligned systems, the tidal potential contains a Fourier component with frequency equal to the stellar spin frequency (in the rotating frame of the star) and rotating opposite to the stellar spin. This component can excite inertial waves in the convective envelope of the star, and the dissipation of inertial waves then leads to a spin-orbit alignment torque and a spin-down torque, but not orbital decay. By contrast, for aligned systems, such inertial wave excitation is forbidden since the tidal forcing frequency is much larger than the stellar spin frequency. We derive a general effective tidal evolution theory for misaligned binaries, taking account of different tidal responses and dissipation rates for

  17. A 12-year Activity Cycle for the Nearby Planet Host Star HD 219134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marshall C.; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Meschiari, Stefano; Robertson, Paul; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Brugamyer, Erik J.; Caldwell, Caroline; Hatzes, Artie P.; Ramírez, Ivan; Wittenmyer, Robert A.

    2016-04-01

    The nearby (6.5 pc) star HD 219134 was recently shown by Motalebi et al. and Vogt et al. to host several planets, the innermost of which is transiting. We present 27 years of radial velocity (RV) observations of this star from the McDonald Observatory Planet Search program, and 19 years of stellar activity data. We detect a long-period activity cycle measured in the Ca ii SHK index, with a period of 4230 ± 100 days (11.7 years), very similar to the 11 year solar activity cycle. Although the period of the Saturn-mass planet HD 219134 h is close to half that of the activity cycle, we argue that it is not an artifact due to stellar activity. We also find a significant periodicity in the SHK data due to stellar rotation with a period of 22.8 days. This is identical to the period of planet f identified by Vogt et al., suggesting that this RV signal might be caused by rotational modulation of stellar activity rather than a planet. Analysis of our RVs allows us to detect the long-period planet HD 219134 h and the transiting super-Earth HD 219134 b. Finally, we use our long time baseline to constrain the presence of longer period planets in the system, excluding to 1σ objects with M{sin}i\\gt 0.36{M}J at 12 years (corresponding to the orbital period of Jupiter) and M{sin}i\\gt 0.72{M}J at a period of 16.4 years (assuming a circular orbit for an outer companion).

  18. Suppression of Star Formation in the Hosts of Low-excitation Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir

    2016-02-01

    The feedback from radio-loud active galactic nuclei (R-AGNs) may help maintain low star-formation (SF) rates in their early-type hosts, but the observational evidence for this mechanism has been inconclusive. We study systematic differences of aggregate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of various subsets of ∼4000 low-redshift R-AGNs from Best & Heckman with respect to (currently) inactive control samples selected to have matching redshift, stellar mass, population age, axis ratio, and environment. Aggregate SEDs, ranging from the ultraviolet (UV) through mid-infrared (mid-IR, 22 μm), were constructed using a Bayesian method that eliminates biases from non-detections in Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. We study rare high-excitation sources separately from low-excitation ones, which we split by environment and host properties. We find that both the UV and mid-IR emission of non-cluster R-AGNs (80% of sample) are suppressed by ∼0.2 dex relative to that of the control group, especially for moderately massive galaxies (log M* ≲ 11). The difference disappears for high-mass R-AGNs and for R-AGNs in clusters, where other, non-AGN quenching/maintenance mechanisms may dominate, or where the suppression of SF due to AGNs may persist between active phases of the central engine, perhaps because of the presence of a hot gaseous halo storing AGN energy. High-excitation (high accretion rate) sources, which make up 2% of the R-AGN sample, do not show any evidence of SF suppression (their UV is the same as in controls), but they exhibit a strong mid-IR excess due to AGN dust heating.

  19. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Temporally- and Spectrally-Resolved Irradiance from Low-mass Exoplanet Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Youngblood, Allison; Linsky, Jeffrey; MUSCLES Treasury Survey Team

    2016-01-01

    The spectral and temporal behavior of exoplanet host stars is a critical input to models of the chemistry and evolution of planetary atmospheres. High-energy photons (X-ray to near-UV; 5 - 3200 Ang) from these stars regulate the atmospheric temperature profiles and photochemistry on orbiting planets, influencing the production of potential "biomarker" gases. It has been shown that the atmospheric signatures of potentially habitable planets around low-mass stars may be significantly different from planets orbiting Sun-like stars owing to the different UV spectral energy distribution. I will present results from a panchromatic survey (Hubble/Chandra/XMM/optical) of M and K dwarf exoplanet hosts, the MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems). We reconstruct the Lyman-alpha and extreme-UV (100-900 Ang) radiation lost to interstellar attenuation and create 5 Angstrom to 5 micron stellar irradiance spectra; these data will be publically available as a High-Level Science Product on MAST. We find that all low-mass exoplanet host stars exhibit significant chromospheric/transition region/coronal emission -- no "UV inactive" M dwarfs are observed. The F(far-UV)/F(near-UV) flux ratio, a driver for possible abiotic production of the suggested biomarkers O2 and O3, increases by ~3 orders of magnitude as the habitable zone moves inward from 1 to 0.1 AU, while the incident far-UV (912 - 1700 Ang) and XUV (5 - 900 Ang) radiation field strengths decrease by factors of a few across this range. Far-UV flare activity is common in 'optically inactive' M dwarfs; statistics from the entire sample indicate that large UV flares (E(300 - 1700 Ang) >= 10^31 erg) occur several times per day on typical M dwarf exoplanet hosts.

  20. Orbital motion of the binary brown dwarf companions HD 130948 BC around their host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Neuhäuser, R.; Mugrauer, M.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Adam, C.

    2013-09-01

    Evolutionary models and mass estimates for brown dwarfs remain uncertain, hence determining the masses of brown dwarfs by model-independent methods is important to test and constrain such theories. Following the orbital motion of brown dwarf companions around their primaries gives us the opportunity to dynamically calculate the masses of these systems. In addition, detecting curvature (acceleration or deceleration) in the orbit would confirm that the companion is physically associated with its primary, thus eliminating the possibility of a by-chance alignment of the primary's and the companion's proper motions and positions. Furthermore, the orbit parameters can be important indicators for the formation process of such wide, massive substellar companions. The binary brown dwarf companions to HD 130948 were discovered by Potter et al. We present various observations of this triple system over the course of 7 yr. With these data points we can show that HD 130948 BC are indeed comoving with HD 130948 A with higher significance than before (˜32.4σ), and also for the first time that the BC pair shows differential motion relative to A (˜2.2σ). We introduce an orbit fitting approach and constrain the orbit parameters for the orbit of the BC binary around their host star.

  1. The mass of the super-Earth orbiting the brightest Kepler planet hosting star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; HARPS-N Team

    2016-01-01

    HD 179070, aka Kepler-21, is a V = 8.25 oscillating F6IV star and the brightest exoplanet host discovered by Kepler. An early analysis of the Q0 - Q5 Kepler light curves by Howell et al. (2012) revealed transits of a planetary companion, Kepler-21b, with a radius of 1.6 R_Earth and an orbital period of 2.7857 days. However, they could not determine the mass of the planet from the initial radial velocity observations with Keck-HIRES, and were only able to impose a 2s upper limit of about 10 M_Earth. Here we present 82 new radial velocity observations of this system obtained with the HARPS-N spectrograph. We detect the Doppler shift signal of Kepler-21b at the 3.6s level, and measure a planetary mass of 5.9 ± 1.6 M_Earth. We also update the radius of the planet to 1.65 ± 0.08 R_Earth, using the now available Kepler Q0 - Q17 photometry for this target. The mass of Kepler-21b appears to fall on the apparent dividing line between super-Earths that have lost all the material in their outer layers and those that have retained a significant amount of volatiles. Based on our results Kepler-21b belongs to the first group. Acknowledgement: This work was supported by funding from the NASA XRP Program and the John Templeton Foundation.

  2. LONG GRBs ARE METALLICITY-BIASED TRACERS OF STAR FORMATION: EVIDENCE FROM HOST GALAXIES AND REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, F. Y.; Dai, Z. G. E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies and the redshift distribution of long GRBs by considering that long GRBs occur in low-metallicity environments. We calculate the upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy which can produce long GRBs by utilizing the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relation of galaxies. After comparing with the observed GRB host galaxies masses, we find that the observed GRB host galaxy masses can fit the predicted masses well if GRBs occur in low-metallicity 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. GRB host galaxies have low metallicity, low mass, and high star formation rate compared with galaxies of seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We also study the cumulative redshift distribution of the latest Swift long GRBs by adding dark GRBs and 10 new GRBs redshifts from the TOUGH survey. The observed discrepancy between the GRB rate and the star formation history can be reconciled by considering that GRBs tend to occur in low-metallicity galaxies with 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7. We conclude that the metallicity cutoff that can produce long GRBs is about 12 + log (O/H){sub KK04} < 8.7 from the host mass distribution and redshift distribution.

  3. Evidence of suppression of star formation by quasar-driven winds in gas-rich host galaxies at z < 1?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-10-01

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies through heating or driving gas out of the galaxy, preventing further increase in stellar mass. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been scarce. We have assembled a sample of 132 radio-quiet type-2 and red AGN at 0.1 < z < 1. We measure the kinematics of the AGN-ionized gas, the host galaxies' stellar masses and star formation rates (SFRs) and investigate the relationships between AGN luminosities, specific star formation rates (sSFRs) and outflow strengths W90 - the 90 per cent velocity width of the [O III]λ5007Å line power and a proxy for the AGN-driven outflow speed. Outflow strength is independent of sSFR for AGN selected on their mid-IR luminosity, in agreement with previous work demonstrating that star formation is not sufficient to produce the observed ionized gas outflows which have to be powered by AGN activity. More importantly, we find a negative correlation between W90 and sSFR in the AGN hosts with the highest SFRs, i.e. with the highest gas content, where presumably the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest. This implies that AGN with strong outflow signatures are hosted in galaxies that are more `quenched' than galaxies with weaker outflow signatures. Despite the galaxies' high SFRs, we demonstrate that the outflows are not star formation driven but indeed due to AGN powering. This observation is consistent with the AGN having a net suppression, `negative' impact, through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history.

  4. Dense Molecular Gas and the Role of Star Formation in the Host Galaxies of Quasi-stellar Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, A. S.; Solomon, P. M.; Tacconi, L. J.; Vavilkin, T.; Downes, D.

    2006-12-01

    New millimeter-wave CO and HCN observations of the host galaxies of infrared-excess Palomar-Green (PG) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) previously detected in CO are presented. These observations are designed to assess the validity of using the infrared luminosity to estimate star formation rates of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by determining the relative significance of dust heating by young, massive stars and AGNs in QSO hosts and IRAS galaxies with warm, AGN-like infrared colors. The analysis of these data is based, in part, on evidence that HCN traces high-density (>104 cm-3) molecular gas, and that the starburst-to-HCN luminosity ratio, LSB/L'HCN, of IRAS-detected galaxies is constant. The new CO data provide a confirmation of prior claims that PG QSO hosts have high infrared-to-CO luminosity ratios, LIR/L'CO, relative to IRAS galaxies of comparable LIR. Such high LIR/L'CO ratios may be due to significant heating of dust by the QSO or to an increased star formation efficiency in QSO hosts relative to the bulk of the luminous IRAS galaxy population. The HCN data show a similar trend, with the PG QSO host I Zw 1 and most of the warm IRAS galaxies having high LIR/L'HCN (>1600) relative to the cool IRAS galaxy population, for which the median cool~890+440-470. If the assumption is made that the infrared emission from cool IRAS galaxies is reprocessed light from embedded star-forming regions, then high values of LIR/L'HCN are likely the result of dust heating by the AGNs. Further, if the median ratio of L'HCN/L'CO~0.06 observed for Seyfert galaxies and I Zw 1 is applied to the PG QSOs not detected in HCN, then the derived LIR/L'HCN values correspond to a stellar contribution to the production of LIR of ~7%-39%, and star formation rates of ~2-37 Msolar yr-1 are derived for the QSO hosts. The corresponding values for the warm galaxies are ~10%-100% and ~3-220 Msolar yr-1. Alternatively, if the far-infrared is adopted as the star formation component

  5. Limits on surface gravities of Kepler planet-candidate host stars from non-detection of solar-like oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Handberg, R.; Miglio, A.; Davies, G. R.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Lund, M. N.; Arentoft, T.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Karoff, C.; Kjeldsen, H.; Lundkvist, M.; Huber, D.; Hekker, S.; García, R. A.; Basu, S.; Bedding, T. R.; Gilliland, R. L.; Kawaler, S. D.; and others

    2014-03-10

    We present a novel method for estimating lower-limit surface gravities (log g) of Kepler targets whose data do not allow the detection of solar-like oscillations. The method is tested using an ensemble of solar-type stars observed in the context of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium. We then proceed to estimate lower-limit log g for a cohort of Kepler solar-type planet-candidate host stars with no detected oscillations. Limits on fundamental stellar properties, as provided by this work, are likely to be useful in the characterization of the corresponding candidate planetary systems. Furthermore, an important byproduct of the current work is the confirmation that amplitudes of solar-like oscillations are suppressed in stars with increased levels of surface magnetic activity.

  6. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-21

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. PMID:26692041

  7. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH STELLAR ASTROMETRY. III. DETERMINATION OF THE ABSOLUTE MASSES OF EXOPLANETS AND THEIR HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Coughlin, J. L.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes

    2012-05-10

    Astrometric measurements of stellar systems are becoming significantly more precise and common, with many ground- and space-based instruments and missions approaching 1 {mu}as precision. We examine the multi-wavelength astrometric orbits of exoplanetary systems via both analytical formulae and numerical modeling. Exoplanets have a combination of reflected and thermally emitted light that causes the photocenter of the system to shift increasingly farther away from the host star with increasing wavelength. We find that, if observed at long enough wavelengths, the planet can dominate the astrometric motion of the system, and thus it is possible to directly measure the orbits of both the planet and star, and thus directly determine the physical masses of the star and planet, using multi-wavelength astrometry. In general, this technique works best for, though is certainly not limited to, systems that have large, high-mass stars and large, low-mass planets, which is a unique parameter space not covered by other exoplanet characterization techniques. Exoplanets that happen to transit their host star present unique cases where the physical radii of the planet and star can be directly determined via astrometry alone. Planetary albedos and day-night contrast ratios may also be probed via this technique due to the unique signature they impart on the observed astrometric orbits. We develop a tool to examine the prospects for near-term detection of this effect, and give examples of some exoplanets that appear to be good targets for detection in the K to N infrared observing bands, if the required precision can be achieved.

  8. Simulating the environment around planet-hosting stars. II. Stellar winds and inner astrospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Grunhut, J.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of a comprehensive numerical simulation of the environment around three exoplanet-host stars (HD 1237, HD 22049, and HD 147513). Our simulations consider one of the latest models currently used for space weather studies in the Heliosphere, with turbulent Alfvén wave dissipation as the source of coronal heating and stellar wind acceleration. Large-scale magnetic field maps, recovered with two implementations of the tomographic technique of Zeeman-Doppler imaging, serve to drive steady-state solutions in each system. This paper contains the description of the stellar wind and inner astrosphere, while the coronal structure was discussed in a previous paper. The analysis includes the magneto-hydrodynamical properties of the stellar wind, the associated mass and angular momentum loss rates, as well as the topology of the astrospheric current sheet in each system. A systematic comparison among the considered cases is performed, including two reference solar simulations covering activity minimum and maximum. For HD 1237, we investigate the interactions between the structure of the developed stellar wind, and a possible magnetosphere around the Jupiter-mass planet in this system. We find that the process of particle injection into the planetary atmosphere is dominated by the density distribution rather than the velocity profile of the stellar wind. In this context, we predict a maximum exoplanetary radio emission of 12 mJy at 40 MHz in this system, assuming the crossing of a high-density streamer during periastron passage. Furthermore, in combination with the analysis performed in the first paper of this study, we obtain for the first time a fully simulated mass loss-activity relation. This relation is compared and discussed in the context of the previously proposed observational counterpart, derived from astrospheric detections. Finally, we provide a characterisation of the global 3D properties of the stellar wind of these systems, at the inner

  9. Providing Stringent Star Formation Rate Limits of z ˜ 2 QSO Host Galaxies at High Angular Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley A.; Do, Tuan; Larkin, James E.; Armus, Lee; Gallagher, S. C.

    2016-04-01

    We present integral field spectrograph (IFS) with laser guide star adaptive optics (LGS-AO) observations of z ˜ 2 quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) designed to resolve extended nebular line emission from the host galaxy. Our data was obtained with W. M. Keck and Gemini North Observatories, using OSIRIS and NIFS coupled with the LGS-AO systems, respectively. We have conducted a pilot survey of five QSOs, three observed with NIFS+AO and two observed with OSIRIS+AO at an average redshift of z = 2.2. We demonstrate that the combination of AO and IFSs provides the necessary spatial and spectral resolutions required to separate QSO emission from its host. We present our technique for generating a point-spread function (PSF) from the broad-line region of the QSO and performing PSF subtraction of the QSO emission to detect the host galaxy emission at a separation of ˜0.″2 (˜1.4 kpc). We detect Hα narrow-line emission for two sources, SDSS J1029+6510 (zHα = 2.182) and SDSS J0925+0655 (zHα = 2.197), that have evidence for both star formation and extended narrow-line emission. Assuming that the majority of narrow-line Hα emission is from star formation, we infer a star formation rate (SFR) for SDSS J1029+6510 of 78.4 M⊙ yr-1 originating from a compact region that is kinematically offset by 290-350 km s-1. For SDSS J0925+0655 we infer a SFR of 29 M⊙ yr-1 distributed over three clumps that are spatially offset by ˜7 kpc. The null detections on three of the QSOs are used to infer surface brightness limits and we find that at 1.4 kpc from the QSO the un-reddened star formation limit is ≲0.3 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. If we assume typical extinction values for z = 2 type-1 QSOs, the dereddened SFR for our null detections would be ≲0.6 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. These IFS observations indicate that while the central black hole is accreting mass at 10%-40% of the Eddington rate, if star formation is present in the host (1.4-20 kpc) it would have to occur diffusely with significant

  10. An Upper Limit on the Ratio Between the Extreme Ultraviolet and the Bolometric Luminosities of Stars Hosting Habitable Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Sujan

    2016-06-01

    A large number of terrestrial planets in the classical habitable zone of stars of different spectral types have already been discovered and many are expected to be discovered in the near future. However, owing to the lack of knowledge on the atmospheric properties, the ambient environment of such planets are unknown. It is known that sufficient amount of Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) radiation from the star can drive hydrodynamic outflow of hydrogen that may drag heavier species from the atmosphere of the planet. If the rate of mass loss is sufficiently high, then substantial amount of volatiles would escape causing the planet to become uninhabitable. Considering energy-limited hydrodynamical mass loss with an escape rate that causes oxygen to escape alongwith hydrogen, an upper limit for the ratio between the EUV and the bolometric luminosities of stars which constrains the habitability of planets around them is presented here. Application of the limit to planet-hosting stars with known EUV luminosities implies that many M-type of stars should not have habitable planets around them.

  11. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_⊙, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_⊙, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  12. Follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B: A new white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugrauer, M.; Dinçel, B.

    2016-07-01

    We report on our follow-up spectroscopy of HD 1071478 B, a recently detected faint co-moving companion of the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A. The companion is separated from its primary star by about 35 arcsec (or 1790 AU of projected separation) and its optical and near infrared photometry is consistent with a white dwarf, located at the distance of HD 107148 A. In order to confirm the white dwarf nature of the co-moving companion, we obtained follow-up spectroscopic observations of HD 107148 B with CAFOS at the CAHA 2.2 m telescope. According to our CAFOS spectroscopy HD 107148 B is a DA white dwarf with an effective temperature in the range between 5900 and 6400 K. The properties of HD 107148 B can further be constrained with the derived effective temperature and the known visual and infrared photometry of the companion, using evolutionary models of DA white dwarfs. We obtain for HD 107148 B a mass of 0.56±0.05 M_ȯ, a luminosity of (2.0±0.2)×10-4 L_ȯ, log g [cm s-2])=7.95±0.09, and a cooling age of 2100±270 Myr. With its white dwarf companion the exoplanet host star HD 107148 A forms an evolved stellar system, which hosts at least one exoplanet. So far, only few of these evolved systems are known, which represent only about 5 % of all known exoplanet host multiple stellar systems. HD 107148 B is the second confirmed white dwarf companion of an exoplanet host star with a projected separation to its primary star of more than 1000 AU. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).

  13. Transit confirmation and improved stellar and planet parameters for the super-Earth HD 97658 b and its host star

    SciTech Connect

    Van Grootel, V.; Gillon, M.; Scuflaire, R.; Valencia, D.; Madhusudhan, N.; Demory, B.-O.; Queloz, D.; Dragomir, D.; Howe, A. R.; Burrows, A. S.; Deming, D.; Ehrenreich, D.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Pepe, F.; Segransan, D.; Udry, S.; Seager, S.

    2014-05-01

    Super-Earths transiting nearby bright stars are key objects that simultaneously allow for accurate measurements of both their mass and radius, providing essential constraints on their internal composition. We present here the confirmation, based on Spitzer transit observations, that the super-Earth HD 97658 b transits its host star. HD 97658 is a low-mass (M {sub *} = 0.77 ± 0.05 M {sub ☉}) K1 dwarf, as determined from the Hipparcos parallax and stellar evolution modeling. To constrain the planet parameters, we carry out Bayesian global analyses of Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (Keck-HIRES) radial velocities and Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) and Spitzer photometry. HD 97658 b is a massive (M{sub P}=7.55{sub −0.79}{sup +0.83} M{sub ⊕}) and large (R{sub P}=2.247{sub −0.095}{sup +0.098}R{sub ⊕} at 4.5 μm) super-Earth. We investigate the possible internal compositions for HD 97658 b. Our results indicate a large rocky component, of at least 60% by mass, and very little H-He components, at most 2% by mass. We also discuss how future asteroseismic observations can improve the knowledge of the HD 97658 system, in particular by constraining its age. Orbiting a bright host star, HD 97658 b will be a key target for upcoming space missions such as the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), the Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS), the Planetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO), and the James Webb Space Telescope to characterize thoroughly its structure and atmosphere.

  14. KNOW THE STAR, KNOW THE PLANET. V. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE STELLAR COMPANION TO THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR HD 177830

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Lewis C. Jr.; Beichman, Charles; Burruss, Rick; Cady, Eric; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Brenner, Douglas; Luszcz-Cook, Statia; Nilsson, Ricky; Crepp, Justin R.; Baranec, Christoph; Dekany, Richard; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Hinkley, Sasha; King, David; Parry, Ian R.; Pueyo, Laurent; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Soummer, Rémi; Rice, Emily L.; and others

    2015-10-15

    HD 177830 is an evolved K0IV star with two known exoplanets. In addition to the planetary companions it has a late-type stellar companion discovered with adaptive optics imagery. We observed the binary star system with the PHARO near-IR camera and the Project 1640 coronagraph. Using the Project 1640 coronagraph and integral field spectrograph we extracted a spectrum of the stellar companion. This allowed us to determine that the spectral type of the stellar companion is a M4 ± 1 V. We used both instruments to measure the astrometry of the binary system. Combining these data with published data, we determined that the binary star has a likely period of approximately 800 years with a semimajor axis of 100–200 AU. This implies that the stellar companion has had little or no impact on the dynamics of the exoplanets. The astrometry of the system should continue to be monitored, but due to the slow nature of the system, observations can be made once every 5–10 years.

  15. Predicting the Extreme-UV and Lyman-α Fluxes Received by Exoplanets from their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin; Ayres, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Extreme-UV (EUV) radiation from the chromospheres, transition regions, and coronae of host stars (spectral types F, G, K, and M) ionize and heat the outer atmospheres of exoplanets leading to mass loss that is observed during transits and can change the exoplanet's atmosphere. Lyman-α emission from host stars controls the photochemistry in the upper layers of planetary atmospheres by photodissociating important molecules including H_2O, CO_2, CH_4, thereby increasing the oxygen and ozone mixing ratios important for habitability. Both the EUV and strong Lyman-α radiation are largely absorbed by the interstellar medium and must be reconstructed or estimated to understand the radiation environment of exoplanets. In two recent papers, tet{Linsky2013} and tet{Linsky2014}, we have presented robust methods for predicting the intrinsic Lyman-α and EUV fluxes from main sequence cool stars. Solar models and satellite observations (HST, FUSE, and EUVE) provide tests for the feasibility of these methods.

  16. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  17. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  18. The mass of the planet-hosting giant star β Geminorum determined from its p-mode oscillation spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatzes, A. P.; Zechmeister, M.; Matthews, J.; Kuschnig, R.; Walker, G. A. H.; Döllinger, M.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2012-07-01

    Aims: Our aim is to use precise radial velocity measurements and photometric data to derive the frequency spacing of the p-mode oscillation spectrum of the planet-hosting star β Gem. This spacing along with the interferometric radius for this star can then be used to derive an accurate stellar mass. Methods: We use a long time series of over 60 h of precise stellar radial velocity measurements of β Gem taken with an iodine absorption cell at the echelle spectrograph mounted on the 2 m Alfred Jensch Telescope. We also present complementary photometric data for this star taken with the MOST microsatellite spanning 3.6 d. A Fourier analysis is used to derive the frequencies that are present in each data set. Results: The Fourier analysis of the radial velocity data reveals the presence of up to 17 significant pulsation modes in the frequency interval 10-250 μHz. Most of these fall on a grid of equally-spaced frequencies having a separation of 7.14 ± 0.12 μHz. An analysis of 3.6 days of high precision photometry taken with the MOST space telescopes shows the presence of up to 16 modes, six of which are consistent with modes found in the spectral (radial velocity) data. This frequency spacing is consistent with high overtone radial pulsations; however, until the pulsation modes are identified we cannot be sure if some of these are nonradial modes or even mixed modes. The radial velocity frequency spacing along with angular diameter measurements of β Gem via interferometry results in a stellar mass of M = 1.91 ± 0.09 M⊙. This value confirms the intermediate mass of the star determined using stellar evolutionary tracks. Conclusions.β Gem is confirmed to be an intermediate mass star. Stellar pulsations in giant stars along with interferometric radius measurements can provide accurate determinations of the stellar mass of planet hosting giant stars. These can also be used to calibrate stellar evolutionary tracks. Based on observations obtained at the 2 m Alfred

  19. Self-assembly behavior of a linear-star supramolecular amphiphile based on host-guest complexation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Xing; Yang, Fei; Shen, Hong; You, Yezi; Wu, Decheng

    2014-11-01

    A star polymer, β-cyclodextrin-poly(l-lactide) (β-CD-PLLA), and a linear polymer, azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol) (Azo-PEG), could self-assemble into a supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer (β-CD-PLLA@Azo-PEG) based on the host-guest interaction between β-CD and azobenzene moieties. This linear-star supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer further self-assembled into a variety of morphologies, including sphere-like micelle, carambola-like micelle, naan-like micelle, shuttle-like lamellae, tube-like fiber, and random curled-up lamellae, by tuning the length of hydrophilic or hydrophobic chains. The variation of morphology was closely related to the topological structure and block ratio of the supramolecular amphiphiles. These self-assembly structures could disassemble upon an ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation. PMID:25310380

  20. Self-assembly behavior of a linear-star supramolecular amphiphile based on host-guest complexation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Xing; Yang, Fei; Shen, Hong; You, Yezi; Wu, Decheng

    2014-11-01

    A star polymer, β-cyclodextrin-poly(l-lactide) (β-CD-PLLA), and a linear polymer, azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol) (Azo-PEG), could self-assemble into a supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer (β-CD-PLLA@Azo-PEG) based on the host-guest interaction between β-CD and azobenzene moieties. This linear-star supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer further self-assembled into a variety of morphologies, including sphere-like micelle, carambola-like micelle, naan-like micelle, shuttle-like lamellae, tube-like fiber, and random curled-up lamellae, by tuning the length of hydrophilic or hydrophobic chains. The variation of morphology was closely related to the topological structure and block ratio of the supramolecular amphiphiles. These self-assembly structures could disassemble upon an ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation.

  1. PROSPECTS FOR CHARACTERIZING HOST STARS OF THE PLANETARY SYSTEM DETECTIONS PREDICTED FOR THE KOREAN MICROLENSING TELESCOPE NETWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2015-02-10

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ{sub H{sub ℓ}}≤0.1 for ≳60% of planet detections ≥5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ∼28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for ≲ (16 · f {sub bin})% of planet detections, where f {sub bin} is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass ≲0.3 M {sub ☉}.

  2. Prospects for Characterizing Host Stars of the Planetary System Detections Predicted for the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Calen B.

    2015-02-01

    I investigate the possibility of constraining the flux of the lens (i.e., host star) for the types of planetary systems the Korean Microlensing Telescope Network is predicted to find. I examine the potential to obtain lens flux measurements by (1) imaging the lens once it is spatially resolved from the source, (2) measuring the elongation of the point-spread function of the microlensing target (lens+source) when the lens and source are still unresolved, and (3) taking prompt follow-up photometry. In each case I simulate the observing programs for a representative example of current ground-based adaptive optics (AO) facilities (specifically NACO on the Very Large Telescope), future ground-based AO facilities (GMTIFS on the Giant Magellan Telescope, GMT), and future space telescopes (NIRCAM on the James Webb Space Telescope, JWST). Given the predicted distribution of relative lens-source proper motions, I find that the lens flux could be measured to a precision of σ H_{\\ell } ≤ 0.1 for gsim60% of planet detections >=5 yr after each microlensing event for a simulated observing program using GMT, which images resolved lenses. NIRCAM on JWST would be able to carry out equivalently high-precision measurements for ~28% of events Δt = 10 yr after each event by imaging resolved lenses. I also explore the effects various blend components would have on the mass derived from prompt follow-up photometry, including companions to the lens, companions to the source, and unassociated interloping stars. I find that undetected blend stars would cause catastrophic failures (i.e., >50% fractional uncertainty in the inferred lens mass) for <~ (16 · f bin)% of planet detections, where f bin is the binary fraction, with the majority of these failures occurring for host stars with mass lsim0.3 M ⊙.

  3. Tidal synchronization of close-in satellites and exoplanets: II. Spin dynamics and extension to Mercury and exoplanet host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraz-Mello, Sylvio

    2015-08-01

    This paper deals with the application of the creep tide theory (Ferraz-Mello, Celest Mech Dyn Astron 116:109, 2013a) to the rotation of close-in satellites, Mercury, close-in exoplanets, and their host stars. The solutions show different behaviors with two extreme cases: close-in giant gaseous planets with fast relaxation (low viscosity) and satellites and Earth-like planets with slow relaxation (high viscosity). The rotation of close-in gaseous planets follows the classical Darwinian pattern: it is tidally driven toward a stationary solution that is synchronized with the orbital motion when the orbit is circular, but if the orbit is elliptical, it has a frequency larger than the orbital mean motion. The rotation of rocky bodies, however, may be driven to several attractors whose frequencies are times the mean motion. The number of attractors increases with the viscosity of the body and with the orbital eccentricity. The final stationary state depends on the initial conditions. The classical example is Mercury, whose rotational period is 2/3 of the orbital period (3/2 attractor). The planet behaves as a molten body with a relaxation that allowed it to cross the 2/1 attractor without being trapped but not to escape being trapped in the 3/2 one. In that case, the relaxation is estimated to lie in the interval (equivalent to a quality factor roughly constrained to the interval ). The stars have a relaxation similar to the hot Jupiters, and their rotation is also driven to the only stationary solution existing in these cases. However, solar-type stars may lose angular momentum due to stellar wind, braking the rotation and displacing the attractor toward larger periods. Old, active host stars with big close-in companions generally have rotational periods larger than the orbital periods of the companions. The paper also includes a study of energy dissipation and the evolution of orbital eccentricity.

  4. Speckle Imaging Excludes Low-mass Companions Orbiting the Exoplanet Host Star TRAPPIST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Steve B.; Everett, Mark E.; Horch, Elliott P.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Hirsch, Lea; Nusdeo, Dan; Scott, Nicholas J.

    2016-09-01

    We have obtained the highest-resolution images available of TRAPPIST-1 using the Gemini-South telescope and our speckle imaging camera. Observing at 692 and 883 nm, we reached the diffraction limit of the telescope providing a best resolution of 27 mas or, at the distance of TRAPPIST-1, a spatial resolution of 0.32 au. Our imaging of the star extends from 0.32 to 14.5 au. We show that to a high confidence level, we can exclude all possible stellar and brown dwarf companions, indicating that TRAPPIST-1 is a single star.

  5. Host-guest interaction induced supramolecular amphiphilic star architecture and uniform nanovesicle formation for anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Ling; Liu, Kerh Li; Wen, Yuting; Song, Xia; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin.A star polymer of poly[(R,S)-3-hydroxybutyrate] (PHB) with adamantyl end-terminals extended from an α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) core is designed. It subsequently self-assembles to form controllable and uniform nanovesicles induced by host-guest interactions between heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-β-CD and the adamantyl ends. The nanovesicles are suitable for loading and intracellular delivery of the anticancer drug doxorubicin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Polymer synthesis, characterization, preparation of drug-loaded nanovesicles, intracellular drug release and cytotoxicity assays, TEM and DLS measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06744h

  6. Glimpses of stellar surfaces. I. Spot evolution and differential rotation of the planet host star Kepler-210

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, P.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-10-01

    We use high accuracy photometric data obtained with the Kepler satellite to monitor the activity modulations of the Kepler-210 planet host star over a time span of more than four years. Following the phenomenology of the star's light curve in combination with a five spot model, we identify six different so-called spot seasons. A characteristic, which is common in the majority of the seasons, is the persistent appearance of spots in a specific range of longitudes on the stellar surface. The most prominent period of the observed activity modulations is different for each season and appears to evolve following a specific pattern, resembling the changes in the sunspot periods during the solar magnetic cycle. Under the hypothesis that the star exhibits solar-like differential rotation, we suggest differential rotation values of Kepler-210 that are similar to or smaller than that of the Sun. Finally, we estimate spot life times between ~60 days and ~90 days, taking into consideration the evolution of the total covered stellar surface computed from our model.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar companions of exoplanet host stars (Ginski+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginski, C.; Mugrauer, M.; Seeliger, M.; Eisenbeiss, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our sample consists of stars with RV planet candidates discovered between 2008 and 2011. They are all observable from the Northern hemisphere with declinations down to -22° and a relatively even distribution in right ascension. All observations were carried out with the Calar Alto 2.2-m telescope in combination with the AstraLux instrument. (2 data files).

  8. ALMA resolves extended star formation in high-z AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, C. M.; Simpson, J. M.; Stanley, F.; Alexander, D. M.; Daddi, E.; Mullaney, J. R.; Pannella, M.; Rosario, D. J.; Smail, Ian

    2016-03-01

    We present high-resolution (0.3 arcsec) Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) 870 μm imaging of five z ≈ 1.5-4.5 X-ray detected AGN (with luminosities of L2-8keV > 1042 erg s-1). These data provide a ≳20 times improvement in spatial resolution over single-dish rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) measurements. The sub-millimetre emission is extended on scales of FWHM ≈ 0.2 arcsec-0.5 arcsec, corresponding to physical sizes of 1-3 kpc (median value of 1.8 kpc). These sizes are comparable to the majority of z=1-5 sub-millimetre galaxies (SMGs) with equivalent ALMA measurements. In combination with spectral energy distribution analyses, we attribute this rest-frame FIR emission to dust heated by star formation. The implied star-formation rate surface densities are ≈20-200 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, which are consistent with SMGs of comparable FIR luminosities (i.e. LIR ≈ [1-5] × 1012 L⊙). Although limited by a small sample of AGN, which all have high-FIR luminosities, our study suggests that the kpc-scale spatial distribution and surface density of star formation in high-redshift star-forming galaxies is the same irrespective of the presence of X-ray detected AGN.

  9. Magnetic Games between a Planet and Its Host Star: The Key Role of Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Matt, S. P.; Réville, V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic interactions between a star and a close-in planet are postulated to be a source of enhanced emissions and to play a role in the secular evolution of the orbital system. Close-in planets generally orbit in the sub-alfvénic region of the stellar wind, which leads to efficient transfers of energy and angular momentum between the star and the planet. We model the magnetic interactions occurring in close-in star-planet systems with three-dimensional, global, compressible magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of a planet orbiting in a self-consistent stellar wind. We focus on the cases of magnetized planets and explore three representative magnetic configurations. The Poynting flux originating from the magnetic interactions is an energy source for enhanced emissions in star-planet systems. Our results suggest a simple geometrical explanation for ubiquitous on/off enhanced emissions associated with close-in planets, and confirm that the Poynting fluxes can reach powers of the order of 1019 W. Close-in planets are also shown to migrate due to magnetic torques for sufficiently strong stellar wind magnetic fields. The topology of the interaction significantly modifies the shape of the magnetic obstacle that leads to magnetic torques. As a consequence, the torques can vary by at least an order of magnitude as the magnetic topology of the interaction varies.

  10. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere . The impact on stellar and planetary mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Mortier, A.; Tsantaki, M.; Adibekyan, V.; Delgado Mena, E.; Israelian, G.; Rojas-Ayala, B.; Neves, V.

    2015-04-01

    Aims: In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods: To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results: We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. Conclusions: We conclude that the stellar mass estimations for giant stars should be managed with extreme caution when using them to compute the planetary masses. We report examples within this sample where the differences in planetary mass can be as high as 100% in the most extreme cases. Based on observations obtained at the Telescope Bernard Lyot (USR5026) operated by the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées and the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France (Run ID L131N11 - OPTICON_2013A_027).

  11. Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capelato, Hugo Vicente

    1999-01-01

    We will begin our study with a more or less superficial inspection of the "forest" of stars that we see in the skies. The first thing we notice is that, as sources of light, they are much weaker than the Sun. Second, their apparent colors vary; from a bluish-white in most of them to a reddish-yellow, which is rarer. There is also a third aspect, though it is not very obvious to the naked eye: most of the stars group themselves in small families of two, three or more members. A good example is the Alpha Centauri, the closest star to us, which, in fact, is a triple system of stars. Another is the group of 7 stars that make up the Pleiades, which will be discussed later on. In fact, almost half of the stars are double systems with only two members, called binary stars. Most of these double stars, though together, are separated by several astronomical units (one astronomical unit, AU, is the distance from Earth to the sun: see Chapter 1), and revolve around each other over periods of several years. And yet the revolutions of some binary stars, separated by much smaller distances, occur in only a few hours! These stars are so close to each other that they can share enveloping material. Often this exchange occurs in a somewhat violent manner. Local explosions may occur, expelling matter away from the system. In other binary systems, where one of the components is a very compact, dense star, companion material flows more calmly, making up a light disk around the compact star.

  12. The Dependence of the Kepler Planet Population on Host Star Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulders, Gijs Dirk; Pascucci, Ilaria; Apai, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler spacecraft has monitored stars with a wide range of masses and metallicities for transiting planets. These stellar properties trace the conditions in the protoplanetary disk at the time of planet formation, and leave an imprint on the exoplanet population. We derive planet occurrence rates as a function of stellar mass and metallicity. In contrasts to giant planets, whose occurrence scales positively with both quantities, the occurrence of super-earths is anti-correlated with stellar mass and does not depend on metallicity except at orbital periods less than 10 days.The higher average mass of planetary systems around low-mass M dwarfs compared to sun-like stars indicates migration of planetary building blocks is stellar-mass dependent and plays a prominent role in the planet formation process. The excess of hot super-earths around metal-rich stars implies they either share a formation mechanism with hot Jupiters, or trace a planet trap at the protoplanetary disk inner edge which is metallicity-dependent.

  13. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Victoria S.; Bitz, Cecilia M.; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T.; Joshi, Manoj M.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO2 in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global

  14. Are long gamma-ray bursts biased tracers of star formation? Clues from the host galaxies of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of bright LGRBs. II. Star formation rates and metallicities at z < 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japelj, J.; Vergani, S. D.; Salvaterra, R.; D'Avanzo, P.; Mannucci, F.; Fernandez-Soto, A.; Boissier, S.; Hunt, L. K.; Atek, H.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Scodeggio, M.; Cristiani, S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Flores, H.; Gallego, J.; Ghirlanda, G.; Gomboc, A.; Hammer, F.; Perley, D. A.; Pescalli, A.; Petitjean, P.; Puech, M.; Rafelski, M.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: Long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) are associated with the deaths of massive stars and might therefore be a potentially powerful tool for tracing cosmic star formation. However, especially at low redshifts (z< 1.5) LGRBs seem to prefer particular types of environment. Our aim is to study the host galaxies of a complete sample of bright LGRBs to investigate the effect of the environment on GRB formation. Methods: We studied host galaxy spectra of the Swift/BAT6 complete sample of 14 z< 1 bright LGRBs. We used the detected nebular emission lines to measure the dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), and nebular metallicity (Z) of the hosts and supplemented the data set with previously measured stellar masses M⋆. The distributions of the obtained properties and their interrelations (e.g. mass-metallicity and SFR-M⋆ relations) are compared to samples of field star-forming galaxies. Results: We find that LGRB hosts at z< 1 have on average lower SFRs than if they were direct star formation tracers. By directly comparing metallicity distributions of LGRB hosts and star-forming galaxies, we find a good match between the two populations up to 12 +log ≤ft( frac{OHright)} 8.4-8.5, after which the paucity of metal-rich LGRB hosts becomes apparent. The LGRB host galaxies of our complete sample are consistent with the mass-metallicity relation at similar mean redshift and stellar masses. The cutoff against high metallicities (and high masses) can explain the low SFR values of LGRB hosts. We find a hint of an increased incidence of starburst galaxies in the Swift/BAT6 z< 1 sample with respect to that of a field star-forming population. Given that the SFRs are low on average, the latter is ascribed to low stellar masses. Nevertheless, the limits on the completeness and metallicity availability of current surveys, coupled with the limited number of LGRB host galaxies, prevents us from investigating more quantitatively whether the starburst incidence is such as expected

  15. THE OPTICALLY UNBIASED GRB HOST (TOUGH) SURVEY. VI. RADIO OBSERVATIONS AT z {approx}< 1 AND CONSISTENCY WITH TYPICAL STAR-FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowski, M. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Kamble, A.; Kaplan, D. L.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kruehler, T.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Ibar, E.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Van der Horst, A. J.; and others

    2012-08-20

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of {approx}825 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least {approx}63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} and at most {approx}8% can have SFR > 500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 {mu}Jy 3{sigma}) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Moreover, {approx}> 88% of the z {approx}< 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A{sub UV} < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation A{sub V} < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A{sub UV} of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, H{alpha} emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z {approx}< 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought.

  16. The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) Survey. VI. Radio Observations at z <~ 1 and Consistency with Typical Star-forming Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Kamble, A.; Hjorth, J.; Malesani, D.; Reinfrank, R. F.; Bonavera, L.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Ibar, E.; Dunlop, J. S.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garrett, M. A.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaplan, D. L.; Krühler, T.; Levan, A. J.; Massardi, M.; Pal, S.; Sollerman, J.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Watson, D.; Wiersema, K.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the level of obscured star formation activity and dust attenuation in a sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts, and to test the hypothesis that GRB hosts have properties consistent with those of the general star-forming galaxy populations. We present a radio continuum survey of all z < 1 GRB hosts in The Optically Unbiased GRB Host (TOUGH) sample supplemented with radio data for all (mostly pre-Swift) GRB-SN hosts discovered before 2006 October. We present new radio data for 22 objects and have obtained a detection for three of them (GRB 980425, 021211, 031203; none in the TOUGH sample), increasing the number of radio-detected GRB hosts from two to five. The star formation rate (SFR) for the GRB 021211 host of ~825 M ⊙ yr-1, the highest ever reported for a GRB host, places it in the category of ultraluminous infrared galaxies. We found that at least ~63% of GRB hosts have SFR < 100 M ⊙ yr-1 and at most ~8% can have SFR > 500 M ⊙ yr-1. For the undetected hosts the mean radio flux (<35 μJy 3σ) corresponds to an average SFR < 15 M ⊙ yr-1. Moreover, >~ 88% of the z <~ 1 GRB hosts have ultraviolet dust attenuation A UV < 6.7 mag (visual attenuation AV < 3 mag). Hence, we did not find evidence for large dust obscuration in a majority of GRB hosts. Finally, we found that the distributions of SFRs and A UV of GRB hosts are consistent with those of Lyman break galaxies, Hα emitters at similar redshifts, and of galaxies from cosmological simulations. The similarity of the GRB population with other star-forming galaxies is consistent with the hypothesis that GRBs, a least at z <~ 1, trace a large fraction of all star formation, and are therefore less biased indicators than once thought. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Large Programme 177.A-0591), the Australian Telescope Compact Array, the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, the Very Large Array, and the Westerbork

  17. A RESOLVED DEBRIS DISK AROUND THE CANDIDATE PLANET-HOSTING STAR HD 95086

    SciTech Connect

    Moór, A.; Ábrahám, P.; Szabó, Gy. M.; Kiss, Cs.; Kóspál, Á.; Apai, D.; Pascucci, I.; Balog, Z.; Henning, Th.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Juhász, A.; Szulágyi, J.; Vavrek, R.

    2013-10-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, β Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of ∼6.''0 × 5.''4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of ∼25°. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  18. A Resolved Debris Disk Around the Candidate Planet-hosting Star HD 95086

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Kospal, A.; Szabo, Gy. M.; Apai, D.; Balog, Z.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.; Henning, Th.; Juhasz, J.; Kiss, Cs.; Pasucci, I.; Szulagyi, J.; Vavrek, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, a new planet candidate was discovered on direct images around the young (10-17 Myr) A-type star HD 95086. The strong infrared excess of the system indicates that, similar to HR8799, Beta Pic, and Fomalhaut, the star harbors a circumstellar disk. Aiming to study the structure and gas content of the HD 95086 disk, and to investigate its possible interaction with the newly discovered planet, here we present new optical, infrared, and millimeter observations. We detected no CO emission, excluding the possibility of an evolved gaseous primordial disk. Simple blackbody modeling of the spectral energy distribution suggests the presence of two spatially separate dust belts at radial distances of 6 and 64 AU. Our resolved images obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory reveal a characteristic disk size of approx. 6.0 × 5.4 (540 × 490 AU) and disk inclination of approx 25 deg. Assuming the same inclination for the planet candidate's orbit, its reprojected radial distance from the star is 62 AU, very close to the blackbody radius of the outer cold dust ring. The structure of the planetary system at HD 95086 resembles the one around HR8799. Both systems harbor a warm inner dust belt and a broad colder outer disk and giant planet(s) between the two dusty regions. Modeling implies that the candidate planet can dynamically excite the motion of planetesimals even out to 270 AU via their secular perturbation if its orbital eccentricity is larger than about 0.4. Our analysis adds a new example to the three known systems where directly imaged planet(s) and debris disks coexist.

  19. Study of the impact of the post-MS evolution of the host star on the orbits of close-in planets. II. A giant planet in a close-in orbit around the RGB star HIP 63242

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Rojo, P.; Melo, C. H. F.; Bluhm, P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. More than 40 planets have been found around giant stars, revealing a lack of systems orbiting interior to ~0.6 AU. This observational fact contrasts with the planetary population around solar-type stars and has been interpreted as the result of the orbital evolution of planets through the interaction with the host star and/or because of a different formation/migration scenario of planets around more massive stars. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity study of a sample of 166 giant stars aimed at studying the population of close-in planets orbiting post-main sequence stars. Methods: We computed precision radial velocities from multi-epoch spectroscopic data to search for planets around giant stars. Results: We present the discovery of a massive planet around the intermediate-mass giant star HIP 63242. The best Keplerian fit to the data leads to an orbital distance of 0.57 AU, an eccentricity of 0.23 and a projected mass of 9.2 MJ. HIP 63242 b is the innermost planet detected around any intermediate-mass giant star and also the first planet detected in our survey. Based on observations collected at La Silla - Paranal Observatory under programs ID's 085.C-0557, 087.C.0476, 089.C-0524, and 090.C-0345.

  20. Spectroscopic parameters for solar-type stars with moderate-to-high rotation. New parameters for ten planet hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsantaki, M.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Montalto, M.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Mortier, A.; Adibekyan, V.; Israelian, G.

    2014-10-01

    Context. Planetary studies demand precise and accurate stellar parameters as input for inferring the planetary properties. Different methods often provide different results that could lead to biases in the planetary parameters. Aims: In this work, we present a refinement of the spectral synthesis technique designed to treat fast rotating stars better. This method is used to derive precise stellar parameters, namely effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity, and rotational velocity. The procedure is tested for FGK stars with low and moderate-to-high rotation rates. Methods: The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis package Spectroscopy Made Easy (SME), which assumes Kurucz model atmospheres in LTE. The line list where the synthesis is conducted is comprised of iron lines, and the atomic data are derived after solar calibration. Results: The comparison of our stellar parameters shows good agreement with literature values, both for slowly and for fast rotating stars. In addition, our results are on the same scale as the parameters derived from the iron ionization and excitation method presented in our previous works. We present new atmospheric parameters for 10 transiting planet hosts as an update to the SWEET-Cat catalog. We also re-analyze their transit light curves to derive new updated planetary properties. Based on observations collected at the La Silla Observatory, ESO (Chile) with the FEROS spectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope (ESO runs ID 089.C-0444(A), 088.C-0892(A)) and with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6 m telescope (ESO runs ID 072.C-0488(E), 079.C-0127(A)); at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence (OHP, CNRS/OAMP), France, with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the 1.93 m telescope and at the Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées (CNRS), France, with the NARVAL spectrograph at the 2 m Bernard Lyot Telescope (Run ID L131N11).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. INTERACTION OF CLOSE-IN PLANETS WITH THE MAGNETOSPHERE OF THEIR HOST STARS. II. SUPER-EARTHS AS UNIPOLAR INDUCTORS AND THEIR ORBITAL EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Laine, Randy O.; Lin, Douglas N. C. E-mail: randy.laine@normalesup.org

    2012-01-20

    Planets with several Earth masses and orbital periods of a few days have been discovered through radial velocity and transit surveys. Regardless of their formation mechanism, an important evolution issue is the efficiency of their retention in the proximity of their host stars. If these 'super-Earths' attained their present-day orbits during or shortly after the T Tauri phase of their host stars, a large fraction of these planets would have encountered an intense stellar magnetic field. These rocky planets have a higher conductivity than the atmosphere of their host stars and, therefore, the magnetic flux tube connecting them would slip though the envelope of the host stars faster than across the planets. The induced electromotive force across the planet's diameter leads to a potential drop which propagates along a flux tube away from the planet with an Alfven speed. The foot of the flux tube would sweep across the stellar surface and the potential drop across the field lines drives a DC current analogous to that proposed for the electrodynamics of the Io-Jupiter system. The ohmic dissipation of this current produces potentially observable hot spots in the star envelope. It also heats the planet and leads to a torque which drives the planet's orbit to evolve toward both circularization and a state of synchronization with the spin of the star. The net effect is the damping of the planet's orbital eccentricity. Around slowly (or rapidly) spinning stars, this process also causes rocky planets with periods less than a few days to undergo orbital decay (or expansion/stagnation) within a few Myr. In principle, this effect can determine the retention efficiency of short-period hot Earths. We also estimate the ohmic dissipation interior to these planets and show that it can lead to severe structure evolution and potential loss of volatile material in them. However, these effects may be significantly weakened by the reconnection of the induced field.

  2. Magnetic Games between a Planet and Its Host Star: The Key Role of Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Matt, S. P.; Réville, V.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic interactions between a star and a close-in planet are postulated to be a source of enhanced emissions and to play a role in the secular evolution of the orbital system. Close-in planets generally orbit in the sub-alfvénic region of the stellar wind, which leads to efficient transfers of energy and angular momentum between the star and the planet. We model the magnetic interactions occurring in close-in star–planet systems with three-dimensional, global, compressible magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of a planet orbiting in a self-consistent stellar wind. We focus on the cases of magnetized planets and explore three representative magnetic configurations. The Poynting flux originating from the magnetic interactions is an energy source for enhanced emissions in star–planet systems. Our results suggest a simple geometrical explanation for ubiquitous on/off enhanced emissions associated with close-in planets, and confirm that the Poynting fluxes can reach powers of the order of 1019 W. Close-in planets are also shown to migrate due to magnetic torques for sufficiently strong stellar wind magnetic fields. The topology of the interaction significantly modifies the shape of the magnetic obstacle that leads to magnetic torques. As a consequence, the torques can vary by at least an order of magnitude as the magnetic topology of the interaction varies.

  3. OBLIQUITIES OF HOT JUPITER HOST STARS: EVIDENCE FOR TIDAL INTERACTIONS AND PRIMORDIAL MISALIGNMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Simon; Winn, Joshua N.; Johnson, John A.; Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Butler, R. Paul; Arriagada, Pamela; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Thompson, Ian B.; Hirano, Teruyuki; Bakos, Gaspar; Hartman, Joel D.

    2012-09-20

    We provide evidence that the obliquities of stars with close-in giant planets were initially nearly random, and that the low obliquities that are often observed are a consequence of star-planet tidal interactions. The evidence is based on 14 new measurements of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect (for the systems HAT-P-6, HAT-P-7, HAT-P-16, HAT-P-24, HAT-P-32, HAT-P-34, WASP-12, WASP-16, WASP-18, WASP-19, WASP-26, WASP-31, Gl 436, and Kepler-8), as well as a critical review of previous observations. The low-obliquity (well-aligned) systems are those for which the expected tidal timescale is short, and likewise the high-obliquity (misaligned and retrograde) systems are those for which the expected timescale is long. At face value, this finding indicates that the origin of hot Jupiters involves dynamical interactions like planet-planet interactions or the Kozai effect that tilt their orbits rather than inspiraling due to interaction with a protoplanetary disk. We discuss the status of this hypothesis and the observations that are needed for a more definitive conclusion.

  4. MAGNETIC GAMES BETWEEN A PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR: THE KEY ROLE OF TOPOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Strugarek, A.; Brun, A. S.; Réville, V.

    2015-12-20

    Magnetic interactions between a star and a close-in planet are postulated to be a source of enhanced emissions and to play a role in the secular evolution of the orbital system. Close-in planets generally orbit in the sub-alfvénic region of the stellar wind, which leads to efficient transfers of energy and angular momentum between the star and the planet. We model the magnetic interactions occurring in close-in star–planet systems with three-dimensional, global, compressible magnetohydrodynamic numerical simulations of a planet orbiting in a self-consistent stellar wind. We focus on the cases of magnetized planets and explore three representative magnetic configurations. The Poynting flux originating from the magnetic interactions is an energy source for enhanced emissions in star–planet systems. Our results suggest a simple geometrical explanation for ubiquitous on/off enhanced emissions associated with close-in planets, and confirm that the Poynting fluxes can reach powers of the order of 10{sup 19} W. Close-in planets are also shown to migrate due to magnetic torques for sufficiently strong stellar wind magnetic fields. The topology of the interaction significantly modifies the shape of the magnetic obstacle that leads to magnetic torques. As a consequence, the torques can vary by at least an order of magnitude as the magnetic topology of the interaction varies.

  5. Dietary modification of host blood lipids affect reproduction in the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum(L.).

    PubMed

    Madden, R D; Sauer, J R; Dillwith, J W; Bowman, A S

    1996-04-01

    The feeding and reproductive performance of female lone star ticks (Amblyomma americanum (L.)) infesting guinea pigs on diets containing 15% fish oil (FO) or safflower oil (SO) were investigated. Replete ticks fed on FO-fed guinea pigs weighed approximately 30% less than those on the SO-fed guinea pigs. The lower engorged weight resulted in a similar decrease in the mass and number of eggs laid and number of larvae hatching. No effect of host dietary treatment was observed upon the reproductive efficiency index, egg weight, or hatchability. Guinea pig blood on the FO-diet contained high levels of eicosapentaenoic acid, which has previously been shown to inhibit the accumulation of arachidonic acid in the tick salivary gland. It is suggested that the ticks on the FO-fed guinea pigs have impaired production and secretion of dienoic prostaglandins in the saliva resulting in poorer feeding performance, possibly by altering the amount of host blood present in the feeding lesion. PMID:8604084

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SWEETCat I. Stellar parameters for host stars (Santos+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Mortier, A.; Neves, V.; Adibekyan, V.; Tsantaki, M.; Delgado Mena, E.; Bonfils, X.; Israelian, G.; Mayor, M.; Udry; S.

    2013-07-01

    The file sweetcat.dat contains the spectroscopic parameters for all the planet hosts compiled for this work (data as of July 2013). Up to date tables can be found at http://www.astro.up.pt/resources/sweet-cat . The spectra were gathered through observations, made by our team, and by the use of the ESO archive. In total, six different spectrographs were used: FEROS (2.2m ESO/MPI telescope, La Silla, Chile), FIES (Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma, Spain), HARPS (3.6m ESO telescope, La Silla, Chile), SARG (TNG Telescope, La Palma, Spain), SOPHIE (1.93m telescope, OHP, France), and UVES (VLT Kueyen telescope, Paranal, Chile). (2 data files).

  7. ASTROPHYSICAL PARAMETERS AND HABITABLE ZONE OF THE EXOPLANET HOSTING STAR GJ 581

    SciTech Connect

    Von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R.; Ciardi, David R.; Boyajian, Tabetha S.; McAlister, Harold A.; Henry, Todd J.; Jao, Wei-Chun; Riedel, Adric R.; Van Belle, Gerard T.; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; Subasavage, John P.; Schaefer, Gail; Ten Brummelaar, Theo A.; Sturmann, Laszlo; Sturmann, Judit; Mazingue, Jude; Turner, Nils H.; Farrington, Chris; Goldfinger, P. J.; Ridgway, Stephen

    2011-03-10

    GJ 581 is an M dwarf host of a multiplanet system. We use long-baseline interferometric measurements from the CHARA Array, coupled with trigonometric parallax information, to directly determine its physical radius to be 0.299 {+-} 0.010 R{sub sun}. Literature photometry data are used to perform spectral energy distribution fitting in order to determine GJ 581's effective surface temperature T{sub EFF} = 3498 {+-} 56 K and its luminosity L = 0.01205 {+-} 0.00024 L{sub sun}. From these measurements, we recompute the location and extent of the system's habitable zone and conclude that two of the planets orbiting GJ 581, planets d and g, spend all or part of their orbit within or just on the edge of the habitable zone.

  8. A population of massive, luminous galaxies hosting heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts: Implications for the use of GRBs as tracers of cosmic star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Perley, D. A.; Levan, A. J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Cenko, S. B.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Morgan, A. N.; Hjorth, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Fruchter, A.; Kalirai, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2013-12-01

    We present observations and analysis of the host galaxies of 23 heavily dust-obscured gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Swift satellite during the years 2005-2009, representing all GRBs with an unambiguous host-frame extinction of A{sub V} > 1 mag from this period. Deep observations with Keck, Gemini, Very Large Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer successfully detect the host galaxies and establish spectroscopic or photometric redshifts for all 23 events, enabling us to provide measurements of the intrinsic host star formation rates, stellar masses, and mean extinctions. Compared to the hosts of unobscured GRBs at similar redshifts, we find that the hosts of dust-obscured GRBs are (on average) more massive by about an order of magnitude and also more rapidly star forming and dust obscured. While this demonstrates that GRBs populate all types of star-forming galaxies, including the most massive, luminous systems at z ≈ 2, at redshifts below 1.5 the overall GRB population continues to show a highly significant aversion to massive galaxies and a preference for low-mass systems relative to what would be expected given a purely star-formation-rate-selected galaxy sample. This supports the notion that the GRB rate is strongly dependent on metallicity, and may suggest that the most massive galaxies in the universe underwent a transition in their chemical properties ∼9 Gyr ago. We also conclude that, based on the absence of unobscured GRBs in massive galaxies and the absence of obscured GRBs in low-mass galaxies, the dust distributions of the lowest-mass and the highest-mass galaxies are relatively homogeneous, while intermediate-mass galaxies (∼10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}) have diverse internal properties.

  9. STAR FORMATION AND GAS KINEMATICS OF QUASAR HOST GALAXIES AT z {approx} 6: NEW INSIGHTS FROM ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Ran; Carilli, Chris L.; Wagg, Jeff; Walter, Fabian; Lentati, Lindley; Fan, Xiaohui; Narayanan, Desika; Riechers, Dominik A.; Bertoldi, Frank; Strauss, Michael A.; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Omont, Alain; Menten, Karl M.; Knudsen, Kirsten K.; Jiang Linhua

    2013-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of the [C II] 158 {mu}m fine structure line and dust continuum emission from the host galaxies of five redshift 6 quasars. We also report complementary observations of 250 GHz dust continuum and CO (6-5) line emission from the z = 6.00 quasar SDSS J231038.88+185519.7 using the IRAM facilities. The ALMA observations were carried out in the extended array at 0.''7 resolution. We have detected the line and dust continuum in all five objects. The derived [C II] line luminosities are 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 8.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun} and the [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratios are 2.9-5.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, which is comparable to the values found in other high-redshift quasar-starburst systems and local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. The sources are marginally resolved and the intrinsic source sizes (major axis FWHM) are constrained to be 0.''3-0.''6 (i.e., 1.7-3.5 kpc) for the [C II] line emission and 0.''2-0.''4 (i.e., 1.2-2.3 kpc) for the continuum. These measurements indicate that there is vigorous star formation over the central few kpc in the quasar host galaxies. The ALMA observations also constrain the dynamical properties of the star-forming gas in the nuclear region. The intensity-weighted velocity maps of three sources show clear velocity gradients. Such velocity gradients are consistent with a rotating, gravitationally bound gas component, although they are not uniquely interpreted as such. Under the simplifying assumption of rotation, the implied dynamical masses within the [C II]-emitting regions are of order 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }. Given these estimates, the mass ratios between the supermassive black holes and the spheroidal bulge are an order of magnitude higher than the mean value found in local spheroidal galaxies, which is in agreement with results from previous CO observations of high redshift quasars.

  10. INFRARED ECLIPSES OF THE STRONGLY IRRADIATED PLANET WASP-33b, AND OSCILLATIONS OF ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Deming, Drake; Fraine, Jonathan D.; Sada, Pedro V.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Knutson, Heather A.; Harrington, Joseph; Blecic, Jasmina; Nymeyer, Sarah; Smith, Alexis M. S.; Jackson, Brian

    2012-08-01

    We observe two secondary eclipses of the strongly irradiated transiting planet WASP-33b, in the K{sub s} band at 2.15 {mu}m, and one secondary eclipse each at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m using Warm Spitzer. This planet orbits an A5V {delta}-Scuti star that is known to exhibit low-amplitude non-radial p-mode oscillations at about 0.1% semi-amplitude. We detect stellar oscillations in all of our infrared eclipse data, and also in one night of observations at J band (1.25 {mu}m) out of eclipse. The oscillation amplitude, in all infrared bands except K{sub s} , is about the same as in the optical. However, the stellar oscillations in K{sub s} band (2.15 {mu}m) have about twice the amplitude (0.2%) as seen in the optical, possibly because the Brackett-{gamma} line falls in this bandpass. As regards the exoplanetary eclipse, we use our best-fit values for the eclipse depth, as well as the 0.9 {mu}m eclipse observed by Smith et al., to explore possible states of the exoplanetary atmosphere, based on the method of Madhusudhan and Seager. On this basis we find two possible states for the atmospheric structure of WASP-33b. One possibility is a non-inverted temperature structure in spite of the strong irradiance, but this model requires an enhanced carbon abundance (C/O > 1). The alternative model has solar composition, but an inverted temperature structure. Spectroscopy of the planet at secondary eclipse, using a spectral resolution that can resolve the water vapor band structure, should be able to break the degeneracy between these very different possible states of the exoplanetary atmosphere. However, both of those model atmospheres absorb nearly all of the stellar irradiance with minimal longitudinal re-distribution of energy, strengthening the hypothesis of Cowan and Agol that the most strongly irradiated planets circulate energy poorly. Our measurement of the central phase of the eclipse yields ecos {omega} = 0.0003 {+-} 0.00013, which we regard as being consistent with a

  11. ALMA observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23: deep limits on obscured star formation 630 million years after the big bang

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Chary, R.-R.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Davies, J. E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Stanway, E. R.; Levan, A. J.; Levesque, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present rest-frame far-infrared (FIR) and optical observations of the host galaxy of GRB 090423 at z = 8.23 from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Spitzer Space Telescope, respectively. The host remains undetected to 3σ limits of F {sub ν}(222 GHz) ≲ 33 μJy and F {sub ν}(3.6 μm) ≲ 81 nJy. The FIR limit is about 20 times fainter than the luminosity of the local ULIRG Arp 220 and comparable to the local starburst M 82. Comparing this with model spectral energy distributions, we place a limit on the infrared (IR) luminosity of L {sub IR}(8-1000 μm) ≲ 3 × 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉}, corresponding to a limit on the obscured star formation rate of SFR{sub IR}≲5 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. For comparison, the limit on the unobscured star formation rate from Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) observations is SFR{sub UV} ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We also place a limit on the host galaxy stellar mass of M {sub *} ≲ 5 × 10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} (for a stellar population age of 100 Myr and constant star formation rate). Finally, we compare our millimeter observations to those of field galaxies at z ≳ 4 (Lyman break galaxies, Lyα emitters, and submillimeter galaxies) and find that our limit on the FIR luminosity is the most constraining to date, although the field galaxies have much larger rest-frame UV/optical luminosities than the host of GRB 090423 by virtue of their selection techniques. We conclude that GRB host galaxies at z ≳ 4, especially those with measured interstellar medium metallicities from afterglow spectroscopy, are an attractive sample for future ALMA studies of high redshift obscured star formation.

  12. The Case of the Tail Wagging the Dog: HD 189733 - Evidence of Hot Jupiter Exoplanets Spinning-up Their Host Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.

    2013-06-01

    (Abstract only) HD 189733A is an eighth mag K1.5V star that has attracted much attention because it hosts a short period, transiting, hot-Jupiter planet. This planet, HD 189733b, has one of the shortest known orbital periods (P = 2.22 days) and is only 0.031 AU from its host star. Because the system undergoes eclipses and is bright, HD 189733 has been extensively studied. The planet's atmosphere has been found to contain water vapor, methane, CO2, and sodium and possible haze. Spitzer IR observations indicate planet temperature, varying ~970 K to ~1,200 K over its surface (Tinetti (2007). Based on measurements of the K-star's P(rot) from starspot modulations of ~11.95 d, strong coronal X-ray emission and chromospheric Ca II-HK emission indicate a young age of ~0.7 Gyr. But this apparent young age is discrepant with a much older age (> 4 Gyr) inferred from the star's very low Lithium abundance. However, the age of the HD 189733 system can be independently determined by the presence of a faint dM4 companion (HD 189733B) some 12" away. Our Age-Activity relations for this star (no detectable coronal X-ray emission and no H-alpha emission) indicate an age > 4 Gyr (and < 8 Gyr from kinematics and metallicity). This age should apply to its K star companion and its planet. The fast rotation and resultant high activity levels of the K star can best be explained from the increase in its (rotation) angular momentum (AM) from the orbital AM of the planet. This AM transfer occurs from tidal and magnetic interactions of the K star with its planet. Determining the possible decrease in the planet's orbital period is possible from studying the planet eclipse times (which can be done by AAVSO members with CCD photometry). We also discuss the properties of other related short-period exoplanet systems found by the Kepler Mission that show similar behavior - in that close-in hot Jupiter size planets appear to be physically interacting with their host stars. This work is supported by

  13. GRB 980425 host: [C II], [O I], and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michałowski, M. J.; Castro Cerón, J. M.; Wardlow, J. L.; Karska, A.; Messias, H.; van der Werf, P.; Hunt, L. K.; Baes, M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gentile, G.; Hjorth, J.; Le Floc'h, E.; Pérez-Martínez, R.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rasmussen, J.; Rizzo, J. R.; Rossi, A.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Schady, P.; Sollerman, J.; Xu, D.

    2016-11-01

    Context. Accretion of gas from the intergalactic medium is required to fuel star formation in galaxies. We have recently suggested that this process can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Aims: Our aim is to test this possibility by studying in detail the properties of gas in the closest galaxy hosting a GRB (980425). Methods: We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [C ii] 158 μm and [O i] 63 μm spectroscopy, and an APEX/SHeFI CO(2-1) line detection and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. Results: The GRB 980425 host has elevated [C ii]/FIR and [O i]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rates (SFR) derived from line ([C ii], [O i], Hα) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [C ii] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy centre, whereas [O i] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [O i] flux indicates that there is high radiation field and high gas density at these positions, as derived from modelling of photo-dissociation regions. The [C ii]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Indeed, its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [C ii]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. Conclusions: The [O i] and H i concentrations and the high radiation field and density close to the GRB position are consistent with the hypothesis of a very recent (at most a few tens of Myr ago) inflow of atomic gas triggering star formation. In this scenario dust has not had time to build up (explaining high line-to-continuum ratios). Such a recent enhancement of star formation activity would indeed manifest itself in high SFRline/SFRcontinuum ratios because the line indicators are sensitive only to recent (≲10 Myr) activity, whereas the continuum indicators measure

  14. XMM-Newton Observations of HD189733 During Planetary Transits. X-rays Interaction Between Hot Jupiters and the Host Star.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillitteri, Ignazio; Wolk, S. J.; Cohen, O.; Kashyap, V.; Knutson, H.; Lisse, C. M.

    2010-03-01

    The irradiation of X-rays from host stars on their nearby gas-giant planets can cause excess heating of the planet which can induce mass loss. Further, it has been argued that the magnetic fields of the two bodies can interact. We present XMM-Newton observations of HD 189733 during the eclipse and planetary transit of its hot jupiter planet HD 189733b in order to investigate any effects of the interaction between the host star and the planet in X-rays. We observe a softening of X-ray spectrum at level of 2 sigmas during the 2009 secondary eclipse. It is followed at 3 ks by an enhancement of the X-ray flux likely due to a flare. No remarkable effects are seen in 2007 transit. Magneto-Hydro-Dynamical (MHD) simulations show that the plasma spectrum could get softer during the eclipse. Further, a region of high plasma density on the stellar corona, and displaced from the planet-star line, should form due to the interaction of magnetic fields of star and planet. The magnetic activity in this region is enhanced and should cause frequent transients. The X-ray observations suggest that these model predictions are globally correct. Despite the simple model adopted and the lack of precise parameters, effects of the interaction of stars and their nearby planets appear to observable in X-rays. X-ray observations allow to probe the structuring and the strength of the complex magnetosphere of the star+planet system.

  15. Interaction of Close-in Planets with the Magnetosphere of Their Host Stars. I. Diffusion, Ohmic Dissipation of Time-dependent Field, Planetary Inflation, and Mass Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laine, Randy O.; Lin, Douglas N. C.; Dong, Shawfeng

    2008-09-01

    The unanticipated discovery of the first close-in planet around 51 Peg has rekindled the notion that shortly after their formation outside the snow line, some planets may have migrated to the proximity of their host stars because of their tidal interaction with their nascent disks. After a decade of discoveries, nearly 20% of the 200 known planets have similar short periods. If these planets indeed migrated to their present-day location, their survival would require a halting mechanism in the proximity of their host stars. Here we consider the possibility that a magnetic coupling between young stars and planets could quench the planet's orbital evolution. Most T Tauri stars have magnetic fields of several thousand gausses on their surface which can clear out a cavity in the innermost regions of their circumstellar disks and impose magnetic induction on the nearby young planets. After a brief discussion of the complexity of the full problem, we focus our discussion on evaluating the permeation and ohmic dissipation of the time-dependent component of the stellar magnetic field in the planet's interior. Adopting a model first introduced by Campbell for interacting binary stars, we determine the modulation of the planetary response to the tilted magnetic field of a nonsynchronously spinning star. We first compute the conductivity in the young planets, which indicates that the stellar field can penetrate well into the planet's envelope in a synodic period. For various orbital configurations, we show that the energy dissipation rate inside the planet is sufficient to induce short-period planets to inflate. This process results in mass loss via Roche lobe overflow and in the halting of the planet's orbital migration.

  16. Trumpeting M dwarfs with CONCH-SHELL: a catalogue of nearby cool host-stars for habitable exoplanets and life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaidos, E.; Mann, A. W.; Lépine, S.; Buccino, A.; James, D.; Ansdell, M.; Petrucci, R.; Mauas, P.; Hilton, E. J.

    2014-09-01

    We present an all-sky catalogue of 2970 nearby (d ≲ 50 pc), bright (J < 9) M- or late K-type dwarf stars, 86 per cent of which have been confirmed by spectroscopy. This catalogue will be useful for searches for Earth-size and possibly Earth-like planets by future space-based transit missions and ground-based infrared Doppler radial velocity surveys. Stars were selected from the SUPERBLINK proper motion catalogue according to absolute magnitudes, spectra, or a combination of reduced proper motions and photometric colours. From our spectra, we determined gravity-sensitive indices, and identified and removed 0.2 per cent of these as interloping hotter or evolved stars. 13 per cent of the stars exhibit Hα emission, an indication of stellar magnetic activity and possible youth. The mean metallicity is [Fe/H] = -0.07 with a standard deviation of 0.22 dex, similar to nearby solar-type stars. We determined stellar effective temperatures by least-squares fitting of spectra to model predictions calibrated by fits to stars with established bolometric temperatures, and estimated radii, luminosities, and masses using empirical relations. Six per cent of stars with images from integral field spectra are resolved doubles. We inferred the planet population around M dwarfs using Kepler data and applied this to our catalogue to predict detections by future exoplanet surveys.

  17. Kepler-91b: a planet at the end of its life. Planet and giant host star properties via light-curve variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillo-Box, J.; Barrado, D.; Moya, A.; Montesinos, B.; Montalbán, J.; Bayo, A.; Barbieri, M.; Régulo, C.; Mancini, L.; Bouy, H.; Henning, T.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The evolution of planetary systems is intimately linked to the evolution of their host stars. Our understanding of the whole planetary evolution process is based on the wide planet diversity observed so far. Only a few tens of planets have been discovered orbiting stars ascending the red giant branch. Although several theories have been proposed, the question of how planets die remains open owing to the small number statistics, making it clear that the sample of planets around post-main sequence stars needs to be enlarged. Aims: In this work we study the giant star Kepler-91 (KOI-2133) in order to determine the nature of a transiting companion. This system was detected by the Kepler Space Telescope, which identified small dims in its light curve with a period of 6.246580 ± 0.000082 days. However, its planetary confirmation is needed due to the large pixel size of the Kepler camera, which can hide other stellar configurations able to mimic planet-like transit events. Methods: We analysed Kepler photometry to 1) re-calculate transit parameters; 2) study the light-curve modulations; and 3) to perform an asteroseismic analysis (accurate stellar parameter determination) by identifying solar-like oscillations on the periodogram. We also used a high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum obtained with the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph (CAFE) to measure stellar properties. Additionally, false-positive scenarios were rejected by obtaining high-resolution images with the AstraLux lucky imaging camera on the 2.2 m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory. Results: We confirm the planetary nature of the object transiting the star Kepler-91 by deriving a mass of Mp=0.88+0.17-0.33 MJup and a planetary radius of Rp=1.384+0.011-0.054 RJup. Asteroseismic analysis produces a stellar radius of R⋆ = 6.30 ± 0.16 R⊙ and a mass of M⋆ = 1.31 ± 0.10 M⊙. We find that its eccentric orbit (e=0.066+0.013-0.017) is just 1.32+0.07-0.22 R⋆ away from

  18. Roche lobe effects on expanded upper atmospheres of short-periodic giant exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaritz, G. F.; Endler, S.; Langmayr, D.; Lammer, H.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Erkaev, N. V.; Biernat, H. K.

    2005-08-01

    Theoretical studies and recent observational evidence of the expansion of the atmospheres of short-periodic exoplanets show that the atmospheres extend up to several planetary radii. This indicates that the atmospheres experience blow-off conditions. Because of the short orbital distance to their host stars, the expansion of the upper atmosphere is no longer radially symmetric, but depends on the direction to the central body, resulting in a deformation of the expanded atmosphere. We show the connection between atmospheric expansion, tidal forces and effects of the Roche potential and find that HD 209458 b, OGLE-TR-10 b and OGLE-TR-111 b are most likely in a state of classical hydrodynamical blow-off, because the distance where blow-off can occur is less than the distance to the Lagrangian point L1. On the other hand, OGLE-TR-56 b, OGLE-TR-113 b, OGLE-TR-132 b and TreS-1 experience a geometrical blow-off defined by the Roche lobe as proposed by Lecavelier des Etangs et al. (2004, A&A, 418, L1). Our results have important implications for the evolution of short periodic gas giants, because the Roche lobe overflow of the atmosphere can lead to lower mass loss rates over the exoplanets history, compared to gas giants which experience hydrodynamic expansion and loss unaffected by this boundary. Thus, massive exoplanets like OGLE-TR-56 b in very close orbital distances are subject to geometrical blow-off conditions, this results in a total mass loss for this particular exoplanet of the order of about 3 × 10-2 M_pl over the planets age, even if current mass loss rates of about 2 × 1011 g s-1 are calculated. If the exoplanet effected by the geometrical blow-off is more massive, the mass loss rate is even lower. However, giant exoplanets like HD 209458 b, OGLE-TR-10 b and OGLE-TR-111 b at orbital distances of about 0.05 AU may experience classical hydrodynamic blow-off conditions, which can result in higher mass loss rates. Thus, such planets may shrink to their core

  19. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. III. X-Ray to Infrared Spectra of 11 M and K Stars Hosting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, R. O. P.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison; Schneider, Christian; Brown, Alexander; Hu, Renyu; Linsky, Jeffrey; Froning, Cynthia S.; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Tian, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We present a catalog of panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 7 M and 4 K dwarf stars that span X-ray to infrared wavelengths (5 Å -5.5 μm). These SEDs are composites of Chandra or XMM-Newton data from 5-˜50 Å, a plasma emission model from ˜50-100 Å, broadband empirical estimates from 100-1170 Å, Hubble Space Telescope data from 1170-5700 Å, including a reconstruction of stellar Lyα emission at 1215.67 Å, and a PHOENIX model spectrum from 5700-55000 Å. Using these SEDs, we computed the photodissociation rates of several molecules prevalent in planetary atmospheres when exposed to each star’s unattenuated flux (“unshielded” photodissociation rates) and found that rates differ among stars by over an order of magnitude for most molecules. In general, the same spectral regions drive unshielded photodissociations both for the minimally and maximally FUV active stars. However, for O3 visible flux drives dissociation for the M stars whereas near-UV flux drives dissociation for the K stars. We also searched for an far-UV continuum in the assembled SEDs and detected it in 5/11 stars, where it contributes around 10% of the flux in the range spanned by the continuum bands. An ultraviolet continuum shape is resolved for the star ɛ Eri that shows an edge likely attributable to Si ii recombination. The 11 SEDs presented in this paper, available online through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, will be valuable for vetting stellar upper-atmosphere emission models and simulating photochemistry in exoplanet atmospheres.

  20. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. III. X-Ray to Infrared Spectra of 11 M and K Stars Hosting Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyd, R. O. P.; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison; Schneider, Christian; Brown, Alexander; Hu, Renyu; Linsky, Jeffrey; Froning, Cynthia S.; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Tian, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We present a catalog of panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 7 M and 4 K dwarf stars that span X-ray to infrared wavelengths (5 Å –5.5 μm). These SEDs are composites of Chandra or XMM-Newton data from 5–˜50 Å, a plasma emission model from ˜50–100 Å, broadband empirical estimates from 100–1170 Å, Hubble Space Telescope data from 1170–5700 Å, including a reconstruction of stellar Lyα emission at 1215.67 Å, and a PHOENIX model spectrum from 5700–55000 Å. Using these SEDs, we computed the photodissociation rates of several molecules prevalent in planetary atmospheres when exposed to each star’s unattenuated flux (“unshielded” photodissociation rates) and found that rates differ among stars by over an order of magnitude for most molecules. In general, the same spectral regions drive unshielded photodissociations both for the minimally and maximally FUV active stars. However, for O3 visible flux drives dissociation for the M stars whereas near-UV flux drives dissociation for the K stars. We also searched for an far-UV continuum in the assembled SEDs and detected it in 5/11 stars, where it contributes around 10% of the flux in the range spanned by the continuum bands. An ultraviolet continuum shape is resolved for the star ɛ Eri that shows an edge likely attributable to Si ii recombination. The 11 SEDs presented in this paper, available online through the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes, will be valuable for vetting stellar upper-atmosphere emission models and simulating photochemistry in exoplanet atmospheres.

  1. CHARACTERIZING THE COOL KEPLER OBJECTS OF INTERESTS. NEW EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURES, METALLICITIES, MASSES, AND RADII OF LOW-MASS KEPLER PLANET-CANDIDATE HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, Philip S.; Hamren, Katherine; Schlawin, Everett; Lloyd, James P.; Rojas-Ayala, Barbara; Covey, Kevin R.

    2012-05-10

    We report stellar parameters for late-K and M-type planet-candidate host stars announced by the Kepler Mission. We obtained medium-resolution, K-band spectra of 84 cool (T{sub eff} {approx}< 4400 K) Kepler Objects of Interest (KOIs) from Borucki et al. We identified one object as a giant (KOI 977); for the remaining dwarfs, we measured effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) and metallicities [M/H] using the K-band spectral indices of Rojas-Ayala et al. We determine the masses (M{sub *}) and radii (R{sub *}) of the cool KOIs by interpolation onto the Dartmouth evolutionary isochrones. The resultant stellar radii are significantly less than the values reported in the Kepler Input Catalog and, by construction, correlate better with T{sub eff}. Applying the published KOI transit parameters to our stellar radius measurements, we report new physical radii for the planet candidates. Recalculating the equilibrium temperatures of the planet-candidates assuming Earth's albedo and re-radiation fraction, we find that three of the planet-candidates are terrestrial sized with orbital semimajor axes that lie within the habitable zones of their host stars (KOI 463.01, KOI 812.03, and KOI 854.01). The stellar parameters presented in this Letter serve as a resource for prioritization of future follow-up efforts to validate and characterize the cool KOI planet candidates.

  2. NAVY PRECISION OPTICAL INTERFEROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EXOPLANET HOST {kappa} CORONAE BOREALIS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STAR'S AND PLANET'S MASSES AND AGES

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, Ellyn K.; Armstrong, J. Thomas; Van Belle, Gerard T.

    2013-07-01

    We used the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer to measure the limb-darkened angular diameter of the exoplanet host star {kappa} CrB and obtained a value of 1.543 {+-} 0.009 mas. We calculated its physical radius (5.06 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }) and used photometric measurements from the literature with our diameter to determine {kappa} CrB's effective temperature (4788 {+-} 17 K) and luminosity (12.13 {+-} 0.09 L{sub Sun }). We then placed the star on an Hertzsprung-Russell diagram to ascertain the star's age (3.42{sup +0.32}{sub -0.25} Gyr) and mass (1.47 {+-} 0.04 M{sub Sun }) using a metallicity of [Fe/H] = +0.15. With this mass, we calculated the system's mass function with the orbital elements from a variety of sources, which produced a range of planetary masses: m{sub p}sin i = 1.61-1.88 M{sub Jup}. We also updated the extent of the habitable zone for the system using our new temperature.

  3. Tracking Advanced Planetary Systems (TAPAS) with HARPS-N. IV. TYC 3667-1280-1: The most massive red giant star hosting a warm Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzielski, A.; Villaver, E.; Nowak, G.; Adamów, M.; Maciejewski, G.; Kowalik, K.; Wolszczan, A.; Deka-Szymankiewicz, B.; Adamczyk, M.

    2016-05-01

    Context. We present the latest result of the TAPAS project that is devoted to intense monitoring of planetary candidates that are identified within the PennState-Toruń planet search. Aims: We aim to detect planetary systems around evolved stars to be able to build sound statistics on the frequency and intrinsic nature of these systems, and to deliver in-depth studies of selected planetary systems with evidence of star-planet interaction processes. Methods: The paper is based on precise radial velocity measurements: 13 epochs collected over 1920 days with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and its High-Resolution Spectrograph, and 22 epochs of ultra-precise HARPS-N data collected over 961 days. Results: We present a warm-Jupiter (Teq = 1350 K, m2 sin i = 5.4 ± 0.4 MJ) companion with an orbital period of 26.468 days in a circular (e = 0.036) orbit around a giant evolved (log g = 3.11 ± 0.09, R = 6.26 ± 0.86 R⊙) star with M⋆ = 1.87 ± 0.17 M⊙. This is the most massive and oldest star found to be hosting a close-in giant planet. Its proximity to its host (a = 0.21 au) means that the planet has a 13.9 ± 2.0% probability of transits; this calls for photometric follow-up study. Conclusions: This massive warm Jupiter with a near circular orbit around an evolved massive star can help set constraints on general migration mechanisms for warm Jupiters and, given its high equilibrium temperature, can help test energy deposition models in hot Jupiters. Based on observations obtained with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, which is a joint project of the University of Texas at Austin, the Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, and Georg-August-Universität Göttingen.Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica) at the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto

  4. An Empirically-derived non-LTE XUV-Visible Spectral Synthesis Model of the M1 V Exoplanet Host Star GJ832

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey; Fontenla, Juan; Witbrod, Jesse; France, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    GJ832 (HD 204961) is a nearby M1 V host star with two exoplanets: a Jovian mass planet and a super-Earth. We have obtained near-UV and far-UV spectra of GJ832 with the STIS and COS instruments on HST as part of the Cycle 19 MUSCLES pilot program (France et al. 2013). Our objective is to obtain the first accurate physical model for a representative M-dwarf host star in order to understand the stellar radiative emission at all wavelengths and to infer the radiation environment of their exoplanets that drives their atmospheric photochemistry.We have calculated a full non-LTE model for GJ 832 including the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region, and corona to fit the observed emission lines formed over a wide range of temperatures and the X-ray flux. Our one-dimensional semi-empirical model uses the Solar-Stellar Physical Modelling tools that are an offspring of the tools used by Fontenla and collaborators for computing solar models. For this model of GJ832, we calculate the populations of 52 atoms and ions and 20 molecules with 2 million spectral lines. We find excellent agreement with the observed H-alpha, CaII, MgII, CII, SiIV, CIV, and NV lines. Our model for GJ832 has a temperature minimum in the lower chromosphere much cooler than the Sun and then a steep temperature rise different from the Sun. The different thermal structure of GJ832 compared to the Sun results in the formation regions of the emission lines being different for the two stars. We also compute theradiative cooling rates as a function of height and temperature in the atmosphere of GJ832.This work is supported by grants from STScI to the University of Colorado.

  5. A Comparison of Archives Held by Three Host Computers: DIALOG, ESA-IRS and DATA-STAR.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonifacio, Flavio

    1992-01-01

    Describes the availability of databases held on DIALOG, ESA-IRS, and DATA-STAR. Database overlap among the systems, prices, database contents, and data transmission costs are addressed; and results of a search of the ENVIROLINE database on each system are presented. The appendix lists subjects referenced on each system and compares database…

  6. Companions to APOGEE Stars. I. A Milky Way-spanning Catalog of Stellar and Substellar Companion Candidates and Their Diverse Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troup, Nicholas W.; Nidever, David L.; De Lee, Nathan; Carlberg, Joleen; Majewski, Steven R.; Fernandez, Martin; Covey, Kevin; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Pepper, Joshua; Nguyen, Duy T.; Stassun, Keivan; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Wisniewski, John P.; Fleming, Scott W.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Ge, Jian; Hearty, Fred; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Pan, Kaike; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Schneider, Donald P.; Shetrone, Matthew D.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wilson, John; Zamora, Olga

    2016-03-01

    In its three years of operation, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-1) observed >14,000 stars with enough epochs over a sufficient temporal baseline for the fitting of Keplerian orbits. We present the custom orbit-fitting pipeline used to create this catalog, which includes novel quality metrics that account for the phase and velocity coverage of a fitted Keplerian orbit. With a typical radial velocity precision of ˜100-200 m s-1, APOGEE can probe systems with small separation companions down to a few Jupiter masses. Here we present initial results from a catalog of 382 of the most compelling stellar and substellar companion candidates detected by APOGEE, which orbit a variety of host stars in diverse Galactic environments. Of these, 376 have no previously known small separation companion. The distribution of companion candidates in this catalog shows evidence for an extremely truncated brown dwarf (BD) desert with a paucity of BD companions only for systems with a\\quad \\lt 0.1-0.2 AU, with no indication of a desert at larger orbital separation. We propose a few potential explanations of this result, some which invoke this catalog’s many small separation companion candidates found orbiting evolved stars. Furthermore, 16 BD and planet candidates have been identified around metal-poor ([Fe/H] < -0.5) stars in this catalog, which may challenge the core accretion model for companions \\gt 10{M}{Jup}. Finally, we find all types of companions are ubiquitous throughout the Galactic disk with candidate planetary-mass and BD companions to distances of ˜6 and ˜16 kpc, respectively.

  7. TIDAL AND MAGNETIC INTERACTIONS BETWEEN A HOT JUPITER AND ITS HOST STAR IN THE MAGNETOSPHERIC CAVITY OF A PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.-H.; Gu, P.-G.; Bodenheimer, P. H.

    2010-01-10

    We present a simplified model to study the orbital evolution of a young hot Jupiter inside the magnetospheric cavity of a proto-planetary disk. The model takes into account the disk locking of stellar spin as well as the tidal and magnetic interactions between the star and the planet. We focus on the orbital evolution starting from the orbit in 2:1 resonance with the inner edge of the disk, followed by the inward and then outward orbital migration driven by the tidal and magnetic torques as well as the Roche-lobe overflow of the tidally inflated planet. The goal in this paper is to study how the orbital evolution inside the magnetospheric cavity depends on the cavity size, planet mass, and orbital eccentricity. In the present work, we only target the mass range from 0.7 to 2 Jupiter masses. In the case of the large cavity corresponding to the rotational period approx7 days, the planet of mass >1 Jupiter mass with moderate initial eccentricities (approx>0.3) can move to the region <0.03 AU from its central star in 10{sup 7} yr, while the planet of mass <1 Jupiter mass cannot. We estimate the critical eccentricity beyond which the planet of a given mass will overflow its Roche radius and finally lose all of its gas onto the star due to runaway mass loss. In the case of the small cavity corresponding to the rotational period approx3 days, all of the simulated planets lose all of their gas even in circular orbits. Our results for the orbital evolution of young hot Jupiters may have the potential to explain the absence of low-mass giant planets inside approx0.03 AU from their dwarf stars revealed by transit surveys.

  8. HATS-6b: A Warm Saturn Transiting an Early M Dwarf Star, and a Set of Empirical Relations for Characterizing K and M Dwarf Planet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, J. D.; Bayliss, D.; Brahm, R.; Bakos, G. Á.; Mancini, L.; Jordán, A.; Penev, K.; Rabus, M.; Zhou, G.; Butler, R. P.; Espinoza, N.; de Val-Borro, M.; Bhatti, W.; Csubry, Z.; Ciceri, S.; Henning, T.; Schmidt, B.; Arriagada, P.; Shectman, S.; Crane, J.; Thompson, I.; Suc, V.; Csák, B.; Tan, T. G.; Noyes, R. W.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P.

    2015-05-01

    We report the discovery by the HATSouth survey of HATS-6b, an extrasolar planet transiting a V = 15.2 mag, i = 13.7 mag M1V star with a mass of 0.57 {{M}⊙ } and a radius of 0.57 {{R}⊙ }. HATS-6b has a period of P = 3.3253 d, mass of {{M}p} = 0.32 {{M}J}, radius of {{R}p} = 1.00 {{R}J}, and zero-albedo equilibrium temperature of {{T}eq} = 712.8 ± 5.1 K. HATS-6 is one of the lowest mass stars known to host a close-in gas giant planet, and its transits are among the deepest of any known transiting planet system. We discuss the follow-up opportunities afforded by this system, noting that despite the faintness of the host star, it is expected to have the highest K-band S/N transmission spectrum among known gas giant planets with {{T}eq}\\lt 750 K. In order to characterize the star we present a new set of empirical relations between the density, radius, mass, bolometric magnitude, and V-, J-, H- and K-band bolometric corrections for main sequence stars with M\\lt 0.80 {{M}⊙ }, or spectral types later than K5. These relations are calibrated using eclipsing binary components as well as members of resolved binary systems. We account for intrinsic scatter in the relations in a self-consistent manner. We show that from the transit-based stellar density alone it is possible to measure the mass and radius of a ˜0.6 {{M}⊙ } star to ˜7 and ˜2% precision, respectively. Incorporating additional information, such as the V-K color, or an absolute magnitude, allows the precision to be improved by up to a factor of two. The HATSouth network is operated by a collaboration consisting of Princeton University (PU), the Max Planck Institute für Astronomie (MPIA), the Australian National University (ANU), and the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile (PUC). The station at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) of the Carnegie Institute is operated by PU in conjunction with PUC, the station at the High Energy Spectroscopic Survey (H.E.S.S.) site is operated in conjunction with MPIA

  9. The Interaction of Venus-like, M-dwarf Planets with the Stellar Wind of Their Host Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Glocer, A.; Drake, J. J.; Ma, Y.; Bell, J. M.; Garraffo, C.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-12-01

    We study the interaction between the atmospheres of Venus-like, non-magnetized exoplanets orbiting an M-dwarf star, and the stellar wind using a multi-species MHD model. We focus our investigation on the effect of enhanced stellar wind and enhanced EUV flux as the planetary distance from the star decreases. Our simulations reveal different topologies of the planetary space environment for sub- and super-Alfvénic stellar wind conditions, which could lead to dynamic energy deposition into the atmosphere during the transition along the planetary orbit. We find that the stellar wind penetration for non-magnetized planets is very deep, up to a few hundreds of kilometers. We estimate a lower limit for the atmospheric mass-loss rate and find that it is insignificant over the lifetime of the planet. However, we predict that when accounting for atmospheric ion acceleration, a significant amount of the planetary atmosphere could be eroded over the course of a billion years.

  10. The Interaction of Venus-like, M-dwarf Planets with the Stellar Wind of Their Host Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, O.; Ma, Y.; Drake, J. J.; Glocer, A.; Garraffo, C.; Bell, J. M.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-06-01

    We study the interaction between the atmospheres of Venus-like, non-magnetized exoplanets orbiting an M-dwarf star, and the stellar wind using a multi-species MHD model. We focus our investigation on the effect of enhanced stellar wind and enhanced EUV flux as the planetary distance from the star decreases. Our simulations reveal different topologies of the planetary space environment for sub- and super-Alfvénic stellar wind conditions, which could lead to dynamic energy deposition into the atmosphere during the transition along the planetary orbit. We find that the stellar wind penetration for non-magnetized planets is very deep, up to a few hundreds of kilometers. We estimate a lower limit for the atmospheric mass-loss rate and find that it is insignificant over the lifetime of the planet. However, we predict that when accounting for atmospheric ion acceleration, a significant amount of the planetary atmosphere could be eroded over the course of a billion years.

  11. THE INTERACTION OF VENUS-LIKE, M-DWARF PLANETS WITH THE STELLAR WIND OF THEIR HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, O.; Drake, J. J.; Garraffo, C.; Ma, Y.; Glocer, A.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2015-06-10

    We study the interaction between the atmospheres of Venus-like, non-magnetized exoplanets orbiting an M-dwarf star, and the stellar wind using a multi-species MHD model. We focus our investigation on the effect of enhanced stellar wind and enhanced EUV flux as the planetary distance from the star decreases. Our simulations reveal different topologies of the planetary space environment for sub- and super-Alfvénic stellar wind conditions, which could lead to dynamic energy deposition into the atmosphere during the transition along the planetary orbit. We find that the stellar wind penetration for non-magnetized planets is very deep, up to a few hundreds of kilometers. We estimate a lower limit for the atmospheric mass-loss rate and find that it is insignificant over the lifetime of the planet. However, we predict that when accounting for atmospheric ion acceleration, a significant amount of the planetary atmosphere could be eroded over the course of a billion years.

  12. Resolving the cold debris disc around a planet-hosting star . PACS photometric imaging observations of q1 Eridani (HD 10647, HR 506)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseau, R.; Eiroa, C.; Fedele, D.; Augereau, J.-C.; Olofsson, G.; González, B.; Maldonado, J.; Montesinos, B.; Mora, A.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D.; Barrado, D.; Bayo, A.; Beichman, C. A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Del Burgo, C.; Ertel, S.; Fridlund, C. W. M.; Heras, A. M.; Krivov, A. V.; Launhardt, R.; Lebreton, J.; Löhne, T.; Marshall, J. P.; Meeus, G.; Müller, S.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Roberge, A.; Rodmann, J.; Solano, E.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Thébault, Ph.; White, G. J.; Wolf, S.

    2010-07-01

    Context. About two dozen exo-solar debris systems have been spatially resolved. These debris discs commonly display a variety of structural features such as clumps, rings, belts, excentric distributions and spiral patterns. In most cases, these features are believed to be formed, shaped and maintained by the dynamical influence of planets orbiting the host stars. In very few cases has the presence of the dynamically important planet(s) been inferred from direct observation. Aims: The solar-type star q1 Eri is known to be surrounded by debris, extended on scales of ⪉30”. The star is also known to host at least one planet, albeit on an orbit far too small to make it responsible for structures at distances of tens to hundreds of AU. The aim of the present investigation is twofold: to determine the optical and material properties of the debris and to infer the spatial distribution of the dust, which may hint at the presence of additional planets. Methods: The Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) aboard the Herschel Space Observatory allows imaging observations in the far infrared at unprecedented resolution, i.e. at better than 6” to 12” over the wavelength range of 60 μm to 210 μm. Together with the results from ground-based observations, these spatially resolved data can be modelled to determine the nature of the debris and its evolution more reliably than what would be possible from unresolved data alone. Results: For the first time has the q1 Eri disc been resolved at far infrared wavelengths. The PACS observations at 70 μm, 100 μm and 160 μm reveal an oval image showing a disc-like structure in all bands, the size of which increases with wavelength. Assuming a circular shape yields the inclination of its equatorial plane with respect to that of the sky, i > 53°. The results of image de-convolution indicate that i likely is larger than 63°, where 90° corresponds to an edge-on disc. Conclusions: The observed emission is thermal and

  13. Far-UV Spectroscopy of the Planet-hosting Star WASP-13: High-energy Irradiance, Distance, Age, Planetary Mass-loss Rate, and Circumstellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, L.; France, K.; Koskinen, T.; Juvan, I. G.; Haswell, C. A.; Lendl, M.

    2015-12-01

    Several transiting hot Jupiters orbit relatively inactive main-sequence stars. For some of those, the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime activity parameter lies below the basal level (-5.1). Two explanations have been proposed so far: (i) the planet affects the stellar dynamo, (ii) the {log}{R}{HK}\\prime measurements are biased by extrinsic absorption, either by the interstellar medium (ISM) or by material local to the system. We present here Hubble Space Telescope/COS far-UV spectra of WASP-13, which hosts an inflated hot Jupiter and has a measured {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value (-5.26), well below the basal level. From the star’s spectral energy distribution we obtain an extinction E(B - V) = 0.045 ± 0.025 mag and a distance d = 232 ± 8 pc. We detect at ≳4σ lines belonging to three different ionization states of carbon (C i, C ii, and C iv) and the Si iv doublet at ˜3σ. Using far-UV spectra of nearby early G-type stars of known age, we derive a C iv/C i flux ratio-age relation, from which we estimate WASP-13's age to be 5.1 ± 2.0 Gyr. We rescale the solar irradiance reference spectrum to match the flux of the C iv 1548 doublet. By integrating the rescaled solar spectrum, we obtain an XUV flux at 1 AU of 5.4 erg s-1 cm-2. We use a detailed model of the planet’s upper atmosphere, deriving a mass-loss rate of 1.5 × 1011 g s-1. Despite the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value, the star shows a far-UV spectrum typical of middle-aged solar-type stars, pointing toward the presence of significant extrinsic absorption. The analysis of a high-resolution spectrum of the Ca ii H&K lines indicates that the ISM absorption could be the origin of the low {log}{R}{HK}\\prime value. Nevertheless, the large uncertainty in the Ca ii ISM abundance does not allow us to firmly exclude the presence of circumstellar gas. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from MAST at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  14. SPITZER AS A MICROLENS PARALLAX SATELLITE: MASS MEASUREMENT FOR THE OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L PLANET AND ITS HOST STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Udalski, A.; Skowron, J.; Kozłowski, S.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Pietrzyński, G.; Szymański, M. K.; Mróz, P.; Soszyński, I.; Ulaczyk, K.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Yee, J. C.; Gould, A.; Zhu, W.; Pogge, R. W.; Carey, S.; Han, C.; Calchi Novati, S.

    2015-02-01

    We combine Spitzer and ground-based observations to measure the microlens parallax vector π{sub E}, and thus the mass and distance of OGLE-2014-BLG-0124L, making it the first microlensing planetary system with a space-based parallax measurement. The planet and star have masses of m ∼ 0.5 M {sub jup} and M ∼ 0.7 M {sub ☉} and are separated by a ∼ 3.1 AU in projection. The main source of uncertainty in all of these numbers (approximately 30%, 30%, and 20%) is the relatively poor measurement of the Einstein radius θ{sub E}, rather than uncertainty in π{sub E}, which is measured with 2.5% precision. This compares to 22% based on OGLE data alone, implying that the Spitzer data provide not only a substantial improvement in the precision of the π{sub E} measurement, but also the first independent test of a ground-based π{sub E} measurement.

  15. An extreme planetary system around HD 219828. One long-period super Jupiter to a hot-Neptune host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, N. C.; Santerne, A.; Faria, J. P.; Rey, J.; Correia, A. C. M.; Laskar, J.; Udry, S.; Adibekyan, V.; Bouchy, F.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Melo, C.; Dumusque, X.; Hébrard, G.; Lovis, C.; Mayor, M.; Montalto, M.; Mortier, A.; Pepe, F.; Figueira, P.; Sahlmann, J.; Ségransan, D.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-07-01

    Context. With about 2000 extrasolar planets confirmed, the results show that planetary systems have a whole range of unexpected properties. This wide diversity provides fundamental clues to the processes of planet formation and evolution. Aims: We present a full investigation of the HD 219828 system, a bright metal-rich star for which a hot Neptune has previously been detected. Methods: We used a set of HARPS, SOPHIE, and ELODIE radial velocities to search for the existence of orbiting companions to HD 219828. The spectra were used to characterise the star and its chemical abundances, as well as to check for spurious, activity induced signals. A dynamical analysis is also performed to study the stability of the system and to constrain the orbital parameters and planet masses. Results: We announce the discovery of a long period (P = 13.1 yr) massive (m sini = 15.1 MJup) companion (HD 219828 c) in a very eccentric orbit (e = 0.81). The same data confirms the existence of a hot Neptune, HD 219828 b, with a minimum mass of 21 M⊕ and a period of 3.83 days. The dynamical analysis shows that the system is stable, and that the equilibrium eccentricity of planet b is close to zero. Conclusions: The HD 219828 system is extreme and unique in several aspects. First, ammong all known exoplanet systems it presents an unusually high mass ratio. We also show that systems like HD 219828, with a hot Neptune and a long-period massive companion are more frequent than similar systems with a hot Jupiter instead. This suggests that the formation of hot Neptunes follows a different path than the formation of their hot jovian counterparts. The high mass, long period, and eccentricity of HD 219828 c also make it a good target for Gaia astrometry as well as a potential target for atmospheric characterisation, using direct imaging or high-resolution spectroscopy. Astrometric observations will allow us to derive its real mass and orbital configuration. If a transit of HD 219828 b is detected

  16. The Sun as a planet-host star: proxies from SDO images for HARPS radial-velocity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haywood, R. D.; Collier Cameron, A.; Unruh, Y. C.; Lovis, C.; Lanza, A. F.; Llama, J.; Deleuil, M.; Fares, R.; Gillon, M.; Moutou, C.; Pepe, F.; Pollacco, D.; Queloz, D.; Ségransan, D.

    2016-04-01

    The Sun is the only star whose surface can be directly resolved at high resolution, and therefore constitutes an excellent test case to explore the physical origin of stellar radial-velocity (RV) variability. We present HARPS observations of sunlight scattered off the bright asteroid 4/Vesta, from which we deduced the Sun's activity-driven RV variations. In parallel, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provided us with simultaneous high spatial resolution magnetograms, Dopplergrams and continuum images of the Sun in the Fe I 6173 Å line. We determine the RV modulation arising from the suppression of granular blueshift in magnetized regions and the flux imbalance induced by dark spots and bright faculae. The rms velocity amplitudes of these contributions are 2.40 and 0.41 m s-1, respectively, which confirms that the inhibition of convection is the dominant source of activity-induced RV variations at play, in accordance with previous studies. We find the Doppler imbalances of spot and plage regions to be only weakly anticorrelated. Light curves can thus only give incomplete predictions of convective blueshift suppression. We must instead seek proxies that track the plage coverage on the visible stellar hemisphere directly. The chromospheric flux index R^' }_{HK} derived from the HARPS spectra performs poorly in this respect, possibly because of the differences in limb brightening/darkening in the chromosphere and photosphere. We also find that the activity-driven RV variations of the Sun are strongly correlated with its full-disc magnetic flux density, which may become a useful proxy for activity-related RV noise.

  17. Effects of pyriproxyfen on off-host water-balance and survival of adult lone star ticks (Acari: Ixodidae).

    PubMed

    Strey, O F; Teel, P D; Longnecker, M T

    2001-07-01

    Newly engorged nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyoma americanum (L.), were continuously exposed to 4 microg/cm2 of pyriproxyfen residues in glass vials. Treatment of engorged nymphs (n = 285) resulted in significant molting inhibition, with more than one-fourth (26.7%, n = 76) of nymphs dying before or during ecdysis. Treatment effects were evident among ticks that molted to the adult stage, with 26.7% (n = 76) of females, and 17.9% (n = 51) of males exhibiting moribund physical characteristics (i.e., lethargy; dull, discolored and desiccated cuticles; lacking full locomotor competency). A few molted adult ticks (10 males, four females) were dead upon inspection. Only 11.2% of pyriproxyfen treated, emergent females (n = 32), and 11.5% of treated emergent males (n = 25) from 285 ticks treated as engorged nymphs, exhibited normal physical appearance and possessed a full range of locomotor activity. Treated adult ticks maintained within a desiccating environmental chamber at 0% RH and 23 degrees C, had significantly accelerated whole-body water loss rates in comparison to untreated males and females maintained under the same environmental conditions. Additionally, treated adult ticks maintained under optimal environmental conditions (23 degrees C and >95% RH) sustained 100% mortality within 32 d following assignment to these conditions (or 79 d posttreatment as engorged nymphs), whereas untreated ticks had 0% mortality for the same duration of time. Results demonstrate that continuous exposure of nymphs to pyriproxyfen disrupted molting, and accelerated both whole-body water loss and subsequent mortality among emergent adult ticks.

  18. REDSHIFT 6.4 HOST GALAXIES OF 10{sup 8} SOLAR MASS BLACK HOLES: LOW STAR FORMATION RATE AND DYNAMICAL MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Willott, Chris J.; Omont, Alain; Bergeron, Jacqueline

    2013-06-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of rest-frame far-infrared continuum and [C II] line emission in two z = 6.4 quasars with black hole masses of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} M{sub Sun }. CFHQS J0210-0456 is detected in the continuum with a 1.2 mm flux of 120 {+-} 35 {mu}Jy, whereas CFHQS J2329-0301 is undetected at a similar noise level. J2329-0301 has a star formation rate limit of <40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, considerably below the typical value at all redshifts for this bolometric luminosity. Through comparison with hydro simulations, we speculate that this quasar is observed at a relatively rare phase where quasar feedback has effectively shut down star formation in the host galaxy. [C II] emission is also detected only in J0210-0456. The ratio of [C II] to far-infrared luminosity is similar to that of low-redshift galaxies of comparable luminosity, suggesting that the previous finding of an offset in the relationships between this ratio and far-infrared luminosity at low and high redshifts may be partially due to a selection effect due to the limited sensitivity of previous continuum data. The [C II] line of J0210-0456 is relatively narrow (FWHM = 189 {+-} 18 km s{sup -1}), indicating a dynamical mass substantially lower than expected from the local black hole-velocity dispersion correlation. The [C II] line is marginally resolved at 0.''7 resolution with the blue and red wings spatially offset by 0.''5 (3 kpc) and a smooth velocity gradient of 100 km s{sup -1} across a scale of 6 kpc, possibly due to the rotation of a galaxy-wide disk. These observations are consistent with the idea that stellar mass growth lags black hole accretion for quasars at this epoch with respect to more recent times.

  19. "Some Like it Hot” - Evidence for the Shrinking Orbit of the 2.2-day Transiting Hot Jupiter Exoplanet HD 189733b - Evidence of Transfer of Planet Orbital Momentum to its Host Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santapaga, Thomas; Guinan, E. F.; Ballouz, R.; Engle, S. G.; Dewarf, L.

    2011-01-01

    HD189733A is a K2V star that has attracted much attention because it hosts a transiting, hot Jupiter-exoplanet. HD189733b has one of the shortest known orbital-periods (P = 2.22-days) and is only 0.031AU from its host star (Buchy et al. 2005). Based on measurements of the K2V star's P(rot) from starspot-modulations of 12-d, coronal Lx 1028 ergs/s, and chromospheric Ca II-HK emission, indicate an age 0.6 -1.0 Gyr - inferred from our rotation-age-activity relations. However, this age is discrepant with an older-age inferred from the star's low Lithium-abundance ( 1/10 Solar.). However, the age-rotation-activity determination assumes no tidal-effects from close companions- such as close planet. Recently Gaspar et al. (2006) discovered a dM4 companion star (HD 189733 B: 12'' distance to the K-dwarf). X MM-Newton observations of the HD 189733 A&B carried out recently by Pilliteri et al. (2010), surprisingly revealed that HD 189733B shows no X-ray emission, with an upper limit of 9*1026 ergs/s. Using activity-age relationships for dM-stars, we expected a Lx of an order of magnitude higher for age <1.0 Ga. This apparent discrepancy can be resolved by the supposition that the K2V-star has been spun-up by its nearby planetary companion, and that its age determined from activity-rotation relationships is invalid. This supposition is supported by the recent photometry by the Kepler for 300+ exoplanet candidate systems discovered thus far (Borucki et al. 2010). The analysis these data have reveal that tidal locking between the planet and host star has occurred for a significant number of exoplanet with short orbital periods. We explain the fast rotation of the K2 star via the transfer of the planet's orbital angular momentum to the star via tidal interactions. The significance of these finding with respect to the evolution of planetary systems is discussed. This work is partially supported by NSF/RUI grant AST-1009903.

  20. Asteroseismology and Exoplanet Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    Asteroseismology is among the most powerful observational tools to determine fundamental properties of stars. Space-based photometry has recently enabled the systematic detection of oscillations in exoplanet host stars, allowing a combination of asteroseismology with transit and radial-velocity measurements to precisely characterize planetary systems. In this talk I will review the latest asteroseismic detections in exoplanet host stars spanning from the main sequence to the red-giant branch, focusing in particular on radii and ages of stars hosting small (sub-Neptune sized) planets discovered by the Kepler mission. I will furthermore discuss applications of asteroseismology to measure spin-orbit inclinations in multiplanet systems, and their implications for formation theories of hot Jupiters. Finally I will give an outlook on asteroseismic studies of exoplanet hosts with current and future space- and ground-based facilities such as K2, SONG, TESS, and PLATO.

  1. Association of the bovine leukocyte antigen major histocompatibility complex class II DRB3*4401 allele with host resistance to the Lone Star Tick, Amblyomma americanum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The MHC of cattle, known as the bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) complex, plays an integral role in disease and parasite susceptibility, and immune responsiveness of the host. While susceptibility to tick infestation in cattle is believed to be heritable, genes that may be responsible for the manife...

  2. Transiting exoplanets from the CoRoT space mission⋆. XXVIII. CoRoT-33b, an object in the brown dwarf desert with 2:3 commensurability with its host star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csizmadia, Sz.; Hatzes, A.; Gandolfi, D.; Deleuil, M.; Bouchy, F.; Fridlund, M.; Szabados, L.; Parviainen, H.; Cabrera, J.; Aigrain, S.; Alonso, R.; Almenara, J.-M.; Baglin, A.; Bordé, P.; Bonomo, A. S.; Deeg, H. J.; Díaz, R. F.; Erikson, A.; Ferraz-Mello, S.; Tadeu dos Santos, M.; Guenther, E. W.; Guillot, T.; Grziwa, S.; Hébrard, G.; Klagyivik, P.; Ollivier, M.; Pätzold, M.; Rauer, H.; Rouan, D.; Santerne, A.; Schneider, J.; Mazeh, T.; Wuchterl, G.; Carpano, S.; Ofir, A.

    2015-12-01

    We report the detection of a rare transiting brown dwarf with a mass of 59 MJup and radius of 1.1 RJup around the metal-rich, [Fe/H] = +0.44, G9V star CoRoT-33. The orbit is eccentric (e = 0.07) with a period of 5.82 d. The companion, CoRoT-33b, is thus a new member in the so-called brown dwarf desert. The orbital period is within 3% to a 3:2 resonance with the rotational period of the star. CoRoT-33b may be an important test case for tidal evolution studies. The true frequency of brown dwarfs close to their host stars (P< 10 d) is estimated to be approximately 0.2% which is about six times smaller than the frequency of hot Jupiters in the same period range. We suspect that the frequency of brown dwarfs declines faster with decreasing period than that of giant planets. The CoRoT space mission, launched on December 27th 2006, has been developed and is operated by CNES, with the contribution of Austria, Belgium, Brazil, ESA (RSSD and Science Programme), Germany and Spain. Based on observations made with HARPS (High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher) spectrograph on the 3.6-m European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere telescope at La Silla Observatory, Chile (ESO program 188.C-0779).Based on observations obtained with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, in time allocated by the Spanish Time Allocation Committee (CAT).

  3. Semi-empirical Modeling of the Photosphere, Chromosphere, Transition Region, and Corona of the M-dwarf Host Star GJ 832

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontenla, J. M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Witbrod, Jesse; France, Kevin; Buccino, A.; Mauas, Pablo; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.

    2016-10-01

    Stellar radiation from X-rays to the visible provides the energy that controls the photochemistry and mass loss from exoplanet atmospheres. The important extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region (10–91.2 nm) is inaccessible and should be computed from a reliable stellar model. It is essential to understand the formation regions and physical processes responsible for the various stellar emission features to predict how the spectral energy distribution varies with age and activity levels. We compute a state-of-the-art semi-empirical atmospheric model and the emergent high-resolution synthetic spectrum of the moderately active M2 V star GJ 832 as the first of a series of models for stars with different activity levels. We construct a one-dimensional simple model for the physical structure of the star’s chromosphere, chromosphere-corona transition region, and corona using non-LTE radiative transfer techniques and many molecular lines. The synthesized spectrum for this model fits the continuum and lines across the UV-to-optical spectrum. Particular emphasis is given to the emission lines at wavelengths that are shorter than 300 nm observed with the Hubble Space Telescope, which have important effects on the photochemistry of the exoplanet atmospheres. The FUV line ratios indicate that the transition region of GJ 832 is more biased to hotter material than that of the quiet Sun. The excellent agreement of our computed EUV luminosity with that obtained by two other techniques indicates that our model predicts reliable EUV emission from GJ 832. We find that the unobserved EUV flux of GJ 832, which heats the outer atmospheres of exoplanets and drives their mass loss, is comparable to the active Sun. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS AR-09525.01A. These observations

  4. MOLECULAR GAS IN LENSED z >2 QUASAR HOST GALAXIES AND THE STAR FORMATION LAW FOR GALAXIES WITH LUMINOUS ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Riechers, Dominik A.

    2011-04-01

    We report the detection of luminous CO(J = 2{yields}1), CO(J = 3{yields}2), and CO(J = 4{yields}3) emission in the strongly lensed high-redshift quasars B1938+666 (z = 2.059), HE 0230-2130 (z = 2.166), HE 1104-1805 (z = 2.322), and B1359+154 (z = 3.240), using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy. B1938+666 was identified in a 'blind' CO redshift search, demonstrating the feasibility of such investigations with millimeter interferometers. These galaxies are lensing-amplified by factors of {mu}{sub L} {approx_equal} 11-170, and thus allow us to probe the molecular gas in intrinsically fainter galaxies than currently possible without the aid of gravitational lensing. We report lensing-corrected intrinsic CO line luminosities of L'{sub CO} = 0.65-21x10{sup 9} K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}, translating to H{sub 2} masses of M(H{sub 2}) = 0.52-17 x 10{sup 9} ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M{sub sun}. To investigate whether or not the active galactic nucleus (AGN) in luminous quasars substantially contributes to L{sub FIR}, we study the L'{sub CO}-L{sub FIR} relation for quasars relative to galaxies without a luminous AGN as a function of redshift. We find no substantial differences between submillimeter galaxies and high-z quasars, but marginal evidence for an excess in L{sub FIR} in nearby low-L{sub FIR} AGN galaxies. This may suggest that an AGN contribution to L{sub FIR} is significant in systems with relatively low gas and dust content, but only minor in the most far-infrared-luminous galaxies (in which L{sub FIR} is dominated by star formation).

  5. Star Formation Across Galactic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    2013-01-01

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in AGN-free and quasar host galaxies. These environments are both insightful; quasars are among the most violent objects known, reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to dwarf star-forming galaxies. The AGN-free galaxies are drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey, an Hα-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to avoid continuum luminosity bias. This work studies the KISS galaxies in mid- and far-IR using Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry. These IR bands are interesting because the UV light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-IR (24μm MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transition features in the mid-IR (8.0μm IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). This work examines the efficiencies of PAH and dust emission as tracers of star-formation. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has no systematic dependance on galactic mass. My study of quasar host galaxies utilizes images of eight PG quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard HST. I use narrow-band images centered on the Hβ, [OII]λ3727, [OIII]λ5007, and Paα emission lines to construct extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I use line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission. I find star formation, albeit at rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies are dynamically more advanced than suspected. Seven of the galaxies have higher mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses from earlier works that AGN activity quenches star formation in host galaxies by disrupting gas reservoirs.

  6. The Host Galaxies of X-Ray Selected Active Galactic Nuclei to z - 2.5: Structure, Star-Formation and Their Relationships from CANDELS and Herschel/Pacs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosario, D.J.; McIntosh, D. H.; van der Wel, A.; Kartaltepe, J.; Lang, P.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Lutz, D.; Rafelski, M.; Villforth, C.; Alexander, D. M.; Bauer, F. E.; Bell, E. F.; Berta, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Conselice, C. J.; Dekel, A.; Faber, S. M.; Ferguson, H. C.; Genzel, R.; Grogin, N. A.; Kocevski, D. D.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Koo, D. C.; Straughn, A.

    2014-01-01

    We study the relationship between the structure and star-formation rate (SFR) of X-ray selected low and moderate luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the two Chandra Deep Fields, using Hubble Space Telescope imaging from the Cosmic Assembly Near Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) and deep far-infrared maps from the PEP+GOODS-Herschel survey. We derive detailed distributions of structural parameters and FIR luminosities from carefully constructed control samples of galaxies, which we then compare to those of the AGNs. At z is approximately 1, AGNs show slightly diskier light profiles than massive inactive (non-AGN) galaxies, as well as modestly higher levels of gross galaxy disturbance (as measured by visual signatures of interactions and clumpy structure). In contrast, at z 2, AGNs show similar levels of galaxy disturbance as inactive galaxies, but display a red central light enhancement, which may arise due to a more pronounced bulge in AGN hosts or due to extinguished nuclear light. We undertake a number of tests of both these alternatives, but our results do not strongly favour one interpretation over the other. The mean SFR and its distribution among AGNs and inactive galaxies are similar at z greater than 1.5. At z less than 1, however, clear and significant enhancements are seen in the SFRs of AGNs with bulge-dominated light profiles. These trends suggest an evolution in the relation between nuclear activity and host properties with redshift towards a minor role for mergers and interactions at z greater than 15

  7. Star Light, Star Bright.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iadevaia, David G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a technique for obtaining a rough measure of the brightness among different stars. Materials needed include a standard 35-mm camera, a plastic ruler, and a photo enlarger. Although a telescope can be used, it is not essential. (JN)

  8. Apple Valley Double Star Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The High Desert Astronomical Society hosts an annual double star workshop, where participants measure the position angles and separations of double stars. Following the New Generation Science Standards (NGSS), adopted by the California State Board of Education, participants are assigned to teams where they learn the process of telescope set-up and operation, the gathering of data, and the reduction of the data. Team results are compared to the latest epoch listed in the Washington Double Star Catalog (WDS) and papers are written for publication in the Journal of Double Star Observations (JDSO). Each team presents a PowerPoint presentation to their peers about actual hands-on astronomical research.

  9. Strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcock, Charles; Farhi, Edward; Olinto, Angela

    1986-01-01

    Strange matter, a form of quark matter that is postulated to be absolute stable, may be the true ground stage of the hadrons. If this hypothesis is correct, neutron stars may convert to 'strange stars'. The mass-radius relation for strange stars is very different from that of neutron stars; there is no minimum mass, and for mass of 1 solar mass or less, mass is proportional to the cube of the radius. For masses between 1 solar mass and 2 solar masses, the radii of strange stars are about 10 km, as for neutron stars. Strange stars may have an exposed quark surface, which is capable of radiating at rates greatly exceeding the Eddington limit, but has a low emissivity for X-ray photons. The stars may have a thin crust with the same composition as the preneutron drip outer layer of a conventional neutron star crust. Strange stars cool efficiently via neutrino emission.

  10. Stars and Star Myths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eason, Oliver

    Myths and tales from around the world about constellations and facts about stars in the constellations are presented. Most of the stories are from Greek and Roman mythology; however, a few Chinese, Japanese, Polynesian, Arabian, Jewish, and American Indian tales are also included. Following an introduction, myths are presented for the following 32…

  11. Producing Runaway Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    How are the hypervelocity stars weve observed in our galaxy produced? A recent study suggests that these escapees could be accelerated by a massive black hole in the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud.A Black Hole SlingshotSince their discovery in 2005, weve observed dozens of candidate hypervelocity stars stars whose velocity in the rest frame of our galaxy exceeds the local escape velocity of the Milky Way. These stars present a huge puzzle: how did they attain these enormous velocities?One potential explanation is known as the Hills mechanism. In this process, a stellar binary is disrupted by a close encounter with a massive black hole (like those thought to reside at the center of every galaxy). One member of the binary is flung out of the system as a result of the close encounter, potentially reaching very large velocities.A star-forming region known as LHA 120-N 11, located within the LMC. Some binary star systems within the LMC might experience close encounters with a possible massive black hole at the LMCs center. [ESA/NASA/Hubble]Blame the LMC?Usually, discussions of the Hills mechanism assume that Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, is the object guilty of accelerating the hypervelocity stars weve observed. But what if the culprit isnt Sgr A*, but a massive black hole at the center of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), one of the Milky Ways satellite galaxies?Though we dont yet have evidence of a massive black hole at the center of the LMC, the dwarf galaxy is large enough to potentially host one as large as 100,000 solar masses. Assuming that it does, two scientists at the University of Cambridge, Douglas Boubert and Wyn Evans, have now modeled how this black hole might tear apart binary star systems and fling hypervelocity stars around the Milky Way.Models for AccelerationBoubert and Evans determined that the LMCs hypothetical black hole could easily eject stars at ~100 km/s, which is the escape velocity of the

  12. Pulsating Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catelan, M.; Smith, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This book surveys our understanding of stars which change in brightness because they pulsate. Pulsating variable stars are keys to distance scales inside and beyond the Milky Way galaxy. They test our understanding not only of stellar pulsation theory but also of stellar structure and evolution theory. Moreover, pulsating stars are important probes of the formation and evolution of our own and neighboring galaxies. Our understanding of pulsating stars has greatly increased in recent years as large-scale surveys of pulsating stars in the Milky Way and other Local Group galaxies have provided a wealth of new observations and as space-based instruments have studied particular pulsating stars in unprecedented detail.

  13. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass

  14. STAR System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doverspike, James E.

    The STAR System is a developmental guidance approach to be used with elementary school children in the 5th or 6th grades. Two basic purposes underlie STAR: to increase learning potential and to enhance personal growth and development. STAR refers to 4 basic skills: sensory, thinking, adapting, and revising. Major components of the 4 skills are:…

  15. Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livio, Mario; Villaver, Eva

    2009-11-01

    Participants; Preface Mario Livio and Eva Villaver; 1. High-mass star formation by gravitational collapse of massive cores M. R. Krumholz; 2. Observations of massive star formation N. A. Patel; 3. Massive star formation in the Galactic center D. F. Figer; 4. An X-ray tour of massive star-forming regions with Chandra L. K. Townsley; 5. Massive stars: feedback effects in the local universe M. S. Oey and C. J. Clarke; 6. The initial mass function in clusters B. G. Elmegreen; 7. Massive stars and star clusters in the Antennae galaxies B. C. Whitmore; 8. On the binarity of Eta Carinae T. R. Gull; 9. Parameters and winds of hot massive stars R. P. Kudritzki and M. A. Urbaneja; 10. Unraveling the Galaxy to find the first stars J. Tumlinson; 11. Optically observable zero-age main-sequence O stars N. R. Walborn; 12. Metallicity-dependent Wolf-Raynet winds P. A. Crowther; 13. Eruptive mass loss in very massive stars and Population III stars N. Smith; 14. From progenitor to afterlife R. A. Chevalier; 15. Pair-production supernovae: theory and observation E. Scannapieco; 16. Cosmic infrared background and Population III: an overview A. Kashlinsky.

  16. Properties of Massive Stars in VVV Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borrissova, J.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars (Borrissova et al. [1]). We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. For the cluster with the largest number of objects, we establish firmly that the WN and WC stars were initially more massive than the O stars still present in the cluster.

  17. Hadron star models. [neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, J. M.; Boerner, G.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of fully relativistic rotating hadron star models are discussed using models based on recently developed equations of state. All of these stable neutron star models are bound with binding energies as high as about 25%. During hadron star formation, much of this energy will be released. The consequences, resulting from the release of this energy, are examined.

  18. Star Surface Polluted by Planetary Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-07-01

    Looking at the chemical composition of stars that host planets, astronomers have found that while dwarf stars often show iron enrichment on their surface, giant stars do not. The astronomers think that the planetary debris falling onto the outer layer of the star produces a detectable effect in a dwarf star, but this pollution is diluted by the giant star and mixed into its interior. "It is a little bit like a Tiramisu or a Capuccino," says Luca Pasquini from ESO, lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "There is cocoa powder only on the top!' ESO PR Photo 29/07 ESO PR Photo 29/07 The Structure of Stars Just a few years after the discovery of the first exoplanet it became evident that planets are preferentially found around stars that are enriched in iron. Planet-hosting stars are on average almost twice as rich in metals than their counterparts with no planetary system. The immediate question is whether this richness in metals enhances planet formation, or whether it is caused by the presence of planets. The classic chicken and egg problem. In the first case, the stars would be metal-rich down to their centre. In the second case, debris from the planetary system would have polluted the star and only the external layers would be affected by this pollution. When observing stars and taking spectra, astronomers indeed only see the outer layers and can't make sure the whole star has the same composition. When planetary debris fall onto a star, the material will stay in the outer parts, polluting it and leaving traces in the spectra taken. A team of astronomers has decided to tackle this question by looking at a different kind of stars: red giants. These are stars that, as will the Sun in several billion years, have exhausted the hydrogen in their core. As a result, they have puffed up, becoming much larger and cooler. Looking at the distribution of metals in fourteen planet-hosting giants, the astronomers found that their distribution was rather different from

  19. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  20. Hot Subluminous Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heber, U.

    2016-08-01

    Hot subluminous stars of spectral type B and O are core helium-burning stars at the blue end of the horizontal branch or have evolved even beyond that stage. Most hot subdwarf stars are chemically highly peculiar and provide a laboratory to study diffusion processes that cause these anomalies. The most obvious anomaly lies with helium, which may be a trace element in the atmosphere of some stars (sdB, sdO) while it may be the dominant species in others (He-sdB, He-sdO). Strikingly, the distribution in the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram of He-rich versus He-poor hot subdwarf stars of the globular clusters ω Cen and NGC 2808 differ from that of their field counterparts. The metal-abundance patterns of hot subdwarfs are typically characterized by strong deficiencies of some lighter elements as well as large enrichments of heavy elements. A large fraction of sdB stars are found in close binaries with white dwarf or very low-mass main sequence companions, which must have gone through a common-envelope (CE) phase of evolution. Because the binaries are detached they provide a clean-cut laboratory to study this important but yet poorly understood phase of stellar evolution. Hot subdwarf binaries with sufficiently massive white dwarf companions are viable candidate progenitors of type Ia supernovae both in the double degenerate as well as in the single degenerate scenario as helium donors for double detonation supernovae. The hyper-velocity He-sdO star US 708 may be the surviving donor of such a double detonation supernova. Substellar companions to sdB stars have also been found. For HW Vir systems the companion mass distribution extends from the stellar into the brown dwarf regime. A giant planet to the acoustic-mode pulsator V391 Peg was the first discovery of a planet that survived the red giant evolution of its host star. Evidence for Earth-size planets to two pulsating sdB stars have been reported and circumbinary giant planets or brown dwarfs have been found around HW

  1. Disrupted Stars in Unusual Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) occur when a star passes a little too close to a supermassive black hole at the center of a galaxy. Tidal forces from the black hole cause the passing star to be torn apart, resulting in a brief flare of radiation as the stars material accretes onto the black hole. A recent study asks the following question: do TDEs occur most frequently in an unusual type of galaxy?A Trend in DisruptionsSo far, we have data from eight candidate TDEs that peaked in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. The spectra from these observations have shown an intriguing trend: many of these TDEs host galaxies exhibit weak line emission (indicating little or no current star-formation activity), and yet they show strong Balmer absorption lines (indicating star formation activity occurred within the last Gyr). These quiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies likely underwent a period of intense star formation that recently ended.To determine if TDEs are overrepresented in such galaxies, a team of scientists led by Decker French (Steward Observatory, University of Arizona) has quantified the fraction of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) that exhibit similar properties to those of TDE hosts.Quantifying OverrepresentationSpectral characteristics of SDSS galaxies (gray) and TDE candidate host galaxies (colored points): line emission vs. Balmer absorption. The lower right-hand box identifies thequiescent, Balmer-strong galaxies which contain most TDE events, yet are uncommon among the galaxy sample as a whole. Click for a better look! [French et al. 2016]French and collaborators compare the optical spectra of the TDE host galaxies to those of nearly 600,000 SDSS galaxies, using two different cutoffs for the Balmer absorption the indicator of past star formation. Their strictest cut, filtering for very high Balmer absorption, selected only 0.2% of the SDSS galaxies, yet 38% of the TDEs are hosted in such galaxies. Using a more relaxed cutoff selects 2.3% of

  2. THE EXTREME HOSTS OF EXTREME SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, James D.; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Wyder, Ted K.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter; Seibert, Mark; Overzier, Roderik; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M.

    2011-01-20

    We use GALEX ultraviolet (UV) and optical integrated photometry of the hosts of 17 luminous supernovae (LSNe, having peak M{sub V} < -21) and compare them to a sample of 26, 000 galaxies from a cross-match between the SDSS DR4 spectral catalog and GALEX interim release 1.1. We place the LSN hosts on the galaxy NUV - r versus M{sub r} color-magnitude diagram (CMD) with the larger sample to illustrate how extreme they are. The LSN hosts appear to favor low-density regions of the galaxy CMD falling on the blue edge of the blue cloud toward the low-luminosity end. From the UV-optical photometry, we estimate the star formation history of the LSN hosts. The hosts have moderately low star formation rates (SFRs) and low stellar masses (M{sub *}) resulting in high specific star formation rates (sSFR). Compared with the larger sample, the LSN hosts occupy low-density regions of a diagram plotting sSFR versus M{sub *} in the area having higher sSFR and lower M{sub *}. This preference for low M{sub *}, high sSFR hosts implies that the LSNe are produced by an effect having to do with their local environment. The correlation of mass with metallicity suggests that perhaps wind-driven mass loss is the factor that prevents LSNe from arising in higher-mass, higher-metallicity hosts. The massive progenitors of the LSNe (>100 M{sub sun}), by appearing in low-SFR hosts, are potential tests for theories of the initial mass function that limit the maximum mass of a star based on the SFR.

  3. Coronet: A Star-Formation Neighbor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    While perhaps not quite as well known as its star-formation cousin Orion, the Corona Australis region (containing, at its heart, the Coronet cluster) is one of the nearest and most active regions of ongoing star formation. At only about 420 light-years away, the Coronet is over three times closer than the Orion nebula is to Earth. The Coronet contains a loose cluster of a few dozen young stars with a wide range of masses and at various stages of evolution, giving astronomers an opportunity to observe embryonic stars simultaneously in several wavelengths.

    This composite image shows the Coronet in X-rays from Chandra (purple) and infrared from Spitzer (orange, green, and cyan). The Spitzer data show young stars plus diffuse emission from dust. Due to the host of young stars in different life stages in the Coronet, astronomers can use these data to pinpoint details of how the youngest stars evolve.

  4. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars. PMID:17836594

  5. Star Polymers.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing M; McKenzie, Thomas G; Fu, Qiang; Wong, Edgar H H; Xu, Jiangtao; An, Zesheng; Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Davis, Thomas P; Boyer, Cyrille; Qiao, Greg G

    2016-06-22

    Recent advances in controlled/living polymerization techniques and highly efficient coupling chemistries have enabled the facile synthesis of complex polymer architectures with controlled dimensions and functionality. As an example, star polymers consist of many linear polymers fused at a central point with a large number of chain end functionalities. Owing to this exclusive structure, star polymers exhibit some remarkable characteristics and properties unattainable by simple linear polymers. Hence, they constitute a unique class of technologically important nanomaterials that have been utilized or are currently under audition for many applications in life sciences and nanotechnologies. This article first provides a comprehensive summary of synthetic strategies towards star polymers, then reviews the latest developments in the synthesis and characterization methods of star macromolecules, and lastly outlines emerging applications and current commercial use of star-shaped polymers. The aim of this work is to promote star polymer research, generate new avenues of scientific investigation, and provide contemporary perspectives on chemical innovation that may expedite the commercialization of new star nanomaterials. We envision in the not-too-distant future star polymers will play an increasingly important role in materials science and nanotechnology in both academic and industrial settings.

  6. Radio stars.

    PubMed

    Hjellming, R M; Wade, C M

    1971-09-17

    Up to the present time six classes of radio stars have been established. The signals are almost always very faint and drastically variable. Hence their discovery has owed as much to serendipity as to the highly sophisticated equipment and techniques that have been used. When the variations are regular, as with the pulsars, this characteristic can be exploited very successfully in the search for new objects as well as in the detailed study of those that are already known. The detection of the most erratically variable radio stars, the flare stars and the x-ray stars, is primarily a matter of luck and patience. In the case of the novas, one at least knows where and oughly when to look for radio emission. A very sensitive interferometer is clearly the best instrument to use in the initial detection of a radio star. The fact that weak background sources are frequently present makes it essential to prove that the position of a radio source agrees with that of a star to within a few arc seconds. The potential of radio astronomy for the study of radio stars will not be realized until more powerful instruments than those that are available today can be utilized. So far, we have been able to see only the most luminous of the radio stars.

  7. The Mass Spectrum of the First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Hajime; Hasegawa, Kenji; Tominaga, Nozomu

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M ⊙ <~ M <~ 300 M ⊙, peaking at several× 10 M ⊙. Most of the very massive stars of >~ 140 M ⊙ are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of <~ 1 M ⊙ that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ~50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  8. The mass spectrum of the first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, Hajime; Tominaga, Nozomu; Hasegawa, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    We perform cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with non-equilibrium primordial chemistry to obtain 59 minihalos that host first stars. The obtained minihalos are used as the initial conditions of local three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the formation of the first stars. We find that two-thirds of the minihalos host multiple stars, while the other third has single stars. The mass of the stars found in our simulations are in the range of 1 M {sub ☉} ≲ M ≲ 300 M {sub ☉}, peaking at several× 10 M {sub ☉}. Most of the very massive stars of ≳ 140 M {sub ☉} are born as single stars, although not all of the single stars are very massive. We also find a few stars of ≲ 1 M {sub ☉} that are kicked by the gravitational three body interactions to the position distant from the center of mass. The frequency that a star forming minihalo contains a binary system is ∼50%. We also investigate the abundance pattern of the stellar remnants by summing up the contributions from the first stars in the simulations. Consequently, the pattern is compatible with that of the low metallicity damped Lyα systems or the extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars, if the mass spectrum obtained in our experiment is shifted to the low mass side by 0.2 dex. If we consider the case that an EMP star is born in the remnant of the individual minihalo without mixing with others, the chemical signature of the pair instability supernova is more prominent, because most of them are born as single stars.

  9. Outflows of stars due to quasar feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubovas, Kastytis; Nayakshin, Sergei; Sazonov, Sergey; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2013-05-01

    Quasar feedback outflows are commonly invoked to drive gas out of galaxies in the early gas-rich epoch to terminate growth of galaxies. Here we present simulations that show that AGN feedback may drive not only gas but also stars out of their host galaxies under certain conditions. The mechanics of this process is as follows: (1) AGN-driven outflows accelerate and compress gas filling the host galaxy; (2) the accelerated dense shells become gravitationally unstable and form stars on radial trajectories. For the spherically symmetric initial conditions explored here, the black hole needs to exceed the host's Mσ mass by a factor of a few to accelerate the shells and the new stars to escape velocities. We discuss potential implications of these effects for the host galaxies: (i) radial mixing of bulge stars with the rest of the host; (ii) contribution of quasar outflows to galactic fountains as sources of high-velocity clouds; (iii) wholesale ejection of hypervelocity stars out of their hosts, giving rise to Type II supernovae on galactic outskirts, and contributing to reionization and metal enrichment of the Universe; (iv) bulge erosion and even complete destruction in extreme cases resulting in overweight or bulgeless SMBHs.

  10. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed

  11. LITHIUM ABUNDANCES IN A SAMPLE OF PLANET-HOSTING DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezzi, L.; Cunha, K.; De la Reza, R.; Smith, V. V.

    2010-11-20

    This work presents a homogeneous determination of lithium abundances in a large sample of giant-planet-hosting stars (N = 117) and a control sample of disk stars without detected planets (N = 145). The lithium abundances were derived using a detailed profile fitting of the Li I doublet at 6708 A in LTE. The planet-hosting and comparison stars were chosen to have significant overlap in their respective physical properties, including effective temperatures, luminosities, masses, metallicities, and ages. The combination of uniform data and homogeneous analysis with well-selected samples makes this study well suited to probe for possible differences in the lithium abundances found in planet-hosting stars. An overall comparison between the two samples reveals no obvious differences between stars with and without planets. A closer examination of the behavior of the Li abundances over a narrow range of effective temperature (5700 K {<=} T{sub eff} {<=} 5850 K) indicates subtle differences between the two stellar samples; this temperature range is particularly sensitive to various physical processes that can deplete lithium. In this T{sub eff} range, planet-hosting stars have lower Li abundances (by {approx}0.26 dex on average) than the comparison stars, although this segregation may be influenced by combining stars from a range of ages, metallicities, and masses. When stars with very restricted ranges in metallicity ([Fe/H] = 0.00 to +0.20 dex) and mass (M {approx} 1.05-1.15 M{sub sun}) are compared, however, both stars with and without planets exhibit similar behaviors in the lithium abundance with stellar age, suggesting that there are no differences in the lithium abundances between stars with planets and stars not known to have planets.

  12. STARS no star on Kauai

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.

    1993-04-01

    The island of Kuai, home to the Pacific Missile Range Facility, is preparing for the first of a series of Star Wars rocket launches expected to begin early this year. The Strategic Defense Initiative plans 40 launches of the Stategic Target System (STARS) over a 10-year period. The focus of the tests appears to be weapons and sensors designed to combat multiple-warhead ICBMs, which will be banned under the START II Treaty that was signed in January. The focus of this article is to express the dubious value of testing the STARS at a time when their application will not be an anticipated problem.

  13. A simple theory of bimodal star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Silk, J.

    1987-01-01

    A model of bimodal star formation is presented, wherein massive stars form in giant molecular clouds (GNC), at a rate regulated by supernovae energy feedback through the interstellar medium, the heat input also ensuring that the initial mass function (IMF) remains skewed towards massive stars. The low mass stars form at a constant rate. The formation of the GMC is governed by the dynamics of the host galaxy through the rotation curve and potential perturbations such as a spiral density wave. The characteristic masses, relative normalizations, and rates of formation of the massive and low mass modes of star formation may be tightly constrained by the requirements of the chemical evolution in the Solar Neighborhood. Good fits were obtained for the age metallicity relation and the metallicity structure of thin disk and spheroid stars only for a narrow range of these parameters.

  14. Planets, debris and their host metallicity correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Mark; Nayakshin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    Recent observations of debris discs (DDs), believed to be made up of remnant planetesimals, brought a number of surprises. DD presence does not correlate with the host star's metallicity, and may anticorrelate with the presence of gas giant planets. These observations contradict both assumptions and predictions of the highly successful Core Accretion model of planet formation. Here, we explore predictions of the alternative tidal downsizing (TD) scenario of planet formation. In TD, small planets and planetesimal debris is made only when gas fragments, predecessors of giant planets, are tidally disrupted. We show that these disruptions are rare in discs around high-metallicity stars but release more debris per disruption than their low [M/H] analogues. This predicts no simple relation between DD presence and host star's [M/H], as observed. A detected gas giant planet implies in TD that its predecessor fragment was not disputed, potentially explaining why DDs are less likely to be found around stars with gas giants. Less massive planets should correlate with DD presence, and sub-Saturn planets (Mp ˜ 50 M⊕) should correlate with DD presence stronger than sub-Neptunes (Mp ≲ 15 M⊕). These predicted planet-DD correlations will be diluted and weakened in observations by planetary systems' long-term evolution and multifragment effects neglected here. Finally, although presently difficult to observe, DDs around M dwarf stars should be more prevalent than around Solar type stars.

  15. Exoplanets bouncing between binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeckel, Nickolas; Veras, Dimitri

    2012-05-01

    Exoplanetary systems are found not only among single stars, but also among binaries of widely varying parameters. Binaries with separations of 100-1000 au are prevalent in the solar neighbourhood; at these separations, planet formation around a binary member may largely proceed as if around a single star. During the early dynamical evolution of a planetary system, planet-planet scattering can eject planets from a star's grasp. In a binary, the motion of a planet ejected from one star has effectively entered a restricted three-body system consisting of itself and the two stars, and the equations of motion of the three-body problem will apply as long as the ejected planet remains far from the remaining planets. Depending on its energy, escape from the binary as a whole may be impossible or delayed until the three-body approximation breaks down, and further close interactions with its planetary siblings boost its energy when it passes close to its parent star. Until then, this planet may be able to transition from the space around one star to the other, and chaotically 'bounce' back and forth. In this paper, we directly simulate scattering planetary systems that are around one member of a circular binary, and quantify the frequency of bouncing in scattered planets. We find that a great majority (70-85 per cent) of ejected planets will pass at least once through the space of it's host's binary companion, and depending on the binary parameters about 35-75 per cent will begin bouncing. The time spent bouncing is roughly lognormally distributed with a peak at about 104 yr, with only a small percentage bouncing for more than 1 Myr. This process may perturb and possibly incite instability among existing planets around the companion star. In rare cases, the presence of multiple planets orbiting both stars may cause post-bouncing capture or planetary swapping.

  16. TURBOVELOCITY STARS: KICKS RESULTING FROM THE TIDAL DISRUPTION OF SOLITARY STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Manukian, Haik; Guillochon, James; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2013-07-10

    The centers of most known galaxies host supermassive black holes (SMBHs). In orbit around these black holes are a centrally concentrated distribution of stars, both in single and in binary systems. Occasionally, these stars are perturbed onto orbits that bring them close to the SMBH. If the star is in a binary system, the three-body interaction with the SMBH can lead to large changes in orbital energy, depositing one of the two stars on a tightly-bound orbit, and its companion into a hyperbolic orbit that may escape the galaxy. In this Letter, we show that the disruption of solitary stars can also lead to large positive increases in orbital energy. The kick velocity depends on the amount of mass the star loses at pericenter, but not on the ratio of black hole to stellar mass, and are at most the star's own escape velocity. We find that these kicks are usually too small to result in the ejection of stars from the Milky Way, but can eject the stars from the black hole's sphere of influence, reducing their probability of being disrupted again. We estimate that {approx} 10{sup 5} stars, {approx} 1% of all stars within 10 pc of the galactic center, are likely to have had mass removed by the central black hole through tidal interaction, and speculate that these 'turbovelocity' stars will at first be redder, but eventually bluer, and always brighter than their unharassed peers.

  17. KEPLER RAPIDLY ROTATING GIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, A. D.; Martins, B. L. Canto; Bravo, J. P.; Paz-Chinchón, F.; Chagas, M. L. das; Leão, I. C.; Oliveira, G. Pereira de; Silva, R. Rodrigues da; Roque, S.; Oliveira, L. L. A. de; Silva, D. Freire da; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-07-10

    Rapidly rotating giant stars are relatively rare and may represent important stages of stellar evolution, resulting from stellar coalescence of close binary systems or accretion of substellar companions by their hosting stars. In the present Letter, we report 17 giant stars observed in the scope of the Kepler space mission exhibiting rapid rotation behavior. For the first time, the abnormal rotational behavior for this puzzling family of stars is revealed by direct measurements of rotation, namely from photometric rotation period, exhibiting a very short rotation period with values ranging from 13 to 55 days. This finding points to remarkable surface rotation rates, up to 18 times the rotation of the Sun. These giants are combined with six others recently listed in the literature for mid-infrared (IR) diagnostics based on Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer information, from which a trend for an IR excess is revealed for at least one-half of the stars, but at a level far lower than the dust excess emission shown by planet-bearing main-sequence stars.

  18. Population III Stars Around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komiya, Yutaka; Suda, Takuma; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2016-03-01

    We explore the possibility of observing Population III (Pop III) stars, born of primordial gas. Pop III stars with masses below 0.8 M⊙ should survive to date though are not yet observed, but the existence of stars with low metallicity as [{{Fe}}/{{H}}]\\lt -5 in the Milky Way halo suggests the surface pollution of Pop III stars with accreted metals from the interstellar gas after birth. In this paper, we investigate the runaway of Pop III stars from their host mini-halos, considering the ejection of secondary members from binary systems when their massive primaries explode as supernovae. These stars save them from surface pollution. By computing the star formation and chemical evolution along with the hierarchical structure formation based on the extended Press-Schechter merger trees, we demonstrate that several hundreds to tens of thousands of low-mass Pop III stars escape from the building blocks of the Milky Way. The second and later generations of extremely metal-poor stars also escaped from the mini-halos. We discuss the spatial distributions of these escaped stars by evaluating the distances between the mini-halos in the branches of merger trees under the spherical collapse model of dark matter halos. It is demonstrated that the escaped stars distribute beyond the stellar halo with a density profile close to the dark matter halo, while Pop III stars are slightly more centrally concentrated. 6%-30% of the escaped stars leave the Milky Way and go out into the intergalactic space. Based on the results, we discuss the feasibility of observing the Pop III stars with the pristine surface abundance.

  19. The Drifting Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    temperature is 6150 K, its mass is 1.25 times that of the Sun, and its age is 625 million years. Moreover, the star is found to be more metal-rich than the Sun by about 50%. ESO PR Photo 09b/08 ESO PR Photo 09b/08 Constellations "These results show the power of asteroseismology when using a very precise instrument such as HARPS," says Vauclair. "It also shows that Iota Horologii has the same metal abundance and age as the Hyades cluster and this cannot be a coincidence." The Hyades is an ensemble of stars that is seen with the unaided eye in the Northern constellation Taurus ("The Bull"). This open cluster, located 151 light-years away, contains stars that were formed together 625 million years ago. The star Iota Horologii must have thus formed together with the stars of the Hyades cluster but must have slowly drifted away, being presently more than 130 light-years away from its original birthplace. This is an important result to understand how stars move on the galactic highways of the Milky Way. This also means that the amount of metals present in the star is due to the original cloud from which it formed and not because it engulfed planetary material. "The chicken and egg question of whether the star got planets because it is metal-rich, or whether it is metal-rich because it made planets that were swallowed up is at least answered in one case," says Vauclair. More information The astronomers' study is being published as a Letter to the Editor in Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The exoplanet-host star iota Horologii: an evaporated member of the primordial Hyades cluster", by S. Vauclair et al.). The team is composed of Sylvie Vauclair, Marion Laymand, Gérard Vauclair, Alain Hui Bon Hoa, and Stéphane Charpinet (LATT, Toulouse, France), François Bouchy (IAP, Paris, France), and Michaël Bazot (University of Porto, Portugal).

  20. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf-Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  1. The Prevalence and Impact of Wolf–Rayet Stars in Emerging Massive Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Indebetouw, Rémy; Massey, Philip

    2016-08-01

    We investigate Wolf–Rayet (WR) stars as a source of feedback contributing to the removal of natal material in the early evolution of massive star clusters. Despite previous work suggesting that massive star clusters clear out their natal material before the massive stars evolve into the WR phase, WR stars have been detected in several emerging massive star clusters. These detections suggest that the timescale for clusters to emerge can be at least as long as the time required to produce WR stars (a few million years), and could also indicate that WR stars may be providing the tipping point in the combined feedback processes that drive a massive star cluster to emerge. We explore the potential overlap between the emerging phase and the WR phase with an observational survey to search for WR stars in emerging massive star clusters hosting WR stars. We select candidate emerging massive star clusters from known radio continuum sources with thermal emission and obtain optical spectra with the 4 m Mayall Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the 6.5 m MMT.4 We identify 21 sources with significantly detected WR signatures, which we term “emerging WR clusters.” WR features are detected in ˜50% of the radio-selected sample, and thus we find that WR stars are commonly present in currently emerging massive star clusters. The observed extinctions and ages suggest that clusters without WR detections remain embedded for longer periods of time, and may indicate that WR stars can aid, and therefore accelerate, the emergence process.

  2. Emerging infectious disease in sea stars: castrating ciliate parasites in Patiria miniata.

    PubMed

    Sunday, J; Raeburn, L; Hart, M W

    2008-08-27

    Orchitophrya stellarum is a holotrich ciliate that facultatively parasitizes and castrates male asteriid sea stars. We discovered a morphologically similar ciliate in testes of an asterinid sea star, the northeastern Pacific bat star Patiria miniata (Brandt, 1835). This parasite may represent a threat to Canadian populations of this iconic sea star. Confirmation that the parasite is O. stellarum would indicate a considerable host range expansion, and suggest that O. stellarum is a generalist sea star pathogen.

  3. Stars Just Got Bigger - A 300 Solar Mass Star Uncovered

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-07-01

    raises the challenge to theorists still further. "Either they were born so big or smaller stars merged together to produce them," explains Crowther. Stars between about 8 and 150 solar masses explode at the end of their short lives as supernovae, leaving behind exotic remnants, either neutron stars or black holes. Having now established the existence of stars weighing between 150 and 300 solar masses, the astronomers' findings raise the prospect of the existence of exceptionally bright, "pair instability supernovae" that completely blow themselves apart, failing to leave behind any remnant and dispersing up to ten solar masses of iron into their surroundings. A few candidates for such explosions have already been proposed in recent years. Not only is R136a1 the most massive star ever found, but it also has the highest luminosity too, close to 10 million times greater than the Sun. "Owing to the rarity of these monsters, I think it is unlikely that this new record will be broken any time soon," concludes Crowther. Notes [1] The star A1 in NGC 3603 is a double star, with an orbital period of 3.77 days. The two stars in the system have, respectively, 120 and 92 times the mass of the Sun, which means that they have formed as stars weighing, respectively, 148 and 106 solar masses. [2] The team used the SINFONI, ISAAC and MAD instruments, all attached to ESO's Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. [3] (note added on 26 July 2010) The "bigger" in the title does not imply that these stars are the biggest observed. Such stars, called red supergiants, can have radii up to about a thousand solar radii, while R136a1, which is blue, is about 35 times as large as the Sun. However, R136a1 is the star with the greatest mass known to date. More information This work is presented in an article published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society ("The R136 star cluster hosts several stars whose individual masses greatly exceed the accepted 150 Msun stellar mass limit", by

  4. The very wide-field gzK Galaxy Survey - II. The relationship between star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2 and their host haloes based upon HOD modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Shogo; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Hamana, Takashi; Toshikawa, Jun; Onoue, Masafusa

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of an halo occupation distribution (HOD) analysis of star-forming galaxies at z ˜ 2. We obtained high-quality angular correlation functions based on a large sgzK sample, which enabled us to carry out the HOD analysis. The mean halo mass and the HOD mass parameters are found to increase monotonically with increasing K-band magnitude, suggesting that more luminous galaxies reside in more massive dark haloes. The luminosity dependence of the HOD mass parameters was found to be the same as in the local Universe; however, the masses were larger than in the local Universe over all ranges of magnitude. This implies that galaxies at z ˜ 2 tend to form in more massive dark haloes than in the local Universe, a process known as downsizing. By analysing the dark halo mass evolution using the extended Press-Schechter formalism and the number evolution of satellite galaxies in a dark halo, we find that faint Lyman break galaxies at z ˜ 4 could evolve into the faintest sgzKs (22.0 < K ≤ 23.0) at z ˜ 2 and into the Milky-Way-like galaxies or elliptical galaxies in the local Universe, whereas the most luminous sgzKs (18.0 ≤ K ≤ 21.0) could evolve into the most massive systems in the local Universe. The stellar-to-halo mass ratio (SHMR) of the sgzKs was found to be consistent with the prediction of the model, except that the SHMR of the faintest sgzKs was smaller than the prediction at z ˜ 2. This discrepancy may be explained by the confinement of our samples to star-forming galaxies.

  5. THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, James P.

    2013-09-01

    High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

  6. Preferred Hosts for Short-Period Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to learn more about how planets form around their host stars, a team of scientists has analyzed the population of Kepler-discovered exoplanet candidates, looking for trends in where theyre found.Planetary OccurrenceSince its launch in 2009, Kepler has found thousands of candidate exoplanets around a variety of star types. Especially intriguing is the large population of super-Earths and mini-Neptunes planets with masses between that of Earth and Neptune that have short orbital periods. How did they come to exist so close to their host star? Did they form in situ, or migrate inwards, or some combination of both processes?To constrain these formation mechanisms, a team of scientists led by Gijs Mulders (University of Arizona and NASAs NExSS coalition) analyzed the population of Kepler planet candidates that have orbital periods between 2 and 50 days.Mulders and collaborators used statistical reconstructions to find the average number of planets, within this orbital range, around each star in the Kepler field. They then determined how this planet occurrence rate changed for different spectral types and therefore the masses of the host stars: do low-mass M-dwarf stars host more or fewer planets than higher-mass, main-sequence F, G, or K stars?Challenging ModelsAuthors estimates for the occurrence rate for short-period planets of different radii around M-dwarfs (purple) and around F, G, and K-type stars (blue). [Mulders et al. 2015]The team found that M dwarfs, compared to F, G, or K stars, host about half as many large planets with orbital periods of P 50 days. But, surprisingly, they host significantly more small planets, racking up an average of 3.5 times the number of planets in the size range of 12.8 Earth-radii.Could it be that M dwarfs have a lower total mass of planets, but that mass is distributed into more, smaller planets? Apparently not: the authors show that the mass of heavy elements trapped in short-orbital-period planets is higher for M

  7. Star quality.

    PubMed

    Dent, Emma

    2007-09-20

    Around 150 wards are participating in the voluntary Star Wards scheme to provide mental health inpatients with more activities with therapeutic value. Suggested activities range from a library, to horse riding Internet access and comedy. Service users are particularly keen to have more exercise, which can be a challenge in inpatient settings. PMID:17970387

  8. Star Power

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  9. Star Power

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has released ''Star Power,'' a new informational video that uses dramatic and beautiful images and thought-provoking interviews to highlight the importance of the Laboratory's research into magnetic fusion.

  10. Binary Systems Within Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunzen, Ernst; Stütz, Christian; Baumann, Bernhard

    2012-04-01

    WEBDA (http://www.univie.ac.at/webda) is a site devoted to observational data of stellar clusters in the Milky Way and the Small Magellanic Cloud. It is intended to provide a reliable presentation of the available data and knowledge about these objects. The success of WEBDA is documented by its worldwide usage and the related acknowledgements in the literature: more than 650 refereed publications within the last twelve years acknowledged its use. It collects all published data for stars in open clusters that may be useful either to determine membership, or to study the stellar content and properties of the clusters. The database content includes astrometric data in the form of coordinates, rectangular positions, and proper motions, photometric data in the major systems in which star clusters have been observed, but also spectroscopic data like spectral classification, radial velocities, and rotational velocities. It also contains miscellaneous types of supplementary data like membership probabilities, orbital elements of spectroscopic binaries, and periods for different kinds of variable stars as well as an extensive bibliography. Several powerful tools help to plot, query and extract the data, which can be directly retrieved via http. At the time of writing, about four million individual measurements have been included in the database. The Star Clusters Young & Old Newsletter (SCYON), a bi-monthly newsletter devoted to star cluster research with about 600 subscribers, is hosted in parallel with the database. We present the current and upcoming new interface and tools, which are needed to visualize and analyze the increasing amount of data from all-sky surveys, and deeper investigations of binary systems, low mass dwarfs, as well as planet-hosting stars.

  11. Hot-Jupiter Breakfasts Realign Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    Two researchers at the University of Chicago have recently developed a new theory to explain an apparent dichotomy in the orbits of planets around cool vs. hot stars. Their model proposes that the spins of cool stars are affected when they ingest hot Jupiters (HJs) early in their stellar lifetimes. A Puzzling Dichotomy: In exoplanet studies, there is a puzzling difference observed between planet orbits around cool and hot (those with Teff ≥ 6250 K) stars: the orbital planes of planets around cool stars are primarily aligned with the host star's spin, whereas the orbital planes of planets around hot stars seem to be randomly distributed. Previous attempts to explain this dichotomy have focused on tidal interactions between the host star and the planets observed in the system. Now Titos Matsakos and Arieh Königl have taken these models a step further — by including in their calculations not only the effects of observed planets, but also those of HJs that may have been swallowed by the star long before we observed the systems. Modeling Meals: Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015]" class="size-thumbnail wp-image-223" height="386" src="http://aasnova.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/fig22-260x386.png" width="260" /> Plots of the distribution of the obliquity λ for hot Jupiters around cool hosts (upper plot) and hot hosts (lower plot). The dashed line shows the initial distribution, the bins show the model prediction for the final distribution after the systems evolve, and the black dots show the current observational data. [Matsakos & Königl, 2015] The authors' model assumes that as HJs are formed and migrate inward through the protoplanetary disk, they stall out near

  12. Tidal Disruption Events Prefer Unusual Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcavi, Iair; French, K. Decker; Zabludoff, Ann I.

    2016-06-01

    A star passing close to a supermassive black hole (SMBH) can be torn apart in a Tidal Disruption Events (TDE). TDEs that are accompanied by observable flares are now being discovered in transient surveys and are revealing the presence and the properties of otherwise-quiescent SMBHs. Recently, it was discovered that TDEs show a strong preference for rare post-starburst galaxies, (i.e. galaxies that have undergone intense star formation but are no longer forming stars today). We quantify this preference and find that TDEs are approximately 30-200 times more likely to occur in post-starburst hosts (compared to the general SDSS galaxy population), with the enhancement factor depending on the star formation history of the galaxy. This surprising host-galaxy preference connects the until-now disparate TDE subclasses of UV/optical-dominated TDEs and X-ray-dominated TDEs, and serves as the basis for TDE-targeted transient surveys. Post-starburst galaxies may be post-mergers, with binary SMBH systems that are still spiraling in. Such systems could enhance the TDE rate, but it is not yet clear if models can quantitatively reproduce the observed enhancement. Alternative explanations for enhanced TDE rate in post-starbursts include non-spherical post-merger central potentials and enhanced rates of giant stars.

  13. Rotating Stars Can Help Planets Become Habitable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    What characteristics must a terrestrial planet exhibit to have the potential to host life? Orbiting within the habitable zone of its host star is certainly a good start, but theres another important aspect: the planet has to have the right atmosphere. A recent study has determined how host stars can help their planets to lose initial, enormous gaseous envelopes and become more Earth-like.Collecting An EnvelopeWhen a terrestrial planet forms inside a gaseous protoplanetary disk, it can accumulate a significant envelope of hydrogen gas causing the planet to bear more similarity to a mini-Neptune than to Earth. Before the planet can become habitable, it must shed this enormous, primordial hydrogen envelope, so that an appropriate secondary atmosphere can form.So what determines whether a planet can get rid of its protoatmosphere? The dominant process for shedding a hydrogen atmosphere is thermal mass loss: as the planets upper atmosphere is heated by X-ray and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from the host star, the envelope evaporates.A Critical DependenceIn a recent study led by Colin Johnstone (University of Vienna), a team of scientists has developed models of this evaporation process for hydrogen planetary atmospheres. In particular, Johnstone and collaborators examine how the host stars initial rotation rate which strongly impacts the stars level of XUV activity affects the degree to which the planets hydrogen atmosphere is evaporated, and the rate at which the evaporation occurs.The authors findings can be illustrated with the example of an Earth-mass planet located in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. In this case, the authors find four interesting regimes (shown in the plot to the right):Evolution of the hydrogen protoatmosphere of an Earth-mass planet in the habitable zone of a solar-mass star. The four lettered cases describe different initial atmospheric masses. The three curves for each case describe the stellar rotation rate: slow (red

  14. Light elements in stars with exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado Mena, E.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; González-Hernández, J. I.; Israelian, G.; Santos, N. C.; Rebolo, R.; Dominguez Cerdeña, C.

    2010-03-01

    Light elements are important tracers of the internal stellar structure and kinematics. Li and Be are both burned in the stellar interiors but Be requires much higher temperatures and thus we can expect to measure Be abundances in stars which have no detectable Li in their atmospheres. The study of these elements can give us information about processes related to the angular momentum history of these stars, since rotation and angular momentum loss are important mechanisms responsible for the depletion of light elements. Additionally, if pollution has played an important role in determining the high-metal content of planet host stars, we would expect to find a similar or even higher increase in the Li and Be contents. We present Be and Li abundances in a sample of 69 stars with planets and 31 stars without known planetary companion, spanning a large range of effective temperatures.

  15. Converting neutron stars into strange stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, A. V.

    1991-01-01

    If strange matter is formed in the interior of a neutron star, it will convert the entire neutron star into a strange star. The proposed mechanisms are reviewed for strange matter seeding and the possible strange matter contamination of neutron star progenitors. The conversion process that follows seeding and the recent calculations of the conversion timescale are discussed.

  16. Weighing the Smallest Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-01-01

    VLT Finds Young, Very Low Mass Objects Are Twice As Heavy As Predicted Summary Thanks to the powerful new high-contrast camera installed at the Very Large Telescope, photos have been obtained of a low-mass companion very close to a star. This has allowed astronomers to measure directly the mass of a young, very low mass object for the first time. The object, more than 100 times fainter than its host star, is still 93 times as massive as Jupiter. And it appears to be almost twice as heavy as theory predicts it to be. This discovery therefore suggests that, due to errors in the models, astronomers may have overestimated the number of young "brown dwarfs" and "free floating" extrasolar planets. PR Photo 03/05: Near-infrared image of AB Doradus A and its companion (NACO SDI/VLT) A winning combination A star can be characterised by many parameters. But one is of uttermost importance: its mass. It is the mass of a star that will decide its fate. It is thus no surprise that astronomers are keen to obtain a precise measure of this parameter. This is however not an easy task, especially for the least massive ones, those at the border between stars and brown dwarf objects. Brown dwarfs, or "failed stars", are objects which are up to 75 times more massive than Jupiter, too small for major nuclear fusion processes to have ignited in its interior. To determine the mass of a star, astronomers generally look at the motion of stars in a binary system. And then apply the same method that allows determining the mass of the Earth, knowing the distance of the Moon and the time it takes for its satellite to complete one full orbit (the so-called "Kepler's Third Law"). In the same way, they have also measured the mass of the Sun by knowing the Earth-Sun distance and the time - one year - it takes our planet to make a tour around the Sun. The problem with low-mass objects is that they are very faint and will often be hidden in the glare of the brighter star they orbit, also when viewed

  17. The properties of planets around giant stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, M. I.; Jenkins, J. S.; Bluhm, P.; Rojo, P.; Melo, C. H. F.

    2014-06-01

    Context. More than 50 exoplanets have been found around giant stars, revealing different properties when compared to planets orbiting solar-type stars. In particular, they are super-Jupiters and are not found orbiting interior to ~0.5 AU. Aims: We are conducting a radial velocity study of a sample of 166 giant stars aimed at studying the population of close-in planets orbiting giant stars and how their orbital and physical properties are influenced by the post-MS evolution of the host star. Methods: We have collected multiepoch spectra for all of the targets in our sample. We have computed precision radial velocities from FECH/CHIRON and FEROS spectra, using the I2 cell technique and the simultaneous calibration method, respectively. Results: We present the discovery of a massive planet around the giant star HIP 105854. The best Keplerian fit to the data leads to an orbital distance of 0.81 ± 0.03 AU, an eccentricity of 0.02 ± 0.03 and a projected mass of 8.2 ± 0.2 MJ. With the addition of this new planet discovery, we performed a detailed analysis of the orbital properties and mass distribution of the planets orbiting giant stars. We show that there is an overabundance of planets around giant stars with a ~ 0.5 - 0.9 AU, which might be attributed to tidal decay. Additionally, these planets are significantly more massive than those around MS and subgiant stars, suggesting that they grow via accretion either from the stellar wind or by mass transfer from the host star. Finally, we show that planets around evolved stars have lower orbital eccentricities than those orbiting solar-type stars, which suggests that they are either formed in different conditions or that their orbits are efficiently circularized by interactions with the host star. Based on observations collected at La Silla - Paranal Observatory under programs IDs 085.C-0557, 087.C.0476, 089.C-0524 and 090.C-0345.The RV Table is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  18. Exceptional Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. R.; Hansen, B.; van Kerkwijk, M.; Phinney, E. S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of our Interdisciplinary Scientist effort (PI, Kulkarni) for the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) we proposed an investigation with SIM of a number of exceptional stars. With SIM we plan to observe dozens of nearby white dwarfs and search for planets surviving the evolution away from the main sequence as well as (newly formed) planets formed in the circumbinary disks of post-AGB binaries or as a result of white dwarf mergers. We propose to measure the proper motion of a sample of X-ray binaries and Be star binaries with the view of understanding the originof high latitude objects and inferring natal kicks and pre-supernova orbits. We plan to observe several compact object binaries to determine the mass of the compact star. Of particular importance is the proposed observation of SS 433 (for which we propose to use the spectrometer on SIM to measure the proper motion of the emission line clumps embedded in the relativistic jets). Separately we are investigating the issue of frame tie between SIM and the ecliptic frame (by observing binary millisecond pulsars with SIM; the position of these objects is very well determined by pulsar timing) and the degree to which highly precise visibility amplitude measurements can be inverted to infer binary parameters.

  19. Stars Can't Spin Out of Control (Artist's Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for QuickTime Movie of Stars Can't Spin Out of Control

    This artist's animation demonstrates how a dusty planet-forming disk can slow down a whirling young star, essentially saving the star from spinning itself to death. Evidence for this phenomenon comes from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The movie begins by showing a developing star (red ball). The star is basically a giant ball of gas that is collapsing onto itself. As it shrinks, it spins faster and faster, like a skater folding in his or her arms. The green lines represent magnetic fields.

    As gravity continues to pull matter inward, the star spins so fast, it starts to flatten out. The same principle applies to the planet Saturn, whose spin has caused it to be slightly squashed or oblate.

    A forming star can theoretically whip around fast enough to overcome gravity and flatten itself into a state where it can no longer become a full-fledged star. But stars don't spin out of control, possibly because swirling disks of dust slow them down. Such disks can be found orbiting young stars, and are filled with dust that might ultimately stick together to form planets.

    The second half of the animation demonstrates how a disk is thought to keep its star's speed in check. A developing star is shown twirling inside its disk. As it turns, its magnetic fields pass through the disk and get bogged down like a spoon in molasses. This locks the star's rotation to the slower-turning disk, so the star, while continuing to shrink, does not spin faster.

    Spitzer found evidence for star-slowing disks in a survey of nearly 500 forming stars in the Orion nebula. It observed that slowly spinning stars are five times more likely to host disks than rapidly spinning stars.

  20. The Stars behind the Curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-02-01

    ESO is releasing a magnificent VLT image of the giant stellar nursery surrounding NGC 3603, in which stars are continuously being born. Embedded in this scenic nebula is one of the most luminous and most compact clusters of young, massive stars in our Milky Way, which therefore serves as an excellent "local" analogue of very active star-forming regions in other galaxies. The cluster also hosts the most massive star to be "weighed" so far. NGC 3603 is a starburst region: a cosmic factory where stars form frantically from the nebula's extended clouds of gas and dust. Located 22 000 light-years away from the Sun, it is the closest region of this kind known in our galaxy, providing astronomers with a local test bed for studying intense star formation processes, very common in other galaxies, but hard to observe in detail because of their great distance from us. The nebula owes its shape to the intense light and winds coming from the young, massive stars which lift the curtains of gas and clouds revealing a multitude of glowing suns. The central cluster of stars inside NGC 3603 harbours thousands of stars of all sorts (eso9946): the majority have masses similar to or less than that of our Sun, but most spectacular are several of the very massive stars that are close to the end of their lives. Several blue supergiant stars crowd into a volume of less than a cubic light-year, along with three so-called Wolf-Rayet stars - extremely bright and massive stars that are ejecting vast amounts of material before finishing off in glorious explosions known as supernovae. Using another recent set of observations performed with the SINFONI instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), astronomers have confirmed that one of these stars is about 120 times more massive than our Sun, standing out as the most massive star known so far in the Milky Way [1]. The clouds of NGC 3603 provide us with a family picture of stars in different stages of their life, with gaseous structures that are

  1. THE SIZE SCALE OF STAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Madrid, Juan P.; Hurley, Jarrod R.; Sippel, Anna C.

    2012-09-10

    Direct N-body simulations of star clusters in a realistic Milky-Way-like potential are carried out using the code NBODY6. Based on these simulations, a new relationship between scale size and galactocentric distance is derived: the scale size of star clusters is proportional to the hyperbolic tangent of the galactocentric distance. The half-mass radius of star clusters increases systematically with galactocentric distance but levels off when star clusters orbit the galaxy beyond {approx}40 kpc. These simulations show that the half-mass radius of individual star clusters varies significantly as they evolve over a Hubble time, more so for clusters with shorter relaxation times, and remains constant through several relaxation times only in certain situations when expansion driven by the internal dynamics of the star cluster and the influence of the host galaxy tidal field balance each other. Indeed, the radius of a star cluster evolving within the inner 20 kpc of a realistic galactic gravitational potential is severely truncated by tidal interactions and does not remain constant over a Hubble time. Furthermore, the half-mass radius of star clusters measured with present-day observations bears no memory of the original cluster size. Stellar evolution and tidal stripping are the two competing physical mechanisms that determine the present-day size of globular clusters. These simulations also show that extended star clusters can form at large galactocentric distances while remaining fully bound to the host galaxy. There is thus no need to invoke accretion from an external galaxy to explain the presence of extended clusters at large galactocentric distances in a Milky-Way-type galaxy.

  2. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars.

  3. Binary stars.

    PubMed

    Paczynacuteski, B

    1984-07-20

    Most stars in the solar neighborhood are either double or multiple systems. They provide a unique opportunity to measure stellar masses and radii and to study many interesting and important phenomena. The best candidates for black holes are compact massive components of two x-ray binaries: Cygnus X-1 and LMC X-3. The binary radio pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 provides the best available evidence for gravitational radiation. Accretion disks and jets observed in close binaries offer a very good testing ground for models of active galactic nuclei and quasars. PMID:17749544

  4. Physical properties of the WR stars in Westerlund 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosslowe, C. K.; Crowther, P. A.; Clark, J. S.; Negueruela, I.

    The Westerlund 1 (Wd1) cluster hosts a rich and varied collection of massive stars. Its dynamical youth and the absence of ongoing star formation indicate a coeval population. As such, the simultaneous presence of both late-type supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars has defied explanation in the context of single-star evolution. Observational evidence points to a high binary fraction, hence this stellar population offers a robust test for stellar models accounting for both single-star and binary evolution. We present an optical to near-IR (VLT & NTT) spectroscopic analysis of 22 WR stars in Wd 1, delivering physical properties for the WR stars. We discuss how these differ from the Galactic field population, and how they may be reconciled with the predictions of single and binary evolutionary models.

  5. Hot Jupiters and cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Villaver, Eva; Mustill, Alexander J.; Livio, Mario; Siess, Lionel

    2014-10-10

    Close-in planets are in jeopardy, as their host stars evolve off the main sequence (MS) to the subgiant and red giant phases. In this paper, we explore the influences of the stellar mass (in the range 1.5-2 M {sub ☉}), mass-loss prescription, planet mass (from Neptune up to 10 Jupiter masses), and eccentricity on the orbital evolution of planets as their parent stars evolve to become subgiants and red giants. We find that planet engulfment along the red giant branch is not very sensitive to the stellar mass or mass-loss rates adopted in the calculations, but quite sensitive to the planetary mass. The range of initial separations for planet engulfment increases with decreasing mass-loss rates or stellar masses and increasing planetary masses. Regarding the planet's orbital eccentricity, we find that as the star evolves into the red giant phase, stellar tides start to dominate over planetary tides. As a consequence, a transient population of moderately eccentric close-in Jovian planets is created that otherwise would have been expected to be absent from MS stars. We find that very eccentric and distant planets do not experience much eccentricity decay, and that planet engulfment is primarily determined by the pericenter distance and the maximum stellar radius.

  6. Star Formation in the First Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, V.

    2016-05-01

    The formation of the first stars and galaxies mark the end of the cosmic dark ages, thus transforming the universe from its initial, pristine state into one of increasing complexity. We will review the current understanding, based on numerical simulations, of this crucial transition in early cosmic history. Specifically, the epoch of first light is predicted to be a two-stage process, where predominantly massive Population III stars form out of pure hydrogen-helium gas in small dark-matter minihalos, followed by Population II stars out of already metal-enriched material inside more massive host halos. Observations with upcoming next-generation telescopes promise to test our emerging theoretical picture of star formation in the first galaxies in ever inceasing detail.

  7. PRIMUS: The Relationship between Star Formation and AGN Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azadi, Mojegan; Aird, James; Coil, Alison L.; Moustakas, John; Mendez, Alexander J.; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Wong, Kenneth C.; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-06-01

    We study the evidence for a connection between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGNs and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGNs with {10}41\\lt {L}X\\lt {10}44 erg s-1 at 0.2\\lt z\\lt 1.2 in the PRIMUS redshift survey. We find AGNs in galaxies with a wide range of SFR at a given LX. We do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous LX for star-forming AGN host galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean LX and SFR of detected AGNs in star-forming galaxies, which likely reflects that LX varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We find no correlation between stellar mass and LX within the AGN population. Within both populations of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, we find a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. Furthermore, at a given stellar mass, we find a star-forming galaxy ˜2-3 more likely than a quiescent galaxy to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN is constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGNs, but AGNs are often hosted by quiescent galaxies.

  8. Planetary science experiments flying as hosted payloads on commercial satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Kalmanson, Phillip M.; Mellon, Russell; Young, Malcolm

    2009-08-01

    There has been a recent surge in interest in hosted and rideshare payloads that would launch aboard commercial communications satellites. Much of this interest originates with the satellite customers themselves as a way to sell excess mass and power margins that exist at launch. In 2008, NASA selected GOLD (Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk) as a mission of opportunity to fly as its first hosted payload experiment on a geosynchronous commercial communications satellite, a STAR-2 bus satellite built by Orbital Sciences. CHIRP (Commercially Hosted Infrared Payload), a hosted payload to test infrared sensors for the Air Force, is also being developed for a STAR-2 bus communications satellite. The mass limitation on a STAR-2 bus hosted payload is roughly 50 - 60 kg and the volume is roughly constrained to a 25" x 30" x 28" box on the nadir deck. Telescope apertures are therefore limited is size to about 50 cm in diameter. The diffraction limit for visible (much less IR) imaging missions barely improves upon ground-based image performance, but UV missions can achieve better than 0.1" resolution. There is at least one family of optical designs that (a) provide the necessary focal length and (b) are light and compact enough to fit within the STAR-2 bus mass and volume constraints. These designs also afford opportunities to maintain 0.05" pointing accuracy through a combination of a fine steering mirror and an orthogonal transfer CCD.

  9. O stars and Wolf-Rayet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Underhill, Anne B.; Jordan, Stuart (Editor); Thomas, Richard (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Basic information is given about O and Wolf-Rayet stars indicating how these stars are defined and what their chief observable properties are. Part 2 of the volume discussed four related themes pertaining to the hottest and most luminous stars. Presented are: an observational overview of the spectroscopic classification and extrinsic properties of O and Wolf-Rayet stars; the intrinsic parameters of luminosity, effective temperature, mass, and composition of the stars, and a discussion of their viability; stellar wind properties; and the related issues concerning the efforts of stellar radiation and wind on the immediate interstellar environment are presented.

  10. Young stars in the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jessica R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Morris, Mark R.; Clarkson, Will; Stolte, Andrea; Do, Tuan; Yelda, Sylvana; Anderson, Jay

    2014-05-01

    The central parsec of our Galaxy hosts not only a supermassive black hole, but also a large population of young stars (age <6 Myr) whose presence is puzzling given how inhospitable the region is for star formation. The strong tidal forces require gas densities many orders of magnitude higher than is found in typical molecular clouds. Kinematic observations of this young nuclear cluster show complex structures, including a well-defined inner disk, but also a substantial off-disk population. Spectroscopic and photometric measurements indicate the initial mass function (IMF) differs significantly from the canonical IMF found in the solar neighborhood. These observations have led to a number of proposed star formation scenarios, such as an infalling massive star cluster, a single infalling molecular cloud, or cloud-cloud collisions. I will review recent works on the young stars in the central parsec and discuss connections with young nuclear star clusters in other galaxies, such as M31, and with star formation in the larger central molecular zone.

  11. THE LOCAL HOSTS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Neill, James D.; Martin, D. Christopher; Barlow, Tom A.; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Morrissey, Patrick; Wyder, Ted K.; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D. Andrew; Conley, Alex; Seibert, Mark; Madore, Barry F.; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Rich, R. Michael

    2009-12-20

    We use multi-wavelength, matched aperture, integrated photometry from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the RC3 to estimate the physical properties of 166 nearby galaxies hosting 168 well-observed Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The ultraviolet (UV) imaging of local SN Ia hosts from GALEX allows a direct comparison with higher-redshift hosts measured at optical wavelengths that correspond to the rest-frame UV. Our data corroborate well-known features that have been seen in other SN Ia samples. Specifically, hosts with active star formation produce brighter and slower SNe Ia on average, and hosts with luminosity-weighted ages older than 1 Gyr produce on average more faint, fast, and fewer bright, slow SNe Ia than younger hosts. New results include that in our sample, the faintest and fastest SNe Ia occur only in galaxies exceeding a stellar mass threshold of approx10{sup 10} M{sub sun}, leading us to conclude that their progenitors must arise in populations that are older and/or more metal rich than the general SN Ia population. A low host extinction subsample hints at a residual trend in peak luminosity with host age, after correcting for light-curve shape, giving the appearance that older hosts produce less-extincted SNe Ia on average. This has implications for cosmological fitting of SNe Ia, and suggests that host age could be useful as a parameter in the fitting. Converting host mass to metallicity and computing {sup 56}Ni mass from the supernova light curves, we find that our local sample is consistent with a model that predicts a shallow trend between stellar metallicity and the {sup 56}Ni mass that powers the explosion, but we cannot rule out the absence of a trend. We measure a correlation between {sup 56}Ni mass and host age in the local universe that is shallower and not as significant as that seen at higher redshifts. The details of the age-{sup 56}Ni mass correlations at low and higher redshift imply a luminosity

  12. Lifestyles of the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F. Kennedy Space Center.

    Some general information on stars is provided in this National Aeronautics and Space Administration pamphlet. Topic areas briefly discussed are: (1) the birth of a star; (2) main sequence stars; (3) red giants; (4) white dwarfs; (5) neutron stars; (6) supernovae; (7) pulsars; and (8) black holes. (JN)

  13. Egyptian "Star Clocks"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symons, Sarah

    Diagonal, transit, and Ramesside star clocks are tables of astronomical information occasionally found in ancient Egyptian temples, tombs, and papyri. The tables represent the motions of selected stars (decans and hour stars) throughout the Egyptian civil year. Analysis of star clocks leads to greater understanding of ancient Egyptian constellations, ritual astronomical activities, observational practices, and pharaonic chronology.

  14. A Four-Star Lightweight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    An important part of exoplanet studies is the attempt to understand how planets and solar systems form. New measurements of the lowest-mass quadruple star system ever discovered are now confirming an intriguing theory: in addition to other channels, large gas planets may form in the same way that stars do.Formation ChannelsExoplanets have been found in an enormous variety of configurations, from hot Jupiters only 0.01 AU away from their host star, to planetary-mass companions that orbit at a whopping distance of 1,000 AU.Formation of these gas giants could occur via a number of different theorized pathways, such as growth from rocky cores close to host star, or fragmentation from instabilities far out in the protoplanetary disk. But given that the line between giant planets and brown dwarfs is somewhat fuzzy, another theory has come under consideration as well: could gas giants form out of the collapse and fragmentation of a molecular cloud, in the same way that stars form?In a recent study, Brendan Bowler and Lynne Hillenbrand (California Institute of Technology) argue that one star system, 2M0441+2301 AabBab, might actually be evidence that this channel works. 2M0441+2301 AabBab is a young (less than 3 million years old) quadruple system in the Taurus star-forming region, previously identified through imaging. Since photometry alone isnt enough to be sure of the masses of the components, Bowler and Hillenbrand used the OSIRIS instrument on the Keck I telescope to obtain the first resolved spectra of each component of this system, verifying the systems intriguing properties.Pair of PairsNear-IR spectra of 2M0441+2301 Aa, Ab, Ba, and Bb. The insets shows the unresolved 2MASS image of the system and the Keck/NIRC2 images of each binary subsystem. Click for a better look! [BowlerHillenbrand 2015]2M0441+2301 AabBab is whats known as a hierarchical quadruple system: it consists of a pair of close-binary star systems that orbit each other at an enormous distance of at

  15. Undercover Stars Among Exoplanet Candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    in solar units. The newly determined, precise values of the mass and radius of OGLE-TR-122b are indicated as the red dot. The blue symbols are values for low-mass stars, while the black symbols on the left represent exoplanets. Note that the "hot Jupiters" - exoplanets orbiting very close to their host star - are larger than OGLE-TR-122b. The various lines represent theoretical models from G. Chabrier, I. Baraffe and colleagues, showing a good agreement between theory and observations. The newly found stellar gnome is the companion of OGLE-TR-122, a rather remote star in the Milky Way galaxy, seen in the direction of the southern constellation Carina. The OGLE programme revealed that OGLE-TR-122 experiences a 1.5 per cent brightness dip once every 7 days 6 hours and 27 minutes, each time lasting just over 3 hours (about 188 min). The FLAMES/UVES measurements, made during 6 nights in March 2004, reveal radial velocity variations of this period with an amplitude of about 20 km/s. This is the clear signature of a very low-mass star, close to the Hydrogen-burning limit, orbiting OGLE-TR-122. This companion received the name OGLE-TR-122b. As François Bouchy of the Observatoire Astronomique Marseille Provence (France) explains: "Combined with the information collected by OGLE, our spectroscopic data now allow us to determine the nature of the more massive star in the system, which appears to be solar-like". This information can then be used to determine the mass and radius of the much smaller companion OGLE-TR-122b. Indeed, the depth (brightness decrease) of the transit gives a direct estimate of the ratio between the radii of the two stars, and the spectroscopic orbit provides a unique value of the mass of the companion, once the mass of the larger star is known. The astronomers find that OGLE-TR-122b weighs one-eleventh of the mass of the Sun and has a diameter that is only one-eighth of the solar one. Thus, although the star is still 96 times as massive as Jupiter, it

  16. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both

  17. Neutron Stars and NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, Varun

    2012-05-01

    My thesis centers around the study of neutron stars, especially those in massive binary systems. To this end, it has two distinct components: the observational study of neutron stars in massive binaries with a goal of measuring neutron star masses and participation in NuSTAR, the first imaging hard X-ray mission, one that is extremely well suited to the study of massive binaries and compact objects in our Galaxy. The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) is a NASA Small Explorer mission that will carry the first focusing high energy X-ray telescope to orbit. NuSTAR has an order-of-magnitude better angular resolution and has two orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than any currently orbiting hard X-ray telescope. I worked to develop, calibrate, and test CdZnTe detectors for NuSTAR. I describe the CdZnTe detectors in comprehensive detail here - from readout procedures to data analysis. Detailed calibration of detectors is necessary for analyzing astrophysical source data obtained by the NuSTAR. I discuss the design and implementation of an automated setup for calibrating flight detectors, followed by calibration procedures and results. Neutron stars are an excellent probe of fundamental physics. The maximum mass of a neutron star can put stringent constraints on the equation of state of matter at extreme pressures and densities. From an astrophysical perspective, there are several open questions in our understanding of neutron stars. What are the birth masses of neutron stars? How do they change in binary evolution? Are there multiple mechanisms for the formation of neutron stars? Measuring masses of neutron stars helps answer these questions. Neutron stars in high-mass X-ray binaries have masses close to their birth mass, providing an opportunity to disentangle the role of "nature" and "nurture" in the observed mass distributions. In 2006, masses had been measured for only six such objects, but this small sample showed the greatest diversity in masses

  18. The Cambridge Double Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacEvoy, Bruce; Tirion, Wil

    2015-12-01

    Preface; What are double stars?; The binary orbit; Double star dynamics; Stellar mass and the binary life cycle; The double star population; Detecting double stars; Double star catalogs; Telescope optics; Preparing to observe; Helpful accessories; Viewing challenges; Next steps; Appendices: target list; Useful formulas; Double star orbits; Double star catalogs; The Greek alphabet.

  19. A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel; Stanford, Spencer A.; Brodwin, Mark; Jarrett, Thomas

    2011-12-10

    We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

  20. Multiplicity of A-type and related stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, P.

    2014-11-01

    The origin of the chemically peculiar stars remains enigmatic, especially regarding their frequency among their ``normal'' peers. Multiplicity may shed light on the question, in addition to magnetic fields and stellar rotation. This review mentions the three main surveys (imaging, spectroscopic, and photometric) that have been carried out to date of intermediate mass stars, both normal or chemically peculiar, magnetic or not. We also consider the multiplicity of red giant stars, since many of them are shown by Mermilliod's radial velocity monitoring of open cluster members to be descendants of A-type stars. We review briefly the orbit properties of binary systems hosting chemically peculiar stars. Some specific objects of special interest are mentioned as deserving further study. Finally, we recall that some binary systems composed of A-type stars are progenitors of Type Ia supernovae, and mention the potentialities of future surveys such as Gaia.

  1. REVISITING THE FIRST GALAXIES: THE EPOCH OF POPULATION III STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Muratov, Alexander L.; Gnedin, Oleg Y.; Zemp, Marcel; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2013-08-10

    We investigate the transition from primordial Population III (Pop III) star formation to normal Pop II star formation in the first galaxies using new cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We find that while the first stars seed their host galaxies with metals, they cannot sustain significant outflows to enrich the intergalactic medium, even assuming a top-heavy initial mass function. This means that Pop III star formation could potentially continue until z Almost-Equal-To 6 in different unenriched regions of the universe, before being ultimately shut off by cosmic reionization. Within an individual galaxy, the metal production and stellar feedback from Pop II stars overtake Pop III stars in 20-200 Myr, depending on galaxy mass.

  2. An instability in neutron stars at birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, Adam; Fryxell, Bruce A.

    1992-01-01

    Calculations with a two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation show that a generic Raleigh-Taylor-like instability occurs in the mantles of nascent neutron stars, that it is possibly violent, and that the standard spherically symmetric models of neutron star birth and supernova explosion may be inadequate. Whether this 'convective' instability is pivotal to the supernova mechanism, pulsar nagnetic fields, or a host of other important issues that attend stellar collapse remains to be seen, but its existence promises to modify all questions concerning this most energetic of astronomical phenomena.

  3. On the IMF of first stars

    SciTech Connect

    Susa, H.; Tominaga, N.; Hasegawa, K.

    2014-05-02

    We investigate the formation of the first stars in 60 minihalos found in cosmological simulations, utilizing radiation hydrodynamics simulations. We find ∼70% of the halos host multiple stellar system, while the rest of them have single stars. The stellar mass found in our simulations is in the range of 0.5M{sub ⊙} < M < 300M{sub ⊙}, peaking at several tens of Msun. We do not find that the mass spectrum do not have significant dependence on the formation redshifts and the spin parameters of parent minihalos.

  4. The suppression of star formation by powerful active galactic nuclei.

    PubMed

    Page, M J; Symeonidis, M; Vieira, J D; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Blain, A; Bock, J; Boselli, A; Buat, V; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dunlop, J S; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Ibar, E; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Oliver, S J; Omont, A; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Sánchez Portal, M; Schulz, B; Scott, D; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

    2012-05-09

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight correlation between the mass of the black hole and the mass of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming galaxies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expelling the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  5. The Suppression of Star Formation by Powerful Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    2012-01-01

    The old, red stars that constitute the bulges of galaxies, and the massive black holes at their centres, are the relics of a period in cosmic history when galaxies formed stars at remarkable rates and active galactic nuclei (AGN) shone brightly as a result of accretion onto black holes. It is widely suspected, but unproved, that the tight corre1ation between the mass of the black hole and the mas. of the stellar bulge results from the AGN quenching the surrounding star formation as it approaches its peak luminosity. X-rays trace emission from AGN unambiguously, whereas powerful star-forming ga1axies are usually dust-obscured and are brightest at infrared and submillimeter wavelengths. Here we report submillimetre and X-ray observations that show that rapid star formation was common in the host galaxies of AGN when the Universe was 2-6 billion years old, but that the most vigorous star formation is not observed around black holes above an X-ray luminosity of 10(exp 44) ergs per second. This suppression of star formation in the host galaxy of a powerful AGN is a key prediction of models in which the AGN drives an outflow, expe11ing the interstellar medium of its host and transforming the galaxy's properties in a brief period of cosmic time.

  6. HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES AND HUBBLE RESIDUALS OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE FROM THE NEARBY SUPERNOVA FACTORY

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, M.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kim, A. G.; Loken, S.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Kerschhaggl, M.; Kowalski, M.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon; Universite de Lyon 1, Villeurbanne; CNRS and others

    2013-06-20

    We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine our data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.

  7. The Stellar Content of Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Michael; Kobulnicky, H.; Alexander, M.; Vargas Alvarez, C.; Arvidsson, K.; Kerton, C.

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to understand the factors that govern the transition from low- to high-mass star formation, we report near-infrared imaging and spectroscopy of stars within a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IMSFRs). Some IMSFRs appear to contain compact <1 pc embedded clusters at an early evolutionary stage similar to compact HII regions, but lacking the massive ionizing central star(s). The IMSFRs have photodissociation regions with diameters 1 pc powered by the equivalent of an early B star, but because all sources lack radio free-free emission, they must host a collection of less massive stars. These spectroscopic observations using FLAMINGOS on the Kitt Peak 4 m telescope, coupled with 2MASS and UKIDSS infrared imaging, identify which candidate IMSFRs host probable stellar clusters and address the nature of their most massive stellar constituents.

  8. AGN Absorption Linked to Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Stéphanie

    2014-07-01

    Multiwavelength identification of AGN is crucial not only to obtain a more complete census, but also to learn about the physical state of the nuclear activity (obscuration, efficiency, etc.). A panchromatic strategy plays an especially important role when the host galaxies are star-forming. Selecting far-Infrared galaxies at 0.3star formation rate (sSFR) of the host galaxies, indicating a physical link between X-ray absorption and either the gas fraction or the gas geometry in the hosts. These findings have implications for our current understanding of both the AGN unification model and the nature of the black hole-galaxy connection.

  9. Glob-Hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Behlendorf, B.; Garlick, J.

    2007-08-31

    The glob-hosts utility manipulates hostlist strings in UNIX shell scripts. Hostlists are a parseable string representatin of list of hosts, which compress nicely when a group of hosts are named with contiguous numeric suffixes. For example, the hosts blue1, blue2, and blue3 can be represented by the hostlist string "blue1, blue2, blue3" or equivalently "blue[1-3]". The globhost utility cn peform the following operations on a hostlist string: count, size, expand, nth, union, minus, intersection, and exclude.

  10. Glob-Hosts

    2007-08-31

    The glob-hosts utility manipulates hostlist strings in UNIX shell scripts. Hostlists are a parseable string representatin of list of hosts, which compress nicely when a group of hosts are named with contiguous numeric suffixes. For example, the hosts blue1, blue2, and blue3 can be represented by the hostlist string "blue1, blue2, blue3" or equivalently "blue[1-3]". The globhost utility cn peform the following operations on a hostlist string: count, size, expand, nth, union, minus, intersection, andmore » exclude.« less

  11. MOLECULAR GAS IN INFRARED ULTRALUMINOUS QSO HOSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, X. Y.; Hao, C.-N.; Gao, Y.; Tan, Q. H.; Mao, S.; Omont, A.; Flaquer, B. O.; Leon, S.; Cox, P.

    2012-05-10

    We report CO detections in 17 out of 19 infrared ultraluminous QSO (IR QSO) hosts observed with the IRAM 30 m telescope. The cold molecular gas reservoir in these objects is in a range of (0.2-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} (adopting a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor {alpha}{sub CO} = 0.8 M{sub Sun} (K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}). We find that the molecular gas properties of IR QSOs, such as the molecular gas mass, star formation efficiency (L{sub FIR}/L'{sub CO}), and CO (1-0) line widths, are indistinguishable from those of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs). A comparison of low- and high-redshift CO-detected QSOs reveals a tight correlation between L{sub FIR} and L'{sub CO(1-0)} for all QSOs. This suggests that, similar to ULIRGs, the far-infrared emissions of all QSOs are mainly from dust heated by star formation rather than by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), confirming similar findings from mid-infrared spectroscopic observations by Spitzer. A correlation between the AGN-associated bolometric luminosities and the CO line luminosities suggests that star formation and AGNs draw from the same reservoir of gas and there is a link between star formation on {approx}kpc scale and the central black hole accretion process on much smaller scales.

  12. Abundance Analysis of 10 Kepler Planetary Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, Zachary A.; Schuler, Simon C.; Williams, Drake; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Smith, Verne V.; Ghezzi, Luan; Teske, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify possible connections between the detailed chemical abundances of stars and the existence of small planets discovered by NASA's Kepler spacecraft. We have analyzed high quality Keck/HIRES spectra of the planetary hosts Kepler-65, Kepler-93, Kepler-97, Kepler-98, Kepler-102, Kepler 128, Kepler-406, Kepler-408, Kepler-409, and Kepler-411 and derived the abundances of up to 17 elements for these stars. Results from previous studies have suggested that stellar abundance patterns or "signatures" may indicate the presence of planets, possibly terrestrial planets in particular. Should such patterns exist, they could be used to identify stars with small planets. Here we present the results of our abundance analysis of 10 stars with a variety of exoplanet systems discovered by Kepler and address the hypothesis that chemical abundance signatures can indicate the presence of small planets.This work is generously supported by NASA through a Kepler Participating Scientist grant to SCS (Grant #NNX13AH78G).

  13. The Millennium Star Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinnott, R. W.

    1997-08-01

    Derived from Hipparcos and Tycho observations, the Millennium Star Atlas is a set of 1548 charts covering the entire sky to about magnitude 11. It stands apart from all previous printed atlases in completeness to magnitude 10 and in uniformity around the sky. The generous chart scale has made possible a number of innovations never before seen in a star atlas: arrows on high-proper-motion stars, double-star ticks conveying separation and position angle for a specific modern epoch, distance labels for nearby stars, and variable stars coded by amplitude, period, and type. Among the nonstellar objects plotted, more than 8000 galaxies are shown with aspect ratio and orientation.

  14. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najarro, F.; Figer, D. F.

    1998-06-01

    Results of an spectroscopic investigation of the Pistol star are presented. The near-infrared spectra and photometry data are fit with stellar wind models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, L = 106.7±0.5 L⊙, making it one of the most luminous stars known. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, Teff = 10^{4.17_{ - 0.06}^{ + 0.19} } K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The derived line of sight velocity of the star assures its membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center.

  15. Hot super-Earths stripped by their host stars.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist, M S; Kjeldsen, H; Albrecht, S; Davies, G R; Basu, S; Huber, D; Justesen, A B; Karoff, C; Silva Aguirre, V; Van Eylen, V; Vang, C; Arentoft, T; Barclay, T; Bedding, T R; Campante, T L; Chaplin, W J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y P; Gilliland, R L; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Kawaler, S D; Lund, M N; Metcalfe, T S; Miglio, A; Rowe, J F; Stello, D; Tingley, B; White, T R

    2016-01-01

    Simulations predict that hot super-Earth sized exoplanets can have their envelopes stripped by photoevaporation, which would present itself as a lack of these exoplanets. However, this absence in the exoplanet population has escaped a firm detection. Here we demonstrate, using asteroseismology on a sample of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates observed during the Kepler mission that, while there is an abundance of super-Earth sized exoplanets with low incident fluxes, none are found with high incident fluxes. We do not find any exoplanets with radii between 2.2 and 3.8 Earth radii with incident flux above 650 times the incident flux on Earth. This gap in the population of exoplanets is explained by evaporation of volatile elements and thus supports the predictions. The confirmation of a hot-super-Earth desert caused by evaporation will add an important constraint on simulations of planetary systems, since they must be able to reproduce the dearth of close-in super-Earths.

  16. Hot super-Earths stripped by their host stars

    PubMed Central

    Lundkvist, M. S.; Kjeldsen, H.; Albrecht, S.; Davies, G. R.; Basu, S.; Huber, D.; Justesen, A. B.; Karoff, C.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Van Eylen, V.; Vang, C.; Arentoft, T.; Barclay, T.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Gilliland, R. L.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Rowe, J. F.; Stello, D.; Tingley, B.; White, T. R.

    2016-01-01

    Simulations predict that hot super-Earth sized exoplanets can have their envelopes stripped by photoevaporation, which would present itself as a lack of these exoplanets. However, this absence in the exoplanet population has escaped a firm detection. Here we demonstrate, using asteroseismology on a sample of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates observed during the Kepler mission that, while there is an abundance of super-Earth sized exoplanets with low incident fluxes, none are found with high incident fluxes. We do not find any exoplanets with radii between 2.2 and 3.8 Earth radii with incident flux above 650 times the incident flux on Earth. This gap in the population of exoplanets is explained by evaporation of volatile elements and thus supports the predictions. The confirmation of a hot-super-Earth desert caused by evaporation will add an important constraint on simulations of planetary systems, since they must be able to reproduce the dearth of close-in super-Earths. PMID:27062914

  17. Hot super-Earths stripped by their host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundkvist, M. S.; Kjeldsen, H.; Albrecht, S.; Davies, G. R.; Basu, S.; Huber, D.; Justesen, A. B.; Karoff, C.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Van Eylen, V.; Vang, C.; Arentoft, T.; Barclay, T.; Bedding, T. R.; Campante, T. L.; Chaplin, W. J.; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J.; Elsworth, Y. P.; Gilliland, R. L.; Handberg, R.; Hekker, S.; Kawaler, S. D.; Lund, M. N.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Miglio, A.; Rowe, J. F.; Stello, D.; Tingley, B.; White, T. R.

    2016-04-01

    Simulations predict that hot super-Earth sized exoplanets can have their envelopes stripped by photoevaporation, which would present itself as a lack of these exoplanets. However, this absence in the exoplanet population has escaped a firm detection. Here we demonstrate, using asteroseismology on a sample of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates observed during the Kepler mission that, while there is an abundance of super-Earth sized exoplanets with low incident fluxes, none are found with high incident fluxes. We do not find any exoplanets with radii between 2.2 and 3.8 Earth radii with incident flux above 650 times the incident flux on Earth. This gap in the population of exoplanets is explained by evaporation of volatile elements and thus supports the predictions. The confirmation of a hot-super-Earth desert caused by evaporation will add an important constraint on simulations of planetary systems, since they must be able to reproduce the dearth of close-in super-Earths.

  18. Hot super-Earths stripped by their host stars.

    PubMed

    Lundkvist, M S; Kjeldsen, H; Albrecht, S; Davies, G R; Basu, S; Huber, D; Justesen, A B; Karoff, C; Silva Aguirre, V; Van Eylen, V; Vang, C; Arentoft, T; Barclay, T; Bedding, T R; Campante, T L; Chaplin, W J; Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Elsworth, Y P; Gilliland, R L; Handberg, R; Hekker, S; Kawaler, S D; Lund, M N; Metcalfe, T S; Miglio, A; Rowe, J F; Stello, D; Tingley, B; White, T R

    2016-01-01

    Simulations predict that hot super-Earth sized exoplanets can have their envelopes stripped by photoevaporation, which would present itself as a lack of these exoplanets. However, this absence in the exoplanet population has escaped a firm detection. Here we demonstrate, using asteroseismology on a sample of exoplanets and exoplanet candidates observed during the Kepler mission that, while there is an abundance of super-Earth sized exoplanets with low incident fluxes, none are found with high incident fluxes. We do not find any exoplanets with radii between 2.2 and 3.8 Earth radii with incident flux above 650 times the incident flux on Earth. This gap in the population of exoplanets is explained by evaporation of volatile elements and thus supports the predictions. The confirmation of a hot-super-Earth desert caused by evaporation will add an important constraint on simulations of planetary systems, since they must be able to reproduce the dearth of close-in super-Earths. PMID:27062914

  19. Star-planet connection through metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; Israelian, G.; Mortier, A.; Mordasini, C.; Delgado Mena, E.; Sousa, S. G.; Correi, A. C. M.; Oshagh, M.

    2014-07-01

    We used a large sample of FGK dwarf planet-hosting stars with stellar parameters derived in a homogeneous way from the SWEET-Cat database (Santos et al. 2013) to study the relation between stellar metallicity and position of planets in the period-mass diagram. Using this large sample we show that planets orbiting metal-poor stars have longer periods than those in metal-rich systems. This trend is valid for masses at least from ≈ 10 M⊕ to ≈ 4 MJup. Moreover, Earth-like planets orbiting metal-rich stars always show shorter periods (≤20 days) than those orbiting metal-poor stars. However, in the short-period regime there are a similar number of planets orbiting metal-poor stars. Our results suggest that the planets in the P-MP diagram are evolving differently because of a mechanism that operates over a wide range of planetary masses. This mechanism is stronger or weaker depending on the metallicity of the respective system. Most probably planets in metal-poor disks form farther out from their central star and/or they form later and do not have time to migrate as far as the planets in metal-rich systems.

  20. Spectral decomposition of broad-line agns and host galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Shen, Jiajian; Yip, Ching-Wa; Schneider, Donald P.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Burton, Ross E.; Jester, Sebastian; Hall, Patrick B.; Szalay, Alex S.; Brinkmann, John; /Apache Point Observ.

    2005-09-01

    Using an eigenspectrum decomposition technique, we separate the host galaxy from the broad line active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a set of 4666 spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), from redshifts near zero up to about 0.75. The decomposition technique uses separate sets of galaxy and quasar eigenspectra to efficiently and reliably separate the AGN and host spectroscopic components. The technique accurately reproduces the host galaxy spectrum, its contributing fraction, and its classification. We show how the accuracy of the decomposition depends upon S/N, host galaxy fraction, and the galaxy class. Based on the eigencoefficients, the sample of SDSS broad-line AGN host galaxies spans a wide range of spectral types, but the distribution differs significantly from inactive galaxies. In particular, post-starburst activity appears to be much more common among AGN host galaxies. The luminosities of the hosts are much higher than expected for normal early-type galaxies, and their colors become increasingly bluer than early-type galaxies with increasing host luminosity. Most of the AGNs with detected hosts are emitting at between 1% and 10% of their estimated Eddington luminosities, but the sensitivity of the technique usually does not extend to the Eddington limit. There are mild correlations among the AGN and host galaxy eigencoefficients, possibly indicating a link between recent star formation and the onset of AGN activity. The catalog of spectral reconstruction parameters is available as an electronic table.

  1. The Rotational Behavior of Kepler Stars with Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Chinchón, F.; Leão, I. C.; Bravo, J. P.; de Freitas, D. B.; Ferreira Lopes, C. E.; Alves, S.; Catelan, M.; Canto Martins, B. L.; De Medeiros, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    We analyzed the host stars of the present sample of confirmed planets detected by Kepler and Kepler Objects of Interest to compute new photometric rotation periods and to study the behavior of their angular momentum. Lomb-Scargle periodograms and wavelet maps were computed for 3807 stars. For 540 of these stars, we were able to detect rotational modulation of the light curves at a significance level of greater than 99%. For 63 of these 540 stars, no rotation measurements were previously available in the literature. According to the published masses and evolutionary tracks of the stars in this sample, the sample is composed of M- to F-type stars (with masses of 0.48-1.53 M ) with rotation periods that span a range of 2-89 days. These periods exhibit an excellent agreement with those previously reported (for the stars for which such values are available), and the observed rotational period distribution strongly agrees with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, for the 540 sources considered here, the stellar angular momentum provides an important test of Kraft’s relation based on the photometric rotation periods. Finally, this study directly contributes in a direct approach to our understanding of how angular momentum is distributed between the host star and its (detected) planetary system; the role of angular momentum exchange in such systems is an unavoidable piece of the stellar rotation puzzle.

  2. HOST GALAXIES OF z = 4 QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    McLeod, K. K.; Bechtold, Jill E-mail: jbechtold@as.arizona.ed

    2009-10-10

    We have undertaken a project to investigate the host galaxies and environments of a sample of quasars at z approx 4. In this paper, we describe deep near-infrared imaging of 34 targets using the Magellan I and Gemini North telescopes. We discuss in detail special challenges of distortion and nonlinearity that must be addressed when performing point-spread function (PSF) subtraction with data from these telescopes and their IR cameras, especially in very good seeing. We derive black hole masses from emission-line spectroscopy, and we calculate accretion rates from our K{sub s} -band photometry, which directly samples the rest frame B for these objects. We introduce a new isophotal diameter technique for estimating host galaxy luminosities. We report the detection of four host galaxies on our deepest, sharpest images, and present upper limits for the others. We find that if host galaxies passively evolve such that they brighten by 2 mag or more in the rest-frame B band between the present and z = 4, then high-z hosts are less massive at a given black hole mass than are their low-z counterparts. We argue that the most massive hosts plateau at approx<10 L*. We estimate the importance of selection effects on this survey and the subsequent limitations of our conclusions. These results are in broad agreement with recent semianalytical models for the formation of luminous quasars and their host spheroids by mergers of gas-rich galaxies, with significant dissipation, and self-regulation of black hole growth and star formation by the burst of merger-induced quasar activity.

  3. The growth of massive stars via stellar collisions in ensemble star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, M. S.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2013-04-01

    Recent simulations and observations suggest that star clusters form via the assembling of smaller subclusters. Because of their short relaxation time, subclusters experience core collapse much earlier than virialized solo clusters, which have similar properties of the merger remnant of the assembling clusters. As a consequence, it seems that the assembling clusters result in efficient multiple collisions of stars in the cluster core. We performed a series of N-body simulations of ensemble and solitary clusters including stellar collisions and found that the efficiency of multiple collisions between stars is suppressed if subclusters assemble after they experience core collapse individually. In this case, subclusters form their own multiple collision stars which experienced a few collisions, but they fail to collide with each other after their host subclusters assemble. The multiple collision stars scatter each other and escape, and furthermore the central density of the remnant clusters had already been depleted for the stars to experience more collisions. On the other hand, if subclusters assemble before they experience core collapse, the multiple collisions of stars proceed efficiently in the remnant cluster, and the collision products are more massive than virialized solo clusters and comparable in mass to cold solo clusters.

  4. UV Emission in Type Ia Supernova Elliptical Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Brad E.

    2015-03-01

    The current use of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) as standard candles is to measure the dark energy equation-of-state to better than 10%. However, we still lack a clear understanding of their progenitor systems. We analyze the host galaxies of type Ia Supernova (SN Ia) discovered by the ESSENCE survey using UV and optical data, as studying the environments of SN Ia is a great way to understand the progenitors. We developed a new method for determining the SED and rest-frame magnitudes of the host galaxies and we use empirical relations to derive stellar mass and star-formation rate (SFR) measurements of the host galaxies. We find a high rate of UV emission in our passive galaxies, suggesting current star-formation in these galaxies.

  5. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  6. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  7. Astrophysics: Stars fight back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Philip F.

    2014-12-01

    Galaxies contain fewer stars than predicted. The discovery of a massive galactic outflow of molecular gas in a compact galaxy, which forms stars 100 times faster than the Milky Way, may help to explain why. See Letter p.68

  8. 'Polaris, Mark Kummerfeldt's Star, and My Star.'

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLure, John W.

    1984-01-01

    In most astronomy courses, descriptions of stars and constellations reveal the western European origins of the astronomers who named them. However, it is suggested that a study of non-western views be incorporated into astronomy curricula. Descriptions of various stars and constellations from different cultures and instructional strategies are…

  9. Characterizing Pale Blue Dots Around FGKM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, S.; Kaltenegger, L.; Sasselov, D. D.; Segura, A.

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanet characterization of small rocky worlds will be a main focus in the coming decades. For future telescopes like JWST and UVOIR/HDST, an exoplanet's host star will influence our ability to detect and interpret spectral features, including biosignatures. We present a complete suit of stellar models and a grid of model atmospheres for Earth-like planets at equivalent stages of geological evolution in their HZ for stellar effective temperature from Teff = 2300K to 7000K, sampling the entire FGKM stellar type range. Since M dwarfs are simultaneously the most numerous in the universe, the most active, and the most likely stars to host terrestrial exoplanets, we focus in particular on the range of UV emission possible in each sub M spectral class. The UV emission from a planet's host star dominates the photochemistry and thus the resultant observable spectral features of the planet. Using the latest UV spectra obtained by HST and IUE we model the effect of stellar activity on Earth-like planets. We also model the amount of UV flux reaching the surface for Earth-like planets at various geological epochs ranging from a pre-biotic world through the rise of oxygen and for Earth-like planets orbiting FGKM stars at equivalent stages of evolution. When modeling the remotely detectable spectra of these planets we focus on the primary detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely: H2O, CO2, O3, CH4, N2O and CH3Cl. We model the emergent as well as transit spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting our grid of FGKM stars in the VIS/NIR (0.4 - 4 μm) and the IR (5 - 20 μm) range as input for future missions like JWST and concepts like UVOIR/HDST.

  10. Characterizing Pale Blue Dots Around FGKM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rugheimer, Sarah; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Sasselov, Dimitar; Segura, Antigona

    2015-12-01

    Exoplanet characterization of small rocky worlds will be a main focus in the coming decades. For future telescopes like JWST and UVOIR/HDST, an exoplanet’s host star will influence our ability to detect and interpret spectral features, including biosignatures. We present a complete suit of stellar models and a grid of model atmospheres for Earth-like planets at equivalent stages of geological evolution in their HZ for stellar effective temperature from Teff = 2300K to 7000K, sampling the entire FGKM stellar type range. Since M dwarfs are simultaneously the most numerous in the universe, the most active, and the most likely stars to host terrestrial exoplanets, we focus in particular on the range of UV emission possible in each sub M spectral class. The UV emission from a planet's host star dominates the photochemistry and thus the resultant observable spectral features of the planet. Using the latest UV spectra obtained by HST and IUE we model the effect of stellar activity on Earth-like planets. We also model the amount of UV flux reaching the surface for Earth-like planets at various geological epochs ranging from a pre-biotic world through the rise of oxygen and for Earth-like planets orbiting FGKM stars at equivalent stages of evolution. When modeling the remotely detectable spectra of these planets we focus on the primary detectable atmospheric features that indicate habitability on Earth, namely: H2O, CO2, O3, CH4, N2O and CH3Cl. We model spectra of Earth-like planets orbiting our grid of FGKM stars in the VIS/NIR (0.4 - 4 μm) and the IR (5 - 20 μm) range as input for future missions and concepts like UVOIR/HDST and JWST.

  11. SUPPRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN NGC 1266

    SciTech Connect

    Alatalo, Katherine; Lanz, Lauranne; Bitsakis, Theodoros; Appleton, Philip N.; Ogle, Patrick M.; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Nyland, Kristina; Meier, David S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Chang, Philip; Davis, Timothy A.; De Zeeuw, P. T.; Martín, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    NGC 1266 is a nearby lenticular galaxy that harbors a massive outflow of molecular gas powered by the mechanical energy of an active galactic nucleus (AGN). It has been speculated that such outflows hinder star formation (SF) in their host galaxies, providing a form of feedback to the process of galaxy formation. Previous studies, however, indicated that only jets from extremely rare, high-power quasars or radio galaxies could impart significant feedback on their hosts. Here we present detailed observations of the gas and dust continuum of NGC 1266 at millimeter wavelengths. Our observations show that molecular gas is being driven out of the nuclear region at M-dot {sub out}≈110 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup –1}, of which the vast majority cannot escape the nucleus. Only 2 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} is actually capable of escaping the galaxy. Most of the molecular gas that remains is very inefficient at forming stars. The far-infrared emission is dominated by an ultra-compact (≲ 50 pc) source that could either be powered by an AGN or by an ultra-compact starburst. The ratio of the SF surface density (Σ{sub SFR}) to the gas surface density (Σ{sub H{sub 2}}) indicates that SF is suppressed by a factor of ≈50 compared to normal star-forming galaxies if all gas is forming stars, and ≈150 for the outskirt (98%) dense molecular gas if the central region is powered by an ultra-compact starburst. The AGN-driven bulk outflow could account for this extreme suppression by hindering the fragmentation and gravitational collapse necessary to form stars through a process of turbulent injection. This result suggests that even relatively common, low-power AGNs are able to alter the evolution of their host galaxies as their black holes grow onto the M-σ relation.

  12. Chromospheres of Coronal Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We summarize the main results obtained from the analysis of ultraviolet emission line profiles of coronal late-type stars observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope. The excellent GHRS spectra provide new information on magnetohydrodynamic phenomena in the chromospheres and transition regions of these stars. One exciting new result is the discovery of broad components in the transition region lines of active stars that we believe provide evidence for microflare heating in these stars.

  13. Dibaryons in neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olinto, Angela V.; Haensel, Pawel; Frieman, Joshua A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects are studied of H-dibaryons on the structure of neutron stars. It was found that H particles could be present in neutron stars for a wide range of dibaryon masses. The appearance of dibaryons softens the equations of state, lowers the maximum neutron star mass, and affects the transport properties of dense matter. The parameter space is constrained for dibaryons by requiring that a 1.44 solar mass neutron star be gravitationally stable.

  14. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms.

  15. Four New Variable Stars in Ophiuchus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Lorenzo; Marchini, Alessandro; Papini, Riccardo

    2011-03-01

    Four new variable stars were discovered by serendipity in the Ophiuchus constellation during photometric analysis of the NEO Asteroid (1988 PA), pictures taken in July 2010 from A81 Balzaretto Observatory in Rome. Based on their light curves and colour indexes, the stars were classified in their variable class and registered in the Variable Star Index (VSX) hosted in the AAVSO web site, respectively as one eclipsing variable EA-type or short period eclipsing subgroup of RS CVn-type (UCAC3 196-166827), identified as the optical counterpart of 1RXS J180755.7+074717 X-ray source, two eclipsing binaries EW-type (UCAC3 196-166958 and UCAC3 196-167279) and one very likely as pulsating variable High Amplitude δ,, Scuti type (HADS) or SX Phe (UCAC3 196-167073).

  16. Accretion of dark matter by stars.

    PubMed

    Brito, Richard; Cardoso, Vitor; Okawa, Hirotada

    2015-09-11

    Searches for dark matter imprints are one of the most active areas of current research. We focus here on light fields with mass m_{B}, such as axions and axionlike candidates. Using perturbative techniques and full-blown nonlinear numerical relativity methods, we show the following. (i) Dark matter can pile up in the center of stars, leading to configurations and geometries oscillating with a frequency that is a multiple of f=2.5×10^{14}(m_{B}c^{2}/eV)  Hz. These configurations are stable throughout most of the parameter space, and arise out of credible mechanisms for dark-matter capture. Stars with bosonic cores may also develop in other theories with effective mass couplings, such as (massless) scalar-tensor theories. We also show that (ii) collapse of the host star to a black hole is avoided by efficient gravitational cooling mechanisms. PMID:26406817

  17. POPULATION III STAR FORMATION IN LARGE COSMOLOGICAL VOLUMES. I. HALO TEMPORAL AND PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Brian D.; O'Shea, Brian W.; Smith, Britton D.; Turk, Matthew J.; Hahn, Oliver

    2013-08-20

    We present a semi-analytic, computationally inexpensive model to identify halos capable of forming a Population III star in cosmological simulations across a wide range of times and environments. This allows for a much more complete and representative set of Population III star forming halos to be constructed, which will lead to Population III star formation simulations that more accurately reflect the diversity of Population III stars, both in time and halo mass. This model shows that Population III and chemically enriched stars coexist beyond the formation of the first generation of stars in a cosmological simulation until at least z {approx} 10, and likely beyond, though Population III stars form at rates that are 4-6 orders of magnitude lower than chemically enriched stars by z = 10. A catalog of more than 40,000 candidate Population III forming halos were identified, with formation times temporally ranging from z = 30 to z = 10, and ranging in mass from 2.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun} to 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun }. At early times, the environment that Population III stars form in is very similar to that of halos hosting chemically enriched star formation. At later times Population III stars are found to form in low-density regions that are not yet chemically polluted due to a lack of previous star formation in the area. Population III star forming halos become increasingly spatially isolated from one another at later times, and are generally closer to halos hosting chemically enriched star formation than to another halo hosting Population III star formation by z {approx} 10.

  18. America's Star Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  19. Managing the star performer.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Our culture seems to be endlessly fascinated with its stars in entertainment, athletics, politics, and business, and holds fast to the idea that extraordinary talent accounts for an individual's extraordinary performance. At first glance, managing a star performer in your medical practice may seem like it would be an easy task. However, there's much more to managing a star performer than many practice managers realize. The concern is how to keep the star performer happy and functioning at a high level without detriment to the rest of the medical practice team. This article offers tips for practice managers who manage star performers. It explores ways to keep the star performer motivated, while at the same time helping the star performer to meld into the existing medical practice team. This article suggests strategies for redefining the star performer's role, for holding the star performer accountable for his or her behavior, and for coaching the star performer. Finally, this article offers practical tips for keeping the star performer during trying times, for identifying and cultivating new star performers, and for managing medical practice prima donnas. PMID:23767124

  20. About Exobiology: The Case for Dwarf K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most fundamental topics of exobiology concerns the identification of stars with environments consistent with life. Although it is believed that most types of main-sequence stars might be able to support life, particularly extremophiles, special requirements appear to be necessary for the development and sustainability of advanced life forms. From our study, orange main-sequence stars, ranging from spectral type late-G to mid-K (with a maximum at early K), are most promising. Our analysis considers a variety of aspects, including (1) the frequency of the various types of stars, (2) the speed of stellar evolution in their lifetimes, (3) the size of the stellar climatological habitable zones (CLI-HZs), (4) the strengths and persistence of their magnetic-dynamo-generated X-ray–UV emissions, and (5) the frequency and severity of flares, including superflares; both (4) and (5) greatly reduce the suitability of red dwarfs to host life-bearing planets. The various phenomena show pronounced dependencies on the stellar key parameters such as effective temperature and mass, permitting the assessment of the astrobiological significance of various types of stars. Thus, we developed a “Habitable-Planetary-Real-Estate Parameter” (HabPREP) that provides a measure for stars that are most suitable for planets with life. Early K stars are found to have the highest HabPREP values, indicating that they may be “Goldilocks” stars for life-hosting planets. Red dwarfs are numerous, with long lifetimes, but their narrow CLI-HZs and hazards from magnetic activity make them less suitable for hosting exolife. Moreover, we provide X-ray–far-UV irradiances for G0 V–M5 V stars over a wide range of ages.

  1. About Exobiology: The Case for Dwarf K Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuntz, M.; Guinan, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    One of the most fundamental topics of exobiology concerns the identification of stars with environments consistent with life. Although it is believed that most types of main-sequence stars might be able to support life, particularly extremophiles, special requirements appear to be necessary for the development and sustainability of advanced life forms. From our study, orange main-sequence stars, ranging from spectral type late-G to mid-K (with a maximum at early K), are most promising. Our analysis considers a variety of aspects, including (1) the frequency of the various types of stars, (2) the speed of stellar evolution in their lifetimes, (3) the size of the stellar climatological habitable zones (CLI-HZs), (4) the strengths and persistence of their magnetic-dynamo-generated X-ray-UV emissions, and (5) the frequency and severity of flares, including superflares; both (4) and (5) greatly reduce the suitability of red dwarfs to host life-bearing planets. The various phenomena show pronounced dependencies on the stellar key parameters such as effective temperature and mass, permitting the assessment of the astrobiological significance of various types of stars. Thus, we developed a “Habitable-Planetary-Real-Estate Parameter” (HabPREP) that provides a measure for stars that are most suitable for planets with life. Early K stars are found to have the highest HabPREP values, indicating that they may be “Goldilocks” stars for life-hosting planets. Red dwarfs are numerous, with long lifetimes, but their narrow CLI-HZs and hazards from magnetic activity make them less suitable for hosting exolife. Moreover, we provide X-ray-far-UV irradiances for G0 V-M5 V stars over a wide range of ages.

  2. Simulation of a method to directly image exoplanets around multiple stars systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Bendek, Eduardo; Belikov, Ruslan

    2014-08-01

    Direct imaging of extra-solar planets has now become a reality, especially with the deployment and commissioning of the first generation of specialized ground-based instruments such as the GPI, SPHERE, P1640 and SCExAO. These systems will allow detection of planets 107 times fainter than their host star. For space- based missions, such as EXCEDE, EXO-C, EXO-S, WFIRST/AFTA, different teams have shown in laboratories contrasts reaching 10-10 within a few diffraction limits from the star using a combination of a coronagraph to suppress light coming from the host star and a wavefront control system. These demonstrations use a de- formable mirror (DM) to remove residual starlight (speckles) created by the imperfections of telescope. However, all these current and future systems focus on detecting faint planets around a single host star or unresolved bi- naries/multiples, while several targets or planet candidates are located around nearby binary stars such as our neighbor star Alpha Centauri. Until now, it has been thought that removing the light of a companion star is impossible with current technology, excluding binary star systems from target lists of direct imaging missions. Direct imaging around binaries/multiple systems at a level of contrast allowing Earth-like planet detection is challenging because the region of interest, where a dark zone is essential, is contaminated by the light coming from the hosts star companion. We propose a method to simultaneously correct aberrations and diffraction of light coming from the target star as well as its companion star in order to reveal planets orbiting the target star. This method works even if the companion star is outside the control region of the DM (beyond its half-Nyquist frequency), by taking advantage of aliasing effects.

  3. Properties of massive stars in four clusters of the VVV survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.; Martins, F.; Chené, A.-N.; Bouret, J.-C.; Borissova, J.

    2016-05-01

    The evolution of massive stars is only partly understood. Observational constraints can be obtained from the study of massive stars located in young massive clusters. The ESO Public Survey "VISTA Variables in the Vía Lácteá (VVV)" discovered several new clusters hosting massive stars. We present an analysis of massive stars in four of these new clusters. Our aim is to provide constraints on stellar evolution and to better understand the relation between different types of massive stars. We use the radiative transfer code CMFGEN to analyse K-band spectra of twelve stars with spectral types ranging from O and B to WN and WC. We derive the stellar parameters of all targets as well as surface abundances for a subset of them. In the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram, the Wolf-Rayet stars are more luminous or hotter than the O stars. From the log(C/N)-log(C/He) diagram, we show quantitatively that WN stars are more chemically evolved than O stars, WC stars being more evolved than WN stars. Mass loss rates among Wolf-Rayet stars are a factor of 10 larger than for O stars, in agreement with previous findings.

  4. Uncovering the monster stars in W49: the most luminous star-forming region in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shiwei; Bik, Arjan; Henning, Thomas; Pasquali, Anna; Brandner, Wolfgang; Stolte, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    As a part of the LOBSTAR project (Luci OBservations of STARburst regions), which aims at understanding the stellar content of some of the most massive star-forming regions, we present our result on the high-mass stellar content of W49. K-band spectra of the candidate massive stars from VLT/ISAAC and LBT/LUCI provide us with reliable spectral types of dozens of massive stars in this HII region.The first results show that this region hosts several of the most massive stars in our galaxy. Two most brightest stars, one in the core of the central cluster and one in W49 South, were identified as very massive stars (M > 100 M⊙). Their K-band spectra exhibit strong stellar wind features, and they are classified as O2-3.5If* supergiant stars. After comparison to the Geneva evolutionary models, the mass range of W49nr1 was estimated to be between 100 M⊙ and 180 M⊙. Additionally we find 12 O stars with spectral types between O7V and O3V and masses from 25 M⊙ to 125 M⊙, respectively.These results allow us to derive the fundamental parameters of the cluster (mass, age) as well as the total energy output in the form of ionising photons. This will enable us to study the feedback effects of this extreme star forming region in great detail. To our surprise, two young stellar objects with infrared excess feature showing CO emission lines in their spectra are identified. This suggests that circumstellar disks can survive even in this extreme environment. Finally the spatial distribution of the massive stars is analysed to discuss the star formation history and identify potential runaway stars. The extreme properties of this region makes it a good template for more extreme star formation outside our galaxy.

  5. Monitoring the Behavior of Star Spots Using Photometric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, P.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2015-01-01

    We use high accuracy photometric data to monitor the behavior of star spots . We develop an algorithm to determine the size and longitude of spots or spot groups, using Kepler light curves . Our algorithm separates the light curve in rotational-period sized intervals and calculates the size and longitude of the star spots by using limb darkened spot crossing models. The results can then be used to identify populations of spots, active regions on the stellar surface, mean spot lifetimes or even evidence for activity cycle evidences. To check the efficiency of our code we calculate the spot positions and sizes for the planet host star Kepler-210 .

  6. Alignment in star-debris disc systems seen by Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, J. S.; Kennedy, G. M.; Thureau, N.; Eiroa, C.; Marshall, J. P.; Maldonado, J.; Matthews, B. C.; Olofsson, G.; Barlow, M. J.; Moro-Martín, A.; Sibthorpe, B.; Absil, O.; Ardila, D. R.; Booth, M.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Brown, D. J. A.; Cameron, A. Collier; del Burgo, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Eislöffel, J.; Duchêne, G.; Ertel, S.; Holland, W. S.; Horner, J.; Kalas, P.; Kavelaars, J. J.; Lestrade, J.-F.; Vican, L.; Wilner, D. J.; Wolf, S.; Wyatt, M. C.

    2014-02-01

    Many nearby main-sequence stars have been searched for debris using the far-infrared Herschel satellite, within the DEBRIS, DUNES and Guaranteed-Time Key Projects. We discuss here 11 stars of spectral types A-M where the stellar inclination is known and can be compared to that of the spatially resolved dust belts. The discs are found to be well aligned with the stellar equators, as in the case of the Sun's Kuiper belt, and unlike many close-in planets seen in transit surveys. The ensemble of stars here can be fitted with a star-disc tilt of ≲ 10°. These results suggest that proposed mechanisms for tilting the star or disc in fact operate rarely. A few systems also host imaged planets, whose orbits at tens of au are aligned with the debris discs, contrary to what might be expected in models where external perturbers induce tilts.

  7. Magnetised winds in single and binary star systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnstone, Colin

    2016-07-01

    Stellar winds are fundamentally important for the stellar magnetic activity evolution and for the immediate environment surrounding their host stars. Ionised winds travel at hundreds of km/s, impacting planets and clearing out large regions around the stars called astropheres. Winds influence planets in many ways: for example, by compressing the magnetosphere and picking up atmospheric particles, they can cause significant erosion of a planetary atmosphere. By removing angular momentum, winds cause the rotation rates of stars to decrease as they age. This causes the star's magnetic dynamo to decay, leading to a significant decay in the star's levels of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission. Despite their importance, little is currently known about the winds of other Sun-like stars. Their small mass fluxes have meant that no direct detections have so far been possible. What is currently known has either been learned indirectly or through analogies with the solar wind. In this talk, I will review what is known about the properties and evolution of the winds of other Sun-like stars. I will also review wind dynamics in binary star systems, where the winds from both stars impact each other, leading to shocks and compression regions.

  8. How to Observe (Rather Than Model) The Interiors of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsworth, Yvonne

    2012-05-01

    Seismology - the study of the propagation of sound waves - allows us to make real observations of the interior of stars and provides a vital counterpoint to the inferences of theory. Helioseismology pioneered this activity and an autonomous small network (BiSON) run from the University of Birmingham (UK) has been making seismic observations of the Sun for more than three solar cycles. Its continuing observations have included the just past rather strange minimum. I will use some of the recent data to illustrate the curious behaviour of our home star. For other stars there have been several recent breakthrough missions. Foremost in these is the NASA Kepler mission which has opened up to view a very large number of stars. The prime aim of the Kepler mission is the hunt for earth-like planets and the role of the seismic analysis is to inform about the host stars. However, the observations of the stars are very important in their own right. My particular interest is in the solar-like main sequence stars and red giants. I will discuss some of the recent exciting results. Given that we can now observe the interior of stars like the Sun and also stars like the Sun will - in time - become, there is every hope that we will see major in our knowledge of stellar populations, structure and evolution.

  9. Simulating high-z gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvaterra, R.; Maio, U.; Ciardi, B.; Campisi, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the nature of high-z host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) by means of state-of-the-art numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation and evolution of galaxies. We combine results from different runs with various box sizes and resolutions. By assigning to each simulated galaxy the probability to host an LGRB, assumed to be proportional to the mass of young stars, we provide a full description of the physical properties of high-z LGRB host galaxy population. We find that LGRBs at z > 6 are hosted in galaxies with typical star formation rates SFR ≃ 0.03-0.3 M⊙ yr-1, stellar masses M⋆ ≃ 106-108 M⊙ and metallicities Z ≃ 0.01-0.1 Z⊙. Furthermore, the ratio between their doubling time and the corresponding cosmic time seems to be universally equal to ˜0.1-0.3, independently from the redshift. The distribution of their UV luminosity places LGRB hosts in the faint end of the galaxy luminosity function, well below the current capabilities of space- or ground-based optical facilities. This is in line with recent reports of non-detection of LGRB hosts using extremely deep Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope observations. In conclusion, high-z LGRBs are found to trace the position of those faint galaxies that are thought to be the major actors in the re-ionization of the Universe.

  10. Ponderable soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The theory of Lee and Pang (1987), who obtained solutions for soliton stars composed of zero-temperature fermions and bosons, is applied here to quark soliton stars. Model soliton stars based on a simple physical model of the proton are computed, and the properties of the solitons are discussed, including the important problem of the existence of a limiting mass and thus the possible formation of black holes of primordial origin. It is shown that there is a definite mass limit for ponderable soliton stars, so that during cooling a soliton star might reach a stage beyond which no equilibrium configuration exists and the soliton star probably will collapse to become a black hole. The radiation of ponderable soliton stars may alter the short-wavelength character of the cosmic background radiation, and may be observed as highly redshifted objects at z of about 100,000.

  11. Star field simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    A Star Field Simulator has been developed to serve as a source of radiation for the ASTRO Star Tracker. The star tracker and simulator are components of a motion compensation test facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Preflight tests and simulations using various levels of guide stars are performed in the test facility to establish performance of the motion compensation system before being used in a flight environment. The ASTRO Star Tracker operates over a wide dynamic range of irradiance corresponding to visual stellar magnitudes of -0.8 to 8. A minimum of three simulated guide stars with variable magnitudes are needed to fully test the Star Tracker performance under simulated mission conditions.

  12. Stellar rotational periods in the planet hosting open cluster Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, Géza; Hartman, Joel D.; Bakos, Gáspár Á.; Quinn, Samuel N.; Penev, Kaloyan; Latham, David W.; Bhatti, Waqas; Csubry, Zoltán; de Val-Borro, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    By using the dense coverage of the extrasolar planet survey project HATNet (Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network), we Fourier analyse 381 high-probability members of the nearby open cluster Praesepe (Beehive/M44/NGC 2632). In addition to the detection of 10 variables (of δ Scuti and other types), we identify 180 rotational variables (including the two known planet hosts). This sample increases the number of known rotational variables in this cluster for spectral classes earlier than M by more than a factor of 3. These stars closely follow a colour/magnitude-period relation from early F to late K stars. We approximate this relation by polynomials for an easier reference to the rotational characteristics in different colours. The total (peak-to-peak) amplitudes of the large majority (94 per cent) of these variables span the range of 0.005-0.04 mag. The periods cover a range from 2.5 to 15 d. These data strongly confirm that Praesepe and the Hyades have the same gyrochronological ages. Regarding the two planet hosts, Pr0211 (the one with the shorter orbital period) has a rotational period that is ˜2 d shorter than the one expected from the main rotational pattern in this cluster. This, together with other examples discussed in the paper, may hint that star-planet interaction via tidal dissipation can be significant in some cases in the rotational evolution of stars hosting hot Jupiters.

  13. Tracing galaxy evolution through resolved stellar populations and star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Villa, E.

    2011-09-01

    Field stars and star clusters contain a big part of the galaxy’s history. To understand galaxy formation and evolution we need then to understand the parts of which galaxies are composed. It has commonly been assumed that most stars formed in clusters. However, the connection between these two systems is not clear, and the fraction of actual star formation happening in clusters is still uncertain. Through this thesis, we aim to use field stars and star clusters to attack different problems regarding galaxy formation and evolution, named: 1. the cluster formation efficiency and its (co-)relation with environment (i.e. the host galaxy), 2. the star formation rate in the arms and inter-arm regions of spiral galaxies, and 3. the indications of a possible interaction between two galaxies observed through their resolved stellar populations. We performed a systematic and homogeneous study over the galaxies NGC45, NGC1313, NGC4395, NGC5236 and NGC7793, where star clusters and field stars are analyze separately. For this aim, we used Hubble Space Telescope observations in the optical bands U, B, V and I, using the Advanced Camera for Surveys and the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. Standard photometric procedures are use to study the properties of these two main parts of the galaxies. However, incompleteness constrains our results to ages younger than 100 Myr. Following the synthetic CMD method we recovered the star formation history for the last 100 Myr over the five galaxies. Comparing observed clusters properties with simple stellar population models, we estimate ages and masses of star clusters. We observe that the galaxies NGC5236 and NGC1313 show higher star and cluster formation rates, while NGC45, NGC4395 and NGC7793 show lower values. We found that the actual fraction of star formation happening in clusters presents low values (< 10%), contrary to common assumptions, however in agreement with studies in other galaxies. Observations of the surface star formation

  14. Stennis hosts educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Steve Culivan, aerospace education specialist at Stennis Space Center, conducts a professional development workshop for fourth- through ninth-grade educators. During the Nov. 4 'Learning with the Stars' workshop, educators spent time learning about different aspects of the universe and enjoying a presentation of Stennis' portable planetarium.

  15. CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE AND HOST GALAXY STELLAR POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Patrick L.; Kirshner, Robert P.

    2012-11-10

    We have used images and spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to examine the host galaxies of 519 nearby supernovae (SN). The colors at the sites of the explosions, as well as chemical abundances, and specific star formation rates (SFRs) of the host galaxies provide circumstantial evidence on the origin of each SN type. We examine separately SN II, SN IIn, SN IIb, SN Ib, SN Ic, and SN Ic with broad lines (SN Ic-BL). For host galaxies that have multiple spectroscopic fibers, we select the fiber with host radial offset most similar to that of the SN. Type Ic SN explode at small host offsets, and their hosts have exceptionally strongly star-forming, metal-rich, and dusty stellar populations near their centers. The SN Ic-BL and SN IIb explode in exceptionally blue locations, and, in our sample, we find that the host spectra for SN Ic-BL show lower average oxygen abundances than those for SN Ic. SN IIb host fiber spectra are also more metal-poor than those for SN Ib, although a significant difference exists for only one of two strong-line diagnostics. SN Ic-BL host galaxy emission lines show strong central specific SFRs. In contrast, we find no strong evidence for different environments for SN IIn compared to the sites of SN II. Because our SN sample is constructed from a variety of sources, there is always a risk that sampling methods can produce misleading results. We have separated the SN discovered by targeted surveys from those discovered by galaxy-impartial searches to examine these questions and show that our results do not depend sensitively on the discovery technique.

  16. Close encounters involving free-floating planets in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Long; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N.; Zheng, Xiaochen; Church, Ross P.; Davies, Melvyn B.

    2015-06-01

    Instabilities in planetary systems can result in the ejection of planets from their host system, resulting in free-floating planets (FFPs). If this occurs in a star cluster, the FFP may remain bound to the star cluster for some time and interact with the other cluster members until it is ejected. Here, we use N-body simulations to characterize close star-planet and planet-planet encounters and the dynamical fate of the FFP population in star clusters containing 500-2000 single or binary star members. We find that FFPs ejected from their planetary system at low velocities typically leave the star cluster 40 per cent earlier than their host stars, and experience tens of close (<1000 au) encounters with other stars and planets before they escape. The fraction of FFPs that experiences a close encounter depends on both the stellar density and the initial velocity distribution of the FFPs. Approximately half of the close encounters occur within the first 30 Myr, and only 10 per cent occur after 100 Myr. The periastron velocity distribution for all encounters is well described by a modified Maxwell-Bolzmann distribution, and the periastron distance distribution is linear over almost the entire range of distances considered, and flattens off for very close encounters due to strong gravitational focusing. Close encounters with FFPs can perturb existing planetary systems and their debris structures, and they can result in re-capture of FFPs. In addition, these FFP populations may be observed in young star clusters in imaging surveys; a comparison between observations and dynamical predictions may provide clues to the early phases of stellar and planetary dynamics in star clusters.

  17. A COMPREHENSIVE STATISTICAL ASSESSMENT OF STAR-PLANET INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Pearson, Elliott G.; Wright, Jason T.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether magnetic interaction between close-in giant planets and their host stars produce observable statistical enhancements in stellar coronal or chromospheric activity. New Chandra observations of 12 nearby (d < 60 pc) planet-hosting solar analogs are combined with archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT coverage of 11 similar stars to construct a sample inoculated against inherent stellar class and planet-detection biases. Survival analysis and Bayesian regression methods (incorporating both measurements errors and X-ray upper limits; 13/23 stars have secure detections) are used to test whether ''hot Jupiter'' hosts are systematically more X-ray luminous than comparable stars with more distant or smaller planets. No significant correlations are present between common proxies for interaction strength (M {sub P}/a {sup 2} or 1/a) versus coronal activity (L {sub X} or L {sub X}/L {sub bol}). In contrast, a sample of 198 FGK main-sequence stars does show a significant (∼99% confidence) increase in X-ray luminosity with M {sub P}/a {sup 2}. While selection biases are incontrovertibly present within the main-sequence sample, we demonstrate that the effect is primarily driven by a handful of extreme hot-Jupiter systems with M {sub P}/a {sup 2} > 450 M {sub Jup} AU{sup –2}, which here are all X-ray luminous but to a degree commensurate with their Ca II H and K activity, in contrast to presented magnetic star-planet interaction scenarios that predict enhancements relatively larger in L {sub X}. We discuss these results in the context of cumulative tidal spin-up of stars hosting close-in gas giants (potentially followed by planetary infall and destruction). We also test our main-sequence sample for correlations between planetary properties and UV luminosity or Ca II H and K emission, and find no significant dependence.

  18. A Comprehensive Statistical Assessment of Star-Planet Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason T.; Pearson, Elliott G.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether magnetic interaction between close-in giant planets and their host stars produce observable statistical enhancements in stellar coronal or chromospheric activity. New Chandra observations of 12 nearby (d < 60 pc) planet-hosting solar analogs are combined with archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT coverage of 11 similar stars to construct a sample inoculated against inherent stellar class and planet-detection biases. Survival analysis and Bayesian regression methods (incorporating both measurements errors and X-ray upper limits; 13/23 stars have secure detections) are used to test whether "hot Jupiter" hosts are systematically more X-ray luminous than comparable stars with more distant or smaller planets. No significant correlations are present between common proxies for interaction strength (M P/a 2 or 1/a) versus coronal activity (L X or L X/L bol). In contrast, a sample of 198 FGK main-sequence stars does show a significant (~99% confidence) increase in X-ray luminosity with M P/a 2. While selection biases are incontrovertibly present within the main-sequence sample, we demonstrate that the effect is primarily driven by a handful of extreme hot-Jupiter systems with M P/a 2 > 450 M Jup AU-2, which here are all X-ray luminous but to a degree commensurate with their Ca II H and K activity, in contrast to presented magnetic star-planet interaction scenarios that predict enhancements relatively larger in L X. We discuss these results in the context of cumulative tidal spin-up of stars hosting close-in gas giants (potentially followed by planetary infall and destruction). We also test our main-sequence sample for correlations between planetary properties and UV luminosity or Ca II H and K emission, and find no significant dependence.

  19. A comprehensive statistical assessment of star-planet interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Brendan P.; Gallo, Elena; Wright, Jason; Pearson, Elliott

    2015-01-01

    We investigate whether magnetic interaction between close-in giant planets and their host stars produce observable statistical enhancements in stellar coronal or chromospheric activity. New Chandra observations of 12 nearby (d<60 pc) planet-hosting solar analogs are combined with archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ROSAT coverage of 11 similar stars to construct a sample inoculated against inherent stellar class and planet-detection biases. Survival analysis and Bayesian regression methods (incorporating both measurements errors and X-ray upper limits; 13/23 stars have secure detections) are used to test whether "hot Jupiter" hosts are systematically more X-ray luminous than comparable stars with more distant or smaller planets. No significant correlations are present between common proxies for interaction strength (Mp/a^2 or 1/a) versus coronal activity (Lx or Lx/Lbol). In contrast, a sample of 198 vetted FGK main-sequence stars does show a significant (~99% confidence) increase in X-ray luminosity with Mp/a^2. While selection biases are incontrovertibly present within the main-sequence sample, we demonstrate that the effect is primarily driven by a handful of extreme hot-Jupiter systems with Mp/a^2>450 Mjup/AU^2, which here are all X-ray luminous but to a degree commensurate with their Ca II H and K activity, in contrast to presented magnetic star-planet interaction scenarios that predict enhancements relatively larger in Lx. We discuss these results in the context of cumulative tidal spin-up of stars hosting close-in gas giants (potentially followed by planetary infall and destruction). We also test our main-sequence sample for correlations between planetary properties and UV luminosity or Ca II H and K emission, and find no significant dependence.

  20. Evolution of star clusters in a cosmological tidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Steven; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Langelaan, Paul; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L. W.; Portegies Zwart, Simon

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to couple N-body star cluster simulations to a cosmological tidal field, using AMUSE (Astrophysical Multipurpose Software Environment). We apply this method to star clusters embedded in the CosmoGrid dark matter only Lambda cold dark matter simulation. Our star clusters are born at z = 10 (corresponding to an age of the universe of about 500 Myr) by selecting a dark matter particle and initializing a star cluster with 32 000 stars on its location. We then follow the dynamical evolution of the star cluster within the cosmological environment. We compare the evolution of star clusters in two Milky Way size haloes with a different accretion history. The mass-loss of the star clusters is continuous irrespective of the tidal history of the host halo, but major merger events tend to increase the rate of mass-loss. From the selected two dark matter haloes, the halo that experienced the larger number of mergers tends to drive a smaller mass-loss rate from the embedded star clusters, even though the final masses of both haloes are similar. We identify two families of star clusters: native clusters, which become part of the main halo before its final major merger event, and the immigrant clusters, which are accreted upon or after this event; native clusters tend to evaporate more quickly than immigrant clusters. Accounting for the evolution of the dark matter halo causes immigrant star clusters to retain more mass than when the z = 0 tidal field is taken as a static potential. The reason for this is the weaker tidal field experienced by immigrant star clusters before merging with the larger dark matter halo.

  1. Association and Host Selectivity in Multi-Host Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Malpica, José M.; Sacristán, Soledad; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of multi-host pathogens over their host range conditions their population dynamics and structure. Also, host co-infection by different pathogens may have important consequences for the evolution of hosts and pathogens, and host-pathogen co-evolution. Hence it is of interest to know if the distribution of pathogens over their host range is random, or if there are associations between hosts and pathogens, or between pathogens sharing a host. To analyse these issues we propose indices for the observed patterns of host infection by pathogens, and for the observed patterns of co-infection, and tests to analyse if these patterns conform to randomness or reflect associations. Applying these tests to the prevalence of five plant viruses on 21 wild plant species evidenced host-virus associations: most hosts and viruses were selective for viruses and hosts, respectively. Interestingly, the more host-selective viruses were the more prevalent ones, suggesting that host specialisation is a successful strategy for multi-host pathogens. Analyses also showed that viruses tended to associate positively in co-infected hosts. The developed indices and tests provide the tools to analyse how strong and common are these associations among different groups of pathogens, which will help to understand and model the population biology of multi-host pathogens. PMID:17183670

  2. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars. PMID:27214049

  3. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (˜10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ˜10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ˜1{{M}⊙} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}⊙} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}⊙} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  4. Dark stars: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only ≲ 0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼1{{M}ȯ} as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >{{10}6}{{M}ȯ} and luminosities  >{{10}10}{{L}ȯ} , making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  5. Intergalactic Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boquien, Médéric

    2007-11-01

    The work presented here is about star formation in the unusual environment of collisional debris studied for the first time as such. These peculiar regions have an interstellar medium, and in particular a metallicity, similar to that of star forming regions in galactic discs while not undergoing similar environment effects such as density waves in the spiral arms for instance. This study has been conducted with a selection of exceptional systems that have ejected large quantities of gas into the intergalactic medium while also showing some intergalactic star forming regions. Principal Investigator as well as archive spectroscopy and imaging from multi-wavelength observations ranging from far ultraviolet to mid-infrared have been used. Withal a model has been built in order to reproduce the spectral energy distributions of intergalactic star forming regions and constrain the star formation histories, their extinctions and their fraction of stars coming from the parent galaxies' discs. Comparisons have been performed on the estimation of star formation rates between infrared, Halpha and ultraviolet wavelengths. This thesis has brought the following main new results: * some regions seem to be deprived of any old stellar population, and these are ideal laboratories in which to study star formation ; * the mid-infrared star formation rate estimator is as reliable as it is in spiral galaxies ; * the scatter in the estimation of star formation rates in various bands is similar to that of spiral galaxies and is mainly due to age effects ; * the combination of the extinction uncorrected Halpha line with mid-infrared yields a good estimation of the actual star formation rate ; * an important part of star formation, which can be as high as 85%, takes place in the intergalactic medium showing that in a young universe, in which this type of system is much more common than in the nearby universe, star formation from collisional debris can be an important factor of enrichment of

  6. Dark stars: a review.

    PubMed

    Freese, Katherine; Rindler-Daller, Tanja; Spolyar, Douglas; Valluri, Monica

    2016-06-01

    Dark stars are stellar objects made (almost entirely) of hydrogen and helium, but powered by the heat from dark matter annihilation, rather than by fusion. They are in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium, but with an unusual power source. Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), among the best candidates for dark matter, can be their own antimatter and can annihilate inside the star, thereby providing a heat source. Although dark matter constitutes only [Formula: see text]0.1% of the stellar mass, this amount is sufficient to power the star for millions to billions of years. Thus, the first phase of stellar evolution in the history of the Universe may have been dark stars. We review how dark stars come into existence, how they grow as long as dark matter fuel persists, and their stellar structure and evolution. The studies were done in two different ways, first assuming polytropic interiors and more recently using the MESA stellar evolution code; the basic results are the same. Dark stars are giant, puffy (∼10 AU) and cool (surface temperatures  ∼10 000 K) objects. We follow the evolution of dark stars from their inception at  ∼[Formula: see text] as they accrete mass from their surroundings to become supermassive stars, some even reaching masses  >[Formula: see text] and luminosities  >[Formula: see text], making them detectable with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope. Once the dark matter runs out and the dark star dies, it may collapse to a black hole; thus dark stars may provide seeds for the supermassive black holes observed throughout the Universe and at early times. Other sites for dark star formation may exist in the Universe today in regions of high dark matter density such as the centers of galaxies. The current review briefly discusses dark stars existing today, but focuses on the early generation of dark stars.

  7. Star formation regions in galaxies: Star complexes and spiral arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Iurii N.

    This book describes observational data on star formation regions (from young star clusters to spiral arms) in the Milky Way and other galaxies. It is concluded that not only high-luminosity stars but also star clusters and associations are forming together in vast complexes. It is claimed that these complexes are the primary, fundamental entities of star formation.

  8. Central star formation in S0 galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressel, L. L.; Oconnell, R. W.; Telesco, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    As a class, S0 galaxies are characterized by a lack of resolved bright stars in the disk. However, several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that a high rate of star formation is occurring at the centers of some S0 galaxies. Many of the warmest, most powerful far infrared sources in nearby bright galaxies occur in S0 galaxies. (Dressel 1988, Ap. J., 329, L69). The ratios of radio continuum flux to far infrared flux for these S0 galaxies are comparable to the ratios found for spiral galaxy disks and for star-burst galaxies. Very Large Array (VLA) maps of some of these S0 galaxies show that the radio continuum emission originates in the central few kiloparsecs. It is diffuse or clumpy, unlike the radio sources in active S0 galaxies, which are either extremely compact or have jet-lobe structures. Imaging of some of these galaxies at 10.8 microns shows that the infrared emission is also centrally concentrated. Many of the infrared-powerful S0 galaxies are Markarian galaxies. In only one case in this sample is the powerful ultraviolet emission known to be generated by a Seyfert nucleus. Optical spectra of the central few kiloparsecs of these S0 galaxies generally show deep Balmer absorption lines characteristic of A stars, and H beta emission suggestive of gas heated by O stars. A key question to our understanding of these galaxies is whether they really are S0 galaxies, or at least would have been recognized as S0 galaxies before the episode of central star formation began. Some of Nilson's classifications (used here) have been confirmed by Sandage or de Vaucouleurs and collaborators from better plates; some of the galaxies may be misclassified Sa galaxies (the most frequent hosts of central star formation); some are apparently difficult to classify because of mixed characteristics, faint non-S0 features, or peculiarities. More optical imaging is needed to characterize the host galaxies and to study the evolution of their star-forming regions.

  9. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand. PMID:27571696

  10. Host Responses to Biofilm.

    PubMed

    Watters, C; Fleming, D; Bishop, D; Rumbaugh, K P

    2016-01-01

    From birth to death the human host immune system interacts with bacterial cells. Biofilms are communities of microbes embedded in matrices composed of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), and have been implicated in both the healthy microbiome and disease states. The immune system recognizes many different bacterial patterns, molecules, and antigens, but these components can be camouflaged in the biofilm mode of growth. Instead, immune cells come into contact with components of the EPS matrix, a diverse, hydrated mixture of extracellular DNA (bacterial and host), proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids. As bacterial cells transition from planktonic to biofilm-associated they produce small molecules, which can increase inflammation, induce cell death, and even cause necrosis. To survive, invading bacteria must overcome the epithelial barrier, host microbiome, complement, and a variety of leukocytes. If bacteria can evade these initial cell populations they have an increased chance at surviving and causing ongoing disease in the host. Planktonic cells are readily cleared, but biofilms reduce the effectiveness of both polymorphonuclear neutrophils and macrophages. In addition, in the presence of these cells, biofilm formation is actively enhanced, and components of host immune cells are assimilated into the EPS matrix. While pathogenic biofilms contribute to states of chronic inflammation, probiotic Lactobacillus biofilms cause a negligible immune response and, in states of inflammation, exhibit robust antiinflammatory properties. These probiotic biofilms colonize and protect the gut and vagina, and have been implicated in improved healing of damaged skin. Overall, biofilms stimulate a unique immune response that we are only beginning to understand.

  11. STAR in CTO PCI: When is STAR not a star?

    PubMed

    Hira, Ravi S; Dean, Larry S

    2016-04-01

    Subintimal tracking and reentry (STAR) has been used as a bailout strategy and involves an uncontrolled dissection and recanalization into the distal lumen to reestablish vessel patency. In the current study, thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) flow < 3 was the only variable which they found to be significantly associated with restenosis and reocclusion after stent placement. It may be reasonable to consider second generation drug eluting stent placement in patients receiving STAR that have TIMI 3 flow, however, this should only be done if there is no compromise of major side branches. If unsure, we recommend to perform balloon angioplasty without stenting.

  12. EVIDENCE FOR THE TIDAL DESTRUCTION OF HOT JUPITERS BY SUBGIANT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaufman, Kevin C.; Winn, Joshua N. E-mail: jwinn@mit.edu

    2013-08-01

    Tidal transfer of angular momentum is expected to cause hot Jupiters to spiral into their host stars. Although the timescale for orbital decay is very uncertain, it should be faster for systems with larger and more evolved stars. Indeed, it is well established that hot Jupiters are found less frequently around subgiant stars than around main-sequence stars. However, the interpretation of this finding has been ambiguous, because the subgiants are also thought to be more massive than the F- and G-type stars that dominate the main-sequence sample. Consequently, it has been unclear whether the absence of hot Jupiters is due to tidal destruction or inhibited formation of those planets around massive stars. Here we show that the Galactic space motions of the planet-hosting subgiant stars demand that on average they be similar in mass to the planet-hosting main-sequence F- and G-type stars. Therefore the two samples are likely to differ only in age, and provide a glimpse of the same exoplanet population both before and after tidal evolution. As a result, the lack of hot Jupiters orbiting subgiants is clear evidence for their tidal destruction. Questions remain, though, about the interpretation of other reported differences between the planet populations around subgiants and main-sequence stars, such as their period and eccentricity distributions and overall occurrence rates.

  13. Rotation periods and seismic ages of KOIs - comparison with stars without detected planets from Kepler observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceillier, T.; van Saders, J.; García, R. A.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Creevey, O.; Mathis, S.; Mathur, S.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Salabert, D.; Tayar, J.

    2016-02-01

    One of the most difficult properties to derive for stars is their age. For cool main-sequence stars, gyrochronology relations can be used to infer stellar ages from measured rotation periods and Hertzsprung Russell diagram positions. These relations have few calibrators with known ages for old, long rotation period stars. There is a significant sample of old Kepler objects of interest, or KOIs, which have both measurable surface rotation periods and precise asteroseismic measurements from which ages can be accurately derived. In this work, we determine the age and the rotation period of solar-like pulsating KOIs to both compare the rotation properties of stars with and without known planets and enlarge the gyrochronology calibration sample for old stars. We use Kepler photometric light curves to derive the stellar surface rotation periods while ages are obtained with asteroseismology using the Asteroseismic Modelling Portal in which individual mode frequencies are combined with high-resolution spectroscopic parameters. We thus determine surface rotation periods and ages for 11 planet-hosting stars, all over 2 Gyr old. We find that the planet-hosting stars exhibit a rotational behaviour that is consistent with the latest age-rotation models and similar to the rotational behaviour of stars without detected planets. We conclude that these old KOIs can be used to test and calibrate gyrochronology along with stars not known to host planets.

  14. The Mass Dependence between Protoplanetary Disks and their Stellar Hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Wilner, David J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a substantial extension of the millimeter (mm) wave continuum photometry catalog for circumstellar dust disks in the Taurus star-forming region, based on a new "snapshot" λ = 1.3 mm survey with the Submillimeter Array. Combining these new data with measurements in the literature, we construct a mm-wave luminosity distribution, f(L mm), for Class II disks that is statistically complete for stellar hosts with spectral types earlier than M8.5 and has a 3σ depth of roughly 3 mJy. The resulting census eliminates a longstanding selection bias against disks with late-type hosts, and thereby demonstrates that there is a strong correlation between L mm and the host spectral type. By translating the locations of individual stars in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram into masses and ages, and adopting a simple conversion between L mm and the disk mass, Md , we confirm that this correlation corresponds to a statistically robust relationship between the masses of dust disks and the stars that host them. A Bayesian regression technique is used to characterize these relationships in the presence of measurement errors, data censoring, and significant intrinsic scatter: the best-fit results indicate a typical 1.3 mm flux density of ~25 mJy for 1 M ⊙ hosts and a power-law scaling L_mm ∝ M_{\\ast}^{1.5-2.0}. We suggest that a reasonable treatment of dust temperature in the conversion from L mm to Md favors an inherently linear Md vpropM * scaling, with a typical disk-to-star mass ratio of ~0.2%-0.6%. The measured rms dispersion around this regression curve is ±0.7 dex, suggesting that the combined effects of diverse evolutionary states, dust opacities, and temperatures in these disks imprint a full width at half-maximum range of a factor of ~40 on the inferred Md (or L mm) at any given host mass. We argue that this relationship between Md and M * likely represents the origin of the inferred correlation between giant planet frequency and host star mass in the exoplanet

  15. The First Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2010-10-01

    The standard cosmological model predicts that the first cosmological objects are formed when the age of the universe is a few hundred million years. Recent theoretical studies and numerical simulations consistently suggest that the first objects are very massive primordial stars. We introduce the key physics and explain why the first stars are thought to be massive, rather than to be low-mass stars. The state-of-the-art simulations include all the relevant atomic and molecular physics to follow the thermal evolution of a prestellar gas cloud to very high ``stellar'' densities. Evolutionary calculations of the primordial stars suggest the formation of massive blackholes in the early universe. Finally, we show the results from high-resolution simulations of star formation in a low-metallicity gas. Vigorous fragmentation is triggered in a star-forming gas cloud at a metallicity of as low as Z = 10-5Zsolar.

  16. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars.

  17. FAST STAR, SLOW STAR; OLD STAR, YOUNG STAR: SUBGIANT ROTATION AS A POPULATION AND STELLAR PHYSICS DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect

    Van Saders, Jennifer L.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.

    2013-10-20

    Stellar rotation is a strong function of both mass and evolutionary state. Missions such as Kepler and CoRoT provide tens of thousands of rotation periods, drawn from stellar populations that contain objects at a range of masses, ages, and evolutionary states. Given a set of reasonable starting conditions and a prescription for angular momentum loss, we address the expected range of rotation periods for cool field stellar populations (∼0.4-2.0 M{sub ☉}). We find that cool stars fall into three distinct regimes in rotation. Rapid rotators with surface periods less than 10 days are either young low-mass main sequence (MS) stars, or higher mass subgiants which leave the MS with high rotation rates. Intermediate rotators (10-40 days) can be either cool MS dwarfs, suitable for gyrochronology, or crossing subgiants at a range of masses. Gyrochronology relations must therefore be applied cautiously, since there is an abundant population of subgiant contaminants. The slowest rotators, at periods greater than 40 days, are lower mass subgiants undergoing envelope expansion. We identify additional diagnostic uses of rotation periods. There exists a period-age relation for subgiants distinct from the MS period-age relations. There is also a period-radius relation that can be used as a constraint on the stellar radius, particularly in the interesting case of planet host stars. The high-mass/low-mass break in the rotation distribution on the MS persists onto the subgiant branch, and has potential as a diagnostic of stellar mass. Finally, this set of theoretical predictions can be compared to extensive datasets to motivate improved modeling.

  18. Massive soliton stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers.

  19. Delta Scuti stars: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Guzik, J.A.

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of asteroseismology is not only to derive the internal structure of individual stars from their observed oscillation frequencies, but also to test and extend one`s understanding of the physics of matter under the extremes of temperature, density, and pressure found in stellar interiors. In this review, the author hopes to point out what one can learn about the Sun by studying {delta} Scuti stars, as well as what one can learn about stars more massive or evolved than the Sun. He discusses some of the difficulties in theoretical approaches to asteroseismology for {delta} Scuti stars, using FG Vir, {delta} Scuti, and CD-24{degree} 7599 as examples.

  20. Massive soliton stars

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hongyee )

    1990-05-01

    The structure of nontopological solutions of Einstein field equations as proposed by Friedberg, Lee, and Pang (1987) is examined. This analysis incorporates finite temperature effects and pair creation. Quarks are assumed to be the only species that exist in interior of soliton stars. The possibility of primordial creation of soliton stars in the incomplete decay of the degenerate vacuum in early universe is explored. Because of dominance of pair creation inside soliton stars, the luminosity of soliton stars is not determined by its radiative transfer characteristics, and the surface temperature of soliton stars can be the same as its interior temperature. It is possible that soliton stars are intense X-ray radiators at large distances. Soliton stars are nearly 100 percent efficient energy converters, converting the rest energy of baryons entering the interior into radiation. It is possible that a sizable number of baryons may also be trapped inside soliton stars during early epochs of the universe. In addition, if soliton stars exist they could assume the role played by massive black holes in galactic centers. 27 refs.

  1. Introduction to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Lattimer, James M.

    2015-02-24

    Neutron stars contain the densest form of matter in the present universe. General relativity and causality set important constraints to their compactness. In addition, analytic GR solutions are useful in understanding the relationships that exist among the maximum mass, radii, moments of inertia, and tidal Love numbers of neutron stars, all of which are accessible to observation. Some of these relations are independent of the underlying dense matter equation of state, while others are very sensitive to the equation of state. Recent observations of neutron stars from pulsar timing, quiescent X-ray emission from binaries, and Type I X-ray bursts can set important constraints on the structure of neutron stars and the underlying equation of state. In addition, measurements of thermal radiation from neutron stars has uncovered the possible existence of neutron and proton superfluidity/superconductivity in the core of a neutron star, as well as offering powerful evidence that typical neutron stars have significant crusts. These observations impose constraints on the existence of strange quark matter stars, and limit the possibility that abundant deconfined quark matter or hyperons exist in the cores of neutron stars.

  2. Strange Nonchaotic Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, John F.; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G.; Ditto, William L.

    2015-08-01

    Exploiting the unprecedented capabilities of the planet-hunting Kepler space telescope, which stared at 150 000 stars for four years, we discuss recent evidence that certain stars dim and brighten in complex patterns with fractal features. Such stars pulsate at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the famous golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies is generically attracted toward a “strange” behavior that is geometrically fractal without displaying the “butterfly effect” of chaos. Strange nonchaotic attractors have been observed in laboratory experiments and have been hypothesized to describe the electrochemical activity of the brain, but a bluish white star 16 000 light years from Earth in the constellation Lyra may manifest, in the scale-free distribution of its minor frequency components, the first strange nonchaotic attractor observed in the wild. The recognition of stellar strange nonchaotic dynamics may improve the classification of these stars and refine the physical modeling of their interiors. We also discuss nonlinear analysis of other RR Lyrae stars in Kepler field of view and discuss some toy models for modeling these stars.References: 1) Hippke, Michael, et al. "Pulsation period variations in the RRc Lyrae star KIC 5520878." The Astrophysical Journal 798.1 (2015): 42.2) Lindner, John F., et al. "Strange nonchaotic stars." Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 054101 (2015)

  3. Stellar signatures of AGN-jet-triggered star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, Zachary; Silk, Joseph; Bryan, Sarah; Gaibler, Volker; Haas, Marcel

    2014-12-01

    To investigate feedback between relativistic jets emanating from active galactic nuclei and the stellar population of the host galaxy, we analyze the long-term evolution of the orbits of the stars formed in the galaxy-scale simulations by Gaibler et al. of jets in massive, gas-rich galaxies at z ∼ 2-3. We find strong, jet-induced differences in the resulting stellar populations of galaxies that host relativistic jets and galaxies that do not, including correlations in stellar locations, velocities, and ages. Jets are found to generate distributions of increased radial and vertical velocities that persist long enough to effectively augment the stellar structure of the host. The jets cause the formation of bow shocks that move out through the disk, generating rings of star formation within the disk. The bow shock often accelerates pockets of gas in which stars form, yielding populations of stars with significant radial and vertical velocities, some of which have large enough velocities to escape the galaxy. These stellar population signatures can serve to identify past jet activity as well as jet-induced star formation.

  4. Combinations of 148 navigation stars and the star tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, R.

    1980-01-01

    The angular separation of all star combinations for 148 nav star on the onboard software for space transportation system-3 flight and following missions is presented as well as the separation of each pair that satisfies the viewing constraints of using both star trackers simultaneously. Tables show (1) shuttle star catalog 1980 star position in M 1950 coordinates; (2) two star combination of 148 nav stars; and (3) summary of two star-combinations of the star tracker 5 deg filter. These 148 stars present 10,875 combinations. For the star tracker filters of plus or minus 5 deg, there are 875 combinations. Formalhaut (nav star 26) has the best number of combinations, which is 33.

  5. C/O ratios of stars with transiting hot Jupiter exoplanets ,

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, Johanna K.; Cunha, Katia; Smith, Verne V.; Schuler, Simon C.; Griffith, Caitlin A.

    2014-06-10

    The relative abundances of carbon and oxygen have long been recognized as fundamental diagnostics of stellar chemical evolution. Now, the growing number of exoplanet observations enable estimation of these elements in exoplanetary atmospheres. In hot Jupiters, the C/O ratio affects the partitioning of carbon in the major observable molecules, making these elements diagnostic of temperature structure and composition. Here we present measurements of carbon and oxygen abundances in 16 stars that host transiting hot Jupiter exoplanets, and we compare our C/O ratios to those measured in larger samples of host stars, as well as those estimated for the corresponding exoplanet atmospheres. With standard stellar abundance analysis we derive stellar parameters as well as [C/H] and [O/H] from multiple abundance indicators, including synthesis fitting of the [O I] λ6300 line and non-LTE corrections for the O I triplet. Our results, in agreement with recent suggestions, indicate that previously measured exoplanet host star C/O ratios may have been overestimated. The mean transiting exoplanet host star C/O ratio from this sample is 0.54 (C/O{sub ☉} = 0.54), versus previously measured C/O{sub host} {sub star} means of ∼0.65-0.75. We also observe the increase in C/O with [Fe/H] expected for all stars based on Galactic chemical evolution; a linear fit to our results falls slightly below that of other exoplanet host star studies but has a similar slope. Though the C/O ratios of even the most-observed exoplanets are still uncertain, the more precise abundance analysis possible right now for their host stars can help constrain these planets' formation environments and current compositions.

  6. Trajectories of Cepheid variable stars in the Galactic nuclear bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2012-06-01

    The central region of our Galaxy provides us with a good opportunity to study the evolution of galactic nuclei and bulges because we can observe various phenomena in detail at the proximity of 8 kpc. There is a hierarchical alignment of stellar systems with different sizes; from the extended bulge, the nuclear bulge, down to the compact cluster around the central supermassive blackhole. The nuclear bulge contains stars as young as a few Myr, and even hosts the ongoing star formation. These are in contrast to the more extended bulge which are dominated by old stars, ~10Gyr. It is considered that the star formation in the nuclear bulge is caused by fresh gas provided from the inner disk. In this picture, the nuclear bulge plays an important role as the interface between the gas supplier, the inner disk, and the galactic nucleus. Kinematics of young stars in the nuclear bulge is important to discuss the star forming process and the gas circulation in the Galactic Center. We here propose spectroscopic observations of Cepheid variable stars, ~25 Myr, which we recently discovered in the nuclear bulge. The spectra taken in this proposal will allow timely estimates of the systemic velocities of the variable stars.

  7. Can brown dwarfs survive on close orbits around convective stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, C.; Díaz, R. F.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The mass range of brown dwarfs extends across the planetary domain to stellar objects. There is a relative paucity of brown dwarfs companions around FGKM-type stars compared to exoplanets for orbital periods of less than a few years, but most of the short-period brown dwarf companions that are fully characterised by transits and radial velocities are found around F-type stars. Aims: We examine the hypothesis that brown dwarf companions could not survive on close orbit around stars with important convective envelopes because the tides and angular momentum loss, the result of magnetic braking, would lead to a rapid orbital decay with the companion being quickly engulfed. Methods: We use a classical Skumanich-type braking law and constant time-lag tidal theory to assess the characteristic timescale for orbital decay for the brown dwarf mass range as a function of the host properties. Results: We find that F-type stars may host massive companions for a significantly longer time than G-type stars for a given orbital period, which may explain the paucity of G-type hosts for brown dwarfs with an orbital period less than five days. On the other hand, we show that the small radius of early M-type stars contributes to orbital decay timescales that are only half those of F-type stars, despite their more efficient tidal dissipation and magnetic braking. For fully convective later type M-dwarfs, orbital decay timescales could be orders of magnitude greater than for F-type stars. Moreover, we find that, for a wide range of values of tidal dissipation efficiency and magnetic braking, it is safe to assume that orbital decay for massive companions can be neglected for orbital periods greater than ten days. Conclusions: For orbital periods greater than ten days, brown dwarf occurrence should largely be unaffected by tidal decay, whatever the mass of the host. On closer orbital periods, the rapid engulfment of massive companions could explain the lack of G and K-type hosts

  8. The SEDs and Host Galaxies of the Dustiest GRB Afterglows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruhler, T.; Greiner, J.; Schady, P.; Savaglio, S.; Afonso, P. M. J.; Clemens, C.; Elliott, J.; Filgas, R.; Gruber, D.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Kupcu-Yoldas, A.; McBreen, S.; Olivares, E.; Pierini, D.; Rau, A.; Rossi, A.; Nardini, M.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Sudilovsky, V.; Updike, A. C.

    2011-01-01

    The afterglows and host galaxies of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) offer unique opportunities to study star-forming galaxies in the high-z Universe, Until recently, however. the information inferred from GRB follow-up observations was mostly limited to optically bright afterglows. biasing all demographic studies against sight-lines that contain large amounts of dust. Aims. Here we present afterglow and host observations for a sample of bursts that are exemplary of previously missed ones because of high visual extinction (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) approx > 1 mag) along the sight-line. This facilitates an investigation of the properties, geometry and location of the absorbing dust of these poorly-explored host galaxies. and a comparison to hosts from optically-selected samples. Methods. This work is based on GROND optical/NIR and Swift/XRT X-ray observations of the afterglows, and multi-color imaging for eight GRB hosts. The afterglow and galaxy spectral energy distributions yield detailed insight into physical properties such as the dust and metal content along the GRB sight-line as well as galaxy-integrated characteristics like the host's stellar mass, luminosity. color-excess and star-formation rate. Results. For the eight afterglows considered in this study we report for the first time the redshift of GRBs 081109 (z = 0.97S7 +/- 0.0005). and the visual extinction towards GRBs 0801109 (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.4(sup +0.4) (sub -0.3) mag) and l00621A (A(sub v) (Sup GRB) = 3.8 +/- 0.2 mag), which are among the largest ever derived for GRB afterglows. Combined with non-extinguished GRBs. there is a strong anti-correlation between the afterglow's metals-to-dust ratio and visual extinction. The hosts of the dustiest afterglows are diverse in their properties, but on average redder(((R - K)(sub AB)) approximates 1.6 mag), more luminous ( approximates 0.9 L (sup *)) and massive ((log M(sup *) [M(solar]) approximates 9.8) than the hosts of optically-bright events. We hence probe

  9. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  10. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, Donald F.; Najarro, Francisco; Morris, Mark; McLean, Ian S.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Langer, Norbert

    1998-10-01

    We present new near-infrared data and analysis, which indicate that the Pistol Star is one of the most luminous stars known, adding another test point for massive star formation and stellar evolution theories. We estimate an extinction of AK = 3.2 +/- 0.5 using the near-infrared colors of the star and of surrounding stars in the young Quintuplet cluster. Using our wind/atmosphere code, we find two families of models that fit the spectral energy distribution and detailed line profiles. The lower luminosity models give L = 106.6+/-0.2 L⊙ and Teff = 104.15+/-0.01 K, while the higher luminosity models give L = 107.2+/-0.2 L⊙ and Teff = 104.33+/-0.01 K; the error in luminosity assumes an uncertainty of +/-0.5 in AK, while the error in Teff is constrained by detailed line modeling. The models also reveal a helium enriched surface. As previously existing stellar evolution models do not extend to such high luminosities, we employ new evolutionary tracks for very massive stars to determine the initial mass and age of the Pistol Star, and estimate Minitial = 200-250 M⊙ and an age of 1.7-2.1 Myr. The inferred luminosity and temperature place the star in a sparsely populated zone in the H-R diagram where luminous blue variables (LBVs) are often found. This is consistent with our evolutionary models, which predict that the star is in an unstable evolutionary stage. We interpret the star and its surrounding nebula as an LBV that has recently ejected large amounts of material. Our K-band speckle-imaging data reveal the star to be single down to a projected separation of 110 AU.

  11. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Lampeitl, Hubert; Smith, Mathew; Nichol, Robert C.; Bassett, Bruce; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Benjamin; Foley, Ryan J.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Goobar, Ariel; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  12. What are the galaxies that host MIR-selected AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, David

    2016-08-01

    Infra-red selection techniques, sensitive to dust strongly heated by an AGN, offer a way to identify some of the most obscured accretion events in the Universe. I will describe the results of a comprehensive multi-wavelength study of AGN to z>2 selected using Spitzer/IRAC based methods in the COSMOS field. Armed with AGN-optimised redshifts and stellar masses, we explore the dust emission from the active nucleus and the host galaxy. We demonstrate that IR-selected AGN tend to be found in low mass host galaxies, when compared to other AGN identification methods. The star-formation rates of obscured and unobscured IR-selected AGN are very similar, implying that large-scale obscuration with co-eval star-bursts are not found in a major proportion of heavily obscured AGN.

  13. Planetary system disruption by Galactic perturbations to wide binary stars.

    PubMed

    Kaib, Nathan A; Raymond, Sean N; Duncan, Martin

    2013-01-17

    Nearly half the exoplanets found within binary star systems reside in very wide binaries with average stellar separations greater than 1,000 astronomical units (one astronomical unit (AU) being the Earth-Sun distance), yet the influence of such distant binary companions on planetary evolution remains largely unstudied. Unlike their tighter counterparts, the stellar orbits of wide binaries continually change under the influence of the Milky Way's tidal field and impulses from other passing stars. Here we report numerical simulations demonstrating that the variable nature of wide binary star orbits dramatically reshapes the planetary systems they host, typically billions of years after formation. Contrary to previous understanding, wide binary companions may often strongly perturb planetary systems, triggering planetary ejections and increasing the orbital eccentricities of surviving planets. Although hitherto not recognized, orbits of giant exoplanets within wide binaries are statistically more eccentric than those around isolated stars. Both eccentricity distributions are well reproduced when we assume that isolated stars and wide binaries host similar planetary systems whose outermost giant planets are scattered beyond about 10 AU from their parent stars by early internal instabilities. Consequently, our results suggest that although wide binaries eventually remove the most distant planets from many planetary systems, most isolated giant exoplanet systems harbour additional distant, still undetected planets. PMID:23292514

  14. The magnetic properties of the star Kepler-78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moutou, C.; Donati, J.-F.; Lin, D.; Laine, R. O.; Hatzes, A.

    2016-06-01

    Kepler-78 is host to a transiting 8.5-h orbit super-Earth. In this paper, the rotation and magnetic properties of the planet host star are studied. We first revisit the Kepler photometric data for a detailed description of the rotation properties of Kepler-78, showing that the star seems to undergo a cycle in the spot pattern of ˜1300 d duration. We then use spectropolarimetric observations with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT)/ESPaDOnS to measure the circular polarization in the line profile of the star during its rotation cycle, as well as spectroscopic proxies of the chromospheric activity. The average field has a strength of 16 G. The magnetic topology is characterized by a poloidal and a toroidal component, encompassing 60 per cent and 40 per cent of the magnetic energy, respectively. Differential rotation is detected with an estimated rate of 0.105±0.039 rad d-1. Activity tracers vary with the rotation cycle of the star; there is no hint that a residual activity level is related to the planetary orbit at the precision of our data. The description of the star magnetic field's characteristics then may serve as input for models of interactions between the star and its close-by planet, e.g. Ohmic dissipation and unipolar induction.

  15. Planetary system disruption by Galactic perturbations to wide binary stars.

    PubMed

    Kaib, Nathan A; Raymond, Sean N; Duncan, Martin

    2013-01-17

    Nearly half the exoplanets found within binary star systems reside in very wide binaries with average stellar separations greater than 1,000 astronomical units (one astronomical unit (AU) being the Earth-Sun distance), yet the influence of such distant binary companions on planetary evolution remains largely unstudied. Unlike their tighter counterparts, the stellar orbits of wide binaries continually change under the influence of the Milky Way's tidal field and impulses from other passing stars. Here we report numerical simulations demonstrating that the variable nature of wide binary star orbits dramatically reshapes the planetary systems they host, typically billions of years after formation. Contrary to previous understanding, wide binary companions may often strongly perturb planetary systems, triggering planetary ejections and increasing the orbital eccentricities of surviving planets. Although hitherto not recognized, orbits of giant exoplanets within wide binaries are statistically more eccentric than those around isolated stars. Both eccentricity distributions are well reproduced when we assume that isolated stars and wide binaries host similar planetary systems whose outermost giant planets are scattered beyond about 10 AU from their parent stars by early internal instabilities. Consequently, our results suggest that although wide binaries eventually remove the most distant planets from many planetary systems, most isolated giant exoplanet systems harbour additional distant, still undetected planets.

  16. Star Formation in Dwarf-Dwarf Mergers: Fueling Hierarchical Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stierwalt, Sabrina; Johnson, K. E.; Kallivayalil, N.; Patton, D. R.; Putman, M. E.; Besla, G.; Geha, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We present early results from the first systematic study a sample of isolated interacting dwarf pairs and the mechanisms governing their star formation. Low mass dwarf galaxies are ubiquitous in the local universe, yet the efficiency of gas removal and the enhancement of star formation in dwarfs via pre-processing (i.e. dwarf-dwarf interactions occurring before the accretion by a massive host) are currently unconstrained. Studies of Local Group dwarfs credit stochastic internal processes for their complicated star formation histories, but a few intriguing examples suggest interactions among dwarfs may produce enhanced star formation. We combine archival UV imaging from GALEX with deep optical broad- and narrow-band (Halpha) imaging taken with the pre- One Degree Imager (pODI) on the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and with the 2.3-m Bok telescope at Steward Observatory to confirm the presence of stellar bridges and tidal tails and to determine whether dwarf-dwarf interactions alone can trigger significant levels of star formation. We investigate star formation rates and global galaxy colors as a function of dwarf pair separation (i.e. the dwarf merger sequence) and dwarf-dwarf mass ratio. This project is a precursor to an ongoing effort to obtain high spatial resolution HI imaging to assess the importance of sequential triggering caused by dwarf-dwarf interactions and the subsequent affect on the more massive hosts that later accrete the low mass systems.

  17. The Lowest Metallicity Stars in the LMC: Clues from MaGICC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brook, Chris B.; Miranda, Maider S.; Gibson, Brad. K.; Pilkington, Kate; Stinson, Greg S.

    2013-07-01

    Using a cosmological hydrodynamical simulation of a galaxy of similar mass to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), we examine the predicted characteristics of its lowest metallicity populations. In particular, we emphasise the spatial distributions of first (Pop III) and second (polluted by only immediate Pop III ancestors) generation stars. We find that primordial composition stars form not only in the central galaxy's progenitor, but also in locally collapsed subhaloes during the early phases of galaxy formation. The lowest metallicity stars in these subhaloes end up in a relatively extended distribution around the host, with these accreted stars possessing present-day galactocentric distances as great as ~40 kpc. By contrast, the earliest stars formed within the central galaxy remain in the inner region, where the vast majority of star formation occurs, for the entirety of the simulation. Consequently, the fraction of stars that are from the earliest generation increases strongly with radius.

  18. Star Trek in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Describes specific educational programs for using the Star Trek TV program from kindergarten through college. For each grade level lesson plans, ideas for incorporating Star Trek into future classes, and reports of specific programs utilizing Star Trek are provided. (SL)

  19. Observations of FK Comae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations on the FK Comae stars are described. FK Com, UZ Lib and HD 199178 are compared and related as a group of stars. The crucial observational tests of the proposed evolutionary status of these stars are noted.

  20. Neutron Star Compared to Manhattan

    NASA Video Gallery

    A pulsar is a neutron star, the crushed core of a star that has exploded. Neutron stars crush half a million times more mass than Earth into a sphere no larger than Manhattan, as animated in this s...

  1. Stars and Flowers, Flowers and Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minti, Hari

    2012-12-01

    The author, a graduated from the Bucharest University (1964), actually living and working in Israel, concerns his book to variable stars and flowers, two domains of his interest. The analogies includes double stars, eclipsing double stars, eclipses, Big Bang. The book contains 34 chapters, each of which concerns various relations between astronomy and other sciences and pseudosciences such as Psychology, Religion, Geology, Computers and Astrology (to which the author is not an adherent). A special part of the book is dedicated to archeoastronomy and ethnoastronomy, as well as to history of astronomy. Between the main points of interest of these parts: ancient sanctuaries in Sarmizegetusa (Dacia), Stone Henge(UK) and other. The last chapter of the book is dedicated to flowers. The book is richly illustrated. It is designed for a wide circle of readers.

  2. Exozodi disk models for the HOSTS survey on the LBTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, Mark; Kennedy, G.; Skemer, A.; Bryden, G.; Danchi, W. C.; Defrere, D.; Haniff, C.; Hinz, P.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Panic, O.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, A.; Serabyn, G.; Shannon, A. B.; Stapelfeldt, K. R.; Weinberger, A. J.; LBTI-HOSTS

    2014-01-01

    This poster describes a simple model for exozodiacal emission that was developed to interpret observations of the Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial planetary Systems (HOSTS) project on the Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer (LBTI). HOSTS is a NASA-funded key science project using mid-infrared nulling interferometry at the LBTI to seach for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi) in the habitable zones of nearby stars. The aim was to make a model that includes the fewest possible assumptions, so that it is easy to characterize how choices of model parameters affect what can be inferred from the observations. However the model is also sufficiently complex that it can be compared in a physically meaningful way with the level of dust in the Solar System, and can also be readily used to assess the impact of a detection (or of a non-detection) on the ability of a mission to detect Earth-like planets. Here we describe the model, and apply it to the sample of stars being searched by HOSTS to determine the zodi level (i.e., the number of Solar System zodiacal clouds) that would be needed for a detection for each star in the survey. Particular emphasis is given to our definition of a zodi, and what that means for stars of different luminosity, and a comparison is given between different zodi definitions justifying our final choice. The achievable exozodi levels range from 1-20 zodi for different stars in the prime sample for a 0.01% null depth, with a median level of 2.5 zodi.

  3. Host Phylogeny Determines Viral Persistence and Replication in Novel Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Longdon, Ben; Hadfield, Jarrod D.; Webster, Claire L.

    2011-01-01

    Pathogens switching to new hosts can result in the emergence of new infectious diseases, and determining which species are likely to be sources of such host shifts is essential to understanding disease threats to both humans and wildlife. However, the factors that determine whether a pathogen can infect a novel host are poorly understood. We have examined the ability of three host-specific RNA-viruses (Drosophila sigma viruses from the family Rhabdoviridae) to persist and replicate in 51 different species of Drosophilidae. Using a novel analytical approach we found that the host phylogeny could explain most of the variation in viral replication and persistence between different host species. This effect is partly driven by viruses reaching a higher titre in those novel hosts most closely related to the original host. However, there is also a strong effect of host phylogeny that is independent of the distance from the original host, with viral titres being similar in groups of related hosts. Most of this effect could be explained by variation in general susceptibility to all three sigma viruses, as there is a strong phylogenetic correlation in the titres of the three viruses. These results suggest that the source of new emerging diseases may often be predictable from the host phylogeny, but that the effect may be more complex than simply causing most host shifts to occur between closely related hosts. PMID:21966271

  4. The Evolution and Stability of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiode, Joshua Hajime

    Massive stars are the ultimate source for nearly all the elements necessary for life. The first stars forge these elements from the sparse set of ingredients supplied by the Big Bang, and distribute enriched ashes throughout their galactic homes via their winds and explosive deaths. Subsequent generations follow suit, assembling from the enriched ashes of their predecessors. Over the last several decades, the astrophysics community has developed a sophisticated theoretical picture of the evolution of these stars, but it remains an incomplete accounting of the rich set of observations. Using state of the art models of massive stars, I have investigated the internal processes taking place throughout the life-cycles of stars spanning those from the first generation ("Population III") to the present-day ("Population I"). I will argue that early-generation stars were not highly unstable to perturbations, contrary to a host of past investigations, if a correct accounting is made for the viscous effect of convection. For later generations, those with near solar metallicity, I find that this very same convection may excite gravity-mode oscillations that produce observable brightness variations at the stellar surface when the stars are near the main sequence. If confirmed with modern high-precision monitoring experiments, like Kepler and CoRoT, the properties of observed gravity modes in massive stars could provide a direct probe of the poorly constrained physics of gravity mode excitation by convection. Finally, jumping forward in stellar evolutionary time, I propose and explore an entirely new mechanism to explain the giant eruptions observed and inferred to occur during the final phases of massive stellar evolution. This mechanism taps into the vast nuclear fusion luminosity, and accompanying convective luminosity, in the stellar core to excite waves capable of carrying a super-Eddington luminosity out to the stellar envelope. This energy transfer from the core to the

  5. A Swarm of Ancient Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    We know of about 150 of the rich collections of old stars called globular clusters that orbit our galaxy, the Milky Way. This sharp new image of Messier 107, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, displays the structure of one such globular cluster in exquisite detail. Studying these stellar swarms has revealed much about the history of our galaxy and how stars evolve. The globular cluster Messier 107, also known as NGC 6171, is a compact and ancient family of stars that lies about 21 000 light-years away. Messier 107 is a bustling metropolis: thousands of stars in globular clusters like this one are concentrated into a space that is only about twenty times the distance between our Sun and its nearest stellar neighbour, Alpha Centauri, across. A significant number of these stars have already evolved into red giants, one of the last stages of a star's life, and have a yellowish colour in this image. Globular clusters are among the oldest objects in the Universe. And since the stars within a globular cluster formed from the same cloud of interstellar matter at roughly the same time - typically over 10 billion years ago - they are all low-mass stars, as lightweights burn their hydrogen fuel supply much more slowly than stellar behemoths. Globular clusters formed during the earliest stages in the formation of their host galaxies and therefore studying these objects can give significant insights into how galaxies, and their component stars, evolve. Messier 107 has undergone intensive observations, being one of the 160 stellar fields that was selected for the Pre-FLAMES Survey - a preliminary survey conducted between 1999 and 2002 using the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, to find suitable stars for follow-up observations with the VLT's spectroscopic instrument FLAMES [1]. Using FLAMES, it is possible to observe up to 130 targets at the same time, making it particularly well suited

  6. A Swarm of Ancient Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-12-01

    We know of about 150 of the rich collections of old stars called globular clusters that orbit our galaxy, the Milky Way. This sharp new image of Messier 107, captured by the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, displays the structure of one such globular cluster in exquisite detail. Studying these stellar swarms has revealed much about the history of our galaxy and how stars evolve. The globular cluster Messier 107, also known as NGC 6171, is a compact and ancient family of stars that lies about 21 000 light-years away. Messier 107 is a bustling metropolis: thousands of stars in globular clusters like this one are concentrated into a space that is only about twenty times the distance between our Sun and its nearest stellar neighbour, Alpha Centauri, across. A significant number of these stars have already evolved into red giants, one of the last stages of a star's life, and have a yellowish colour in this image. Globular clusters are among the oldest objects in the Universe. And since the stars within a globular cluster formed from the same cloud of interstellar matter at roughly the same time - typically over 10 billion years ago - they are all low-mass stars, as lightweights burn their hydrogen fuel supply much more slowly than stellar behemoths. Globular clusters formed during the earliest stages in the formation of their host galaxies and therefore studying these objects can give significant insights into how galaxies, and their component stars, evolve. Messier 107 has undergone intensive observations, being one of the 160 stellar fields that was selected for the Pre-FLAMES Survey - a preliminary survey conducted between 1999 and 2002 using the 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile, to find suitable stars for follow-up observations with the VLT's spectroscopic instrument FLAMES [1]. Using FLAMES, it is possible to observe up to 130 targets at the same time, making it particularly well suited

  7. Populations of Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd Evans, T.

    2011-09-01

    Carbon stars in the Galaxy do not constitute a single family, but may be divided over several types with distinctive spectroscopic and photometric properties. A subtype of the N stars, characterised by high velocities and weak CN bands, may have been captured by the Milky Way from a cannibalised dwarf galaxy.

  8. Modeling rapidly rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieutord, M.

    2006-06-01

    We review the quest of modeling rapidly rotating stars during the past 40 years and detail the challenges to be taken up by models facing new data from interferometry, seismology, spectroscopy... We then present the progress of the ESTER project aimed at giving a physically self-consistent model for the structure and evolution of rapidly rotating stars.

  9. Science through ARts (STAR)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Marycay; Kolecki, Joseph C.; Miller, Allan; Petersen, Ruth; Terrell, Mike

    2005-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is a free, international, cross-curricular program thematically aligned with "The Vision for Space Exploration," a framework of goals and objectives published by NASA in February 2004. Through the STAR program, students in grades 5 through 12 are encouraged to apply their knowledge in creative ways as they approach a…

  10. Observing Double Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.; Fulton, B. J.; Bianco, Federica B.; Martinez, John; Baxter, John; Brewer, Mark; Carro, Joseph; Collins, Sarah; Estrada, Chris; Johnson, Jolyon; Salam, Akash; Wallen, Vera; Warren, Naomi; Smith, Thomas C.; Armstrong, James D.; McGaughey, Steve; Pye, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Church, Rebecca

    2012-05-01

    Double stars have been systematically observed since William Herschel initiated his program in 1779. In 1803 he reported that, to his surprise, many of the systems he had been observing for a quarter century were gravitationally bound binary stars. In 1830 the first binary orbital solution was obtained, leading eventually to the determination of stellar masses. Double star observations have been a prolific field, with observations and discoveries - often made by students and amateurs - routinely published in a number of specialized journals such as the Journal of Double Star Observations. All published double star observations from Herschel's to the present have been incorporated in the Washington Double Star Catalog. In addition to reviewing the history of visual double stars, we discuss four observational technologies and illustrate these with our own observational results from both California and Hawaii on telescopes ranging from small SCTs to the 2-meter Faulkes Telescope North on Haleakala. Two of these technologies are visual observations aimed primarily at published "hands-on" student science education, and CCD observations of both bright and very faint doubles. The other two are recent technologies that have launched a double star renaissance. These are lucky imaging and speckle interferometry, both of which can use electron-multiplying CCD cameras to allow short (30 ms or less) exposures that are read out at high speed with very low noise. Analysis of thousands of high speed exposures allows normal seeing limitations to be overcome so very close doubles can be accurately measured.

  11. Party with the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaine, Lloyd

    1997-01-01

    Describes a Star Party which involves comparing the different colors of the stars, demonstrating how astronomers measure the sky with degrees, determining the cardinal direction, discussing numerous stories that ancient civilizations gave to constellations, exercising science process skills, and using science instruments. (JRH)

  12. Science Through ARts (STAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolecki, Joseph; Petersen, Ruth; Williams, Lawrence

    2002-01-01

    Science Through ARts (STAR) is an educational initiative designed to teach students through a multidisciplinary approach to learning. This presentation describes the STAR pilot project, which will use Mars exploration as the topic to be integrated. Schools from the United Kingdom, Japan, the United States, and possibly eastern Europe are expected to participate in the pilot project.

  13. The Massive Star Population in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammer, Skyler H.

    five annuli, examine the effects that a metallicity gradient and variable SFH have on the predicted ratios, and compare to the observed values. We find that the radial behavior of our modeled blue to red supergiant ratios is highly sensitive to both spatial variations in the SFH and metallicity. Incorporating the derived SFH into the modeled ratios, we are able to reproduce the observed values at large radii (low metallicity), but at small radii (high metallicity) the modeled and observed ratios are discrepant. Though photometry has proven to be a powerful tool to identify candidate evolved massive stars and their effects on their host galaxy, spectroscopy is necessary to study the physical properties of individual stars. We observed moderate-resolution optical spectra for 56 of the brightest stars in the direction to M101 using the Multiple Mirror Telescope. We also created light curves for each target using multi-epoch U BV R images from the Large Binocular Telescope. We separate the spectroscopially confirmed members of M101 into four groups: hot supergiants, intermediate supergiants, emission-line stars, and LBVs. Several stars in each group are discussed in detail. Of the spectroscopically confirmed members, we find that eight meet our criterion for variability. We present light curves for the known LBV candidates, V2, V4, and V9, and introduce a new candidate: 9492 &barbelow;14 &barbelow;11998. Additionally, we identify 20 new variables in M101. Lacking spectra, we separated the variables, by their photometric properties, into three groups: hot, intermediate, and cool. We find two hot stars with V-band variability of +/-1 magnitude; we flag these stars as LBV candidates. Of the intermediate and cool variables, we identify several stars with low- to moderate-amplitude variability (0.1--0.5 magnitudes).

  14. 'Marginal' BY Draconis stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Bernard W.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 52 dK-dM stars, obtained at 640-665 nm (with spectral resolution 70-90 pm) using CCD detectors on the coude-feed telescope at KPNO since 1982, are reported. Data for four stars found to have diluted absorption or weak emission above continuum at H-alpha are presented in tables and spectra and discussed in detail. These objects (Gliese numbers 256, 425A, 900, and 907.1) are shown to be 'marginal' BY Dra stars, single objects of age 2.5-3 Gyr with activity and rotational velocity (3-5 km/s) between those of normal dM stars and those of true BY Dra stars. An explanation based on evolution from the BY Dra stage through marginal BY Dra to inactive dM is proposed.

  15. Abundances in Sagittarius Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Zaggia, S.; Sbordone, L.; Santin, P.; Monaco, L.; Monai, S.; Molaro, P.; Marconi, G.; Girardi, L.; Ferraro, F.; di Marcantonio, P.; Caffau, E.; Bellazzini, M.

    The Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal is a very complex galaxy, which has undergone prolonged star formation. From the very first high resolution chemical analysis of Sgr stars, conducted using spectra obtained during the commissioning of UVES at VLT, it was clear that the star had undergone a high level of chemical processing, at variance with most of the other Local Group dwarf spheroidals. Thanks to FLAMES at VLT we now have accurate metallicities and abundances of alpha-chain elements for about 150 stars, which provide the first reliable metallicity distribution for this galaxy. Besides the already known high metallicity tail the existence of a metal-poor population has also been highlighted, although an assessment of the fraction of Sgr stars which belong to this population requires a larger sample. From our data it is also obvious that Sagittarius is a nucleated galaxy and that the centre of the nucleus coincides with M54, as already shown by Monaco et al.

  16. Does Planet Formation Influence Whether Binary Stars Are Identical or Fraternal “Twins”?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teske, Johanna

    2015-12-01

    Disentangling how an individual star’s atmospheric composition is affected by the chemistry and transport of disk material, the formation of planets, and its broader position in/motion through the Galaxy during its evolution is difficult. While initially suggested as a sign of accretion of H-depleted material onto the star, the giant planet-metallicity correlation is now established as a mostly primordial effect -- stellar composition affects planet formation. But is it still possible that planet formation may also alter host star composition? Previous studies hinted at a few cases of compositional differences between stars in binary systems, and now high-precision abundance analyses are exploring this possibility in systems known to host planets. I will discuss the important role binary host stars have to play in extending correlations between stellar composition and the presence/type of planets that form, including brand new (not yet published!) results.

  17. Jet Feedback on the Hosts of Radio Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, L.; Ogle, P. M.; Alatalo, K.; Appleton, P. N.

    2016-06-01

    Feedback due to active galactic nuclei is one of the key components of the current paradigm of galaxy evolution; however our understanding of the process remains incomplete. Radio galaxies with strong rotational H_2 emission provide an interesting window into the effect of radio jet feedback on their host galaxies, since the large masses of warm (>100 K) H_2 cannot solely be heated by star formation, instead requiring jet-driven ISM turbulence to power the molecular emission. I will discuss the insights multiwavelength (X-ray to submm) observations of 22 H_2 luminous radio galaxies yield on the process of jet feedback in these galaxies and the impact on star formation activity. Specifically, I find that the diffuse X-ray and warm H_2 emission are consistent with both being powered by dissipation of the jet's mechanical energy into the interstellar medium (ISM) and that the resulting turbulence injected into the ISM by this process results in the suppression of star formation activity by a factor of 3--6. The hosts of these galaxies show a wide range of star formation activity and optical and IR colors, indicating a diversity of evolutionary states in which this process may be active.

  18. Distributions of Quasar Hosts on the Galaxy Main Sequence Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhoujian; Shi, Yong; Rieke, George H.; Xia, Xiaoyang; Wang, Yikang; Sun, Bingqing; Wan, Linfeng

    2016-03-01

    The relation between star formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses, i.e., the galaxy main sequence, is a useful diagnostic of galaxy evolution. We present the distributions relative to the main sequence of 55 optically selected PG and 12 near-IR-selected Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) quasars at z ≤ 0.5. We estimate the quasar host stellar masses from Hubble Space Telescope or ground-based AO photometry, and the SFRs through the mid-infrared aromatic features and far-IR photometry. We find that PG quasar hosts more or less follow the main sequence defined by normal star-forming galaxies while 2MASS quasar hosts lie systematically above the main sequence. PG and 2MASS quasars with higher nuclear luminosities seem to have higher specific SFRs (sSFRs), although there is a large scatter. No trends are seen between sSFRs and SMBH masses, Eddington ratios, or even morphology types (ellipticals, spirals, and mergers). Our results could be placed in an evolutionary scenario with quasars emerging during the transition from ULIRGs/mergers to ellipticals. However, combined with results at higher redshift, they suggest that quasars can be widely triggered in normal galaxies as long as they contain abundant gas and have ongoing star formation.

  19. On the thick-disc exoplanet host subgiant HD 155358

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Klaus; Bernkopf, Jan

    2008-03-01

    The nearby subgiant HD 155358 has very recently been announced by Cochran et al. to harbour two Jovian-mass planetary companions and to be the lowest metallicity exoplanet host star yet found. Here, we present a model atmosphere analysis and stellar evolutionary tracks for HD 155358, and demonstrate that it is actually a member of the ancient thick-disc population of the Milky Way (τ >= 12 Gyr). As such, HD 155358 is considerably rich in its α-chain nuclei, and hence only about a factor of 2 below the solar abundance in terms of these species. Yet, as a precursor to the thin disc and residing on the metal-poor end of the thin-disc metal abundance distribution, HD 155358 gives way to the principal possibility that any star of the thin-disc population of the Galaxy can be a potential exoplanet host. As opposed to this, the formation of planets and even planetary systems for HD 155358 and HD 37124 (another previously known thick-disc exoplanet host) is mentionable, as there is strong evidence for a vigorous starburst phase in the early Milky Way, and secondly, the direct census of an unbiased nearby thick-disc sample implies a minimum fraction of no less than 30 per cent multiple star systems (N >= 3) to originate from that epoch.

  20. Modeling abundances in star forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are produced from various types of supernovae (and AGB stars). I first show that elemental abundances of extremely metal-poor stars are consistent not with pair-instability supernovae but with faint supernovae. Then I introduce subclasses of Type Ia supernovae such as SN 2002cx-like objects and sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosions. These "minor" supernovae are important in the early Universe or metal-poor systems such as dwarf spheroidal galaxies. With "major" chemical enrichment sources, I show cosmic chemical enrichment in our cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations. The feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is also included with a new model for the formation of black holes motivated by the first star formation. AGN-driven outflows transport metals into the circumgalactic medium and the intergalactic medium. Nonetheless, the metallicity changes of galaxies are negligible, and the mass-metallicity relations, which are mainly generated by supernova feedback at the first star burst, are preserved. Within galaxies, metallicity radial gradients are produced, which can be affected by AGN feedback but are more sensitive to the merging histories. We find a weak correlation between the gradients and galaxy mass, which is consistent with available observations. These simulations also provide predictions of supernova/hypernova/GRB rates and the properties of their host galaxies.

  1. Does radiative feedback by the first stars promote or prevent second generation star formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Shapiro, Paul R.

    2007-03-01

    We study the effect of starlight from the first stars on the ability of other minihaloes in their neighbourhood to form additional stars. The first stars in the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) universe are believed to have formed in minihaloes of total mass ~105-6 Msolar at redshifts z >~ 20, when molecular hydrogen (H2) formed and cooled the dense gas at their centres, leading to gravitational collapse. Simulations suggest that the Population III (Pop III) stars thus formed were massive (~100 Msolar) and luminous enough in ionizing radiation to cause an ionization front (I-front) to sweep outward, through their host minihalo and beyond, into the intergalactic medium. Our previous work suggested that this I-front was trapped when it encountered other, nearby minihaloes, and that it failed to penetrate the dense gas at their centres within the lifetime of the Pop III stars (<~3 Myr). The question of what the dynamical consequences were for these target minihaloes, of their exposure to the ionizing and dissociating starlight from the Pop III star requires further study, however. Towards this end, we have performed a series of detailed, one-dimensional (1D), radiation-hydrodynamical simulations to answer the question of whether star formation in these surrounding minihaloes was triggered or suppressed by radiation from the first stars. We have varied the distance to the source (and, hence, the flux) and the mass and evolutionary stage of the target haloes to quantify this effect. We find (1) trapping of the I-front and its transformation from R-type to D-type, preceded by a shock front; (2) photoevaporation of the ionized gas (i.e. all gas originally located outside the trapping radius); (3) formation of an H2 precursor shell which leads the I-front, stimulated by partial photoionization; and (4) the shock-induced formation of H2 in the minihalo neutral core when the shock speeds up and partially ionizes the gas. The fate of the neutral core is mostly determined by the

  2. Comparing mechanisms of host manipulation across host and parasite taxa.

    PubMed

    Lafferty, Kevin D; Shaw, Jenny C

    2013-01-01

    Parasites affect host behavior in several ways. They can alter activity, microhabitats or both. For trophically transmitted parasites (the focus of our study), decreased activity might impair the ability of hosts to respond to final-host predators, and increased activity and altered microhabitat choice might increase contact rates between hosts and final-host predators. In an analysis of trophically transmitted parasites, more parasite groups altered activity than altered microhabitat choice. Parasites that infected vertebrates were more likely to impair the host's reaction to predators, whereas parasites that infected invertebrates were more likely to increase the host's contact with predators. The site of infection might affect how parasites manipulate their hosts. For instance, parasites in the central nervous system seem particularly suited to manipulating host behavior. Manipulative parasites commonly occupy the body cavity, muscles and central nervous systems of their hosts. Acanthocephalans in the data set differed from other taxa in that they occurred exclusively in the body cavity of invertebrates. In addition, they were more likely to alter microhabitat choice than activity. Parasites in the body cavity (across parasite types) were more likely to be associated with increased host contact with predators. Parasites can manipulate the host through energetic drain, but most parasites use more sophisticated means. For instance, parasites target four physiological systems that shape behavior in both invertebrates and vertebrates: neural, endocrine, neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory. The interconnections between these systems make it difficult to isolate specific mechanisms of host behavioral manipulation.

  3. Intermediate-Mass Star-Forming Regions: What are the Most Massive Stars Formed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobulnicky, Chip; Vargas, Carlos; Kerton, Charles; Arvidsson, Kim

    2010-08-01

    High-mass star formation cannot be viewed as simply a scaled-up version of the paradigm for low-mass star formation. The high-mass regime (M> 10 Msun) appears to require significant differences in cloud fragmentation, accretion, radiation, turbulence, and overall molecular density compared to the low-mass regime. We have identified a sample of intermediate-mass star-forming regions (IM SFRs) hosting embedded clusters that straddle the boundary of these two regimes and can be used to understand the factors that govern the transition between these extremes. Most notable among these factors is the possibility of a critical cloud mass column density that appears to divide high-mass SFRs from IM SFRs. Yet, the very nature of IM SFRs and their stellar content are almost completely unknown, primarily because of the previous difficulty in identifying such objects. We propose HK band spectroscopy of the brightest stellar sources near nine IM SFRs to identify probable members, confirm the IM nature of the most massive stars, and characterize their evolutionary state. Three nights with FLAMINGOS on the 4 m (or equivalent IR spectrograph) will suffice to obtain classification spectra and several spectral diagnostics sensitive to accretion for at least 8-10 stars per object.

  4. XUV-driven mass loss from extrasolar giant planets orbiting active stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadney, J. M.; Galand, M.; Unruh, Y. C.; Koskinen, T. T.; Sanz-Forcada, J.

    2015-04-01

    Upper atmospheres of Hot Jupiters are subject to extreme radiation conditions that can result in rapid atmospheric escape. The composition and structure of the upper atmospheres of these planets are affected by the high-energy spectrum of the host star. This emission depends on stellar type and age, which are thus important factors in understanding the behaviour of exoplanetary atmospheres. In this study, we focus on Extrasolar Giant Planets (EPGs) orbiting K and M dwarf stars. XUV spectra for three different stars - ɛ Eridani, AD Leonis and AU Microscopii - are constructed using a coronal model. Neutral density and temperature profiles in the upper atmosphere of hypothetical EGPs orbiting these stars are then obtained from a fluid model, incorporating atmospheric chemistry and taking atmospheric escape into account. We find that a simple scaling based solely on the host star's X-ray emission gives large errors in mass loss rates from planetary atmospheres and so we have derived a new method to scale the EUV regions of the solar spectrum based upon stellar X-ray emission. This new method produces an outcome in terms of the planet's neutral upper atmosphere very similar to that obtained using a detailed coronal model of the host star. Our results indicate that in planets subjected to radiation from active stars, the transition from Jeans escape to a regime of hydrodynamic escape at the top of the atmosphere occurs at larger orbital distances than for planets around low activity stars (such as the Sun).

  5. INTERNAL GRAVITY WAVES MODULATE THE APPARENT MISALIGNMENT OF EXOPLANETS AROUND HOT STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T. M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Lau, H. H. B. E-mail: lin@ucolick.org

    2012-10-10

    We propose that the observed misalignment between extrasolar planets and their hot host stars can be explained by angular momentum transport within the host star. Observations have shown that this misalignment is preferentially around hot stars, which have convective cores and extended radiative envelopes. This situation is amenable to substantial angular momentum transport by internal gravity waves (IGW) generated at the convective-radiative interface. Here, we present numerical simulations of this process and show that IGW can modulate the surface rotation of the star. With these two-dimensional simulations, we show that IGW could explain the retrograde orbits observed in systems such as HAT-P-6 and HAT-P-7. However, extension to high-obliquity objects will await future three-dimensional simulations. We note that these results also imply that individual massive stars should show temporal variations in their v sin i measurements.

  6. Comet 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Spectrometer Graph

    This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from this type of comet disruption. The findings suggest that a host of other comet survivors may still orbit in this long-dead solar system.

    The white dwarf G29-38 began life as a star that was about three times as massive as our sun. Its death involved the same steps that the sun will ultimately undergo billions of years from now. According to theory, the G29-38 star became brighter and brighter as it aged, until it bloated up into a dying star called a red giant. This red giant was large enough to engulf and evaporate any terrestrial planets like Earth that happened to be in its way. Later, the red giant shed its outer atmosphere, leaving behind a shrunken skeleton of star, called a white dwarf. If the star did host a planetary system, outer planets akin to Jupiter and Neptune and a remote ring of icy comets would remain.

    The Spitzer observations provide observational evidence for this orbiting outpost of comet survivors. Astronomers speculate that one such comet was knocked into the inner regions of G29-38, possibly by an outer planet. As the comet approached very close to the white dwarf, it may have been torn apart by the star's tidal forces. Eventually, all that would be left of the comet is a disk of dust.

    This illustration shows a comet in the process of being pulverized: part of it still exists as a chain of small clumps, while the rest has already spread out into a dusty disk. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke apart in a similar fashion when it plunged into Jupiter in 1994. Evidence for Comets Found in Dead Star's Dust The graph of data, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates that a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29

  7. Catch a Star!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-11-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education are launching today the 2007 edition of 'Catch a Star!', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its fifth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. Students are invited to 'become astronomers' and embark on a journey to explore the Universe. ESO PR Photo 42/06 The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star!' also includes an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. "'Catch a Star!' offers a unique opportunity for students to learn more about astronomy and about the methods scientists use to discover new things about the Universe", said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. In teams, students choose an astronomical topic to study and produce an in-depth report. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes or a telescope of the future can contribute to their investigations of the subject. As well as the top prize - a trip to one of ESO's observatory sites in Chile - visits to observatories in Germany, Austria and Spain, and many other prizes are also available to be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners chosen with the help of a public online vote. The first editions of 'Catch a Star!' have attracted several hundred entries from more than 25 countries worldwide. Previous winning entries have included "Star clusters and the structure of the Milky Way" (Budapest, Hungary), "Vega" (Acqui Terme, Italy) and "Venus

  8. Lithium Abundance in Planet Search Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myles, Justin; Yale Exoplanets

    2016-01-01

    Since most lithium in the universe is primordial and is destroyed in stars, lithium abundance can be used as a stellar age indicator. Some research seems to show that planet formation may also affect lithium abundance in exoplanet host stars (EHS). However, small and heterogenous samples have made both of these phenomena unclear. Further study of lithium abundance in EHS is needed to better understand possible physical roles of lithium in planet formation theory. We use a large homogenous sample with accurate stellar parameters on which we will use equivalent width analysis to determine precise lithium abundances. From these abundance values we determine an age vs. abundance relation. Additionally, we aim to explore correlation between lithium abundance and planet formation.

  9. QUART: Quasar hosts Unveiled by high Angular Resolution Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayner, Andrey; Wright, Shelley; Murray, Norman W.; Armus, Lee; Larkin, James E.

    2016-06-01

    We present results from the new QUART survey that aims to resolve high-redshift (z = 1.5 - 2.5) radio-quiet and radio-loud quasi stellar object (QSO) host galaxies using the integral field spectrograph (IFS) OSIRIS, and the Keck Adaptive Optics (AO) system. The combination of AO and IFS provides the necessary contrast to disentangle the bright-unresolved QSO from the underlying faint host galaxy with unprecedented sensitivity. We study the ionized gas in these systems to sub-kiloparsec scales, yielding essential constraints on the resolved host galaxies dynamics, morphologies, star formation rates, metallicities, and nebular emission diagnostics. We combine OSIRIS and AO observations with multi-wavelength data sets from Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Very Large Array to better understand the multiple phases of the ISM and stellar population properties of the hosts. Radio-quiet QSOs have shown little-to-no star formation and no evidence of extended QSO narrow line emission. In contrast, our latest OSIRIS results of radio-loud z~1.5-2 quasars have revealed evidence for both concurrent star formation and extended quasar narrow line emission with strong outflows. These outflows are co-spatial with structure observed in the radio data, typically with the path of the quasar jet and/or lobe structure. These winds are highly extended (8-12 kpc) and show broad emission line profiles (extending up to 2,500 km/s), indicating strong evidence of quasar “feedback” in their host galaxies.

  10. Hosting a Katrina Evacuee.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoagland, David

    2008-03-01

    No individual or institution anticipated the impact on the academic research community of hurricane Katrina. When Tulane physicist Wayne Reed asked me to host his research group just a day or two after the disaster, with no authorization or understanding of the commitment, I agreed immediately and then pondered implications. Fortunately, colleagues helped in making the commitment real, only the bureaucracy of my public university posing small hindrances. Industry was remarkably generous in providing Reed with significant ``loaner'' equipment, and amazingly, a suite of custom Reed experiments was running within weeks. At the end, the most productive collaborations for Reed seemed not to have been with my group, with its similar research, but to other groups at my institution, particularly the synthetic chemists, who gained access to methods previously unique to Tulane while offering samples previously unique to UMass. Quickly designed projects exploiting this match turned out remarkably productive. Although begun with trepidation, hosting of Reed had huge positive benefits to me and UMass, and I believe, also to Reed and Tulane. Some key lessons for the future: (i) industry has capacity and willingness to help academic research during disruption (ii) commitment of a host institution must be immediate, without a wait for formal approvals or arrangement of special funding -- delay leads only to discouragement, (iii) continuing academic progress of displaced students must come first, and (iv) intellectual synergy rather than overlap should be the basis for seeking a host. Lastly, NSF or other funding agency should consider a program directly addressing the research needs of unexpectedly disrupted academic scientists, and most particularly, graduate students who face greatly extended studies.

  11. Determining the Ages of Nearby A-Stars with Long-Baseline Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jeremy; White, R. J.; Boyajian, T.; Schaefer, G.; Baines, E.; Ireland, M.; Patience, J.; Aff001

    2016-01-01

    We determine the age of 7 stars in the Ursa Major moving group using a novel method that models the fundamental parameters of rapidly rotating A-stars based on interferometric observations and literature photometry and compares these parameters (namely, radius, luminosity, and rotation velocity) with evolution models that account for rotation. We find these stars to be coeval, thus providing an age estimate for the moving group and validating this technique. With this technique validated, we determine the age of the rapidly rotating, directly imaged planet host star, κ Andromedae.

  12. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  13. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing. PMID:23390743

  14. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere.

  15. A rocky planet transiting a nearby low-mass star.

    PubMed

    Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Irwin, Jonathan; Charbonneau, David; Newton, Elisabeth R; Dittmann, Jason A; Astudillo-Defru, Nicola; Bonfils, Xavier; Gillon, Michaël; Jehin, Emmanuël; Stark, Antony A; Stalder, Brian; Bouchy, Francois; Delfosse, Xavier; Forveille, Thierry; Lovis, Christophe; Mayor, Michel; Neves, Vasco; Pepe, Francesco; Santos, Nuno C; Udry, Stéphane; Wünsche, Anaël

    2015-11-12

    M-dwarf stars--hydrogen-burning stars that are smaller than 60 per cent of the size of the Sun--are the most common class of star in our Galaxy and outnumber Sun-like stars by a ratio of 12:1. Recent results have shown that M dwarfs host Earth-sized planets in great numbers: the average number of M-dwarf planets that are between 0.5 to 1.5 times the size of Earth is at least 1.4 per star. The nearest such planets known to transit their star are 39 parsecs away, too distant for detailed follow-up observations to measure the planetary masses or to study their atmospheres. Here we report observations of GJ 1132b, a planet with a size of 1.2 Earth radii that is transiting a small star 12 parsecs away. Our Doppler mass measurement of GJ 1132b yields a density consistent with an Earth-like bulk composition, similar to the compositions of the six known exoplanets with masses less than six times that of the Earth and precisely measured densities. Receiving 19 times more stellar radiation than the Earth, the planet is too hot to be habitable but is cool enough to support a substantial atmosphere, one that has probably been considerably depleted of hydrogen. Because the host star is nearby and only 21 per cent the radius of the Sun, existing and upcoming telescopes will be able to observe the composition and dynamics of the planetary atmosphere. PMID:26560298

  16. Pseudosynchronization of Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Mara; Thompson, Susan E.; Hambleton, Kelly; Fuller, Jim; Shporer, Avi; Isaacson, Howard T.; Howard, Andrew; Kurtz, Donald

    2016-01-01

    A type of eccentric binary star that undergoes extreme dynamic tidal forces, known as Heartbeat stars, were discovered by the Kepler Mission. As the two stars pass through periastron, the tidal distortion causes unique brightness variations. Short period, eccentric binary stars, like these, are theorized to pseudosynchronize, or reach a rotational frequency that matches the weighted average orbital angular velocity of the system. This pseudosynchronous rate, as predicted by Hut (1981), depends on the binary's orbital period and eccentricity. We tested whether sixteen heartbeat stars have pseudosynchronized. We measure the rotation rate from obvious spot signatures in the light curve. We measure the eccentricity by fitting the light curve using PHOEBE and are actively carrying out a radial velocity monitoring program with Keck/HIRES in order to improve these orbital parameters. Our initial results show that while most heartbeat stars appear to have pseudosynchronized we find stars with rotation frequencies both longer and shorter than this rate. We thank the SETI Institute REU program, the NSF, and the Kepler Guest Observer Program for making this work possible.

  17. Dense Axion Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Abhishek; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2016-03-01

    If the dark matter consists of axions, gravity can cause them to coalesce into axion stars, which are stable gravitationally bound Bose-Einstein condensates of axions. In the previously known axion stars, gravity and the attractive force between pairs of axions are balanced by the kinetic pressure. If the axion mass energy is mc2 =10-4 eV, these dilute axion stars have a maximum mass of about 10-14M⊙ . We point out that there are also dense axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field pressure of the axion condensate. We study axion stars using the leading term in a systematically improvable approximation to the effective potential of the nonrelativistic effective field theory for axions. Using the Thomas-Fermi approximation in which the kinetic pressure is neglected, we find a sequence of new branches of axion stars in which gravity is balanced by the mean-field interaction energy of the axion condensate. If mc2 =10-4 4 eV, the first branch of these dense axion stars has mass ranging from about 10-11M⊙ toabout M⊙.

  18. STAR-FORMING GALAXY EVOLUTION IN NEARBY RICH CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, K. D.; Rieke, G. H.; Bai, L.

    2013-08-20

    Dense environments are known to quench star formation in galaxies, but it is still unknown what mechanism(s) are directly responsible. In this paper, we study the star formation of galaxies in A2029 and compare it to that of Coma, combining indicators at 24 {mu}m, H{alpha}, and UV down to rates of 0.03 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We show that A2029's star-forming galaxies follow the same mass-SFR relation as the field. The Coma cluster, on the other hand, has a population of galaxies with star formation rates (SFRs) significantly lower than the field mass-SFR relation, indicative of galaxies in the process of being quenched. Over half of these galaxies also host active galactic nuclei. Ram-pressure stripping and starvation/strangulation are the most likely mechanisms for suppressing the star formation in these galaxies, but we are unable to disentangle which is dominating. The differences we see between the two clusters' populations of star-forming galaxies may be related to their accretion histories, with A2029 having accreted its star-forming galaxies more recently than Coma. Additionally, many early-type galaxies in A2029 are detected at 24 {mu}m and/or in the far-UV, but this emission is not directly related to star formation. Similar galaxies have probably been classified as star forming in previous studies of dense clusters, possibly obscuring some of the effects of the cluster environment on true star-forming galaxies.

  19. An Exo-Venus Around a Cool, Nearby Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelo, Isabel; Rowe, Jason F.; Howell, Steve B.

    2015-11-01

    We present the discovery and planetary confirmation of KOI-3138, a likely Earth-sized (1.08 Earth radii ) planet in a 9-day orbit around a nearby M Dwarf star. A planet transit was detected around KOI-3138 with the Kepler spacecraft and confirmed via false positive analysis using data from the UK Infrared telescope, Digital Sky Survey, and DSSI Speckle imaging. The planet’s short orbital period places it close to its host star, making it an interesting Venus analog around a cool star.It remains possible, although unlikely, that KOI-3138.01 instead orbits a bound, undetected binary companion to KOI-3138. Under these conditions, the planet becomes a mini-Neptune-sized planet orbiting a brown dwarf with a mass of ~0.05 solar mass. Follow-up radial velocity measurements on the host star are required in order to accurately assess the likelihood of this possibility. Specifically, detection of a significant radial velocity ( ~725 m/s) upon observation of KOI-3138 will indicate the presence of a bound companion that was not detected by our false positive analysis procedures. Such a companion, if detected, cannot be ruled out as the host star around which KOI-3138.01 orbits.KOI-3138.01 is too small to induce a detectable “wobble" in its host star. We therefore make no conclusions about mass or composition. However, there is reasonable incentive to determine these properties in the hopes of understanding the nature of habitable zones around M-type stars. Kepler-186f, a previously discovered Earth-like exoplanet, is similar in size to KOI-3138.01 and orbits the outer reaches of its star’s conservative habitable zone. KOI-3138.01, also Earth-sized, orbits a similar star but resides much closer in. The two planets together span the range of distances within the habitable zones of M Dwarfs. Determining the composition and atmosphere of KOI-3138.01 is therefore useful in understanding the nature of habitable zone boundaries of such star types. This task may in fact be

  20. Evaluation of DEET and eight essential oils for repellency against nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight commercially available essential oils (oregano, clove, thyme, vetiver, sandalwood, cinnamon, cedarwood, and peppermint) were evaluated for repellency against host-seeking nymphs of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Concentration- repellency response was established using the vertical ...

  1. Galaxy Zoo: Evidence for rapid, recent quenching within a population of AGN host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smethurst, R. J.; Lintott, C. J.; Simmons, B. D.; Schawinski, K.; Bamford, S. P.; Cardamone, C. N.; Kruk, S. J.; Masters, K. L.; Urry, C. M.; Willett, K. W.; Wong, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    We present a population study of the star formation history of 1244 Type 2 AGN host galaxies, compared to 6107 inactive galaxies. A Bayesian method is used to determine individual galaxy star formation histories, which are then collated to visualise the distribution for quenching and quenched galaxies within each population. We find evidence for some of the Type 2 AGN host galaxies having undergone a rapid drop in their star formation rate within the last 2 Gyr. AGN feedback is therefore important at least for this population of galaxies. This result is not seen for the quenching and quenched inactive galaxies whose star formation histories are dominated by the effects of downsizing at earlier epochs, a secondary effect for the AGN host galaxies. We show that histories of rapid quenching cannot account fully for the quenching of all the star formation in a galaxy's lifetime across the population of quenched AGN host galaxies, and that histories of slower quenching, attributed to secular (non-violent) evolution, are also key in their evolution. This is in agreement with recent results showing both merger-driven and non-merger processes are contributing to the co-evolution of galaxies and supermassive black holes. The availability of gas in the reservoirs of a galaxy, and its ability to be replenished, appear to be the key drivers behind this co-evolution.

  2. Luminosity Distribution of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies at Redshift = 1 in Cosmological Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niino, Y.; Choi, J.-H.; Kobayashi, M. A. R.; Nagamine, K.; Totani, T.; Zhang, B.

    2010-10-01

    Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the brightest astronomical transient events which provide us clues to study high redshift universe. It is broadly accepted that at least some of the long GRBs originate from dying massive stars. Therefore GRBs can be used as a tracer of star formation which is detectable to very high redshift (z>~10). However, studies using stellar evolution models suggest that GRBs do not simply trace star formation, but preferentially occur in low-metallicity environment. The observational evidence is still controversial. We need to understand the low-metallicity preference of long GRBs before using them as a probe to the high redshift universe. To study the low-metallicity preference, we construct first numerical model of GRB host galaxies that can quantitatively reproduce luminosity distribution of GRB host galaxies. Using cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations, we compute the UV luminosity distribution of GRB host galaxies for two different cases: (i) GRBs simply trace star formation, and (ii) GRBs preferentially occur in low-metallicity environment. We compare the simulation with observations, and discuss the low-metallicity preference of GRBs. Our model reproduce the observed luminosity probability distribution function of GRB host galaxies when we assume that GRBs originate from stars with metallicities Z<~0.1 Zsolar, supporting the suggestion from the theoretical studies.

  3. The SUNBIRD survey: characterizing the super star cluster populations of intensely star-forming galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randriamanakoto, Zara; Vaisanen, Petri; Escala, Andres

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates properties of young, massive and dense star clusters in a sample of 42 nearby starbursts and LIRGs with an average distance of 80 Mpc. The targets form the sample of the SUperNovae and starBursts in the InfraReD (SUNBIRD) survey that were imaged using near-infrared K-band adaptive optics mounted on the Gemini/NIRI and the VLT/NaCo instruments.We fitted power-laws to the SSC K-band luminosity functions and found index values ranging between 1.5 and 2.4 with a median value of α ˜ 1.86±0.24. This is shallower than the average of ≈ 2.4 associated with normal spiral galaxies indicating that SSCs hosted by star-forming galaxies are disrupted in a way depending on their mass or environment. Using simulations we found that blending effects are not significant for targets closer than ≈100Mpc. We also established the first ever near-infrared (NIR) brightest star cluster magnitude - star formation rate (SFR) relation. The correlation has a steeper slope compared to the one with optical data at lower SFRs which could indicate a simple statistical effect, though we argue that a physical truncation of the mass distribution at high masses would better explain the tight scatter of the observed relation.Finally, we combined new NIR imaging of seven LIRG targets with their optical HST archival data to derive the age, mass, and extinction distributions of optically-selected SSC candidates. Apart from having a high mass range of 10^4 - 10^8 M⊙, more than a quarter of the cluster population is younger than 30 Myr. We also derived the cluster initial mass functions and found that at least in one of the LIRGs, a mass-dependent disruption mechanism is responsible for the deficiency in low-mass star clusters. The cluster formation efficiencies Γ = 10 - 23 %, on the other hand, support the arguments that highly-pressurized environments favor SF in bound star clusters.This work has shown the importance of studying SSC host galaxies with high SFR levels to

  4. STARs in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Ehrmann, Ingrid; Fort, Philippe; Elliott, David J

    2016-08-15

    STAR (signal transduction and activation of RNA) proteins regulate splicing of target genes that have roles in neural connectivity, survival and myelination in the vertebrate nervous system. These regulated splicing targets include mRNAs such as the Neurexins (Nrxn), SMN2 (survival of motor neuron) and MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein). Recent work has made it possible to identify and validate STAR protein splicing targets in vivo by using genetically modified mouse models. In this review, we will discuss the importance of STAR protein splicing targets in the CNS (central nervous system). PMID:27528753

  5. Strange nonchaotic stars.

    PubMed

    Lindner, John F; Kohar, Vivek; Kia, Behnam; Hippke, Michael; Learned, John G; Ditto, William L

    2015-02-01

    The unprecedented light curves of the Kepler space telescope document how the brightness of some stars pulsates at primary and secondary frequencies whose ratios are near the golden mean, the most irrational number. A nonlinear dynamical system driven by an irrational ratio of frequencies generically exhibits a strange but nonchaotic attractor. For Kepler's "golden" stars, we present evidence of the first observation of strange nonchaotic dynamics in nature outside the laboratory. This discovery could aid the classification and detailed modeling of variable stars. PMID:25699444

  6. Mariner 9 star photography.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    Mariner 9 achieved successful photography of the stars, the purpose of the experiment being to measure camera parameters associated with point source photometry, and to examine the feasibility of using stars as invariant calibration sources and a reference for optical navigation. The Mariner 9 camera-B photography demonstrated photometric response consistency over a limited sample of data to better than 15%. Camera performance verified the ability to model vidicon response characteristics as well as demonstrated an imaging capability sufficient to permit the use of stars for photometric calibration.

  7. The statistical investigation of supernovae and their host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Artur A.

    2009-04-01

    Chapters 1-2: We aimed to obtain new, refined, supernova (SN) rates from a set of five SN surveys, by making use of a joint analysis of near-infrared data. We described the properties of the 3838 galaxies that were monitored for SNe events, including newly determined morphologies and their DENIS and POSS-II/UKST I, 2MASS and DENIS J and Ks and 2MASS H magnitudes. The computation of SN rate was based on the control time method, which allowed the proper merging of the observations of each galaxy in the various searches. We computed the rate of SNe of different types along the Hubble sequence normalized to U, B, R, I, J, H, and Ks luminosities and to the stellar mass of galaxies. We find that the rates of all SN types show a dependence on both morphology and colors of the galaxies, and therefore, on the star-formation activity. The rate of core-collapse (CC) SNe is confirmed to be closely related to the Star Formation Rate and only indirectly to the total mass of the galaxies. The rate of SNe Ia can be explained by assuming that at least 15% of Ia events in spiral galaxies originates in relatively young stellar populations. We found that the rates show no modulation with nuclear activity or environment. The ratio of SN rates between types Ib/c and II showed no trend with spiral type. Chapter 3: It is widely accepted that the progenitors of CC SNe are young massive stars and therefore their host galaxies are mostly spiral or irregular galaxies dominated by a young stellar population. Surprisingly, among morphologically classified hosts of CC SNe, we found 22 cases where the host has been classified as an elliptical or S0 galaxy. To clarify this apparent contradiction, we carry out a detailed morphological study and an extensive literature search for additional information on the sample objects. The results confirm the presence of a limited, but significant, number of CC SNe in galaxies generally classified as early-type. In all cases, anyway, there are independent

  8. "Retired" Planet Hosts: Not So Massive, Maybe Just Portly After Lunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, James P.

    2011-10-01

    Studies of the planet abundance as a function of stellar mass have suggested a strong increase in the frequency of planet occurrence around stars more massive than 1.5 M sun, and that such stars are deficit in short-period planets. These planet searches have relied on giant stars for a sample of high mass stars, which are hostile to precision Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity while on the main sequence. This Letter considers the observed vsin i and observationally inferred mass for exoplanet hosting giants with the vsin i of distribution of field stars, which show discrepancies that can be explained by erroneous mass determinations of some exoplanet host stars. By comparison with an expected mass distribution constructed from integrating isochrones, it is shown that the exoplanet hosts are inconsistent with a population of massive stars. These stars are more likely to have originated from a main-sequence population of late F/early G dwarfs with mass 1.0-1.2 M sun, only slightly more massive than the typical FGK dwarfs with Doppler detected planets. The deficit of short-period planets is most likely explained by tidal capture. The planet abundance difference requires either a steeper increase in planet frequency with mass than previously thought or a high rate of false positives due to signals of stellar origin. The measurement of photospheric carbon isotope ratios is suggested as a method to discriminate whether this sample of giant stars is significantly more massive than the population of FGK dwarfs with Doppler detected planets.

  9. On the conversion of neutron stars into quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagliara, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    The possible existence of two families of compact stars, neutron stars and quark stars, naturally leads to a scenario in which a conversion process between the two stellar objects occurs with a consequent release of energy of the order of 1053 erg. We discuss recent hydrodynamical simulations of the burning process and neutrino diffusion simulations of cooling of a newly formed strange star. We also briefly discuss this scenario in connection with recent measurements of masses and radii of compact stars.

  10. Obscured Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, J. T.

    most luminous stars, because of the differences in dust formation radius and (possibly) outflow velocities. OH masers yield outflow velocities, but they have been severely underestimated for sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud. I show our SiO and H2O maser detections (also: van Loon et al. 1996, 1998b) in some of these sources, and argue that there is no evidence for metallicity dependence of the outflow velocities. The available data are consistent with equal mass-loss rates irrespective of metallicity, with the dust-to-gas ratio directly proportional to metallicity. I then place the (obscured) AGB stars in the context of the hosting galaxies. Stellar evolution, mass loss, and metallicity differences all affect the period-luminosity diagram of LPVs, and I discuss the implications for their use as distance indicators. I discuss the use of obscured AGB stars as tracers of the star formation history, metallicity, and kinematics throughout the host galaxy. Finally I address the impact of AGB mass loss on the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

  11. CNO behaviour in planet-harbouring stars. I. Nitrogen abundances in stars with planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Andrés, L.; Israelian, G.; González Hernández, J. I.; Adibekyan, V. Zh.; Delgado Mena, E.; Santos, N. C.; Sousa, S. G.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen (CNO) are key elements in stellar formation and evolution, and their abundances should also have a significant impact on planetary formation and evolution. Aims: We present a detailed spectroscopic analysis of 74 solar-type stars, 42 of which are known to harbour planets. We determine the nitrogen abundances of these stars and investigate a possible connection between N and the presence of planetary companions. Methods: We used VLT/UVES to obtain high-resolution near-UV spectra of our targets. Spectral synthesis of the NH band at 3360 Å was performed with the spectral synthesis codes MOOG and FITTING. Results: We identify several spectral windows from which accurate N abundance can be obtained. Nitrogen distributions for stars with and without planets show that planet hosts are nitrogen-rich when compared to single stars. However, given the linear trend between [N/Fe] vs. [Fe/H], this fact can be explained as being due to the metal-rich nature of planet hosts. Conclusions: We conclude that reliable N abundances can be derived for metal-rich solar type stars from the near UV molecular band at 3360 Å. We confirm a linear trend between [N/Fe] and metallicity expected from standard models of Galactic chemical evolution. Based on observations collected with the UVES spectrograph at the 8-m Very Large Telescope (VLT) - program IDs: 074.C-0134(A), 075.D-0453(A), 086.D-0082(A), 093.D-0328(A), installed at the Cerro Paranal Observatory.

  12. Graft-versus-host disease

    MedlinePlus

    GVHD; Bone marrow transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Stem cell transplant - graft-versus-host disease; Allogeneic transplant - ... GVHD may occur after a bone marrow, or stem cell, transplant in which someone receives bone marrow ...

  13. BRITE-Constellation: Nanosatellites for precision photometry of bright stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, W. W.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Schwarzenberg-Czerny, A.; Koudelka, O. F.; Grant, C. C.; Zee, R. E.; Kuschnig, R.; Mochnacki, St.; Rucinski, S. M.; Matthews, J. M.; Orleański, P.; Pamyatnykh, A. A.; Pigulski, A.; Alves, J.; Guedel, M.; Handler, G.; Wade, G. A.; Scholtz, A. L.; Scholtz

    2014-02-01

    will be selected is shown in Fig. 1. This sample falls into two principal classes of stars: (1) Hot luminous H-burning stars (O to F stars). Analyses of OB star variability have the potential to help solve two outstanding problems: the sizes of convective (mixed) cores in massive stars and the influence of rapid rotation on their structure and evolution. (2) Cool luminous stars (AGB stars, cool giants and cool supergiants). Measurements of the time scales involved in surface granulation and differential rotation will constrain turbulent convection models. Mass loss from these stars (especially the massive supernova progenitors) is a major contributor to the evolution of the interstellar medium, so in a sense, this sample dominates cosmic ``ecology'' in terms of future generations of star formation. The massive stars are believed to share many characteristics of the lower mass range of the first generation of stars ever formed (although the original examples are of course long gone). BRITE observations will also be used to detect some Jupiter- and even Neptune-sized planets around bright host stars via transits, as expected on the basis of statistics from the Kepler exoplanet mission. Detecting planets around such very bright stars will greatly facilitate their subsequent characterization. BRITE will also use surface spots to investigate stellar rotation. The following Table summarizes launch and orbit parameters of BRITE-Constellation components. The full version of this paper describing in more detail BRITE-Constellation will be published separately in a journal. The symposium presentation is available at http://iaus301.astro.uni.wroc.pl/program.php

  14. Mass loss of massive stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution we review the properties of the winds of massive stars. We focus on OB stars, red supergiants, Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and Wolf-Rayet stars. For each type of star, we summarize the main wind properties and we give a brief description of the physical mechanism(s) responsible for mass loss.

  15. One or more bound planets per Milky Way star from microlensing observations.

    PubMed

    Cassan, A; Kubas, D; Beaulieu, J-P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Greenhill, J; Wambsganss, J; Menzies, J; Williams, A; Jørgensen, U G; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Cook, K H; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Hill, K; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Warren, D; Watson, B; Zub, M; Sumi, T; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2012-01-12

    Most known extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been discovered using the radial velocity or transit methods. Both are biased towards planets that are relatively close to their parent stars, and studies find that around 17-30% (refs 4, 5) of solar-like stars host a planet. Gravitational microlensing, on the other hand, probes planets that are further away from their stars. Recently, a population of planets that are unbound or very far from their stars was discovered by microlensing. These planets are at least as numerous as the stars in the Milky Way. Here we report a statistical analysis of microlensing data (gathered in 2002-07) that reveals the fraction of bound planets 0.5-10 AU (Sun-Earth distance) from their stars. We find that 17(+6)(-9)% of stars host Jupiter-mass planets (0.3-10 M(J), where M(J) = 318 M(⊕) and M(⊕) is Earth's mass). Cool Neptunes (10-30 M(⊕)) and super-Earths (5-10 M(⊕)) are even more common: their respective abundances per star are 52(+22)(-29)% and 62(+35)(-37)%. We conclude that stars are orbited by planets as a rule, rather than the exception. PMID:22237108

  16. ON THE EXTREME POSITIVE STAR FORMATION FEEDBACK CONDITION IN SCUBA SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Wuensch, Richard; Palous, Jan

    2010-03-01

    We present a detailed study of the hydrodynamics of the matter reinserted by massive stars via stellar winds and supernovae explosions in young assembling galaxies. We show that the interplay between the thermalization of the kinetic energy provided by massive stars, radiative cooling of the thermalized plasma, and the gravitational pull of the host galaxy lead to three different hydrodynamic regimes. These are: (1) the quasi-adiabatic supergalactic winds; (2) the bimodal flows, with mass accumulation in the central zones and gas expulsion from the outer zones of the assembling galaxy; and (3) the gravitationally bound regime, for which all of the gas returned by massive stars remains bound to the host galaxy and is likely to be reprocessed into further generations of stars. Which of the three possible solutions takes place depends on the mass of the star-forming region, its mechanical luminosity (or star formation rate), and its size. The model predicts that massive assembling galaxies with large star formation rates similar to those detected in Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array sources ({approx}1000 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) are likely to evolve in a positive star formation feedback condition, either in the bimodal or in the gravitationally bound regime. This implies that star formation in these sources may have little impact on the intergalactic medium and result instead into a fast interstellar matter enrichment, as observed in high redshift quasars.

  17. One or more bound planets per Milky Way star from microlensing observations.

    PubMed

    Cassan, A; Kubas, D; Beaulieu, J-P; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Greenhill, J; Wambsganss, J; Menzies, J; Williams, A; Jørgensen, U G; Udalski, A; Bennett, D P; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cole, A; Coutures, Ch; Cook, K H; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Hill, K; Kains, N; Kane, S; Marquette, J-B; Martin, R; Pollard, K R; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Warren, D; Watson, B; Zub, M; Sumi, T; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Poleski, R; Soszynski, I; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrzyński, G; Wyrzykowski, L

    2012-01-11

    Most known extrasolar planets (exoplanets) have been discovered using the radial velocity or transit methods. Both are biased towards planets that are relatively close to their parent stars, and studies find that around 17-30% (refs 4, 5) of solar-like stars host a planet. Gravitational microlensing, on the other hand, probes planets that are further away from their stars. Recently, a population of planets that are unbound or very far from their stars was discovered by microlensing. These planets are at least as numerous as the stars in the Milky Way. Here we report a statistical analysis of microlensing data (gathered in 2002-07) that reveals the fraction of bound planets 0.5-10 AU (Sun-Earth distance) from their stars. We find that 17(+6)(-9)% of stars host Jupiter-mass planets (0.3-10 M(J), where M(J) = 318 M(⊕) and M(⊕) is Earth's mass). Cool Neptunes (10-30 M(⊕)) and super-Earths (5-10 M(⊕)) are even more common: their respective abundances per star are 52(+22)(-29)% and 62(+35)(-37)%. We conclude that stars are orbited by planets as a rule, rather than the exception.

  18. Habitable planets around the star Gliese 581?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selsis, F.; Kasting, J. F.; Levrard, B.; Paillet, J.; Ribas, I.; Delfosse, X.

    2007-12-01

    Context: Thanks to remarkable progress, radial velocity surveys are now able to detect terrestrial planets at habitable distance from low-mass stars. Recently, two planets with minimum masses below 10 M⊕ have been reported in a triple system around the M-type star Gliese 581. These planets are found at orbital distances comparable to the location of the boundaries of the habitable zone of their star. Aims: In this study, we assess the habitability of planets Gl 581c and Gl 581d (assuming that their actual masses are close to their minimum masses) by estimating the locations of the habitable-zone boundaries of the star and discussing the uncertainties affecting their determination. An additional purpose of this paper is to provide simplified formulae for estimating the edges of the habitable zone. These may be used to evaluate the astrobiological potential of terrestrial exoplanets that will hopefully be discovered in the near future. Methods: Using results from radiative-convective atmospheric models and constraints from the evolution of Venus and Mars, we derive theoretical and empirical habitable distances for stars of F, G, K, and M spectral types. Results: Planets Gl 581c and Gl 581d are near to, but outside, what can be considered as the conservative habitable zone. Planet “c” receives 30% more energy from its star than Venus from the Sun, with an increased radiative forcing caused by the spectral energy distribution of Gl 581. This planet is thus unlikely to host liquid water, although its habitability cannot be positively ruled out by theoretical models due to uncertainties affecting cloud properties and cloud cover. Highly reflective clouds covering at least 75% of the day side of the planet could indeed prevent the water reservoir from being entirely vaporized. Irradiation conditions of planet “d” are comparable to those of early Mars, which is known to have hosted surface liquid water. Thanks to the greenhouse effect of CO2-ice clouds, also

  19. Are the stars of a new class of variability detected in NGC 3766 fast rotating SPB stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, S. J. A. J.; Montalbán, J.; Reese, D. R.; Dupret, M.-A.; Eggenberger, P.

    2015-01-01

    A recent photometric survey in the NGC 3766 cluster led to the detection of stars presenting an unexpected variability. They lie in a region of the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram where no pulsation are theoretically expected, in between the δ Scuti and slowly pulsating B (SPB) star instability domains. Their variability periods, between ~0.1-0.7 d, are outside the expected domains of these well-known pulsators. The NCG 3766 cluster is known to host fast rotating stars. Rotation can significantly affect the pulsation properties of stars and alter their apparent luminosity through gravity darkening. Therefore we inspect if the new variable stars could correspond to fast rotating SPB stars. We carry out instability and visibility analysis of SPB pulsation modes within the frame of the traditional approximation. The effects of gravity darkening on typical SPB models are next studied. We find that at the red border of the SPB instability strip, prograde sectoral (PS) modes are preferentially excited, with periods shifted in the 0.2-0.5 d range due to the Coriolis effect. These modes are best seen when the star is seen equator-on. For such inclinations, low-mass SPB models can appear fainter due to gravity darkening and as if they were located between the δ Scuti and SPB instability strips.

  20. The origin of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    Where do stars come from and how do they form? These are profound questions which link the nature of our Universe to the roots of mankind. Yet, until a recent revolution in understanding, the proposed answers have been raw speculation. Now, accompanying penetrating observations, a new picture has come into prominence. This book presents the latest astounding observations and scientific ideas covering star formation, star birth and early development. It encompasses all aspects, from the dramatic stories of individual objects, to the collective influence of entire stellar systems. The very first stars to come into existence and the nurturing of planets are discussed to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview. Presenting background information with only the essential mathematics, this book will appeal to scientists wishing to expand their horizons, students seeking solid foundations, and general readers with enquiring minds.

  1. Discovery of variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurochkin, N. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Instrumented methods of discovering variable stars are reviewed, specifically the blink comparator, color contrast method, positive-negative method, and television method. Among the empirical methods discussed, the Van Gent method is the most important.

  2. Planets Around Neutron Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolszczan, Alexander; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Anderson, Stuart B.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this proposal was to continue investigations of neutron star planetary systems in an effort to describe and understand their origin, orbital dynamics, basic physical properties and their relationship to planets around normal stars. This research represents an important element of the process of constraining the physics of planet formation around various types of stars. The research goals of this project included long-term timing measurements of the planets pulsar, PSR B1257+12, to search for more planets around it and to study the dynamics of the whole system, and sensitive searches for millisecond pulsars to detect further examples of old, rapidly spinning neutron stars with planetary systems. The instrumentation used in our project included the 305-m Arecibo antenna with the Penn State Pulsar Machine (PSPM), the 100-m Green Bank Telescope with the Berkeley- Caltech Pulsar Machine (BCPM), and the 100-m Effelsberg and 64-m Parkes telescopes equipped with the observatory supplied backend hardware.

  3. Winds from cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral observations of cool stars enable study of the presence and character of winds and the mass loss process in objects with effective temperatures, gravities, and atmospheric compositions which differ from that of the Sun. A wealth of recent spectroscopic measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer complement high resolution ground-based measures in the optical and infrared spectral regions. Such observations when combined with realistic semi-empirical atmospheric modeling allow us to estimate the physical conditions in the atmospheres and winds of many classes of cool stars. Line profiles support turbulent heating and mass motions. In low gravity stars, evidence is found for relatively fast (approximately 200 km s(exp -1)), warm winds with rapid acceleration occurring in the chromosphere. In some cases outflows commensurate with stellar escape velocities are present. Our current understanding of cool star winds will be reviewed including the implications of stellar observations for identification of atmospheric heating and acceleration processes.

  4. Cosmology with hypervelocity stars

    SciTech Connect

    Loeb, Abraham

    2011-04-01

    In the standard cosmological model, the merger remnant of the Milky Way and Andromeda (Milkomeda) will be the only galaxy remaining within our event horizon once the Universe has aged by another factor of ten, ∼ 10{sup 11} years after the Big Bang. After that time, the only extragalactic sources of light in the observable cosmic volume will be hypervelocity stars being ejected continuously from Milkomeda. Spectroscopic detection of the velocity-distance relation or the evolution in the Doppler shifts of these stars will allow a precise measurement of the vacuum mass density as well as the local matter distribution. Already in the near future, the next generation of large telescopes will allow photometric detection of individual stars out to the edge of the Local Group, and may target the ∼ 10{sup 5±1} hypervelocity stars that originated in it as cosmological tracers.

  5. Spectroscopy among the stars.

    PubMed

    Winnewisser, G

    1996-06-01

    The space between the stars is not void, but filled with interstellar matter, mainly composed of dust and gas, which gather in large interstellar clouds. In our Galaxy these interstellar clouds are distributed along a thin, but extended layer which basically traces out the spiral distribution of matter: the stars, the gas, and the dust component. Up to the present time more than 100 different molecules have been identified in interstellar molecular clouds. The majority of the interstellar molecules constitute carbon containing organic substances. During the past years, overwhelming evidence has been gathered, mainly through spectroscopic observations, that interstellar molecular clouds provide the birthplaces for stars. In fact detailed high spectral and spatial resolution spectroscopic measurements reveal physical and chemical processes of the intricate star formation process.

  6. Worlds around other stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, David C.

    1991-01-01

    The possible, though tentative, detection of planetary companions to other stars which may be capable of supporting life as we know it through the use of a new generation of detectors and telescopes, combined with some innovative detection techniques, is discussed. The current view of the origin of the solar system, based on the nebular hypothesis, is discussed as it pertains to the formation of how and where planets form and, hence, how and where to search for them. Both direct methods of search for other planetary systems, which involve detecting reflected light or infrared radiation form the planets themselves, and indirect methods, which involve the scrutinization of a star for signs that it is responding to the gravitational tug of an orbiting planet, are discussed at length. In particular, various methods for detecting minute velocity perturbations of stars are discussed. It is noted that the study of brown dwarfs may also provide clues on the formation of stars and planets.

  7. Temperature of neutron stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Sachiko

    2016-07-01

    We start with a brief introduction to the historical background in the early pioneering days when the first neutron star thermal evolution calculations predicted the presence of neutron stars hot enough to be observable. We then report on the first detection of neutron star temperatures by ROSAT X-ray satellite, which vindicated the earlier prediction of hot neutron stars. We proceed to present subsequent developments, both in theory and observation, up to today. We then discuss the current status and the future prospect, which will offer useful insight to the understanding of basic properties of ultra-high density matter beyond the nuclear density, such as the possible presence of such exotic particles as pion condensates.

  8. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  9. Women and the Stars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spradley, Joseph L.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the contributions of 15 women astronomers to the modern understanding of the stars. Discussed are early women pioneers, early spectrographic studies, and recent women astronomers. A list of 29 references is included. (CW)

  10. Carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars: relics from the dark ages

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Madau, Piero

    2014-08-20

    We use detailed nucleosynthesis calculations and a realistic prescription for the environment of the first stars to explore the first episodes of chemical enrichment that occurred during the dark ages. Based on these calculations, we propose a novel explanation for the increased prevalence of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP) stars with decreasing Fe abundance: the observed chemistry for the most metal-poor Galactic halo stars is the result of an intimate link between the explosions of the first stars and their host minihalo's ability to retain its gas. Specifically, high-energy supernovae produce a near solar ratio of C/Fe, but are effective in evacuating the gas from their host minihalo, thereby suppressing the formation of a second generation of stars. On the other hand, minihalos that host low-energy supernovae are able to retain their gas and form a second stellar generation, but, as a result, the second stars are born with a supersolar ratio of C/Fe. Our models are able to accurately reproduce the observed distributions of [C/Fe] and [Fe/H], as well as the fraction of CEMP stars relative to non-CEMP stars as a function of [Fe/H] without any free parameters. We propose that the present lack of chemical evidence for very massive stars (≳ 140 M {sub ☉}) that ended their lives as a highly energetic pair-instability supernova does not imply that such stars were rare or did not exist; the chemical products of these very massive first stars may have been evacuated from their host minihalos and were never incorporated into subsequent generations of stars. Finally, our models suggest that the most Fe-poor stars currently known may have seen the enrichment from a small multiple of metal-free stars, and need not have been exclusively enriched by a solitary first star. These calculations also add further support to the possibility that some of the surviving dwarf satellite galaxies of the Milky Way are the relics of the first galaxies.

  11. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-05-04

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2].

  12. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool.

    PubMed

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2]. PMID:27153081

  13. Comparing mechanisms of host manipulation across host and parasite taxa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Shaw, Jenny C.

    2013-01-01

    Parasites affect host behavior in several ways. They can alter activity, microhabitats or both. For trophically transmitted parasites (the focus of our study), decreased activity might impair the ability of hosts to respond to final-host predators, and increased activity and altered microhabitat choice might increase contact rates between hosts and final-host predators. In an analysis of trophically transmitted parasites, more parasite groups altered activity than altered microhabitat choice. Parasites that infected vertebrates were more likely to impair the host’s reaction to predators, whereas parasites that infected invertebrates were more likely to increase the host’s contact with predators. The site of infection might affect how parasites manipulate their hosts. For instance, parasites in the central nervous system seem particularly suited to manipulating host behavior. Manipulative parasites commonly occupy the body cavity, muscles and central nervous systems of their hosts. Acanthocephalans in the data set differed from other taxa in that they occurred exclusively in the body cavity of invertebrates. In addition, they were more likely to alter microhabitat choice than activity. Parasites in the body cavity (across parasite types) were more likely to be associated with increased host contact with predators. Parasites can manipulate the host through energetic drain, but most parasites use more sophisticated means. For instance, parasites target four physiological systems that shape behavior in both invertebrates and vertebrates: neural, endocrine, neuromodulatory and immunomodulatory. The interconnections between these systems make it difficult to isolate specific mechanisms of host behavioral manipulation.

  14. HostPhinder: A Phage Host Prediction Tool

    PubMed Central

    Villarroel, Julia; Kleinheinz, Kortine Annina; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Zschach, Henrike; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Larsen, Mette Voldby

    2016-01-01

    The current dramatic increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria has revitalised the interest in bacteriophages as alternative antibacterial treatment. Meanwhile, the development of bioinformatics methods for analysing genomic data places high-throughput approaches for phage characterization within reach. Here, we present HostPhinder, a tool aimed at predicting the bacterial host of phages by examining the phage genome sequence. Using a reference database of 2196 phages with known hosts, HostPhinder predicts the host species of a query phage as the host of the most genomically similar reference phages. As a measure of genomic similarity the number of co-occurring k-mers (DNA sequences of length k) is used. Using an independent evaluation set, HostPhinder was able to correctly predict host genus and species for 81% and 74% of the phages respectively, giving predictions for more phages than BLAST and significantly outperforming BLAST on phages for which both had predictions. HostPhinder predictions on phage draft genomes from the INTESTI phage cocktail corresponded well with the advertised targets of the cocktail. Our study indicates that for most phages genomic similarity correlates well with related bacterial hosts. HostPhinder is available as an interactive web service [1] and as a stand alone download from the Docker registry [2]. PMID:27153081

  15. Sounds of a Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-06-01

    Acoustic Oscillations in Solar-Twin "Alpha Cen A" Observed from La Silla by Swiss Team Summary Sound waves running through a star can help astronomers reveal its inner properties. This particular branch of modern astrophysics is known as "asteroseismology" . In the case of our Sun, the brightest star in the sky, such waves have been observed since some time, and have greatly improved our knowledge about what is going on inside. However, because they are much fainter, it has turned out to be very difficult to detect similar waves in other stars. Nevertheless, tiny oscillations in a solar-twin star have now been unambiguously detected by Swiss astronomers François Bouchy and Fabien Carrier from the Geneva Observatory, using the CORALIE spectrometer on the Swiss 1.2-m Leonard Euler telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory. This telescope is mostly used for discovering exoplanets (see ESO PR 07/01 ). The star Alpha Centauri A is the nearest star visible to the naked eye, at a distance of a little more than 4 light-years. The new measurements show that it pulsates with a 7-minute cycle, very similar to what is observed in the Sun . Asteroseismology for Sun-like stars is likely to become an important probe of stellar theory in the near future. The state-of-the-art HARPS spectrograph , to be mounted on the ESO 3.6-m telescope at La Silla, will be able to search for oscillations in stars that are 100 times fainter than those for which such demanding observations are possible with CORALIE. PR Photo 23a/01 : Oscillations in a solar-like star (schematic picture). PR Photo 23b/01 : Acoustic spectrum of Alpha Centauri A , as observed with CORALIE. Asteroseismology: listening to the stars ESO PR Photo 23a/01 ESO PR Photo 23a/01 [Preview - JPEG: 357 x 400 pix - 96k] [Normal - JPEG: 713 x 800 pix - 256k] [HiRes - JPEG: 2673 x 3000 pix - 2.1Mb Caption : PR Photo 23a/01 is a graphical representation of resonating acoustic waves in the interior of a solar-like star. Red and blue

  16. The Pistol Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figer, D. F.; Morris, M.; McLean, I. S.; Ghez, A. M.; Najarro, F.; Geballe, T. R.; Serabyn, E.; Rich, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    We present near-infrared spectra, photometry (JHK(') nbL), and Keck K-band speckle images of the ``Pistol Star.'' We also present HST/NICMOS Paschen-alpha images and near-infrared spectra of the surrounding HII region (G0.15-0.05), the ``Pistol.'' The stellar spectra cover the J, H, and K bands at low resolution, and between 1.80 to 1.96 \\micron, 2.10 to 2.26 \\micron, and 4.02 to 4.08 \\micron\\ at moderate resolution. The spectra of the Pistol cover the K-band at low resolution and 1.80 to 1.96 \\micron\\ at moderate resolution. The stellar data are fit with wind/atmosphere models to find that the star is extraordinarily luminous, having L = 10(6.7({+0.5}_{-0.5})) L_sun, making it one of the most luminous stars known; the range in luminosity is primarily due to uncertainties in extinction and intrinsic spectral energy distribution of the star. Coupled with the relatively cool temperature, T_eff = 10(4.17({+0.19}_{-0.06})) K, the star is clearly in violation of the Humphreys-Davidson limit. The line of sight velocity of the star is confirmed to be ~ 130 kms(-1) , assuring membership in the Quintuplet cluster. This, along with the inferred extinction, places the star at the Galactic Center. The spectra of the Pistol confirm that the ionized gas has smoothly varying velocity gradients superposed on a bulk velocity of 130 kms(-1) . Radio and near-infrared hydrogen-to-helium line ratios suggest that the Pistol may have extrasolar helium abundance and that it must be excited, in part, by a star which is hotter than the Pistol Star. The morphology of the gas, the velocities in the gas, and the location of the star in the HR diagram suggest that the gas in G0.15-0.05 is matter which was ejected from the star.

  17. Catch a Star 2008!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-10-01

    ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education have just launched the 2008 edition of 'Catch a Star', their international astronomy competition for school students. Now in its sixth year, the competition offers students the chance to win a once-in-a-lifetime trip to ESO's flagship observatory in Chile, as well as many other prizes. CAS logo The competition includes separate categories - 'Catch a Star Researchers' and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' - to ensure that every student, whatever their level, has the chance to enter and win exciting prizes. In teams, students investigate an astronomical topic of their choice and write a report about it. An important part of the project for 'Catch a Star Researchers' is to think about how ESO's telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) or future telescopes such as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) could contribute to investigations of the topic. Students may also include practical activities such as observations or experiments. For the artistically minded, 'Catch a Star' also offers an artwork competition, 'Catch a Star Artists'. Last year, hundreds of students from across Europe and beyond took part in 'Catch a Star', submitting astronomical projects and artwork. "'Catch a Star' gets students thinking about the wonders of the Universe and the science of astronomy, with a chance of winning great prizes. It's easy to take part, whether by writing about astronomy or creating astronomically inspired artwork," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. As well as the top prize - a trip to ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile - visits to observatories in Austria and Spain, and many other prizes, can also be won. 'Catch a Star Researchers' winners will be chosen by an international jury, and 'Catch a Star Adventurers' will be awarded further prizes by lottery. Entries for 'Catch a Star Artists' will be displayed on the web and winners

  18. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  19. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 16. Damped Lyα systems as probes of chemical evolution over cosmological timescales Miroslava Dessauges-Zavadsky; 17. Connecting high-redshift galaxy populations through observations of local damped Lyman alpha dwarf galaxies Regina E. Schulte-Ladbeck; 18. Chemical enrichment and feedback in low metallicity environments: constraints on galaxy formation Francesca Matteucci; 19. Effects of reionization on dwarf galaxy formation Massimo Ricotti; 20. The importance of following the evolution of the dust in galaxies on their SEDs A. Schurer, F. Calura, L. Silva, A. Pipino, G. L. Granato, F. Matteucci and R. Maiolino; 21. About the chemical evolution of dSphs (and the peculiar globular cluster ωCen) Andrea Marcolini and Annibale D'Ercole; 22. Young star clusters in the small Magellanic cloud: impact of local and global conditions on star formation Elena Sabbi, Linda J. Smith, Lynn R. Carlson, Antonella Nota, Monca Tosi, Michele Cignoni, Jay S. Gallagher III, Marco Sirianni and Margaret Meixner; 23. Modeling the ISM properties of metal-poor galaxies and gamma-ray burst hosts Emily M. Levesque, Lisa J. Kewley, Kirsten Larson and Leonie Snijders; 24. Dwarf galaxies and the magnetisation of the IGM Uli Klein; Session III. Explosive Events in Low-Metallicity Environments: 25. Supernovae and their evolution in a low metallicity ISM Roger A. Chevalier; 26. First stars - type Ib supernovae connection Ken'ichi Nomoto, Masaomi Tanaka, Yasuomi Kamiya, Nozomu Tominaga and Keiichi Maeda; 27. Supernova nucleosynthesis in the early universe Nozomu Tominaga, Hideyuki Umeda, Keiichi Maeda, Ken'ichi Nomoto and Nobuyuki Iwamoto; 28. Powerful explosions at Z = 0? Sylvia Ekström, Georges Meynet, Raphael Hirschi and André Maeder; 29. Wind anisotropy and stellar evolution Cyril Georgy, Georges Meynet and André Maeder; 30. Low-mass and metal-poor gamma-ray burst

  20. IFU Spectroscopy of 32 SweetSpot Supernova Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponder, Kara Ann; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Allen, Lori; Garnavich, Peter M.; Jha, Saurabh; Kroboth, Jessica Rose; Joyce, Richard R.; Matheson, Thomas; Rest, Armin; Weyant, Anja

    2016-06-01

    SweetSpot is an NOAO Survey program from 2012B-2015A that gathered NIR lightcurves for 114 Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) located in the Hubble flow. The aims of this survey are to test the standard nature of SNeIa in the NIR, explore their color evolution, study the dust of host galaxies, and provide an anchor for upcoming high redshift NIR surveys. Another primary goal of this survey is to explore relationships between SNeIa observed in the NIR with their host galaxy properties previously done with optical lightcurves.Correlations between the residual brightness of SNeIa with their host galaxy properties have been found in a series of recent papers, but have yet to be studied in the NIR. We study the NIR brightness of SNIa compared to both photometric and spectroscopic properties of the host galaxies. We use SDSS data to explore host galaxy color and mass relations with peak brightness of SNeIa. In order to examine local environment relationships, we obtained optical spectra of 32 host galaxies of NIR SNeIa using the WIYN 3.5-m Bench Spectrograph IFU HexPak. These spectra extend from H-beta through H-alpha and allow us to study the local surface brightness of very recent star formation.We here present preliminary results from these investigations.

  1. Star of Bethlehem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D.; Murdin, P.

    2001-07-01

    The biblical Star of Bethlehem, which heralded the birth of Jesus Christ, is only mentioned in the Gospel of St Matthew 2. The astrologically significant 7 bc triple conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces is the most likely candidate, although a comet/nova in 5 bc and a comet in 4 bc cannot be ruled out. There is also the possibility that the star was simply fictitious....

  2. Bubbly Little Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In this processed Spitzer Space Telescope image, baby star HH 46/47 can be seen blowing two massive 'bubbles.' The star is 1,140 light-years away from Earth.

    The infant star can be seen as a white spot toward the center of the Spitzer image. The two bubbles are shown as hollow elliptical shells of bluish-green material extending from the star. Wisps of green in the image reveal warm molecular hydrogen gas, while the bluish tints are formed by starlight scattered by surrounding dust.

    These bubbles formed when powerful jets of gas, traveling at 200 to 300 kilometers per second, or about 120 to 190 miles per second, smashed into the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that surrounds HH 46/47. The red specks at the end of each bubble show the presence of hot sulfur and iron gas where the star's narrow jets are currently crashing head-on into the cosmic cloud's gas and dust material.

    Whenever astronomers observe a star, or snap a stellar portrait, through the lens of any telescope, they know that what they are seeing is slightly blurred. To clear up the blurring in Spitzer images, astronomers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed an image processing technique for Spitzer called Hi-Res deconvolution.

    This process reduces blurring and makes the image sharper and cleaner, enabling astronomers to see the emissions around forming stars in greater detail. When scientists applied this image processing technique to the Spitzer image of HH 46/47, they were able to see winds from the star and jets of gas that are carving the celestial bubbles.

    This infrared image is a three-color composite, with data at 3.6 microns represented in blue, 4.5 and 5.8 microns shown in green, and 24 microns represented as red.

  3. Chaotic Star Birth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Poster VersionClick on the image for IRAS 4B Inset

    Located 1,000 light years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, a reflection nebula called NGC 1333 epitomizes the beautiful chaos of a dense group of stars being born. Most of the visible light from the young stars in this region is obscured by the dense, dusty cloud in which they formed. With NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, scientists can detect the infrared light from these objects. This allows a look through the dust to gain a more detailed understanding of how stars like our sun begin their lives.

    The young stars in NGC 1333 do not form a single cluster, but are split between two sub-groups. One group is to the north near the nebula shown as red in the image. The other group is south, where the features shown in yellow and green abound in the densest part of the natal gas cloud. With the sharp infrared eyes of Spitzer, scientists can detect and characterize the warm and dusty disks of material that surround forming stars. By looking for differences in the disk properties between the two subgroups, they hope to find hints of the star and planet formation history of this region.

    The knotty yellow-green features located in the lower portion of the image are glowing shock fronts where jets of material, spewed from extremely young embryonic stars, are plowing into the cold, dense gas nearby. The sheer number of separate jets that appear in this region is unprecedented. This leads scientists to believe that by stirring up the cold gas, the jets may contribute to the eventual dispersal of the gas cloud, preventing more stars from forming in NGC 1333.

    In contrast, the upper portion of the image is dominated by the infrared light from warm dust, shown as red.

  4. Spectroscopic Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batten, A.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Historically, spectroscopic binary stars were binary systems whose nature was discovered by the changing DOPPLER EFFECT or shift of the spectral lines of one or both of the component stars. The observed Doppler shift is a combination of that produced by the constant RADIAL VELOCITY (i.e. line-of-sight velocity) of the center of mass of the whole system, and the variable shift resulting from the o...

  5. The Stars Surrounding WR 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, David G.; Forbes, Douglas

    2005-09-01

    Photoelectric UBV photometry is presented for stars in a field closely adjacent to the Wolf-Rayet star WR 55 (WN7) in a search for a possible parent cluster. There is a group of at least eight stars ~7' south-southeast of the WR star forming a newly discovered, sparsely populated open cluster (designated C1331-622), but the stars are only 819+/-26 pc distant, less than a quarter of the predicted distance to WR 55.

  6. Effects of intermediate mass black holes on nuclear star clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-20

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  7. Effects of Intermediate Mass Black Holes on Nuclear Star Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastrobuono-Battisti, Alessandra; Perets, Hagai B.; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear star clusters (NSCs) are dense stellar clusters observed in galactic nuclei, typically hosting a central massive black hole. Here we study the possible formation and evolution of NSCs through the inspiral of multiple star clusters hosting intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs). Using an N-body code, we examine the dynamics of the IMBHs and their effects on the NSC. We find that IMBHs inspiral to the core of the newly formed NSC and segregate there. Although the IMBHs scatter each other and the stars, none of them is ejected from the NSC. The IMBHs are excited to high eccentricities and their radial density profile develops a steep power-law cusp. The stars also develop a power-law cusp (instead of the central core that forms in their absence), but with a shallower slope. The relaxation rate of the NSC is accelerated due to the presence of IMBHs, which act as massive perturbers. This in turn fills the loss cone and boosts the tidal disruption rate of stars both by the MBH and the IMBHs to a value excluded by rate estimates based on current observations. Rate estimates of tidal disruptions can therefore provide a cumulative constraint on the existence of IMBHs in NSCs.

  8. STAR facility tritium accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelko, R. J.; Sharpe, J. P.; Denny, B. J.

    2008-07-15

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5 g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed. (authors)

  9. STAR Facility Tritium Accountancy

    SciTech Connect

    R. J. Pawelko; J. P. Sharpe; B. J. Denny

    2007-09-01

    The Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility has been established to provide a laboratory infrastructure for the fusion community to study tritium science associated with the development of safe fusion energy and other technologies. STAR is a radiological facility with an administrative total tritium inventory limit of 1.5g (14,429 Ci) [1]. Research studies with moderate tritium quantities and various radionuclides are performed in STAR. Successful operation of the STAR facility requires the ability to receive, inventory, store, dispense tritium to experiments, and to dispose of tritiated waste while accurately monitoring the tritium inventory in the facility. This paper describes tritium accountancy in the STAR facility. A primary accountancy instrument is the tritium Storage and Assay System (SAS): a system designed to receive, assay, store, and dispense tritium to experiments. Presented are the methods used to calibrate and operate the SAS. Accountancy processes utilizing the Tritium Cleanup System (TCS), and the Stack Tritium Monitoring System (STMS) are also discussed. Also presented are the equations used to quantify the amount of tritium being received into the facility, transferred to experiments, and removed from the facility. Finally, the STAR tritium accountability database is discussed.

  10. Seeing Stars in Serpens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Infant stars are glowing gloriously in this infrared image of the Serpens star-forming region, captured by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    The reddish-pink dots are baby stars deeply embedded in the cosmic cloud of gas and dust that collapsed to create it. A dusty disk of cosmic debris, or 'protoplanetary disk,' that may eventually form planets, surrounds the infant stars.

    Wisps of green throughout the image indicate the presence of carbon rich molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. On Earth, these molecules can be found on charred barbecue grills and in automobile exhaust. Blue specks sprinkled throughout the image are background stars in our Milky Way galaxy.

    The Serpens star-forming region is located approximately 848 light-years away in the Serpens constellation.

    The image is a three-channel, false-color composite, where emission at 4.5 microns is blue, emission at 8.0 microns is green, and 24 micron emission is red.

  11. Barium Stars: Theoretical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data Sys